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Sample records for actin transforming growth

  1. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Downregulation of the DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 stimulates transforming growth factor-β1 production and promotes actin rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-05-22

    The DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) plays a central role in base excision repair and functions as a reductive activator of various transcription factors. Multiple other functionalities have been ascribed to APE1 in addition to these major functions. A recent study showed that APE1 knockdown upregulated the expression of a set of genes related to extracellular matrix (ECM) production, indicating an additional novel biological role for this enzyme. Based on this finding, we have investigated the effect of APE1 downregulation on ECM-related gene expression and its biological consequences. Endogenous APE1 expression was downregulated in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells and human lung carcinoma A549 cells using siRNA. When the expression of six ECM-related genes (TGFB1, LAMC1, FN1, COL1A1, COL3A1, and COL4A1) was evaluated, we found that APE1 knockdown upregulated the expression of TGFB1 in both cell lines. APE1 downregulation promoted actin rearrangement, inducing F-actin accumulation in HeLa cells and the dissipation of stress fibers in A549 cells. We also discovered that APE1 knockdown enhanced cellular motility in A549 cells, which was suppressed by the inhibition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling. These results suggested that APE1 controls the organization of actin cytoskeleton through the regulation of TGF-β1 expression, providing novel insights into the biological significance of APE1. PMID:25858321

  3. Transformation from Spots to Waves in a Model of Actin Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Bretschneider, Till; Burroughs, Nigel J.

    2009-05-01

    Actin networks in certain single-celled organisms exhibit a complex pattern-forming dynamics that starts with the appearance of static spots of actin on the cell cortex. Spots soon become mobile, executing persistent random walks, and eventually give rise to traveling waves of actin. Here we describe a possible physical mechanism for this distinctive set of dynamic transformations, by equipping an excitable reaction-diffusion model with a field describing the spatial orientation of its chief constituent (which we consider to be actin). The interplay of anisotropic actin growth and spatial inhibition drives a transformation at fixed parameter values from static spots to moving spots to waves.

  4. Transformation from spots to waves in a model of actin pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Whitelam, Stephen; Bretschneider, Till; Burroughs, Nigel J

    2009-05-15

    Actin networks in certain single-celled organisms exhibit a complex pattern-forming dynamics that starts with the appearance of static spots of actin on the cell cortex. Spots soon become mobile, executing persistent random walks, and eventually give rise to traveling waves of actin. Here we describe a possible physical mechanism for this distinctive set of dynamic transformations, by equipping an excitable reaction-diffusion model with a field describing the spatial orientation of its chief constituent (which we consider to be actin). The interplay of anisotropic actin growth and spatial inhibition drives a transformation at fixed parameter values from static spots to moving spots to waves.

  5. MicroRNA-584 and the Protein Phosphatase and Actin Regulator 1 (PHACTR1), a New Signaling Route through Which Transforming Growth Factor-β Mediates the Migration and Actin Dynamics of Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fils-Aimé, Nadège; Dai, Meiou; Guo, Jimin; El-Mousawi, Mayada; Kahramangil, Bora; Neel, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    TGF-β plays an important role in breast cancer progression as a prometastatic factor, notably through enhancement of cell migration. It is becoming clear that microRNAs, a new class of small regulatory molecules, also play crucial roles in mediating tumor formation and progression. We found TGF-β to down-regulate the expression of the microRNA miR-584 in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we identified PHACTR1, an actin-binding protein, to be positively regulated by TGF-β in a miR-584-dependent manner. Moreover, we found TGF-β-mediated down-regulation of miR-584 and increased expression of PHACTR1 to be required for TGF-β-induced cell migration of breast cancer cells. Indeed, both overexpression of miR-584 and knockdown of PHACTR1 resulted in a drastic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced TGF-β-induced cell migration. Our data highlight a novel signaling route whereby TGF-β silences the expression of miR-584, resulting in enhanced PHACTR1 expression, and further leading to actin rearrangement and breast cancer cell migration. PMID:23479725

  6. Oscillatory increases in alkalinity anticipate growth and may regulate actin dynamics in pollen tubes of lily.

    PubMed

    Lovy-Wheeler, Alenka; Kunkel, Joseph G; Allwood, Ellen G; Hussey, Patrick J; Hepler, Peter K

    2006-09-01

    Lily (Lilium formosanum or Lilium longiflorum) pollen tubes, microinjected with a low concentration of the pH-sensitive dye bis-carboxyethyl carboxyfluorescein dextran, show oscillating pH changes in their apical domain relative to growth. An increase in pH in the apex precedes the fastest growth velocities, whereas a decline follows growth, suggesting a possible relationship between alkalinity and cell extension. A target for pH may be the actin cytoskeleton, because the apical cortical actin fringe resides in the same region as the alkaline band in lily pollen tubes and elongation requires actin polymerization. A pH-sensitive actin binding protein, actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF), together with actin-interacting protein (AIP) localize to the cortical actin fringe region. Modifying intracellular pH leads to reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, especially in the apical domain. Acidification causes actin filament destabilization and inhibits growth by 80%. Upon complete growth inhibition, the actin fringe is the first actin cytoskeleton component to disappear. We propose that during normal growth, the pH increase in the alkaline band stimulates the fragmenting activity of ADF/AIP, which in turn generates more sites for actin polymerization. Increased actin polymerization supports faster growth rates and a proton influx, which inactivates ADF/AIP, decreases actin polymerization, and retards growth. As pH stabilizes and increases, the activity of ADF/AIP again increases, repeating the cycle of events. PMID:16920777

  7. Decrease in membrane-associated actin of fibroblasts after transformation by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Wickus, G; Gruenstein, E; Robbins, P W; Rich, A

    1975-02-01

    The actin content of membranes prepared from cultured chick embryo fibroblasts has been measured on polyacrylamide gels. The actin was identified by tryptic peptide mapping. After transformation of the cells by Rous sarcoma virus, the amount of actin associated with the membranes is decreased by 30-50%. This result is not due to infection per se, since infection by a temperature-sensitive strain of the virus decreases membrane-associated actin only at the permissive temperature. A shift from the nonpermissive (41 degrees) to the permissive (36 degrees) temperature results in an increase in the percentage of total cellular protein synthesis devoted to actin production, so that the decrease in membrane-associated actin appears to be a selective displacement from the membrane rather than a general decrease in total cellular actin.

  8. ROP Gtpase–Dependent Dynamics of Tip-Localized F-Actin Controls Tip Growth in Pollen Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Wu, Guang; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2001-01-01

    Tip-growing pollen tubes provide a useful model system to study polar growth. Although roles for tip-focused calcium gradient and tip-localized Rho-family GTPase in pollen tube growth is established, the existence and function of tip-localized F-actin have been controversial. Using the green fluorescent protein–tagged actin-binding domain of mouse talin, we found a dynamic form of tip-localized F-actin in tobacco pollen tubes, termed short actin bundles (SABs). The dynamics of SABs during polar growth in pollen tubes is regulated by Rop1At, a Rop GTPase belonging to the Rho family. When overexpressed, Rop1At transformed SAB into a network of fine filaments and induced a transverse actin band behind the tip, leading to depolarized growth. These changes were due to ectopic Rop1At localization to the apical region of the plasma membrane and were suppressed by guanine dissociation inhibitor overexpression, which removed ectopically localized Rop1At. Rop GTPase–activating protein (RopGAP1) overexpression, or Latrunculin B treatments, also recovered normal actin organization and tip growth in Rop1At-overexpressing tubes. Moreover, overexpression of RopGAP1 alone disrupted SABs and inhibited growth. Finally, SAB oscillates and appears at the tip before growth. Together, these results indicate that the dynamics of tip actin are essential for tip growth and provide the first direct evidence to link Rho GTPase to actin organization in controlling cell polarity and polar growth in plants. PMID:11238457

  9. Reconstitution and regulation of actin gel-sol transformation with purified filamin and villin.

    PubMed

    Nunnally, M H; Powell, L D; Craig, S W

    1981-03-10

    Gel-sol transformation of actin filaments, a process essential for cell motility, can be reconstituted in vitro and regulated in a predictable fashion by the combined action of villin and filamin. Measurements made in a low shear falling ball viscometer show that mixtures of actin, villin, and filamin exist either as a gel (yield point greater than or equal to 140 dynes/cm2) or as a low viscosity liquid depending on the relative ration of villin:actin. Filamin induces gelation of F-actin by forming stable cross-links between actin filaments. Villin inhibits filamin-induced F-actin gelation, but the effect can be overcome by increasing the amount of filamin. Sedimentation assays show that villin does not inhibit gelation of actin by preventing filamin from binding to F-actin. Results from viscosity measurements and filament length determinations show that villin increases actin filament number by reducing the average filament length without altering the total amount of polymer. Because the gel point of a fixed amount of polymer is sharply dependent on the ratio of cross-links to number of polymers, the solation effect of villin might be explained by its effect on filament number. Based on the network theory of gel formation, calculations of the amount of additional cross-linker required to overcome the effect of a known increase in the number of actin filaments agree reasonably well with experimental findings. These results document the existence of cellular proteins which could regulate gel-sol transformation in vivo by their effect on actin polymer length and, therefore, on actin filament number.

  10. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  11. Profilin Regulates Apical Actin Polymerization to Control Polarized Pollen Tube Growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaonan; Qu, Xiaolu; Jiang, Yuxiang; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Ruihui; Wu, Youjun; Fu, Ying; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-12-01

    Pollen tube growth is an essential step during flowering plant reproduction, whose growth depends on a population of dynamic apical actin filaments. Apical actin filaments were thought to be involved in the regulation of vesicle fusion and targeting in the pollen tube. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the construction of apical actin structures in the pollen tube remain largely unclear. Here, we identify profilin as an important player in the regulation of actin polymerization at the apical membrane in the pollen tube. Downregulation of profilin decreased the amount of filamentous actin and induced disorganization of apical actin filaments, and reduced tip-directed vesicle transport and accumulation in the pollen tube. Direct visualization of actin dynamics revealed that the elongation of actin filaments originating at the apical membrane decreased in profilin mutant pollen tubes. Mutant profilin that is defective in binding poly-L-proline only partially rescues the actin polymerization defect in profilin mutant pollen tubes, although it fully rescues the actin turnover phenotype. We propose that profilin controls the construction of actin structures at the pollen tube tip, presumably by favoring formin-mediated actin polymerization at the apical membrane.

  12. Dynamics of Actin Cables in Polarized Growth of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Bergs, Anna; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Evangelinos, Minoas; Nienhaus, G. U.; Takeshita, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although, specific marker proteins have been developed to visualize actin cables in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here, we observed actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA) and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in living Aspergillus nidulans hyphae and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules. PMID:27242709

  13. Arabidopsis RIC1 Severs Actin Filaments at the Apex to Regulate Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shi, Haifan; Chen, Binqing; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes deliver sperms to the ovule for fertilization via tip growth. The rapid turnover of F-actin in pollen tube tips plays an important role in this process. In this study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana RIC1, a member of the ROP-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein family, regulates pollen tube growth via its F-actin severing activity. Knockout of RIC1 enhanced pollen tube elongation, while overexpression of RIC1 dramatically reduced tube growth. Pharmacological analysis indicated that RIC1 affected F-actin dynamics in pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical assays revealed that RIC1 directly bound and severed F-actin in the presence of Ca2+ in addition to interfering with F-actin turnover by capping F-actin at the barbed ends. In vivo, RIC1 localized primarily to the apical plasma membrane (PM) of pollen tubes. The level of RIC1 at the apical PM oscillated during pollen tube growth. The frequency of F-actin severing at the apex was notably decreased in ric1-1 pollen tubes but was increased in pollen tubes overexpressing RIC1. We propose that RIC1 regulates F-actin dynamics at the apical PM as well as the cytosol by severing F-actin and capping the barbed ends in the cytoplasm, establishing a novel mechanism that underlies the regulation of pollen tube growth. PMID:25804540

  14. Farnesyltransferase inhibition causes morphological reversion of ras-transformed cells by a complex mechanism that involves regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Davide, J P; deSolms, S J; Giuliani, E A; Graham, S L; Gibbs, J B; Oliff, A; Kohl, N E

    1994-01-01

    A potent and specific small molecule inhibitor of farnesyl-protein transferase, L-739,749, caused rapid morphological reversion and growth inhibition of ras-transformed fibroblasts (Rat1/ras cells). Morphological reversion occurred within 18 h of L-739,749 addition. The reverted phenotype was stable for several days in the absence of inhibitor before the transformed phenotype reappeared. Cell enlargement and actin stress fiber formation accompanied treatment of both Rat1/ras and normal Rat1 cells. Significantly, inhibition of Ras processing did not correlate with the initiation or maintenance of the reverted phenotype. While a single treatment with L-739,749 was sufficient to morphologically revert Rat1/ras cells, repetitive inhibitor treatment was required to significantly reduce cell growth rate. Thus, the effects of L-739,749 on transformed cell morphology and cytoskeletal actin organization could be separated from effects on cell growth, depending on whether exposure to a farnesyl-protein transferase inhibitor was transient or repetitive. In contrast, L-739,749 had no effect on the growth, morphology, or actin organization of v-raf-transformed cells. Taken together, the results suggest that the mechanism of morphological reversion is complex and may involve farnesylated proteins that control the organization of cytoskeletal actin. Images PMID:8196657

  15. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Sánchez, Paula; Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y; Rhee, Jeong S; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A T; Lyons, David A; Simons, Mikael

    2015-07-27

    During CNS development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multilamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic, and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as an essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading.

  16. Actin-dependent vacuolar occupancy of the cell determines auxin-induced growth repression.

    PubMed

    Scheuring, David; Löfke, Christian; Krüger, Falco; Kittelmann, Maike; Eisa, Ahmed; Hughes, Louise; Smith, Richard S; Hawes, Chris; Schumacher, Karin; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2016-01-12

    The cytoskeleton is an early attribute of cellular life, and its main components are composed of conserved proteins. The actin cytoskeleton has a direct impact on the control of cell size in animal cells, but its mechanistic contribution to cellular growth in plants remains largely elusive. Here, we reveal a role of actin in regulating cell size in plants. The actin cytoskeleton shows proximity to vacuoles, and the phytohormone auxin not only controls the organization of actin filaments but also impacts vacuolar morphogenesis in an actin-dependent manner. Pharmacological and genetic interference with the actin-myosin system abolishes the effect of auxin on vacuoles and thus disrupts its negative influence on cellular growth. SEM-based 3D nanometer-resolution imaging of the vacuoles revealed that auxin controls the constriction and luminal size of the vacuole. We show that this actin-dependent mechanism controls the relative vacuolar occupancy of the cell, thus suggesting an unanticipated mechanism for cytosol homeostasis during cellular growth.

  17. Collapsin response mediator protein 4 regulates growth cone dynamics through the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Mohamad R; Girouard, Marie-Pier; Alchini, Ricardo; Ong Tone, Stephan; Shimada, Tadayuki; Bechstedt, Susanne; Cowan, Mitra; Guillet, Dominique; Wiseman, Paul W; Brouhard, Gary; Cloutier, Jean Francois; Fournier, Alyson E

    2014-10-24

    Coordinated control of the growth cone cytoskeleton underlies axon extension and guidance. Members of the collapsin response mediator protein (CRMP) family of cytosolic phosphoproteins regulate the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton, but their roles in regulating growth cone dynamics remain largely unexplored. Here, we examine how CRMP4 regulates the growth cone cytoskeleton. Hippocampal neurons from CRMP4-/- mice exhibited a selective decrease in axon extension and reduced growth cone area, whereas overexpression of CRMP4 enhanced the formation and length of growth cone filopodia. Biochemically, CRMP4 can impact both microtubule assembly and F-actin bundling in vitro. Through a structure function analysis of CRMP4, we found that the effects of CRMP4 on axon growth and growth cone morphology were dependent on microtubule assembly, whereas filopodial extension relied on actin bundling. Intriguingly, anterograde movement of EB3 comets, which track microtubule protrusion, slowed significantly in neurons derived from CRMP4-/- mice, and rescue of microtubule dynamics required CRMP4 activity toward both the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Together, this study identified a dual role for CRMP4 in regulating the actin and microtubule growth cone cytoskeleton. PMID:25225289

  18. Actions of cytochalasins on the organization of actin filaments and microtubules in a neuronal growth cone

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Actions of cytochalasin B (CB) on cytoskeletons and motility of growth cones from cultured Aplysia neurons were studied using a rapid flow perfusion chamber and digital video light microscopy. Living growth cones were observed using differential interference contrast optics and were also fixed at various time points to assay actin filament (F- actin) and microtubule distributions. Treatment with CB reversibly blocked motility and eliminated most of the phalloidin-stainable F- actin from the leading lamella. The loss of F-actin was nearly complete within 2-3 min of CB application and was largely reversed within 5-6 min of CB removal. The loss and recovery of F-actin were found to occur with a very distinctive spatial organization. Within 20-30 s of CB application, F-actin networks receded from the entire peripheral margin of the lamella forming a band devoid of F-actin. This band widened as F- actin receded at rates of 3-6 microns/min. Upon removal of CB, F-actin began to reappear within 20-30 s. The initial reappearance of F-actin took two forms: a coarse isotropic matrix of F-actin bundles throughout the lamella, and a denser matrix along the peripheral margin. The denser peripheral matrix then expanded in width, extending centrally to replace the coarse matrix at rates again between 3-6 microns/min. These results suggest that actin normally polymerizes at the leading edge and then flows rearward at a rate between 3-6 microns/min. CB treatment was also observed to alter the distribution of microtubules, assayed by antitubulin antibody staining. Normally, microtubules are restricted to the neurite shaft and a central growth cone domain. Within approximately 5 min after CB application, however, microtubules began extending into the lamellar region, often reaching the peripheral margin. Upon removal of CB, the microtubules were restored to their former central localization. The timing of these microtubule redistributions is consistent with their being secondary to

  19. Actin-dependent vacuolar occupancy of the cell determines auxin-induced growth repression

    PubMed Central

    Scheuring, David; Löfke, Christian; Krüger, Falco; Kittelmann, Maike; Eisa, Ahmed; Hughes, Louise; Smith, Richard S.; Hawes, Chris; Schumacher, Karin; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is an early attribute of cellular life, and its main components are composed of conserved proteins. The actin cytoskeleton has a direct impact on the control of cell size in animal cells, but its mechanistic contribution to cellular growth in plants remains largely elusive. Here, we reveal a role of actin in regulating cell size in plants. The actin cytoskeleton shows proximity to vacuoles, and the phytohormone auxin not only controls the organization of actin filaments but also impacts vacuolar morphogenesis in an actin-dependent manner. Pharmacological and genetic interference with the actin–myosin system abolishes the effect of auxin on vacuoles and thus disrupts its negative influence on cellular growth. SEM-based 3D nanometer-resolution imaging of the vacuoles revealed that auxin controls the constriction and luminal size of the vacuole. We show that this actin-dependent mechanism controls the relative vacuolar occupancy of the cell, thus suggesting an unanticipated mechanism for cytosol homeostasis during cellular growth. PMID:26715743

  20. The role of Arp2/3 in growth cone actin dynamics and guidance is substrate dependent.

    PubMed

    San Miguel-Ruiz, José E; Letourneau, Paul C

    2014-04-23

    During development extrinsic guidance cues modulate the peripheral actin network in growth cones to direct axons to their targets. We wanted to understand the role of the actin nucleator Arp2/3 in growth cone actin dynamics and guidance. Since growth cones migrate in association with diverse adhesive substrates during development, we probed the hypothesis that the functional significance of Arp2/3 is substrate dependent. We report that Arp2/3 inhibition led to a reduction in the number of filopodia and growth cone F-actin content on laminin and L1. However, we found substrate-dependent differences in growth cone motility, actin retrograde flow, and guidance after Arp2/3 inhibition, suggesting that its role, and perhaps that of other actin binding proteins, in growth cone motility is substrate dependent. PMID:24760849

  1. Arabidopsis ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 Severs Actin Filaments and Regulates Actin Cable Turnover to Promote Normal Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-01-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes. PMID:24058157

  2. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R.; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y.; Rhee, Jeong S.; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A.T.; Lyons, David A.; Simons, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Summary During central nervous system development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multi-lamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/Cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading. PMID:26166299

  3. Interdependence of endomembrane trafficking and actin dynamics during polarized growth of Arabidopsis pollen tubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During polarized growth of pollen tubes, endomembrane trafficking and actin polymerization are two critical processes that establish membrane/wall homeostasis and maintain growth polarity. Fine-tuned interactions between these two processes are therefore necessary but poorly understood. To better un...

  4. FIMBRIN1 Is Involved in Lily Pollen Tube Growth by Stabilizing the Actin Fringe[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hui; Zhu, Jinsheng; Cai, Chao; Pei, Weike; Wang, Jiaojiao; Dong, Huaijian; Ren, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    An actin fringe structure in the subapex plays an important role in pollen tube tip growth. However, the precise mechanism by which the actin fringe is generated and maintained remains largely unknown. Here, we cloned a 2606-bp full-length cDNA encoding a deduced 77-kD fimbrin-like protein from lily (Lilium longiflorum), named FIMBRIN1 (FIM1). Ll-FIM1 was preferentially expressed in pollen and concentrated at actin fringe in the subapical region, as well as in longitudinal actin-filament bundles in the shank of pollen tubes. Microinjection of Ll-FIM1 antibody into lily pollen tubes inhibited tip growth and disrupted the actin fringe. Furthermore, we verified the function of Ll-FIM1 in the fim5 mutant of its closest relative, Arabidopsis thaliana. Pollen tubes of fim5 mutants grew with a larger diameter in early stages but could recover into normal forms in later stages, despite significantly slower growth rates. The actin fringe of the fim5 mutants, however, was impaired during both early and late stages. Impressively, stable expression of fim5pro:GFP:Ll-FIM1 rescued the actin fringe and the growth rate of Arabidopsis fim5 pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical analysis showed that Ll-FIM1 could bundle actin filaments. Thus, our study has identified a fimbrin that may stabilize the actin fringe by cross-linking actin filaments into bundles, which is important for proper tip growth of lily pollen tubes. PMID:23150633

  5. Molecular Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii Formin 3, an Actin Nucleator Dispensable for Tachyzoite Growth and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Wassim; Klages, Natacha; Carlier, Marie-France

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa, a group of obligate intracellular parasites that rely on gliding motility to enter host cells. Drugs interfering with the actin cytoskeleton block parasite motility, host cell invasion, and egress from infected cells. Myosin A, profilin, formin 1, formin 2, and actin-depolymerizing factor have all been implicated in parasite motility, yet little is known regarding the importance of actin polymerization and other myosins for the remaining steps of the parasite lytic cycle. Here we establish that T. gondii formin 3 (TgFRM3), a newly described formin homology 2 domain (FH2)-containing protein, binds to Toxoplasma actin and nucleates rabbit actin assembly in vitro. TgFRM3 expressed as a transgene exhibits a patchy localization at several distinct structures within the parasite. Disruption of the TgFRM3 gene by double homologous recombination in a ku80-ko strain reveals no vital function for tachyzoite propagation in vitro, which is consistent with its weak level of expression in this life stage. Conditional stabilization of truncated forms of TgFRM3 suggests that different regions of the molecule contribute to distinct localizations. Moreover, expression of TgFRM3 lacking the C-terminal domain severely affects parasite growth and replication. This work provides a first insight into how this specialized formin, restricted to the group of coccidia, completes its actin-nucleating activity. PMID:22210829

  6. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  7. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  8. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  9. Initial stem cell adhesion on porous silicon surface: molecular architecture of actin cytoskeleton and filopodial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Panayotov, Ivan; Secret, Emilie; Cunin, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Martin, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The way cells explore their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during development and migration is mediated by lamellipodia at their leading edge, acting as an actual motor pulling the cell forward. Lamellipodia are the primary area within the cell of actin microfilaments (filopodia) formation. In this work, we report on the use of porous silicon (pSi) scaffolds to mimic the ECM of mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp (DPSC) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that pSi promoted the appearance of lateral filopodia protruding from the DPSC cell body and not only in the lamellipodia area. The formation of elongated lateral actin filaments suggests that pores provided the necessary anchorage points for protrusion growth. Although MCF-7 cells displayed a lower presence of organized actin network on both pSi and nonporous silicon, pSi stimulated the formation of extended cell protrusions.

  10. Arabidopsis ACT11 modifies actin turnover to promote pollen germination and maintain the normal rate of tube growth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-08-01

    Actin is an ancient conserved protein that is encoded by multiple isovariants in multicellular organisms. There are eight functional actin genes in the Arabidopsis genome, and the precise function and mechanism of action of each isovariant remain poorly understood. Here, we report the characterization of ACT11, a reproductive actin isovariant. Our studies reveal that loss of function of ACT11 causes a delay in pollen germination, but enhances pollen tube growth. Cytological analysis revealed that the amount of filamentous actin decreased, and the rate of actin turnover increased in act11 pollen. Convergence of actin filaments upon the germination aperture was impaired in act11 pollen, consistent with the observed delay of germination. Reduction of actin dynamics with jasplakinolide suppressed the germination and tube growth phenotypes in act11 pollen, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms involve an increase in actin dynamics. Thus, we demonstrate that ACT11 is required to maintain the rate of actin turnover in order to promote pollen germination and maintain the normal rate of pollen tube growth.

  11. Rac regulation of transformation, gene expression, and actin organization by multiple, PAK-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Westwick, J K; Lambert, Q T; Clark, G J; Symons, M; Van Aelst, L; Pestell, R G; Der, C J

    1997-01-01

    Rac1 and RhoA are members of the Rho family of Ras-related proteins and function as regulators of actin cytoskeletal organization, gene expression, and cell cycle progression. Constitutive activation of Rac1 and RhoA causes tumorigenic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, and their functions may be required for full Ras transformation. The effectors by which Rac1 and RhoA mediate these diverse activities, as well as the interrelationship between these events, remain poorly understood. Rac1 is distinct from RhoA in its ability to bind and activate the p65 PAK serine/threonine kinase, to induce lamellipodia and membrane ruffling, and to activate the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). To assess the role of PAK in Rac1 function, we identified effector domain mutants of Rac1 and Rac1-RhoA chimeric proteins that no longer bound PAK. Surprisingly, PAK binding was dispensable for Rac1-induced transformation and lamellipodium formation, as well as activation of JNK, p38, and serum response factor (SRF). However, the ability of Rac1 to bind to and activate PAK correlated with its ability to stimulate transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter. Furthermore, Rac1 activation of JNK or SRF, or induction of lamellipodia, was neither necessary nor sufficient for Rac1 transforming activity. Finally, the signaling pathways that mediate Rac1 activation of SRF or JNK were distinct from those that mediate Rac1 induction of lamellipodia. Taken together, these observations suggest that Rac1 regulates at least four distinct effector-mediated functions and that multiple pathways may contribute to Rac1-induced cellular transformation. PMID:9032259

  12. Bidirectional interactions between NOX2-type NADPH oxidase and the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Munnamalai, Vidhya; Weaver, Cory J; Weisheit, Corinne E; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Quinn, Mark T; Suter, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    NADPH oxidases are important for neuronal function but detailed subcellular localization studies have not been performed. Here, we provide the first evidence for the presence of functional NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-type complex in neuronal growth cones and its bidirectional relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. NADPH oxidase inhibition resulted in reduced F-actin content, retrograde F-actin flow, and neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of NADPH oxidase via protein kinase C activation increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in the growth cone periphery. The main enzymatic NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2/gp91(phox) localized to the growth cone plasma membrane and showed little overlap with the regulatory subunit p40(phox) . p40(phox) itself exhibited colocalization with filopodial actin bundles. Differential subcellular fractionation revealed preferential association of NOX2/gp91(phox) and p40(phox) with the membrane and the cytoskeletal fraction, respectively. When neurite growth was evoked with beads coated with the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, we observed a significant increase in colocalization of p40(phox) with NOX2/gp91(phox) at apCAM adhesion sites. Together, these findings suggest a bidirectional functional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones, which contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth. We have previously shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical for actin organization and dynamics in neuronal growth cones as well as neurite outgrowth. Here, we report that the cytosolic subunit p40(phox) of the NOX2-type NADPH oxidase complex is partially associated with F-actin in neuronal growth cones, while ROS produced by this complex regulates F-actin dynamics and neurite growth. These findings provide evidence for a bidirectional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones. PMID:24702317

  13. Tip-localized actin polymerization and remodeling, reflected by the localization of ADF, profilin and villin, are fundamental for gravity-sensing and polar growth in characean rhizoids.

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus; Hauslage, Jens; Czogalla, Aleksander; Limbach, Christoph

    2004-07-01

    Polar organization and gravity-oriented, polarized growth of characean rhizoids are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. In this report, we demonstrate that the prominent center of the Spitzenkörper serves as the apical actin polymerization site in the extending tip. After cytochalasin D-induced disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, the regeneration of actin microfilaments (MFs) starts with the reappearance of a flat, brightly fluorescing actin array in the outermost tip. The actin array rounds up, produces actin MFs that radiate in all directions and is then relocated into its original central position in the center of the Spitzenkörper. The emerging actin MFs rearrange and cross-link to form the delicate, subapical meshwork, which then controls the statolith positioning, re-establishes the tip-high calcium gradient and mediates the reorganization of the Spitzenkörper with its central ER aggregate and the accumulation of secretory vesicles. Tip growth and gravitropic sensing, which includes control of statolith positioning and gravity-induced sedimentation, are not resumed until the original polar actin organization is completely restored. Immunolocalization of the actin-binding proteins, actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) and profilin, which both accumulate in the center of the Spitzenkörper, indicates high actin turnover and gives additional support for the actin-polymerizing function of this central, apical area. Association of villin immunofluorescence with two populations of thick undulating actin cables with uniform polarity underlying rotational cytoplasmic streaming in the basal region suggests that villin is the major actin-bundling protein in rhizoids. Our results provide evidence that the precise coordination of apical actin polymerization and dynamic remodeling of actin MFs by actin-binding proteins play a fundamental role in cell polarization, gravity sensing and gravity-oriented polarized growth of characean rhizoids.

  14. Semaphorin3a Enhances Endocytosis at Sites of Receptor–F-Actin Colocalization during Growth Cone Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Alyson E.; Nakamura, Fumio; Kawamoto, Susumu; Goshima, Yoshio; Kalb, Robert G.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    Axonal growth cone collapse is accompanied by a reduction in filopodial F-actin. We demonstrate here that semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) induces a coordinated rearrangement of Sema3A receptors and F-actin during growth cone collapse. Differential interference contrast microscopy reveals that some sites of Sema3A-induced F-actin reorganization correlate with discrete vacuoles, structures involved in endocytosis. Endocytosis of FITC-dextran by the growth cone is enhanced during Sema3A treatment, and sites of dextran accumulation colocalize with actin-rich vacuoles and ridges of membrane. Furthermore, the Sema3A receptor proteins, neuropilin-1 and plexin, and the Sema3A signaling molecule, rac1, also reorganize to vacuoles and membrane ridges after Sema3A treatment. These data support a model whereby Sema3A stimulates endocytosis by focal and coordinated rearrangement of receptor and cytoskeletal elements. Dextran accumulation is also increased in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) growth cones, in response to ephrin A5, and in RGC and DRG growth cones, in response to myelin and phorbol-ester. Therefore, enhanced endocytosis may be a general principle of physiologic growth cone collapse. We suggest that growth cone collapse is mediated by both actin filament rearrangements and alterations in membrane dynamics. PMID:10769032

  15. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes®: potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Trapasso, Elena; Cilurzo, Felisa; Fresta, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Topical application of anticancer drugs for the treatment of malignancies represents a new challenge in dermatology, potentially being an alternative therapeutic approach for the efficacious treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, that is, actinic keratoses, and malignant lesions of the skin caused by ultraviolet radiation. Anti-proliferative and antimitotic drugs, including many of the taxanes, are currently under investigation for the treatment of cutaneous malignant transformation of actinic keratoses, particularly the squamous cell carcinoma. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® are proposed as topical drug delivery systems for the treatment of this pathology due to their suitable physicochemical characteristics and enhanced skin penetration ability for deep dermal delivery. Our in vitro data show that the skin application of paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® improved the permeation of paclitaxel in a stratum corneum-epidermis membrane model and increased its anti-proliferative activity in a squamous cell carcinoma model as compared to the free drug. The results obtained encouraged the use of the paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® as the formulation for the potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

  16. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes®: potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Trapasso, Elena; Cilurzo, Felisa; Fresta, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Topical application of anticancer drugs for the treatment of malignancies represents a new challenge in dermatology, potentially being an alternative therapeutic approach for the efficacious treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, that is, actinic keratoses, and malignant lesions of the skin caused by ultraviolet radiation. Anti-proliferative and antimitotic drugs, including many of the taxanes, are currently under investigation for the treatment of cutaneous malignant transformation of actinic keratoses, particularly the squamous cell carcinoma. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® are proposed as topical drug delivery systems for the treatment of this pathology due to their suitable physicochemical characteristics and enhanced skin penetration ability for deep dermal delivery. Our in vitro data show that the skin application of paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® improved the permeation of paclitaxel in a stratum corneum-epidermis membrane model and increased its anti-proliferative activity in a squamous cell carcinoma model as compared to the free drug. The results obtained encouraged the use of the paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® as the formulation for the potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses. PMID:22414731

  17. In β-actin knockouts, epigenetic reprogramming and rDNA transcription inactivation lead to growth and proliferation defects.

    PubMed

    Almuzzaini, Bader; Sarshad, Aishe A; Rahmanto, Aldwin S; Hansson, Magnus L; Von Euler, Anne; Sangfelt, Olle; Visa, Neus; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Östlund; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2016-08-01

    Actin and nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) are regulators of transcription and chromatin organization. Using a genome-wide approach, we report here that β-actin binds intergenic and genic regions across the mammalian genome, associated with both protein-coding and rRNA genes. Within the rDNA, the distribution of β-actin correlated with NM1 and the other subunits of the B-WICH complex, WSTF and SNF2h. In β-actin(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we found that rRNA synthesis levels decreased concomitantly with drops in RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and NM1 occupancies across the rRNA gene. Reintroduction of wild-type β-actin, in contrast to mutated forms with polymerization defects, efficiently rescued rRNA synthesis underscoring the direct role for a polymerization-competent form of β-actin in Pol I transcription. The rRNA synthesis defects in the β-actin(-/-) MEFs are a consequence of epigenetic reprogramming with up-regulation of the repressive mark H3K4me1 (monomethylation of lys4 on histone H3) and enhanced chromatin compaction at promoter-proximal enhancer (T0 sequence), which disturb binding of the transcription factor TTF1. We propose a novel genome-wide mechanism where the polymerase-associated β-actin synergizes with NM1 to coordinate permissive chromatin with Pol I transcription, cell growth, and proliferation.-Almuzzaini, B., Sarshad, A. A. , Rahmanto, A. S., Hansson, M. L., Von Euler, A., Sangfelt, O., Visa, N., Farrants, A.-K. Ö., Percipalle, P. In β-actin knockouts, epigenetic reprogramming and rDNA transcription inactivation lead to growth and proliferation defects.

  18. The F-actin capping protein is required for hyphal growth and full virulence but is dispensable for septum formation in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Victoria E; Garrido, Carlos; Cantoral, Jesús M; Schumacher, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Filamentous (F-) actin is an integral part of the cytoskeleton allowing for cell growth, intracellular motility, and cytokinesis of eukaryotic cells. Its assembly from G-actin monomers and its disassembly are tightly regulated processes involving a number of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) such as F-actin nucleators and cross-linking proteins. F-actin capping protein (CP) is an alpha/beta heterodimer known from yeast and higher eukaryotes to bind to the fast growing ends of the actin filaments stabilizing them. In this study, we identified the orthologs of the two CP subunits, named BcCPA1 and BcCPB1, in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and showed that the two proteins physically interact in a yeast two-hybrid approach. GFP-BcCPA1 fusion proteins were functional and localized to the assumed sites of F-actin accumulation, i.e. to the hyphal tips and the sites of actin ring formation. Deletion of bccpa1 had a profound effect on hyphal growth, morphogenesis, and virulence indicating the importance of F-actin capping for an intact actin cytoskeleton. As polarized growth - unlike septum formation - is impaired in the mutants, it can be concluded that the organization and/or localization of actin patches and cables are disturbed rather than the functionality of the actin rings.

  19. The F-actin capping protein is required for hyphal growth and full virulence but is dispensable for septum formation in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Victoria E; Garrido, Carlos; Cantoral, Jesús M; Schumacher, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Filamentous (F-) actin is an integral part of the cytoskeleton allowing for cell growth, intracellular motility, and cytokinesis of eukaryotic cells. Its assembly from G-actin monomers and its disassembly are tightly regulated processes involving a number of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) such as F-actin nucleators and cross-linking proteins. F-actin capping protein (CP) is an alpha/beta heterodimer known from yeast and higher eukaryotes to bind to the fast growing ends of the actin filaments stabilizing them. In this study, we identified the orthologs of the two CP subunits, named BcCPA1 and BcCPB1, in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and showed that the two proteins physically interact in a yeast two-hybrid approach. GFP-BcCPA1 fusion proteins were functional and localized to the assumed sites of F-actin accumulation, i.e. to the hyphal tips and the sites of actin ring formation. Deletion of bccpa1 had a profound effect on hyphal growth, morphogenesis, and virulence indicating the importance of F-actin capping for an intact actin cytoskeleton. As polarized growth - unlike septum formation - is impaired in the mutants, it can be concluded that the organization and/or localization of actin patches and cables are disturbed rather than the functionality of the actin rings. PMID:27647239

  20. Bidirectional interactions between NOX2-type NADPH oxidase and the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Munnamalai, Vidhya; Weaver, Cory J.; Weisheit, Corinne E.; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Quinn, Mark T.; Suter, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidases are important for neuronal function but detailed subcellular localization studies have not been performed. Here, we provide the first evidence for the presence of functional NOX2-type NADPH oxidase complex in neuronal growth cones and its bidirectional relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. NADPH oxidase inhibition resulted in reduced F-actin content, retrograde F-actin flow, and neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of NADPH oxidase via protein kinase C activation increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in the growth cone periphery. The main enzymatic NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2/gp91phox localized to the growth cone plasma membrane and showed little overlap with the regulatory subunit p40phox. p40phox itself exhibited co-localization with filopodial actin bundles. Differential subcellular fractionation revealed preferential association of NOX2/gp91phox and p40phox with the membrane and the cytoskeletal fraction, respectively. When neurite growth was evoked with beads coated with the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, we observed a significant increase in co-localization of p40phox with NOX2/gp91phox at apCAM adhesion sites. Together, these findings suggest a bidirectional functional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones, which contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth. PMID:24702317

  1. DNA segregation by the bacterial actin AlfA during Bacillus subtilis growth and development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Eric; Herrera, Nick C; Gunderson, Felizza Q; Derman, Alan I; Dance, Amber L; Sims, Jennifer; Larsen, Rachel A; Pogliano, Joe

    2006-12-13

    We here identify a protein (AlfA; actin like filament) that defines a new family of actins that are only distantly related to MreB and ParM. AlfA is required for segregation of Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 (a mini pLS32-derivative) during growth and sporulation. A 3-kb DNA fragment encoding alfA and a downstream gene (alfB) is necessary and sufficient for plasmid stability. AlfA-GFP assembles dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that rapidly turn over (t(1/2)< approximately 45 s) in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. A point mutation (alfA D168A) that completely inhibits AlfA subunit exchange in vivo is strongly defective for plasmid segregation, demonstrating that dynamic polymerization of AlfA is necessary for function. During sporulation, plasmid segregation occurs before septation and independently of the DNA translocase SpoIIIE and the chromosomal Par proteins Soj and Spo0J. The absence of the RacA chromosome anchoring protein reduces the efficiency of plasmid segregation (by about two-fold), suggesting that it might contribute to anchoring the plasmid at the pole during sporulation. Our results suggest that the dynamic polymerization of AlfA mediates plasmid separation during both growth and sporulation.

  2. DNA segregation by the bacterial actin AlfA during Bacillus subtilis growth and development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Eric; Herrera, Nick C; Gunderson, Felizza Q; Derman, Alan I; Dance, Amber L; Sims, Jennifer; Larsen, Rachel A; Pogliano, Joe

    2006-12-13

    We here identify a protein (AlfA; actin like filament) that defines a new family of actins that are only distantly related to MreB and ParM. AlfA is required for segregation of Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 (a mini pLS32-derivative) during growth and sporulation. A 3-kb DNA fragment encoding alfA and a downstream gene (alfB) is necessary and sufficient for plasmid stability. AlfA-GFP assembles dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that rapidly turn over (t(1/2)< approximately 45 s) in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. A point mutation (alfA D168A) that completely inhibits AlfA subunit exchange in vivo is strongly defective for plasmid segregation, demonstrating that dynamic polymerization of AlfA is necessary for function. During sporulation, plasmid segregation occurs before septation and independently of the DNA translocase SpoIIIE and the chromosomal Par proteins Soj and Spo0J. The absence of the RacA chromosome anchoring protein reduces the efficiency of plasmid segregation (by about two-fold), suggesting that it might contribute to anchoring the plasmid at the pole during sporulation. Our results suggest that the dynamic polymerization of AlfA mediates plasmid separation during both growth and sporulation. PMID:17139259

  3. Growth inhibition and changes in morphology and actin distribution in Acetabularia acetabulum by phalloidin and phalloidin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sawitzky, H; Hanfstingl, U; Faulstich, H

    2003-03-01

    Effects on morphology and microfilament structure caused by phalloidin, phallacidin, and some semisynthetic phalloidin derivatives were studied in vegetative cells of the green alga Acetabularia acetabulum (L.) Silva. All phalloidin derivatives (except for phalloidin itself) caused growth stop of the alga after 1 day and (except for the fluorescein-labeled phalloidin) death of the cells after 4-7 days. Hair whorl tip growth and morphology as screened by light microscopy, as well as microfilament structure in tips, suggested that growth stop is correlated with a disorganization of actin filaments similar to that recently described for jasplakinolide (H. Sawitzky, S. Liebe, J. Willingale-Theune, D. Menzel, European Journal of Cell Biology 78: 424-433, 1999). Using rabbit muscle actin as a model target protein, we found that the toxic effects in vivo did not correlate with actin affinity values, suggesting that permeation through membranes must play a role. Indeed, the most lipophilic phalloidin derivatives benzoylphalloidin and dithiolanophalloidin were the most active in causing growth stop at ca. 100 microM. In comparison to the concentration of jasplakinolide required to cause similar effects (<3 microM), the two most active phalloidin derivatives exhibited an activity ca. 30 times lower. Nonetheless, lipophilic phalloidin derivatives can be used in algae, and probably also other cells, to modulate actin dynamics in vivo. In addition, we found that the fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin is able to enter living algal cells and stains actin structures brightly. Since it does not suppress actin dynamics, we suggest fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin as a tool for studying rearrangements of actin structures in live cells, e.g., by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  4. How capping protein enhances actin filament growth and nucleation on biomimetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe; Carlsson, Anders E.

    2015-12-01

    Capping protein (CP), which caps the growing ends of actin filaments, accelerates actin-based motility. Recent experiments on biomimetic beads have shown that CP also enhances the rate of actin filament nucleation. Proposed explanations for these phenomena include (i) the actin funneling hypothesis (AFH), in which the presence of CP increases the free-actin concentration, and (ii) the monomer gating model, in which CP binding to actin filament barbed ends makes more monomers available for filament nucleation. To establish how CP increases the rates of filament elongation and nucleation on biomimetic beads, we perform a quantitative modeling analysis of actin polymerization, using rate equations that include actin filament nucleation, polymerization and capping, as modified by monomer depletion near the surface of the bead. With one adjustable parameter, our simulation results match previously measured time courses of polymerized actin and filament number. The results support a version of the AFH where CP increases the local actin monomer concentration at the bead surface, but leaves the global free-actin concentration nearly constant. Because the rate of filament nucleation increases with the monomer concentration, the increased local monomer concentration enhances actin filament nucleation. We derive a closed-form formula for the characteristic CP concentration where the local free-actin concentration reaches half the bulk value, and find it to be comparable to the global Arp2/3 complex concentration. We also propose an experimental protocol for distinguishing branching nucleation of filaments from spontaneous nucleation.

  5. A variational approach to the growth dynamics of pre-stressed actin filament networks.

    PubMed

    John, Karin; Stöter, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-09-21

    In order to model the growth dynamics of elastic bodies with residual stresses a thermodynamically consistent approach is needed such that the cross-coupling between growth and mechanics can be correctly described. In the present work we apply a variational principle to the formulation of the interfacial growth dynamics of dendritic actin filament networks growing from biomimetic beads, an experimentally well studied system, where the buildup of residual stresses governs the network growth. We first introduce the material model for the network via a strain energy density for an isotropic weakly nonlinear elastic material and then derive consistently from this model the dynamic equations for the interfaces, i.e. for a polymerizing internal interface in contact with the bead and a depolymerizing external interface directed towards the solvent. We show that (i) this approach automatically preserves thermodynamic symmetry-properties, which is not the case for the often cited 'rubber-band-model' (Sekimoto et al 2004 Eur. Phys. J. E 13 247-59, Plastino et al 2004 Eur. Biophys. J. 33 310-20) and (ii) leads to a robust morphological instability of the treadmilling network interfaces. The nature of the instability depends on the interplay of the two dynamic interfaces. Depending on the biochemical conditions the network envelope evolves into a comet-like shape (i.e. the actin envelope thins out at one side and thickens on the opposite side of the bead) via a varicose instability or it breaks the symmetry via higher order zigzag modes. We conclude that morphological instabilities due to mechano-chemical coupling mechanisms and the presences of mechancial pre-stresses can play a major role in locally organizing the cytoskeleton of living cells. PMID:27420637

  6. A variational approach to the growth dynamics of pre-stressed actin filament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Stöter, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-09-01

    In order to model the growth dynamics of elastic bodies with residual stresses a thermodynamically consistent approach is needed such that the cross-coupling between growth and mechanics can be correctly described. In the present work we apply a variational principle to the formulation of the interfacial growth dynamics of dendritic actin filament networks growing from biomimetic beads, an experimentally well studied system, where the buildup of residual stresses governs the network growth. We first introduce the material model for the network via a strain energy density for an isotropic weakly nonlinear elastic material and then derive consistently from this model the dynamic equations for the interfaces, i.e. for a polymerizing internal interface in contact with the bead and a depolymerizing external interface directed towards the solvent. We show that (i) this approach automatically preserves thermodynamic symmetry-properties, which is not the case for the often cited ‘rubber-band-model’ (Sekimoto et al 2004 Eur. Phys. J. E 13 247–59, Plastino et al 2004 Eur. Biophys. J. 33 310–20) and (ii) leads to a robust morphological instability of the treadmilling network interfaces. The nature of the instability depends on the interplay of the two dynamic interfaces. Depending on the biochemical conditions the network envelope evolves into a comet-like shape (i.e. the actin envelope thins out at one side and thickens on the opposite side of the bead) via a varicose instability or it breaks the symmetry via higher order zigzag modes. We conclude that morphological instabilities due to mechano-chemical coupling mechanisms and the presences of mechancial pre-stresses can play a major role in locally organizing the cytoskeleton of living cells.

  7. A variational approach to the growth dynamics of pre-stressed actin filament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Stöter, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-09-01

    In order to model the growth dynamics of elastic bodies with residual stresses a thermodynamically consistent approach is needed such that the cross-coupling between growth and mechanics can be correctly described. In the present work we apply a variational principle to the formulation of the interfacial growth dynamics of dendritic actin filament networks growing from biomimetic beads, an experimentally well studied system, where the buildup of residual stresses governs the network growth. We first introduce the material model for the network via a strain energy density for an isotropic weakly nonlinear elastic material and then derive consistently from this model the dynamic equations for the interfaces, i.e. for a polymerizing internal interface in contact with the bead and a depolymerizing external interface directed towards the solvent. We show that (i) this approach automatically preserves thermodynamic symmetry-properties, which is not the case for the often cited ‘rubber-band-model’ (Sekimoto et al 2004 Eur. Phys. J. E 13 247-59, Plastino et al 2004 Eur. Biophys. J. 33 310-20) and (ii) leads to a robust morphological instability of the treadmilling network interfaces. The nature of the instability depends on the interplay of the two dynamic interfaces. Depending on the biochemical conditions the network envelope evolves into a comet-like shape (i.e. the actin envelope thins out at one side and thickens on the opposite side of the bead) via a varicose instability or it breaks the symmetry via higher order zigzag modes. We conclude that morphological instabilities due to mechano-chemical coupling mechanisms and the presences of mechancial pre-stresses can play a major role in locally organizing the cytoskeleton of living cells.

  8. The F-BAR protein Hof1 tunes formin activity to sculpt actin cables during polarized growth

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Brian R.; Yu, Hoi-Ying E.; Alioto, Salvatore L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Ydenberg, Casey A.; Waterman, David P.; Garabedian, Mikael; Goode, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell growth and division rely on polarized actin cytoskeleton remodeling events, the regulation of which is poorly understood. In budding yeast, formins stimulate the assembly of an organized network of actin cables that direct polarized secretion. Here we show that the Fer/Cip4 homology–Bin amphiphysin Rvs protein Hof1, which has known roles in cytokinesis, also functions during polarized growth by directly controlling the activities of the formin Bnr1. A mutant lacking the C-terminal half of Hof1 displays misoriented and architecturally altered cables, along with impaired secretory vesicle traffic. In vitro, Hof1 inhibits the actin nucleation and elongation activities of Bnr1 without displacing the formin from filament ends. These effects depend on the Src homology 3 domain of Hof1, the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain of Bnr1, and Hof1 dimerization, suggesting a mechanism by which Hof1 “restrains” the otherwise flexible FH1-FH2 apparatus. In vivo, loss of inhibition does not alter actin levels in cables but, instead, cable shape and functionality. Thus Hof1 tunes formins to sculpt the actin cable network. PMID:24719456

  9. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  10. Mycosis fungoides patient accompanied actinic keratosis, actinic keratosis with squamous cell carcinoma transformation, and porokeratosis after NBUVB therapy – 1st case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-jie; Abdul-fattah, Bilal; Qu, Xiao-ying; Wang, Cui-yan; Wang, Xia; Ran, Yi; Lai, Ting; Chen, Si-yuan; Huang, Chang-zheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Narrowband ultraviolet B light (NBUVB) is used increasingly in treating MF because of its good toleration and well-established management. Concerns: To discuss the risk factors and underlying pathogenic factors in the patients with secondary skin diseases after NBUVB therapy. Methods: We report in details the first case of a patient with MF accompanied with actinic keratosis (AK), AK with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation and porokeratosis after NBUVB therapy. Meanwhile, Sequence variants in tumor suppressor p53 gene in the patient's specimens were detected. A literature search of the key word “narrowband ultraviolet B light ”and “side effects” was performed on PubMed, 14 cases of this entity were found. A total of 15 patients including our case were reviewed in this study and meaningful conclusion could be drawn. Outcomes: The mean age at diagnosis of secondary skin dermatoses after NBUVB therapy was 62.08 years with a male to female ratio of 2:1. The cases were reported more in Europeans than in Asians (2.75:1), and the Fitzpatrick skin type was mainly Ito III (12/15). The mean cumulative number and cumulative dose of UVB treatments were 43.71 and 42, 400 (mJ/cm2), respectively. There was a positive relationship between Fitzpatrick skin type and cumulative dose of UVB treatments. Among the secondary skin diseases after NBUVB treatment, 12 were tumors, 2 were non-tumorous dermatoses. Only our patient presented with both. By polymerase chain reaction-single nucleotide polymorphism (PCR-SNP) analysis, C–G mutation of exon 4 of p53 was found in AK and MF specimens in our patient. Conclusion: To our knowledge, our case is the first MF patient accompanied with AK, AK with SCC transformation and Porokeratosis after NBUVB treatment. Lower Fitzpatrick skin type may be the risk factor of secondary skin diseases after NBUVB treatment. PMID

  11. Filopodial actin bundles are not necessary for microtubule advance into the peripheral domain of Aplysia neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Burnette, Dylan T; Schaefer, Andrew W; Ji, Lin; Danuser, Gaudenz; Forscher, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Filopodial actin bundles guide microtubule assembly in the growth cone peripheral (P) domain and retrograde actin-network flow simultaneously transports microtubules rearward. Therefore, microtubule-end position is determined by the sum of microtubule assembly and retrograde transport rates. However, how filopodia actually affect microtubule assembly dynamics is unknown. To address this issue we quantitatively assessed microtubule and actin dynamics before and after selective removal of filopodia. Filopodium removal had surprisingly little effect on retrograde actin-flow rates or underlying network structures, but resulted in an approximate doubling of peripheral microtubule density and deeper penetration of microtubules into the P domain. The latter stemmed from less efficient coupling of microtubules to remaining actin networks and not from a change in microtubule polymer dynamics. Loss of filopodia also resulted in increased lateral microtubule movements and a more randomized microtubule distribution in the P domain. In summary, filopodia do not seem to be formally required for microtubule advance; however, their presence ensures radial distribution of microtubules in the P domain and facilitates microtubule transport by retrograde flow. The resulting dynamic steady state has interesting implications for rapid microtubule-positioning responses in the P domain.

  12. Formin-Dependent Synaptic Growth; Evidence that Dlar Signals via Diaphanous to Modulate Synaptic Actin and Dynamic Pioneer Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, Catherine; Eaton, Benjamin A.; Davis, Graeme W.

    2008-01-01

    The diaphanous gene is the founding member of a family of Diaphanous Related Formin proteins (DRF). We identified diaphanous in a screen for genes that are necessary for the normal growth and stabilization of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we demonstrate that diaphanous mutations perturb synaptic growth at the NMJ. Diaphanous protein is present both pre- and postsynaptically. However, genetic rescue experiments in combination with additional genetic interaction experiments support the conclusion that dia is necessary presynaptically for normal NMJ growth. We then document defects in both the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in dia mutant nerve terminals. In so doing, we define and characterize a population of dynamic pioneer microtubules within the NMJ that are distinct from the bundled core of microtubules identified by the MAP1b-like protein Futsch. Defects in both synaptic actin and dynamic pioneer MTs are correlated with impaired synaptic growth in dia mutants. Finally, we present genetic evidence that Dia functions downstream of the presynaptic receptor tyrosine phosphatase Dlar and the Rho-type GEF trio to control NMJ growth. Based upon the established function of DRFs as Rho-GTPase dependent regulators of the cell cytoskeleton, we propose a model in which Diaphanous links receptor tyrosine phosphatase signaling at the plasma membrane to growth-dependent modulation of the synaptic actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. PMID:18971454

  13. Cdc42 and Actin Control Polarized Expression of TI-VAMP Vesicles to Neuronal Growth Cones and Their Fusion with the Plasma MembraneV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth. PMID:16381811

  14. Cdc42 and actin control polarized expression of TI-VAMP vesicles to neuronal growth cones and their fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 3 GENE MUTATIONS IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Annie; Dekker, Nusi; Jordan, Richard C.K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Activating mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene are responsible for several craniosynostosis and chondrodysplasia syndromes as well as some human cancers including bladder and cervical carcinoma. Despite a high frequency in some benign skin disorders, FGFR3 mutations have not been reported in cutaneous malignancies. Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a sun-induced premalignancy affecting the lower lip that frequently progresses to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The objective of this study was to determine if FGFR3 gene mutations are present in AC and SCC of the lip. Study Design DNA was extracted and purified from micro-dissected, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 20 cases of AC and SCC arising in AC. Exons 7, 15, and 17 were PCR amplified and direct sequenced. Results Four novel somatic mutations in the FGFR3 gene were identified: exon 7 mutation 742C→T (amino acid change R248C), exon 15 mutations 1850A→G (D617G) and 1888G→A (V630M), and exon 17 mutation 2056G→A (E686K). Grade of dysplasia did not correlate with presence of mutations. Conclusion The frequency of FGFR3 receptor mutations suggests a functional role for the FGFR3 receptor in the development of epithelial disorders and perhaps a change may contribute to the pathogenesis of some AC and SCC. PMID:19327639

  16. Cytoskeletal social networking in the growth cone: How +TIPs mediate microtubule-actin cross-linking to drive axon outgrowth and guidance.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Garrett M; Bearce, Elizabeth A; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2016-09-01

    The growth cone is a unique structure capable of guiding axons to their proper destinations. Within the growth cone, extracellular guidance cues are interpreted and then transduced into physical changes in the actin filament (F-actin) and microtubule cytoskeletons, providing direction and movement. While both cytoskeletal networks individually possess important growth cone-specific functions, recent data over the past several years point towards a more cooperative role between the two systems. Facilitating this interaction between F-actin and microtubules, microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) have been shown to link the two cytoskeletons together. Evidence suggests that many +TIPs can couple microtubules to F-actin dynamics, supporting both microtubule advance and retraction in the growth cone periphery. In addition, growing in vitro and in vivo data support a secondary role for +TIPs in which they may participate as F-actin nucleators, thus directly influencing F-actin dynamics and organization. This review focuses on how +TIPs may link F-actin and microtubules together in the growth cone, and how these interactions may influence axon guidance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Apical Actin Fringe Contributes to Localized Cell Wall Deposition and Polarized Growth in the Lily Pollen Tube1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Caleb M.; Hepler, Peter K.; Winship, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    In lily (Lilium formosanum) pollen tubes, pectin, a major component of the cell wall, is delivered through regulated exocytosis. The targeted transport and secretion of the pectin-containing vesicles may be controlled by the cortical actin fringe at the pollen tube apex. Here, we address the role of the actin fringe using three different inhibitors of growth: brefeldin A, latrunculin B, and potassium cyanide. Brefeldin A blocks membrane trafficking and inhibits exocytosis in pollen tubes; it also leads to the degradation of the actin fringe and the formation of an aggregate of filamentous actin at the base of the clear zone. Latrunculin B, which depolymerizes filamentous actin, markedly slows growth but allows focused pectin deposition to continue. Of note, the locus of deposition shifts frequently and correlates with changes in the direction of growth. Finally, potassium cyanide, an electron transport chain inhibitor, briefly stops growth while causing the actin fringe to completely disappear. Pectin deposition continues but lacks focus, instead being delivered in a wide arc across the pollen tube tip. These data support a model in which the actin fringe contributes to the focused secretion of pectin to the apical cell wall and, thus, to the polarized growth of the pollen tube. PMID:25037212

  18. The Arabidopsis Wave Complex: Mechanisms Of Localized Actin Polymerization And Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Szymanski

    2012-10-23

    The objective of this project was to discover the protein complexes and control mechanisms that determine the location of actin filament roadways in plant cells. Our work provided the first molecular description of protein complexes that are converted from inactive complexes to active actin filament nucleators in the cell. These discoveries provided a conceptual framework to control to roadways in plant cells that determine the location and delivery of plant metabolites and storage molecules that are relevant to the bioenergy economy.

  19. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  20. Selective inhibition of growth-related gene expression in murine keratinocytes by transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, R J; Bascom, C C; Sipes, N J; Graves-Deal, R; Weissman, B E; Moses, H L

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is a potent inhibitor of epithelial cell proliferation. A nontumorigenic epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent epithelial cell line, BALB/MK, is reversibly growth arrested by TGF beta. TGF beta will also abrogate EGF-stimulated mitogenesis of quiescent BALB/MK cells. Increased levels of calcium (greater than 1.0 mM) will induce differentiation in BALB/MK cells; in contrast, TGF beta-mediated growth inhibition does not result in induction of terminal differentiation. In the present study, the effects of TGF beta and calcium on growth factor-inducible gene expression were examined. TGF beta markedly decreased c-myc and KC gene expression in rapidly growing BALB/MK cells and reduced the EGF induction of c-myc and KC in a quiescent population of cells. TGF beta exerted its control over c-myc expression at a posttranscriptional level, and this inhibitory effect was dependent on protein synthesis. TGF beta had no effect on c-fos gene expression, whereas 1.5 mM calcium attenuated EGF-induced c-fos expression in quiescent cells. Expression of beta-actin, however, was slightly increased in both rapidly growing and EGF-restimulated quiescent BALB/MK cells treated with TGF beta. Thus, in this system, TGF beta selectively reduced expression of certain genes associated with cell proliferation (c-myc and KC), and at least part of the TGF beta effect was at a posttranscriptional level. Images PMID:2463471

  1. The Spatial Distribution of the Exocyst and Actin Cortical Patches Is Sufficient To Organize Hyphal Tip Growth

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Lima, David; Kaneva, Iliyana N.; Watton, Simon P.

    2013-01-01

    In the hyphal tip of Candida albicans we have made detailed quantitative measurements of (i) exocyst components, (ii) Rho1, the regulatory subunit of (1,3)-β-glucan synthase, (iii) Rom2, the specialized guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of Rho1, and (iv) actin cortical patches, the sites of endocytosis. We use the resulting data to construct and test a quantitative 3-dimensional model of fungal hyphal growth based on the proposition that vesicles fuse with the hyphal tip at a rate determined by the local density of exocyst components. Enzymes such as (1,3)-β-glucan synthase thus embedded in the plasma membrane continue to synthesize the cell wall until they are removed by endocytosis. The model successfully predicts the shape and dimensions of the hyphae, provided that endocytosis acts to remove cell wall-synthesizing enzymes at the subapical bands of actin patches. Moreover, a key prediction of the model is that the distribution of the synthase is substantially broader than the area occupied by the exocyst. This prediction is borne out by our quantitative measurements. Thus, although the model highlights detailed issues that require further investigation, in general terms the pattern of tip growth of fungal hyphae can be satisfactorily explained by a simple but quantitative model rooted within the known molecular processes of polarized growth. Moreover, the methodology can be readily adapted to model other forms of polarized growth, such as that which occurs in plant pollen tubes. PMID:23666623

  2. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Verrecchia, Franck; Mauviel, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a prototype of multifunctional cytokine, is a key regulator of extracellular matrix (ECM) assembly and remodeling. Specifically, TGF-β isoforms have the ability to induce the expression of ECM proteins in mesenchymal cells, and to stimulate the production of protease inhibitors that prevent enzymatic breakdown of the ECM. Elevated TGF-β expression in affected organs, and subsequent deregulation of TGF-β functions, correlates with the abnormal connective tissue deposition observed during the onset of fibrotic diseases. During the last few years, tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular aspects of intracellular signaling downstream of the TGF-β receptors. In particular, Smad proteins, TGF-β receptor kinase substrates that translocate into the cell nucleus to act as transcription factors, have been studied extensively. The role of Smad3 in the transcriptional regulation of typeIcollagen gene expression and in the development of fibrosis, demonstrated both in vitro and in animal models with a targeted deletion of Smad3, is of critical importance because it may lead to novel therapeutic strategies against these diseases. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying Smad modulation of fibrillar collagen expression and how it relates to fibrotic processes. PMID:17589920

  4. Transforming growth factor beta1 and aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kota; Hathaway, Catherine K.; Chang, Albert S.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review It is well established that blocking renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system (RAAS) is effective for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal complications in hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Although the induction of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) by components of RAAS mediates the hypertrophic and fibrogenic changes in cardiovascular-renal complications, it is still controversial as to whether TGFbeta1 can be a target to prevent such complications. Here we review recent findings on the role of TGFbeta1 in fluid homeostasis, focusing on the relationship with aldosterone. Recent findings TGFbeta1 suppresses adrenal production of aldosterone and renal tubular sodium reabsorption. We have generated mice with TGFbeta1 mRNA expression graded in five steps from 10% to 300% normal, and found that blood pressure and plasma volume are negatively regulated by TGFbeta1. Notably, the 10 % hypomorph exhibits primary aldosteronism and sodium and water retention due to markedly impaired urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. Summary These results identify TGFbeta signaling as an important counterregulatory system against aldosterone. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for the suppressive effects of TGFbeta1 on adrenocortical and renal function may further our understanding of primary aldosteronism as well as assist in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for hypertension. PMID:25587902

  5. Cortactin involvement in the keratinocyte growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 10 promotion of migration and cortical actin assembly in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, Simona; Cardinali, Giorgia; Aspite, Nicaela; Picardo, Mauro; Marchese, Cinzia; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Patrizia . E-mail: patrizia.mancini@uniroma1.it

    2007-05-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF7) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10/KGF2) regulate keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by binding to the tyrosine kinase KGF receptor (KGFR). KGF induces keratinocyte motility and cytoskeletal rearrangement, whereas a direct role of FGF10 on keratinocyte migration is not clearly established. Here we analyzed the motogenic activity of FGF10 and KGF on human keratinocytes. Migration assays and immunofluorescence of actin cytoskeleton revealed that FGF10 is less efficient than KGF in promoting migration and exerts a delayed effect in inducing lamellipodia and ruffles formation. Both growth factors promoted phosphorylation and subsequent membrane translocation of cortactin, an F-actin binding protein involved in cell migration; however, FGF10-induced cortactin phosphorylation was reduced, more transient and delayed with respect to that promoted by KGF. Cortactin phosphorylation induced by both growth factors was Src-dependent, while its membrane translocation and cell migration were blocked by either Src and PI3K inhibitors, suggesting that both pathways are involved in KGF- and FGF10-dependent motility. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of cortactin inhibited KGF- and FGF10-induced migration. These results indicate that cortactin is involved in keratinocyte migration promoted by both KGF and FGF10.

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 and fibroblast growth factors in rat growth plate.

    PubMed

    Jingushi, S; Scully, S P; Joyce, M E; Sugioka, Y; Bolander, M E

    1995-09-01

    Chondrocytes in the growth plate progress in an orderly fashion from resting through proliferating to hypertrophic cells. In the region of hypertrophic chondrocytes, the cartilage is invaded by capillary loops and endochondral ossification is initiated. It is currently believed that growth factors may regulate the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes and the synthesis of extracellular matrix in the growth plate. The ordered sequence of proliferation and differentiation observed in the growth plate provides a unique opportunity to study the role of acidic fibroblast growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in the regulation of these processes. In this study, expression of the mRNA of these growth factors was examined using total RNA extracted from the physis and epiphysis of rat tibias. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 mRNA was detected by Northern hybridization. Expression of the genes encoding acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification. In addition, using polyclonal antibodies against these growth factors, we localized them by immunohistochemical analysis. Strong intracellular staining with a predominantly nuclear pattern was observed in chondrocytes from the proliferating and upper hypertrophic zones. In contrast, chondrocytes in the resting zone stained only faintly for the presence of these growth factors. Some chondrocytes in the resting zone adjacent to the proliferating zone stained with these antibodies, and the antibodies also stained cells in the zone of Ranvier, which regulates latitudinal bone growth. Lastly, the location of transforming growth factor-beta 1 was examined further with use of a polyclonal antipeptide antibody specific for its extracellular epitope.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7472755

  7. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  8. The NAV2 homolog Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth in Drosophila mushroom body neurons via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Satoshi; Hiroi, Makoto; Nitta, Yohei; Maeyama, Yuko; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    The Rac-Cofilin pathway is essential for cytoskeletal remodeling to control axonal development. Rac signals through the canonical Rac-Pak-LIMK pathway to suppress Cofilin-dependent axonal growth and through a Pak-independent non-canonical pathway to promote outgrowth. Whether this non-canonical pathway converges to promote Cofilin-dependent F-actin reorganization in axonal growth remains elusive. We demonstrate that Sickie, a homolog of the human microtubule-associated protein neuron navigator 2, cell-autonomously regulates axonal growth of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons via the non-canonical pathway. Sickie was prominently expressed in the newborn F-actin-rich axons of MB neurons. A sickie mutant exhibited axonal growth defects, and its phenotypes were rescued by exogenous expression of Sickie. We observed phenotypic similarities and genetic interactions among sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling components. Using the MARCM technique, distinct F-actin and phospho-Cofilin patterns were detected in developing axons mutant for sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling regulators. The upregulation of Cofilin function alleviated the axonal defect of the sickie mutant. Epistasis analyses revealed that Sickie suppresses the LIMK overexpression phenotype and is required for Pak-independent Rac1 and Slingshot phosphatase to counteract LIMK. We propose that Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway in a Slingshot-dependent manner.

  9. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young's modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility.

  10. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated. PMID:27385345

  11. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-08-15

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated.

  12. Latent transforming growth factor binding protein 4 regulates transforming growth factor beta receptor stability.

    PubMed

    Su, Chi-Ting; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Lawrence, Elizabeth C; Levine, Kara L; Dabovic, Branka; Jung, Christine; Davis, Elaine C; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Urban, Zsolt

    2015-07-15

    Mutations in the gene for the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 4 (LTBP4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C. To understand the molecular disease mechanisms of this disease, we investigated the impact of LTBP4 loss on transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling. Despite elevated extracellular TGFβ activity, downstream signaling molecules of the TGFβ pathway, including pSMAD2 and pERK, were down-regulated in LTBP4 mutant human dermal fibroblasts. In addition, TGFβ receptors 1 and 2 (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) were reduced at the protein but not at the ribonucleic acid level. Treatment with exogenous TGFβ1 led to an initially rapid increase in SMAD2 phosphorylation followed by a sustained depression of phosphorylation and receptor abundance. In mutant cells TGFBR1 was co-localized with lysosomes. Treatment with a TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor, endocytosis inhibitors or a lysosome inhibitor, normalized the levels of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated a molecular interaction between LTBP4 and TGFBR2. Knockdown of LTBP4 reduced TGFβ receptor abundance and signaling in normal cells and supplementation of recombinant LTBP4 enhanced these measures in mutant cells. In a mouse model of Ltbp4 deficiency, reduced TGFβ signaling and receptor levels were normalized upon TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor treatment. Our results show that LTBP4 interacts with TGFBR2 and stabilizes TGFβ receptors by preventing their endocytosis and lysosomal degradation in a ligand-dependent and receptor kinase activity-dependent manner. These findings identify LTBP4 as a key molecule required for the stability of the TGFβ receptor complex, and a new mechanism by which the extracellular matrix regulates cytokine receptor signaling.

  13. Latent transforming growth factor binding protein 4 regulates transforming growth factor beta receptor stability

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chi-Ting; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Lawrence, Elizabeth C.; Levine, Kara L.; Dabovic, Branka; Jung, Christine; Davis, Elaine C.; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Urban, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 4 (LTBP4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C. To understand the molecular disease mechanisms of this disease, we investigated the impact of LTBP4 loss on transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling. Despite elevated extracellular TGFβ activity, downstream signaling molecules of the TGFβ pathway, including pSMAD2 and pERK, were down-regulated in LTBP4 mutant human dermal fibroblasts. In addition, TGFβ receptors 1 and 2 (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) were reduced at the protein but not at the ribonucleic acid level. Treatment with exogenous TGFβ1 led to an initially rapid increase in SMAD2 phosphorylation followed by a sustained depression of phosphorylation and receptor abundance. In mutant cells TGFBR1 was co-localized with lysosomes. Treatment with a TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor, endocytosis inhibitors or a lysosome inhibitor, normalized the levels of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated a molecular interaction between LTBP4 and TGFBR2. Knockdown of LTBP4 reduced TGFβ receptor abundance and signaling in normal cells and supplementation of recombinant LTBP4 enhanced these measures in mutant cells. In a mouse model of Ltbp4 deficiency, reduced TGFβ signaling and receptor levels were normalized upon TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor treatment. Our results show that LTBP4 interacts with TGFBR2 and stabilizes TGFβ receptors by preventing their endocytosis and lysosomal degradation in a ligand-dependent and receptor kinase activity-dependent manner. These findings identify LTBP4 as a key molecule required for the stability of the TGFβ receptor complex, and a new mechanism by which the extracellular matrix regulates cytokine receptor signaling. PMID:25882708

  14. Phosphoinositide turnover in cell growth and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Interaction of cells with various stimuli triggers a common signal transduction pathway involving breakdown and resynthesis of the minor membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/). Hydrolysis of PIP/sub 2/ by phospholipase C generates two key catabolites-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacylglycerol (DAG)-which mediate and amplify cellular responses. These studies provide evidence for potential involvement of this pathway in oncogenic transformation and cell cycle progression. Altered levels of PIP/sub 2/ and its breakdown products were found in cells transformed by ras oncogenes, in contrast to untransformed counterparts. Steady-state levels of PIP/sub 2/, DAG and inositol phosphates were measured in NIH 3T3 and NRK cells metabolically labelled with /sup 3/H-glycerol and /sup 3/H-inositol. DAG and inositol phosphate levels were significantly elevated by 2.5-3 fold in the transformed cells while levels of PIP/sub 2/ were decreased. These findings suggest that the ras protein may activate phospholipase C. Elevated DAG content in the transformed cells was also measured by phosphorylation of DAG using a partially purified DAG kinase, indicating that the differences seen could not be attributed to differences in labelling between the cell lines.

  15. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Actinic keratosis is caused by exposure to sunlight. You are more likely to develop it if you: Have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Had a ...

  16. Cardiac fibroblasts are predisposed to convert into myocyte phenotype: Specific effect of transforming growth factor. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, M.; Tomek, R.; Woods, C.; Bhambi, B. )

    1991-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts are mainly responsible for the synthesis of major extracellular matrix proteins in the heart, including fibrillar collagen types I and III and fibronectin. In this report we show that these cells, when stimulated by transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}), acquire certain myocyte-specific properties. Cultured cardiac fibroblasts from adult rabbit heart were treated with TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, (10-15 ng/ml) for different periods of time. Northern hybridization analysis of total RNA showed that cells treated with TGF-{beta}{sub 1} became stained with a monoclonal antibody to muscle-specific actin. After treatment of quiescent cells with TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, cell proliferation (as measured by ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation) was moderately increased. Cultured cardiac fibroblasts at the subconfluent stage, when exposed to TGF-{beta}{sub 1} in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, gave rise to a second generation of slowly growing cells that expressed muscle-specific actin filaments. The findings demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts can be made to differentiate into cells that display many characteristics of cardiac myocytes. TGF-{beta}{sub 1} seems to be a specific inducer of such conversion.

  17. Guardians of the actin monomer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Robinson, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a universal force provider in eukaryotic cells. Biological processes harness the pressure generated from actin polymerization through dictating the time, place and direction of filament growth. As such, polymerization is initiated and maintained via tightly controlled filament nucleation and elongation machineries. Biological systems integrate force into their activities through recruiting and activating these machineries. In order that actin function as a common force generating polymerization motor, cells must maintain a pool of active, polymerization-ready monomeric actin, and minimize extemporaneous polymerization. Maintenance of the active monomeric actin pool requires the recycling of actin filaments, through depolymerization, nucleotide exchange and reloading of the polymerization machineries, while the levels of monomers are constantly monitored and supplemented, when needed, via the access of a reserve pool of monomers and through gene expression. Throughout its monomeric life, actin needs to be protected against gratuitous nucleation events. Here, we review the proteins that act as custodians of monomeric actin. We estimate their levels on a tissue scale, and calculate the implied concentrations of each actin complex based on reported binding affinities. These estimations predict that monomeric actin is rarely, if ever, alone. Thus, the guardians keep the volatility of actin in check, so that its explosive power is only released in the controlled environments of the nucleation and polymerization machineries. PMID:24268205

  18. Actin Automata with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Adamatzky, Andy

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in eukaryotic. The actin filaments play the roles of cytoskeleton, motility units, information processing and learning. We model actin filament as a double chain of finite state machines, nodes, which take states “0” and “1”. The states are abstractions of absence and presence of a subthreshold charge on actin units corresponding to the nodes. All nodes update their state in parallel to discrete time. A node updates its current state depending on states of two closest neighbors in the node chain and two closest neighbors in the complementary chain. Previous models of actin automata consider momentary state transitions of nodes. We enrich the actin automata model by assuming that states of nodes depend not only on the current states of neighboring node but also on their past states. Thus, we assess the effect of memory of past states on the dynamics of acting automata. We demonstrate in computational experiments that memory slows down propagation of perturbations, decrease entropy of space-time patterns generated, transforms traveling localizations to stationary oscillators, and stationary oscillations to still patterns.

  19. A single-cell correlative nanoelectromechanosensing approach to detect cancerous transformation: monitoring the function of F-actin microfilaments in the modulation of the ion channel activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdolahadThe Authors With Same Contributions., Mohammad; Saeidi, Ali; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mashinchian, Omid; Taghinejad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Hossein; Azimi, Soheil; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2015-01-01

    Cancerous transformation may be dependent on correlation between electrical disruptions in the cell membrane and mechanical disruptions of cytoskeleton structures. Silicon nanotube (SiNT)-based electrical probes, as ultra-accurate signal recorders with subcellular resolution, may create many opportunities for fundamental biological research and biomedical applications. Here, we used this technology to electrically monitor cellular mechanosensing. The SiNT probe was combined with an electrically activated glass micropipette aspiration system to achieve a new cancer diagnostic technique that is based on real-time correlation between mechanical and electrical behaviour of single cells. Our studies demonstrated marked changes in the electrical response following increases in the mechanical aspiration force in healthy cells. In contrast, such responses were extremely weak for malignant cells. Confocal microscopy results showed the impact of actin microfilament remodelling on the reduction of the electrical response for aspirated cancer cells due to the significant role of actin in modulating the ion channel activity in the cell membrane.Cancerous transformation may be dependent on correlation between electrical disruptions in the cell membrane and mechanical disruptions of cytoskeleton structures. Silicon nanotube (SiNT)-based electrical probes, as ultra-accurate signal recorders with subcellular resolution, may create many opportunities for fundamental biological research and biomedical applications. Here, we used this technology to electrically monitor cellular mechanosensing. The SiNT probe was combined with an electrically activated glass micropipette aspiration system to achieve a new cancer diagnostic technique that is based on real-time correlation between mechanical and electrical behaviour of single cells. Our studies demonstrated marked changes in the electrical response following increases in the mechanical aspiration force in healthy cells. In contrast, such

  20. Actinic Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a precancerous condition related to cumulative lifetime sun exposure. The lower lip is most often affected. Individuals ... Wearing barrier clothing (eg, wide-brimmed hats) and sunscreen-containing lip balms can aid in preventing actinic ...

  1. ROCK1 via LIM kinase regulates growth, maturation and actin based functions in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Reuben; Shi, Jianjian; Ghosh, Joydeep; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Sims, Emily; Martin, Holly; Wei, Lei; Mali, Raghuveer Singh

    2016-01-01

    Understanding mast cell development is essential due to their critical role in regulating immunity and autoimmune diseases. Here, we show how Rho kinases (ROCK) regulate mast cell development and can function as therapeutic targets for treating allergic diseases. Rock1 deficiency results in delayed maturation of bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) in response to IL-3 stimulation and reduced growth in response to stem cell factor (SCF) stimulation. Further, integrin-mediated adhesion and migration, and IgE-mediated degranulation are all impaired in Rock1-deficient BMMCs. To understand the mechanism behind altered mast cell development in Rock1−/− BMMCs, we analyzed the activation of ROCK and its downstream targets including LIM kinase (LIMK). We observed reduced activation of ROCK, LIMK, AKT and ERK1/2 in Rock1-deficient BMMCs in response to SCF stimulation. Further, loss of either Limk1 or Limk2 also demonstrated altered BMMC maturation and growth; combined deletion of both Limk1 and Limk2 resulted in further reduction in BMMC maturation and growth. In passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, deficiency of Rock1 or treatment with ROCK inhibitor Fasudil protected mice against IgE-mediated challenge. Our results identify ROCK/LIMK pathway as a novel therapeutic target for treating allergic diseases involving mast cells. PMID:26943578

  2. Transforming growth factor-{beta}2 enhances differentiation of cardiac myocytes from embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinender . E-mail: Dinender.Kumar@uvm.edu; Sun, Baiming

    2005-06-24

    Stem cell therapy holds great promise for the treatment of injured myocardium, but is challenged by a limited supply of appropriate cells. Three different isoforms of transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) -{beta}1, -{beta}2, and -{beta}3 exhibit distinct regulatory effects on cell growth, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development. We compared the effects of these three different isoforms on cardiomyocyte differentiation from embryonic stem (ES) cells. In contrast to TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3, treatment of mouse ES cells with TGF-{beta}2 isoform significantly increased embryoid body (EB) proliferation as well as the extent of the EB outgrowth that beat rhythmically. At 17 days, 49% of the EBs treated with TGF-{beta}2 exhibited spontaneous beating compared with 15% in controls. Cardiac myocyte specific protein markers sarcomeric myosin and {alpha}-actin were demonstrated in beating EBs and cells isolated from EBs. In conclusion, TGF-{beta}2 but not TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3 promotes cardiac myocyte differentiation from ES cells.

  3. The actin-binding proteins eps8 and gelsolin have complementary roles in regulating the growth and stability of mechanosensory hair bundles of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Olt, Jennifer; Mburu, Philomena; Johnson, Stuart L; Parker, Andy; Kuhn, Stephanie; Bowl, Mike; Marcotti, Walter; Brown, Steve D M

    2014-01-01

    Sound transduction depends upon mechanosensitive channels localized on the hair-like bundles that project from the apical surface of cochlear hair cells. Hair bundles show a stair-case structure composed of rows of stereocilia, and each stereocilium contains a core of tightly-packed and uniformly-polarized actin filaments. The growth and maintenance of the stereociliary actin core are dynamically regulated. Recently, it was shown that the actin-binding protein gelsolin is expressed in the stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs) and in its absence they become long and straggly. Gelsolin is part of a whirlin scaffolding protein complex at the stereocilia tip, which has been shown to interact with other actin regulatory molecules such as Eps8. Here we investigated the physiological effects associated with the absence of gelsolin and its possible overlapping role with Eps8. We found that, in contrast to Eps8, gelsolin does not affect mechanoelectrical transduction during immature stages of development. Moreover, OHCs from gelsolin knockout mice were able to mature into fully functional sensory receptors as judged by the normal resting membrane potential and basolateral membrane currents. Mechanoelectrical transducer current in gelsolin-Eps8 double knockout mice showed a profile similar to that observed in the single mutants for Eps8. We propose that gelsolin has a non-overlapping role with Eps8. While Eps8 is mainly involved in the initial growth of stereocilia in both inner hair cells (IHCs) and OHCs, gelsolin is required for the maintenance of mature hair bundles of low-frequency OHCs after the onset of hearing. PMID:24475274

  4. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  5. Actinic Keratoses

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are common intra-epidermal neoplasms that lie on a continuum with squamous cell carcinoma. Tightly linked to ultraviolet irradiation, they occur in areas of chronic sun exposure, and early treatment of these lesions may prevent their progression to invasive disease. A large variety of effective treatment modalities exist, and the optimal therapeutic choice is dependent on a variety of patient- and physician-associated variables. Many established and more recent approaches are discussed in this review with a focus on efficacy and administration techniques. Several previously experimental options, such as imiquimod and photodynamic therapy, have become incorporated as first-line options for the treatment of actinic keratoses, while combination treatment strategies have been gaining in popularity. The goal of all therapies is to ultimately limit the morbidity and mortality of squamous cell carcinoma. (J Clin Aesthetic Dermatol. 2009;2(7):43–48.) PMID:20729970

  6. A simplified implementation of edge detection in MATLAB is faster and more sensitive than fast fourier transform for actin fiber alignment quantification.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, Steven Frank; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2011-04-01

    Fiber alignment plays a critical role in the structure and function of cells and tissues. While fiber alignment quantification is important to experimental analysis and several different methods for quantifying fiber alignment exist, many studies focus on qualitative rather than quantitative analysis perhaps due to the complexity of current fiber alignment methods. Speed and sensitivity were compared in edge detection and fast Fourier transform (FFT) for measuring actin fiber alignment in cells exposed to shear stress. While edge detection using matrix multiplication was consistently more sensitive than FFT, image processing time was significantly longer. However, when MATLAB functions were used to implement edge detection, MATLAB's efficient element-by-element calculations and fast filtering techniques reduced computation cost 100 times compared to the matrix multiplication edge detection method. The new computation time was comparable to the FFT method, and MATLAB edge detection produced well-distributed fiber angle distributions that statistically distinguished aligned and unaligned fibers in half as many sample images. When the FFT sensitivity was improved by dividing images into smaller subsections, processing time grew larger than the time required for MATLAB edge detection. Implementation of edge detection in MATLAB is simpler, faster, and more sensitive than FFT for fiber alignment quantification.

  7. A genome-wide analysis reveals that the Drosophila transcription factor Lola promotes axon growth in part by suppressing expression of the actin nucleation factor Spire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The phylogenetically conserved transcription factor Lola is essential for many aspects of axon growth and guidance, synapse formation and neural circuit development in Drosophila. To date it has been difficult, however, to obtain an overall view of Lola functions and mechanisms. Results We use expression microarrays to identify the lola-dependent transcriptome in the Drosophila embryo. We find that lola regulates the expression of a large selection of genes that are known to affect each of several lola-dependent developmental processes. Among other loci, we find lola to be a negative regulator of spire, an actin nucleation factor that has been studied for its essential role in oogenesis. We show that spire is expressed in the nervous system and is required for a known lola-dependent axon guidance decision, growth of ISNb motor axons. We further show that reducing spire gene dosage suppresses this aspect of the lola phenotype, verifying that derepression of spire is an important contributor to the axon stalling phenotype of embryonic motor axons in lola mutants. Conclusions These data shed new light on the molecular mechanisms of many lola-dependent processes, and also identify several developmental processes not previously linked to lola that are apt to be regulated by this transcription factor. These data further demonstrate that excessive expression of the actin nucleation factor Spire is as deleterious for axon growth in vivo as is the loss of Spire, thus highlighting the need for a balance in the elementary steps of actin dynamics to achieve effective neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:22129300

  8. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts retain intact transforming growth factor-{beta} responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yasuji; Hinchcliff, Monique; Wu, Minghua; Warner-Blankenship, Matthew; Lyons, Karen M.

    2008-03-10

    Background: The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) has been implicated in pathological fibrosis, but its physiologic role remains elusive. In vitro, transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) induces CCN2 expression in mesenchymal cells. Because CCN2 can enhance profibrotic responses elicited by TGF-{beta}, it has been proposed that CCN2 functions as an essential downstream signaling mediator for TGF-{beta}. To explore this notion, we characterized TGF-{beta}-induced activation of fibroblasts from CCN2-null (CCN2{sup -/-}) mouse embryos. Methods: The regulation of CCN2 expression was examined in vivo in a model of fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Cellular TGF-{beta} signal transduction and regulation of collagen gene expression were examined in CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs by immunohistochemistry, Northern, Western and RT-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and transient transfection assays. Results: Bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis in the mouse was associated with substantial CCN2 up-regulation in lesional fibroblasts. Whereas in vitro proliferation rate of CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs was markedly reduced compared to wild type MEFs, TGF-{beta}-induced activation of the Smad pathways, including Smad2 phosphorylation, Smad2/3 and Smad4 nuclear accumulation and Smad-dependent transcriptional responses, were unaffected by loss of CCN2. The stimulation of COL1A2 and fibronectin mRNA expression and promoter activity, and of corresponding protein levels, showed comparable time and dose-response in wild type and CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs, whereas stimulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and myofibroblast transdifferentiation showed subtle impairment in MEFs lacking CCN2. Conclusion: Whereas endogenous CCN2 plays a role in regulation of proliferation and TGF-{beta}-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation, it appears to be dispensable for Smad-dependent stimulation of collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis in murine embryonic fibroblasts.

  9. Optogenetic Control of PIP3: PIP3 Is Sufficient to Induce the Actin-Based Active Part of Growth Cones and Is Regulated via Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) is highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and plays multiple roles in individual cells. However, the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3 in developing neurons remain unclear because of a lack of techniques for manipulating PIP3 spatiotemporally. We addressed this issue by combining optogenetic control and observation of endogenous PIP3 signaling. Endogenous PIP3 was abundant in actin-rich structures such as growth cones and “waves”, and PIP3-rich plasma membranes moved actively within growth cones. To study the role of PIP3 in developing neurons, we developed a PI3K photoswitch that can induce production of PIP3 at specific locations upon blue light exposure. We succeeded in producing PIP3 locally in mouse hippocampal neurons. Local PIP3 elevation at neurite tips did not induce neurite elongation, but it was sufficient to induce the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Interestingly, ectopic PIP3 elevation alone activated membranes to form actin-based structures whose behavior was similar to that of growth-cone-like “waves”. We also found that endocytosis regulates effective PIP3 concentration at plasma membranes. These results revealed the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3, providing fundamental information about PIP3 signaling in neurons. PMID:23951027

  10. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  11. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  12. Detecting transforming growth factor-β release from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  13. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike; Huber, Steven C; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  14. Amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) affects the actin cytoskeleton and increases pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sheinin, Yuri; Naslavsky, Naava; Pan, Zenggang; Smith, Brittney L.; Peters, Haley L.; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; McKenna, Nicole R.; Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Haridas, Dhanya; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; MacDonald, Richard G.; Meza, Jane L.; Caplan, Steve; Batra, Surinder K.; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) is aberrantly expressed in pancreatic cancer. Here we showed that APLP2 is increased in pancreatic cancer metastases, particularly in metastatic lesions found in the diaphragm and intestine. Examination of matched human primary tumor-liver metastasis pairs showed that 38.1% of the patients had positive APLP2 expression in both the primary tumor and the corresponding liver metastasis. Stable knock-down of APLP2 expression (with inducible shRNA) in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the ability of these cells to migrate and invade. Loss of APLP2 decreased cortical actin and increased intracellular actin filaments in pancreatic cancer cells. Down-regulation of APLP2 decreased the weight and metastasis of orthotopically transplanted pancreatic tumors in nude mice. PMID:25576918

  15. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  16. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  17. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  18. Loss of Tumor Necrosis Factor α Potentiates Transforming Growth Factor β-mediated Pathogenic Tissue Response during Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Shizuya; Ikeda, Kazuo; Yamanaka, Osamu; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Okada, Yuka; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kitano, Ai; Ooshima, Akira; Nakajima, Yuji; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    Animal cornea is an avascular transparent tissue that is suitable for research on wound healing-related scarring and neovascularization. Here we show that loss of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) potentiates the undesirable, pathogenic response of wound healing in an alkali-burned cornea in mice. Excessive invasion of macrophages and subsequent formation of a vascularized scar tissue were much more marked in TNFα-null knockout (KO) mice than in wild-type mice. Such an unfavorable outcome in KO mice was abolished by Smad7 gene introduction, indicating the involvement of transforming growth factor β or activin/Smad signaling. Bone marrow transplantation from wild-type mice normalized healing of the KO mice, suggesting the involvement of bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells in this phenomenon. Co-culture experiments showed that loss of TNFα in macrophages, but not in fibroblasts, augmented the fibroblast activation as determined by detection of α-smooth muscle actin, the hallmark of myofibroblast generation, mRNA expression of collagen Iα2 and connective tissue growth factor, and detection of collagen protein. TNFα in macrophages may be required to suppress undesirable excessive inflammation and scarring, both of which are promoted by transforming growth factor β, and for restoration of tissue architecture in a healing alkali-burned cornea in mice. PMID:16723700

  19. Multiple actin binding domains of Ena/VASP proteins determine actin network stiffening.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Brian S; van der Meulen, Stef; Noguera, Philippe; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Plastino, Julie; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2012-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) is an actin binding protein, important for actin dynamics in motile cells and developing organisms. Though VASP's main activity is the promotion of barbed end growth, it has an F-actin binding site and can form tetramers, and so could additionally play a role in actin crosslinking and bundling in the cell. To test this activity, we performed rheology of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of wild-type VASP or mutants lacking the ability to tetramerize or to bind G-actin and/or F-actin. We show that increasing amounts of wild-type VASP increase network stiffness up to a certain point, beyond which stiffness actually decreases with increasing VASP concentration. The maximum stiffness is 10-fold higher than for pure actin networks. Confocal microscopy shows that VASP forms clustered actin filament bundles, explaining the reduction in network elasticity at high VASP concentration. Removal of the tetramerization site results in significantly reduced bundling and bundle clustering, indicating that VASP's flexible tetrameric structure causes clustering. Removing either the F-actin or the G-actin binding site diminishes VASP's effect on elasticity, but does not eliminate it. Mutating the F-actin and G-actin binding site together, or mutating the F-actin binding site and saturating the G-actin binding site with monomeric actin, eliminates VASP's ability to increase network stiffness. We propose that, in the cell, VASP crosslinking confers only moderate increases in linear network elasticity, and unlike other crosslinkers, VASP's network stiffening activity may be tuned by the local concentration of monomeric actin.

  20. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-. alpha. in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masaki; Wakai, Kae; Shizume, Kazuo ); Iwashita, Mitsutoshi ); Ohmura, Eiji; Kamiya, Yoshinobu; Murakami, Hitomi; Onoda, Noritaka; Tsushima, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{alpha} and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured in human milk by means of homologous radioimmunoassay. As previously reported, EGF concentration in the colostrum was approximately 200 ng/ml and decreased to 50 ng/ml by day 7 postpartum. The value of immunoreactive (IR)-TGF-{alpha} was 2.2-7.2 ng/ml, much lower than that of EGF. In contrast to EGF, the concentration of IR-TGF-{alpha} was fairly stable during the 7 postpartum days. There was no relationship between the concentrations of IR-TGF-{alpha} and IR-EGF, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism in the release of the two growth factors is different. On gel-chromatography using a Sephadex G-50 column, IR-EGF appeared in the fraction corresponding to that of authentic human EGF, while 70%-80% of the IR-TGF-{alpha} was eluted as a species with a molecular weight greater than that of authentic human TGF-{alpha}. Although the physiological role of TGF-{alpha} in milk is not known, it is possible that it is involved in the development of the mammary gland and/or the growth of newborn infants.

  1. Incisional wound healing in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Koch, R M; Roche, N S; Parks, W T; Ashcroft, G S; Letterio, J J; Roberts, A B

    2000-01-01

    Expression of endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is reduced in many animal models of impaired wound healing, and addition of exogenous transforming growth factor-beta has been shown to improve healing. To test the hypothesis that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is essential for normal wound repair, we have studied wound healing in mice in which the transforming growth factor-beta1 gene has been deleted by homologous recombination. No perceptible differences were observed in wounds made in 3-10-day-old neonatal transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice compared to wild-type littermates. To preclude interference from maternally transferred transforming growth factor-beta1, cutaneous wounds were also made on the backs of 30-day-old transforming growth factor-beta1 null and littermate control mice treated with rapamycin, which extends their lifetime and suppresses the inflammatory response characteristic of the transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Again, no impairment in healing was seen in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Instead these wounds showed an overall reduction in the amount of granulation tissue and an increased rate of epithelialization compared to littermate controls. Our data suggest that release of transforming growth factor-beta1 from degranulating platelets or secretion by infiltrating macrophages and fibroblasts is not critical to initiation or progression of tissue repair and that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 may actually function to increase inflammation and retard wound closure.

  2. [Actinic Keratosis].

    PubMed

    Dejaco, D; Hauser, U; Zelger, B; Riechelmann, H

    2015-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is a cutaneous lesion characterized by proliferation of atypical epidermal keratinocytes due to prolonged exposure to exogenous factors such as ultraviolet radiation. AKs are in-situ-squamous cell carcinomas (PEC) of the skin. AK typically presents as erythematous, scaly patch or papule (classic AK), occasionally as thick, adherent scale on an erythematous base. Mostly fair-skinned adults are affected. AKs typically occur in areas of frequent sun exposure (balding scalp, face, "H-region", lateral neck, décolleté, dorsum of the hand and lower extremities). Actinic Cheilitis is the term used for AKs appearing on the lips. The diagnosis of AK is based on clinical examination including inspection and palpation. The typical palpable rough surface of AK often precedes a visible lesion. Dermoscopy may provide additional information. If diagnosis is uncertain and invasion suspected, biopsy and histopathologic evaluation should be performed. The potential for progression to invasive PECs mandates therapeutic intervention. Treatment options include topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies are classified into physical, medical and combined physical-chemical approaches and a sequential combination of treatment modalities is possible. Topical-physical cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for isolated, non-hypertrophic AK. Topical-medical treatment, e. g. 5-fluoruracil (5FU) cream or Imiquomod or Ingenolmebutat application is used for multiple, non-hypertrophic AKs. For hypertrophic AKs, a dehorning pretreatment with salicinated vaseline is recommended. Isolated hypertrophic AKs often need cryotherapy with prolonged freezing time or several consecutive applications. Sequentially combined approaches are recommended for multiple, hypertrophic AKs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as example for a combined physical-chemical approach is an established treatment for multiple, non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic AKs. Prevention includes avoidance of sun and

  3. Change in the actin-myosin subfragment 1 interaction during actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chaussepied, P; Kasprzak, A A

    1989-12-01

    To better characterize the conformational differences of G- and F-actin, we have compared the interaction between G- and F-actin with myosin subfragment 1 (S1) which had part of its F-actin binding site (residues 633-642) blocked by a complementary peptide or "antipeptide" (Chaussepied, P., and Morales, M. F. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 7471-7475). Light scattering, sedimentation, and electron microscopy measurements showed that, with the antipeptide covalently attached to the S1 heavy chain, S1 was not capable of inducing G-actin polymerization in the absence of salt. Moreover, the antipeptide-carrying S1 did not change the fluorescence polarization of 5-[2-(iodoacetyl)-aminoethyl]aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS)-labeled G-actin or of 1,5-IAEDANS-labeled actin dimer, compared to the control S1. This result, interpreted as a lack of interaction between G-actin and antipeptide-carrying S1, was confirmed further by the following experiments: in the presence of G-actin, antipeptide.S1 heavy chain was not protected against trypsin and papain proteolysis, and G-actin could not be cross-linked to antipeptide.S1 by 1-ethyl-3[-3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide. In contrast, similar experiments showed that antipeptide.S1 was able to interact with nascent F-actin and with F-actin. Thus, blocking the stretch 633-642 of S1 heavy chain by the antipeptide strongly inhibits G-actin-S1 interaction but only slightly alters F-actin-S1 contact. We, therefore postulate that this stretch of skeletal S1 heavy chain is essential for G-actin-S1 interaction and that the G-F transformation generates new S1 binding site(s) on the actin molecule.

  4. Transforming Growth Factor Beta and Excess Burden of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    August, Phyllis; Sharma, Vijay; Ding, Ruchuang; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is more frequent in African Americans (blacks) compared to whites. Because renal fibrosis is a correlate of progressive renal failure and a dominant feature of ESRD, and because transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) can induce fibrosis and renal insufficiency, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 hyperexpression is more frequent in blacks compared to whites. We measured circulating levels of TGF-β1 in black and white patients with ESRD, hypertension, and in normal patients. We demonstrated that circulating levels of TGF-β1 are higher in black ESRD patients, hypertensive patients, and normal control patients compared to their white counterparts. Our preliminary genetic analyses suggest that TGF-β1 DNA polymorphisms are different in blacks and whites. Our observations of hyperexpression of TGF-β1 in blacks suggest a mechanism for the increased prevalence of renal failure and hypertensive target organ damage in this population. PMID:19768163

  5. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  6. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  7. Effects of transforming growth factor type beta on expression of cytoskeletal proteins in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lomri, A.; Marie, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many cell types in vitro. We have examined the effects of TGF beta on cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization in relation to parameters of cell proliferation and differentiation in endosteal osteoblastic cells isolated from mouse caudal vertebrae. Treatment of mouse osteoblastic cells cultured in serum free medium for 24 hours with TGF beta (1.5-30 ng/mL) slightly (-23%) inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. In parallel, TGF beta (0.5-30 ng/mL, 24 hours) greatly increased cell replication as evaluated by (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA (157% to 325% of controls). At a median dose (1.5 ng/mL) that affected both alkaline phosphatase and DNA synthesis (235% of controls) TGF beta induced rapid (six hours) cell respreading of quiescent mouse osteoblastic cells. This effect was associated with increased polymerization of actin, alpha actinin, and tubulins, as evaluated by both biochemical and immunofluorescence methods. In addition, TGF beta (1.5 ng/mL) increased the de novo biosynthesis of actin, alpha actinin, vimentin, and tubulins, as determined by {sup 35}S methionine labeling and fractionation of cytoskeletal proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These effects were rapid and transient, as they occurred at six hours and were reversed after 24 hours of TGF beta exposure. The results indicate that the stimulatory effect of TGF beta on DNA synthesis in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells is associated with a transient increase in cell spreading associated with enhanced polymerization and synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins.

  8. Zoledronic acid suppresses transforming growth factor-β-induced fibrogenesis by human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, YUKO; IBI, MIHO; CHOSA, NAOYUKI; KYAKUMOTO, SEIKO; KAMO, MASAHARU; SHIBATA, TOSHIYUKI; SUGIYAMA, YOSHIKI; ISHISAKI, AKIRA

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are analogues of pyro-phosphate that are known to prevent bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activity. Nitrogen-containing BPs, such as zoledronic acid (ZA), are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastasis. However, despite having benefits, ZA has been reported to induce BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in cancer patients. The molecular pathological mechanisms responsible for the development of BRONJ, including necrotic bone exposure after tooth extraction, remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of ZA on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced myofibroblast (MF) differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) and the migratory activity of hGFs, which are important for wound closure by fibrous tissue formation. The ZA maximum concentration in serum (Cmax) was found to be approximately 1.47 µM, which clinically, is found after the intravenous administration of 4 mg ZA, and ZA at this dose is considered appropriate for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis or bone diseases, such as Erdheim-Chester disease. At Cmax, ZA significantly suppressed i) the TGF-β-induced promotion of cell viability, ii) the TGF-β-induced expression of MF markers such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen, iii) the TGF-β-induced migratory activity of hGFs and iv) the expression level of TGF-β type I receptor on the surfaces of hGFs, as well as the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Thus, ZA suppresses TGF-β-induced fibrous tissue formation by hGFs, possibly through the inhibition of Smad-dependent signal transduction. Our findings partly elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying BRONJ and may prove to be beneficial to the identification of drug targets for the treatment of this symptom at the molecular level. PMID:27176567

  9. Transcriptional modulation of transin gene expression by epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor beta

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, C.M.; Muldoon, L.L.; Rodland, K.D.; Magun, B.E.

    1988-06-01

    Transin is a transformation-associated gene which is expressed constitutively in rat fibroblasts transformed by a variety of oncogenes and in malignant mouse skin carcinomas but not benign papillomas or normal skin. It has been demonstrated that, in nontransformed Rat-1 cells, transin RNA expression is modulated positively by epidermal growth factor (EGF) and negatively by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-BETA); other peptide growth factors were found to have no effect on transin expression. Results presented here indicate that both protein synthesis and continuous occupancy of the EGF receptor by EGF were required for sustained induction of transin RNA. Treatment with TGF-BETA inhibited the ability of EGF to induce transin, whether assayed at the transcriptional level by nuclear run-on analysis or at the level of transin RNA accumulation by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of cellular RNA. TGF-BETA both blocked initial production of transin transcription by EGF and halted established production of transin transcripts during prolonged treatment. These results suggest that TGF-BETA acts at the transcriptional level to antagonize EGF-mediated induction of transin gene expression.

  10. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation. PMID:26708004

  11. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation.

  12. New Aspects of Progesterone Interactions with the Actin Cytoskeleton and Neurosteroidogenesis in the Cerebellum and the Neuronal Growth Cone

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Lisa; Olbrich, Laura; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The impact of progesterone on neuronal tissues in the central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system is of significant scientific and therapeutic interest. Glial and neuronal cells of vertebrates express steroidogenic enzymes, and are able to synthesize progesterone de novo from cholesterol. Progesterone is described to have neuroprotective, neuroreparative, anti-degenerative, and anti-apoptotic effects in the CNS and the PNS. Thus, the first clinical studies promise new therapeutic options using progesterone in the treatment of patients with traumatic brain injury. Additionally, experimental data from different animal models suggest further positive effects of progesterone on neurological diseases such as cerebral ischemia, peripheral nerve injury and amyothropic lateral sclerosis. In regard to this future clinical use of progesterone, we discuss in this review the underlying physiological principles of progesterone effects in neuronal tissues. Mechanisms leading to morphological reorganizations of neurons in the CNS and PNS affected by progesterone are addressed, with special focus on the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, new aspects of a progesterone-dependent regulation of neurosteroidogenesis mediated by the recently described progesterone binding protein PGRMC1 in the nervous system are discussed. PMID:25141866

  13. The actin cytoskeleton as a sensor and mediator of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Melissa; Gunning, Peter W.; Stehn, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important biological process required for the removal of unwanted or damaged cells. Mounting evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton as both a sensor and mediator of apoptosis. Studies also suggest that actin binding proteins (ABPs) significantly contribute to apoptosis and that actin dynamics play a key role in regulating apoptosis signaling. Changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton has been attributed to the process of malignant transformation and it is hypothesized that remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton may enable tumor cells to evade normal apoptotic signaling. This review aims to illuminate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in apoptosis by systematically analyzing how actin and ABPs regulate different apoptosis pathways and to also highlight the potential for developing novel compounds that target tumor-specific actin filaments. PMID:22880146

  14. Transforming Growth Factor-β and the Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Maozhen; Neil, Jason R.; Schiemann, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is in many respects a process of dysregulated cellular evolution that drives malignant cells to acquire six phenotypic hallmarks of cancer, including their ability to proliferate and replicate autonomously, to resist cytostatic and apoptotic signals, and to induce tissue invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine that functions as a formidable barrier to the development of cancer hallmarks in normal cells and tissues. Paradoxically, tumorigenesis counteracts the tumor suppressing activities of TGF-β, thus enabling TGF-β to stimulate cancer invasion and metastasis. Fundamental gaps exist in our knowledge of how malignant cells overcome the cytostatic actions of TGF-β, and of how TGF-β stimulates the acquisition of cancer hallmarks by developing and progressing human cancers. Here we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the ability of TGF-β to mediate tumor suppression in normal cells, and conversely, to facilitate cancer progression and disease dissemination in malignant cells. PMID:20940046

  15. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Vincze, Csilla; Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed. PMID:22942700

  16. Arabidopsis VILLIN2 and VILLIN3 are required for the generation of thick actin filament bundles and for directional organ growth.

    PubMed

    van der Honing, Hannie S; Kieft, Henk; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2012-03-01

    In plant cells, actin filament bundles serve as tracks for myosin-dependent organelle movement and play a role in the organization of the cytoplasm. Although virtually all plant cells contain actin filament bundles, the role of the different actin-bundling proteins remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the actin-bundling protein villin in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We used Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion lines to generate a double mutant in which VILLIN2 (VLN2) and VLN3 transcripts are truncated. Leaves, stems, siliques, and roots of vln2 vln3 double mutant plants are twisted, which is caused by local differences in cell length. Microscopy analysis of the actin cytoskeleton showed that in these double mutant plants, thin actin filament bundles are more abundant while thick actin filament bundles are virtually absent. In contrast to full-length VLN3, truncated VLN3 lacking the headpiece region does not rescue the phenotype of the vln2 vln3 double mutant. Our results show that villin is involved in the generation of thick actin filament bundles in several cell types and suggest that these bundles are involved in the regulation of coordinated cell expansion.

  17. Transforming growth factor-betas and vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Alex

    2006-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily members, TGF-beta and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), are potent regulatory cytokines with diverse functions on vascular cells. They signal through heteromeric type I and II receptor complexes activating Smad-dependent and Smad-independent signals, which regulate proliferation, differentiation, and survival. They are potent regulators of vascular development and vessel remodeling and play key roles in atherosclerosis and restenosis, regulating endothelial, smooth muscle cell, macrophage, T cell, and probably vascular calcifying cell responses. In atherosclerosis, TGF-beta regulates lesion phenotype by controlling T-cell responses and stimulating smooth muscle cells to produce collagen. It contributes to restenosis by augmenting neointimal cell proliferation and collagen accumulation. Defective TGF-beta signaling in endothelial cells attributable to mutations in endoglin or the type I receptor ALK-1 leads to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, whereas defective BMP signaling attributable to mutations in the BMP receptor II has been associated with development of primary pulmonary hypertension. The development of mouse models with either cell type-specific or general inactivation of TGF-beta/BMP signaling has started to reveal the importance of the regulatory network of TGF-beta/BMP pathways in vivo and their significance for atherosclerosis, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and primary pulmonary hypertension. This review highlights recent findings that have advanced our understanding of the roles of TGF-beta superfamily members in regulating vascular cell responses and provides likely avenues for future research that may lead to novel pharmacological therapies for the treatment or prevention of vascular disorders. PMID:16675726

  18. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  19. Modulation of growth and differentiation in normal human keratinocytes by transforming growth factor-beta

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Hashiro, M.; Yoshimasa, H.; Yoshikawa, K. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of transforming growth factor-type beta 1(TGF-beta) on the growth and differentiation of normal human skin keratinocytes cultured in serum-free medium was investigated. TGF-beta markedly inhibited the growth of keratinocytes at the concentrations greater than 2 ng/ml under low Ca2+ conditions (0.1 mM). Growth inhibition was accompanied by changes in cell functions related to proliferation. Remarkable inhibition of DNA synthesis was demonstrated by the decrease of (3H)thymidine incorporation. The decrease of (3H)thymidine incorporation was observed as early as 3 hr after addition of TGF-beta. TGF-beta also decreased c-myc messenger RNA (mRNA) expression 30 min after addition of TGF-beta. This rapid reduction of c-myc mRNA expression by TGF-beta treatment is possibly one of the main factors in the process of TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition of human keratinocytes. Since growth inhibition and induction of differentiation are closely related in human keratinocytes, the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-beta under high Ca2+ conditions was examined. TGF-beta inhibited the growth of keratinocytes under high Ca2+ conditions in the same manner as under low Ca2+ conditions, suggesting that it is a strong growth inhibitor in both low and high Ca2+ environments. The induction of keratinocyte differentiation was evaluated by measuring involucrin expression and cornified envelope formation: TGF-beta at 20 ng/ml increased involucrin expression from 9.3% to 18.8% under high Ca2+ conditions, while it decreased involucrin expression from 7.0% to 3.3% under low Ca2+ conditions. Cornified envelope formation was modulated in a similar way by addition of TGF-beta: TGF-beta at 20 ng/ml decreased cornified envelope formation by 53% under low Ca2+ conditions, while it enhanced cornified envelope formation by 30.7% under high Ca2+ conditions.

  20. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  1. The effect of pasteurization on transforming growth factor alpha and transforming growth factor beta 2 concentrations in human milk.

    PubMed

    McPherson, R J; Wagner, C L

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and beta 2 (TGF-beta2) are present in human milk and are involved in growth differentiation and repair of neonatal intestinal epithelia. Heat treatment at 56 degrees C has been shown effective for providing safe banked donor milk, with good retention of other biologically active factors. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of heat sterilization on TGF-alpha and TGF-beta2 concentrations in human milk. Twenty milk samples were collected from 20 lactating mothers in polypropylene containers and frozen at -20 degrees C for transport or storage. Before heat treatment by holder pasteurization, the frozen milk was thawed and divided into 1-mL aliquots. All samples were heated in an accurately regulated water bath until a holding temperature was achieved, then held for 30 minutes using constant agitation. Holding temperature ranged from 56.5 degrees C to 56.9 degrees C. The milk was then stored at 4 degrees C overnight for analysis the following day. The concentration of TGF-alpha was measured by radioimmunoassay. Mean concentration +/- SD of TGF-alpha in raw milk samples was 119+/-50 pg/mL, range 57 to 234. The mean concentration +/- SD of TGF-alpha in heat treated samples was 113+/-50 pg/mL, range 51 to 227. TGF-alpha concentration was minimally affected by pasteurization, with an overall loss of 6.1%. Of 19 samples, 4 had increased and 15 had decreased concentrations after pasteurization (mean percent SEM: 94%+/-7% of raw milk, range 72%+/-107%). The concentration of acid-activated TGF-beta2 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mean concentration +/- SD of TGF-beta2 in raw milk samples was 5624+/-5038 pg/mL, range 195 to 15480. The mean concentration +/- SD of TGF-beta2 in heat-treated samples was 5073+/-4646 pg/mL, range 181 to 15140. TGF-beta2 survived with relatively little loss (0.6%): of 18 samples, 11 had increased and 7 had decreased concentrations after pasteurization (mean percent

  2. Transforming growth factor-1 promotes the transcriptional activation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Yin, Wan-Le; Ba, Yu-Feng; Tian, Lin; Gu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ming-Sheng; Zhong, Chu-Nan

    2012-11-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a pivotal role in promoting the growth, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. However, to date little is known about the oncogenic mechanisms of CAFs. This study aimed to identify the microenvironmental factors involved in tumor development and progression directed by CAFs in liver metastases. Tissue samples collected from 20 patients with colorectal liver metastases were used in this study. Histological and morphological characterization of the samples was performed using hybridization and immunohistological assays. The mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was measured by northern blotting. The expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As a result, co-expression of Thy-1 (CD90) and α-SMA was identified in CAFs, while normal liver samples were negative for α-SMA and Thy-1. Compared with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) incubation, the expression of α-SMA increased significantly following transforming growth factor-1 (TGF-1) incubation (P<0.05), while platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) caused a significant suppression of α-SMA expression (P<0.05). PAI-1 expression was significantly lower in unstimulated fibroblasts compared to TGF-1-treated fibroblasts (P<0.01). The levels of PAI-1 transcription were significantly higher in CAFs from the patient samples compared with the healthy controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAFs may be important in migration, matrix degradation, invasion and angiogenesis of tumors, and TGF-1 may promote the activation of PAI-1 transcription in CAFs.

  3. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro-tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element.

  4. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro­tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element. PMID:27307590

  5. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads. PMID:9175265

  6. Actin3 promoter reveals undulating F-actin bundles at shanks and dynamic F-actin meshworks at tips of tip-growing pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Jásik, Ján; Mičieta, Karol; Siao, Wei; Voigt, Boris; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Schmelzer, Elmon; Turňa, Ján; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton of pollen tubes is both the driver of the tip growth and the organizer of cell polarity. In order to understand this fast re-arranging cytoskeletal system, we need reliable constructs expressed under relevant promoters. Here we are reporting that the Lifeact reporter, expressed under the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter, visualizes very dynamic F-actin elements both in germinating pollen grains and tip-growing pollen tubes. Importantly, we have documented very active actin polymerization at the cell periphery, especially in the bulging area during pollen germination and in the apical clear zone. Expression of the Lifeact reporter under control of the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter revealed 2 new aspects: (i) long F-actin bundles in pollen tube shanks are dynamic, showing undulating movements, (ii) subapical 'actin collars' or 'fringes' are absent.

  7. Actin3 promoter reveals undulating F-actin bundles at shanks and dynamic F-actin meshworks at tips of tip-growing pollen tubes

    PubMed Central

    Jásik, Ján; Mičieta, Karol; Siao, Wei; Voigt, Boris; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Schmelzer, Elmon; Turňa, Ján; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dynamic actin cytoskeleton of pollen tubes is both the driver of the tip growth and the organizer of cell polarity. In order to understand this fast re-arranging cytoskeletal system, we need reliable constructs expressed under relevant promoters. Here we are reporting that the Lifeact reporter, expressed under the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter, visualizes very dynamic F-actin elements both in germinating pollen grains and tip-growing pollen tubes. Importantly, we have documented very active actin polymerization at the cell periphery, especially in the bulging area during pollen germination and in the apical clear zone. Expression of the Lifeact reporter under control of the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter revealed 2 new aspects: (i) long F-actin bundles in pollen tube shanks are dynamic, showing undulating movements, (ii) subapical ‘actin collars’ or ‘fringes’ are absent. PMID:26980067

  8. Regulation of intestinal epithelial cell growth by transforming growth factor type. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Beauchamp, R.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Moses, H.L. )

    1989-03-01

    A nontransformed rat jejunal crypt cell line (IEC-6) expresses transforming growth factor type {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) mRNA, secretes latent {sup 125}I-labeled TGF-{beta}1 to specific, high-affinity cell surface receptors. IEC-6 cell growth is markedly inhibited by TGF-{beta}1 and TGF-{beta}2 with half-maximal inhibition occurring between 0.1 and 1.0 ng of TGF-{beta}1 per ml. TGF-{beta}1-mediated growth inhibition is not associated with the appearance of biochemical markers of enterocyte differentiation such as alkaline phosphatase expression and sucrase activity. TGF-{beta}1 increases steady-state levels of its own mRNA expression within 8 hr of treatment of rapidly growing IEC-6 cells. In freshly isolated rat jejunal enterocytes that are sequentially eluted from the crypt villus axis, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression is most abundant in terminally differentiated villus tip cells and least abundant in the less differentiated, mitotically active crypt cells. The authors conclude that TGF-{beta}1 is an autoregulated growth inhibitor in IEC-6 cells that potentially functions in an autocrine manner. In the rat jejunal epithelium, TGF-{beta}1 expression is most prominently localized to the villus tip--i.e., the region of the crypt villus unit that is characterized by the terminally differentiated phenotype. These data suggest that TGF-{beta}1 may function in coordination of the rapid cell turnover typical for the intestinal epithelium.

  9. A dynamic formin-dependent deep F-actin network in axons

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Archan; Tang, Yong; Wang, Lina; Ladt, Kelsey; Loi, Jonathan; Dargent, Bénédicte; Leterrier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although actin at neuronal growth cones is well-studied, much less is known about actin organization and dynamics along axon shafts and presynaptic boutons. Using probes that selectively label filamentous-actin (F-actin), we found focal “actin hotspots” along axons—spaced ∼3–4 µm apart—where actin undergoes continuous assembly/disassembly. These foci are a nidus for vigorous actin polymerization, generating long filaments spurting bidirectionally along axons—a phenomenon we call “actin trails.” Super-resolution microscopy reveals intra-axonal deep actin filaments in addition to the subplasmalemmal “actin rings” described recently. F-actin hotspots colocalize with stationary axonal endosomes, and blocking vesicle transport diminishes the actin trails, suggesting mechanistic links between vesicles and F-actin kinetics. Actin trails are formin—but not Arp2/3—dependent and help enrich actin at presynaptic boutons. Finally, formin inhibition dramatically disrupts synaptic recycling. Collectively, available data suggest a two-tier F-actin organization in axons, with stable “actin rings” providing mechanical support to the plasma membrane and dynamic "actin trails" generating a flexible cytoskeletal network with putative physiological roles. PMID:26216902

  10. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE:
    TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  11. Transforming growth factor. beta. sub 1 is present at sites of extracellular matrix gene expression in human pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Broekelmann, T.J.; Limper, A.H.; McDonald, J.A. ); Colby, T.V. )

    1991-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is an inexorably fatal disorder characterized by connective tissue deposition within the terminal air spaces resulting in loss of lung function and eventual respiratory failure. Previously, the authors demonstrated that foci of activated fibroblasts expressing high levels of fibronectin, procollagen, and smooth muscle actin and thus resembling those found in healing wounds are responsible for the connective tissue deposition and scarring in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, they now demonstrate the presence of transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}), a potent profibrotic cytokine, in the foci containing these activated fibroblasts. These results suggest that matrix-associated TGF-{beta}{sub 1} may serve as a stimulus for the persistent expression of connective tissue genes. One potential source of the TGF-{beta}{sub 1} is the alveolar macrophage, and they demonstrate the expression of abundant TGF-{beta}{sub 1} mRNA in alveolar macrophages in lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  12. Overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta1 in fetal monkey lung results in prenatal pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, A F; Chen, H; Shi, T T; Lu, C-H; Fang, A B; Buckley, S; Kolb, M; Gauldie, J; Warburton, D; Shi, W

    2010-10-01

    Altered transforming growth factor (TGF)-β expression levels have been linked to a variety of human respiratory diseases, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary fibrosis. However, a causative role for aberrant TGF-β in neonatal lung diseases has not been defined in primates. Exogenous and transient TGF-β1 overexpression in fetal monkey lung was achieved by transabdominal ultrasound-guided fetal intrapulmonary injection of adenoviral vector expressing TGF-β1 at the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The lungs were then harvested near term, and fixed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Lung hypoplasia was observed where TGF-β1 was overexpressed during the second trimester. The most clearly marked phenotype consisted of severe pulmonary and pleural fibrosis, which was independent of the gestational time point when TGF-β1 was overexpressed. Increased cell proliferation, particularly in α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts, was detected within the fibrotic foci. But epithelium to mesenchyme transdifferentiation was not detected. Massive collagen fibres were deposited on the inner and outer sides of the pleural membrane, with an intact elastin layer in the middle. This induced fibrotic pathology persisted even after adenoviral-mediated TGF-β1 overexpression was no longer evident. Therefore, overexpression of TGF-β1 within developing fetal monkey lung results in severe and progressive fibrosis in lung parenchyma and pleural membrane, in addition to pulmonary hypoplasia.

  13. Constitutive activation of transforming growth factor Beta receptor 1 in the mouse uterus impairs uterine morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function.

  14. Constitutive Activation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor 1 in the Mouse Uterus Impairs Uterine Morphology and Function1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bayless, Kayla J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. PMID:25505200

  15. Histone deacetylase 3 unconventional splicing mediates endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition through transforming growth factor β2.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingfang; Wang, Gang; Ummarino, Dario; Margariti, Andriana; Xu, Qihe; Xiao, Qingzhong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Zhongyi; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Cockerill, Gillian; Li, Julie Yi-shuan; Chien, Shu; Hu, Yanhua; Xu, Qingbo

    2013-11-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) plays a critical role in the maintenance of endothelial integrity and other physiological processes. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAC3 undergoes unconventional splicing during stem cell differentiation. Four different splicing variants have been identified, designated as HD3α, -β, -γ, and -δ, respectively. HD3α was confirmed in stem cell differentiation by specific antibody against the sequences from intron 12. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that the HD3α isoform co-localized with CD31-positive or α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells at different developmental stages of mouse embryos. Overexpression of HD3α reprogrammed human aortic endothelial cells into mesenchymal cells featuring an endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) phenotype. HD3α directly interacts with HDAC3 and Akt1 and selectively activates transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2) secretion and cleavage. TGFβ2 functioned as an autocrine and/or paracrine EndMT factor. The HD3α-induced EndMT was both PI3K/Akt- and TGFβ2-dependent. This study provides the first evidence of the role of HDAC3 splicing in the maintenance of endothelial integrity.

  16. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  17. Exploring the Stability Limits of Actin and Its Suprastructures

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher; Erlkamp, Mirko; Ecken, Julian von der; Raunser, Stefan; Winter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Actin is the main component of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells and can be found in distinct morphological states. Global (G)-actin is able to assemble into highly organized, supramolecular cellular structures known as filamentous (F)-actin and bundled (B)-actin. To evaluate the structure and stability of G-, F-, and B-actin over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, laser confocal scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our analysis was designed to provide new (to our knowledge) insights into the stabilizing forces of actin self-assembly and to reveal the stability of the actin polymorphs, including in conditions encountered in extreme environments. In addition, we sought to explain the limited pressure stability of actin self-assembly observed in vivo. G-actin is not only the least temperature-stable but also the least pressure-stable actin species. Under abyssal conditions, where temperatures as low as 1–4°C and pressures up to 1 kbar are reached, G-actin is hardly stable. However, the supramolecular assemblies of actin are stable enough to withstand the extreme conditions usually encountered on Earth. Beyond ∼3–4 kbar, filamentous structures disassemble, and beyond ∼4 kbar, complete dissociation of F-actin structures is observed. Between ∼1 and 2 kbar, some disordering of actin assemblies commences, in agreement with in vivo observations. The limited pressure stability of the monomeric building block seems to be responsible for the suppression of actin assembly in the kbar pressure range. PMID:25517163

  18. Dynamic Localization of G-actin During Membrane Protrusion in Neuronal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Wai; Vitriol, Eric A.; Shim, Sangwoo; Wise, Ariel L.; Velayutham, Radhi P.; Zheng, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Actin-based cell motility is fundamental for the development, function, and malignant events of eukaryotic organisms. During neural development, axonal growth cones depend on rapid assembly and disassembly of actin filaments (F-actin) for their guided extension to specific targets for wiring. Monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is the building block for F-actin but is not considered to play a direct role in spatiotemporal control of actin dynamics in cell motility. Results Here we report that a pool of G-actin dynamically localizes to the leading edge of growth cones and neuroblastoma cells to spatially elevate the G-/F-actin ratio that drives membrane protrusion and cell movement. Loss of G-actin localization leads to the cessation and retraction of membrane protrusions. Moreover, G-actin localization occurs asymmetrically in growth cones during attractive turning. Finally, we identify the actin monomer binding proteins profilin and thymosin β4 as key molecules that localize actin monomers to the leading edge of lamellipodia for their motility. Conclusions Our results suggest that dynamic localization of G-actin provides a novel mechanism to regulate the spatiotemporal actin dynamics underlying membrane protrusion in cell locomotion and growth cone chemotaxis. PMID:23746641

  19. Actin in Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kari L.; Baines, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Actin is important for a variety of cellular processes, including uptake of extracellular material and intracellular transport. Several emerging lines of evidence indicate that herpesviruses exploit actin and actin-associated myosin motors for viral entry, intranuclear transport of capsids, and virion egress. The goal of this review is to explore these processes and to highlight potential future directions for this area of research. PMID:21994736

  20. Overexpression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces pulmonary granulation tissue formation and fibrosis by induction of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and myofibroblast accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Z.; Tremblay, G. M.; Sime, P. J.; Gauldie, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that transfer to rat lung of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene leads to high expression of GM-CSF between days 1 and 4 and granulation tissue formation followed by an irreversible fibrotic response starting from day 12 onward. In the current study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found that GM-CSF overexpression did not enhance production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in a significant manner at any time after GM-CSF gene transfer. However, the content of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was markedly induced at day 4 and appeared to be maximal around day 7 and remained high at day 12. Macrophages purified from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 7 days after GM-CSF gene transfer spontaneously released significant quantities of transforming growth factor-beta 1 protein in vitro. After peak transforming growth factor-beta 1 production was the emergence of alpha-smooth muscle actin-rich myofibroblasts. Accumulation of these cells was most prominent at day 12 within the granulation tissues and they were still present in fibrotic areas between days 12 and 24 and diminished markedly afterward. Thus, we provide the first in vivo evidence that tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be dissociated from participation in a fibrotic process in the lung and GM-CSF may play a more direct role in pulmonary fibrogenesis at least in part through its capability to induce transforming growth factor-beta 1 in macrophages and the subsequent emergence of myofibroblast phenotypes. This GM-CSF transgene lung model is useful for a stepwise dissection of both cellular and molecular events involved in pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9006322

  1. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  2. Role of polypeptide growth factors in phenotypic transformation of normal rat kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    van Zoelen, E.J.J.; van Oostwaard, T.M.J.; de Laat, S.W.

    1988-01-05

    A serum-free assay has been established for studying the role of polypeptide growth factors in inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. The process has been characterized by measuring the time course of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into confluent, quiescent NRK cultures stimulated by defined polypeptide growth factors, in combination with cell counting studies, increases in DNA content, and cell cycle analysis by means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. It is shown that none of the growth factors tested is able to induce loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth by itself, but strong synergism was observed when combinations of growth factors were tested. None of the above factors was found to be essential, however, since any combination of three of the above four growth factors strongly induced the process. Strong parallels were observed between the growth factor requirements for inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth under serum-free conditions and the requirements for induction of anchorage-independent proliferation under growth factor-defined assay conditions. This indicates that most likely the same cellular processes underlie these two aspects of phenotypic transformation, although data indicate that anchorage-independent proliferation may be a more restricted property of phenotypic transformation than loss of density dependence of proliferation. It is concluded that phenotypic transformation of NRK cells does not require specific polypeptide growth factors, but reflects the ability of these cells to respond to multiple growth factors.

  3. Levels of transforming growth factor beta and transforming growth factor beta receptors in rat liver during growth, regression by apoptosis and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Grasl-Kraupp, B; Rossmanith, W; Ruttkay-Nedecky, B; Müllauer, L; Kammerer, B; Bursch, W; Schulte-Hermann, R

    1998-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) has been implicated as inhibitor of cell proliferation and a potent inducer of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo after the administration of high doses. To assess the role of endogenous TGF-beta1, we quantitated the cytokine and its receptors in rat liver during regenerative and hyperplastic growth, regression by apoptosis, and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This was accomplished by Northern blot analysis and by RNase protection assay of the messenger RNA (mRNA) of TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta receptors (TbetaR) types I to III and by an activity bioassay of the TGF-beta proteins. Untreated rat livers were found to contain 15.6 +/- 4.8 ng TGF-beta1 protein/g tissue; TGF-beta2 protein was not detected. To induce toxic cell death and subsequent regenerative DNA synthesis in the liver, rats were treated with a necrogenic dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). After 24 and 48 hours, there was an upregulation of TGF-beta1 (mRNA, up to tenfold; protein, about twofold) and of TbetaRs (mRNA: two- to fourfold); that indicates an overall enhanced production of and sensitivity to TGF-beta1, which may serve to confine the regenerative response. Hyperplastic liver growth and regression of the hyperplasia were induced by treatment with cyproterone acetate (CPA) or nafenopin (NAF) followed by withdrawal; neither mRNAs of TGF-beta1 and TbetaR types I to III nor TGF-beta1 protein exhibited significant changes during the growth phase or during regression by apoptosis. We also studied neoplastic growth. HCC, obtained after long-term treatment with NAF, exhibited high rates of cell replication and apoptosis. The majority of lesions contained mRNA and protein of TGF-beta1 and mRNA of TbetaR types I to III at concentrations similar to those of the surrounding tissue. In conclusion, during liver regeneration there is a pronounced upregulation of expression of both TGF-beta1 and TbetaRs I to III, but not during mitogen-induced liver growth or

  4. Effects of transforming growth factor β2 and connective tissue growth factor on induction of epithelial mesenchymal transition and extracellular matrix synthesis in human lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Cheng; Ma, Bo; Kang, Qian-Yan; Qin, Li; Cui, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) on transdifferentiation of human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) cultured in vitro and synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). METHODS HLECs were treated with TGF-β2 (0, 0.5, 1.0, 5, 10µg/L) and CTGF (0, 15, 30, 60, 100µg/L) for different times (0, 24, 48, 72h) in vitro and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), the main component of the extracellular matrix type I collagen (Col-1) and fibronectin (Fn) were measured by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western-blot. RESULTS TGF-β2 and CTGF significantly increased expression of α-SMA mRNA and protein (P<0.05, P<0.001), Fn mRNA and protein (P<0.001), Col-1 mRNA and protein (P<0.001). TGF-β2 could induce HLECs expression of CTGF mRNA and protein in dose-dependent manner (P<0.05, P<0.001). TGF-β2 and CTGF could induce HLECs to express α-SMA, Fn and Col-1 in time-dependent manner. Each time of TGF-β2 and CTGF induced HELCs expression of α-SMA, Fn, Col-1 mRNA and protein was significant increase compared with control (P<0.05, P<0.001). CONCLUSION TGF-β2 and CTGF could induce HLECs epithelial mesenchymal transition and ECM synthesis. PMID:24392320

  5. Loss of responsiveness to transforming growth factor beta induces malignant transformation of nontumorigenic rat prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, B; de Castro, K; Barnes, H E; Parks, W T; Stewart, L; Böttinger, E P; Danielpour, D; Wakefield, L M

    1999-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-betas are multifunctional growth factors, the properties of which include the potent inhibition of epithelial cell growth. Expression patterns of TGF-betas and TGF-beta receptors in the normal prostate indicate that these growth regulators play key roles in prostatic development and proliferative homeostasis. Importantly, TGF-beta receptor levels are frequently diminished in malignant human prostate tissue. To test the hypothesis that loss of TGF-beta responsiveness is causally involved in the tumorigenic process, we have used retroviral transduction to introduce a dominant-negative mutant type II TGF-beta receptor (DNR) into the premalignant rat prostatic epithelial cell line, NRP-152. High-level expression of the DNR abolished the ability of TGF-beta to inhibit cell growth, to promote cell differentiation, and to induce apoptosis, and it partially blocked the induction of extracellular matrix gene expression. When injected into nude mice, NRP-152-DNR cells formed carcinomas at 13 of 34 sites, compared with 0 of 30 sites for parental and control cells (P = 0.0001). We conclude that the type II TGF-beta receptor is an important tumor suppressor in the prostate, and furthermore, that loss of TGF-beta responsiveness can contribute early in the tumorigenic process by causing the malignant transformation of preneoplastic cells.

  6. Myofibroblast accumulation induced by transforming growth factor-beta is involved in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q P; Escudier, E; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Abd-Al Samad, I; Peynegre, R; Coste, A

    1997-07-01

    Myofibroblasts that express alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) are detected in many chronic inflammatory diseases. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a potent inducer of myofibroblast accumulation in tissues. In this study, scattered myofibroblasts and TGF-beta were quantified and localized in nasal polyps (NPs) and normal nasal mucosa (NM). NPs were sampled in 16 patients during ethmoidectomy and NM was obtained from 10 control subjects during rhinoplasty. alpha-SMA and TGF-beta were detected using immunohistochemistry and the numbers of labeled cells were quantified (alpha-SMA and TGF-beta indices) and compared between NPs and NM. In eight NPs, in which the pedicle was preserved, alpha-SMA and TGF-beta were evaluated and compared in the pedicle, central, and tip areas. Finally, TGF-beta expression was compared between low (zone 1), moderate (zone 2), and high (zone 3) zones of alpha-SMA positivity. alpha-SMA and TGF-beta indices were significantly higher in NPs than in NM. In the eight selected NPs, alpha-SMA-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the pedicle than in the central and tip areas, whereas TGF-beta-positive cells were significantly more numerous in the pedicle than in the tip area. The number of TGF-beta-positive cells was significantly higher in zone 3 than in zone 1 of alpha-SMA positivity. Myofibroblasts, which are abundant in NPs but rare in NM, could be involved in the growth of NPs by inducing extracellular matrix accumulation. The local development of myofibroblasts in NPs could be controlled by TGF-beta, locally produced by inflammatory cells.

  7. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field. PMID:19824469

  8. Direct dynamin–actin interactions regulate the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changkyu; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Weins, Astrid; Osborn, Teresia; Reiser, Jochen; Pollak, Martin; Hartwig, John; Sever, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin assembles into higher order structures that are thought to promote endocytosis. Dynamin also regulates the actin cytoskeleton through an unknown, GTPase-dependent mechanism. Here, we identify a highly conserved site in dynamin that binds directly to actin filaments and aligns them into bundles. Point mutations in the actin-binding domain cause aberrant membrane ruffling and defective actin stress fibre formation in cells. Short actin filaments promote dynamin assembly into higher order structures, which in turn efficiently release the actin-capping protein (CP) gelsolin from barbed actin ends in vitro, allowing for elongation of actin filaments. Together, our results support a model in which assembled dynamin, generated through interactions with short actin filaments, promotes actin polymerization via displacement of actin-CPs. PMID:20935625

  9. Regulation of growth and gene expression in human papillomavirus-transformed keratinocytes by transforming growth factor-beta: implications for the control of papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Braun, L; Dürst, M; Mikumo, R; Crowley, A; Robinson, M

    1992-01-01

    Cervical carcinogenesis is a multistep process that appears to be initiated by infection of squamous epithelial cells in the cervix with one of a limited number of human papillomavirus (HPV) types. However, the mechanisms involved in the evolution of benign, HPV-induced lesions to malignancy have not yet been fully elucidated. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional growth factor produced by cells in the skin, inhibits the proliferation of foreskin and cervical keratinocytes in vitro. We examined the effects of TGF-beta on growth and virus early-gene expression in cell lines immortalized by two HPV types associated with cervical carcinogenesis as well as the expression of TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcripts in normal and HPV-positive cells in vivo and in vitro. We found that normal and HPV-positive cells expressed similar levels of TGF-beta 1 mRNAs and exhibited similar patterns of responsiveness to three isoforms of TGF-beta in both monolayer and modified organotypic cultures. Of particular interest is our finding that the expression of the E6 and E7 early viral transforming regions of both HPV16 and HPV18 was reversibly and rapidly inhibited by TGF-beta. In one HPV16-positive cell line examined in detail, inhibition of HPV expression required protein synthesis and occurred at the level of transcription. HPV-immortalized cells selected for resistance to in vitro differentiation signals remained sensitive to TGF-beta-mediated growth inhibition. These results, showing that both growth and virus gene expression in HPV-transformed cells were responsive to TGF-beta, suggest that endogenous growth factors produced by different cell types in squamous epithelium may play a role in the progression of cervical neoplasia. PMID:1326988

  10. Dynamin at actin tails.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; De Camilli, Pietro

    2002-01-01

    Dynamin, the product of the shibire gene of Drosophila, is a GTPase critically required for endocytosis. Some studies have suggested a functional link between dynamin and the actin cytoskeleton. This link is of special interest, because there is evidence implicating actin dynamics in endocytosis. Here we show that endogenous dynamin 2, as well as green fluorescence protein fusion proteins of both dynamin 1 and 2, is present in actin comets generated by Listeria or by type I PIP kinase (PIPK) overexpression. In PIPK-induced tails, dynamin is further enriched at the interface between the tails and the moving organelles. Dynamin mutants harboring mutations in the GTPase domain inhibited nucleation of actin tails induced by PIPK and moderately reduced their speed. Although dynamin localization to the tails required its proline-rich domain, expression of a dynamin mutant lacking this domain also diminished tail formation. In addition, this mutant disrupted a membrane-associated actin scaffold (podosome rosette) previously shown to include dynamin. These findings suggest that dynamin is part of a protein network that controls nucleation of actin from membranes. At endocytic sites, dynamin may couple the fission reaction to the polymerization of an actin pool that functions in the separation of the endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane. PMID:11782545

  11. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  12. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  13. Non-instantaneous growth characteristics of martensitic transformation in high Cr ferritic creep-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenxi; Shao, Yi; Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Yongchang

    2016-08-01

    Microstructural observation and high-resolution dilatometry were employed to investigate kinetics of martensitic transformation in high Cr ferritic creep-resistant steel upon different quenching/cooling rates. By incorporating the classical athermal nucleation and impingement correction, a non-instantaneous growth model for martensitic transformation has been developed. The developed model describes austenite/martensite interface mobility during martensite growth. The growth rate of martensite is found to be varied from 1 × 10-6 to 3 × 10-6 m/s. The low interface mobility suggests that it is not appropriate to presume the instantaneous growth behavior of martensite. Moreover, based on the proposed model, nucleation rate of martensite under different cooling rates is found to be nearly the same, while the growth rate of martensite is promoted by increasing the cooling rate.

  14. Relation of the slow growth phenotype to neoplastic transformation: possible significance for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Chow, M; Rubin, H

    1999-09-01

    Deletions are widely distributed over the genome in the most frequently occurring human cancers and are the most abundant genetic lesion found there. Deletions are highly correlated with the slow growth phenotype of mutated animal and human cells and result in chromosomal transposition when the retained ends are joined. Transpositions are only a minor source of mutation in rapidly multiplying bacteria but are a major cause of mutations in stationary bacteria. The NIH 3T3 line of mouse cells undergoes neoplastic transformation during prolonged incubation in a stationary state and expresses the slow growth phenotype on serial subculture at low density, suggesting a relation between transformation and chromosomal deletions. To further explore the relation between neoplastic transformation and the slow growth phenotype as a surrogate for deletions, two sublines of the NIH 3T3 cells with differing competence for transformation were serially subcultured in the stationary state at confluence and tested at each subculture for transformation and growth rate. Cell death in a fraction of the population and a heritable slowdown in proliferation of most of the survivors became increasingly pronounced with successive rounds of confluence. The reduction in growth rate was not proportional to the degree of transformation of the cultures, but all of the transformed cultures were slow growers at low density. All of the discrete colonies from cloning transformed cultures developed at a lower initial rate than control colonies under optimal conditions for growth, but they continued to grow at later stages, forming multilayered colonies under conditions that inhibited the further growth of the control colonies. The results suggest that prolonged incubation of NIH 3T3 cells in the stationary state results in growth-impairing deletions over a wide range of sites in the genome, but more restricted subsets of such lesions are responsible for neoplastic transformation. These findings

  15. Cells transformed with a ts viral src mutant are temperature sensitive for in vivo growth.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, A F; Wilson, S

    1985-01-01

    Studies on ts mutants of avian sarcoma viruses have previously implicated the src gene product (pp60src) kinase function in in vitro transformation. The role of src in vivo, however, has not been clearly defined. Using a sensitive and quantitative assay that was developed in chicken embryos (Chambers et al., Cancer Res. 42:4018-4025, 1982), we tested the in vivo tumorigenic properties of cells transformed with LA23, an avian sarcoma virus that is temperature sensitive for in vitro transformation. We found that the in vivo growth ability of these cells was temperature sensitive and that this in vivo behavior correlated with the in vitro transformation behavior (growth in soft agar and saturation density). PMID:3921824

  16. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26784007

  18. The growth and transformation of American ego psychology.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    The roots of ego psychology trace back to Sigmund Freud's The Ego and the Id (1923) and "Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety" (1926), works followed by two additional fundaments, Anna Freud's The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936) and Heinz Hartmann's Ego Psychology and the Problem of Adaptation (1939). It was brought to full flowering in post-World War II America by Hartmann and his many collaborators, and for over two decades it maintained a monolithic hegemony over American psychoanalysis. Within this framework the conceptions of the psychoanalytic psychotherapies evolved as specific modifications of psychoanalytic technique directed to the clinical needs of the spectrum of patients not amenable to psychoanalysis proper. This American consensus on the ego psychology paradigm and its array of technical implementations fragmented several decades ago, with the rise in America of Kohut's self psychology, geared to the narcissistic disorders, and with the importation from Britain of neo-Kleinian and object-relational perspectives, all coinciding with the rapid growth of the varieties of relational psychoanalysis, with its shift in focus to the two-person, interactive, and co-constructed transference-countertransference matrix. Implications of this intermingled theoretical pluralism (as contrasted with the unity of the once dominant ego psychology paradigm) for the evolution of the American ego psychology are spelled out.

  19. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. PMID:23190411

  20. The Molecular Evolution of Actin

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, Robin C.; Meagher, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular evolution of plant and nonplant actin genes comparing nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 20 actin genes. Nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid substitutions (replacement substitutions) ranged from 3–7% for all pairwise comparisons of animal actin genes with the following exceptions. Comparisons between higher animal muscle actin gene sequences and comparisons between higher animal cytoplasmic actin gene sequences indicated <3% divergence. Comparisons between plant and nonplant actin genes revealed, with two exceptions, 11–15% replacement substitution. In the analysis of plant actins, replacement substitution between soybean actin genes SAc1, SAc3, SAc4 and maize actin gene MAc1 ranged from 8–10%, whereas these members within the soybean actin gene family ranged from 6–9% replacement substitution. The rate of sequence divergence of plant actin sequences appears to be similar to that observed for animal actins. Furthermore, these and other data suggest that the plant actin gene family is ancient and that the families of soybean and maize actin genes have diverged from a single common ancestral plant actin gene that originated long before the divergence of monocots and dicots. The soybean actin multigene family encodes at least three classes of actin. These classes each contain a pair of actin genes that have been designated kappa (SAc1, SAc6), lambda (SAc2, SAc4) and mu (SAc3, SAc7). The three classes of soybean actin are more divergent in nucleotide sequence from one another than higher animal cytoplasmic actin is divergent from muscle actin. The location and distribution of amino acid changes were compared between actin proteins from all sources. A comparison of the hydropathy of all actin sequences, except from Oxytricha, indicated a strong similarity in hydropathic character between all plant and nonplant actins despite the greater number of replacement substitutions in plant actins. These protein sequence

  1. The sublimation growth of AlN fibers: transformations in morphology & fiber direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, H. Q.; Chen, X. L.; Li, H.; Wang, G.; Song, B.; Wang, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The growth of AlN fibers using sublimation method was investigated in the temperature range from 1600 °C to 2000 °C. Large-scale AlN fibers are obtained with diameters from 100 nm to 50 μm and lengths up to several millimeters. The fiber morphology and growth direction are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman scattering. The fibers change from wire-like to prism-like in morphology and increase in diameter as rising temperatures, accompanying a transformation in axial direction from [10 bar{1}0 ] to [0001]. The transformation in the growth direction is discussed in terms of AlN structure and supersaturation of AlN gas species. These results provide useful information for controlling the growth of large-scale AlN fibers.

  2. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  3. Stable Glass Transformation to Supercooled Liquid via Surface-Initiated Growth Front

    SciTech Connect

    Swallen, Stephen F.; Traynor, Katherine; McMahon, Robert J.; Ediger, M. D.; Mates, Thomas E.

    2009-02-13

    Highly stable glasses of tris-naphthylbenzene transform into a liquid when annealed above the glass transition temperature T{sub g}. In contrast to the predictions of standard models, the observed transformation is spatially inhomogeneous. Secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments on isotopically labeled multilayer films show that the liquid grows into the stable glass with sharp growth fronts initiated at the free surface and at the interface with the substrate. For the free surface, the growth velocity is constant in time and has the same temperature dependence as self-diffusion in the equilibrium supercooled liquid. These stable glasses are packed so efficiently that surfaces and interfaces are required to initiate the transformation to the liquid even well above T{sub g}.

  4. Intranuclear Actin Regulates Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Uzer, Gunes; Thompson, William R.; Styner, Maya; Wu, Xin; Rubin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton induces nuclear trafficking of regulatory proteins and global effects on gene transcription. We here show that in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cytochalasin D treatment causes rapid cofilin-/importin-9-dependent transfer of G-actin into the nucleus. The continued presence of intranuclear actin, which forms rod-like structures that stain with phalloidin, is associated with induction of robust expression of the osteogenic genes osterix and osteocalcin in a Runx2-dependent manner, and leads to acquisition of osteogenic phenotype. Adipogenic differentiation also occurs, but to a lesser degree. Intranuclear actin leads to nuclear export of Yes-associated protein (YAP); maintenance of nuclear YAP inhibits Runx2 initiation of osteogenesis. Injection of cytochalasin into the tibial marrow space of live mice results in abundant bone formation within the space of 1 week. In sum, increased intranuclear actin forces MSC into osteogenic lineage through controlling Runx2 activity; this process may be useful for clinical objectives of forming bone. PMID:26140478

  5. A central role for the WH2 domain of Srv2/CAP in recharging actin monomers to drive actin turnover in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Little, Kristin; Talarico, Lou; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Goode, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes propelled by actin polymerization require rapid disassembly of filaments, and then efficient recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound ADP-actin monomers back to an assembly-competent ATP-bound state. How monomer recharging is regulated in vivo is still not well understood, but recent work suggests the involvement of the ubiquitous actin-monomer binding protein Srv2/CAP. To better understand Srv2/CAP mechanism, we explored the contribution of its WH2 domain, the function of which has remained highly elusive. We found that the WH2 domain binds to actin monomers and, unlike most other WH2 domains, exhibits similar binding affinity for ATP-actin and ADP-actin (Kd ~1.5μM). Mutations in the WH2 domain that impair actin binding disrupt the ability of purified full-length Srv2/CAP to catalyze nucleotide exchange on ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers and accelerate actin turnover in vitro. The same mutations impair Srv2/CAP function in vivo in regulating actin organization, cell growth, and cell morphogenesis. Thus, normal cell growth and organization depend on the ability of Srv2/CAP to recharge actin monomers, and the WH2 domain plays a central role in this process. Our data also reveal that while most isolated WH2 domains inhibit nucleotide exchange on actin, WH2 domains in the context of intact proteins can help promote nucleotide exchange. PMID:20169536

  6. Divergent effects of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factors on a human endometrial carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Haussler, C A; Trookman, N S

    1987-09-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), at concentrations ranging from 0.83 to 4.98 nM, markedly inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at low plating densities (4.7 X 10(3) cells/cm2). Under the same incubation conditions, 16.6 pM EGF enhanced cell proliferation. At high plating densities (2.5 X 10(4) cells/cm2) 0.83 nM EGF also stimulated cell proliferation. Both the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of EGF were mimicked by transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). However, the inhibitory action of TGF-alpha was always greater that of EGF. Binding studies with 125I-labeled TGF-alpha indicated that maximal cell surface binding of TGF-alpha occurred at 15 min, whereas maximal internalization occurred at 45 min. Both cell surface and internalized radioactivity declined sharply thereafter. Analysis of radioactivity released into the incubation medium during pulse-chase experiments indicated that RL95-2 cells extensively degraded both TGF-alpha and EGF. The lysosomotropic compound methylamine arrested the generation of low-molecular-weight degradation products of EGF, but not of TGF-alpha. In contrast to EGF and TGF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at either low or high plating densities. Further, transforming growth factor-beta induced the appearance of large cuboidal cells that were readily distinguished from cells treated with either EGF or TGF-alpha. These findings point to complex regulatory actions of growth factors on the proliferation of RL95-2 cells and suggest that the processing of TGF-alpha following EGF receptor activation is distinct from the processing of EGF. PMID:3497713

  7. He-Ne laser influenced actin filaments alleviate the damage of UV-B in wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huize; Han, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the use of a He-Ne laser in alleviating the damaging effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on wheat seedlings by influenced actin filaments. Triticum aestivum seedlings were irradiated with either enhanced UV-B (10.08 KJ m-2 d-1) or a combination of UV-B light and the He-Ne laser. Plants were also exposed to the He-Ne laser alone. In order to compare the effect of the He-Ne laser, red light (same power and wavelength as the He-Ne laser) treatment and the combined UV-B and red light treatment were added. Moreover, wheat seedlings were treated with actin special drugs, including cytochalasin B (CB) and jasplakinolide (JAS). We analyzed the growth of the seedlings, the distribution of actin filaments (AFs), DNA laddering and ACTIN expression in the different groups. The results showed that enhanced UV-B produced negative effects on the growth of wheat seedlings while implementing the He-Ne laser partially alleviated the injury. With the red light treatment, there are no positive effects. The ACTIN expression stayed the same in the different treatments, while the distribution and the protein content are different. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic results further established significant changes in the chemical composition of the wall material. These results suggested that the He-Ne laser alleviated the damaging effects of UV-B radiation in wheat seedlings by changing the characteristics of the AFs.

  8. Force generation by endocytic actin patches in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders E; Bayly, Philip V

    2014-04-15

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value.

  9. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  10. Actin Filament Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Huang, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for actin filament segmentation in 2D TIRFM image sequences. This problem is difficult because actin filaments dynamically change shapes during their growth, and the TIRFM images are usually noisy. We ask a user to specify the two tips of a filament of interest in the first frame. We then model the segmentation problem in an image sequence as a temporal chain, where its states are tip locations; given candidate tip locations, actin filaments' body points are inferred by a dynamic programming method, which adaptively generates candidate solutions. Combining candidate tip locations and their inferred body points, the temporal chain model is efficiently optimized using another dynamic programming method. Evaluation on noisy TIRFM image sequences demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of this approach. PMID:21761674

  11. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  12. A synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing F-actin formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Mao, Xinjian; Xu, Baiyao; Yang, Li; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2014-03-10

    Tendon injuries are common in sports and are frequent reasons for orthopedic consultations. The management of damaged tendons is one of the most challenging problems in orthopedics. Mechano-growth factor (MGF), a recently discovered growth repair factor, plays positive roles in tissue repair through the improvement of cell proliferation and migration and the protection of cells against injury-induced apoptosis. However, it remains unclear whether MGF has the potential to accelerate tendon repair. We used a scratch wound assay in this study to demonstrate that MGF-C25E (a synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide) promotes the migration of rat tenocytes and that this promotion is accompanied by an elevation in the expression of the following signaling molecules: focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibitors of the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways inhibited the MGF-C25E-induced tenocyte migration, indicating that MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration through the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The analysis of the mechanical properties showed that the Young's modulus of tenocytes was decreased through treatment of MGF-C25E, and an obvious formation of pseudopodia and F-actin was observed in MGF-C25E-treated tenocytes. The inhibition of the FAK or ERK1/2 signals restored the decrease in Young's modulus and inhibited the formation of pseudopodia and F-actin. Overall, our study demonstrated that MGF-C25E promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing pseudopodia formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Mechano-growth factor E peptide (MGF-C25E) promotes migration of rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E activates the FAK-ERK1/2 pathway in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E induces the actin remodeling and the formation of pseudopodia, and decreases the stiffness in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration via altering stiffness and forming pseudopodia by the activation of the FAK-ERK1

  13. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  14. Graphene growth by a metal-catalyzed solid-state transformation of amorphous carbon.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Banhart, Florian

    2011-02-22

    Single and few-layer graphene is grown by a solid-state transformation of amorphous carbon on a catalytically active metal. The process is carried out and monitored in situ in an electron microscope. It is observed that an amorphous carbon film is taken up by Fe, Co, or Ni crystals at temperatures above 600 °C. The nucleation and growth of graphene layers on the metal surfaces happen after the amorphous carbon film has been dissolved. It is shown that the transformation of the energetically less favorable amorphous carbon to the more favorable phase of graphene occurs by diffusion of carbon atoms through the catalytically active metal.

  15. Handling Arabidopsis plants: growth, preservation of seeds, transformation, and genetic crosses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz; Scholl, Randy; Holomuzki, Nicholas; Crist, Deborah; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Growing healthy plants is essential for the advancement of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) research. Over the last 20 years, the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) has collected and developed a series of best-practice protocols, some of which are presented in this chapter. Arabidopsis can be grown in a variety of locations, growth media, and environmental conditions. Most laboratory accessions and their mutant or transgenic derivatives flower after 4-5 weeks and set seeds after 7-8 weeks, under standard growth conditions (soil, long day, 23 ºC). Some mutant genotypes, natural accessions, and Arabidopsis relatives require strict control of growth conditions best provided by growth rooms, chambers, or incubators. Other lines can be grown in less-controlled greenhouse settings. Although the majority of lines can be grown in soil, certain experimental purposes require utilization of sterile solid or liquid growth media. These include the selection of primary transformants, identification of homozygous lethal individuals in a segregating population, or bulking of a large amount of plant material. The importance of controlling, observing, and recording growth conditions is emphasized and appropriate equipment required to perform monitoring of these conditions is listed. Proper conditions for seed harvesting and preservation, as well as seed quality control, are also described. Plant transformation and genetic crosses, two of the methods that revolutionized Arabidopsis genetics, are introduced as well.

  16. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  17. Sustained activation of fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in a murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Shinsuke; Lakos, Gabriella; Mori, Yasuji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Varga, John

    2003-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is responsible for triggering a cascade of events leading to fibrosis in scleroderma. The Smads are intracellular signal transducers recently shown to mediate fibroblast activation and other profibrotic responses elicited by transforming growth factor-betain vitro. To understand better the involvement of Smads in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we examined Smad expression and activation in situ in a murine model of scleroderma. Bleomycin injections induced striking dermal infiltration with macrophages by 3 d, and progressive fibrosis by 2 wk. Infiltrating macrophages and resident fibroblasts expressed Smad3, the positive mediator for transforming growth factor-beta responses. Importantly, in bleomycin-injected skin, fibroblasts showed predominantly nuclear localization of Smad3 and intense staining for phospho-Smad2/3. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in fibroblasts was detected even after the resolution of inflammation. Expression of Smad7, the endogenous inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling, was strongly induced in dermal cells by transforming growth factor-beta, but not by bleomycin injections. Collectively, these results indicate that bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma is associated with rapid and sustained induction of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in resident dermal fibroblasts. Despite apparent activation of the intracellular transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lesional dermis, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta-inducible Smad7 was not upregulated. In light of the critical function of Smad7 as an endogenous inhibitor of Smad signaling that restricts the duration and magnitude of transforming growth factor-beta responses, and as a mediator of apoptosis, relative Smad7 deficiency observed in the present studies may account for sustained activation of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in lesional tissues. These findings raise the

  18. Transforming Growth Factor β/activin signalling induces epithelial cell flattening during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brigaud, Isabelle; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Chlasta, Julien; Le Bail, Sandrine; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the regulation of epithelial morphogenesis is essential for the formation of tissues and organs in multicellular organisms, little is known about how signalling pathways control cell shape changes in space and time. In the Drosophila ovarian epithelium, the transition from a cuboidal to a squamous shape is accompanied by a wave of cell flattening and by the ordered remodelling of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. We show that activation of the TGFβ pathway is crucial to determine the timing, the degree and the dynamic of cell flattening. Within these cells, TGFβ signalling controls cell-autonomously the formation of Actin filament and the localisation of activated Myosin II, indicating that internal forces are generated and used to remodel AJ and to promote cytoskeleton rearrangement. Our results also reveal that TGFβ signalling controls Notch activity and that its functions are partly executed through Notch. Thus, we demonstrate that the cells that undergo the cuboidal-to-squamous transition produce active cell-shaping mechanisms, rather than passively flattening in response to a global force generated by the growth of the underlying cells. Thus, our work on TGFβ signalling provides new insights into the mechanisms through which signal transduction cascades orchestrate cell shape changes to generate proper organ structure. PMID:25681395

  19. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  20. [THE ROLE OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-B IN IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF DISEASES OF CONNECTIVE TISSUE].

    PubMed

    Rudoi, A S; Moskalev, A V; Sboitchakov, V B

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies of molecular physiology of fibrillin and pathophysiology of inherent disorders of structure and function of connective tissue such as dissection and aneurysm of aorta, myxomatously altered cusps and prolapses of mitral valve, syndrome of hyper-mobility of joints, demonstrated that important role in development of these malformations play alterations of transfer of signals by growth factors and matrix cellular interaction. These conditions under manifesting Marfan's syndrome can be a consequence of anomalies of fibrillin-1 which deficiency unbrakes process of activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). The involvement of TGFβ in pathogenesis of Marfan's syndrome permits consider antagonists of angiotensin-transforming enzymes as potential pharmaceuticals in therapy of this disease. The article presents analysis of publications' data related to this problem.

  1. Transformation of the Herbicide Sulcotrione into a Root Growth Enhancer Compound by Sequential Photolysis and Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Eric; Maruel, Sandra; Richard, Claire; Goupil, Pascale; Ledoigt, Gérard

    2016-01-27

    Xanthene-1,9-dione-3,4-dihydro-6-methylsulfonyl (1), the main product of sulcotrione phototransformation on plant leaves, was slowly hydrolyzed into 2-hydroxy-4-methylsulfonylbenzoic acid (2) and 1,3-cyclohexanedione (3) in aqueous solution. Interestingly, the rate of hydrolysis was significantly enhanced in the presence of roots of monocotyledonous plants, while the same treatment showed adverse effects on broadleaf weeds. Root growth enhancement varied according to the plant species and concentrations of compound 2, as shown with Zea mays roots. Compound 2 is a derivative of salicylic acid that is known to be a plant signaling messenger. Compound 2 was, therefore, able to mimic some known effects of this phytohormone. This work showed that a pesticide like sulcotrione was transformed into a compound exhibiting a positive impact on plant growth. This study exemplified a rarely reported situation where chemical and biological chain reactions transformed a xenobiotic into a compound exhibiting potential beneficial effects. PMID:26654319

  2. [THE ROLE OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-B IN IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF DISEASES OF CONNECTIVE TISSUE].

    PubMed

    Rudoi, A S; Moskalev, A V; Sboitchakov, V B

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies of molecular physiology of fibrillin and pathophysiology of inherent disorders of structure and function of connective tissue such as dissection and aneurysm of aorta, myxomatously altered cusps and prolapses of mitral valve, syndrome of hyper-mobility of joints, demonstrated that important role in development of these malformations play alterations of transfer of signals by growth factors and matrix cellular interaction. These conditions under manifesting Marfan's syndrome can be a consequence of anomalies of fibrillin-1 which deficiency unbrakes process of activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). The involvement of TGFβ in pathogenesis of Marfan's syndrome permits consider antagonists of angiotensin-transforming enzymes as potential pharmaceuticals in therapy of this disease. The article presents analysis of publications' data related to this problem. PMID:27455564

  3. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. [Effects of nitrogen regulators on fertilizer nitrogen transformation in meadow cinnamon soil and on pakchoi growth].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Mei; Zhang, Kuo; Liu, Jian-Tao; Si, Huan-Sen; Wang, Yan-Qun

    2012-09-01

    Soil incubation test and pot experiment were conducted to investigate the effects of dicyandiamide (DCD) and its combination with nano-carbon on the transformation of fertilizers (urea and ammonium bicarbonate) nitrogen (N) in meadow cinnamon soil, a typical soil type in North China Plain, and on the growth of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis). In the first two weeks after applying urea and ammonium bicarbonate, the soil NH4+-N and NO3(-)-N contents varied greatly, but little variation was observed since then. The effects of the applied fertilizer N on the pakchoi growth and its N use efficiency differed significantly at early growth stages, but had little difference at harvesting stage. The DCD inhibited the transformation of the fertilizer N (especially ammonium bicarbonate N) into nitrate markedly, and this effect increased with increasing DCD dose. Under the conditions of our experiment, the optimal application rate of DCD was 1.0-1.5% of applied fertilize N, which could increase the pakchoi yield significantly, improve the leaf color, decrease the plant nitrate contents, and increase the fertilizer N use efficiency. The combination of DCD and nano-carbon exerted a synergistic effect on inhibiting soil ammonium oxidation, and also, promoted the pakchoi growth and N utilization at early growth stages significantly and decreased the plant nitrate level at harvesting stage.

  5. [Effects of nitrogen regulators on fertilizer nitrogen transformation in meadow cinnamon soil and on pakchoi growth].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Mei; Zhang, Kuo; Liu, Jian-Tao; Si, Huan-Sen; Wang, Yan-Qun

    2012-09-01

    Soil incubation test and pot experiment were conducted to investigate the effects of dicyandiamide (DCD) and its combination with nano-carbon on the transformation of fertilizers (urea and ammonium bicarbonate) nitrogen (N) in meadow cinnamon soil, a typical soil type in North China Plain, and on the growth of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis). In the first two weeks after applying urea and ammonium bicarbonate, the soil NH4+-N and NO3(-)-N contents varied greatly, but little variation was observed since then. The effects of the applied fertilizer N on the pakchoi growth and its N use efficiency differed significantly at early growth stages, but had little difference at harvesting stage. The DCD inhibited the transformation of the fertilizer N (especially ammonium bicarbonate N) into nitrate markedly, and this effect increased with increasing DCD dose. Under the conditions of our experiment, the optimal application rate of DCD was 1.0-1.5% of applied fertilize N, which could increase the pakchoi yield significantly, improve the leaf color, decrease the plant nitrate contents, and increase the fertilizer N use efficiency. The combination of DCD and nano-carbon exerted a synergistic effect on inhibiting soil ammonium oxidation, and also, promoted the pakchoi growth and N utilization at early growth stages significantly and decreased the plant nitrate level at harvesting stage. PMID:23286007

  6. Developmental tumours, early differentiation and the transforming growth factor beta superfamily.

    PubMed

    Mummery, C L; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, A J

    1999-01-01

    Embryonal carcinoma and embryonic stem cells have been very useful models for identifying some of the factors that regulate differentiation in early mammalian development. Here, we present a brief history of their original isolation and characterization and of their later introduction into the Hubrecht Laboratory. We illustrate in a review their contribution to our current understanding of the function of transforming growth factor beta and ligands binding to the receptors of a related factor, activin, in development with some of our own work.

  7. Side-binding proteins modulate actin filament dynamics.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dupont, Aurélie; Mizuno, Naoko; Kowalska, Kaja; Lange, Oliver F; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Lamb, Don C

    2015-01-01

    Actin filament dynamics govern many key physiological processes from cell motility to tissue morphogenesis. A central feature of actin dynamics is the capacity of filaments to polymerize and depolymerize at their ends in response to cellular conditions. It is currently thought that filament kinetics can be described by a single rate constant for each end. In this study, using direct visualization of single actin filament elongation, we show that actin polymerization kinetics at both filament ends are strongly influenced by the binding of proteins to the lateral filament surface. We also show that the pointed-end has a non-elongating state that dominates the observed filament kinetic asymmetry. Estimates of flexibility as well as effects on fragmentation and growth suggest that the observed kinetic diversity arises from structural alteration. Tuning elongation kinetics by exploiting the malleability of the filament structure may be a ubiquitous mechanism to generate a rich variety of cellular actin dynamics. PMID:25706231

  8. Synthesis of a 35-Member Stereoisomer Library of Bistramide A: Evaluation of Effects on Actin State, Cell Cycle and Tumor Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wrona, Iwona E.; Lowe, Jason T.; Turbyville, Thomas J.; Johnson, Tanya R.; Beignet, Julien; Beutler, John A.; Panek, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of a 35-member library of bistramide A stereoisomers are reported. All eight stereoisomers of the C1-C13 tetrahydropyran fragment of the molecule were prepared utilizing crotylsilane reagents 9 and 10 in our [4+2]-annulation methodology. In addition, the four isomers of the C14-C18 γ-amino acid unit were accessed via a Lewis acid mediated crotylation reaction using both enantiomers of organosilane 11. The spiroketal subunit of bistramide A was modified at the C39-alcohol to give another point of stereochemical diversification. The fragments were coupled using standard peptide coupling protocol to provide 35 stereoisomers of the natural product. These stereochemical analogs were screened for their effects on cellular actin and cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines (UO-31 renal and SF-295 CNS). The results of these assays identified one analog, 1.21, with enhanced potency relative to the natural product, bistramide A. PMID:19191575

  9. Role of LncRNA-activated by transforming growth factor beta in the progression of hepatitis C virus-related liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Na; Niu, Xuemin; Wang, Yang; Du, Huijuan; Wang, Baoyu; Du, Jinghua; Li, Ya; Wang, Rongqi; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhao, Suxian; Sun, Dianxing; Qiao, Liang; Nan, Yuemin

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNA (LncRNA)-activated by transforming growth factor-beta (LncRNA-ATB) is a key regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway, and is positively correlated with the development of liver cirrhosis and vascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of LncRNA-ATB in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. In the present study, we confirmed a high expression level of LncRNA-ATB in the liver tissues and plasma samples of patients with HCV-related hepatic fibrosis, and the plasma level of LncRNA-ATB was significantly correlated with liver fibrosis stages. Furthermore, increased expression level of LncRNA-ATB was also present in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and knockdown of LncRNA-ATB inhibited the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and alpha-1 type I collagen (Col1A1). LncRNA-ATB was found to share the common miRNA responsive element of miR-425-5p with TGF-β type II receptor (TGF-βRII) and SMAD2. Ectopic expression of LncRNA-ATB in HSCs could upregulate the protein expression of TGF-βRII and SMAD2 by inhibiting the endogenous miR-425-5p. Moreover, overexpression of miR-425-5p could partly abrogate the expression of TGF-βRII and SMAD2 induced by LncRNA-ATB. Hence, we conclude that LncRNA-ATB promotes HCV-induced liver fibrogenesis by activating HSCs and increasing collagen I production through competitively binding to miR-425-5p. LncRNA-ATB may be a novel diagnostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for HCV-related hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27585228

  10. Adenoviral delivery of an antisense RNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits fibrogenic activities of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Arias, Monica; Lahme, Birgit; Van de Leur, Eddy; Gressner, Axel M; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2002-06-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs as a consequence of the transdifferentiationof hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblasts and is associated with an increased expression and activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. This pluripotent, profibrogenic cytokine stimulates matrix synthesis and decreases matrix degradation, resulting in fibrosis. Thus, blockade of synthesis or sequestering of mature TGF-beta1 is a primary target for the development of antifibrotic approaches. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the administration of adenoviruses constitutively expressing an antisense mRNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of TGF-beta1 is able to suppress the synthesis of TGF-beta1 in culture-activated hepatic stellate cells. We demonstrate that the adenoviral vehicle directs high-level expression of the transgene and proved that the transduced antisense is biologically active by immunoprecipitation, Western blot, quantitative TGF-beta1 ELISA, and cell proliferation assays. Additionally, the biological function of the transgene was confirmed by analysis of differential activity of TGF-beta1-responsive genes using cell ELISA, Northern blotting, and by microarray technology, respectively. Furthermore, we examined the effects of that transgene on the expression of TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, collagen type alpha1(I), latent transforming growth factor binding protein 1, types I and II TGF-beta receptors, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Our results indicate that the administration of antisense mRNA offers a feasible approach to block autocrine TGF-beta1 signaling in hepatic stellate cells and may be useful and applicable in future to the treatment of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases.

  11. Transforming growth factor beta mRNA increases during liver regeneration: a possible paracrine mechanism of growth regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, L; Mead, J E; Panzica, M; Mikumo, R; Bell, G I; Fausto, N

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a growth factor with multiple biological properties including stimulation and inhibition of cell proliferation. To determine whether TGF-beta is involved in hepatocyte growth responses in vivo, we measured the levels of TGF-beta mRNA in normal liver and during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats. TGF-beta mRNA increases in the regenerating liver and reaches a peak (about 8 times higher than basal levels) after the major wave of hepatocyte cell division and mitosis have taken place and after the peak expression of the ras protooncogenes. Although hepatocytes from normal and regenerating liver respond to TGF-beta, they do not synthesize TGF-beta mRNA. Instead, the message is present in liver nonparenchymal cells and is particularly abundant in cell fractions enriched for endothelial cells. TGF-beta inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis in vitro in hepatocytes from normal or regenerating liver, although the dose-response curves vary according to the culture medium used. We conclude that TGF-beta may function as the effector of an inhibitory paracrine loop that is activated during liver regeneration, perhaps to prevent uncontrolled hepatocyte proliferation. Images PMID:3422749

  12. A functional connection between pRB and transforming growth factor beta in growth inhibition and mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sarah M; Bergsied, Jacqueline; Isaac, Christian E; Coschi, Courtney H; Martens, Alison L; Hojilla, Carlo V; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Dimattia, Gabriel E; Khoka, Rama; Wang, Jean Y J; Dick, Frederick A

    2009-08-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a crucial mediator of breast development, and loss of TGF-beta-induced growth arrest is a hallmark of breast cancer. TGF-beta has been shown to inhibit cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity, which leads to the accumulation of hypophosphorylated pRB. However, unlike other components of TGF-beta cytostatic signaling, pRB is thought to be dispensable for mammary development. Using gene-targeted mice carrying subtle missense changes in pRB (Rb1(DeltaL) and Rb1(NF)), we have discovered that pRB plays a critical role in mammary gland development. In particular, Rb1 mutant female mice have hyperplastic mammary epithelium and defects in nursing due to insensitivity to TGF-beta growth inhibition. In contrast with previous studies that highlighted the inhibition of cyclin/CDK activity by TGF-beta signaling, our experiments revealed that active transcriptional repression of E2F target genes by pRB downstream of CDKs is also a key component of TGF-beta cytostatic signaling. Taken together, our work demonstrates a unique functional connection between pRB and TGF-beta in growth control and mammary gland development.

  13. Impact of epidermal growth factor receptor and transforming growth factor-α on hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Afkar Abdel-Ghany; El-Hindawi, Ali; Hammam, Olfat; Moussa, Mona; Gabal, Samia; Said, Noha

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor system plays a central hepato-protective and pro-regenerative role in liver. Transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) is an important autocrine growth regulator of hepatocytes that plays a role in development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study was done on 40 core liver biopsies from patients with CHC, 20 liver specimens from HCC cases on top of CHC as well as five normal controls. All were immunohistochemically stained with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and TGF-α antibodies. Some selected HCC cases were submitted for FISH technique to detect EGFR gene alteration. By immunohistochemistry EGFR and TGF-α were overexpressed in HCC and cirrhotic cases compared to CHC cases without cirrhosis. Also, their expression was stronger in CHC cases with higher grades of activity and stages of fibrosis compared to lower ones. FISH positive results for EGFR were detected in 33.3% of the examined HCC cases. EGFR and TGF-α can be used as predictive markers for activity, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis in CHC patients. Overexpression of EGFR in HCC patients can be promising in selecting those who can get benefit from anti-EGFR target therapy. PMID:26279457

  14. The prognostic significance of transforming growth factors in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P. A.; Barrett-Lee, P.; Travers, M.; Luqmani, Y.; Powles, T.; Coombes, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1) are growth regulatory for breast cancer cell lines in vitro and several studies have suggested that levels of the receptor for TGF alpha, the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) in tumour biopsies predict relapse and survival. We have examined the prognostic significance of TGF alpha, TGF-beta 1 and EGFR mRNA expression in a series of patients with primary breast cancer with a median follow up period of 60 months. In 167 patients the expression of TGF-beta 1 was inversely correlated with node status (P = 0.065) but not ER status, tumour size or menopausal status. Patients with high levels of TGF-beta 1 had a longer disease free interval with a significantly longer probability of survival at 80 months although the overall relapse free survival was not increased. EGFR mRNA expression was measured in 106 patients and was inversely correlated with ER status (P = 0.018). EGFR levels did not predict for early relapse or survival. TGF alpha mRNA levels were measured in 104 patients, no correlation was seen tumour size, node status, Er status, or clinical outcome. PMID:8390290

  15. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  16. Arabidopsis FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in the pollen tube

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Ruihui; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of pollen tube growth. Actin filaments have distinct distribution patterns and dynamic properties within different regions of the pollen tube. Apical actin filaments are highly dynamic and crucial for pollen tube growth. However, how apical actin filaments are generated and properly constructed remains an open question. Here we showed that Arabidopsis fimbrin5 (FIM5) decorates filamentous structures throughout the entire tube but is apically concentrated. Apical actin structures are disorganized to different degrees in the pollen tubes of fim5 loss-of-function mutants. Further observations suggest that apical actin structures are not constructed properly because apical actin filaments cannot be maintained at the cortex of fim5 pollen tubes. Actin filaments appeared to be more curved in fim5 pollen tubes and this was confirmed by measurements showing that the convolutedness and the rate of change of convolutedness of actin filaments was significantly increased in fim5 pollen tubes. This suggests that the rigidity of the actin filaments may be compromised in fim5 pollen tubes. Further, the apical cell wall composition is altered, implying that tip-directed vesicle trafficking events are impaired in fim5 pollen tubes. Thus, we found that FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in order to drive polarized pollen tube growth. PMID:27117336

  17. Heart and liver defects and reduced transforming growth factor beta2 sensitivity in transforming growth factor beta type III receptor-deficient embryos.

    PubMed

    Stenvers, Kaye L; Tursky, Melinda L; Harder, Kenneth W; Kountouri, Nicole; Amatayakul-Chantler, Supavadee; Grail, Dianne; Small, Clayton; Weinberg, Robert A; Sizeland, Andrew M; Zhu, Hong-Jian

    2003-06-01

    The type III transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) receptor (TbetaRIII) binds both TGFbeta and inhibin with high affinity and modulates the association of these ligands with their signaling receptors. However, the significance of TbetaRIII signaling in vivo is not known. In this study, we have sought to determine the role of TbetaRIII during development. We identified the predominant expression sites of TbetaRIII mRNA as liver and heart during midgestation and have disrupted the murine TbetaRIII gene by homologous recombination. Beginning at embryonic day 13.5, mice with mutations in TbetaRIII developed lethal proliferative defects in heart and apoptosis in liver, indicating that TbetaRIII is required during murine somatic development. To assess the effects of the absence of TbetaRIII on the function of its ligands, primary fibroblasts were generated from TbetaRIII-null and wild-type embryos. Our results indicate that TbetaRIII deficiency differentially affects the activities of TGFbeta ligands. Notably, TbetaRIII-null cells exhibited significantly reduced sensitivity to TGFbeta2 in terms of growth inhibition, reporter gene activation, and Smad2 nuclear localization, effects not observed with other ligands. These data indicate that TbetaRIII is an important modulator of TGFbeta2 function in embryonic fibroblasts and that reduced sensitivity to TGFbeta2 may underlie aspects of the TbetaRIII mutant phenotype.

  18. An evolutionarily conserved enzyme degrades transforming growth factor- alpha as well as insulin

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A single enzyme found in both Drosophila and mammalian cells is able to selectively bind and degrade transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and insulin, but not EGF, at physiological concentrations. These growth factors are also able to inhibit binding and degradation of one another by the enzyme. Although there are significant immunological differences between the mammalian and Drosophila enzymes, the substrate specificity has been highly conserved. These results demonstrate the existence of a selective TGF-alpha-degrading enzyme in both Drosophila and mammalian cells. The evolutionary conservation of the ability to degrade both insulin and TGF-alpha suggests that this property is important for the physiological role of the enzyme and its potential for regulating growth factor levels. PMID:2670957

  19. Overexpression of RACK1 inhibits collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts via inhibition of transforming growth factor-β1/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Shi, Lina; Li, Qing; Lu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Keloids are benign skin tumors characterized by collagen accumulation and hyperproliferation of fibroblasts. The receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1) was involved in liver fibrosis. However, the role of RACK1 in dermal fibrosis keloids is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of RACK1 on keloid fibroblasts (KFs) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen expression and explored the underlying mechanism. We found that RACK1 was decreased in KFs, overexpression of RACK1 significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced KFs proliferation. RACK1 also obviously inhibited the expression of TGF-β1-induced TGF-β receptor I, II, type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in human KFs. In addition, RACK1 suppressed the expression of TGF-β1-induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation in human KFs. Taken together, our study suggested that RACK1 inhibits collagen synthesis in KFs via inhibition the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway, and RACK1 is a potential target for treatment of the keloid disease. PMID:26629012

  20. Involvement of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and associated transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling in paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying-Ying; Shen, Peng; Chang, Wen-Xiu

    2015-12-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a highly toxic herbicide which is able to induce pulmonary fibrosis in humans and animals. The epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) was demonstrated to be an important factor in pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has remained elusive whether PQ induces pulmonary fibrosis via EMT, which was therefore investigated in the present study. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of PQ‑induced EMT were examined in vitro. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of rat lung tissues demonstrated that PQ induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Western blot analysis then revealed that the expression of epithelial cell marker E‑cadherin was significantly decreased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers α‑smooth‑muscle actin and vimentin was significantly increased in rat lung tissues and A549 cells following PQ treatment. Transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β/Smad signaling was also induced by PQ as evidenced by increased expression of TGF‑β1 and Smad2. However, PQ‑induced EMT in A549 cells was abolished by transfection with TGF‑β1‑specific small hairpin RNA. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that PQ induced EMT in vivo and in vitro, which may be an important process in the development of PQ‑induced pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, TGF-β/Smad signaling was involved in PQ-induced EMT. PMID:26499763

  1. Long Non-Coding RNA MALAT1 Mediates Transforming Growth Factor Beta1-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuai; Yao, Haipei; Li, Min; Li, Hui; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the role of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) MALAT1 in transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods ARPE-19 cells were cultured and exposed to TGF-β1. The EMT of APRE-19 cells is confirmed by morphological change, as well as the increased expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and fibronectin, and the down-regulation of E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1(ZO-1) at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of lncRNA MALAT1 in RPE cells were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Knockdown of MALAT1 was achieved by transfecting a small interfering RNA (SiRNA). The effect of inhibition of MALAT1 on EMT, migration, proliferation, and TGFβ signalings were observed. MALAT1 expression was also detected in primary RPE cells incubated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) vitreous samples. Results The expression of MALAT1 is significantly increased in RPE cells incubated with TGFβ1. MALAT1 silencing attenuates TGFβ1-induced EMT, migration, and proliferation of RPE cells, at least partially through activating Smad2/3 signaling. MALAT1 is also significantly increased in primary RPE cells incubated with PVR vitreous samples. Conclusion LncRNA MALAT1 is involved in TGFβ1-induced EMT of human RPE cells and provides new understandings for the pathogenesis of PVR. PMID:27019196

  2. p38 MAP kinase inhibitor suppresses transforming growth factor-β2-induced type 1 collagen production in trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Mochita, Miyuki; Inoue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Tomokazu; Kameda, Takanori; Awai-Kasaoka, Nanako; Ohtsu, Naoki; Kimoto, Kenichi; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is an age-related neurodegenerative disease of retinal ganglion cells, and appropriate turnover of the extracellular matrix in the trabecular meshwork is important in its pathology. Here, we report the effects of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and p38 MAP kinase on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2-induced type I collagen production in human trabecular meshwork cells. TGF-β2 increased RhoA activity, actin polymerization, and myosin light chain 2 phosphorylation. These effects were significantly inhibited by Y-27632, but not SB203580. TGF-β2 also increased promoter activity, mRNA synthesis, and protein expression of COL1A2. These effects were significantly inhibited by SB203580, but not Y-27632. Additionally, Y-27632 did not significantly inhibit TGF-β2-induced promoter activation, or phosphorylation or nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, whereas SB203580 partially suppressed these processes. Collectively, TGF-β2-induced production of type 1 collagen is suppressed by p38 inhibition and accompanied by partial inactivation of Smad2/3, in human trabecular meshwork cells.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta-induced stimulation of formation of collagen fiber network and anti-fibrotic effect of taurine in an in vitro model of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junya; Ido, Akio; Hasuike, Satoru; Uto, Hirofumi; Hori, Takeshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Murakami, Shigeru; Terano, Akira; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2004-09-01

    The cell strain M, which was established from normal rat liver cells, is characterized by the active formation of a collagen fiber network. In this study, we investigated the characterization of M cells and evaluated the anti-fibrogenic effects of taurine using this culture system. M cells expressed cytokeratin (CK)8, CK18, vimentin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin, whereas expression of CK-19 or desmin was not detected. Also, M cells expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, -beta2, and TGF-beta type I and II receptors, and treatment with TGF-beta1 (1ng/ml) for 6 days markedly stimulated the formation of a collagen fiber network and expression of procollagen alpha1(I) mRNA. When M cells were treated with various concentrations of taurine (10-50mM), network formation and procollagen alpha1(I) expression were significantly suppressed in a dose dependent manner. Additionally, even in the presence of TGF-beta1, taurine treatment effectively reduced the formation of a collagen fiber network. These results suggest that M cells exhibit features of not only hepatocytes but also myofibroblasts, and TGF-beta1 plays an important role in the formation of collagen fiber networks in this culture system. Additionally, this M cell culture system is appropriate for use as an in vitro model of hepatic fibrosis in the evaluation of the anti-fibrogenic effects of various agents.

  4. Symmetry breaking in actin gels - Implications for cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2007-03-01

    The physical origin of cell motility is not fully understood. Recently minimal model systems have shown, that polymerizing actin itself can produce a motile force, without the help of motor proteins. Pathogens like Shigella or Listeria use actin to propel themselves forward in their host cell. The same process can be mimicked with polystyrene beads covered with the activating protein ActA, which reside in a solution containing actin monomers. ActA induces the growth of an actin gel at the bead surface. Initially the gel grows symmetrically around the bead until a critical size is reached. Subsequently one observes a symmetry breaking and the gel starts to grow asymmetrically around the bead developing a tail of actin at one side. This symmetry breaking is accompanied by a directed movement of the bead, with the actin tail trailing behind the bead. Force generation relies on the combination of two properties: growth and elasticity of the actin gel. We study this phenomenon theoretically within the framework of a linear elasticity theory and linear flux-force relationships for the evolution of an elastic gel around a hard sphere. Conditions for a parity symmetry breaking are identified analytically and illustrated numerically with the help of a phasefield model.

  5. Actin dynamics in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ballestrem, C; Wehrle-Haller, B; Imhof, B A

    1998-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton maintains the cellular architecture and mediates cell movements. To explore actin cytoskeletal dynamics, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was fused to human &bgr ;-actin. The fusion protein was incorporated into actin fibers which became depolymerized upon cytochalasin B treatment. This functional EGFP-actin construct enabled observation of the actin cytoskeleton in living cells by time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Stable expression of the construct was obtained in mammalian cell lines of different tissue origins. In stationary cells, actin rich, ring-like structured 'actin clouds' were observed in addition to stress fibers. These ruffle-like structures were found to be involved in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. In migratory cells, EGFP-actin was found in the advancing lamellipodium. Immobile actin spots developed in the lamellipodium and thin actin fibers formed parallel to the leading edge. Thus EGFP-actin expressed in living cells unveiled structures involved in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton.

  6. Shape and size transformation of gold nanorods (GNRs) via oxidation process: A reverse growth mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Govindasamy; Mougin, Karine; Haidara, Hamidou; Vidal, Loïc; Gnecco, Enrico

    2011-02-01

    The anisotropic shape transformation of gold nanorods (GNRs) with H2O2 was observed in the presence of "cethyl trimethylammonium bromide" (CTAB). The adequate oxidative dissolution of GNR is provided by the following autocatalytic scheme with H2O2: Au0 → Au+, Au0 + Aun+ → 2Au3+, n = 1 and 3. The shape transformation of the GNRs was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As-synthesised GNRs exhibit transverse plasmon band (TPB) at 523 nm and longitudinal plasmon band (LPB) at 731 nm. Upon H2O2 oxidation, the LPB showed a systematic hypsochromic (blue) shift, while TPB stays at ca. 523 nm. In addition, a new emerging peak observed at ca. 390 nm due to Au(III)-CTAB complex formation during the oxidation. TEM analysis of as-synthesised GNRs with H2O2 confirmed the shape transformation to spherical particles with 10 nm size in 2 h, whereas centrifuged nanorod solution showed no changes in the aspect ratio under the same condition. Au3+ ions produced from oxidation, complex with excess free CTAB and approach the nanorods preferentially at the end, leading to spatially directed oxidation. This work provides some information to the crystal stability and the growth mechanism of GNRs, as both growth and shortening reactions occur preferentially at the edge of single-crystalline GNRs, all directed by Br- ions.

  7. Expression of neu protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, and transforming growth factor alpha in breast cancer. Correlation with clinicopathologic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, J.; Schuss, A.; Stanick, D.; McCormack, E. S.; Kramer, S.; Sorvillo, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were twofold: to determine 1) if growth factors or growth factor receptors were expressed similarly or differently in a clinically well-characterized group of breast cancer patients and 2) if these phenotypic characteristics were associated with any of the commonly used prognostic parameters. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue from 51 node-positive breast cancer patients were analyzed for the expression of neu, epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R), and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) using immunoperoxidase staining. Positive membranous staining for neu was observed in 15 (29%) tumors. Over-expression of neu was observed in high-grade, estrogen-receptor-negative tumors (P less than 0.05). Epidermal growth factor receptor was expressed in 22 (43%) of the tumors analyzed and found to a greater degree in estrogen-receptor-negative and high-grade tumors (P less than 0.025). A significant correlation between neu and EGF-R expression was also noted. Tumors expressing membranous staining of neu had a greater than 70% chance of expressing EGF-R (P less than 0.01). Expression of TGF alpha was found in 68% of tumors and TGF alpha was detected in grade 1 and 2 tumor to a greater degree than EGF-R. The authors conclude that assaying tumors for these antigens may give additional phenotypic characteristics that can give further insight into the biology of breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1711294

  8. Hic-5 Regulates Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Expression of Fibrogenic Markers and Myocilin in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan Paranji; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of inducible focal adhesion (FA) protein Hic-5 in actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FA formation, fibrogenic activity, and expression of myocilin in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Methods Using primary cultures of human TM (HTM) cells, the effects of various external factors on Hic-5 protein levels, as well as the effects of recombinant Hic-5 and Hic-5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on actin cytoskeleton, FAs, myocilin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and collagen-1 were determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses. Results Hic-5 distributes discretely to the FAs in HTM cells and throughout the TM and Schlemm's canal of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow pathway. Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and RhoA significantly increased Hic-5 protein levels in HTM cells in association with reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and FAs. While recombinant Hic-5 induced actin stress fibers, FAs, αv integrin redistribution to the FAs, increased levels of αSMA, collagen-1, and myocilin, Hic-5 siRNA suppressed most of these responses in HTM cells. Hic-5 siRNA also suppressed TGF-β2-induced fibrogenic activity and dexamethasone-induced myocilin expression in HTM cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results reveal that Hic-5, whose levels were increased by various external factors implicated in elevated intraocular pressure, induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FAs, expression of fibrogenic markers, and myocilin in HTM cells. These characteristics of Hic-5 in TM cells indicate its importance in regulation of AH outflow through the TM in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26313302

  9. Evidence That an Unconventional Actin Can Provide Essential F-Actin Function and That a Surveillance System Monitors F-Actin Integrity in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Masayuki; Pringle, John R; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-03-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved eukaryotic proteins. It is thought to have multiple essential cellular roles and to function primarily or exclusively as filaments ("F-actin"). Chlamydomonas has been an enigma, because a null mutation (ida5-1) in its single gene for conventional actin does not affect growth. A highly divergent actin gene, NAP1, is upregulated in ida5-1 cells, but it has been unclear whether NAP1 can form filaments or provide actin function. Here, we used the actin-depolymerizing drug latrunculin B (LatB), the F-actin-specific probe Lifeact-Venus, and genetic and molecular methods to resolve these issues. LatB-treated wild-type cells continue to proliferate; they initially lose Lifeact-stained structures but recover them concomitant with upregulation of NAP1. Thirty-nine LatB-sensitive mutants fell into four genes (NAP1 and LAT1-LAT3) in which we identified the causative mutations using a novel combinatorial pool-sequencing strategy. LAT1-LAT3 are required for NAP1 upregulation upon LatB treatment, and ectopic expression of NAP1 largely rescues the LatB sensitivity of the lat1-lat3 mutants, suggesting that the LAT gene products comprise a regulatory hierarchy with NAP1 expression as the major functional output. Selection of LatB-resistant revertants of a nap1 mutant yielded dominant IDA5 mutations that presumably render F-IDA5 resistant to LatB, and nap1 and lat mutations are synthetically lethal with ida5-1 in the absence of LatB. We conclude that both IDA5 and the divergent NAP1 can form filaments and redundantly provide essential F-actin functions and that a novel surveillance system, probably responding to a loss of F-actin, triggers NAP1 expression and perhaps other compensatory responses. PMID:26715672

  10. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  11. Effect of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) receptor I kinase inhibitor on prostate cancer bone growth.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinhai; Li, Zhi-Gang; Yingling, Jonathan M; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Ravoori, Murali K; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba; Navone, Nora M

    2012-03-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis. In this study, we tested the antitumor efficacy of a selective TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor, LY2109761, in preclinical models. The effect of LY2109761 on the growth of MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 human PCa cells and primary mouse osteoblasts (PMOs) was assessed in vitro by measuring radiolabeled thymidine incorporation into DNA. In vivo, the right femurs of male SCID mice were injected with PCa cells. We monitored the tumor burden in control- and LY2109761-treated mice with MRI analysis and the PCa-induced bone response with X-ray and micro-CT analyses. Histologic changes in bone were studied by performing bone histomorphometric evaluations. PCa cells and PMOs expressed TGF-β receptor I. TGF-β1 induced pathway activation (as assessed by induced expression of p-Smad2) and inhibited cell growth in PC-3 cells and PMOs but not in MDA PCa 2b cells. LY2109761 had no effect on PCa cells but induced PMO proliferation in vitro. As expected, LY2109761 reversed the TGF-β1-induced pathway activation and growth inhibition in PC-3 cells and PMOs. In vivo, LY2109761 treatment for 6weeks resulted in increased volume in normal bone and increased osteoblast and osteoclast parameters. In addition, LY2109761 treatment significantly inhibited the growth of MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 in the bone of SCID mice (p<0.05); moreover, it resulted in significantly less bone loss and change in osteoclast-associated parameters in the PC-3 tumor-bearing bones than in the untreated mice. In summary, we report for the first time that targeting TGF-β receptors with LY2109761 can control PCa bone growth while increasing the mass of normal bone. This increased bone mass in nontumorous bone may be a desirable side effect of LY2109761 treatment for men with osteopenia or osteoporosis secondary to androgen-ablation therapy, reinforcing the benefit of effectively controlling PCa growth

  12. Effect of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) receptor I kinase inhibitor on prostate cancer bone growth.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinhai; Li, Zhi-Gang; Yingling, Jonathan M; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Ravoori, Murali K; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba; Navone, Nora M

    2012-03-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis. In this study, we tested the antitumor efficacy of a selective TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor, LY2109761, in preclinical models. The effect of LY2109761 on the growth of MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 human PCa cells and primary mouse osteoblasts (PMOs) was assessed in vitro by measuring radiolabeled thymidine incorporation into DNA. In vivo, the right femurs of male SCID mice were injected with PCa cells. We monitored the tumor burden in control- and LY2109761-treated mice with MRI analysis and the PCa-induced bone response with X-ray and micro-CT analyses. Histologic changes in bone were studied by performing bone histomorphometric evaluations. PCa cells and PMOs expressed TGF-β receptor I. TGF-β1 induced pathway activation (as assessed by induced expression of p-Smad2) and inhibited cell growth in PC-3 cells and PMOs but not in MDA PCa 2b cells. LY2109761 had no effect on PCa cells but induced PMO proliferation in vitro. As expected, LY2109761 reversed the TGF-β1-induced pathway activation and growth inhibition in PC-3 cells and PMOs. In vivo, LY2109761 treatment for 6weeks resulted in increased volume in normal bone and increased osteoblast and osteoclast parameters. In addition, LY2109761 treatment significantly inhibited the growth of MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 in the bone of SCID mice (p<0.05); moreover, it resulted in significantly less bone loss and change in osteoclast-associated parameters in the PC-3 tumor-bearing bones than in the untreated mice. In summary, we report for the first time that targeting TGF-β receptors with LY2109761 can control PCa bone growth while increasing the mass of normal bone. This increased bone mass in nontumorous bone may be a desirable side effect of LY2109761 treatment for men with osteopenia or osteoporosis secondary to androgen-ablation therapy, reinforcing the benefit of effectively controlling PCa growth

  13. Effect of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) receptor I kinase inhibitor on prostate cancer bone growth

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinhai; Li, Zhi-Gang; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Ravoori, Murali K.; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba; Navone, Nora M.

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis. In this study, we tested the antitumor efficacy of a selective TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor, LY2109761, in preclinical models. The effect of LY2109761 on the growth of MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 human PCa cells and primary mouse osteoblasts (PMOs) was assessed in vitro by measuring radiolabeled thymidine incorporation into DNA. In vivo, the right femurs of male SCID mice were injected with PCa cells. We monitored the tumor burden in control- and LY2109761-treated mice with MRI analysis and the PCa-induced bone response with x-ray and micro-CT analyses. Histologic changes in bone were studied by performing bone histomorphometric evaluations. PCa cells and PMOs expressed TGF-β receptor I. TGF-β1 induced pathway activation (as assessed by induced expression of p-Smad2) and inhibited cell growth in PC-3 cells and PMOs but not in MDA PCa 2b cells. LY2109761 had no effect on PCa cells but induced PMO proliferation in vitro. As expected, LY2109761 reversed the TGF-β1–induced pathway activation and growth inhibition in PC-3 cells and PMOs. In vivo, LY2109761 treatment for 6 weeks resulted in increased volume in normal bone and increased osteoblast and osteoclast parameters. In addition, LY2109761 treatment significantly inhibited the growth of MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 in the bone of SCID mice (p < 0.05); moreover, it resulted in significantly less bone loss and change in osteoclast-associated parameters in the PC-3 tumor–bearing bones than in the untreated mice. In summary, we report for the first time that targeting TGF-β receptors with LY2109761 can control PCa bone growth while increasing the mass of normal bone. This increased bone mass in nontumorous bone may be a desirable side effect of LY2109761 treatment for men with osteopenia or osteoporosis secondary to androgen-ablation therapy, reinforcing the benefit of effectively controlling PCa

  14. Role of actin in auxin transport and transduction of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Basu, S.; Brady, S.; Muday, G.

    Transport of the plant hormone auxin is polar and the direction of the hormone movement appears to be controlled by asymmetric distribution of auxin transport protein complexes. Changes in the direction of auxin transport are believed to drive asymmetric growth in response to changes in the gravity vector. To test the possibility that asymmetric distribution of the auxin transport protein complex is mediated by attachment to the actin cytoskeleton, a variety of experimental approaches have been used. The most direct demonstration of the role of the actin cytoskeleton in localization of the protein complex is the ability of one protein in this complex to bind to affinity columns containing actin filaments. Additionally, treatments of plant tissues with drugs that fragment the actin c toskeleton reducey polar transport. In order to explore this actin interaction and the affect of gravity on auxin transport and developmental polarity, embryos of the brown alga, Fucus have been examined. Fucus zygotes are initially symmetrical, but develop asymmetry in response to environmental gradients, with light gradients being the best- characterized signal. Gravity will polarize these embryos and gravity-induced polarity is randomized by clinorotation. Auxin transport also appears necessary for environmental controls of polarity, since auxin efflux inhibitors perturb both photo- and gravity-polarization at a very discrete temporal window within six hours after fertilization. The actin cytoskeleton has previously been shown to reorganize after fertilization of Fucus embryos leading to formation of an actin patch at the site of polar outgrowth. These actin patches still form in Fucus embryos treated with auxin efflux inhibitors, yet the position of these patches is randomized. Together, these results suggest that there are connections between the actin cytoskeleton, auxin transport, and gravity oriented growth and development. (Supported by NASA Grant: NAG2-1203)

  15. Regulation of transglutaminase type II by transforming growth factor-beta 1 in normal and transformed human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    George, M D; Vollberg, T M; Floyd, E E; Stein, J P; Jetten, A M

    1990-07-01

    This study examines the effect of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on the expression of Type I and II transglutaminase in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK cells). Treatment of undifferentiated NHEK cells with 100 pM TGF-beta 1 caused a 10- to 15-fold increase in the activity of a soluble transglutaminase. Based on its cellular distribution and immunoreactivity this transglutaminase was identified as Type II (tissue) transglutaminase. TGF-beta 1 did not enhance the levels of the membrane-bound Type I (epidermal) transglutaminase activity which is induced during squamous cell differentiation and did not increase Type II transglutaminase activity in differentiated NHEK cells. Several SV40 large T antigen-immortalized NHEK cell lines also exhibited a dramatic increase in transglutaminase Type II activity after TGF-beta 1 treatment; however, TGF-beta 1 did not induce any significant change in transglutaminase activity in the carcinoma-derived cell lines SCC-13, SCC-15, and SQCC/Y1. Half-maximal stimulation of transglutaminase Type II activity in NHEK cells occurred at a dose of 15 pM TGF-beta 1. TGF-beta 2 was about equally effective. This enhancement in transglutaminase activity was related to an increase in the amount of transglutaminase Type II protein as indicated by immunoblot analysis. Northern blot analyses using a specific cDNA probe for Type II transglutaminase showed that exposure of NHEK cells to TGF-beta 1 caused a marked increase in the mRNA levels of this enzyme which could be observed as early as 4 h after the addition of TGF-beta 1. Maximal induction of transglutaminase Type II mRNA occurred between 18 and 24 h. The increase in Type II transglutaminase mRNA levels was blocked by the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that this increase in mRNA by TGF-beta 1 is dependent on protein synthesis. PMID:1972706

  16. Transforming growth factor β as regulator of cancer stemness and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Claudia; Caja, Laia; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    Key elements of cancer progression towards metastasis are the biological actions of cancer stem cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment. Cross-communication between tumour and stromal cells is mediated by secreted cytokines, one of which, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), regulates essentially every cell within the malignant tissue. In this article, we focus on the actions of TGFβ on cancer stem cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and immune cells that assist the overall process of metastatic dissemination. We aim at illustrating intricate connections made by various cells in the tumour tissue and which depend on the action of TGFβ. PMID:27537386

  17. Influence of phase transformation on stress evolution during growth of metal thin films on silicon.

    PubMed

    Fillon, A; Abadias, G; Michel, A; Jaouen, C; Villechaise, P

    2010-03-01

    In situ stress measurements during two-dimensional growth of low mobility metal films on amorphous Si were used to demonstrate the impact of interface reactivity and phase transformation on stress evolution. Using Mo1-xSix films as examples, the results show that the tensile stress rise, which develops after the film has become crystalline, is correlated with an increase in lateral grain size. The origin of the tensile stress is attributed to the volume change resulting from the alloy crystallization, which occurs at a concentration-dependent critical thickness. PMID:20366996

  18. The recombinant proregion of transforming growth factor beta1 (latency-associated peptide) inhibits active transforming growth factor beta1 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Böttinger, E P; Factor, V M; Tsang, M L; Weatherbee, J A; Kopp, J B; Qian, S W; Wakefield, L M; Roberts, A B; Thorgeirsson, S S; Sporn, M B

    1996-06-11

    All three isoforms of transforming growth factors beta (TGF-betal, TGF-beta2, and TGF-beta3) are secreted as latent complexes and activated extracellularly, leading to the release of the mature cytokines from their noncovalently associated proregions, also known as latency-associated peptides (LAPs). The LAP region of TGF-beta1 was expressed in a baculovirus expression system and purified to homogeneity. In vitro assays of growth inhibition and gene induction mediated by TGF-beta3 demonstrate that recombinant TGF-beta1 LAP is a potent inhibitor of the activities of TGF-betal, -beta2, and -beta3. Effective dosages of LAP for 50% neutralization of TGF-beta activities range from 4.7- to 80-fold molar excess depending on the TGF-beta isoform and activity examined. Using 125I-labeled LAP, we show that the intraperitoneal application route is effective for systemic administration of LAP. Comparison of concentrations of LAP in tissues shows a homogenous pattern in most organs with the exception of heart and muscle, in which levels of LAP are 4- to 8-fold lower. In transgenic mice with elevated hepatic levels of bioactive TGF-betal, treatment with recombinant LAP completely reverses suppression of the early proliferative response induced by TGF-beta1 in remnant livers after partial hepatectomy. The results suggest that recombinant LAP is a potent inhibitor of bioactive TGF-beta both in vitro and in vivo, after intraperitoneal administration. Recombinant LAP should be a useful tool for novel approaches to study and therapeutically modulate pathophysiological processes mediated by TGF-beta3.

  19. Rho/Rock cross-talks with transforming growth factor-β/Smad pathway participates in lung fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Tang, Haiying; Lin, Hongli; Mao, Jingwei; Gao, Lili; Liu, Jia; Wu, Taihua

    2014-11-01

    The differentiation of fibroblasts, which are promoted by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad, is involved in the process of pulmonary fibrosis. The Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein kinase (Rock) pathway may regulate the fibroblast differentiation and myofibroblast expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), however, the mechanism is not clear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of Rho/Rock and TGF-β/Smad in TGF-β1-induced lung fibroblasts differentiation. Human embryonic lung fibroblasts were stimulated by TGF-β1, Y-27632 (inhibitor of Rho/Rock signaling) and staurosporine (inhibitor of TGF-β/Smad signaling). The α-SMA expression, cell cycle progression, content of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in cell culture supernatants and the expression of RhoA, RhoC, Rock1 and Smad2 were detected. The results demonstrated that α-SMA-positive cells significantly increased following TGF-β1 stimulation. Rho/Rock and TGF-β/Smad inhibitors suppressed TGF-β1-induced lung fibroblast differentiation. The inhibitors increased G0/G1 and decreased S and G2/M percentages. The concentrations of the ECM proteins in the supernatant were significantly increased by TGF-β1 stimulation, whereas they were decreased by inhibitor stimulation. RhoA, RhoC, Rock1, Smad2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were upregulated by TGF-β1 stimulation. The Rho/Rock inhibitor downregulated Smad2 expression and the TGF-β/Smad inhibitor downregulated RhoA, RhoC and Rock1 expression. Therefore, the Rho/Rock pathway and Smad signaling were involved in the process of lung fibroblasts transformation, induced by TGF-β1, to myofibroblasts. The two pathways may undergo cross-talk in the lung fibroblasts differentiation in vitro.

  20. Harnessing High Density Lipoproteins to Block Transforming Growth Factor Beta and to Inhibit the Growth of Liver Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Fioravanti, Jessica; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Frank, Kathrin; Aranda, Fernando; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Dotor, Javier; Umansky, Viktor; Prieto, Jesús; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a powerful promoter of cancer progression and a key target for antitumor therapy. As cancer cells exhibit active cholesterol metabolism, high density lipoproteins (HDLs) appear as an attractive delivery system for anticancer TGFβ-inhibitory molecules. We constructed a plasmid encoding a potent TGF-β-blocking peptide (P144) linked to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) through a flexible linker (pApoLinkerP144). The ApoLinkerP144 sequence was then incorporated into a hepatotropic adeno-associated vector (AAVApoLinkerP144). The aim was to induce hepatocytes to produce HDLs containing a modified ApoA-I capable of blocking TGF-β. We observed that transduction of the murine liver with pApoLinkerP144 led to the appearance of a fraction of circulating HDL containing the fusion protein. These HDLs were able to attenuate TGF-β signaling in the liver and to enhance IL-12 -mediated IFN-γ production. Treatment of liver metastasis of MC38 colorectal cancer with AAVApoLinkerP144 resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth and enhanced expression of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in cancerous tissue. ApoLinkerP144 also delayed MC38 liver metastasis in Rag2−/−IL2rγ−/− immunodeficient mice. This effect was associated with downregulation of TGF-β target genes essential for metastatic niche conditioning. Finally, in a subset of ret transgenic mice, a model of aggressive spontaneous metastatic melanoma, AAVApoLinkerP144 delayed tumor growth in association with increased CD8+ T cell numbers in regional lymph nodes. In conclusion, modification of HDLs to transport TGF-β-blocking molecules is a novel and promising approach to inhibit the growth of liver metastases by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. PMID:24797128

  1. Transforming growth factor beta 1 null mutation in mice causes excessive inflammatory response and early death.

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, A B; Huh, C G; Becker, D; Geiser, A; Lyght, M; Flanders, K C; Roberts, A B; Sporn, M B; Ward, J M; Karlsson, S

    1993-01-01

    To delineate specific developmental roles of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) we have disrupted its cognate gene in mouse embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination to generate TGF-beta 1 null mice. These mice do not produce detectable amounts of either TGF-beta 1 RNA or protein. After normal growth for the first 2 weeks they develop a rapid wasting syndrome and die by 3-4 weeks of age. Pathological examination revealed an excessive inflammatory response with massive infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages in many organs, but primarily in heart and lungs. Many lesions resembled those found in autoimmune disorders, graft-vs.-host disease, or certain viral diseases. This phenotype suggests a prominent role for TGF-beta 1 in homeostatic regulation of immune cell proliferation and extravasation into tissues. Images PMID:8421714

  2. The actin cytoskeleton is a suppressor of the endogenous skewing behaviour of Arabidopsis primary roots in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, J; Liao, F; Sparks, J A; Tang, Y; Blancaflor, E B

    2014-01-01

    Before plants can be effectively utilised as a component of enclosed life-support systems for space exploration, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which they develop in microgravity. Using the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware on board the second to the last flight of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-131 mission), we studied how microgravity impacts root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Ground-based studies showed that the actin cytoskeleton negatively regulates root gravity responses on Earth, leading us to hypothesise that actin might also be an important modulator of root growth behaviour in space. We investigated how microgravity impacted root growth of wild type (ecotype Columbia) and a mutant (act2-3) disrupted in a root-expressed vegetative actin isoform (ACTIN2). Roots of etiolated wild-type and act2-3 seedlings grown in space skewed vigorously toward the left, which was unexpected given the reduced directional cue provided by gravity. The left-handed directional root growth in space was more pronounced in act2-3 mutants than wild type. To quantify differences in root orientation of these two genotypes in space, we developed an algorithm where single root images were converted into binary images using computational edge detection methods. Binary images were processed with Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), and histogram and entropy were used to determine spectral distribution, such that high entropy values corresponded to roots that deviated more strongly from linear orientation whereas low entropy values represented straight roots. We found that act2-3 roots had a statistically stronger skewing/coiling response than wild-type roots, but such differences were not apparent on Earth. Ultrastructural studies revealed that newly developed cell walls of space-grown act2-3 roots were more severely disrupted compared to space-grown wild type, and ground control wild-type and act2-3 roots. Collectively, our results provide

  3. The actin cytoskeleton is a suppressor of the endogenous skewing behaviour of Arabidopsis primary roots in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, J; Liao, F; Sparks, J A; Tang, Y; Blancaflor, E B

    2014-01-01

    Before plants can be effectively utilised as a component of enclosed life-support systems for space exploration, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which they develop in microgravity. Using the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware on board the second to the last flight of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-131 mission), we studied how microgravity impacts root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Ground-based studies showed that the actin cytoskeleton negatively regulates root gravity responses on Earth, leading us to hypothesise that actin might also be an important modulator of root growth behaviour in space. We investigated how microgravity impacted root growth of wild type (ecotype Columbia) and a mutant (act2-3) disrupted in a root-expressed vegetative actin isoform (ACTIN2). Roots of etiolated wild-type and act2-3 seedlings grown in space skewed vigorously toward the left, which was unexpected given the reduced directional cue provided by gravity. The left-handed directional root growth in space was more pronounced in act2-3 mutants than wild type. To quantify differences in root orientation of these two genotypes in space, we developed an algorithm where single root images were converted into binary images using computational edge detection methods. Binary images were processed with Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), and histogram and entropy were used to determine spectral distribution, such that high entropy values corresponded to roots that deviated more strongly from linear orientation whereas low entropy values represented straight roots. We found that act2-3 roots had a statistically stronger skewing/coiling response than wild-type roots, but such differences were not apparent on Earth. Ultrastructural studies revealed that newly developed cell walls of space-grown act2-3 roots were more severely disrupted compared to space-grown wild type, and ground control wild-type and act2-3 roots. Collectively, our results provide

  4. Epidermal transformation leads to increased perlecan synthesis with heparin-binding-growth-factor affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Tapanadechopone, P; Tumova, S; Jiang, X; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Perlecan, a proteoglycan of basement membrane and extracellular matrices, has important roles in both normal biological and pathological processes. As a result of its ability to store and protect growth factors, perlecan may have crucial roles in tumour-cell growth and invasion. Since the biological functions of different types of glycosaminoglycan vary with cellular origin and structural modifications, we analysed the expression and biological functions of perlecan produced by a normal epidermal cell line (JB6) and its transformed counterpart (RT101). Expression of perlecan in tumorigenic cells was significantly increased in both mRNA and protein levels. JB6 perlecan was exclusively substituted with heparan sulphate, whereas that of RT101 contained some additional chondroitin sulphate. Detailed structural analysis of the heparan sulphate (HS) chains from perlecan of both cell types revealed that their overall sulphation and chain length were similar (approximately 60 kDa), but the HS chains of tumour-cell-derived perlecan were less sulphated. This resulted from reduced 2-O- and 6-O-sulphation, but not N-sulphation, and an increase in the proportion of unsulphated disaccharides. Despite this, the heparan sulphate of RT101- and JB6-derived perlecan bound fibroblast growth factor-1, -2, -4 and -7 and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor with similar affinity. Therefore abundant tumour-derived perlecan may support the angiogenic responses seen in vivo and be a key player in tumorigenesis. PMID:11284741

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta requires its target plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 for cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kortlever, Roderik M; Nijwening, Jeroen H; Bernards, René

    2008-09-01

    The cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) has strong antiproliferative activity in most normal cells but contributes to tumor progression in the later stages of oncogenesis. It is not fully understood which TGFbeta target genes are causally involved in mediating its cytostatic activity. We report here that suppression of the TGFbeta target gene encoding plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by RNA interference leads to escape from the cytostatic activity of TGFbeta both in human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with this, PAI-1 knock-out mouse embryo fibroblasts are also resistant to TGFbeta growth arrest. Conversely, we show that ectopic expression of PAI-1 in proliferating HaCaT cells induces a growth arrest. PAI-1 knockdown does not interfere with canonical TGFbeta signaling as judged by SMAD phosphorylation and induction of bona fide TGFbeta target genes. Instead, knockdown of PAI-1 results in sustained activation of protein kinase B. Significantly, we find that constitutive protein kinase B activity leads to evasion of the growth-inhibitory action of TGFbeta. Our data are consistent with a model in which induction of PAI-1 by TGFbeta is critical for the induction of proliferation arrest.

  6. The yin-yang of dendrite morphology: unity of actin and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Georges, Penelope C; Hadzimichalis, Norell M; Sweet, Eric S; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2008-12-01

    Actin and microtubules (MT) are targets of numerous molecular pathways that control neurite outgrowth. To generate a neuronal protrusion, coordinated structural changes of the actin and MT cytoskeletons must occur. Neurite formation occurs when actin filaments (F-actin) are destabilized, filopodia are extended, and MTs invade filopodia. This process results in either axon or dendrite formation. Axonal branching involves interplay between F-actin and MTs, with F-actin and MTs influencing polymerization, stabilization, and maintenance of each other. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development of the axon, however, far eclipses our understanding of dendritic development and branching. The two classes of neurites, while fundamentally similar in their ability to elongate and branch, dramatically differ in growth rate, orientation of polarized MT bundles, and mechanisms that initiate branching. In this review, we focus on how F-actin, MTs, and proteins that link the two cytoskeletons coordinate to specifically initiate dendritic events. PMID:18987787

  7. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN. PMID:25740786

  8. Expression of transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor 2 in the lens epithelium of Morioka cataract mice.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomohiro; Ishiga-Hashimoto, Naoko; Nagai, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Ai; Mino, Masaki; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Ken Takeshi; Okada, Toshiya

    2014-05-01

    In the Morioka cataract (MCT) mice, lens opacity appears at 6 to 8 weeks of age, and swollen lens fiber is electron-microscopically observed at 3 weeks after birth. The present study was designed to characterize the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in the lens epithelium of the MCT mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression of TGFβ in the lens epithelium of the MCT mice was stronger than that of the wild-type ddY mice at 2 and 4 weeks after birth. The expression of TGFβ receptors (TGFβRI and TGFβRII) and FGF2 in the lens epithelium of the MCT mice was stronger than that of the wild-type ddY mice at 4 weeks and weaker than that of the wild-type ddY mice at 15 weeks after birth. Using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that expression of TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 mRNA in the lens of 2-week-old MCT mice was significantly higher compared to age-matched wild-type ddY mice. These findings indicate that the lens epithelium of MCT mice has increased expression of TGFβ before cataract affection and that changes in the expression of FGF2 as well as TGFβ may contribute to the progression of the cataract in the mice.

  9. Butachlor, a suspected carcinogen, alters growth and transformation characteristics of mouse liver cells.

    PubMed

    Ou, Y H; Chung, P C; Chang, Y C; Ngo, F Q; Hsu, K Y; Chen, F D

    2000-12-01

    Butachlor is a widely used herbicide in Asia and South America. Previous investigations have indicated that it is a suspected carcinogen. To understand more about the biological effects of butachlor on cultured cells and the mechanism(s) of its carcinogenicity, we studied the alteration of the growth characteristics that was induced by butachlor in normal mouse liver cells (BNL CL2). This study demonstrates that butachlor decreases the population-doubling time of BNL CL2 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. To support this finding, a thymidine incorporation assay was conducted and a similar result that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation was elucidated. In addition, we show that butachlor increases the saturation density of the BNL CL2 cells. When combined with the tumor initiator N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), butachlor transforms cells efficiently, as demonstrated by loss of contact inhibition. These findings indicate that butachlor alters the growth characteristics of BNL CL2 cells and suggest that butachlor may induce malignant transformation through stimulation of cell proliferation, alteration of cell cycle regulation, and suppression of cell density-dependent inhibition of proliferation.

  10. Transforming growth factor-alpha precursors in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Asbert, M; Montaner, B; Pérez-Tomás, R

    2001-06-01

    Among the proteins of the epidermal growth factor family, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) may be an especially reliable indicator of metastasis or prognosis in human colorectal carcinomas. Moreover, anomalous forms of TGF-alpha have been detected in several tissues of cancer origin, suggesting a role of these forms in the development of the disease. This study was designed to identify the presence of TGF-alpha precursors in different colon cancer cell lines by mean of immunocytochemistry and western blotting techniques. Pro-TGF-alpha was detected in all cell lines tested. Staining for pro-TGF-alpha was observed in cytoplasm. Monoclonal antibody to TGF-alpha detected two bands of 20 and 21 kDa. Polyclonal antibody to pro-TGF-alpha revealed five bands ranging from 15 to 24 kDa. All these proteins were also detected in nonmalignant cells expressing a transfected rat pro-TGF-alpha gene. In conclusions, transformation in these human colon carcinoma cells is not due to the presence of anomalous forms of TGF-alpha precursors.

  11. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered “solid-cored” CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  12. Retinoic acid modulates rat Ito cell proliferation, collagen, and transforming growth factor beta production.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Kramer, R T; Davidson, N O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin A plays an inhibitory role with respect to "activation" of the hepatic Ito cell, a likely effector of hepatic fibrogenesis. Ito cell "activation" during fibrogenesis is characterized by a decrease in intracellular vitamin A and an increase in cellular proliferation and collagen production. To explore the hypothesis that retinoids have the capacity to diminish Ito cell activation, cultured Ito cells were exposed to retinoic acid and its effects assessed on three key features: cell proliferation, collagen protein production and mRNA abundance, and transforming growth factor beta protein production. Retinoic acid was 100-1,000X more potent than retinol with respect to inhibition of Ito cell proliferation. Interstitial collagen and transforming growth factor beta production were also reduced by 10(-6) M retinoic acid. The relative abundance of type I collagen mRNA however, was not significantly altered. By contrast, retinoic acid administration to rats caused a marked reduction in the abundance of type I collagen mRNA in both total hepatic and purified Ito cell RNA. The relative abundance of rat hepatic fibronectin or apolipoprotein E mRNA was not significantly altered. These studies demonstrate that retinoic acid can differentially modulate several key features of hepatic fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2254460

  13. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered "solid-cored" CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  14. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  15. Parabens enable suspension growth of MCF-10A immortalized, non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sugandha; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are used extensively as preservatives in consumer products, and intact esters have been measured in several human tissues. Concerns of a potential link between parabens and breast cancer have been raised, but mechanistic studies have centred on their oestrogenic activity and little attention has been paid to any carcinogenic properties. In the present study, we report that parabens can induce anchorage-independent growth of MCF-10A immortalized but non-transformed human breast epithelial cells, a property closely related to transformation and a predictor of tumour growth in vivo. In semi-solid methocel suspension culture, MCF-10A cells produced very few colonies and only of a small size but the addition of 5 × 10(-4) M methylparaben, 10(-5) M n-propylparaben or 10(-5) M n-butylparaben resulted in a greater number of colonies per dish (P < 0.05 in each case) and an increased average colony size (P < 0.001 in each case). Dose-responses showed that concentrations as low as 10(-6) M methylparaben, 10(-7) M n-propylparaben and 10(-7) M n-butylparaben could increase colony numbers (P = 0.016, P = 0.010, P = 0.008, respectively): comparison with a recent measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue samples from 40 mastectomies (Barr et al., 2012) showed that 22/40 of the patients had at least one of the parabens at the site of the primary tumour at or above these concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that parabens can induce a transformed phenotype in human breast epithelial cells in vitro, and further investigation is now justified into a potential link between parabens and breast carcinogenesis.

  16. P-cadherin regulates human hair growth and cycling via canonical Wnt signaling and transforming growth factor-β2.

    PubMed

    Samuelov, Liat; Sprecher, Eli; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Bíró, Tamás; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Paus, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    P-cadherin is a key component of epithelial adherens junctions, and it is prominently expressed in the hair follicle (HF) matrix. Loss-of-function mutations in CDH3, which encodes P-cadherin, result in hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD), an autosomal recessive disorder featuring sparse and short hair. Here, we attempted to recapitulate some aspects of HJMD in vitro by transfecting normal, organ-cultured human scalp HFs with lipofectamine and CDH3-specific or scrambled control siRNAs. As in HJMD patients, P-cadherin silencing inhibited hair shaft growth, prematurely induced HF regression (catagen), and inhibited hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation. In situ, membrane β-catenin expression and transcription of the β-catenin target gene, axin2, were significantly reduced, whereas glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β) and phospho-β-catenin immunoreactivity were increased. These effects were partially reversed by inhibiting GSK3β. P-cadherin silencing reduced the expression of the anagen-promoting growth factor, IGF-1, whereas that of transforming growth factor β 2 (TGFβ2; catagen promoter) was enhanced. Neutralizing TGFβ antagonized the catagen-promoting effects of P-cadherin silencing. In summary, we introduce human HFs as an attractive preclinical model for studying the functions of P-cadherin in human epithelial biology and pathology. This model demonstrates that cadherins can be successfully knocked down in an intact human organ in vitro, and shows that P-cadherin is needed for anagen maintenance by regulating canonical Wnt signaling and suppressing TGFβ2.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 does not relate to hypertension in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, A; Orange, S; Willis, N; Painter, D M; Child, A; Horvath, J S

    2002-11-01

    1. Pre-eclampsia is a human disease of pregnancy characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria and end-organ damage, if severe. Pre-eclampsia is thought to be related to changes in early placental development, with the formation of a shallower than normal placental bed. 2. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is a multifunctional fibrogenic growth factor involved in immune regulation that is elevated in some populations with a high risk of hypertensive end-organ disease related to increases in endothelin release. Transforming growth factor-beta1 is also an important factor in placental implantation. Alterations in TGF-beta1 may be related to abnormal placental development in early pregnancy and, thus, are a candidate for the development of hypertension in pre-eclampsia. 3. The aim of the present study was to examine the placental distribution and serum concentration of TGF-beta1 in patients with pre-eclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. 4. Patients with pre-eclampsia (n = 12) were compared with patients with normal pregnancy (n = 14). Transforming growth factor-beta1 was determined by TGF-beta1 Max ELISA (Promega, Madsion, WI, USA) after serum dilution (1/150) and acid activation. Placental distribution was determined by immunostaining with TGF-beta1 (Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA; 20 ng/mL) and the villi and decidual trophoblast were scored for intensity and extent of staining. 5. Patients with pre-eclampsia had a mean gestational age of 36 weeks, whereas those with a normal pregnancy had a mean gestational age of 39.0 +/- 0.4 weeks. There was no difference in TGF-beta1 concentration between the two groups (mean (+/-SEM) 27.1 +/- 1.0 vs 26.4 +/- 0.7 pg/mL for normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia, respectively; P = 0.73, Mann-Whitney U-test). There was no correlation between systolic or diastolic blood pressure and TGF-beta1 concentration (regression analysis P = 0.4 and 0.2). Immunostaining was absent in the villous trophoblast cells and endovascular and

  18. Arabidopsis Actin Depolymerizing Factor4 Modulates the Stochastic Dynamic Behavior of Actin Filaments in the Cortical Array of Epidermal Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Henty, Jessica L.; Bledsoe, Samuel W.; Khurana, Parul; Meagher, Richard B.; Day, Brad; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Actin filament arrays are constantly remodeled as the needs of cells change as well as during responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. Previous studies demonstrate that many single actin filaments in the cortical array of living Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells undergo stochastic dynamics, a combination of rapid growth balanced by disassembly from prolific severing activity. Filament turnover and dynamics are well understood from in vitro biochemical analyses and simple reconstituted systems. However, the identification in living cells of the molecular players involved in controlling actin dynamics awaits the use of model systems, especially ones where the power of genetics can be combined with imaging of individual actin filaments at high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we test the hypothesis that actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin contributes to stochastic filament severing and facilitates actin turnover. A knockout mutant for Arabidopsis ADF4 has longer hypocotyls and epidermal cells when compared with wild-type seedlings. This correlates with a change in actin filament architecture; cytoskeletal arrays in adf4 cells are significantly more bundled and less dense than in wild-type cells. Several parameters of single actin filament turnover are also altered. Notably, adf4 mutant cells have a 2.5-fold reduced severing frequency as well as significantly increased actin filament lengths and lifetimes. Thus, we provide evidence that ADF4 contributes to the stochastic dynamic turnover of actin filaments in plant cells. PMID:22010035

  19. Hammerhead Ribozyme-Mediated Knockdown of mRNA for Fibrotic Growth Factors: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paulette M.; Blalock, Timothy D.; Yuan, Rong; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive scarring (fibrosis) is a major cause of pathologies in multiple tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, heart, cornea, and skin. The transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) system has been shown to play a key role in regulating the formation of scar tissue throughout the body. Furthermore, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been shown to mediate most of the fibrotic actions of TGF- β, including stimulation of synthesis of extracellular matrix and differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Currently, no approved drugs selectively and specifically regulate scar formation. Thus, there is a need for a drug that selectively targets the TGF- β cascade at the molecular level and has minimal off-target side effects. This chapter focuses on the design of hammerhead ribozymes, measurement of kinetic activity, and assessment of knockdown mRNAs of TGF- β and CTGF in cell cultures. PMID:22131029

  20. Nerve growth factor stimulates axon outgrowth through negative regulation of growth cone actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance

    PubMed Central

    Turney, Stephen G.; Ahmed, Mostafa; Chandrasekar, Indra; Wysolmerski, Robert B.; Goeckeler, Zoe M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Whitesides, George M.; Bridgman, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of sensory neurons in the mammalian nervous system. Little is known about how NGF elicits faster axon outgrowth or how growth cones integrate and transform signal input to motor output. Using cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that myosin II (MII) is required for NGF to stimulate faster axon outgrowth. From experiments inducing loss or gain of function of MII, specific MII isoforms, and vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, we determined that NGF causes decreased vinculin-dependent actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance. Inhibition of MII blocked NGF stimulation, indicating the central role of restraint in directed outgrowth. The restraint consists of myosin IIB- and IIA-dependent processes: retrograde actin network flow and transverse actin bundling, respectively. The processes differentially contribute on laminin-1 and fibronectin due to selective actin tethering to adhesions. On laminin-1, NGF induced greater vinculin-dependent adhesion–cytoskeletal coupling, which slowed retrograde actin network flow (i.e., it regulated the molecular clutch). On fibronectin, NGF caused inactivation of myosin IIA, which negatively regulated actin bundling. On both substrates, the result was the same: NGF-induced weakening of MII-dependent restraint led to dynamic microtubules entering the actin-rich periphery more frequently, giving rise to faster elongation. PMID:26631553

  1. Coordinated Regulation of Apoptosis and Cell Proliferation by Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Cultured Uterine Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotello, Rocco J.; Lieberman, Rita C.; Purchio, Anthony F.; Gerschenson, Lazaro E.

    1991-04-01

    Cell and tissue growth is regulated through a complex interplay of stimulatory and inhibitory signals. We describe two biological actions of transforming growth factor β 1 (TGF-β 1) in primary cultures of rabbit uterine epithelial cells: (i) inhibition of cell proliferation and (ii) a concomitant increase in cells undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death). It is proposed that proliferation and apoptosis together comprise normal cell growth regulation.

  2. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  3. Sorption and mineral-promoted transformation of synthetic hormone growth promoters in soil systems.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shen; Kolodziej, Edward P; Cwiertny, David M

    2014-12-24

    This work examines the fate of synthetic growth promoters (trenbolone acetate, melengestrol acetate, and zeranol) in sterilized soil systems, focusing on their sorption to organic matter and propensity for mineral-promoted reactions. In organic-rich soil matrices (e.g., Pahokee Peat), the extent and reversibility of sorption did not generally correlate with compound hydrophobicity (e.g., K(ow) values), suggesting that specific binding interactions (e.g., potentially hydrogen bonding through C17 hydroxyl groups for the trenbolone and melengestrol families) can also contribute to uptake. In soils with lower organic carbon contents (1-5.9% OC), evidence supports sorption occurring in parallel with surface reaction on inorganic mineral phases. Subsequent experiments with pure mineral phases representative of those naturally abundant in soil (e.g., iron, silica, and manganese oxides) suggest that growth promoters are prone to mineral-promoted oxidation, hydrolysis, and/or nucleophilic (e.g., H2O or OH(-)) addition reactions. Although reaction products remain unidentified, this study shows that synthetic growth promoters can undergo abiotic transformation in soil systems, a previously unidentified fate pathway with implications for their persistence and ecosystem effects in the subsurface.

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta and its implication in the malignancy of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Roy, Laurent-Olivier; Poirier, Marie-Belle; Fortin, David

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumors. They are characterized by enhanced growing capabilities, neoangiogenic proliferation, and extensive infiltration of the brain parenchyma, which make their complete surgical resection impossible. Together with transient and refractory responses to standard therapy, these aggressive neoplasms are incurable and present a median survival of 12 to 14 months. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine of which two of the three isoforms expressed in humans have been shown to be overexpressed proportionally to the histologic grade of glioma malignancy. The increase of chromosomal aberrations and genetic mutations observed in glioma cells turns TGF-β into an oncogene. For that reason, it plays critical roles in glioma progression through induction of several genes implicated in many carcinogenic processes such as proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. Consequently, investigators have begun developing innovative therapeutics targeting this growth factor or its signaling pathway in an attempt to hinder TGF-β's appalling effects in order to refine the treatment of malignant gliomas and improve their prognosis. In this paper, we extensively review the TGF-β-induced oncogenic pathways and discuss the diverse new molecules targeting this growth factor. PMID:24590691

  5. Capsaicin Inhibits Preferentially the NADH Oxidase and Growth of Transformed Cells in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Morre, Dorothy M.

    1995-03-01

    A hormone- and growth factor-stimulated NADH oxidase of the mammalian plasma membrane, constitutively activated in transformed cells, was inhibited preferentially in HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells, all of human origin, by the naturally occurring quinone analog capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-noneamide), compared with plasma membranes from human mammary epithelial, rat liver, normal rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. With cells in culture, capsaicin preferentially inhibited growth of HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells but was largely without effect on the mammary epithelial cells, rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. Inhibited cells became smaller and cell death was accompanied by a condensed and fragmented appearance of the nuclear DNA, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, suggestive of apoptosis. The findings correlate capsaicin inhibition of cell surface NADH oxidase activity and inhibition of growth that correlate with capsaicin-induced apoptosis.

  6. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  7. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  8. Structural Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin System: A Prototypical System of Filaments and Linkers in Stereocilia

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, Kirstin R.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Bartles, James R.

    2007-02-02

    We examine the interaction between cytoskeletal F-actin and espin 3A, a prototypical actin bundling protein found in sensory cell microvilli, including ear cell stereocilia. Espin induces twist distortions in F-actin as well as facilitates bundle formation. Mutations in one of the two F-actin binding sites of espin, which have been implicated in deafness, can tune espin-actin interactions and radically transform the system's phase behavior. These results are compared to recent theoretical work on the general phase behavior linker-rod systems.

  9. Structural Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin System: A Prototypical System of Filaments and Linkers in Stereocilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin R.; Bartles, James R.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2007-02-01

    We examine the interaction between cytoskeletal F-actin and espin 3A, a prototypical actin bundling protein found in sensory cell microvilli, including ear cell stereocilia. Espin induces twist distortions in F-actin as well as facilitates bundle formation. Mutations in one of the two F-actin binding sites of espin, which have been implicated in deafness, can tune espin-actin interactions and radically transform the system’s phase behavior. These results are compared to recent theoretical work on the general phase behavior linker-rod systems.

  10. Transactivation of the TIEG1 confers growth inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-susceptible hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Chan, Chu-Yan; Lu, Gang; Lin, Marie CM; He, Ming-Liang; Li, Ji-Cheng; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) in TGF-β-induced growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: Human hepatocyte and HCC cell lines with varied susceptibilities to TGF-β1 were tested by methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT) assay. The expression changes of Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, Smad7, TIEG1 and TIEG2 gene following treatment with TGF-β1 in a TGF-β-sensitive hepatocyte cell line (MIHA), a TGF-β-sensitive hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) and two TGF-β-insensitive hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Bel7404) were examined. SiRNA targeting TIEG1 was transfected into Hep3B cells and the sensitivity of cells to TGF-β1 was examined. Overexpression of TIEG1 was induced by lentiviral-mediated transduction in TGF-β1-resistant hepatoma cell lines (Bel7404 and HepG2). MTT assay and 4’,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole staining were used to identify cell viability and apoptosis, respectively. The expression level of stathmin was measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western-blotting analysis, and stathmin promoter activity by TIEG1 was monitored by a luciferase reporter gene system. RESULTS: TIEG1 was significantly upregulated by TGF-β1 in the TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cell line, Hep3B, but not in the resistant cell lines. The suppression of TIEG1 by siRNAs decreased the sensitivity of Hep3B cells to TGF-β1, whereas the overexpression of TIEG1 mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis in TGF-β1-resistant HCC cell lines, which resembled those of TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cells treated with TGF-β1. Our data further suggested that stathmin was a direct target of TIEG1, as stathmin was significantly downregulated by TIEG1 overexpression, and stathmin promoter activity was inhibited by TIEG1 in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that transactivation of TIEG1 conferred growth inhibition of TGF-β-susceptible human HCC cells. PMID:22563190

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of the epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, and their receptor in the human mesonephros and metanephros.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, N; Bianchi, F; Lupetti, M; Dolfi, A

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), and EGF/TGF alpha receptor were studied by means of immunohistochemical methods starting from the very early stages of human embryonic kidney development. Mesonephros and metanephros were examined in order to detect immunoreactive staining in serial sectioned embryos and fetal kidneys. Anti-EGF immunoprecipitates were found in the S-shaped mesonephric vesicles of 6-week old embryos as well as in the mesonephric duct albeit with a lower degree of reactivity. Intense reactivity was observed in the metanephros within the blastemic caps of the same gestational period; the reaction was weaker within the ureteric bud branches. Bowman's capsule, proximal tubules, and collecting ducts were also reactive in the fetal kidney to varying degrees. The distribution of TGF alpha reactivity in the mesonephros was similar to that observed for EGF but with a lower intensity. In contrast, there was no reactivity in the metanephros, at least during the embyronic periods examined. By the 11th week of gestation, an intense reactivity for TGF alpha polipeptide was shown in the fetal kidney at the level of the proximal tubules and Bowman's capsule; distal tubules as well as all urinary structures from the collecting ducts to the pelvis were less reactive. Finally, EGF/TGF alpha receptor reactivity was identified by the 6th week of development, being more intense in the mesonephros at the level of the mesonephric duct cells. In the metanephros, the ureteric bud-derived branches were reactive, whereas most of the blastemic tissue did not stain. By the 11th week, only the collecting ducts and the remaining urinary structures contained reaction products: Reactivity was distributed to the tissues originating from the ureteric bud branching. Taking into account recent advances in knowledge about the biology of growth factors, the hypothesis is proposed that the secretory components (vesicles

  12. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient.

  13. Interferon-alpha inhibits murine macrophage transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, S; Huang, M; Wang, J; Dubinett, S M

    1994-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional polypeptide is produced by a wide variety of cells and regulates a broad array of physiological and pathological functions. TGF-beta appears to play a central role in pulmonary fibrosis and may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. Alveolar macrophages are a rich source of TGF-beta and are intimately involved in lung inflammation. We therefore chose to study TGF-beta regulation in murine alveolar macrophages as well as an immortalized peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21). Murine macrophages were incubated with cytokines to evaluate their role in regulating TGF-beta mRNA expression. We conclude that IFN-alpha downregulates TGF-beta mRNA expression in murine macrophages. PMID:8088926

  14. Role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF) beta in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gil, Elena; Galindo-Izquierdo, María

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Although its role in rheumatoid arthritis is not well defined, TGF-β activation leads to functional immunomodulatory effects according to environmental conditions. The function of TGF-β in the development of arthritis in murine models has been extensively studied with controversial results. Recent findings point to a non-relevant role for TGF-β in a mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. The study of TGF-β on T-cell responses has shown controversial results as an inhibitor or promoter of the inflammatory response. This paper presents a review of the role of TGF-β in animal models of arthritis.

  15. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianshuang; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic, helical bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction of virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated conditions, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β regulates various biological processes, including cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. This review focuses on the potential etiological roles of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis. PMID:26583078

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  17. CYLD negatively regulates transforming growth factor-β-signalling via deubiquitinating Akt

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Hyang; Jono, Hirofumi; Komatsu, Kensei; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jiyun; Miyata, Masanori; Matsuno, Takashi; Xu, Xiangbin; Huang, Yuxian; Zhang, Wenhong; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Yu-Il; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Shen, Huahao; Heo, Kyung-Sun; Xu, Haodong; Bourne, Patricia; Koga, Tomoaki; Xu, Haidong; Yan, Chen; Wang, Binghe; Chen, Lin-Feng; Feng, Xin-Hua; Li, Jian-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury, whether induced by infection or caustic chemicals, initiates a series of complex wound-healing responses. If uncontrolled, these responses may lead to fibrotic lung diseases and loss of function. Thus, resolution of lung injury must be tightly regulated. The key regulatory proteins required for tightly controlling the resolution of lung injury have yet to be identified. Here we show that loss of deubiquitinase CYLD led to the development of lung fibrosis in mice after infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. CYLD inhibited transforming growth factor-β-signalling and prevented lung fibrosis by decreasing the stability of Smad3 in an E3 ligase carboxy terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein-dependent manner. Moreover, CYLD decreases Smad3 stability by deubiquitinating K63-polyubiquitinated Akt. Together, our results unveil a role for CYLD in tightly regulating the resolution of lung injury and preventing fibrosis by deubiquitinating Akt. These studies may help develop new therapeutic strategies for preventing lung fibrosis. PMID:22491319

  18. The Role of Transforming Growth Factor β1 in the Regulation of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kota; Hathaway, Catherine K.; Lawrence, Marlon G.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Although human association studies suggest a link between polymorphisms in the gene encoding transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and differing blood pressure levels, a causative mechanism for this correlation remains elusive. Recently we have generated a series of mice with graded expression of TGFβ1, ranging from approximately 10% to 300% compared to normal. We have found that blood pressure and plasma volume are negatively regulated by TGFβ1. Of note, the 10% hypomorph exhibits primary aldosteronism and markedly impaired urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. We here review previous literature highlighting the importance of TGFβ signaling as a natriuretic system, which we postulate is a causative mechanism explaining how polymorphisms in TGFβ1 could influence blood pressure levels. PMID:25801626

  19. Proton NMR assignment and secondary structural elements of human transforming growth factor. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.C.; Mueller, L.; Jeffs, P.W. )

    1989-01-24

    The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of human transforming growth factor {alpha} (hTGF-{alpha}) has been completely assigned, and secondary structural elements have been identified as a preliminary step in determining the structure of this protein by distance geometry methods. Many of these structural elements closely correspond to those previously found in a truncated human EGF and murine EGF. These include the presence of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet between residues G19 and C34 with a type I {beta}-turn at V25-D28, a type II {beta}-turn at H35-Y38, and another short {beta}-sheet between residues Y38-V39 and H45-A46.

  20. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on the Release of Transforming Growth Factor-β.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Rika; Mizumoto, Naoko; Kanno, Nana; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is released by activated platelets and induces the differentiation of T-helper 17 from naïve T cells. Contact between blood and cellulose acetate (CA) beads induces cytokine release, although their inflammatory effects on TGF-β release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on the release of TGF-β in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured platelets and TGF-β. Compared with blood samples incubated without beads, the platelet count and amount of TGF-β significantly decreased in blood samples incubated with CA beads. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited the release of TGF-β from adsorbed platelets. The biological effects of this reduction of TGF-β release during platelet adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  1. Transforming growth factor Beta2 is required for valve remodeling during heart development.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Mohamad; Brown, Kristen; Gard, Connie; Chen, Hwudaurw; Rajan, Sudarsan; Elliott, David A; Stevens, Mark V; Camenisch, Todd D; Conway, Simon J; Doetschman, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Although the function of transforming growth factor beta2 (TGFβ2) in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is well studied, its role in valve remodeling remains to be fully explored. Here, we used histological, morphometric, immunohistochemical and molecular approaches and showed that significant dysregulation of major extracellular matrix (ECM) components contributed to valve remodeling defects in Tgfb2(-/-) embryos. The data indicated that cushion mesenchymal cell differentiation was impaired in Tgfb2(-/-) embryos. Hyaluronan and cartilage link protein-1 (CRTL1) were increased in hyperplastic valves of Tgfb2(-/-) embryos, indicating increased expansion and diversification of cushion mesenchyme into the cartilage cell lineage during heart development. Finally, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses indicate that the activation of SMAD2/3 was decreased in Tgfb2(-/-) embryos during valve remodeling. Collectively, the data indicate that TGFβ2 promotes valve remodeling and differentiation by inducing matrix organization and suppressing cushion mesenchyme differentiation into cartilage cell lineage during heart development.

  2. Regulation of the transforming growth factor β pathway by reversible ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Al-Salihi, Mazin A; Herhaus, Lina; Sapkota, Gopal P

    2012-05-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling pathway plays a central role during embryonic development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It regulates gene transcription through a signalling cascade from cell surface receptors to intracellular SMAD transcription factors and their nuclear cofactors. The extent, duration and potency of signalling in response to TGFβ cytokines are intricately regulated by complex biochemical processes. The corruption of these regulatory processes results in aberrant TGFβ signalling and leads to numerous human diseases, including cancer. Reversible ubiquitylation of pathway components is a key regulatory process that plays a critical role in ensuring a balanced response to TGFβ signals. Many studies have investigated the mechanisms by which various E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate the turnover and activity of TGFβ pathway components by ubiquitylation. Moreover, recent studies have shed new light into their regulation by deubiquitylating enzymes. In this report, we provide an overview of current understanding of the regulation of TGFβ signalling by E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitylases.

  3. Effect of transforming growth factor-alpha on inositol phospholipid metabolism in human epidermoid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Takenawa, T.; Twardzik, D.R.

    1988-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) stimulates (in a dose-dependent manner) the incorporation of (/sup 32/P)Pi into phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), and phosphatidic acid (PA) in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line (A431). The effect of TGF-alpha on the incorporation was found to be similar to that of EGF. On the other hand, a striking difference in the activation of diacylglycerol (DG) kinase activity was seen between TGF-alpha and EGF. At least 100 times more TGF-alpha was required to achieve maximal stimulation of DG kinase activity relative to EGF. These results suggest that the activation of DG kinase by TGF-alpha may involve a mechanism independent from or subsequent to activation of the EGF receptor.

  4. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  5. Transforming growth factor beta differentially modulates the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene in distinct cell types.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R S; Herschman, H R

    1993-08-31

    Nitric oxide is a mediator of paracrine cell signalling. An inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in macrophages and in Swiss 3T3 cells. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a cytokine that modulates many cellular functions. We find that TGF-beta cannot induce iNOS mRNA expression, either in macrophage cell lines or in Swiss 3T3 cells. However, TGF-beta attenuates lipopolysaccharide induction of iNOS mRNA in macrophages. In contrast, TGF-beta enhances iNOS induction by phorbol ester, serum or lipopolysaccharide in 3T3 cells. Thus TGF-beta can inhibit or augment iNOS mRNA induction in response to primary inducers, depending on the cell type in question.

  6. Stromal inhibition of prostatic epithelial cell proliferation not mediated by transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, A.; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, A. J.; Klaij, I. A.; Romijn, J. C.; Schröder, F. H.

    1995-01-01

    The paracrine influence of prostatic stroma on the proliferation of prostatic epithelial cells was investigated. Stromal cells from the human prostate have previously been shown to inhibit anchorage-dependent as well as anchorage-independent growth of the prostatic tumour epithelial cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. Antiproliferative activity, mediated by a diffusible factor in the stromal cell conditioned medium, was found to be produced specifically by prostatic stromal cells. In the present study the characteristics of this factor were examined. It is demonstrated that prostate stroma-derived inhibiting factor is an acid- and heat-labile, dithiothreitol-sensitive protein. Although some similarities with type beta transforming growth factor (TGF-beta)-like inhibitors are apparent, evidence is presented that the factor is not identical to TGF-beta or to the TGF-beta-like factors activin and inhibin. Absence of TGF-beta activity was shown by the lack of inhibitory response of the TGF-beta-sensitive mink lung cell line CCL-64 to prostate stromal cell conditioned medium and to concentrated, partially purified preparations of the inhibitor. Furthermore, neutralising antibodies against TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 2 did not cause a decline in the level of PC-3 growth inhibition caused by partially purified inhibitor. Using Northern blot analyses, we excluded the involvement of inhibin or activin. It is concluded that the prostate stroma-derived factor may be a novel growth inhibitor different from any of the currently described inhibiting factors. Images Figure 5 PMID:7543773

  7. Inhibition of spermidine synthase gene expression by transforming growth factor-beta 1 in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Y; Kar, S; Wiest, L; Pegg, A E; Carr, B I

    1997-01-01

    We screened genes responsive to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta 1) protein in a human hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) using a PCR-mediated differential display technique, in order to investigate the mechanisms involved in TGF-beta-induced growth suppression. We found a gene that was down-regulated by TGF-beta 1 to be completely identical in an approx. 620 bp segment to the gene for the enzyme spermidine synthase, which mediates the conversion of putrescine into spermidine. Both spermidine synthase mRNA expression and its enzyme activity were decreased after TGF-beta 1 treatment of Hep3B cells. The inhibition of spermidine synthase gene expression by TGF-beta 1 protein was also observed in other hepatoma cell lines. The expression of genes for other biosynthetic enzymes in polyamine metabolism (ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase) was also inhibited to the same extent as for spermidine synthase, while the gene expression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, a catabolic enzyme, was relatively resistant to TGF-beta 1. Spermine levels in Hep3B cells were decreased by TGF-beta 1 treatment, although the levels of spermidine and putrescine were unchanged, probably due to compensation by remaining spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase activity. Exogenously added spermidine or spermine, but not putrescine, partially antagonized the growth-inhibitor effects of TGF-beta 1 on Hep3B cells. Our data suggest that down-regulation of gene expression of the enzymes involved in polyamine metabolism, including spermidine synthase, may be associated with the mechanism of TGF-beta-induced growth suppression. PMID:9020892

  8. Role of transforming growth factor Beta in corneal function, biology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Tandon, A; Tovey, J C K; Sharma, A; Gupta, R; Mohan, R R

    2010-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a pleiotropic multifunctional cytokine that regulates several essential cellular processes in many parts of the body including the cornea. Three isoforms of TGFbeta are known in mammals and the human cornea expresses all of them. TGFbeta1 has been shown to play a central role in scar formation in adult corneas whereas TGFbeta2 and TGFbeta3 have been implicated to play a critical role in corneal development and scarless wound healing during embryogenesis. The biological effects of TGFbeta in the cornea have been shown to follow Smad dependent as well as Smad-independent signaling pathways depending upon cellular responses and microenvironment. Corneal TGFbeta expression is necessary for maintaining corneal integrity and corneal wound healing. On the other hand, TGFbeta is perhaps the most important cytokine in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease in the cornea. Although the transformation of keratocytes to myofibroblasts induced by TGFbeta is largely believed to cause corneal fibrosis or scarring, the precise molecular mechanism(s) involved in this process is still unknown. Currently no drugs are available to treat corneal scarring effectively without causing significant side effects. Many approaches to treat TGFbeta-mediated corneal scarring are under investigation. These include blocking of TGFbeta, TGFbeta receptor, TGFbeta function and/or TGFbeta maturation. Other strategies such as modulating keratocyte proliferation, apoptosis, transcription and DNA condensation are also being investigated. The potential of gene therapy to neutralize the pathologic effects of TGFbeta has also been demonstrated recently.

  9. Fullerenol Nanoparticles with Structural Activity Induce Variable Intracellular Actin Filament Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junjiang; Dong, Ying; Wang, Ying; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Bai, Xue; Chang, Yanan; Zhang, Mingyi; Chen, Kui; Li, Juan; Zhao, Lina; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    Fullerenol nanoparticles are promising for various biological applications; many studies have shown that they induce variable and diverse biological effects including side effects. Separation and purification of two fractions of fullerenols has demonstrated that they have varied chemical structures on the surfaces of their carbon cages. Actin is an important structural protein that is able to transform functional structures under varied physiological conditions. We assessed the abilities of the two fractions of fullerenols to attach to actin and induce variable morphological features in actin filament structures. Specifically the fullerenol fraction with a surface electric charge of -1.913 ± 0.008q (x10(-6) C) has percentages of C-OH and C=O on the carbon cage of 16.14 ± 0.60 and 17.55 ± 0.69. These features allow it to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with actin at a stoichiometric ratio of four fullerenols per actin subunit. Molecular simulations revealed these specific binding sites and binding modes in atomic details in the interaction between the active fullerenol and actin filament. Conversely, these interactions were not possible for the other fraction of fullerenol with that percentages of C-OH and C=O on the carbon cage were 15.59 ± 0.01 and 1.94 ± 0.11. Neither sample induced appreciable cytotoxicity or acute cell death. After entering cells, active fullerenol binding to actin induces variable morphological features and may transform ATP-actin to ADP-actin. These changes facilitate the binding of ADF/cofilin, allowing cofilin to sever actin filaments to form cofilin/actin/fullerenol rods. Our findings suggest that fullerenol with structural activity binding disturbs actin filament structure, which may inhibit locomotion of cell or induce chronic side effects in to cells. PMID:27319217

  10. Long-range conformational effects of proteolytic removal of the last three residues of actin.

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecka-Gołaszewska, H; Mossakowska, M; Woźniak, A; Moraczewska, J; Nakayama, H

    1995-01-01

    Truncated derivatives of actin devoid of either the last two (actin-2C) or three residues (actin-3C) were used to study the role of the C-terminal segment in the polymerization of actin. The monomer critical concentration and polymerization rate increased in the order: intact actin < actin-2C < actin-3C. Conversely, the rate of hydrolysis of actin-bound ATP during spontaneous polymerization of Mg-actin decreased in the same order, so that, for actin-3C, the ATP hydrolysis significantly lagged behind the polymer growth. Probing the conformation of the nucleotide site in the monomer form by measuring the rates of the bound nucleotide exchange revealed a similar change upon removal of either the two or three residues from the C-terminus. The C-terminal truncation also resulted in a slight decrease in the rate of subtilisin cleavage of monomeric actin within the DNAse-I binding loop, whereas in F-actin subunits the susceptibility of this and of another site within this loop, specifically cleaved by a proteinase from Escherichia coli A2 strain, gradually increased upon sequential removal of the two and of the third residue from the C-terminus. From these and other observations made in this work it has been concluded that perturbation of the C-terminal structure in monomeric actin is transmitted to the cleft, where nucleotide and bivalent cation are bound, and to the DNAse-I binding loop on the top of subdomain 2. Further changes at these sites, observed on the polymer level, seem to result from elimination of the intersubunit contact between the C-terminal residues and the DNAse-I binding loop. It is suggested that formation of this contact plays an essential role in regulating the hydrolysis of actin-bound ATP associated with the polymerization process. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:7733893

  11. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  12. Expression and localization of epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-α and epidermal growth factor receptor in the canine testis

    PubMed Central

    TAMADA, Hiromichi; TAKEMOTO, Kohei; TOMINAGA, Masato; KAWATE, Noritoshi; TAKAHASHI, Masahiro; HATOYA, Shingo; MATSUYAMA, Satoshi; INABA, Toshio; SAWADA, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and EGF receptor (EGF-R) and the localization of the corresponding proteins in the canine testis were studied. Levels of mRNA expressions were determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the testes of the peripubertal (4–6 months), young adult (3–4 years), advanced adult (7–8 years) and senescent (11–16 years) groups. The EGF-R mRNA level in the testes of the peripubertal group was significantly higher than those in the other groups, whereas there was no difference in EGF and TGF-α mRNA levels among groups. Immunohistochemical stainings for EGF, TGF-α and EGF-R in the testis revealed that immunoreactivity in the seminiferous epithelium and Sertoli cell was weak and nonspecific for the stage of spermatogenesis, and distinct staining was found in Leydig cells. These results suggest that the EGF family of growth factors may be involved in testicular maturation and function in the dog. PMID:26498203

  13. Astragalus and Paeoniae radix rubra extract inhibits liver fibrosis by modulating the transforming growth factor‑β/Smad pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijuan; Li, Lin; Tian, Xiaopeng; Yan, Jinjin; Yang, Xinzheng; Wang, Xinlong; Liao, Guozhen; Qiu, Genquan

    2015-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that Astragalus and Paeoniae radix rubra extract (APE) had a protective effect against liver fibrosis in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of APE on CCl4‑induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. Liver fibrosis was induced in male Sprague‑Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of 50% CCl4 twice a week for eight weeks. Organ coefficients, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), hexadecenoic acid (HA), laminin (LN), procollagen type III (PCIII), hydroxyproline (Hyp), glutathione (GSH‑Px), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF‑β1) levels were measured in rats with hepatic fibrosis. Histopathological changes in affected livers were studied using hematoxylin‑eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. The expression of transforming growth factor‑β/Smad pathway proteins, α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA), collagen I and collagen III was observed in fibrotic livers using western blot analysis. The present study observed significant reductions in serum levels of AST, ALT, HA, LN, PCIII and Hyp in APE‑treated (2.6 and 5.2 g/kg) rats, indicating the significant hepatoprotective effects of APE. Furthermore, the depletion of GSH‑Px and SOD, in addition to the accumulation of MDA in liver tissue was suppressed by APE (2.6 and 5.2 g/kg). Pathological assessment of CCl4‑induced fibrotic livers revealed a significant reduction of liver injury and development of hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with APE (2.6 and 5.2 g/kg). Moreover, APE (2.6 and 5.2 g/kg) decreased the elevation of TGF‑β1, α‑SMA, collagen I and collagen III expression, inhibited Smad2/3 phosphorylation as well as elevated the expression of the TGF‑β1 inhibitor Smad7. These results suggested that APE may protect against liver damage and inhibit the progression of CCl4‑induced hepatic fibrosis. The mechanism of action of APE is

  14. Regulation of proliferation of embryonic heart mesenchyme: Role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and the interstitial matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, M.; Armstrong, M.T.; Armstrong, P.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Proliferation of atrioventricular cushion mesenchyme of the embryonic avian heart maintained in three-dimensional aggregate culture is stimulated by interaction with the interstitial matrix. Chicken serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1, which stimulates proliferation, induces matrix deposition in regions of the aggregate showing high labeling indices with tritiated thymidine. Dispersed heart mesenchyme interstitial matrix introduced into serum-free culture is incorporated into the aggregate and stimulates cellular proliferation similar to serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1. Proliferation is reversibly inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. It is suggested that transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates the production of interstitial matrix and that a sufficient stimulus for proliferation in this system is the presence of the matrix, which acts as the adhesive support for cellular anchorage.

  15. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  16. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  17. Essential Roles of RNA-binding Protein HuR in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jingjing; Chang, Na; Zhao, Zhongxin; Tian, Lei; Duan, Xianghui; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding protein HuR mediates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced profibrogenic actions. Up-regulation of Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is involved in TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in liver fibrogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of TGF-β1 regulates SphK1 remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the role of HuR in TGF-β1-induced SphK1 expression and identify a new molecular mechanism in liver fibrogenensis. In vivo, HuR expression was increased, translocated to cytoplasm, and bound to SphK1 mRNA in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced mouse fibrotic liver. HuR mRNA expression had a positive correlation with mRNA expressions of SphK1 and fibrotic markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen α1(I), respectively. In vitro, up-regulation of SphK1 and activation of HSCs stimulated by TGF-β1 depended on HuR cytoplasmic accumulation. The effects of TGF-β1 were diminished when HuR was silenced or HuR cytoplasmic translocation was blocked. Meanwhile, overexpression of HuR mimicked the effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β1 prolonged half-life of SphK1 mRNA by promoting its binding to HuR. Pharmacological or siRNA-induced SphK1 inhibition abrogated HuR-mediated HSC activation. In conclusion, our data suggested that HuR bound to SphK1 mRNA and played a crucial role in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation. PMID:26912347

  18. Immunohistochemical localization of transforming growth factor β-1 and its relationship with collagen expression in advanced liver fibrosis due to biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Farrington, Christian; Novak, Don; Liu, Chen; Haafiz, Allah B

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common indication of liver transplantation in children. Pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis, which is a prominent feature of BA, remains obscure. The purpose of this work was to determine the cellular sources of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ1) and establish the relationship between TGFβ1-producing cells and extracellular matrix producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) in advanced BA. Methods: Trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry were carried out to determine the expression pattern of collagen and TGFβ1 protein in explant liver specimens from patients with BA. The intensities of portal and lobular TGFβ1 expressions were compared. Immunofluorescence technique was carried out to determine the relationship between α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive-MFB and TGFβ1-positve cells. Results: Lobular TGFβ1 protein expression was significantly higher than portal (89 ± 6 versus 10 ± 1 arbitrary units, P ≤ 0.05), whereas no difference was noted in livers used as control (10 ± 1.6 versus 19 ± 5 arbitrary units, P = 0.11). TGFβ1 expression was more in the center of nodules versus MFB in surrounding fibrous septa. Contrary to TGFβ1 expression, α1-SMA was mostly expressed in the portal structures and the adjacent fibrous septa enacting lobulation of the parenchyma. The results obtained by coimmunofluorescence staining showed no colocalization of α-SMA and TGFβ1. Conclusions: TGFβ1 protein expression is mostly localized to hepatocytes in advanced BA. These findings suggest a paracrine mechanisms of TGFβ1-driven fibrogenesis in advanced BA. PMID:21694865

  19. Inhibition of liver fibrosis by solubilized coenzyme Q10: Role of Nrf2 activation in inhibiting transforming growth factor-beta1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Lim, Sung Chul; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kwak, Mi Kyong; Kang, Keon Wook

    2009-11-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an endogenous antioxidant, is important in oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. It has anti-diabetic and anti-cardiovascular disease effects, but its ability to protect against liver fibrosis has not been studied. Here, we assessed the ability of solubilized CoQ10 to improve dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrogenesis in mice. DMN treatments for 3 weeks produced a marked liver fibrosis as assessed by histopathological examination and tissue 4-hydroxyproline content. Solubilized CoQ10 (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly inhibited both the increases in fibrosis score and 4-hydroxyproline content induced by DMN. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited increases in the transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) mRNA and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) protein by DMN. Interestingly, hepatic glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione S-transferase A2 (GSTA2) were up-regulated in mice treated with CoQ10. Solubilized CoQ10 also up-regulated antioxidant enzymes such as catalytic subunits of GCL and GSTA2 via activating NF-E2 related factor2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Moreover, CoQ10's inhibition of alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 expressions disappeared in Nrf2-null MEF cells. In contrast, Nrf2 overexpression significantly decreased the basal expression levels of alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 in Nrf2-null MEF cells. These results demonstrated that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited DMN-induced liver fibrosis through suppression of TGF-beta1 expression via Nrf2/ARE activation.

  20. Essential Roles of RNA-binding Protein HuR in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingjing; Chang, Na; Zhao, Zhongxin; Tian, Lei; Duan, Xianghui; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-02-25

    RNA-binding protein HuR mediates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced profibrogenic actions. Up-regulation of Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is involved in TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in liver fibrogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of TGF-β1 regulates SphK1 remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the role of HuR in TGF-β1-induced SphK1 expression and identify a new molecular mechanism in liver fibrogenensis. In vivo, HuR expression was increased, translocated to cytoplasm, and bound to SphK1 mRNA in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced mouse fibrotic liver. HuR mRNA expression had a positive correlation with mRNA expressions of SphK1 and fibrotic markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen α1(I), respectively. In vitro, up-regulation of SphK1 and activation of HSCs stimulated by TGF-β1 depended on HuR cytoplasmic accumulation. The effects of TGF-β1 were diminished when HuR was silenced or HuR cytoplasmic translocation was blocked. Meanwhile, overexpression of HuR mimicked the effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β1 prolonged half-life of SphK1 mRNA by promoting its binding to HuR. Pharmacological or siRNA-induced SphK1 inhibition abrogated HuR-mediated HSC activation. In conclusion, our data suggested that HuR bound to SphK1 mRNA and played a crucial role in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation.

  1. Lactic Acid is Elevated in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Induces Myofibroblast Differentiation Via pH-Dependent Activation of Transforming Growth Factor-β

    SciTech Connect

    Kottman, R. M.; Kulkarni, Ajit A.; Smolnycki, Katie A.; Lyda, Elizabeth; Dahanayake, Thinesh; Salibi, Rami; Honnons, Sylvie; Jones, Carolyn; Isern, Nancy G.; Hu, Jian Z.; Nathan, Steven D.; Grant, Geraldine; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2012-10-15

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex disease for which the pathogenesis is poorly understood. In this study, we identified lactic acid as a metabolite that is elevated in the lung tissue of patients with IPF. Objectives: This study examines the effect of lactic acid on myofibroblast differentiation and pulmonary fibrosis. Methods:We used metabolomic analysis to examine cellular metabolism in lung tissuefrom patients with IPFanddeterminedthe effects of lactic acid and lactate dehydrogenase-5 (LDH5) overexpression on myofibroblast differentiation and transforming growth factor (TGF)-b activation in vitro. Measurements and Main Results: Lactic acid concentrations from healthy and IPF lung tissue were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; a-smooth muscle actin, calponin, and LDH5 expression were assessed by Western blot of cell culture lysates. Lactic acid and LDH5 were significantly elevated in IPF lung tissue compared with controls. Physiologic concentrations of lactic acid induced myofibroblast differentiation via activation of TGF-b. TGF-b induced expression of LDH5 via hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF1a). Importantly, overexpression of both HIF1a and LDH5 in human lung fibroblasts induced myofibroblast differentiation and synergized with low dose TGF-b to induce differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of both HIF1a and LDH5 inhibited TGF-b–induced myofibroblast differentiation. Conclusions: We have identified the metabolite lactic acid as an important mediator of myofibroblast differentiation via a pHdependent activation of TGF-b. We propose that the metabolic milieu of the lung, and potentially other tissues, is an important driving force behind myofibroblast differentiation and potentially the initiation and progression of fibrotic disorders.

  2. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Induces Smad3-Dependent β1 Integrin Gene Expression in Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition during Chronic Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wei, Wei-Chun; Wang, Yang-Kao; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Sung, Junne-Ming; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to the pathophysiological development of kidney fibrosis. Although it was reported that TGF-β1 enhances β1 integrin levels in NMuMG cells, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying TGF-β1-induced β1 integrin gene expression and the role of β1 integrin during EMT in the renal system are still unclear. In this study, we examined the role of β1 integrin in TGF-β1-induced EMT both in vitro and in vivo. TGF-β1-induced augmentation of β1 integrin expression was required for EMT in several epithelial cell lines, and knockdown of Smad3 inhibited TGF-β1-induced augmentation of β1 integrin. TGF-β1 triggered β1 integrin gene promoter activity as assessed by luciferase activity assay. Both knockdown of Smad3 and mutation of the Smad-binding element to block binding to the β1 integrin promoter markedly reduced TGF-β1-induced β1 integrin promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that TGF-β1 enhanced Smad3 binding to the β1 integrin promoter. Furthermore, induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction triggered increases of β1 integrin in both renal epithelial and interstitial cells. In human kidney with chronic tubulointerstitial fibrosis, we also found a concomitant increase of β1 integrin and α-smooth muscle actin in tubule epithelia. Blockade of β1 integrin signaling dampened the progression of fibrosis. Taken together, β1 integrin mediates EMT and subsequent tubulointerstitutial fibrosis, suggesting that inhibition of β1 integrin is a possible therapeutic target for prevention of renal fibrosis. PMID:20709799

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta regulates stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase expression through a Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Samuel, William; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kutty, R Krishnan; Parks, W Tony; Gordon, Joel S; Prouty, Stephen M; Hooks, John J; Wiggert, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, is physiologically important because the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids is thought to control cellular functions by modulating the structural integrity and fluidity of cell membranes. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, increased SCD mRNA expression in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells. This response was elicited by all three TGF-beta isoforms, beta1, beta2, and beta3. However, SCD mRNA expression was not increased either by other members of the TGF-beta family or by other growth factors or cytokines. TGF-beta also increased SCD mRNA expression in several other cell lines tested. The increase in SCD mRNA expression was preceded by a marked increase in Smad2 phosphorylation in TGF-beta-treated human retinal pigment epithelial cells. TGF-beta did not induce SCD mRNA expression in a Smad4-deficient cell line. However, Smad4 overexpression restored the TGF-beta effect in this cell line. Moreover, TGF-beta-induced SCD mRNA expression was effectively blocked by the overexpression of Smad7, an inhibitory Smad. Thus, a TGF-beta signal transduction pathway involving Smad proteins appears to regulate the cellular expression of the SCD gene, and this regulation may play an important role in lipid metabolism.

  4. Development and application of fully functional epitope-tagged forms of transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Wolfraim, Lawrence A; Alkemade, Gonnie M; Alex, Biju; Sharpe, Shellyann; Parks, W Tony; Letterio, John J

    2002-08-01

    Administration of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) has been found to be of therapeutic benefit in various mouse disease models and has potential clinical usefulness. However, the ability to track the distribution of exogenously administered, recombinant forms of these proteins has been restricted by cross-reactivity with endogenous TGF-beta and related TGF-beta isoforms. We describe novel FLAG- and hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged versions of mature TGF-beta1 that retain full biological activity as demonstrated by their ability to inhibit the growth of Mv1Lu epithelial cells, and to induce phosphorylation of the TGF-beta signaling intermediate, smad 2. Intracellular FLAG- and HA-TGF-beta1 can be detected in transfected cells by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. We also describe sandwich ELISAs designed to specifically detect epitope-tagged TGF-beta and demonstrate the utility of these tagged ligands as probes for TGF-beta receptor expression by flow cytometry. The design of these fully functional epitope-tagged TGF-beta proteins should facilitate studies such as the evaluation of in vivo peptide pharmacodynamics and trafficking of TGF-beta ligand-receptor complexes.

  5. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    DOE PAGES

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach.more » In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. Lastly, the ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.« less

  6. Regulation of experimental autoimmune neuritis by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Lee, W P; Beck, L S; Rostami, A; Amento, E P

    1994-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by demyelination and mononuclear cell infiltration of the peripheral nervous system. It is induced in Lewis rats by administration of myelin P2 protein or a synthetic peptide (SP-26) corresponding to amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein. The effects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on the clinical signs, histological changes, cell-mediated immune responses, and secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by lymphoid cells of rats with EAN were examined. Systemic administration of TGF-beta 1 markedly inhibited the clinical signs and histological changes of EAN when given intraperitoneally every other day for Days 0 through 18. In addition, it decreased proliferative responses and reduced the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to SP-26 compared to control rats. The reduction in clinical severity correlated with skin test unresponsiveness (DTH) to the disease-inducing agent (SP-26) as well to decreased cellular responsiveness to the antigen in vitro. The decrease in cellular responsiveness extended to a decrease in at least one T cell lymphokine, IFN-gamma. The profound effect of TGF-beta on disease progression in EAN, a T-cell-mediated process, is consistent with a direct effect of this growth factor on T lymphocytes. PMID:7515330

  7. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-01

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.

  8. Wnt3a upregulates transforming growth factor-β-stimulated VEGF synthesis in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kato, Kenji; Yamakawa, Kengo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kozawa, Osamu

    2011-07-01

    It is recognized that Wnt3a affects bone metabolism via the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. We have previously shown that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) stimulates the synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Wnt3a on TGF-β-stimulated VEGF synthesis in these cells. Wnt3a, which alone had little effect on the VEGF levels, significantly enhanced the TGF-β-stimulated VEGF release. Lithium chloride and SB216763, inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, markedly amplified the TGF-β-stimulated VEGF release. Wnt3a failed to affect the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2, p44/p42 MAP kinase, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK. Wnt3a and lithium chloride strengthened the VEGF mRNA expression induced by TGF-β. These results strongly suggest that Wnt3a upregulates VEGF synthesis stimulated by TGF-β via activation of the canonical pathway in osteoblasts.

  9. Transforming Growth Factor Beta 3 Is Required for Excisional Wound Repair In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Le, Mark; Naridze, Rachelle; Morrison, Jasmine; Biggs, Leah C.; Rhea, Lindsey; Schutte, Brian C.; Kaartinen, Vesa; Dunnwald, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that relies on proper levels of cytokines and growth factors to successfully repair the tissue. Of particular interest are the members of the transforming growth factor family. There are three TGF-ß isoforms–TGF- ß 1, 2, and 3, each isoform showing a unique expression pattern, suggesting that they each play a distinct function during development and repair. Previous studies reported an exclusive role for TGF-ß 3 in orofacial development and a potent anti-scarring effect. However, the role of TGF- ß 3 in excisional wound healing and keratinocyte migration remains poorly understood. We tested the effect of TGF-ß 3 levels on excisional cutaneous wounds in the adult mouse by directly injecting recombinant TGF-ß 3 or neutralizing antibody against TGF-ß 3 (NAB) in the wounds. Our results demonstrate that TGF-ß 3 does not promote epithelialization. However, TGF-ß 3 is necessary for wound closure as wounds injected with neutralizing antibody against TGF-ß 3 showed increased epidermal volume and proliferation in conjunction with a delay in keratinocyte migration. Wild type keratinocytes treated with NAB and Tgfb3-deficient keratinocytes closed an in vitro scratch wound with no delay, suggesting that our in vivo observations likely result from a paracrine effect. PMID:23110169

  10. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in oesophageal diseases; correlation with transforming growth factor alpha expression.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, J; McMenemin, R; Yu, C; Hopwood, D; Wormsley, K G

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to correlate mucosal proliferation in Barrett's oesophagus with expression of a growth promoting peptide, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha). Oesophageal mucosa was studied from 50 patients with oesophageal disease who had been treated by oesophagectomy. Histological analysis showed a range of oesophageal pathology - 18 patients had gastric type Barrett's mucosa, 18 had intestinal type Barrett's mucosa, and 14 had oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Sections were stained immunohistochemically for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (an index of cellular proliferation) and TGF alpha. PCNA immunostaining was seen mainly in the basal cells of the neck/foveolar epithelial compartment of the glands in Barrett's oesophagus. However, in mucosa with high grade dysplasia, the proliferative compartment extended upwards into the superficial layers of the glands. At least 2000 cells were counted in each patient to determine the proportion with PCNA immunoreactivity (PCNA labelling index). The labelling index was highest in adenocarcinoma (25%) and in Barrett's intestinal type mucosa with high grade dysplasia (26%) compared with intestinal type mucosa with no significant dysplasia (20%) and Barrett's gastric type mucosa (12%). There was a significant positive correlation between PCNA labelling indices and TGF alpha expression in Barrett's mucosa (p less than 0.01). In glands showing high grade dysplasia, TGF alpha immunoreactivity was seen in the same regions of the glands as PCNA immunoreactivity, indicating the possibility of involvement of TGF alpha in (pre) neoplastic proliferation in Barrett's oesophagus. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:1351861

  11. Production and response of a human prostatic cancer line to transforming growth factor-like molecules.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A.; Chisholm, G. D.; Habib, F. K.

    1990-01-01

    Serum-free media conditioned by the androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell line DU145 showed immunological transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha) activity, as well as competing activity in epidermal growth factor (EGF) radioreceptor assays (RRA). Furthermore, there were factors in the conditioned media which inhibited and stimulated DNA synthesis by DU145 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Fractionation of the concentrated conditioned media by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography revealed several peaks containing EGF-like competitive activity only one of which demonstrated TGF alpha activity. However, none of the peaks corresponded to immunoreactive EGF. Measurement of EGF receptors on DU145 cells by competition and saturation analysis revealed high levels of receptors (mean +/- s.d. = 2.5 +/- 1 x 10(5) surface receptors per cell) which were of high affinity (Kd +/- s.d. = 1.0 +/- 0.5 nmol l-1). Although DU145 cells express high levels of EGF receptors, DNA synthesis was only minimally affected by exogenous EGF and TGF alpha. PMID:2223575

  12. Regulation of experimental autoimmune neuritis by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Lee, W P; Beck, L S; Rostami, A; Amento, E P

    1994-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by demyelination and mononuclear cell infiltration of the peripheral nervous system. It is induced in Lewis rats by administration of myelin P2 protein or a synthetic peptide (SP-26) corresponding to amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein. The effects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on the clinical signs, histological changes, cell-mediated immune responses, and secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by lymphoid cells of rats with EAN were examined. Systemic administration of TGF-beta 1 markedly inhibited the clinical signs and histological changes of EAN when given intraperitoneally every other day for Days 0 through 18. In addition, it decreased proliferative responses and reduced the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to SP-26 compared to control rats. The reduction in clinical severity correlated with skin test unresponsiveness (DTH) to the disease-inducing agent (SP-26) as well to decreased cellular responsiveness to the antigen in vitro. The decrease in cellular responsiveness extended to a decrease in at least one T cell lymphokine, IFN-gamma. The profound effect of TGF-beta on disease progression in EAN, a T-cell-mediated process, is consistent with a direct effect of this growth factor on T lymphocytes.

  13. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    PubMed Central

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc. PMID:26988919

  14. Disrupted pulmonary vascular development and pulmonary hypertension in transgenic mice overexpressing transforming growth factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Le Cras, Timothy D; Hardie, William D; Fagan, Karen; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2003-11-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease plays a major role in morbidity and mortality in infant and adult lung diseases in which increased levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and its receptor EGFR have been associated. The aim of this study was to determine whether overexpression of TGF-alpha disrupts pulmonary vascular development and causes pulmonary hypertension. Lung-specific expression of TGF-alpha in transgenic mice was driven with the human surfactant protein (SP)-C promoter. Pulmonary arteriograms and arterial counts show that pulmonary vascular development was severely disrupted in TGF-alpha mice. TGF-alpha mice developed severe pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling characterized by abnormally extensive muscularization of small pulmonary arteries. Pulmonary vascular development was significantly improved and pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling were prevented in bi-transgenic mice expressing both TGF-alpha and a dominant-negative mutant EGF receptor under the control of the SP-C promoter. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), an important angiogenic factor produced by the distal epithelium, was decreased in the lungs of TGF-alpha adults and in the lungs of infant TGF-alpha mice before detectable abnormalities in pulmonary vascular development. Hence, overexpression of TGF-alpha caused severe pulmonary vascular disease, which was mediated through EGFR signaling in distal epithelial cells. Reductions in VEGF may contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease in TGF-alpha mice.

  15. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass.

    PubMed

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc. PMID:26988919

  16. Analysis of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Induced by Transforming Growth Factor β.

    PubMed

    Valcourt, Ulrich; Carthy, Jonathon; Okita, Yukari; Alcaraz, Lindsay; Kato, Mitsuyasu; Thuault, Sylvie; Bartholin, Laurent; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of the cell biological process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been established via an exponentially growing number of reports. EMT has been documented during embryonic development, tissue fibrosis, and cancer progression in vitro, in animal models in vivo and in human specimens. EMT relates to many molecular and cellular alterations that occur when epithelial cells undergo a switch in differentiation that generates mesenchymal-like cells with newly acquired migratory and invasive properties. In addition, EMT relates to a nuclear reprogramming similar to the one occurring in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Via such a process, EMT is gradually established to promote the generation and maintenance of adult tissue stem cells which under disease states such as cancer, are known as cancer stem cells. EMT is induced by developmental growth factors, oncogenes, radiation, and hypoxia. A prominent growth factor that causes EMT is transforming growth factor β (TGF-β).A series of molecular and cellular techniques can be applied to define and characterize the state of EMT in diverse biological samples. These methods range from DNA and RNA-based techniques that measure the expression of key EMT regulators and markers of epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation to functional assays of cell mobility, invasiveness and in vitro stemness. This chapter focuses on EMT induced by TGF-β and provides authoritative protocols and relevant reagents and citations of key publications aiming at assisting newcomers that enter this prolific area of biomedical sciences, and offering a useful reference tool to pioneers and aficionados of the field. PMID:26520123

  17. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β signaling promotes epiblast formation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-02-15

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways--TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)--significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only.

  18. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Promotes Epiblast Formation in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways—TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)—significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only. PMID:25245024

  19. Dynamics of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling in Wound Healing and Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Finnson, Kenneth W.; McLean, Sarah; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M.; Philip, Anie

    2013-01-01

    Significance Wound healing is an intricate biological process in which the skin, or any other tissue, repairs itself after injury. Normal wound healing relies on the appropriate levels of cytokines and growth factors to ensure that cellular responses are mediated in a coordinated manner. Among the many growth factors studied in the context of wound healing, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is thought to have the broadest spectrum of effects. Recent Advances Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway have been elucidated, and the role of TGF-β in wound healing has been well characterized. Targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway using therapeutic agents to improve wound healing and/or reduce scarring has been successful in pre-clinical studies. Critical Issues Although TGF-β isoforms (β1, β2, β3) signal through the same cell surface receptors, they display distinct functions during wound healing in vivo through mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. The challenge of translating preclinical studies targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway to a clinical setting may require more extensive preclinical research using animal models that more closely mimic wound healing and scarring in humans, and taking into account the spatial, temporal, and cell-type–specific aspects of TGF-β isoform expression and function. Future Directions Understanding the differences in TGF-β isoform signaling at the molecular level and identification of novel components of the TGF-β signaling pathway that critically regulate wound healing may lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for treatment of impaired wound healing and pathological scarring. PMID:24527343

  20. Effect of transforming growth factor beta on synthesis of glycosaminoglycans by human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dubaybo, B.A.; Thet, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The processes of lung growth, injury, and repair are characterized by alterations in fibroblast synthesis and interstitial distribution of extracellular matrix components. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), which is postulated to play a role in modulating lung repair, alters the distribution of several matrix components such as collagen and fibronectin. We studied the effect of TGF-beta on the synthesis and distribution of the various glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and whether these effects may explain its role in lung repair. Human diploid lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) were exposed to various concentrations of TGF-beta (0-5 nM) for variable periods of time (0-18 h). Newly synthesized GAGs were labeled with either (3H)glucosamine or (35S)sulfate. Individual GAGs were separated by size exclusion chromatography after serial enzymatic and chemical digestions and quantitated using scintillation counting. There was a dose-dependent increase in total GAG synthesis with maximal levels detected after 6 h of exposure. This increase was noted in all individual GAG types measured and was observed in both the cell associated GAGs (cell-matrix fraction) as well as the GAGs released into the medium (medium fraction). In the cell-matrix fraction, TGF-beta increased the proportion of heparan sulfate that was membrane bound as well as the proportion of dermatan sulfate in the intracellular compartment. In the medium fraction, TGF-beta increased the proportion of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate released. We conclude that the role of TGF-beta in lung growth and repair may be related to increased synthesis of GAGs by human lung fibroblasts as well as alterations in the distribution of individual GAGs.

  1. Analysis of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Induced by Transforming Growth Factor β.

    PubMed

    Valcourt, Ulrich; Carthy, Jonathon; Okita, Yukari; Alcaraz, Lindsay; Kato, Mitsuyasu; Thuault, Sylvie; Bartholin, Laurent; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of the cell biological process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been established via an exponentially growing number of reports. EMT has been documented during embryonic development, tissue fibrosis, and cancer progression in vitro, in animal models in vivo and in human specimens. EMT relates to many molecular and cellular alterations that occur when epithelial cells undergo a switch in differentiation that generates mesenchymal-like cells with newly acquired migratory and invasive properties. In addition, EMT relates to a nuclear reprogramming similar to the one occurring in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Via such a process, EMT is gradually established to promote the generation and maintenance of adult tissue stem cells which under disease states such as cancer, are known as cancer stem cells. EMT is induced by developmental growth factors, oncogenes, radiation, and hypoxia. A prominent growth factor that causes EMT is transforming growth factor β (TGF-β).A series of molecular and cellular techniques can be applied to define and characterize the state of EMT in diverse biological samples. These methods range from DNA and RNA-based techniques that measure the expression of key EMT regulators and markers of epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation to functional assays of cell mobility, invasiveness and in vitro stemness. This chapter focuses on EMT induced by TGF-β and provides authoritative protocols and relevant reagents and citations of key publications aiming at assisting newcomers that enter this prolific area of biomedical sciences, and offering a useful reference tool to pioneers and aficionados of the field.

  2. Overview of Transforming Growth Factor β Superfamily Involvement in Glioblastoma Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Nana, Andre Wendindonde; Yang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Hung-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma, also known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is the most aggressive of human brain tumors and has a stunning progression with a mean survival of one year from the date of diagnosis. High cell proliferation, angiogenesis and/or necrosis are histopathological features of this cancer, which has no efficient curative therapy. This aggressiveness is associated with particular heterogeneity of the tumor featuring multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations, but also with implications of aberrant signaling driven by growth factors. The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily is a large group of structurally related proteins including TGFβ subfamily members Nodal, Activin, Lefty, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and growth and differentiation factor (GDF). It is involved in important biological functions including morphogenesis, embryonic development, adult stem cell differentiation, immune regulation, wound healing and inflammation. This superfamily is also considered to impact on cancer biology including that of GBM, with various effects depending on the member. The TGFβ subfamily, in particular, is overexpressed in some GBM types which exhibit aggressive phenotypes. This subfamily impairs anti-cancer immune responses in several ways, including immune cells inhibition and major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and II abolishment. It promotes GBM angiogenesis by inducing angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-I) and insulin- like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), contributes to GBM progression by inducing metalloproteinases (MMPs), "pro-neoplastic" integrins (αvβ3, α5β1) and GBM initiating cells (GICs) as well as inducing a GBM mesenchymal phenotype. Equally, Nodal promotes GICs, induces cancer metabolic switch and supports GBM cell proliferation, but is negatively regulated by Lefty. Activin promotes GBM cell proliferation while GDF yields immune-escape function

  3. Regulation of an Actin Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Barney; Shin, Jennifer; Brau, Ricardo; Lang, Matthew; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-03-01

    To produce motion, cells rely on the conversion of potential energy into mechanical work. One such example is the dramatic process involving the acrosome reaction of Limulus sperm, whereby a 60 μm-long bundle of actin filaments straightens from a coiled conformation to extend out of the cell in five seconds. This cellular engine and the motion it produces represent a third type of actin-based motility fundamentally different from polymerization or myosin-driven processes. The motive force for this extension originates from stored elastic energy in the overtwisted, pre-formed coil---much like a compressed mechanical spring. When the actin bundle untwists, this energy is converted to mechanical work powering the extension. We report on experiments probing the regulation of this actin spring by extracellular calcium. We find that extracellular calcium needs to be present for the spring to activate, and that calcium regulates the velocity of the extension.

  4. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  5. Pollen specific expression of maize genes encoding actin depolymerizing factor-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, I; Anthony, R G; Maciver, S K; Jiang, C J; Khan, S; Weeds, A G; Hussey, P J

    1996-01-01

    In pollen development, a dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton takes place during the passage of the pollen grain into dormancy and on activation of pollen tube growth. A role for actin-binding proteins is implicated and we report here the identification of a small gene family in maize that encodes actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)-like proteins. The ADF group of proteins are believed to control actin polymerization and depolymerization in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Two of the maize genes ZmABP1 and ZmABP2 are expressed specifically in pollen and germinating pollen suggesting that the protein products may be involved in pollen actin reorganization. A third gene, ZmABP3, encodes a protein only 56% and 58% identical to ZmABP1 and ZmABP2, respectively, and its expression is suppressed in pollen and germinated pollen. The fundamental biochemical characteristics of the ZmABP proteins has been elucidated using bacterially expressed ZmABP3 protein. This has the ability to bind monomeric actin (G-actin) and filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, it decreases the viscosity of polymerized actin solutions consistent with an ability to depolymerize filaments. These biochemical characteristics, taken together with the sequence comparisons, support the inclusion of the ZmABP proteins in the ADF group. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8693008

  6. Regulation of actin catch-slip bonds with a RhoA-formin module

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cho-yin; Lou, Jizhong; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Chien, Shu; Ono, Shoichiro; Zhu, Cheng; McIntire, Larry V.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated cooperatively by force and biochemical signaling. We previously demonstrated that actin depolymerization under force is governed by catch-slip bonds mediated by force-induced K113:E195 salt-bridges. Yet, the biochemical regulation as well as the functional significance of actin catch bonds has not been elucidated. Using AFM force-clamp experiments, we show that formin controlled by RhoA switches the actin catch-slip bonds to slip-only bonds. SMD simulations reveal that the force does not induce the K113:E195 interaction when formin binds to actin K118 and E117 residues located at the helical segment extending to K113. Actin catch-slip bonds are suppressed by single residue replacements K113E and E195K that interrupt the force-induced K113:E195 interaction; and this suppression is rescued by a K113E/E195K double mutant (E/K) restoring the interaction in the opposite orientation. These results support the biological significance of actin catch bonds, as they corroborate reported observations that RhoA and formin switch force-induced actin cytoskeleton alignment and that either K113E or E195K induces yeast cell growth defects rescued by E/K. Our study demonstrates how the mechano-regulation of actin dynamics is modulated by biochemical signaling molecules, and suggests that actin catch bonds may be important in cell functions. PMID:27731359

  7. Regulation of actin catch-slip bonds with a RhoA-formin module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cho-Yin; Lou, Jizhong; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Chien, Shu; Ono, Shoichiro; Zhu, Cheng; McIntire, Larry V.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated cooperatively by force and biochemical signaling. We previously demonstrated that actin depolymerization under force is governed by catch-slip bonds mediated by force-induced K113:E195 salt-bridges. Yet, the biochemical regulation as well as the functional significance of actin catch bonds has not been elucidated. Using AFM force-clamp experiments, we show that formin controlled by RhoA switches the actin catch-slip bonds to slip-only bonds. SMD simulations reveal that the force does not induce the K113:E195 interaction when formin binds to actin K118 and E117 residues located at the helical segment extending to K113. Actin catch-slip bonds are suppressed by single residue replacements K113E and E195K that interrupt the force-induced K113:E195 interaction; and this suppression is rescued by a K113E/E195K double mutant (E/K) restoring the interaction in the opposite orientation. These results support the biological significance of actin catch bonds, as they corroborate reported observations that RhoA and formin switch force-induced actin cytoskeleton alignment and that either K113E or E195K induces yeast cell growth defects rescued by E/K. Our study demonstrates how the mechano-regulation of actin dynamics is modulated by biochemical signaling molecules, and suggests that actin catch bonds may be important in cell functions.

  8. Three's company: the fission yeast actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kovar, David R; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    How the actin cytoskeleton assembles into different structures to drive diverse cellular processes is a fundamental cell biological question. In addition to orchestrating the appropriate combination of regulators and actin-binding proteins, different actin-based structures must insulate themselves from one another to maintain specificity within a crowded cytoplasm. Actin specification is particularly challenging in complex eukaryotes where a multitude of protein isoforms and actin structures operate within the same cell. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe possesses a single actin isoform that functions in three distinct structures throughout the cell cycle. In this review we explore recent studies in fission yeast that help unravel how different actin structures operate in cells.

  9. Structural insights into de novo actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many cellular functions depend on rapid and localized actin polymerization/depolymerization. Yet, the de novo polymerization of actin in cells is kinetically unfavorable because of the instability of polymerization intermediates (small actin oligomers) and the actions of actin monomer binding proteins. Cells use filament nucleation and elongation factors to initiate and sustain polymerization. Structural biology is beginning to shed light on the diverse mechanisms by which these unrelated proteins initiate polymerization, undergo regulation, and mediate the transition of monomeric actin onto actin filaments. A prominent role is played by the W domain, which in some of these proteins occurs in tandem repeats that recruit multiple actin subunits. Pro-rich regions are also abundant and mediate the binding of profilin-actin complexes, which are the main source of polymerization competent actin in cells. Filament nucleation and elongation factors frequently interact with Rho family GTPases, which relay signals from membrane receptors to regulate actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:20096561

  10. Involvement of actin filaments in rhizoid morphogenesis of Spirogyra.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsuhisa; Shimmen, Teruo

    2009-01-01

    The role of actin filaments in rhizoid morphogenesis was studied in Spirogyra. When the algal filaments were severed, new terminal cells started tip growth and finally formed rhizoids. Actin inhibitors, latrunculin B and cytochalasin D, reversibly inhibited the process. A mesh-like structure of actin filaments (AFs) was formed at the tip region. Gd(3+) inhibited tip growth and decreased AFs in the tip region. Either a decrease in turgor pressure or lowering of the external Ca(2+) concentration also induced similar results. It was suggested that the mesh-like AF structure is indispensable for the elongation of rhizoids. A possible organization mechanism of the mesh-like AF structure was discussed.

  11. Functional mapping of quantitative trait loci underlying growth trajectories using a transform-both-sides logistic model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongling; Ma, Chang-Xing; Lin, Min; Wang, Zuoheng; Casella, George

    2004-09-01

    The incorporation of developmental control mechanisms of growth has proven to be a powerful tool in mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying growth trajectories. A theoretical framework for implementing a QTL mapping strategy with growth laws has been established. This framework can be generalized to an arbitrary number of time points, where growth is measured, and becomes computationally more tractable, when the assumption of variance stationarity is made. In practice, however, this assumption is likely to be violated for age-specific growth traits due to a scale effect. In this article, we present a new statistical model for mapping growth QTL, which also addresses the problem of variance stationarity, by using a transform-both-sides (TBS) model advocated by Carroll and Ruppert (1984, Journal of the American Statistical Association 79, 321-328). The TBS-based model for mapping growth QTL cannot only maintain the original biological properties of a growth model, but also can increase the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation and the power to detect a QTL responsible for growth differentiation. Using the TBS-based model, we successfully map a QTL governing growth trajectories to a linkage group in an example of forest trees. The statistical and biological properties of the estimates of this growth QTL position and effect are investigated using Monte Carlo simulation studies. The implications of our model for understanding the genetic architecture of growth are discussed.

  12. Synthetic chondramide A analogues stabilize filamentous actin and block invasion by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher I; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Maier, Martin E; Sept, David; Sibley, L David

    2013-09-27

    Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii rely on actin-based motility to cross biological barriers and invade host cells. Key structural and biochemical differences in host and parasite actins make this an attractive target for small-molecule inhibitors. Here we took advantage of recent advances in the synthesis of cyclic depsipeptide compounds that stabilize filamentous actin to test the ability of chondramides to disrupt growth of T. gondii in vitro. Structural modeling of chondramide A (2) binding to an actin filament model revealed variations in the binding site between host and parasite actins. A series of 10 previously synthesized analogues (2b-k) with substitutions in the β-tyrosine moiety blocked parasite growth on host cell monolayers with EC₅₀ values that ranged from 0.3 to 1.3 μM. In vitro polymerization assays using highly purified recombinant actin from T. gondii verified that synthetic and natural product chondramides target the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, chondramide treatment blocked parasite invasion into host cells and was more rapidly effective than pyrimethamine, a standard therapeutic agent. Although the current compounds lack specificity for parasite vs host actin, these studies provide a platform for the future design and synthesis of synthetic cyclic peptide inhibitors that selectively disrupt actin dynamics in parasites. PMID:24020843

  13. Synthetic Chondramide A Analogues Stabilize Filamentous Actin and Block Invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii rely on actin-based motility to cross biological barriers and invade host cells. Key structural and biochemical differences in host and parasite actins make this an attractive target for small-molecule inhibitors. Here we took advantage of recent advances in the synthesis of cyclic depsipeptide compounds that stabilize filamentous actin to test the ability of chondramides to disrupt growth of T. gondii in vitro. Structural modeling of chondramide A (2) binding to an actin filament model revealed variations in the binding site between host and parasite actins. A series of 10 previously synthesized analogues (2b–k) with substitutions in the β-tyrosine moiety blocked parasite growth on host cell monolayers with EC50 values that ranged from 0.3 to 1.3 μM. In vitro polymerization assays using highly purified recombinant actin from T. gondii verified that synthetic and natural product chondramides target the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, chondramide treatment blocked parasite invasion into host cells and was more rapidly effective than pyrimethamine, a standard therapeutic agent. Although the current compounds lack specificity for parasite vs host actin, these studies provide a platform for the future design and synthesis of synthetic cyclic peptide inhibitors that selectively disrupt actin dynamics in parasites. PMID:24020843

  14. Isolation from Animal Tissue and Genetic Transformation of Coxiella burnetii Are Facilitated by an Improved Axenic Growth Medium▿

    PubMed Central

    Omsland, Anders; Beare, Paul A.; Hill, Joshua; Cockrell, Diane C.; Howe, Dale; Hansen, Bryan; Samuel, James E.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We recently described acidified citrate cysteine medium (ACCM), which supports host cell-free (axenic) growth of Coxiella burnetii. After 6 days of incubation, greater than 3 logs of growth was achieved with the avirulent Nine Mile phase II (NMII) strain. Here, we describe modified ACCM and culture conditions that support improved growth of C. burnetii and their use in genetic transformation and pathogen isolation from tissue samples. ACCM was modified by replacing fetal bovine serum with methyl-β-cyclodextrin to generate ACCM-2. Cultivation of NMII in ACCM-2 with moderate shaking and in 2.5% oxygen yielded 4 to 5 logs of growth over 7 days. Similar growth was achieved with the virulent Nine Mile phase I and G isolates of C. burnetii. Colonies that developed after 6 days of growth in ACCM-2 agarose were approximately 0.5 mm in diameter, roughly 5-fold larger than those formed in ACCM agarose. By electron microscopy, colonies consisted primarily of the C. burnetii small cell variant morphological form. NMII was successfully cultured in ACCM-2 when medium was inoculated with as little as 10 genome equivalents contained in tissue homogenates from infected SCID mice. A completely axenic C. burnetii genetic transformation system was developed using ACCM-2 that allowed isolation of transformants in about 2 1/2 weeks. Transformation experiments demonstrated clonal populations in colonies and a transformation frequency of approximately 5 × 10−5. Cultivation in ACCM-2 will accelerate development of C. burnetii genetic tools and provide a sensitive means of primary isolation of the pathogen from Q fever patients. PMID:21478315

  15. Polymerization of Actin from Maize Pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Yen, L. F.; Liu, X.; Cai, S.

    1995-01-01

    Here we describe the in vitro polymerization of actin from maize (Zea mays) pollen. The purified actin from maize pollen reported in our previous paper (X. Liu, L.F. Yen [1992] Plant Physiol 99: 1151-1155) is biologically active. In the presence of ATP, KCl, and MgCl2 the purified pollen actin polymerized into filaments. During polymerization the spectra of absorbance at 232 nm increased gradually. Polymerization of pollen actin was evidently accompanied by an increase in viscosity of the pollen actin solution. Also, the specific viscosity of pollen F-actin increased in a concentration-dependent manner. The ultraviolet difference spectrum of pollen actin is very similar to that of rabbit muscle actin. The activity of myosin ATPase from rabbit muscle was activated 7-fold by the polymerized pollen actin (F-actin). The actin filaments were visualized under the electron microscope as doubly wound strands of 7 nm diameter. If cytochalasin B was added before staining, no actin filaments were observed. When actin filaments were treated with rabbit heavy meromyosin, the actin filaments were decorated with an arrowhead structure. These results imply that there is much similarity between pollen and muscle actin. PMID:12228343

  16. Liposome-encapsulated actin-hemoglobin (LEAcHb) artificial blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuliang; Nickels, Jonathan; Palmer, Andre Francis

    2005-06-01

    A new approach to enhance the circulation persistence of liposomes has been applied to develop liposome-encapsulated actin-hemoglobin (LEAcHb) dispersions as potential blood substitutes by introducing an actin matrix into the liposome aqueous core. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle static light scattering was used to study the shape, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency of liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEHb) and LEAcHb dispersions. By polymerizing monomeric actin into filamentous actin inside the liposome aqueous core, LEAcHb particles transformed into a disk-like shape. We studied the effect of an encapsulated actin matrix on the size distribution, hemoglobin (Hb) encapsulation efficiency, oxygen affinity, and methemoglobin (MetHb) level of LEAcHb dispersions, and compared them with plain LEHb dispersions (without actin). LEHb, and LEAcHb dispersions extruded through 400 nm membranes were injected into rats and it was observed that LEAcHb dispersions with 1mg/mL of actin enhanced the circulatory half-life versus LEHb dispersions. The circulatory characteristics of empty PEGylated and non-PEGylated actin-containing liposomes (without Hb) were studied as controls for the LEHb and LEAcHb dispersions in this paper, which displayed maximum circulatory half-lives greater than 72 h. Taken together the results of this study supports our hypothesis that a lipid membrane supported by an underlying actin matrix will extend the circulatory half-life of LEHb dispersions.

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy and Light Scattering of Small Unilamellar Actin-Containing Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Andre F.; Wingert, Philip; Nickels, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional networks of filamentous actin (F-actin) encapsulated inside phosphatidylcholine liposomes are currently being used in an effort to model the cytoskeleton and plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. In this article, unilamellar lipid vesicles consisting of egg yolk-derived phosphatidylcholine encapsulating monomeric actin (G-actin) were made via extrusion in low ionic strength buffer (G-buffer). Vesicle shape and structure in these dispersions was studied using a combination of fluid-tapping atomic force microscopy, and multiangle static light scattering. After subjecting the liposome dispersion to high ionic strength polymerization buffer (F-buffer) containing K+ ions, atomic force microscopy imaging and light scattering of these liposomes indicated the formation of specialized structures, including an overall liposome structure transformation from spherical to torus, disk-shaped geometries and tubular assemblies. Several atomic force microscopy control measurements were made to ascertain that the specialized structures formed were not due to free G-actin and F-actin self-assembling on the sample surface, plain liposomes exposed to G- and F-buffer, or liposomes encapsulating G-actin. Liposomes encapsulating G-actin assumed mostly thin disk shapes and some large irregularly shaped aggregates. In contrast, liposomes encapsulating polymerized actin assumed mostly torus or disk shapes along with some high aspect ratio tubular structures. PMID:12885667

  18. Cultured rat mesangial cells contain smooth muscle alpha-actin not found in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Elger, M.; Drenckhahn, D.; Nobiling, R.; Mundel, P.; Kriz, W.

    1993-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against smooth muscle alpha-actin (SM alpha-actin) was used to study the expression of SM alpha-actin in kidney sections and mesangial cell (MC) cultures. In the tissue sections, indirect immunofluorescence revealed intense labeling of vascular smooth muscle cells and precapillary pericytes for SM alpha-actin. Glomerular cells including MC were negative, with the exception of scattered smooth muscle cells in the wall of the intraglomerular segment of the efferent arteriole. In contrast, in MC cultures 50 to 95% of the cells displayed bright fluorescence. Immunoreactivity for SM alpha-actin first appeared 3 days after explanation of glomeruli and increased until the primary culture reached subconfluence. In each subculture (1 to 10) expression of SM alpha-actin was weak on day 1 and pronounced at subconfluence. Growth arrest of subconfluent cultures for 1 to 7 days in serum-free medium did not alter the percentage of cells positive for SM alpha-actin. However, exposure of MC to serum-free medium beginning on the first day of subculture curtailed expression of SM alpha-actin. Double-labeling with antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen and SM alpha-actin revealed SM alpha-actin-positive filaments in both replicating and resting cells. In summary, our results demonstrate that some process or processes associated with cell proliferation and cell growth of MC are accompanied by de novo expression of SM alpha-actin. The relevance to the contractile behavior of the difference in SM alpha-actin expression under in vitro and in vivo conditions is unknown. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:8434645

  19. Increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial fibrosis in transgenic goats expressing transforming growth factor - B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in people with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong association between atrial fibrosis and AF. Transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1) is an essential mediator of atrial fibrosis in animal models and human pat...

  20. Growth habit and photo-synthetic activity of shoot cultures of Medicago sativa L. transformed with the oryzacystatin II gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro maintained shoot cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Zajeÿarska 83) that were transformed with the oryzacystatin II (OCII) gene and propagated on growth regulator-free medium were subjected to analysis of morphological characteristics and photosynthetic activity. The most striking f...

  1. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  2. Tyrosine dephosphorylation of nuclear proteins mimics transforming growth factor {beta}1 stimulation of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwel, P.; Hu, Wei; Ramirez, F.; Kohanski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how the transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulates the transcription of the gene coding for collagen I (COL1A2). The report goes on to correlate tyrosine dephosphorylation, increased binding of a transcriptional complex and TGF-{beta}1 stimulation of gene expression. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Potassium inhibits dietary salt-induced transforming growth factor-beta production.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W

    2009-11-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-beta. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-beta demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-beta in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-beta but did not affect production of TGF-beta by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the alpha subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-beta but did not alter TGF-beta production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake.

  4. Transforming growth factor: beta signaling is essential for limb regeneration in axolotls.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Mathieu; Gatien, Samuel; Finnson, Kenneth; Desmeules, Sophie; Villiard, Eric; Pilote, Mireille; Philip, Anie; Roy, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Axolotls (urodele amphibians) have the unique ability, among vertebrates, to perfectly regenerate many parts of their body including limbs, tail, jaw and spinal cord following injury or amputation. The axolotl limb is the most widely used structure as an experimental model to study tissue regeneration. The process is well characterized, requiring multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms. The preparation phase represents the first part of the regeneration process which includes wound healing, cellular migration, dedifferentiation and proliferation. The redevelopment phase represents the second part when dedifferentiated cells stop proliferating and redifferentiate to give rise to all missing structures. In the axolotl, when a limb is amputated, the missing or wounded part is regenerated perfectly without scar formation between the stump and the regenerated structure. Multiple authors have recently highlighted the similarities between the early phases of mammalian wound healing and urodele limb regeneration. In mammals, one very important family of growth factors implicated in the control of almost all aspects of wound healing is the transforming growth factor-beta family (TGF-beta). In the present study, the full length sequence of the axolotl TGF-beta1 cDNA was isolated. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of TGF-beta1 in regenerating limbs shows that this gene is up-regulated during the preparation phase of regeneration. Our results also demonstrate the presence of multiple components of the TGF-beta signaling machinery in axolotl cells. By using a specific pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-beta type I receptor, SB-431542, we show that TGF-beta signaling is required for axolotl limb regeneration. Treatment of regenerating limbs with SB-431542 reveals that cellular proliferation during limb regeneration as well as the expression of genes directly dependent on TGF-beta signaling are down-regulated. These data directly implicate TGF-beta signaling in the

  5. Relation of spontaneous transformation in cell culture to adaptive growth and clonal heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rubin, A L; Yao, A; Rubin, H

    1990-01-01

    Cell transformation in culture is marked by the appearance of morphologically altered cells that continue to multiply to form discrete foci in confluent sheets when the surrounding cells are inhibited. These foci occur spontaneously in early-passage NIH 3T3 cells grown to confluency in 10% calf serum (CS) but are not seen in cultures grown to confluency in 2% CS. However, repeated passage of the cells at low density in 2% CS gives rise to an adapted population that grows to increasingly higher saturation densities and produces large numbers of foci in 2% CS. The increased saturation density of the adapted population in 2% CS is retained upon repeated passage in 10% CS, but the number and size of the foci produced in 2% CS gradually decrease under this regime. Clonal analysis confirms that the focus-forming potential of most if not all of the cells in a population increases in response to a continuously applied growth constraint, although only a small fraction of the population may actually form foci in a given assay. The acquired capacity for focus formation varies widely in clones derived from the adapted population and changes in diverse ways upon further passage of the clones. We propose that the adaptive changes result from progressive selection of successive phenotypic variations in growth capacity that occur spontaneously. The process designated progressive state selection resolves the apparent dichotomy between spontaneous mutation with selection on the one hand and induction on the other, by introducing selection among fluctuating states or metabolic patterns rather than among genetically altered cells.

  6. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  7. Loss of transforming growth factor-beta 2 leads to impairment of central synapse function

    PubMed Central

    Heupel, Katharina; Sargsyan, Vardanush; Plomp, Jaap J; Rickmann, Michael; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Zhang, Weiqi; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    Background The formation of functional synapses is a crucial event in neuronal network formation, and with regard to regulation of breathing it is essential for life. Members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily act as intercellular signaling molecules during synaptogenesis of the neuromuscular junction of Drosophila and are involved in synaptic function of sensory neurons of Aplysia. Results Here we show that while TGF-β2 is not crucial for the morphology and function of the neuromuscular junction of the diaphragm muscle of mice, it is essential for proper synaptic function in the pre-Bötzinger complex, a central rhythm organizer located in the brainstem. Genetic deletion of TGF-β2 in mice strongly impaired both GABA/glycinergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the pre-Bötzinger complex area, while numbers and morphology of central synapses of knock-out animals were indistinguishable from their wild-type littermates at embryonic day 18.5. Conclusion The results demonstrate that TGF-β2 influences synaptic function, rather than synaptogenesis, specifically at central synapses. The functional alterations in the respiratory center of the brain are probably the underlying cause of the perinatal death of the TGF-β2 knock-out mice. PMID:18854036

  8. Targeting the Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathway in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S

    2009-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes. TGF-β switches its role from tumor suppressor in normal or dysplastic cells to a tumor promoter in advanced cancers. It is widely believed that Smad-dependent pathway is involved in TGF-β tumor suppressive functions, whereas activation of Smad-independent pathways coupled with the loss of tumor suppressor functions of TGF-β is important for its pro-oncogenic functions. TGF-β signaling has been considered as a very suitable therapeutic target. The discovery of oncogenic actions of TGF-β has generated a great deal of enthusiasm for developing TGF-β signaling inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. The challenge is to identify the group of patients where targeted tumors are not only refractory to TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor functions but also responsive to tumor promoting effects of TGF-β. TGF-β pathway inhibitors including small and large molecules have now entered clinical trials. Preclinical studies with these inhibitors have shown promise in a variety of different tumor models. Here we emphasize on the mechanisms of signaling and specific targets of the TGF-β pathway that are critical effectors of tumor progression and invasion. This report also focuses on the therapeutic intervention of TGF-β signaling in human cancers. PMID:20001556

  9. Transforming Growth Factor β Drives Hemogenic Endothelium Programming and the Transition to Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rui; Pinheiro, Philip; Joseph, Nicola; Peterkin, Tessa; Koth, Jana; Repapi, Emmanouela; Bonkhofer, Florian; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are self-renewing multipotent stem cells that generate mature blood lineages throughout life. They, together with hematopoietic progenitor cells (collectively known as HSPCs), emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the floor of the embryonic dorsal aorta by an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is required for HSPC specification and that it regulates the expression of the Notch ligand Jagged1a in endothelial cells prior to EHT, in a striking parallel with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The requirement for TGFβ is two fold and sequential: autocrine via Tgfβ1a and Tgfβ1b produced in the endothelial cells themselves, followed by a paracrine input of Tgfβ3 from the notochord, suggesting that the former programs the hemogenic endothelium and the latter drives EHT. Our findings have important implications for the generation of HSPCs from pluripotent cells in vitro. PMID:27499523

  10. Structure-function analysis of synthetic and recombinant derivatives of transforming growth factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Wegrzyn, R J; Vuocolo, G A; Baker, A E; Payne, L S; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Riemen, M W

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) is a 50-amino-acid peptide that stimulates cell proliferation via binding to cell surface receptors. To identify the structural features of TGF-alpha that govern receptor-ligand interactions, we prepared synthetic peptide fragments and recombinant mutant proteins of TGF-alpha. These TGF-alpha derivatives were tested in receptor binding and mitogenesis assays. Synthetic peptides representing the N terminus, the C terminus, or the individual disulfide constrained rings of TGF-alpha did not exhibit receptor-binding or mitogenic activity. Replacement of the cysteines with alanines at positions 8 and 21, 16 and 32, and 34 and 43 or at positions 8 and 21 and 34 and 43 yielded inactive mutant proteins. However, mutant proteins containing substitutions or deletions in the N-terminal region retained significant biologic activity. Conservative amino acid changes at residue 29 or 38 or both and a nonconservative amino acid change at residue 12 had little effect on binding or mitogenesis. However, nonconservative amino acid changes at residues 15, 38, and 47 produced dramatic decreases in receptor binding (23- to 71-fold) and mitogenic activity (38- to 125-fold). These studies indicate that at least three distinct regions of TGF-alpha contribute to biologic activity. PMID:2850475

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 is decreased in remodeling hypertensive bovine pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Botney, M D; Parks, W C; Crouch, E C; Stenmark, K; Mecham, R P

    1992-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension in hypoxic newborn calves is associated with a complex pattern of increased tropoelastin and type I procollagen synthesis and deposition by smooth muscle cells in large elastic pulmonary arteries compared to normoxic controls. We examined the possibility that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) may be associated with the production of extracellular matrix protein in this model of pulmonary hypertension. Medial smooth muscle cells in both normotensive and hypertensive vessels, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, were the major source of TGF-beta 1. Staining was confined to foci of smooth muscle cells in the outer media and appeared greater in normotensive than hypertensive vessels. Consistent with the immunohistochemistry, a progressive, age-dependent increase in normotensive pulmonary artery TGF-beta 1 mRNA was observed after birth, whereas TGF-beta 1 mRNA remained at low, basal levels in hypertensive, remodeling pulmonary arteries. These observations suggest that local expression of TGF-beta 1 is not associated with increased extracellular matrix protein synthesis in this model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Images PMID:1569202

  12. Integration of sexual trauma in a religious narrative: transformation, resolution and growth among contemplative nuns.

    PubMed

    Durà-Vilà, Glòria; Littlewood, Roland; Leavey, Gerard

    2013-02-01

    The psychological consequences of sexual abuse are generally serious and enduring, particularly when the perpetrator is known and trusted by the survivor. This paper explores the experiences of five contemplative nuns who were sexually abused by priests and the spiritual journeys that followed. In the context of an ethnographic study of contemplative practice, participant observation and in-depth interviews were used to examine the ways that the nuns sought to make sense of their experiences through a long process of solitary introspection. The pursuit of meaning was shaped by religious beliefs relating to forgiveness, sacrifice, and salvation. Thus, trauma was transformed into a symbolic religious narrative that shaped their sense of identity. They were able to restructure core beliefs and to manage their current relationships with priests more securely. They described regaining their spiritual well-being in ways that suggest a form of posttraumatic spiritual growth. We conclude by discussing the findings in the light of the existing literature on the interaction of trauma and spirituality.

  13. Ursolic acid, an antagonist for transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru; Takashima, Hajime; Sato-Watanabe, Mariko; Chonan, Sumi; Yamamoto, Koji; Saitoh, Masako; Saito, Shiuji; Yoshimura, Hiromitsu; Sugawara, Koko; Yang, Junshan; Gao, Nannan; Zhang, Xinggao

    2004-05-21

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine which is involved in extracellular matrix modulation, has a major role in the pathogenesis and progression of fibrotic diseases. We now report the effects of ursolic acid on TGF-beta1 receptor binding and TGF-beta1-induced cellular functions in vitro. Ursolic acid inhibited [(125)I]-TGF-beta1 receptor binding to Balb/c 3T3 mouse fibroblasts with an IC(50) value of 6.9+/-0.8 microM. Ursolic acid dose-dependently recovered reduced proliferation of Minc Mv1Lu cells in the presence of 5 nM of TGF-beta1 and attenuated TGF-beta1-induced collagen synthesis and production in human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ursolic acid may interact with the hydrophobic region of the dimeric interface and thereby inhibit the binding of TGF-beta1 to its receptor. All these findings taken together show that ursolic acid functions as an antagonist for TGF-beta1. This is the first report to show that a small molecule can inhibit TGF-beta1 receptor binding and influence functions of TGF-beta1.

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta signaling in thoracic aortic aneurysm development: a paradox in pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) are potentially devastating, and due to their asymptomatic behavior, pose a serious health risk characterized by the lack of medical treatment options and high rates of surgical morbidity and mortality. Independent of the inciting stimuli (biochemical/mechanical), TAA development proceeds by a multifactorial process influenced by both cellular and extracellular mechanisms, resulting in alterations of the structure and composition of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). While the role of enhanced ECM proteolysis in TAA formation remains undisputed, little attention has been focused on the upstream signaling events that drive the remodeling process. Recent evidence highlighting the dysregulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling in ascending TAAs from Marfan syndrome patients has stimulated an interest in this intracellular signaling pathway. However, paradoxical discoveries have implicated both enhanced TGF-β signaling and loss of function TGF-β receptor mutations, in aneurysm formation; obfuscating a clear functional role for TGF-β in aneurysm development. In an effort to elucidate this subject, TGF-β signaling and its role in vascular remodeling and pathology will be reviewed, with the aim of identifying potential mechanisms of how TGF-β signaling may contribute to the formation and progression of TAA. PMID:18765947

  15. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  16. Genetic variations in the transforming growth factor beta pathway as predictors of bladder cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua; Kamat, Ashish M; Aldousari, Saad; Ye, Yuanqing; Huang, Maosheng; Dinney, Colin P; Wu, Xifeng

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and identifying genetic markers that may predict susceptibility in high-risk population is always needed. The purpose of our study is to determine whether genetic variations in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway are associated with bladder cancer risk. We identified 356 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 key genes from this pathway and evaluated their association with cancer risk in 801 cases and 801 controls. Forty-one SNPs were significantly associated with cancer risk, and after adjusting for multiple comparisons, 9 remained significant (Q-value ≤0.1). Haplotype analysis further revealed three haplotypes within VEGFC and two haplotypes in EGFR were significantly associated with increased bladder cancer risk compared to the most common haplotype. Classification and regression tree analysis further revealed potential high-order gene-gene interactions, with VEGFC: rs3775194 being the initial split, which suggests that this variant is responsible for the most variation in risk. Individuals carrying the common genotype for VEGFC: rs3775194 and EGFR: rs7799627 and the variant genotype for VEGFR: rs4557213 had a 4.22-fold increase in risk, a much larger effect magnitude than that conferred by common genotype for VEGFR: rs4557213. Our study provides the first epidemiological evidence supporting a connection between TGF-β pathway variants and bladder cancer risk.

  17. Role of transforming growth factor-beta in the development of the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical methods, we have investigated the role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in the development of the mouse embryo. For detection of TGF-beta in 11-18-d-old embryos, we have used a polyclonal antibody specific for TGF-beta type 1 and the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique. Staining of TGF-beta is closely associated with mesenchyme per se or with tissues derived from mesenchyme, such as connective tissue, cartilage, and bone. TGF-beta is conspicuous in tissues derived from neural crest mesenchyme, such as the palate, larynx, facial mesenchyme, nasal sinuses, meninges, and teeth. Staining of all of these tissues is greatest during periods of morphogenesis. In many instances, intense staining is seen in mesenchyme when critical interactions with adjacent epithelium occur, as in the development of hair follicles, teeth, and the submandibular gland. Marked staining is also seen when remodeling of mesenchyme or mesoderm occurs, as during formation of digits from limb buds, formation of the palate, and formation of the heart valves. The presence of TGF-beta is often coupled with pronounced angiogenic activity. The histochemical results are discussed in terms of the known biochemical actions of TGF-beta, especially its ability to control both synthesis and degradation of both structural and adhesion molecules of the extracellular matrix. PMID:3320058

  18. Effect of transforming growth factor-β3 on mono and multilayer chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Youseffi, Mansour; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Soon, Chin Fhung; Javid, Farideh

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and flexible connective tissue found in joints. It produces a cushioning effect at the joints and provides low friction to protect the ends of the bones from wear and tear/damage. It has poor repair capacity and any injury can result pain and loss of mobility. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), a cytokine superfamily, regulates cell function, including differentiation and proliferation. Although the function of the TGF-βs in various cell types has been investigated, their function in cartilage repair is as yet not fully understood. The effect of TGF-β3 in biological regulation of primary chondrocyte was investigated in this work. TGF-β3 provided fibroblastic morphology to chondrocytes and therefore overall reduction in cell proliferation was observed. The length of the cells supplemented with TGF-β3 were larger than the cells without TGF-β3 treatment. This was caused by the fibroblast like cells (dedifferentiated chondrocytes) which occupied larger areas compared to cells without TGF-β3 addition. The healing process of the model wound closure assay of chondrocyte multilayer was slowed down by TGF-β3, and this cytokine negatively affected the strength of chondrocyte adhesion to the cell culture surface. PMID:27108397

  19. Association of transforming growth-factor alpha gene polymorphisms with nonsyndromic cleft palate only (CPO)

    SciTech Connect

    Shiang, R. ); Lidral, A.C.; Ardinger, H.H.; Murray, J.C.; Romitti, P.A.; Munger, R.G.; Buetow, K.H.

    1993-10-01

    Genetic analysis and tissue-specific expression studies support a role for transforming growth-factor alpha (TGFA) in craniofacial development. Previous studies have confirmed an association of alleles for TGFA with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) in humans. The authors carried out a retrospective association study to determine whether specific allelic variants of the TGFA gene are also associated with cleft palate only (CPO). The PCR products from 12 overlapping sets of primers to the TGFA cDNA were examined by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis. Four DNA polymorphic sites for TGFA were identified in the 3[prime] untranslated region of the TGFA gene. These variants, as well as previously identified RFLPs for TGFA, were characterized in case and control populations for CPO by using X[sup 2] analysis. A significant association between alleles of TGFA and CPO was identified which further supports a role for this gene as one of the genetic determinants of craniofacial development. Sequence analysis of the variants disclosed a cluster of three variable sites within 30 bp of each other in the 3[prime] untranslated region previously associated with an antisense transcript. These studies extend the role for TGFA in craniofacial morphogenesis and support an interrelated mechanism underlying nonsyndromic forms of CL/P. 46 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Transforming growth factor receptor type II (ec-TβR II) behaves as a halophile.

    PubMed

    Saini, Komal; Khan, M Ashhar I; Chakrapani, Sumit; Deep, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The members of transforming growth factor β family (TGF-β) are multifunctional proteins but their main role is to control cell proliferation and differentiation. Polypeptides of TGF-β family function by binding to two related, functionally distinct transmembrane receptor kinases, first to the type II (TβR II) followed by type I receptor (TβR I). The paper describes, in details, the stability of wt-ec-TβR II under different conditions. The stability of wt-ec-TβR II was observed at different pH and salt concentration using fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability of ec-TβR II decreases with decrease in pH. Interestingly, the addition of salt increases the stability of the TβRII at pH 5.0 as observed for halophiles. Computational analysis using DELPHI suggests that this is probably due to the decrease in repulsion between negatively charged residues at surface on the addition of salt. This is further confirmed by the change in the stability of receptor on mutation of some of the residues (D32A) at surface.

  1. Transforming Growth Factors β Coordinate Cartilage and Tendon Differentiation in the Developing Limb Mesenchyme*

    PubMed Central

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I.; Montero, Juan A.; Martinez-Cue, Carmen; Garcia-Porrero, Juan A.; Hurle, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling has an increasing interest in regenerative medicine as a potential tool to repair cartilages, however the chondrogenic effect of this pathway in developing systems is controversial. Here we have analyzed the function of TGFβ signaling in the differentiation of the developing limb mesoderm in vivo and in high density micromass cultures. In these systems highest signaling activity corresponded with cells at stages preceding overt chondrocyte differentiation. Interestingly treatments with TGFβs shifted the differentiation outcome of the cultures from chondrogenesis to fibrogenesis. This phenotypic reprogramming involved down-regulation of Sox9 and Aggrecan and up-regulation of Scleraxis, and Tenomodulin through the Smad pathway. We further show that TGFβ signaling up-regulates Sox9 in the in vivo experimental model system in which TGFβ treatments induce ectopic chondrogenesis. Looking for clues explaining the dual role of TGFβ signaling, we found that TGFβs appear to be direct inducers of the chondrogenic gene Sox9, but the existence of transcriptional repressors of TGFβ signaling modulates this role. We identified TGF-interacting factor Tgif1 and SKI-like oncogene SnoN as potential candidates for this inhibitory function. Tgif1 gene regulation by TGFβ signaling correlated with the differential chondrogenic and fibrogenic effects of this pathway, and its expression pattern in the limb marks the developing tendons. In functional experiments we found that Tgif1 reproduces the profibrogenic effect of TGFβ treatments. PMID:19717568

  2. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and programmed cell death in the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Duenker, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a precisely regulated phenomenon essential for the homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Developmental systems, particularly the nervous system, have provided key observations supporting the physiological role of PCD. We have recently shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays an important role in mediating ontogenetic PCD in the nervous system. As part of the central nervous system the developing retina serves as an ideal model system for investigating apoptotic processes during neurogenesis in vivo as it is easily accessible experimentally and less complex due to its limited number of different neurons. This review summarizes data indicating a pivotal role of TGF-beta in mediating PCD in the vertebrate retina. The following topics are discussed: expression of TGF-beta isoforms and receptors in the vertebrate retina, the TGF-beta signaling pathway, functions and molecular mechanisms of PCD in the nervous system, TGF-beta-mediated retinal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and interactions of TGF-beta with other pro- and anti-apoptotic factors.

  3. Metformin is a novel suppressor for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Han; Zhang, Jianshu; Xu, Zhonghe; Feng, Yenan; Zhang, Mingliang; Liu, Jianli; Chen, Ruifei; Shen, Jing; Wu, Jimin; Lu, Zhizhen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Jingyuan; Zhang, Youyi

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used first-line antidiabetic drug that has been shown to protect against a variety of specific diseases in addition to diabetes, including cardiovascular disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the diverse therapeutic effects of metformin remain elusive. Here, we report that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, is a novel target of metformin. Using a surface plasmon resonance-based assay, we identified the direct binding of metformin to TGF-β1 and found that metformin inhibits [125I]-TGF-β1 binding to its receptor. Furthermore, based on molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, metformin was predicted to interact with TGF-β1 at its receptor-binding domain. Single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed that metformin reduces the binding probability but not the binding force of TGF-β1 to its type II receptor. Consequently, metformin suppresses type II TGF-β1 receptor dimerization upon exposure to TGF-β1, which is essential for downstream signal transduction. Thus, our results indicate that metformin is a novel TGF-β suppressor with therapeutic potential for numerous diseases in which TGF-β1 hyperfunction is indicated. PMID:27349853

  4. Integration of sexual trauma in a religious narrative: Transformation, resolution and growth among contemplative nuns

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Roland; Leavey, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The psychological consequences of sexual abuse are generally serious and enduring, particularly when the perpetrator is known and trusted by the survivor. This paper explores the experiences of five contemplative nuns who were sexually abused by priests and the spiritual journeys that followed. In the context of an ethnographic study of contemplative practice, participant observation and in-depth interviews were used to examine the ways that the nuns sought to make sense of their experiences through a long process of solitary introspection. The pursuit of meaning was shaped by religious beliefs relating to forgiveness, sacrifice, and salvation. Thus, trauma was transformed into a symbolic religious narrative that shaped their sense of identity. They were able to restructure core beliefs and to manage their current relationships with priests more securely. They described regaining their spiritual well-being in ways that suggest a form of posttraumatic spiritual growth. We conclude by discussing the findings in the light of the existing literature on the interaction of trauma and spirituality. PMID:23296289

  5. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor I Inhibitor Sensitizes Drug-resistant Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Hwang, Jae Seok; Hong, Young Bin; Bae, Insoo; Seong, Yeon-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance to gemcitabine is a major obstacle in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Previous exploration of protein kinase inhibitors demonstrated that blocking transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signal enhances the efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. Materials and Methods We analyzed the cell viability after combinational treatment of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI) inhibitors, SB431542 and SB525334 with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, apoptotic cell death and cell migration were measured. Results Combination with TβRI inhibitors significantly augmented the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine in both parental and gemcitabine resistant pancreatic cancer cells. SB525334 significantly increased apoptotic cell death in gemcitabine-resistant cells. Treatment of SB525334 also reduced AKT signal pathway, which plays crucial role in gemcitabine resistance. Migration assay also revealed that blocking TβRI reduces cell migration. Conclusion Chemotherapeutic approaches using SB525334 might enhance the treatment benefit of the gemcitabine-containing regimens in the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:22399597

  6. Elevated Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Plasma of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuchtey, John; Kunkel, Jessica; Burgess, L. Goodwin; Parks, Megan B.; Brantley, Milam A.; Kuchtey, Rachel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To test the hypothesis that primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients have a systemic elevation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Methods. Plasma was prepared from blood samples drawn from patients of the Vanderbilt Eye Institute during clinic visits. Concentrations of total TGFβ1 and thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) in plasma were determined by ELISA. Statistical significance of differences between POAG and control samples was evaluated by Mann-Whitney test. Regression analysis was used to evaluate correlations between plasma TGFβ1 and patient age and between plasma TGFβ1 and TSP1. Results. Plasma samples were obtained from 148 POAG patients and 150 controls. Concentration of total TGFβ1 in the plasma of POAG patients (median = 3.25 ng/mL) was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than in controls (median = 2.46 ng/mL). Plasma TGFβ1 was not correlated with age of patient (P = 0.17). Thrombospondin-1 concentration was also significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in POAG patients (median = 0.774 μg/mL) as compared to controls (median = 0.567 μg/mL). Plasma total TGFβ1 and TSP1 concentrations were linearly correlated (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Plasma samples from POAG patients display elevated total TGFβ1 compared to controls, consistent with elevated systemic TGFβ1 in POAG patients. PMID:25061114

  7. Transforming growth factor-β2 is sequestered in preterm human milk by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Coffing, Hayley P; Sankaranarayanan, Nehru Viji; Jin, Yingzi; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Frost, Brandy L; Blanco, Cynthia L; Patel, Aloka L; Meier, Paula P; Garzon, Steven A; Desai, Umesh R; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-08-01

    Human milk contains biologically important amounts of transforming growth factor-β2 isoform (TGF-β2), which is presumed to protect against inflammatory gut mucosal injury in the neonate. In preclinical models, enterally administered TGF-β2 can protect against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis, an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In this study, we investigated whether TGF-β bioactivity in human preterm milk could be enhanced for therapeutic purposes by adding recombinant TGF-β2 (rTGF-β2) to milk prior to feeding. Milk-borne TGF-β bioactivity was measured by established luciferase reporter assays. Molecular interactions of TGF-β2 were investigated by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and immunoblots, computational molecular modeling, and affinity capillary electrophoresis. Addition of rTGF-β2 (20-40 nM) to human preterm milk samples failed to increase TGF-β bioactivity in milk. Milk-borne TGF-β2 was bound to chondroitin sulfate (CS) containing proteoglycan(s) such as biglycan, which are expressed in high concentrations in milk. Chondroitinase treatment of milk increased the bioactivity of both endogenous and rTGF-β2, and consequently, enhanced the ability of preterm milk to suppress LPS-induced NF-κB activation in macrophages. These findings provide a mechanism for the normally low bioavailability of milk-borne TGF-β2 and identify chondroitinase digestion of milk as a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of preterm milk.

  8. Differential expression of transforming growth factor-beta in the interstitial tissue of testis during aging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Chang; Park, Geun-Tae; Kim, Kook-Hee; Woo, Ju Hyung; An, Jung-Min; Kim, Ki-Chul; Chung, Hae Young; Bae, Young-Seuk; Park, Jeen Woo; Kang, Shin-Sung; Lee, Young-Sup

    2004-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) have significant effects on testis development. The pattern of TGF-beta expression in aging testis has not been established to date. We examined age-related changes in the expression of TGF-beta and its receptors in the testis using Western blot analysis. TGF-beta1 expression increased continuously in aging rat testis, whereas no age-associated changes were observed for TGF-beta3. Strong expression of TGF-beta2, as well as type I and II receptors was observed in 12-month-old testis, but following this time, expression decreased dramatically. Interestingly, TGF-beta2 and -beta3 displayed strong and similar expression patterns in liver, regardless of age, suggesting that the down-regulation of TGF-beta2 is testis-specific. We observed significant induction of p53 and p21WAF1 in 18-month-old testis that appeared to correspond with aging. Moreover, caloric restriction (CR) prevented age-related decrease in TGF-beta2 expression. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that all TGF-beta1, -beta2, and -beta3 proteins are expressed primarily in interstitial cells, which are located in the space between adjoining seminiferous tubules. Our data collectively indicate that aging in the testis is regulated by differential expression of TGF-beta proteins, and decreased levels of TGF-beta2 contribute to the aging process.

  9. Genetic programs of epithelial cell plasticity directed by transforming growth factor-β

    PubMed Central

    Zavadil, Jiri; Bitzer, Markus; Liang, Dan; Yang, Yaw-Ching; Massimi, Aldo; Kneitz, Susanne; Piek, Ester; Böttinger, Erwin P.

    2001-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) are an essential manifestation of epithelial cell plasticity during morphogenesis, wound healing, and tumor progression. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) modulates epithelial plasticity in these physiological contexts by inducing EMT. Here we report a transcriptome screen of genetic programs of TGF-β-induced EMT in human keratinocytes and propose functional roles for extracellular response kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in cell motility and disruption of adherens junctions. We used DNA arrays of 16,580 human cDNAs to identify 728 known genes regulated by TGF-β within 4 hours after treatment. TGF-β-stimulated ERK signaling mediated regulation of 80 target genes not previously associated with this pathway. This subset is enriched for genes with defined roles in cell–matrix interactions, cell motility, and endocytosis. ERK-independent genetic programs underlying the onset of EMT involve key pathways and regulators of epithelial dedifferentiation, undifferentiated transitional and mesenchymal progenitor phenotypes, and mediators of cytoskeletal reorganization. The gene expression profiling approach delineates complex context-dependent signaling pathways and transcriptional events that determine epithelial cell plasticity controlled by TGF-β. Investigation of the identified pathways and genes will advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms that underlie tumor invasiveness and metastasis. PMID:11390996

  10. Association of Transforming Growth Factor Alpha Polymorphisms with Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate in Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Ebadifar, Asghar; Hamedi, Roya; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Saliminejad, Kioomars; Kamali, Koorosh; Aghakhani Moghadam, Fatemeh; Esmaeili Anvar, Nazanin; Ameli, Nazilla

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is one of the most common congenital anomalies and the etiology of orofacial clefts is multifactorial. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) is expressed at the medial edge epithelium of fusing palatal shelves during craniofacial development. In this study, the association of two important TGFA gene polymorphisms, BamHI (rs11466297) and RsaI (rs3732248), with CL/P was evaluated in an Iranian population. Methods: The frequencies of BamHI and RsaI variations were determined in 105 unrelated Iranian subjects with nonsyndromic CL/P and 218 control subjects using PCR and RFLP methods, and the results were compared with healthy controls. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The BamHI AC genotype was significantly higher (p=0.016) in the patients (12.4%) than the control group (5.0%). The BamHI C allele was significantly higher (p=0.001; OR=3.4, 95% CI: 1.6–7.4) in the cases (8.0%) compared with the control group (2.5%). Conclusion: Our study showed that there was an association between the TGFA BamHI variation and nonsyndromic CL/P in Iranian population. PMID:26605011

  11. Transforming Growth Factor-β and Endoglin Signaling Orchestrate Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Valluru, Manoj; Staton, Carolyn A.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Brown, Nicola J.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological wound healing is a complex process requiring the temporal and spatial co-ordination of various signaling networks, biomechanical forces, and biochemical signaling pathways in both hypoxic and non-hypoxic conditions. Although a plethora of factors are required for successful physiological tissue repair, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) expression has been demonstrated throughout wound healing and shown to regulate many processes involved in tissue repair, including production of ECM, proteases, protease inhibitors, migration, chemotaxis, and proliferation of macrophages, fibroblasts of the granulation tissue, epithelial and capillary endothelial cells. TGF-β mediates these effects by stimulating signaling pathways through a receptor complex which contains Endoglin. Endoglin is expressed in a broad spectrum of proliferating and stem cells with elevated expression during hypoxia, and regulates important cellular functions such as proliferation and adhesion via Smad signaling. This review focuses on how the TGF-β family and Endoglin, regulate stem cell availability, and modulate cellular behavior within the wound microenvironment, includes current knowledge of the signaling pathways involved, and explores how this information may be applicable to inflammatory and/or angiogenic diseases such as fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis and metastatic cancer. PMID:22164144

  12. Transforming growth factor-β1 in carcinogenesis, progression, and therapy in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Sun, Luzhe; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional cytokine that plays important roles in cervical tumor formation, invasion, progression, and metastasis. TGF-β1 functions as a tumor inhibitor in precancerous lesions and early stage cancers of cervix whereas as a tumor promoter in later stage. This switch from a tumor inhibitor to a tumor promoter might be due to various alterations in TGF-β signaling pathway, such as mutations or loss of expression of TGF-β receptors and SMAD proteins. Additionally, the oncoproteins of human papillomaviruses have been shown to stimulate TGF-β1 expression, which in turn suppresses host immune surveillance. Thus, in addition to driving tumor cell migration and metastasis, TGF-β1 is believed to play a key role in promoting human papillomavirus infection by weakening host immune defense. In this article, we will discuss the role of TGF-β1 in the expression, carcinogenesis, progression, and therapy in cervical cancers. A better understanding of this cytokine in cervical carcinogenesis is essential for critical evaluation of this cytokine as a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target. PMID:27010470

  13. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  14. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) isomers influence cell detachment of MG-63 bone cells.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Nejatian, Touraj; Genedy, Mohammed; Abdeldayem, Ali; Moghaddam, Zoha Salehi; Denyer, Morgan C T; Youseffi, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    Bone repair and wound healing are modulated by different stimuli. There is evidence that Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family of cytokines have significant effects on bone structure by regulating the replication and differentiation of chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. There is also significant evidence that interactions with extracellular matrix molecules influence cell behaviour. In this study cell surface attachment was examined via a trypsinization assay using various TGF-β isomers in which the time taken to trypsinize cells from the surface provided a means of assessing the strength of attachment. Three TGF-β isomers (TGF-β1, 2 and 3), four combined forms (TGF-β(1+2), TGF-β(1+3), TGF-β(2+3) and TGF-β(1+2+3)) along with four different controls (BSA, HCl, BSA/HCl and negative control) were investigated in this study. The results indicated that treatment with TGF-β1, 2, 3 and HCl decreased cell attachment, however, this effect was significantly greater in the case of TGF-β3 (p<0.001) indicating perhaps that TGF-β3 does not act alone in cell detachment, but instead functions synergistically with signalling pathways that are dependent on the availability of hydrogen ions. Widefield Surface Plasmon Resonance (WSPR) microscope was also used to investigate cell surface interactions.

  15. Metformin is a novel suppressor for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Zhang, Jianshu; Xu, Zhonghe; Feng, Yenan; Zhang, Mingliang; Liu, Jianli; Chen, Ruifei; Shen, Jing; Wu, Jimin; Lu, Zhizhen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Jingyuan; Zhang, Youyi

    2016-06-01

    Metformin is a widely used first-line antidiabetic drug that has been shown to protect against a variety of specific diseases in addition to diabetes, including cardiovascular disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the diverse therapeutic effects of metformin remain elusive. Here, we report that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, is a novel target of metformin. Using a surface plasmon resonance-based assay, we identified the direct binding of metformin to TGF-β1 and found that metformin inhibits [125I]-TGF-β1 binding to its receptor. Furthermore, based on molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, metformin was predicted to interact with TGF-β1 at its receptor-binding domain. Single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed that metformin reduces the binding probability but not the binding force of TGF-β1 to its type II receptor. Consequently, metformin suppresses type II TGF-β1 receptor dimerization upon exposure to TGF-β1, which is essential for downstream signal transduction. Thus, our results indicate that metformin is a novel TGF-β suppressor with therapeutic potential for numerous diseases in which TGF-β1 hyperfunction is indicated.

  16. Analysis of the transforming growth factor-beta 1 gene promoter polymorphisms in early osseointegrated implant failure.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Maria Cristina Leme Godoy; Campos, Maria Isabela Guimarães; Souza, Ana Paula; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel Mantuaneli; Mazzonetto, Renato; Line, Sergio Roberto Peres

    2004-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 is a multifunctional cytokine involved in extracellular matrix deposition, reduction of inflammation, and promotion of wound healing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of human transforming growth factor-beta 1 gene, C-509T and G-800A, have been shown to increase the transcriptional activity of this cytokine and have been associated with a variety of diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible association between these single nucleotide polymorphisms and the early implant failure. A sample of 68 nonsmoking patients was divided into two groups: a test group comprising 28 patients with one or more early failed implants and a control group consisting of 40 individuals with one or more healthy implants. Genomic DNA from oral mucosa was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The significance of the differences in observed frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms was assessed using the chi square test and Fisher's exact test. The cited single nucleotide polymorphisms in transforming growth factor-beta 1 were analyzed in combination as haplotype using the computer program ARLEQUIN. The authors did not observe significant differences in the allele and genotypes to both single nucleotide polymorphisms of transforming growth factor-beta 1 gene (C-509T and G-800A) between control and early implant failure groups. The distribution of the haplotypes arranged as allele and genotypes were similar between control and test groups. These results indicate that C-509T and G-800A polymorphisms in the transforming growth factor-beta 1 gene are not associated separately or in haplotype combinations with early implant failure, suggesting that the presence of those single nucleotide polymorphisms alone do not constitute a genetic risk factor for early implant failure in the Brazilian population. PMID:15359164

  17. Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Augments Calvarial Defect Healing and Promotes Suture Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Sameer; MacIsaac, Zoe M.; Naran, Sanjay; Smith, Darren M.; Bykowski, Michael R.; Cray, James J.; Craft, Timothy K.; Wang, Dan; Weiss, Lee; Campbell, Phil G.; Mooney, Mark P.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Repair of complex cranial defects is hindered by a paucity of appropriate donor tissue. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) have been shown separately to induce bone formation through physiologically distinct mechanisms and potentially improve surgical outcome for cranial defect repair by obviating the need for donor tissue. We hypothesize that a combination of BMP2 and TGFβ1 would improve calvarial defect healing by augmenting physiologic osteogenic mechanisms. Methods/Results: Coronal suturectomies (3×15 mm) were performed in 10-day-old New Zealand White rabbits. DermaMatrix™ (3×15mm) patterned with four treatments (vehicle, 350 ng BMP2, 200 ng TGFβ1, or 350 ng BMP2+200 ng TGFβ1) was placed in suturectomy sites and rabbits were euthanized at 6 weeks of age. Two-dimensional (2D) defect healing, bone volume, and bone density were quantified by computed tomography. Regenerated bone was qualitatively assessed histologically. One-way analysis of variance revealed significant group main effects for all bone quantity measures. Analysis revealed significant differences in 2D defect healing, bone volume, and bone density between the control group and all treatment groups, but no significant differences were detected among the three growth factor treatment groups. Qualitatively, TGFβ1 treatment produced bone with morphology most similar to native bone. TGFβ1-regenerated bone contained a suture-like tissue, growing from the lateral edge of the defect margin toward the midline. Unique to the BMP2 treatment group, regenerated bone contained lacunae with chondrocytes, demonstrating the presence of endochondral ossification. Conclusions/Significance: Total healing in BMP2 and TGFβ1 treatment groups is not significantly different. The combination of BMP2+TGFβ1 did not significantly increase bone healing compared with treatment with BMP2 or TGFβ1 alone postoperatively at 4 weeks. We highlight the

  18. Porous tricalcium phosphate and transforming growth factor used for anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Steffen, T; Stoll, T; Arvinte, T; Schenk, R K

    2001-10-01

    Harvesting autologous bone graft from the iliac crest is associated with considerable secondary morbidity. Bone graft substitutes such as porous ceramics are increasingly used for spinal surgery. This paper presents the results of an animal study in which beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) bone substitutes were used for anterior spinal surgery in sheep and baboons. The presented baboon study also investigated the effect of impregnating the ceramic material with transforming growth factor (TGF). In the first study, using the sheep model, a stand-alone instrumented anterior fusion was performed. The animals were randomized into three treatment groups: autologous bone, beta-TCP granules, and sham group. The results were analyzed biomechanically and histologically at three survival intervals: 8, 16 and 32 weeks. An additional animal group was added later, with ceramic pre-filled implants. In the second study, a baboon model was used to assess the osteointegration of a 15-mm-diameter porous beta-TCP block into the vertebral body. The experiment was partially motivated by a new surgical procedure proposed for local bone graft harvest. Three treatment groups were used: beta-TCP plug, beta-TCP plug impregnated with TGF-beta3, and a sham group with empty defect. The evaluation for all animals included computer tomograms at 3 and 6 months, as well as histology at 6 months. In the sheep model, the mechanical evaluation failed to demonstrate differences between treatment groups. This was because massive anterior bone bridges formed in almost all the animals, masking the effects of individual treatments. Histologically, beta-TCP was shown to be a good osteoconductor. While multiple signs of implant micromotion were documented, pre-filling the cages markedly improved the histological fusion outcomes. In the baboon study, the beta-TCP plugs were completely osteointegrated at 6 months. For the group that used ceramic plugs impregnated with TGF-beta3, no incremental advantage was

  19. Human pulmonary acinar aplasia: reduction of transforming growth factor-beta ligands and receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, M F; Gray, K D; Prentice, M A; Mariano, J M; Jakowlew, S B

    1999-07-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia has been found in the human neonatal autopsy population and has been attributed to an alteration in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development of the lung. Pulmonary acinar aplasia is a very rare and severe form of pulmonary hypoplasia. The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-beta) are multifunctional regulatory peptides that are secreted by a variety of normal and malignant cells and are expressed in developing organs including the lung; their tissue distribution patterns have possible significance for signaling roles in many epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Here, we report our examination of TGF-beta in the lungs of a term female infant diagnosed with pulmonary acinar aplasia whose autopsy revealed extremely hypoplastic lungs with complete absence of alveolar ducts and alveoli. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses were used to localize and measure the proteins and mRNA, respectively, for TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, and TGF-beta type I and type II receptors (TGF-beta RI and RII) in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of these hypoplastic lungs and normal lungs. Immunostaining for TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, and TGF-beta RI and RII was significantly lower in the bronchial epithelium and muscle of the hypoplastic lungs than in normal lungs, whereas no difference was detected in staining for other proteins including Clara cell 10-kD protein, adrenomedullin, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor/Met in the hypoplastic and normal lungs or in the liver and kidneys of this infant compared with normal liver and kidney. In addition, in situ hybridization showed that TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta RI transcripts were considerably reduced in the bronchial epithelium of the hypoplastic lung compared with normal lung. These results show that there is a selective reduction of TGF-beta in pulmonary acinar aplasia and suggest that the signaling action of TGF-beta in epithelial

  20. Organized F-actin is essential for normal trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, D B; Marks, M D; Wick, S M

    1999-01-01

    Actin microfilaments form a three-dimensional cytoskeletal network throughout the cell and constitute an essential throughway for organelle and vesicle transport. Development of Arabidopsis trichomes, unicellular structures derived from the epidermis, is being used as a genetic system in which to study actin-dependent growth in plant cells. The present study indicates that filamentous actin (F-actin) plays an important role during Arabidopsis trichome morphogenesis. For example, immunolocalization of actin filaments during trichome morphogenesis identified rearrangements of the cytoskeletal structure during the development of the mature cell. Moreover, pharmacological experiments indicate that there are distinct requirements for actin- and microtubule-dependent function during trichome morphogenesis. The F-actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D does not affect the establishment of polarity during trichome development; however, maintenance and coordination of the normal pattern of cell growth are very sensitive to this drug. In contrast, oryzalin, an agent that depolymerizes microtubules, severely inhibits cell polarization. Furthermore, cytochalasin D treatment phenocopies a known class of mutations that cause distorted trichome morphology. Results of an analysis of cell shape and microfilament structure in wild-type, mutant, and drug-treated trichomes are consistent with a role for actin in the maintenance and coordination of an established growth pattern. PMID:10590162

  1. Effect of Flumorph on F-Actin Dynamics in the Potato Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chenlei; Kots, Kiki; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine; Meijer, Harold J G

    2015-04-01

    Oomycetes are fungal-like pathogens that cause notorious diseases. Protecting crops against oomycetes requires regular spraying with chemicals, many with an unknown mode of action. In the 1990s, flumorph was identified as a novel crop protection agent. It was shown to inhibit the growth of oomycete pathogens including Phytophthora spp., presumably by targeting actin. We recently generated transgenic Phytophthora infestans strains that express Lifeact-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), which enabled us to monitor the actin cytoskeleton during hyphal growth. For analyzing effects of oomicides on the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, the P. infestans Lifeact-eGFP strain is an excellent tool. Here, we confirm that flumorph is an oomicide with growth inhibitory activity. Microscopic analyses showed that low flumorph concentrations provoked hyphal tip swellings accompanied by accumulation of actin plaques in the apex, a feature reminiscent of tips of nongrowing hyphae. At higher concentrations, swelling was more pronounced and accompanied by an increase in hyphal bursting events. However, in hyphae that remained intact, actin filaments were indistinguishable from those in nontreated, nongrowing hyphae. In contrast, in hyphae treated with the actin depolymerizing drug latrunculin B, no hyphal bursting was observed but the actin filaments were completely disrupted. This difference demonstrates that actin is not the primary target of flumorph. PMID:25496300

  2. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... growths on the skin caused by too much sun exposure). Diclofenac is in a class of medications ... plan to avoid exposure to real and artificial sunlight (sun lamps) and to wear protective clothing and ...

  3. Enhancer of zeste homolog-2 (EZH2) methyltransferase regulates transgelin/smooth muscle-22α expression in endothelial cells in response to interleukin-1β and transforming growth factor-β2.

    PubMed

    Maleszewska, Monika; Gjaltema, Rutger A F; Krenning, Guido; Harmsen, Martin C

    2015-08-01

    Smooth muscle-22α (SM22α), encoded by transgelin (TAGLN), is expressed in mesenchymal lineage cells, including myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. It is an F-actin binding protein that regulates the organization of actin cytoskeleton, cellular contractility and motility. SM22α is crucial for the maintenance of smooth muscle cell phenotype and its function. SM22α is also expressed in the processes of mesenchymal transition of epithelial (EMT) or endothelial cells (EndMT). The expression of TAGLN/SM22α is induced by transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling and enhanced by concomitant interleukin-1β (IL-1β) signaling. We investigated the epigenetic regulation of TAGLN expression by enhancer of zeste homolog-2 (EZH2), the methyltransferase of Polycomb, in the context of TGFβ and IL-1β signaling in endothelial cells. We demonstrate that the expression of EZH2 in endothelial cells was regulated by the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. A decrease in both expression and activity of EZH2 led to an increase in TAGLN expression. Inhibition of EZH2 augmented TGFβ2-induced SM22α expression. The decrease of EZH2 levels in endothelial cells co-stimulated with IL-1β and TGFβ2 correlated with decreased H3K27me3 levels at the TAGLN proximal promoter. Moreover, the SM22α expression increased. Taken together, this suggests that EZH2 regulates the chromatin structure at the TAGLN promoter through tri-methylation of H3K27. EZH2 therefore acts as an epigenetic integrator of IL-1β and TGFβ2 signaling, providing an example of how cellular signaling can be resolved at the level of epigenetic regulation. Since IL-1β and TGFβ2 represent the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic conditions during vascular fibroproliferative disease, we surmise that EZH2, as the molecule that integrates their signaling, could also be a promising target for development of future therapy.

  4. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  5. Aqueous Date Flesh or Pits Extract Attenuates Liver Fibrosis via Suppression of Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines, Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Angiogenic Markers in Carbon Tetrachloride-Intoxicated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rasheed, Nouf M.; Attia, Hala A.; Mohamad, Raeesa A.; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M.; Al-Amin, Maha A.; AL-Onazi, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Previous data indicated the protective effect of date fruit extract on oxidative damage in rat liver. However, the hepatoprotective effects via other mechanisms have not been investigated. This study was performed to evaluate the antifibrotic effect of date flesh extract (DFE) or date pits extract (DPE) via inactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reducing the levels of inflammatory, fibrotic and angiogenic markers. Coffee was used as reference hepatoprotective agent. Liver fibrosis was induced by injection of CCl4 (0.4 mL/kg) three times weekly for 8 weeks. DFE, DPE (6 mL/kg), coffee (300 mg/kg), and combination of coffee + DFE and coffee + DPE were given to CCl4-intoxicated rats daily for 8 weeks. DFE, DPE, and their combination with coffee attenuated the elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. The increased levels of transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen deposition in injured liver were alleviated by both extracts. CCl4-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin was suppressed indicating HSCs inactivation. Increased angiogenesis was ameliorated as revealed by reduced levels and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD31. We concluded that DFE or DPE could protect liver via different mechanisms. The combination of coffee with DFE or DPE may enhance its antifibrotic effects. PMID:25945106

  6. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  7. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M; Wong, Elissa W P; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby arriving the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium beyond stage VIII of the epithelial cycle will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come.

  8. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  9. Profilin-Dependent Nucleation and Assembly of Actin Filaments Controls Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in plant cells are incredibly dynamic; they undergo incessant remodeling and assembly or disassembly within seconds. These dynamic events are choreographed by a plethora of actin-binding proteins, but the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we dissect the contribution of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PROFILIN1 (PRF1), a conserved actin monomer-binding protein, to actin organization and single filament dynamics during axial cell expansion of living epidermal cells. We found that reduced PRF1 levels enhanced cell and organ growth. Surprisingly, we observed that the overall frequency of nucleation events in prf1 mutants was dramatically decreased and that a subpopulation of actin filaments that assemble at high rates was reduced. To test whether profilin cooperates with plant formin proteins to execute actin nucleation and rapid filament elongation in cells, we used a pharmacological approach. Here, we used Small Molecule Inhibitor of Formin FH2 (SMIFH2), after validating its mode of action on a plant formin in vitro, and observed a reduced nucleation frequency of actin filaments in live cells. Treatment of wild-type epidermal cells with SMIFH2 mimicked the phenotype of prf1 mutants, and the nucleation frequency in prf1-2 mutant was completely insensitive to these treatments. Our data provide compelling evidence that PRF1 coordinates the stochastic dynamic properties of actin filaments by modulating formin-mediated actin nucleation and assembly during plant cell expansion. PMID:26574597

  10. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima.

  11. TWISTED DWARF1 Mediates the Action of Auxin Transport Inhibitors on Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinsheng; Bailly, Aurelien; Zwiewka, Marta; Sovero, Valpuri; Di Donato, Martin; Ge, Pei; Oehri, Jacqueline; Aryal, Bibek; Hao, Pengchao; Linnert, Miriam; Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias; Michel, Max; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Pollmann, Stephan; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Ferro, Noel; Fukao, Yoichiro; Hoffmann, Céline; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Friml, Jiří; Thomas, Clément; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth and architecture is regulated by the polar distribution of the hormone auxin. Polarity and flexibility of this process is provided by constant cycling of auxin transporter vesicles along actin filaments, coordinated by a positive auxin-actin feedback loop. Both polar auxin transport and vesicle cycling are inhibited by synthetic auxin transport inhibitors, such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), counteracting the effect of auxin; however, underlying targets and mechanisms are unclear. Using NMR, we map the NPA binding surface on the Arabidopsis thaliana ABCB chaperone TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). We identify ACTIN7 as a relevant, although likely indirect, TWD1 interactor, and show TWD1-dependent regulation of actin filament organization and dynamics and that TWD1 is required for NPA-mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The TWD1-ACTIN7 axis controls plasma membrane presence of efflux transporters, and as a consequence act7 and twd1 share developmental and physiological phenotypes indicative of defects in auxin transport. These can be phenocopied by NPA treatment or by chemical actin (de)stabilization. We provide evidence that TWD1 determines downstream locations of auxin efflux transporters by adjusting actin filament debundling and dynamizing processes and mediating NPA action on the latter. This function appears to be evolutionary conserved since TWD1 expression in budding yeast alters actin polarization and cell polarity and provides NPA sensitivity. PMID:27053424

  12. Synthetic polyamines: new compounds specific to actin dynamics for mammalian cell and fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Riveline, Daniel; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Carlier, Marie-France

    2014-01-01

    Actin is a major actor in the determination of cell shape. On the one hand, site-directed assembly/disassembly cycles of actin filaments drive protrusive force leading to lamellipodia and filopodia dynamics. Force produced by actin similarly contributes in membrane scission in endocytosis or Golgi remodeling. On the other hand, cellular processes like adhesion, immune synapse, cortex dynamics or cytokinesis are achieved by combining acto-myosin contractility and actin assembly in a complex and not fully understood manner. New chemical compounds are therefore needed to disentangle acto-myosin and actin dynamics. We have found that synthetic, cell permeant, short polyamines are promising new actin regulators in this context. They generate growth and stabilization of lamellipodia within minutes by slowing down the actin assembly/disassembly cycle and facilitating nucleation. We now report that these polyamines also slow down cytokinetic ring closure in fission yeast. This shows that these synthetic compounds are active also in yeasts, and these experiments specifically highlight that actin depolymerization is involved in the ring closure. Thus, synthetic polyamines appear to be potentially powerful agents in a quantitative approach to the role of actin in complex processes in cell biology, developmental biology and potentially cancer research.

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta1 upregulates myostatin expression in mouse C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Budasz-Rwiderska, M; Jank, M; Motyl, T

    2005-06-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) belong to the same TGF-beta superfamily of proteins. They are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle growth and development as well as muscle catabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MSTN and TGF-beta1 expression in proliferating and differentiating mouse C2C12 myoblasts cultured in normal and catabolic conditions and to evaluate the effect of exogenous TGF-beta1 as well as "knock down" of TGF-beta1 receptor type II on MSTN expression in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. The direct effect of TGF-beta1 on myostatin was also examined. Myostatin expression increased gradually with cell confluency in proliferating cultures, while the level of TGF-beta1, detected in the form of a 100 kDa small latent complex diminished. Myostatin expression was accompanied by a partial cell cycle arrest. Three forms of myostatin were found: a 52 kDa precursor, a 40 kDa latency associated propeptide, and a 26 kDa active peptide. A decrease in myostatin and TGF-beta1 levels was observed during the first three days of differentiation, which was subsequently followed by significant increase of their expression during next three to four days of differentiation. Catabolic state induced by dexamethasone significantly increased the level of all forms of myostatin as well as latent (100 kDa) and active (25 kDa) forms of TGF-beta1 in differentiating myoblasts in a dose dependent manner. Exogenous TGF-beta1 (2 ng/ml) significantly increased myostatin levels both in proliferating and differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, whereas silencing of the TGF-beta1 receptor II gene significantly lowered myostatin level in examined cells. The presented results indicate that TGF-beta1 may control myostatin-related regulation of myogenesis through up-regulation of myostatin, predominantly in the course of terminal differentiation and glucocorticoid-dependent catabolic stimulation.

  14. Transforming Growth Factor-α Improves Memory Impairment and Neurogenesis Following Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Alipanahzadeh, Hassan; Soleimani, Mansooreh; Soleimani Asl, Sara; Pourheydar, Bagher; Nikkhah, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stroke is most important cause of death and disability in adults. The hippocampal CA1 and sub-ventricular zone neurons are vulnerable to ischemia that can impair memory and learning functions. Although neurogenesis normally occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) following brain damage, this response is unable to compensate for severely damaged areas. This study aims to assess both neurogenesis and the neuroprotective effects of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) on the hippocampus and SVZ following ischemia-reperfusion. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a total of 48 male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: surgical (n=12), phosphate buffered saline (PBS) treated vehicle shams (n=12), ischemia (n=12) and treatment (n=12) groups. Ischemia was induced by common carotid occlusion for 30 minutes followed by reperfusion, and TGF-α was then injected into the right lateral ventricle. Spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM). Nestin and Bcl-2 family protein expressions were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot methods, respectively. Finally, data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA) version 16 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results TGF-α injection significantly increased nestin expression in both the hippocampal DG and SVZ areas. TGF-α treatment caused a significant decrease in Bax expression and an increase in Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic protein expression in the hippocampus. Our results showed a significant increase in the number of pyramidal neurons. Memory also improved significantly following TGF-α treatment. Conclusion Our findings proved that TGF-α reduced ischemic injury and played a neuroprotective role in the pathogenesis of ischemic injury. PMID:24611146

  15. Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor-β1–driven Lung Fibrosis by Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Alison C.; Gibbons, Michael A.; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Leffler, Hakon; Nilsson, Ulf J.; Delaine, Tamara; Simpson, A. John; Forbes, Stuart J.; Hirani, Nik; Gauldie, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic dysregulated response to alveolar epithelial injury with differentiation of epithelial cells and fibroblasts into matrix-secreting myofibroblasts resulting in lung scaring. The prognosis is poor and there are no effective therapies or reliable biomarkers. Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside binding lectin that is highly expressed in fibrotic tissue of diverse etiologies. Objectives: To examine the role of galectin-3 in pulmonary fibrosis. Methods: We used genetic deletion and pharmacologic inhibition in well-characterized murine models of lung fibrosis. Further mechanistic studies were performed in vitro and on samples from patients with IPF. Measurements and Main Results: Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis was dramatically reduced in mice deficient in galectin-3, manifest by reduced TGF-β1–induced EMT and myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Galectin-3 reduced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of β-catenin but had no effect on Smad2/3 phosphorylation. A novel inhibitor of galectin-3, TD139, blocked TGF-β–induced β-catenin activation in vitro and in vivo and attenuated the late-stage progression of lung fibrosis after bleomycin. There was increased expression of galectin-3 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum from patients with stable IPF compared with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis and controls, which rose sharply during an acute exacerbation suggesting that galectin-3 may be a marker of active fibrosis in IPF and that strategies that block galectin-3 may be effective in treating acute fibrotic exacerbations of IPF. Conclusions: This study identifies galectin-3 as an important regulator of lung fibrosis and provides a proof of principle for galectin-3 inhibition as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for IPF. PMID:22095546

  16. Transforming growth factor-ß1 genotype and susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Chau, J; Young, R; Pokorny, V; Mills, G; Hopkins, R; McLean, L; Black, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Only a few long term smokers develop symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and this may be due, at least in part, to genetic susceptibility to the disease. Transforming growth factor ß1 (TGF-ß1) has a number of actions that make it a candidate for a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. We have investigated a single nucleotide polymorphism at exon 1 nucleotide position 29 (T→C) of the TGF-ß1 gene that produces a substitution at codon 10 (Leu→Pro). Methods: The frequency of this polymorphism was determined in 165 subjects with COPD, 140 healthy blood donors, and 76 smokers with normal lung function (resistant smokers) using the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism. Results: The distribution of genotypes was Leu-Leu (41.8%), Leu-Pro (50.3%), and Pro-Pro (7.9%) for subjects with COPD, which was significantly different from the control subjects (blood donors: Leu-Leu (29.3%), Leu-Pro (52.1%) and Pro-Pro (18.6%), p = 0.006; resistant smokers: Leu-Leu (28.9%), Leu-Pro (51.3%) and Pro-Pro (19.7%), p = 0.02). The Pro10 allele was less common in subjects with COPD (33%) than in blood donors (45%; OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.86, p = 0.005) and resistant smokers (45%; OR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.88, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The proline allele at codon 10 of the TGF-ß1 gene occurs more commonly in control subjects than in individuals with COPD. This allele is associated with increased production of TGF-ß1 which raises the possibility that TGF-ß1 has a protective role in COPD. PMID:14760152

  17. Transforming growth factor-β2 is sequestered in preterm human milk by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Coffing, Hayley P.; Sankaranarayanan, Nehru Viji; Jin, Yingzi; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Frost, Brandy L.; Blanco, Cynthia L.; Patel, Aloka L.; Meier, Paula P.; Garzon, Steven A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2015-01-01

    Human milk contains biologically important amounts of transforming growth factor-β2 isoform (TGF-β2), which is presumed to protect against inflammatory gut mucosal injury in the neonate. In preclinical models, enterally administered TGF-β2 can protect against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis, an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In this study, we investigated whether TGF-β bioactivity in human preterm milk could be enhanced for therapeutic purposes by adding recombinant TGF-β2 (rTGF-β2) to milk prior to feeding. Milk-borne TGF-β bioactivity was measured by established luciferase reporter assays. Molecular interactions of TGF-β2 were investigated by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and immunoblots, computational molecular modeling, and affinity capillary electrophoresis. Addition of rTGF-β2 (20–40 nM) to human preterm milk samples failed to increase TGF-β bioactivity in milk. Milk-borne TGF-β2 was bound to chondroitin sulfate (CS) containing proteoglycan(s) such as biglycan, which are expressed in high concentrations in milk. Chondroitinase treatment of milk increased the bioactivity of both endogenous and rTGF-β2, and consequently, enhanced the ability of preterm milk to suppress LPS-induced NF-κB activation in macrophages. These findings provide a mechanism for the normally low bioavailability of milk-borne TGF-β2 and identify chondroitinase digestion of milk as a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of preterm milk. PMID:26045614

  18. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  19. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Expression and clinical significance of the transforming growth factor-β signalling pathway in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Akers, Stacey; DuPont, Nefertiti Chianti; Clark, Kimberly; Lele, Shashikant; Liu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the components of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β–Smad signalling pathway in human endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and results TGF-β1, TGF-β receptor type I, TGF-β receptor type II, Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, Skil and Disabled-2 (DAB2) mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on EC cell lines and in 70 EC tissues. Immunohistochemistry for Skil and DAB2 antibodies was performed on 362 EC cases. Decreased mRNA levels of all eight components of the TGF-β pathway tested were found in the majority of 70 cases. For DAB2, the mRNA level was correlated with protein expression level (P = 0.04). The Skil mRNA level was associated with tumour stage (P = 0.03), and the Smad2/3/4 mRNA level with tumour grade (P = 0.03, P = 0.02, and P = 0.00, respectively). The Smad4 mRNA level was also associated with tumour size (P = 0.05), subtype (P = 0.04), and disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.05). The TGF-β1 mRNA level was associated with DFS (P = 0.04). Finally, tumours with positive Skil protein expression had a shorter recurrence time, whereas, those with positive DAB2 protein expression had a longer recurrence time. Conclusions Down-regulation of the TGF-β–Smad signalling pathway might be responsible for the pathogenesis of human EC, and some of its components appeared to be prognostic factors. Exploration of future therapy targeting the TGF-β–Smad pathway is warranted in EC. PMID:21771027

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced EMT via Wnt/Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has anti-fibrotic potential in lung, kidney and other organs. The exogenous H2S is released from sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and can influence the renal fibrosis by blocking the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. But whether H2S affects renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Our study is aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of H2S on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cells) and the associated mechanisms. The induced EMT is assessed by Western blotting analysis on the expressions of α-SMA, E-cadherin and fibronectin. HK-2 cells were treated with NaHS before incubating with TGF-β1 to investigate its effect on EMT and the related molecular mechanism. Results demonstrated that NaHS decreased the expression of α-SMA and fibronectin, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. NaHS reduced the expression of TGF-β receptor type I (TβR I) and TGF-β receptor type II (TβR II). In addition, NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced increase of β-catenin expression and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, it inhibited the TGF-β1-induced nuclear translocation of ββ-catenin. These effects of NaHS on fibronectin, E-cadherin and TβR I were abolished by the ERK inhibitor U0126 or β-catenin inhibitor XAV939, or β-catenin siRNA interference. We get the conclusion that NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced EMT in HK-2 cells through both ERK-dependent and β-catenin-dependent pathways. PMID:26760502

  2. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  3. MicroRNA-326 regulates profibrotic functions of transforming growth factor-β in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta; Kumar, Manish; Negi, Vinny; Pattnaik, Bijay; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2014-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disorder resulting from the progressive remodeling of lungs, with no known effective treatment. Although transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has a well-established role in lung fibrosis, clinical experience with neutralizing antibodies to TGF-β has been disappointing, and strategies to directly suppress TGF-β1 secretion are needed. In this study we used a combination of in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approaches to identify microRNAs involved in TGF-β1 regulation and to validate the role of miR-326 in pulmonary fibrosis.We show that hsa-miR-326 regulates TGF-β1 expression and that hsa-miR-326 levels are inversely correlated to TGF-β1 protein levels in multiple human cell lines. The increase in TGF-β1 expression during the progression of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice was associated with loss of mmu-miR-326. Restoration of mmu-miR-326 levels by intranasal delivery of miR-326 mimics was sufficient to inhibit TGF-β1 expression and attenuate the fibrotic response. Moreover, human IPF lung specimens had markedly diminished miR-326 expression as compared with nonfibrotic lungs. Additional targets of miR-326 controlling TGF-β signaling and fibrosis-related pathways were identified, and miR-326 was found to down-regulate profibrotic genes, such as Ets1, Smad3, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, whereas it up-regulates antifibrotic genes, such as Smad7. Our results suggest for the first time that miR-326 plays a key role in regulating TGF-β1 expression and other profibrotic genes and could be useful in developing better therapeutic strategies for alleviating lung fibrosis.

  4. Amyloid beta-peptide possesses a transforming growth factor-beta activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, S S; Huang, F W; Xu, J; Chen, S; Hsu, C Y; Huang, J S

    1998-10-16

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) of 39-42 amino acid residues is a major constituent of Alzheimer's disease neurite plaques. Abeta aggregates (fibrils) are believed to be responsible for neuronal damage and dysfunction, as well as microglia and astrocyte activation in disease lesions by multiple mechanisms. Since Abeta aggregates possess the multiple valencies of an FAED motif (20th to 23rd amino acid residues), which resembles the putative transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) active site motif, we hypothesize that Abeta monomers and Abeta aggregates may function as TGF-beta antagonists and partial agonists, analogous to previously described monovalent and multivalent TGF-beta peptide antagonists and agonists (Huang, S. S., Liu, Q., Johnson, F. E., Konish, Y., and Huang, J. S. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27155-27159). Here, we report that the Abeta monomer, Abeta-(1-40) and its fragment, containing the motif inhibit radiolabeled TGF-beta binding to cell-surface TGF-beta receptors in mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu cells). Abeta-(1-40)-bovine serum albumin conjugate (Abeta-(1-40)-BSA), a multivalent synthetic analogue of Abeta aggregates, exhibited cytotoxicity toward bovine cerebral endothelial cells and rat post-mitotic differentiated hippocampal neuronal cells (H19-7 cells) and inhibitory activities of radiolabeled TGF-beta binding to TGF-beta receptors and TGF-beta-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression, that were approximately 100-670 times more potent than those of Abeta-(1-40) monomers. At less than micromolar concentrations, Abeta-(1-40)-BSA but not Abeta-(1-40) monomers inhibited proliferation of Mv1Lu cells. Since TGF-beta is an organizer of responses to neurodegeneration and is also found in neurite plaques, the TGF-beta antagonist and partial agonist activities of Abeta monomers and aggregates may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  5. Activity-dependent release of transforming growth factor-beta in a neuronal network in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lacmann, A; Hess, D; Gohla, G; Roussa, E; Krieglstein, K

    2007-12-12

    For neurotrophins and also for members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family an activity-dependent regulation of synthesis and release has been proposed. Together with the observation that the secretion of neurotransmitters is initiated by neurotrophic factors, it is reasonable to assume that they might act as retrograde modulators enhancing the efficacy and stabilization of synapses. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis and studied the release and regulation of TGF-beta in vitro using mouse primary hippocampal neurons at embryonic day E16.5 as model. We show that neuronal activity regulates TGF-beta release and TGF-beta expression in vitro. Treatment of the cultures with KCl, 3-veratroylveracevine (veratridine), glutamate or carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol) increased the levels of secreted TGF-beta, as assessed by the MLEC/plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-luciferase-assay, whereas TGF-beta release stimulated by KCl or veratridine was reduced in the presence of tetrodotoxin or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). In addition, application of glutamate significantly upregulated expression of TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 in the culture. Notably, KCl stimulation caused Smad (composite term from SMA (C. elegans) and MAD=mothers against dpp (Drosophila)) translocation into the nucleus and upregulated TGF-beta inducible early gene (Tieg1) expression, demonstrating that activity-dependent released TGF-beta may exert autocrine actions and thereby activate the TGF-beta-dependent signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest an activity-dependent release and gene transcription of TGF-beta from mouse hippocampal neurons in vitro as well as subsequent autocrine functions of the released TGF-beta within the hippocampal network.

  6. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels and unprovoked recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Memon, Ashfaque A; Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Zöller, Bengt

    2014-10-01

    Prediction of recurrence in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a challenge. Studies of atherosclerosis suggest a protective role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. However, the role of TGF-β has not been studied in VTE. The aim of this study was to investigate TGF-β as a predictive marker of recurrent VTE in patients with a first episode of unprovoked VTE. Patients in the Malmö Thrombophilia Study (MATS) were followed after the discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until the diagnosis of recurrent VTE or the end of the study in December 2008 (mean ± SD 38.5 months ± 27). Among patients with a first episode of unprovoked VTE, we identified 42 patients with recurrent VTE during the follow-up period. Two age- and sex-matched control subjects without recurrent VTE were selected for each patient (n = 84). Plasma levels of the three isoforms of TGF-β (TGF-β1, TGF-β2 and TGF-β3) were quantified simultaneously by TGF-β 3-plex immunoassay. Compared to controls, plasma levels of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 were significantly lower in patients with recurrent VTE (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found for TGF-β3. In a multivariate Cox regression analyses, adjusted for inherited thrombophilia, age, sex and BMI, low levels of TGF-β1 [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.3; p = 0.02] and TGF-β2 (HR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.7; p = 0.01) were independently associated with a higher risk of recurrent VTE. We propose TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 as potential predictive markers for recurrence in patients with unprovoked VTE.

  7. Transforming growth factor-β inhibits cystogenesis in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elberg, Dorit; Jayaraman, Siddarth; Turman, Martin A; Elberg, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited cause of kidney failure and characterized by the formation of multiple fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is believed that environmental factors may play an important role in the disease progression. However, the molecular identity of autocrine/paracrine factors influencing cyst formation is largely unknown. In this study, we identified transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) secreted by normal human kidney (NHK) and ADPKD cells as an inhibitor of cystogenesis in 3D culture system using ADPKD cells from human kidneys. TGF-β2 was identified in conditioned media (CM) of NHK and ADPKD cells as a latent factor activated by heat in vitro. While all TGF-β isoforms recombinant proteins (TGF-β1, -β2, or -β3) displayed a similar inhibitory effect on cyst formation, TGF-β2 was the predominant isoform detected in CM. The involvement of TGF-β2 in the suppression of cyst formation was demonstrated by using a TGF-β2 specific blocking antibody and a TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor. TGF-β2 inhibited cyst formation by a mechanism other than activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase that mediated cell death in ADPKD cells. Further, we found that TGF-β2 modulated expression of various genes involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and extracellular matrix proteins that may play a role in the regulation of cystogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that TGF-β2 secreted by renal epithelial cells may be an inhibitor of cystogenesis influencing the progression of ADPKD.

  8. Invasive candidiasis stimulates hepatocyte and monocyte production of active transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed

    Letterio, J J; Lehrnbecher, T; Pollack, G; Walsh, T J; Chanock, S J

    2001-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with compromised immune function. The cytokine response to tissue invasion by C. albicans can influence the differentiation and function of lymphocytes and other mononuclear cells that are critical components of the host response. While the production of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) has been documented in mice infected with C. albicans and is known to suppress phagocyte function, the cellular source and role of this cytokine in the pathogenesis of systemic candidiasis are not well understood. We have investigated the source of production of TGF-beta by immunohistochemical studies in tissue samples from patients with an uncommon complication of lymphoreticular malignancy, chronic disseminated candidiasis (CDC), and from a neutropenic-rabbit model of CDC. Liver biopsy specimens from patients with documented CDC demonstrated intense staining for extracellular matrix-associated TGF-beta1 within inflammatory granulomas, as well as staining for TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3 within adjacent hepatocytes. These results correlate with the immunolocalization of TGF-beta observed in livers of infected neutropenic rabbits, using a neutralizing antibody that recognizes the mature TGF-beta protein. Human peripheral blood monocytes incubated with C. albicans in vitro release large amounts of biologically active TGF-beta1. The data demonstrate that local production of active TGF-betas by hepatocytes and by infected mononuclear cells is a component of the response to C. albicans infection that most probably contributes to disease progression in the immunocompromised host.

  9. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Dix, T. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  10. Neuroprotection by glial metabotropic glutamate receptors is mediated by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Battaglia, G; Casabona, G; Copani, A; Caciagli, F; Nicoletti, F

    1998-12-01

    The medium collected from cultured astrocytes transiently exposed to the group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists (2S,1'R, 2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) or (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (4C3HPG) is neuroprotective when transferred to mixed cortical cultures challenged with NMDA (). The following data indicate that this particular form of neuroprotection is mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta). (1) TGFbeta1 and -beta2 were highly neuroprotective against NMDA toxicity, and their action was less than additive with that produced by the medium collected from astrocytes treated with DCG-IV or 4C3HPG (GM/DCG-IV or GM/4C3HPG); (2) antibodies that specifically neutralized the actions of TGFbeta1 or -beta2 prevented the neuroprotective activity of DCG-IV or 4C3HPG, as well as the activity of GM/DCG-IV or GM/4C3HPG; and (3) a transient exposure of cultured astrocytes to either DCG-IV or 4C3HPG led to a delayed increase in both intracellular and extracellular levels of TGFbeta. We therefore conclude that a transient activation of group-II mGlu receptors (presumably mGlu3 receptors) in astrocytes leads to an increased formation and release of TGFbeta, which in turn protects neighbor neurons against excitotoxic death. These results offer a new strategy for increasing the local production of neuroprotective factors in the CNS. PMID:9822720

  11. Induction of apoptosis in cultured hepatocytes and in regressing liver by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Oberhammer, F A; Pavelka, M; Sharma, S; Tiefenbacher, R; Purchio, A F; Bursch, W; Schulte-Hermann, R

    1992-01-01

    In previous studies hepatocytes undergoing cell death by apoptosis but not normal hepatocytes in rat liver showed immunostaining for transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). Staining was much stronger with antibodies recognizing the pro-region of TGF-beta 1 than the mature peptide itself. Therefore we investigated the ability of both forms of TGF-beta 1 to induce apoptosis in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Mature TGF-beta 1 induced rounding up of the cells and fragmentation into multiple vesicles. As revealed by the DNA-specific stain H33258, the chromatin of these cells condensed and segregated into masses at the nuclear membrane; this was obviously followed by fragmentation of the nucleus. Ultrastructurally the cytoplasm was well preserved, as demonstrated by the presence of intact cell organelles. These features strongly suggest the occurrence of apoptosis. Quantification of nuclei with condensed chromatin revealed that mature TGF-beta 1 was 30-fold more effective than the TGF-beta 1 latency-associated protein complex. Finally, we administered TGF-beta 1 in vivo using an experimental model in which regression of rat liver was initiated by a short preceding treatment with the hepatomitogen cyproterone acetate. Two doses of TGF-beta 1, each 1 nM/kg, augmented the incidence of apoptotic hepatocytes 5-fold. Equimolar doses of TGF-beta 1 latency-associated protein complex were ineffective. These studies suggest that TGF-beta 1 is involved in the initiation of apoptosis in the liver and that the mature form of TGF-beta 1 is the active principle. Images PMID:1608949

  12. Genetic polymorphisms in transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1) and childhood asthma and atopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiling; Romieu, Isabelle; Wu, Hao; Sienra-Monge, Juan-Jose; Ramírez-Aguilar, Matiana; del Río-Navarro, Blanca Estela; Lara-Sánchez, Irma del Carmen; Kistner, Emily O.; Gjessing, Håkon K.; London, Stephanie J.

    2007-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1) may influence asthma by modulating allergic airway inflammation and airway remodeling. The role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TGFB1 in asthma remains inconclusive. We examined TGFB1 SNPs in relation to asthma risk and degree of atopy among 546 case-parent triads, consisting of asthmatics aged 4 to 17 years and their parents in Mexico City. Atopy to 24 aeroallergens was determined by skin prick tests. We genotyped five TGFB1 SNPs, including two known functional SNPs [C-509T (rs1800469), T869C (rs1982073)] and three others (rs7258445, rs1800472, rs8179181), using TaqMan and Masscode assays. We analyzed the data using log-linear and polytomous logistic methods. Three associated SNPs, including the two known functional SNPs, were statistically significantly related to asthma risk. Individuals carrying the T allele of C-509T had an increased risk of asthma [relative risk (RR) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08–1.87 for one copy; RR (95%CI) = 1.95 (1.36–2.78) for two copies]. For T869C, the RRs (95%CI) were 1.47 (1.09–1.98) for one and 2.00 (1.38–2.90) for two copies of the C allele. Similar results were found for rs7258445. The haplotype containing all three risk alleles conferred an increased risk of asthma (RR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.11–1.95 for one copy; RR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.22–2.57 for two copies). These three SNPs were also related to the degree of atopy. This largest study to date of genetic variation in TGFB1 and asthma and atopy adds to increasing evidence for a role in these disorders. PMID:17333284

  13. Molecular characterisation of sea bream (Sparus aurata) transforming growth factor beta1.

    PubMed

    Tafalla, C; Aranguren, R; Secombes, C J; Castrillo, J L; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2003-05-01

    A transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF beta1) full length cDNA was characterised and sequenced from the head kidney of sea bream (Sparus aurata) previously challenged with a nodavirus. The cloned cDNA of 1778bp contains a predicted open reading frame of 379 amino acids, which includes the mature peptide region of 112 amino acids. The regulating region of the peptide possesses four potential N-linked glycosylation sites (N-X-T/S), as well as an RGD integrin binding site, an RKKR tetrabasic cut site and nine conserved cysteines all characteristic of the TGF beta superfamily. Compared to other teleost TGF beta1 genes, the sea bream TGF beta1 is most closely related to hybrid striped bass (Moronesaxatilis xM. chrysops) TGF beta1 (80% amino acid identity). The genomic organisation of TGF beta1 was determined through the generation of contiguous PCR clones. The sea bream TGF beta1 gene is approximately 3.6kb in length and consists of five coding regions. Two introns are absent in comparison to the genomic organisation of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss TGF beta1, whilst an additional intron not present in other sequenced TGF beta genes, but present in the trout TGF beta1 gene, is conserved in sea bream.A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to study TGF beta expression in different sea bream tissues. Constitutive TGF beta1 expression was detected in the liver, brain, muscle, kidney, heart, gills and spleen of sea bream, as well as in head kidney macrophages and blood leucocytes.

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of active transforming growth factor-beta in situ using engineered tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Kalia, M.; Jirtle, R.; Flanders, K.; Tsang, M. L.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The biological activity of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta) is governed by dissociation from its latent complex. Immunohistochemical discrimination of active and latent TGF-beta could provide insight into TGF-beta activation in physiological and pathological processes. However, evaluation of immunoreactivity specificity in situ has been hindered by the lack of tissue in which TGF-beta status is known. To provide in situ analysis of antibodies to differentiate between these functional forms, we used xenografts of human tumor cells modified by transfection to overexpress latent TGF-beta or constitutively active TGF-beta. This comparison revealed that, whereas most antibodies did not differentiate between TGF-beta activation status, the immunoreactivity of some antibodies was activation dependent. Two widely used peptide antibodies to the amino-terminus of TGF-beta, LC(1-30) and CC(1-30) showed marked preferential immunoreactivity with active TGF-beta versus latent TGF-beta in cryosections. However, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, discrimination of active TGF-beta by CC(1-30) was lost and immunoreactivity was distinctly extracellular, as previously reported for this antibody. Similar processing-dependent extracellular localization was found with a neutralizing antibody raised to recombinant TGF-beta. Antigen retrieval recovered cell-associated immunoreactivity of both antibodies. Two antibodies to peptides 78-109 showed mild to moderate preferential immunoreactivity with active TGF-beta only in paraffin sections. LC(1-30) was the only antibody tested that discriminated active from latent TGF-beta in both frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue. Thus, in situ discrimination of active versus latent TGF-beta depends on both the antibody and tissue preparation. We propose that tissues engineered to express a specific form of a given protein provide a physiological setting in which to evaluate antibody reactivity with specific functional forms of a

  15. Differential regulation of mesothelial cell fibrinolysis by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed

    Falk, P; Ma, C; Chegini, N; Holmdahl, L

    2000-10-01

    Inflammation and tissue trauma during the surgical procedure reduce the peritoneal fibrinolytic capacity. These conditions promote adhesion formation, and are associated with increased expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1). The objective of the present study was to investigate whether TGF-beta1 regulates the expression of fibrinolytic components in peritoneal mesothelial cells. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) were cultured and treated with various concentrations of human recombinant TGF-beta1 (0.1, 1.0 and 10 ng/mL) for 24 h. Levels of tissue- and urokinase plasminogen activator (t-PA and uPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and type-2 (PAI-2) mRNA and protein were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR) and ELISA, respectively. HPMC expressed these components at the gene and protein level. TGF-beta1 downregulated, dose-dependently t-PA mRNA and protein to about 50% of control values (p = 0.0010), and doubled PAI-1 protein production (p = 0.0008) compared to untreated controls. Although uPA gene expression increased in cells exposed to TGF-beta1, the corresponding protein concentration in conditioned media did not. PAI-2 was not affected, either at the gene or protein level. In conclusion, the results indicate that fibrinolytic capacity of mesothelial cells is reduced by TGF-beta1, suggesting that peritoneal adhesion formation induced by TGF-beta1 may be mediated, in part, through reduction in fibrin degradation capacity at an early stage of peritoneal tissue repair.

  16. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Grega-Larson, Nathan E; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J; Weaver, Alissa M

    2016-07-18

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  17. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kelpsch, Daniel J; Groen, Christopher M; Fagan, Tiffany N; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L

    2016-10-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5-9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved.

  18. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kelpsch, Daniel J; Groen, Christopher M; Fagan, Tiffany N; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L

    2016-10-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5-9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  19. Actin filament dynamics impacts keratinocyte stem cell maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Daisuke; Toki, Fujio; Matsushita, Natsuki; Matsushita, Sachi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Barrandon, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Cultured human epidermal keratinocyte stem cells (holoclones) are crucial for regenerative medicine for burns and genetic disorders. In serial culture, holoclones progressively lose their proliferative capacity to become transient amplifying cells with limited growth (paraclones), a phenomenon termed clonal conversion. Although it negatively impacts the culture lifespan and the success of cell transplantation, little is known on the molecular mechanism underlying clonal conversion. Here, we show that holoclones and paraclones differ in their actin filament organization, with actin bundles distributed radially in holoclones and circumferentially in paraclones. Moreover, actin organization sets the stage for a differing response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), since EGF signalling induces a rapid expansion of colony size in holoclones and a significant reduction in paraclones. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K or Rac1 in holoclones results in the reorganization of actin filaments in a pattern that is similar to that of paraclones. Importantly, continuous Rac1 inhibition in holoclones results in clonal conversion and reduction of growth potential. Together, our data connect loss of stem cells to EGF-induced colony dynamics governed by Rac1. PMID:23554171

  20. F-actin marks the rhizoid pole in living Pelvetia compressa zygotes.

    PubMed

    Alessa, L; Kropf, D L

    1999-01-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in F-actin during polarity establishment in Pelvetia compressa zygotes were investigated using vital staining with rhodamine phalloidin (RP). F-actin was localized to a patch in the cortex of young zygotes. When unilateral light was applied to induce a growth axis (photopolarization) in a population of zygotes, the cortical F-actin patches localized at the shaded pole (rhizoid pole of growth axis). Treatments that prevented photopolarization prevented localization of F-actin patches to the shaded pole. When the direction of the light treatment was reversed, the previous growth axis was abandoned and a new axis was established in the opposite direction. The F-actin patch repositioned to the new rhizoid pole within minutes of light reversal, indicating that F-actin was an immediate marker of the nascent growth axis. Repositioning probably occurred by disassembly of the initial patch and reassembly of a new one. The patch grew in size as zygotes developed, eventually becoming a ring just prior to rhizoid outgrowth. The rhizoid emerged at the site of the F-actin ring and, following germination, the ring was located in the subapical zone of the elongating tip.

  1. The reconstitution of actin polymerization on liposomes.

    PubMed

    Stamnes, Mark; Xu, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated actin polymerization is of considerable interest due to its role in cell migration and the motility of intracellular organelles. Intensive research efforts are underway to investigate the physiological role of membrane-associated actin as well as the regulation and mechanics of actin assembly. Branched actin polymerization on membranes is catalyzed by the Arp2/3 complex. Signaling events leading to the activation of the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein Cdc42 stimulate Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization. We have studied the role of Cdc42 at the Golgi apparatus in part by reconstituting actin polymerization on isolated Golgi membranes and on liposomes. In this manner, we showed that cytosolic proteins are sufficient for actin assembly on a phospholipid bilayer. Here we describe methods for the cell-free reconstitution of membrane-associated actin polymerization using liposomes and brain cytosol.

  2. Dynamic actin structures stabilized by profilin.

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, T; Theriot, J A; Dise, K R; Tomaselli, G F; Goldschmidt-Clermont, P J

    1994-01-01

    We describe the production and analysis of clonal cell lines in which we have overexpressed human profilin, a small ubiquitous actin monomer binding protein, to assess the role of profilin on actin function in vivo. The concentration of filamentous actin is increased in cells with higher profilin levels, and actin filament half-life measured in these cells is directly proportional to the steady-state profilin concentration. The distribution of actin filaments is altered by profilin overexpression. While parallel actin bundles crossing the cells are virtually absent in cells overexpressing profilin, the submembranous actin network of these cells is denser than in control cells. These results suggest that in vivo profilin regulates the stability, and thereby distribution, of specific dynamic actin structures. Images PMID:8108438

  3. Actinic Keratosis Treatment as a Key Component of Preventive Strategies for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is responsible for more than eight million visits to dermatologists and primary care physicians annually. Actinic keratosis, the result of chronic sun damage to the skin, is closely linked to nonmelanoma skin cancer, both histologically and pathophysiologically. Clinical evidence shows that not only does actinic keratosis have the potential to progress and transform into nonmelanoma skin cancer, but it also may in fact be an early stage of cancer. The treatment of actinic keratosis is evolving from a “treat-as-you-go” strategy to a more preventive approach to curtail the potential emergence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. As the interrelationship between actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma continues to strengthen, treating actinic keratosis as part of a preventive strategy to reduce nonmelanoma skin cancer is coming to the forefront. The following review of the relationship between actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancer discusses the rationale for early actinic keratosis treatment to prevent or reduce nonmelanoma skin cancer occurrence. PMID:20725550

  4. Differential cell cycle response of nontumorigenic and tumorigenic human papillomavirus-positive keratinocytes towards transforming growth factor-beta1.

    PubMed

    Hasskarl, J; Butz, K; Whitaker, N; Ullmann, A; Dürst, M; Hoppe-Seyler, F

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents of a number of malignancies in humans, including cervical cancer. Their tumorigenic potential is linked to expression of the viral E6/E7 genes which can interfere with normal cell cycle control by targeting p53, p21WAF1, p27KIP1, and pRb. We show here that nontumorigenic and tumorigenic HPV-positive keratinocytes (HPK) exhibit striking differences in the response of cell cycle regulatory genes towards transforming growth factor beta-beta1. Treatment with this agent led to an efficient induction of p53 and the growth-inhibitory p15INK4 and p21WAF1 genes only in nontumorigenic HPKs and was linked to an efficient reduction in viral E6/E7 oncogene expression. This was associated with increased pRb levels, exhibiting sustained hypophosphorylation, and a permanent growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, tumorigenic HPKs exhibited only a modest rise in p53 protein levels and a substantially reduced induction of the p15INK4 and p21WAF1 genes, which was linked to a lesser degree of viral oncogene repression. In addition, tumorigenic HPKs rapidly resumed cell growth after a transient G1 arrest, concomitantly with the reappearance of hyperphosphorylated pRb. These results support the notion that the progression of HPV-positive cells to a malignant phenotype is associated with increased resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor-beta1. This is linked in the tumorigenic cells to a lack of persistent G1 arrest, inefficient induction of several cell cycle control genes involved in growth inhibition, and inefficient repression of the growth-promoting viral E6/E7 oncogenes. PMID:10794545

  5. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor beta 1 selectively modulate glycosaminoglycans, collagen, and myofibroblasts in excisional wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, G. F.; Vande Berg, J.; Rudolph, R.; Tarpley, J.; Mustoe, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) influence the rate of extracellular matrix formed in treated incisional wounds. Because incisional healing processes are difficult to quantify, a full-thickness excisional wound model in the rabbit ear was developed to permit detailed analyses of growth-factor-mediated tissue repair. In the present studies, quantitative and qualitative differences in acute inflammatory cell influx, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) deposition, collagen formation, and myofibroblast generation in PDGF-BB (BB homodimer)- and TGF-beta 1-treated wounds were detected when analyzed histochemically and ultrastructurally. Although both growth factors significantly augmented extracellular matrix formation and healing in 10-day wounds compared with controls (P less than 0.002). PDGF-BB markedly increased macrophage influx and GAG deposition, whereas TGF-beta 1 selectively induced significantly more mature collagen bundles at the leading edge of new granulation tissue (P = 0.007). Transforming growth factor-beta 1-treated wound fibroblasts demonstrated active collagen fibrillogenesis and accretion of subfibrils at the ultrastructural level. Myofibroblasts, phenotypically modified fibroblasts considered responsible for wound contraction, were observed in control, but were absent in early growth-factor-treated granulating wounds. These results provide important insights into the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and indicate that 1) PDGF-BB induces an inflammatory response and provisional matrix synthesis within wounds that is qualitatively similar but quantitatively increased compared with normal wounds; 2) TGF-beta 1 preferentially triggers synthesis and more rapid maturation of collagen within early wounds; and 3) both growth factors inhibit the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, perhaps because wound contraction is not required, due to increased extracellular matrix synthesis. Images

  6. Unidirectional movement of an actin filament taking advantage of temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomoaki; Honda, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    An actin filament with heat acceptors attached to its Cys374 residue in each actin monomer could move unidirectionally even under heat pulsation alone, while in the total absence of both ATP and myosin. The prime driver for the movement was temperature gradients operating between locally heated portions on an actin filament and its cooler surroundings. In this report, we investigated how the mitigation of the temperature gradients induces a unidirectional movement of an actin filament. We then observed the transversal fluctuations of the filament in response to heat pulsation and their transition into longitudinally unidirectional movement. The transition was significantly accelerated when Cys374 and Lys336 were simultaneously excited within an actin monomer. These results suggest that the mitigation of the temperature gradients within each actin monomer first went through the energy transformation to transversal fluctuations of the filament, and then followed by the transformation further down to longitudinal movements of the filament. The faster mitigation of temperature gradients within actin monomer helps build up the transition from the transversal to longitudinal movements of the filament by coordinating the interaction between the neighboring monomers. PMID:17030086

  7. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  8. Actin in hair cells and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Meghan C; Belyantseva, Inna A; Friderici, Karen H; Friedman, Thomas B

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary deafness is genetically heterogeneous such that mutations of many different genes can cause hearing loss. This review focuses on the evidence and implications that several of these deafness genes encode actin-interacting proteins or actin itself. There is a growing appreciation of the contribution of the actin interactome in stereocilia development, maintenance, mechanotransduction and malfunction of the auditory system.

  9. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  10. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  11. Induction of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptors following Focal Ischemia in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. TGF-βs bind to type I (TGF-βRI) and II receptors (TGF-βRII), which are transmembrane kinase receptors, and an accessory type III receptor (TGF-βRIII). TGF-β may utilize another type I receptor, activin-like kinase receptor (Alk1). TGF-β is neuroprotective in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of stroke. Recently, we reported the expression pattern of TGF-β1-3 after MCAO. To establish how TGF-βs exert their actions following MCAO, the present study describes the induction of TGF-βRI, RII, RIII and Alk1 at 24 h, 72 h and 1 mo after transient 1 h MCAO as well as following 24 h permanent MCAO using in situ hybridization histochemistry. In intact brain, only TGF-βRI had significant expression: neurons in cortical layer IV contained TGF-βRI. At 24 h after the occlusion, no TGF-β receptors showed induction. At 72 h following MCAO, all four types of TGF-β receptors were induced in the infarct area, while TGF-βRI and RII also appeared in the penumbra. Most cells with elevated TGF-βRI mRNA levels were microglia. TGF-βRII co-localized with both microglial and endothelial markers while TGF-βRIII and Alk1 were present predominantly in endothels. All four TGF-β receptors were induced within the lesion 1 mo after the occlusion. In particular, TGF-βRIII was further induced as compared to 72 h after MCAO. At this time point, TGF-βRIII signal was predominantly not associated with blood vessels suggesting its microglial location. These data suggest that TGF-β receptors are induced after MCAO in a timely and spatially regulated fashion. TGF-β receptor expression is preceded by increased TGF-β expression. TGF-βRI and RII are likely to be co-expressed in microglial cells while Alk1, TGF-βRII, and RIII in endothels within the infarct where TGF-β1 may be their ligand. At later time points, TGF-βRIII may also appear in glial cells to potentially

  12. Urinary active transforming growth factor β in feline chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J S; Syme, H M; Wheeler-Jones, C P D; Elliott, J

    2016-08-01

    The cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been widely implicated in the development and progression of renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans and in experimental models. The aims of this study were to assess the association between urinary active TGF-β1 and (a) development of CKD in a cross-sectional study, (b) deterioration of renal function over 1 year in a longitudinal study, and (c) renal histopathological parameters in cats. A human active TGF-β1 ELISA was validated for use in feline urine. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no significant difference in urinary active TGF-β1:creatinine ratio (aTGF-β1:UCr) between groups with differing renal function. Longitudinally, non-azotaemic cats that developed CKD demonstrated a significant (P = 0.028) increase in aTGF-β1:UCr approximately 6 months before the development of azotaemia, which remained elevated (P = 0.046) at diagnosis (approximately 12 months prior, 8.4 pg/mg; approximately 6 months prior, 22.2 pg/mg; at CKD diagnosis, 24.6 pg/mg). In the histopathology study, aTGF-β1:UCr was significantly higher in cats with moderate (P = 0.02) and diffuse (P = 0.005) renal fibrosis than in cats without fibrosis. Cats with moderate renal inflammation had significantly higher urinary active aTGF-β1 concentrations than cats with mild (P = 0.035) or no inflammatory change (P = 0.004). The parameter aTGF-β1:UCr was independently associated with Log urine protein:creatinine ratio in a multivariable analysis of clinicopathological parameters and interstitial fibrosis score in a multivariable analysis of histopathological features. These results suggest that urinary aTGF-β1 reflects the severity of renal pathology. Increases in urinary aTGF-β1 followed longitudinally in individual cats may indicate the development of CKD. PMID:27387717

  13. Production of Gastrointestinal Tumors in Mice by Modulating Latent Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shibahara, Kotaro; Ota, Mitsuhiko; Horiguchi, Masahito; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Melamed, Jonathan; Rifkin, Daniel B

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and its signaling pathways are important mediators in the suppression of cancers of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. TGF-β is released from cells in a latent complex consisting of TGF-β, the TGF-β propeptide (LAP) and a latent TGF-β binding protein (LTBP). We previously generated mice in which the LTBP-binding cysteine residues in LAP TGF-β1 were mutated to serine precluding covalent interactions with LTBP. These Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice develop multiorgan inflammation and tumors consistent with reduced TGF-β1 activity. To test whether further reduction in active TGF-β levels would yield additional tumors and a phenotype more similar to Tgfb1-/- mice, we generated mice that express TGF-β1C33S and are deficient in either integrin β8 or TSP-1, known activators of latent TGF-β1. In addition we generated mice that have one mutant allele and one null allele at the Tgfb1 locus, reasoning that these mice should synthesize half the total amount of TGF-β1 as Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice and the amount of active TGF-β1 would be correspondingly decreased compared to Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice. These compound mutant mice displayed more severe inflammation and higher tumor numbers than the parental Tgfb1C33S/C33S animals. The level of active TGF-β1 in compound mutant mice appeared to be decreased compared to Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice as determined from analyses of surrogate markers of active TGF-β, such as P-Smad2, C-Myc, KI-67, and markers of cell cycle traverse. We conclude that these mutant mice provide a useful system for modulating TGF-β levels in a manner that determines tumor number and inflammation within the GI tract. PMID:23117884

  14. Expression of transforming growth factor β receptor II in mesenchymal stem cells from systemic sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Vanneaux, Valérie; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Lecourt, Séverine; Baraut, Julie; Cras, Audrey; Jean-Louis, Francette; Brun, Cécilia; Verrecchia, Franck; Larghero, Jérôme; Michel, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The present work aimed to evaluate the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors on bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and the consequences of TGF-β activation in these cells, since MSC have potential therapeutic interest for SSc patients and knowing that TGF-β plays a critical role during the development of fibrosis in SSc. Design This is a prospective research study using MSC samples obtained from SSc patients and compared with MSC from healthy donors. Setting One medical hospital involving collaboration between an internal medicine department for initial patient recruitment, a clinical biotherapeutic unit for MSC preparation and an academic laboratory for research. Participants 9 patients with diffuse SSc for which bone marrow (BM) aspiration was prescribed by sternum aspiration before haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, versus nine healthy donors for normal BM. Primary and secondary outcome measures TGF-β, TGF-β receptor types I (TBRI) and II (TBRII) mRNA and protein expression were assessed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry, respectively, in MSC from both SSc patients and healthy donors. MSC were exposed to TGF-β and assessed for collagen 1α2 synthesis and Smad expression. As positive controls, primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts were also analysed. Results Compared with nine controls, MSC from nine SSc patients showed significant increase in mRNA levels (p<0.002) and in membrane expression (p<0.0001) of TBRII. In response to TGF-β activation, a significant increase in collagen 1α synthesis (p<0.05) and Smad-3 phosphorylation was upregulated in SSc MSC. Similar results were obtained on eight SSc-derived dermal fibroblasts compared to six healthy controls. Conclusions TBRII gene and protein expression defect in MSC derived from SSc patients may have pathological significance. These findings should be taken into account when considering

  15. Low dose radiation interactions with the transformation growth factor (TFG)-beta pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, Amy Jesse

    A major limiting factor for long-term, deep-space missions is the radiation dose to astronauts. Because the dose to the astronauts is a mixed field of low- and high-LET radiation, there is a need to understand the effects of both radiation types on whole tissue; however, there are limited published data on the effects of high-LET (linear-energy-transfer) radiation on tissue. Thus, we designed a perfusion chamber system for rat trachea in order to mimic in vivo respiratory tissue. We successfully maintained the perfused tracheal tissue ex vivo in a healthy and viable condition for up to three days. In addition, this project studied the effects of high-LET Fe particles on the overall transformation growth factor (TGF)-beta response after TGF-beta inactivation and compared the results to the TGF-beta response post x-ray irradiation. It was found that a TGF-beta response could be measured in the perfused tracheal tissue, for x-ray and Fe particle irradiations, despite the high autofluorescent background intrinsic to tissue. However, after comparing the TGF-beta response of x-ray irradiation to High-Z-High-energy (HZE) irradiation, there was not a significant difference in radiation types. The TGF-beta response in x-ray and HZE irradiated perfusion chambers was also measured over time post irradiation. It was found that for 6 hour and 8 hour post irradiation, the TGF-beta response was higher for lower doses of radiation than for higher doses. This is in contrast to the 0 hour fixation which found the TGF-beta response to increase with increased dose. The inverse relationship found for 6 hour and 8 hour fixation times may indicate a threshold response for TGF-beta response; i.e., for low doses, a threshold of dose must be reached for an immediate TGF-beta response, otherwise the tissue responds more slowly to the irradiation damage. This result was unexpected and will require further investigation to determine if the threshold can be determined for the 250 kVp x-rays and

  16. The types II and III transforming growth factor-beta receptors form homo-oligomers

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Affinity-labeling experiments have detected hetero-oligomers of the types I, II, and III transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) receptors which mediate intracellular signaling by TGF-beta, but the oligomeric state of the individual receptor types remains unknown. Here we use two types of experiments to show that a major portion of the receptor types II and III forms homo-oligomers both in the absence and presence of TGF-beta. Both experiments used COS-7 cells co-transfected with combinations of these receptors carrying different epitope tags at their extracellular termini. In immunoprecipitation experiments, radiolabeled TGF-beta was bound and cross-linked to cells co-expressing two differently tagged type II receptors. Sequential immunoprecipitations using anti-epitope monoclonal antibodies showed that type II TGF-beta receptors form homo-oligomers. In cells co- expressing epitope-tagged types II and III receptors, a low level of co- precipitation of the ligand-labeled receptors was observed, indicating that some hetero-oligomers of the types II and III receptors exist in the presence of ligand. Antibody-mediated cross-linking studies based on double-labeling immunofluorescence explored co-patching of the receptors at the cell surface on live cells. In cells co-expressing two differently tagged type II receptors or two differently tagged type III receptors, forcing one receptor into micropatches by IgG induced co- patching of the receptor carrying the other tag, labeled by noncross- linking monovalent Fab'. These studies showed that homo-oligomers of the types II and III receptors exist on the cell surface in the absence or presence of TGF-beta 1 or -beta 2. In cells co-expressing types II and III receptors, the amount of heterocomplexes at the cell surface was too low to be detected in the immunofluorescence co-patching experiments, confirming that hetero-oligomers of the types II and III receptors are minor and probably transient species. PMID:8027173

  17. Differential response of nontumorigenic and tumorigenic human papillomavirus type 16-positive epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed

    Braun, L; Dürst, M; Mikumo, R; Gruppuso, P

    1990-11-15

    The transforming growth factor (TGF) beta s are multifunctional polypeptide growth factors with diverse biological effects, including inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the possible role of TGF beta 1 in the regulation of papillomavirus infection and papillomavirus-associated transformation, we compared the response to TGF beta 1 of normal keratinocytes, human papillomavirus, type 16 (HPV 16)-positive-immortalized keratinocytes (nontumorigenic), and HPV 16-positive cervical carcinoma cells (tumorigenic) with respect to DNA synthesis and protooncogene expression. All HPV 16-immortalized cell lines were nearly as inhibited by TGF beta 1 as normal keratinocytes, whereas two cervical carcinoma cell lines (Caski and Siha) were refractory to growth inhibition by TGF beta 1. Cell surface receptors for TGF beta 1 were present on both normal and carcinoma cell lines. In all cases, growth inhibition by TGF beta 1 was accompanied by suppression of Steady-state levels of c-myc mRNA. In contrast, TGF beta 1 induced the expression of c-jun mRNA transcripts in normal, immortalized, and tumorigenic cells. We also studied the effect of TGF beta 1 on HPV 16 mRNA expression. Steady-state levels of HPV 16 mRNA transcripts were suppressed by TGF beta 1 in the nontumorigenic HPK cells but were unaffected in the tumorigenic lines. These findings suggest that TGF beta 1 may be an in vivo modulator of HPV infection and that loss of responsiveness to this growth inhibitory signal may be involved in HPV-associated malignant transformation. PMID:2171761

  18. Transforming growth factor-β-sphingosine kinase 1/S1P signaling upregulates microRNA-21 to promote fibrosis in renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Quan; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Yanyan; Zou, Xin; Xu, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is a progressive pathological change characterized by tubular cell apoptosis, tubulointerstitial fibroblast proliferation, and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). miR-21 has been implicated in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-stimulated tissue fibrosis. Recent studies showed that sphingosine kinase/sphingosine-1-phosphate (SphK/S1P) are also critical for TGF-β-stimulated tissue fibrosis; however, it is not clear whether SphK/S1P interacts with miR-21 or not. In this study, we hypothesized that SphK/S1P signaling is linked to upregulation of miR-21 by TGF-β. To verify this hypothesis, we first determined that miR-21 was highly expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) stimulated with TGF-β by using qRT-PCR and Northern blotting. Simultaneously, inhibition of miR-21, mediated by the corresponding antimir, markedly decreased the expression and deposition of type I collagen, fibronectin (Fn), cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), α-smooth muscle actin, and fibroblast-specific protein1 in TGF-β-treated TECs. ELISA and qRT-PCR were used to measure the S1P and SphK1 levels in TECs. S1P production was induced by TGF-β through activation of SphK1. Furthermore, it was observed that TGF-β-stimulated upregulation of miR-21 was abolished by SphK1 siRNA and was restored by the addition of exogenous S1P. Blocking S1PR2 also inhibited upregulation of miR-21. Additionally, miR-21 overexpression attenuated the repression of TGF-β-stimulated ECM deposition and epithelial–mesenchymal transition by SphK1 and S1PR2 siRNA. In summary, our study demonstrates a link between SphK1/S1P and TGF-β-induced miR-21 in renal TECs and may represent a novel therapeutic target in renal fibrosis. PMID:26376826

  19. Increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Kutty, R K; Nagineni, C N; Kutty, G; Hooks, J J; Chader, G J; Wiggert, B

    1994-05-01

    Antibodies specific for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were produced in rabbits, using the multiple antigen peptide (MAP) technique, and were employed to investigate the ability of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) to induce the HO-1 protein in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Western blot analyses showed that the cytokine induced HO-1 in these cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. TGF-beta 1 also increased the mRNA for HO-1 in treated cells prior to the increase in HO-1 protein. The induction was effectively blocked by a neutralizing antibody preparation against TGF-beta 1. When tested under similar conditions, other growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor-I, platelet-derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-alpha, and epidermal growth factor did not show appreciable induction of HO-1. Lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma were also not inducers, although TGF-beta 2 effectively induced HO-1. Heavy metal ions and thiol reagents were also highly potent inducers of HO-1 in human RPE cells. The induction of HO-1 by TGF-beta 1 was also observed in bovine choroid fibroblasts, but not in HELA, HEL or bovine corneal fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate for the first time that HO-1 can be induced by an important cytokine, TGF-beta 1, causing an increase in the expression of both HO-1 message and protein in specific neuroepithelial and fibroblast cells.

  20. Distinct roles for mammalian target of rapamycin complexes in the fibroblast response to transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Rod A; Andrianifahanana, Mahefatiana; Wilkes, Mark C; Edens, Maryanne; Kottom, Theodore J; Blenis, John; Leof, Edward B

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) promotes a multitude of diverse biological processes, including growth arrest of epithelial cells and proliferation of fibroblasts. Although the TGF-beta signaling pathways that promote inhibition of epithelial cell growth are well characterized, less is known about the mechanisms mediating the positive response to this growth factor. Given that TGF-beta has been shown to promote fibrotic diseases and desmoplasia, identifying the fibroblast-specific TGF-beta signaling pathways is critical. Here, we investigate the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a known effector of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and promoter of cell growth, in the fibroblast response to TGF-beta. We show that TGF-beta activates mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in fibroblasts but not epithelial cells via a PI3K-Akt-TSC2-dependent pathway. Rapamycin, the pharmacologic inhibitor of mTOR, prevents TGF-beta-mediated anchorage-independent growth without affecting TGF-beta transcriptional responses or extracellular matrix protein induction. In addition to mTORC1, we also examined the role of mTORC2 in TGF-beta action. mTORC2 promotes TGF-beta-induced morphologic transformation and is required for TGF-beta-induced Akt S473 phosphorylation but not mTORC1 activation. Interestingly, both mTOR complexes are necessary for TGF-beta-mediated growth in soft agar. These results define distinct and overlapping roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the fibroblast response to TGF-beta and suggest that inhibitors of mTOR signaling may be useful in treating fibrotic processes, such as desmoplasia. PMID:19117990

  1. A RhoA and Rnd3 cycle regulates actin reassembly during membrane blebbing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kana; Maeda, Fumiyo; Nagasako, Tomoya; Mochizuki, Yuki; Uchida, Seiichi; Ikenouchi, Junichi

    2016-03-29

    The actin cytoskeleton usually lies beneath the plasma membrane. When the membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton is transiently disrupted or the intracellular pressure is increased, the plasma membrane detaches from the cortex and protrudes. Such protruded membrane regions are called blebs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying membrane blebbing are poorly understood. This study revealed that epidermal growth factor receptor kinase substrate 8 (Eps8) and ezrin are important regulators of rapid actin reassembly for the initiation and retraction of protruded blebs. Live-cell imaging of membrane blebbing revealed that local reassembly of actin filaments occurred at Eps8- and activated ezrin-positive foci of membrane blebs. Furthermore, we found that a RhoA-ROCK-Rnd3 feedback loop determined the local reassembly sites of the actin cortex during membrane blebbing. PMID:26976596

  2. A Steric Antagonism of Actin Polymerization by a Salmonella Virulence Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Margarit,S.; Davidson, W.; Frego, L.; Stebbins, F.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella spp. require the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the SpvB protein for intracellular growth and systemic virulence. SpvB covalently modifies actin, causing cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of SpvB, and we show by mass spectrometric analysis that SpvB modifies actin at Arg177, inhibiting its ATPase activity. We also describe two crystal structures of SpvB-modified, polymerization-deficient actin. These structures reveal that ADP-ribosylation does not lead to dramatic conformational changes in actin, suggesting a model in which this large family of toxins inhibits actin polymerization primarily through steric disruption of intrafilament contacts.

  3. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  4. A RhoA and Rnd3 cycle regulates actin reassembly during membrane blebbing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kana; Maeda, Fumiyo; Nagasako, Tomoya; Mochizuki, Yuki; Uchida, Seiichi; Ikenouchi, Junichi

    2016-03-29

    The actin cytoskeleton usually lies beneath the plasma membrane. When the membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton is transiently disrupted or the intracellular pressure is increased, the plasma membrane detaches from the cortex and protrudes. Such protruded membrane regions are called blebs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying membrane blebbing are poorly understood. This study revealed that epidermal growth factor receptor kinase substrate 8 (Eps8) and ezrin are important regulators of rapid actin reassembly for the initiation and retraction of protruded blebs. Live-cell imaging of membrane blebbing revealed that local reassembly of actin filaments occurred at Eps8- and activated ezrin-positive foci of membrane blebs. Furthermore, we found that a RhoA-ROCK-Rnd3 feedback loop determined the local reassembly sites of the actin cortex during membrane blebbing.

  5. Inhibition of transforming growth factor α (TGF-α)-mediated growth effects in ovarian cancer cell lines by a tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZM 252868

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, B J B; Bartlett, J M S; Macleod, K G; Rabiasz, G; Miller, E P; Rae, A L; Gordge, P; Leake, R E; Miller, W R; Smyth, J; Langdon, S P

    1999-01-01

    The modulating effects of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZM 252868 on cell growth and signalling have been evaluated in four ovarian carcinoma cell lines PE01, PE04, SKOV-3 and PE01CDDP. Transforming growth factor α (TGF-α)-stimulated growth was completely inhibited by concentrations ≥ 0.3 μM in the PE01 and PE04 cell lines and by ≥ 0.1 μM in SKOV-3 cells. TGF-α inhibition of PE01CDDP growth was reversed by concentrations ≥ 0.1 μM ZM 252868. TGF-α-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of both the EGF receptor and c-erbB2 receptor in all four cell lines. The inhibitor ZM 252868, at concentrations ≥ 0.3 μM, completely inhibited TGF-α-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF receptor and reduced phosphorylation of the c-erbB2 protein. EGF-activated EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity was completely inhibited by 3 μM ZM 252868 in PE01, SKOV-3 and PE01CDDP cells. These data indicate that the EGF receptor-targeted TK inhibitor ZM 252868 can inhibit growth of ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro consistent with inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation at the EGF receptor. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098742

  6. Effect of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion on expressions of endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor betain lung and its relation with lung repair.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-Bing; Yang, Yin-Hui; Sun, Tong-Zhu; Gu, Xiao-Man; Jiang, Li-Xian; Sun, Xiao-Qing; Sheng, Zhi-Yong

    2000-06-01

    AIM:To study the changes of endogenous transforming growth factor beta(TGFbeta) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in lung following intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury and their effects on lung injury and repair.METHODS:Sixty Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which underwent sham-operation, ischemia (45 minutes), and reperfusion (6, 24 and 48 hours, respectively) after ischemia (45 minutes). Immunohistochemical method was used to observe the localization and amounts of both growth factors.RESULTS:Positive signals of both growth factors could be found in normal lung, mainly in alveolar cells and endothelial cells of vein. After ischemia and reperfusion insult, expressions of both growth factors were increased and their amounts at 6 hours were larger than those of normal control or of 24 and 48 hours after insult.CONCLUSION:The endogenous bFGF and TGF beta expression appears to be upregulated in the lung following intestinal ischemia and reperfusion, suggesting that both growth factors may be involved in the process of lung injury and repair. PMID:11819596

  7. Cloning the promoter for transforming growth factor-beta type III receptor. Basal and conditional expression in fetal rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; McCarthy, T. L.; Centrella, M.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta binds to three high affinity cell surface molecules that directly or indirectly regulate its biological effects. The type III receptor (TRIII) is a proteoglycan that lacks significant intracellular signaling or enzymatic motifs but may facilitate transforming growth factor-beta binding to other receptors, stabilize multimeric receptor complexes, or segregate growth factor from activating receptors. Because various agents or events that regulate osteoblast function rapidly modulate TRIII expression, we cloned the 5' region of the rat TRIII gene to assess possible control elements. DNA fragments from this region directed high reporter gene expression in osteoblasts. Sequencing showed no consensus TATA or CCAAT boxes, whereas several nuclear factors binding sequences within the 3' region of the promoter co-mapped with multiple transcription initiation sites, DNase I footprints, gel mobility shift analysis, or loss of activity by deletion or mutation. An upstream enhancer was evident 5' proximal to nucleotide -979, and a silencer region occurred between nucleotides -2014 and -2194. Glucocorticoid sensitivity mapped between nucleotides -687 and -253, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 2 sensitivity co-mapped within the silencer region. Thus, the TRIII promoter contains cooperative basal elements and dispersed growth factor- and hormone-sensitive regulatory regions that can control TRIII expression by osteoblasts.

  8. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  9. Prodomains of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily members specify different functions: extracellular matrix interactions and growth factor bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Ono, Robert N; Sasaki, Takako; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2011-02-18

    The specific functions of the prodomains of TGFβ superfamily members are largely unknown. Interactions are known between prodomains of TGFβ-1-3 and latent TGFβ-binding proteins and between prodomains of BMP-2, -4, -7, and -10 and GDF-5 and fibrillins, raising the possibility that latent TGFβ-binding proteins and fibrillins may mediate interactions with all other prodomains of this superfamily. This possibility is tested in this study. Results show that the prodomain of BMP-5 interacts with the N-terminal regions of fibrillin-1 and -2 in a site similar to the binding sites for other bone morphogenetic proteins. However, in contrast, the prodomain of GDF-8 (myostatin) interacts with the glycosaminoglycan side chains of perlecan. The binding site for the GDF-8 prodomain is likely the heparan sulfate chain present on perlecan domain V. These results support and extend the emerging concept that TGFβ superfamily prodomains target their growth factor dimers to extracellular matrix macromolecules. In addition, biochemical studies of prodomain·growth factor complexes were performed to identify inactive complexes. For some members of the superfamily, the prodomain is noncovalently associated with its growth factor dimer in an inactive complex; for others, the prodomain·growth factor complex is active, even though the prodomain is noncovalently associated with its growth factor dimer. Results show that the BMP-10 prodomain, in contrast to BMP-4, -5, and -7 prodomains, can inhibit the bioactivity of the BMP-10 growth factor and suggest that the BMP-10 complex is like TGFβ and GDF-8 complexes, which can be activated by cleavage of the associated prodomain.

  10. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  11. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  12. Structural Variability of Tropospheric Growth Factors Transforming Mid-latitude Cyclones to Severe Storms over the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Simon; Befort, Daniel J.; Leckebusch, Gregor C.

    2015-04-01

    The development of European surface wind storms out of normal mid-latitude cyclones is substantially influenced by upstream tropospheric growth factors over the Northern Atlantic. The main factors include divergence and vorticity advection in the upper troposphere, latent heat release and the presence of instabilities of short baroclinic waves of suitable wave lengths. In this study we examine a subset of these potential growth factors and their related influences on the transformation of extra-tropical cyclones into severe damage prone surface storm systems. Previous studies have shown links between specific growth factors and surface wind storms related to extreme cyclones. In our study we investigate in further detail spatial and temporal variability patterns of these upstream processes at different vertical levels of the troposphere. The analyses will comprise of the three growth factors baroclinicity, latent heat release and upper tropospheric divergence. Our definition of surface wind storms is based on the Storm Severity Index (SSI) alongside a wind tracking algorithm identifying areas of exceedances of the local 98th percentile of the 10m wind speed. We also make use of a well-established extra-tropical cyclone identification and tracking algorithm. These cyclone tracks form the base for a composite analysis of the aforementioned growth factors using ERA-Interim Reanalysis from 1979 - 2014 for the extended winter season (ONDJFM). Our composite analysis corroborates previous similar studies but extends them by using an impact based algorithm for the identification of strong wind systems. Based on this composite analysis we further identify variability patterns for each growth factor most important for the transformation of a cyclone into a surface wind storm. We thus also address the question whether the link between storm intensity and related growth factor anomaly taking into account its spatial variability is stable and can be quantified. While the

  13. The actin of muscle and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P J

    1976-01-01

    The isolation and quantification of an 18-residue peptide from the N-terminal region of chicken actin was used to quantify the amount of actin in acetone-dried powders of chicken breast muscle and chicken-embryo fibroblasts. Either isotope dilution or double labelling can be used for peptide quantification. About 17% of the protein of chicken breast muscle was estimated to be actin. However, only 0.25% of the protein of chicken-embryo fibroblasts was determined to be actin by quantification of this peptide. The actin content of fibroblasts may be low or the amino acid sequences of muscle and fibroblast actin may differ in the N-terminal region. The methodology used can be extended to examine whether other regions of muscle actin sequence are present in fibroblasts or other cell types. PMID:938480

  14. Quantifying actin wave modulation on periodic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parker, Joshua; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Actin is the essential builder of the cell cytoskeleton, whose dynamics are responsible for generating the necessary forces for the formation of protrusions. By exposing amoeboid cells to periodic topographical cues, we show that actin can be directionally guided via inducing preferential polymerization waves. To quantify the dynamics of these actin waves and their interaction with the substrate, we modify a technique from computer vision called ``optical flow.'' We obtain vectors that represent the apparent actin flow and cluster these vectors to obtain patches of newly polymerized actin, which represent actin waves. Using this technique, we compare experimental results, including speed distribution of waves and distance from the wave centroid to the closest ridge, with actin polymerization simulations. We hypothesize the modulation of the activity of nucleation promotion factors on ridges (elevated regions of the surface) as a potential mechanism for the wave-substrate coupling. Funded by NIH grant R01GM085574.

  15. Plastins regulate ectoplasmic specialization via its actin bundling activity on microfilaments in the rat testis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Wong, Chris KC; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Plastins are a family of actin binding proteins (ABPs) known to cross-link actin microfilaments in mammalian cells, creating actin microfilament bundles necessary to confer cell polarity and cell shape. Plastins also support cell movement in response to changes in environment, involved in cell/tissue growth and development. They also confer plasticity to cells and tissues in response to infection or other pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation). In the testis, the cell-cell anchoring junction unique to the testis that is found at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and at the Sertoli-spermatid (e.g., 8–19 spermatids in the rat testis) is the basal and the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES), respectively. The ES is an F-actin-rich anchoring junction constituted most notably by actin microfilament bundles. A recent report using RNAi that specifically knocks down plastin 3 has yielded some insightful information regarding the mechanism by which plastin 3 regulates the status of actin microfilament bundles at the ES via its intrinsic actin filament bundling activity. Herein, we provide a brief review on the role of plastins in the testis in light of this report, which together with recent findings in the field, we propose a likely model by which plastins regulate ES function during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis via their intrinsic activity on actin microfilament organization in the rat testis. PMID:26608945

  16. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Øverby, Anders; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2015-01-01

    Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. PMID:26690132

  17. Transforming growth factor alpha may be a physiological regulator of liver regeneration by means of an autocrine mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Mead, J E; Fausto, N

    1989-01-01

    We investigated whether transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) is involved in hepatocyte growth responses both in vivo and in culture. During liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats, TGF-alpha mRNA increased; it reached a maximum (approximately 9-fold higher than normal) at the peak of DNA synthesis. The message and the peptide were localized in hepatocytes and found in higher amounts in hepatocytes obtained from regenerating liver. TGF-alpha caused a 13-fold elevation of DNA synthesis in hepatocytes in primary culture and was slightly more effective than epidermal growth factor. TGF-beta blocked TGF-alpha stimulation when added either simultaneously with TGF-alpha or a day later. TGF-alpha message increased in hepatocytes stimulated to undergo DNA synthesis by TGF-alpha or epidermal growth factor, and the peptide was detected in the culture medium by RIA. In the regenerating liver, the increase in TGF-alpha mRNA during the first day after partial hepatectomy coincided with an increase in epidermal growth factor/TGF-alpha receptor mRNA and a decrease (already reported) in the number of these receptors. We conclude that TGF-alpha may function as a physiological inducer of hepatocyte DNA synthesis during liver regeneration by means of an autocrine mechanism and that its stimulatory effects in this growth process are balanced by the inhibitory action of TGF-beta 1. Images PMID:2922399

  18. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  19. Size distribution of linear and helical polymers in actin solution analyzed by photon counting histogram.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naofumi; Shimozawa, Togo; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2007-03-15

    Actin is a ubiquitous protein that is a major component of the cytoskeleton, playing an important role in muscle contraction and cell motility. At steady state, actin monomers and filaments (F-actin) coexist, and actin subunits continuously attach and detach at the filament ends. However, the size distribution of actin oligomers in F-actin solution has never been clarified. In this study, we investigated the size distribution of actin oligomers using photon-counting histograms. For this purpose, actin was labeled with a fluorescent dye, and the emitted photons were detected by confocal optics (the detection volume was of femtoliter (fL) order). Photon-counting histograms were analyzed to obtain the number distribution of actin oligomers in the detection area from their brightness, assuming that the brightness of an oligomer was proportional to the number of protomers. We found that the major populations at physiological ionic strength were 1-5mers. For data analysis, we successfully applied the theory of linear and helical aggregations of macromolecules. The model postulates three states of actin, i.e., monomers, linear polymers, and helical polymers. Here we obtained three parameters: the equilibrium constants for polymerization of linear polymers, K(l)=(5.2 +/- 1.1) x 10(6) M(-1), and helical polymers, K(h)=(1.6 +/- 0.5) x 10(7) M(-1); and the ratio of helical to linear trimers, gamma = (3.6 +/- 2.3) x 10(-2). The excess free energy of transforming a linear trimer to a helical trimer, which is assumed to be a nucleus for helical polymers, was calculated to be 2.0 kcal/mol. These analyses demonstrate that the oligomeric phase at steady state is predominantly composed of linear 1-5mers, and the transition from linear to helical polymers occurs on the level of 5-7mers. PMID:17172301

  20. Relationship between transforming growth factor β1 and anti-fibrotic effect of interleukin-10

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mei-Na; Huang, Yue-Hong; Zheng, Wei-Da; Zhang, Li-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of interleukin-10 (IL-10) on the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in hepatic fibrosis rats and the anti-fibrotic role of exo-genous IL-10. METHODS: Hepatic fibrosis was induced by carbon tetrachloride administered (CCl4) intraperitoneally. The experiment was performed in two stages. In the first stage, 60 SD rats were divided randomly into normal control group 1(GN1, n = 8), hepatic fibrosis group(GC, n = 28)and IL-10 intervened group(GI, n = 24). At the beginning of the 7th and 11th wk, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reation (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry were performed to detect the expression of TGF-β1 in HSCs. Histological examination was used to determine the degree of hepatic fibrosis. In the second stage, 47 SD rats were divided randomly into normal control group 2(GN2, n = 6)and CCl4 group(GZ, n = 41). At the end of the 9th week, rats in GZ group were allocated randomly into model group(GM, n = 9), IL-10 treatment group(GT, n = 9)and recovered group(GR, n = 9). At the end of the 12th week, all rats were sacrificed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of TGF-β1 in liver tissue. ELISA was used to assay serum TGF-β1 levels. RESULTS: Hepatic fibrosis developed in rats with the increase of the injection frequency of CCl4. In the first stage, hepatic fibrosis developed and HSCs were isolated successfully. At the 7th and 11th week, TGF-β1 mRNA in GC group increased significantly compared with that in GN1(P = 0.001/0.042)and GI groups(P = 0.001/0.007), whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups. The levels of TGF-β1 at the beginning of the 7th wk was higher than that of the 11th wk(P = 0.049). Immunocytochemistry results of TGF-β1 were consistent with the above findings. In the second stage, TGF-β1 increased significantly in GM group compared to GN2. After treatment with IL-10, TGF-β1 declined

  1. Transforming growth factor-β1 up-regulates connexin43 expression in human granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Tsai, Horng-Der; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) up-regulate connexin43 (Cx43) to promote cell–cell communication in human granulosa cells? SUMMARY ANSWER TGF-β1 up-regulates Cx43 and increases gap junction intercellular communication activities (GJIC) in human granulosa cells, and this effect occurs via the activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)5-mediated Sma- and Mad-related protein (SMAD)2/3-SMAD4-dependent pathway. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY TGF-β1 and its receptors are expressed in human granulosa cells, and follicular fluid contains TGF-β1 protein. In human granulosa cells, Cx43 gap junctions play an important role in the development of follicles and oocytes. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This is an experimental study which was performed over a 1-year period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Immortalized human granulosa cells (SVOG cells) and primary human granulosa-lutein cells obtained from women undergoing IVF in an academic research center were used as the study models. Cx43 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined after exposure of SVOG cells to recombinant human TGF-β1. An activin/TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor, SB431542, and small interfering RNAs targeting ALK4, ALK5, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SMAD4 were used to verify the specificity of the effects and to investigate the molecular mechanisms. Real-time-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis were used to detect the specific mRNA and protein levels, respectively. GJIC between SVOG cells were evaluated using a scrape loading and dye transfer assay. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE TGF-β1 treatment increased phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 (P < 0.0001) and up-regulated Cx43 mRNA and protein levels (P < 0.001) in SVOG cells and these stimulatory effects were abolished by the TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542. In addition, the up-regulatory effect of TGF-β1 on Cx43 expression (mRNA and protein) was confirmed in primary

  2. Evidence for a species of nuclear actin distinct from cytoplasmic and muscles actins.

    PubMed

    Bremer, J W; Busch, H; Yeoman, L C

    1981-03-31

    Nuclear actin (protein BJ) has been isolated from the chromatin of Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells and purified to homogeneity by selective extraction, Sepharose CL-6B chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A comparison of nuclear and cytoplasmic actins from Novikoff hepatoma cells and rabbit muscle actin was made by amino acid analysis, isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and two-dimensional peptide mapping procedures. By these criteria, all of the proteins compared are actins, but each is chemically distinct. It was concluded, therefore, that nuclear actin is similar to, but not identical with, cytoplasmic actin isolated from Novikoff hepatoma cells. A striking similarity in peptide charge and migration as shown by peptide map analysis was observed for nuclear and rabbit skeletal muscle actins. This may indicate that nuclear actin has the capacity for contractile function. In addition, the actins synthesized in Novikoff hepatoma cells may results from more than two structural genes.

  3. A recessive cellular mutation in v-fes-transformed mink cells restores contact inhibition and anchorage-dependent growth.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, J R; Downing, J R

    1988-01-01

    A contact-inhibited revertant of mink cells transformed by the Gardner-Arnstein strain of feline sarcoma virus was isolated by fluorescence-activated sorting of cells stained with the mitochondria-specific dye rhodamine 123. The revertant cell line exhibited a decrease in its proliferative rate and saturation density and a complete loss of its capacity for anchorage-independent growth, but it remained tumorigenic when inoculated into nude mice. The revertant cells retained a rescuable Gardner-Arnstein feline sarcoma provirus, expressed high levels of the v-fes oncogene product and its associated tyrosine kinase activity, manifested elevated levels of phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins similar to those observed in v-fes-transformed cells, and were refractory to retransformation by retroviruses containing the v-fes, v-fms, and v-ras oncogenes. Fusion of the revertant and parental cells generated somatic cell hybrids which formed colonies in semisolid medium, indicating that the block in transformation was recessive. These data together with the observation that the revertant phenotype is unstable in continuous culture suggest that the loss of transformation is due to the presence of limiting quantities of a gene product which functions downstream of the v-fes-coded kinase in the mitogenic pathway. Images PMID:3261387

  4. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  5. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications.

  6. Transformation phenotype of polyoma virus-transformed rat fibroblasts: plasminogen activator production is modulated by the growth state of the cells and regulated by the expression of an early viral gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Perbal, B

    1980-01-01

    The expression of two transformation parameters, namely, ability to grow in agar and plasminogen activator production, was studied in several rat fibroblasts transformed by either wild-type or thermo-sensitive (tsa and ts25) polyoma viruses. The production of plasminogen activator was found to be dependent upon the growth state of the infected cells during a period of several days after infection. The analysis of the transformed phenotype of 25 tsa transformants and of 19 ts25 transformants independently isolated under various growth conditions led to the conclusion that there is no correlation between the regulation processes involved in plasminogen activator production and ability to grow without anchorage. The results obtained also suggested that the production of plasminogen activator is under the control of a functional large T antigen. PMID:6255182

  7. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-dependent smooth muscle cell phenotype modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in normal blood vessels exist in a highly differentiate state characterized by expression of SMC-specific contractile proteins ("contractile phenotype"). Following blood vessel injury in vivo or when cultured in vitro in the presence of multiple growth factors, SMC undergo a phenotype switch characterized by the loss of contractile markers and appearance of expression of non-muscle proteins ("proliferative phenotype"). While a number of factors have been reported to modulate this process, its regulation remains uncertain. Here we show that induction of SMC FGF signaling inhibits TGFβ signaling and converts contractile SMCs to the proliferative phenotype. Conversely, inhibition of SMC FGF signaling induces TGFβ signaling converting proliferating SMCs to the contractile phenotype, even in the presence of various growth factors in vitro or vascular injury in vivo. The importance of this signaling cross-talk is supported by in vivo data that show that an SMC deletion of a pan-FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α (fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 alpha) in mice profoundly reduces neointima formation and vascular remodelling following carotid artery ligation. These results demonstrate that FGF-TGFβ signaling antagonism is the primary regulator of the SMC phenotype switch. Manipulation of this cross-talk may be an effective strategy for treatment of SMC-proliferation related diseases. PMID:27634335

  8. Protopanaxatirol type ginsenoside Re promotes cyclic growth of hair follicles via inhibiting transforming growth factor β signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Sunchang; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-02-19

    Ginsenosides, the major bio-active ingredients included in Panax ginseng, have been known for the hair growth activity and used to treat patients who suffer from hair loss; however, the detailed mechanisms of this action are still largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for hair growth promoting effect of ginsenoside Re (GRe) in vitro and in vivo. Different doses of minoxidil and GRe were administered topically to the back regions of nude mice for up to 45 days, and hair shaft length and hair cycles were determined for hair promoting activities. Topical treatment of GRe significantly increased the hair shaft length and hair existent time, which was comparable to the action of minoxidil. We also demonstrated that GRe stimulated hair shaft elongation in the ex vivo cultures of vibrissa hair follicles isolated from C57BL/6 mouse. Systemic transcriptome analysis by next generation sequencing demonstrated that TGF-β-pathway related genes were selectively down-regulated by treatment of GRe in vivo, and the same treatment suppressed TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of ERK in HeLa cells. The results clearly indicated that GRe is the effective constituent in the ginseng on hair promotion via selective inhibition of the hair growth phase transition related signaling pathways, TGF-β signaling cascades.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-dependent smooth muscle cell phenotype modulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in normal blood vessels exist in a highly differentiate state characterized by expression of SMC-specific contractile proteins (“contractile phenotype”). Following blood vessel injury in vivo or when cultured in vitro in the presence of multiple growth factors, SMC undergo a phenotype switch characterized by the loss of contractile markers and appearance of expression of non-muscle proteins (“proliferative phenotype”). While a number of factors have been reported to modulate this process, its regulation remains uncertain. Here we show that induction of SMC FGF signaling inhibits TGFβ signaling and converts contractile SMCs to the proliferative phenotype. Conversely, inhibition of SMC FGF signaling induces TGFβ signaling converting proliferating SMCs to the contractile phenotype, even in the presence of various growth factors in vitro or vascular injury in vivo. The importance of this signaling cross-talk is supported by in vivo data that show that an SMC deletion of a pan-FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α (fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 alpha) in mice profoundly reduces neointima formation and vascular remodelling following carotid artery ligation. These results demonstrate that FGF-TGFβ signaling antagonism is the primary regulator of the SMC phenotype switch. Manipulation of this cross-talk may be an effective strategy for treatment of SMC-proliferation related diseases. PMID:27634335

  10. Synergistic Action of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 and Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 Enhances Bioprinted Human Neocartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Breitenkamp, Kurt; Lotz, Martin; D’Lima, Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Bioprinting as a promising but unexplored approach for cartilage tissue engineering has the advantages of high throughput, digital control, and highly accurate placement of cells and biomaterial scaffold to the targeted 3D locations with simultaneous polymerization. This study tested feasibility of using bioprinting for cartilage engineering and examined the influence of cell density, growth and differentiation factors. Human articular chondrocytes were printed at various densities, stimulated transiently with growth factors and subsequently with chondrogenic factors. Samples were cultured for up to 4 weeks to evaluate cell proliferation and viability, mechanical properties, mass swelling ratio, water content, gene expression, ECM production, DNA content, and histology. Bioprinted samples treated with FGF-2/TGF-β1 had the best chondrogenic properties among all groups apparently due to synergistic stimulation of cell proliferation and chondrogenic phenotype. ECM production per chondrocyte in low cell density was much higher than that in high cell seeding density. This finding was also verified by mechanical testing and histology. In conclusion, cell seeding density that is feasible for bioprinting also appears optimal for human neocartilage formation when combined with appropriate growth and differentiation factors. PMID:22508498

  11. Protopanaxatirol type ginsenoside Re promotes cyclic growth of hair follicles via inhibiting transforming growth factor β signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Sunchang; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-02-19

    Ginsenosides, the major bio-active ingredients included in Panax ginseng, have been known for the hair growth activity and used to treat patients who suffer from hair loss; however, the detailed mechanisms of this action are still largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for hair growth promoting effect of ginsenoside Re (GRe) in vitro and in vivo. Different doses of minoxidil and GRe were administered topically to the back regions of nude mice for up to 45 days, and hair shaft length and hair cycles were determined for hair promoting activities. Topical treatment of GRe significantly increased the hair shaft length and hair existent time, which was comparable to the action of minoxidil. We also demonstrated that GRe stimulated hair shaft elongation in the ex vivo cultures of vibrissa hair follicles isolated from C57BL/6 mouse. Systemic transcriptome analysis by next generation sequencing demonstrated that TGF-β-pathway related genes were selectively down-regulated by treatment of GRe in vivo, and the same treatment suppressed TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of ERK in HeLa cells. The results clearly indicated that GRe is the effective constituent in the ginseng on hair promotion via selective inhibition of the hair growth phase transition related signaling pathways, TGF-β signaling cascades. PMID:26820528

  12. Co-stimulation of gastrointestinal tumour cell growth by gastrin, transforming growth factor alpha and insulin like growth factor-I.

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, L. G.; Watson, S. A.; Hall, A.; Morris, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors and insulin like growth factor-I receptors were co-expressed on two gastric and three colorectal tumour cell lines. Previous studies have shown that gastrin receptors were also expressed at a low level or two of these cell lines. Both TGF alpha and IGF-I promoted cell growth in all of the cell lines tested. The cell doubling time of a colorectal cell line was reduced from 48 to 30-34 h. Furthermore the effects of the growth factors were additive. Each growth factor also increased the response of the cells to gastrin, but a combination of both growth factors and gastrin did not further increase growth. PMID:1846553

  13. Profilin Interaction with Actin Filament Barbed End Controls Dynamic Instability, Capping, Branching, and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Pernier, Julien; Shekhar, Shashank; Jegou, Antoine; Guichard, Bérengère; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell motility and actin homeostasis depend on the control of polarized growth of actin filaments. Profilin, an abundant regulator of actin dynamics, supports filament assembly at barbed ends by binding G-actin. Here, we demonstrate how, by binding and destabilizing filament barbed ends at physiological concentrations, profilin also controls motility, cell migration, and actin homeostasis. Profilin enhances filament length fluctuations. Profilin competes with Capping Protein at barbed ends, which generates a lower amount of profilin-actin than expected if barbed ends were tightly capped. Profilin competes with barbed end polymerases, such as formins and VopF, and inhibits filament branching by WASP-Arp2/3 complex by competition for filament barbed ends, accounting for its as-yet-unknown effects on motility and metastatic cell migration observed in this concentration range. In conclusion, profilin is a major coordinator of polarized growth of actin filaments, controlled by competition between barbed end cappers, trackers, destabilizers, and filament branching machineries. PMID:26812019

  14. Effects of the F-actin inhibitor latrunculin A on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, Marie; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kawamoto, Susumu

    2015-07-01

    Our basic cell biology research was aimed at investigating the effect on eukaryotic cells of the sudden loss of the F-actin cytoskeleton. Cells treated with latrunculin A (LA) in yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD) medium were examined using phase-contrast and fluorescent microscopy, freeze-substitution, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, counted using a Bürker chamber and their absorbance measured. The cells responded to the presence of LA, an F-actin inhibitor, with the disappearance of actin patches, actin cables and actin rings. This resulted in the formation of larger spherical cells with irregular morphology in the cell walls and ultrastructural disorder of the cell organelles and secretory vesicles. Instead of buds, LA-inhibited cells formed only 'table-mountain-like' wide flattened swellings without apical growth with a thinner glucan cell-wall layer containing β-1,3-glucan microfibrils. The LA-inhibited cells lysed. Actin cables and patches were required for bud formation and bud growth. In addition, actin patches were required for the formation of β-1,3-glucan microfibrils in the bud cell wall. LA has fungistatic, fungicidal and fungilytic effects on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  15. Assessing spiritual growth and spiritual decline following a diagnosis of cancer: reliability and validity of the spiritual transformation scale.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brenda S; Hopkins, Clare M; Tisak, John; Steel, Jennifer L; Carr, Brian I

    2008-02-01

    This study assessed the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an instrument designed to assess spiritual transformations following a diagnosis of cancer-the Spiritual Transformation Scale (STS). The instrument was administering to 253 people diagnosed with cancer within the previous 2 years. Two underlying factors emerged (spiritual growth (SG) and spiritual decline (SD)) with adequate internal reliability (alpha = 0.98 and 0.86, respectively) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.85 and 0.73, respectively). Validity was supported by correlations between SG and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) Positive Affect Subscale (r = 0.23, p < 0.001), the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (r = 0.57, p < 0.001), and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). SD was associated with higher scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (r = 0.38, p < 0.001) and PANAS-Negative Affect Subscale (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), and lower scores on the PANAS-Positive Affect Subscale (r = -0.23, p < 0.001), and the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (r = -0.30, p < 0.001). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that the subscales uniquely predicted adjustment beyond related constructs (intrinsic religiousness, spiritual coping, and general post-traumatic growth). The results indicate that the STS is psychometrically sound, with SG predicting better, and SD predicting poorer, mental and spiritual well-being following a diagnosis of cancer. PMID:17458862

  16. Creating Sacred Experiences for Children as Pathways to Healing, Growth and Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagwan, Raisuyah

    2009-01-01

    Spiritual well-being forms an important dimension of children's lives globally. They are vulnerable to a range of difficulties as they grow and develop. Recently there has been a strong awareness that spirituality not only enables their healing but is critical to spiritual transformation. This paper briefly explores children's spirituality and…

  17. Affinity chromatography of immobilized actin and myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, R C; Trayer, I P

    1975-01-01

    Actin and myosin were immobilized by coupling them to agarose matrices. Both immobilized G-actin and immobilized myosin retain most of the properties of the proteins in free solution and are reliable over long periods of time. Sepharose-F-actin, under the conditions used in this study, has proved unstable and variable in its properties. Sepharose-G-actin columns were used to bind heavy meromyosin and myosin subfragment 1 specifically and reversibly. The interaction involved is sensitive to variation in ionic strength, such that myosin itself is not retained by the columns at the high salt concentration required for its complete solubilization. Myosin, rendered soluble at low ionic strength by polyalanylation, will interact successfully with the immobilized actin. The latter can distinguish between active and inactive fractions of the proteolytic and polyalanyl myosin derivatives, and was used in the preparation of these molecules. The complexes formed between the myosin derivatives and Sepharose-G-actin can be dissociated by low concentrations of ATP, ADP and pyrophosphate in both the presence and the absence of Mg2+. The G-actin columns were used to evaluate the results of chemical modifications of myosin subfragments on their interactions with actin. F-Actin in free solution is bound specifically and reversibly to columns of insolubilized myosin. Thus, with elution by either ATP or pyrophosphate, actin has been purified in one step from extracts of acetone-dried muscle powder. PMID:241335

  18. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation.

  19. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation. PMID:26469935

  20. Ca-alginate hydrogel mechanical transformations--the influence on yeast cell growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pajić-Lijaković, Ivana; Plavsić, Milenko; Bugarski, Branko; Nedović, Viktor

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe yeast cell growth within the Ca-alginate microbead during air-lift bioreactor cultivation. Model development was based on experimentally obtained data for the intra-bead cell concentration profile, after reached the equilibrium state, as well as, total yeast cell concentration per microbed and microbead volume as function of time. Relatively uniform cell concentration in the carrier matrix indicated that no internal nutrient diffusion limitations, but microenvironmental restriction, affected dominantly the dynamics of cell growth. Also interesting phenomenon of very different rates of cell number growth during cultivation is observed. After some critical time, the growth rate of cell colonies decreased drastically, but than suddenly increased again under all other experimental condition been the same. It is interpreted as disintegration of gel network and opening new free space for growth of cell clusters. These complex phenomena are modeled using the thermodynamical, free energy formalism. The particular form of free energy functional is proposed to describe various kinds of interactions, which affected the dynamics of cell growth and cause pseudo-phase transition of hydrogel. The good agreement of experimentally obtained data and model predictions are obtained. In that way the model provides both, the quantitative tools for further technological optimization of the process and deeper insight into dynamics of cell growth mechanism.

  1. Actin Cross-Linkers and the Shape of Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Martin; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Stereocilia are actin-based cellular protrusions essential for hearing. We propose that they are shaped by the detachment dynamics of actin cross-linkers, in particular espin. We account for experimentally observed stereocilium shapes, treadmilling velocity to length relationship, espin 1 localization profile, and microvillus length to espin level relationship. If the cross-linkers are allowed to reattach, our model yields a dynamical phase transition toward unbounded growth. Considering the simplified case of a noninteracting, one-filament system, we calculate the length probability distribution in the growing phase and its stationary form in a continuum approximation of the finite-length phase. Numerical simulations of interacting filaments suggest an anomalous power-law divergence of the protrusion length at the growth transition, which could be a universal feature of cross-linked depolymerizing systems. PMID:20959082

  2. The role of palladin in actin organization and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Arneman, Daniel; Otey, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Palladin is a widely expressed protein found in stress fibers, focal adhesions, growth cones, Z-discs, and other actin-based subcellular structures. It belongs to a small gene family that includes the Z-disc proteins myopalladin and myotilin, all of which share similar Ig-like domains. Recent advances have shown that palladin shares with myotilin the ability to bind directly to F-actin, and to crosslink actin filaments into bundles, in vitro. Studies in a variety of cultured cells suggest that the actin-organizing activity of palladin plays a central role in promoting cell mot