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Sample records for actin transforming growth

  1. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 induces alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in granulation tissue myofibroblasts and in quiescent and growing cultured fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Granulation tissue fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) develop several ultrastructural and biochemical features of smooth muscle (SM) cells, including the presence of microfilament bundles and the expression of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells. Myofibroblasts have been proposed to play a role in wound contraction and in retractile phenomena observed during fibrotic diseases. We show here that the subcutaneous administration of transforming growth factor- beta 1 (TGF beta 1) to rats results in the formation of a granulation tissue in which alpha-SM actin expressing myofibroblasts are particularly abundant. Other cytokines and growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, despite their profibrotic activity, do not induce alpha-SM actin in myofibroblasts. In situ hybridization with an alpha-SM actin probe shows a high level of alpha-SM actin mRNA expression in myofibroblasts of TGF beta 1-induced granulation tissue. Moreover, TGF beta 1 induces alpha-SM actin protein and mRNA expression in growing and quiescent cultured fibroblasts and preincubation of culture medium containing whole blood serum with neutralizing antibodies to TGF beta 1 results in a decrease of alpha-SM actin expression by fibroblasts in replicative and non-replicative conditions. These results suggest that TGF beta 1 plays an important role in myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing and fibrocontractive diseases by regulating the expression of alpha-SM actin in these cells. PMID:8314838

  3. Carbonylation and disassembly of the F-actin cytoskeleton in oxidant induced barrier dysfunction and its prevention by epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor α in a human colonic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Banan, A; Zhang, Y; Losurdo, J; Keshavarzian, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Intestinal barrier dysfunction concomitant with high levels of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) in the inflamed mucosa have been observed in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The cytoskeletal network has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of barrier function. Growth factors (epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor α (TGF-α)) protect gastrointestinal barrier integrity against a variety of noxious agents. However, the underlying mechanisms of oxidant induced disruption and growth factor mediated protection remain elusive.
AIMS—To determine: (1) if oxidation and disassembly of actin (a key cytoskeletal component) plays a major role in ROM induced epithelial monolayer barrier dysfunction; and (2) if growth factor mediated protection involves prevention of theses alterations.
METHODS—Caco-2 monolayers were preincubated with EGF, TGF-α, or vehicle before incubation with ROM (H2O2 or HOCl). Effects on cell integrity, barrier function, and G- and F-actin (oxidation, disassembly, and assembly) were determined.
RESULTS—ROM dose dependently and significantly increased F- and G-actin oxidation (carbonylation), decreased the stable F-actin fraction (index of stability), and increased the monomeric G-actin fraction (index of disassembly). Concomitant with these changes were disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and loss of the monolayer barrier function. In contrast, growth factor pretreatment decreased actin oxidation and enhanced the stable F-actin, while in concert prevented actin disruption and restored normal barrier function of monolayers exposed to ROM. Cytochalasin-D, an inhibitor of actin assembly, not only caused actin disassembly and barrier dysfunction but also abolished the protective action of growth factors. Moreover, an actin stabilising agent, phalloidin, mimicked the protective actions of the growth factors.
CONCLUSIONS—Oxidation, disassembly, and instability of the actin cytoskeleton appears to

  4. F-actin aggregates in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Polymerized actin has been found aggregated into distinctive patches inside transformed cells in culture. The F-actin-specific fluorescent probe, nitrobenzoxadiazole-phallacidin, labels these F-actin aggregates near the ventral cell surface of cells transformed by RNA or DNA tumor viruses, or by chemical mutagens, or spontaneously. Their appearance in all eight transformed cell types studied suggests their ubiquity and involvement in transformation morphology. Actin patches developed in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells transformed by a temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus (LA23-NRK) within 30 min after a shift from the nonpermissive (39 degrees C) to the permissive temperature (32 degrees C). Patch appearance paralleling viral src gene expression tends to implicate pp60src kinase activity in destabilizing the cytoskeleton. However, appearance of the actin aggregates in cells not transformed by retrovirus calls for alternative mechanisms, perhaps involving an endogenous kinase, for this apparently common trait. PMID:6270163

  5. Labeling F-actin barbed ends with rhodamine-actin in permeabilized neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Marsick, Bonnie M; Letourneau, Paul C

    2011-03-17

    The motile tips of growing axons are called growth cones. Growth cones lead navigating axons through developing tissues by interacting with locally expressed molecular guidance cues that bind growth cone receptors and regulate the dynamics and organization of the growth cone cytoskeleton. The main target of these navigational signals is the actin filament meshwork that fills the growth cone periphery and that drives growth cone motility through continual actin polymerization and dynamic remodeling. Positive or attractive guidance cues induce growth cone turning by stimulating actin filament (F-actin) polymerization in the region of the growth cone periphery that is nearer the source of the attractant cue. This actin polymerization drives local growth cone protrusion, adhesion of the leading margin and axonal elongation toward the attractant. Actin filament polymerization depends on the availability of sufficient actin monomer and on polymerization nuclei or actin filament barbed ends for the addition of monomer. Actin monomer is abundantly available in chick retinal and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) growth cones. Consequently, polymerization increases rapidly when free F-actin barbed ends become available for monomer addition. This occurs in chick DRG and retinal growth cones via the local activation of the F-actin severing protein actin depolymerizing factor (ADF/cofilin) in the growth cone region closer to an attractant. This heightened ADF/cofilin activity severs actin filaments to create new F-actin barbed ends for polymerization. The following method demonstrates this mechanism. Total content of F-actin is visualized by staining with fluorescent phalloidin. F-actin barbed ends are visualized by the incorporation of rhodamine-actin within growth cones that are permeabilized with the procedure described in the following, which is adapted from previous studies of other motile cells. When rhodamine-actin is added at a concentration above the critical concentration

  6. Actin-binding proteins take the reins in growth cones.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chi W; Flynn, Kevin C; Bamburg, James R

    2008-02-01

    Higher-order actin-based networks (actin superstructures) are important for growth-cone motility and guidance. Principles for generating, organizing and remodelling actin superstructures have emerged from recent findings in cell-free systems, non-neuronal cells and growth cones. This Review examines how actin superstructures are initiated de novo at the leading-edge membrane and how the spontaneous organization of actin superstructures is driven by ensembles of actin-binding proteins. How the regulation of actin-binding proteins can affect growth-cone turning and axonal regeneration is also discussed.

  7. Growth of branched actin networks against obstacles.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A E

    2001-01-01

    A method for simulating the growth of branched actin networks against obstacles has been developed. The method is based on simple stochastic events, including addition or removal of monomers at filament ends, capping of filament ends, nucleation of branches from existing filaments, and detachment of branches; the network structure for several different models of the branching process has also been studied. The models differ with regard to their inclusion of effects such as preferred branch orientations, filament uncapping at the obstacle, and preferential branching at filament ends. The actin ultrastructure near the membrane in lamellipodia is reasonably well produced if preferential branching in the direction of the obstacle or barbed-end uncapping effects are included. Uncapping effects cause the structures to have a few very long filaments that are similar to those seen in pathogen-induced "actin tails." The dependence of the growth velocity, branch spacing, and network density on the rate parameters for the various processes is quite different among the branching models. An analytic theory of the growth velocity and branch spacing of the network is described. Experiments are suggested that could distinguish among some of the branching models. PMID:11566765

  8. Participation of Actin on Giardia lamblia Growth and Encystation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Romero, Araceli; Leon-Avila, Gloria; Perez Rangel, Armando; Cortes Zarate, Rafael; Garcia Tovar, Carlos; Hernandez, Jose Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background Microfilaments play a determinant role in different cell processes such as: motility, cell division, phagocytosis and intracellular transport; however, these structures are poorly understood in the parasite Giardia lamblia. Methodology and Principal Findings By confocal microscopy using TRITC-phalloidin, we found structured actin distributed in the entire trophozoite, the label stand out at the ventral disc, median body, flagella and around the nuclei. During Giardia encystation, a sequence of morphological changes concurrent to modifications on the distribution of structured actin and in the expression of actin mRNA were observed. To elucidate whether actin participates actively on growth and encystation, cells were treated with Cytochalasin D, Latrunculin A and Jasplakinolide and analyzed by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. All drugs caused a growth reduction (27 to 45%) and changes on the distribution of actin. Besides, 60 to 80% of trophozoites treated with the drugs, exhibited damage at the caudal region, alterations in the flagella and wrinkles-like on the plasma membrane. The drugs also altered the cyst-yield and the morphology, scanning electron microscopy revealed diminished cytokinesis, cysts with damages in the wall and alterations in the size and on the intermembranal space. Furthermore, the drugs caused a significant reduction of the intensity of flourescence-labeled CWP1 on ESV and on cyst wall, this was coincident with a reduction of CWP1 gene expression (34%). Conclusions and Significance All our results, indicated an important role of actin in the morphology, growth and encystation and indirectly suggested an actin role in gene expression. PMID:19774081

  9. Actin Polymerization Is Essential for Pollen Tube GrowthV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vidali, Luis; McKenna, Sylvester T.; Hepler, Peter K.

    2001-01-01

    Actin microfilaments, which are prominent in pollen tubes, have been implicated in the growth process; however, their mechanism of action is not well understood. In the present work we have used profilin and DNAse I injections, as well as latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments, under quantitatively controlled conditions, to perturb actin microfilament structure and assembly in an attempt to answer this question. We found that a ∼50% increase in the total profilin pool was necessary to half-maximally inhibit pollen tube growth, whereas a ∼100% increase was necessary for half-maximal inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming. DNAse I showed a similar inhibitory activity but with a threefold more pronounced effect on growth than streaming. Latrunculin B, at only 1–4 nM in the growth medium, has a similar proportion of inhibition of growth over streaming to that of profilin. The fact that tip growth is more sensitive than streaming to the inhibitory substances and that there is no correlation between streaming and growth rates suggests that tip growth requires actin assembly in a process independent of cytoplasmic streaming. PMID:11514633

  10. Actin-Capping Protein and the Hippo pathway regulate F-actin and tissue growth in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Beatriz García; Gaspar, Pedro; Brás-Pereira, Catarina; Jezowska, Barbara; Rebelo, Sofia Raquel; Janody, Florence

    2011-06-01

    The conserved Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key kinase cascade that controls tissue growth by regulating the nuclear import and activity of the transcription co-activator Yorkie. Here, we report that the actin-Capping Protein αβ heterodimer, which regulates actin polymerization, also functions to suppress inappropriate tissue growth by inhibiting Yorkie activity. Loss of Capping Protein activity results in abnormal accumulation of apical F-actin, reduced Hippo pathway activity and the ectopic expression of several Yorkie target genes that promote cell survival and proliferation. Reduction of two other actin-regulatory proteins, Cofilin and the cyclase-associated protein Capulet, cause abnormal F-actin accumulation, but only the loss of Capulet, like that of Capping Protein, induces ectopic Yorkie activity. Interestingly, F-actin also accumulates abnormally when Hippo pathway activity is reduced or abolished, independently of Yorkie activity, whereas overexpression of the Hippo pathway component expanded can partially reverse the abnormal accumulation of F-actin in cells depleted for Capping Protein. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel interplay between Hippo pathway activity and actin filament dynamics that is essential for normal growth control.

  11. Effects of latrunculin B on the actin cytoskeleton and hyphal growth in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Ketelaar, Tijs; Meijer, Harold J G; Spiekerman, Marjolein; Weide, Rob; Govers, Francine

    2012-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is conserved in all eukaryotes, but its functions vary among different organisms. In oomycetes, the function of the actin cytoskeleton has received relatively little attention. We have performed a bioinformatics study and show that oomycete actin genes fall within a distinct clade that is divergent from plant, fungal and vertebrate actin genes. To obtain a better understanding of the functions of the actin cytoskeleton in hyphal growth of oomycetes, we studied the actin organization in Phytophthora infestans hyphae and the consequences of treatment with the actin depolymerising drug latrunculin B (latB). This revealed that latB treatment causes a concentration dependent inhibition of colony expansion and aberrant hyphal growth. The most obvious aberrations observed upon treatment with 0.1 μM latB were increased hyphal branching and irregular tube diameters whereas at higher concentrations latB (0.5 and 1 μM) tips of expanding hyphae changed into balloon-like shapes. This aberrant growth correlated with changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In untreated hyphae, staining with fluorescently tagged phalloidin revealed two populations of actin filaments: long, axially oriented actin filament cables and cortical actin filament plaques. Two hyphal subtypes were recognized, one containing only plaques and the other containing both cables and plaques. In the latter, some hyphae had an apical zone without actin filament plaques. Upon latB treatment, the proportion of hyphae without actin filament cables increased and there were more hyphae with a short apical zone without actin filament plaques. In general, actin filament plaques were more resilient against actin depolymerisation than actin filament cables. Besides disturbing hyphal growth and actin organization, actin depolymerisation also affected the positioning of nuclei. In the presence of latB, the distance between nuclei and the hyphal tip decreased, suggesting that the actin

  12. Role of the actin bundling protein fascin in growth cone morphogenesis: localization in filopodia and lamellipodia.

    PubMed

    Cohan, C S; Welnhofer, E A; Zhao, L; Matsumura, F; Yamashiro, S

    2001-02-01

    Growth cones at the distal tips of growing nerve axons contain bundles of actin filaments distributed throughout the lamellipodium and that project into filopodia. The regulation of actin bundling by specific actin binding proteins is likely to play an important role in many growth cone behaviors. Although the actin binding protein, fascin, has been localized in growth cones, little information is available on its functional significance. We used the large growth cones of the snail Helisoma to determine whether fascin was involved in temporal changes in actin filaments during growth cone morphogenesis. Fascin localized to radially oriented actin bundles in lamellipodia (ribs) and filopodia. Using a fascin antibody and a GFP fascin construct, we found that fascin incorporated into actin bundles from the beginning of growth cone formation at the cut end of axons. Fascin associated with most of the actin bundle except the proximal 6--12% adjacent to the central domain, which is the region associated with actin disassembly. Later, during growth cone morphogenesis when actin ribs shortened, the proximal fascin-free zone of bundles increased, but fascin was retained in the distal, filopodial portion of bundles. Treatment with tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), which phosphorylates fascin and decreases its affinity for actin, resulted in loss of all actin bundles from growth cones. Our findings suggest that fascin may be particularly important for the linear structure and dynamics of filopodia and for lamellipodial rib dynamics by regulating filament organization in bundles.

  13. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  14. Focal loss of actin bundles causes microtubule redistribution and growth cone turning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng-Quan; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Cohan, Christopher S

    2002-05-27

    It is commonly believed that growth cone turning during pathfinding is initiated by reorganization of actin filaments in response to guidance cues, which then affects microtubule structure to complete the turning process. However, a major unanswered question is how changes in actin cytoskeleton are induced by guidance cues and how these changes are then translated into microtubule rearrangement. Here, we report that local and specific disruption of actin bundles from the growth cone peripheral domain induced repulsive growth cone turning. Meanwhile, dynamic microtubules within the peripheral domain were oriented into areas where actin bundles remained and were lost from areas where actin bundles disappeared. This resulted in directional microtubule extension leading to axon bending and growth cone turning. In addition, this local actin bundle loss coincided with localized growth cone collapse, as well as asymmetrical lamellipodial protrusion. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that regional actin bundle reorganization can steer the growth cone by coordinating actin reorganization with microtubule dynamics. This suggests that actin bundles can be potential targets of signaling pathways downstream of guidance cues, providing a mechanism for coupling changes in leading edge actin with microtubules at the central domain during turning.

  15. Profilin Regulates Apical Actin Polymerization to Control Polarized Pollen Tube Growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaonan; Qu, Xiaolu; Jiang, Yuxiang; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Ruihui; Wu, Youjun; Fu, Ying; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-12-07

    Pollen tube growth is an essential step during flowering plant reproduction, whose growth depends on a population of dynamic apical actin filaments. Apical actin filaments were thought to be involved in the regulation of vesicle fusion and targeting in the pollen tube. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the construction of apical actin structures in the pollen tube remain largely unclear. Here, we identify profilin as an important player in the regulation of actin polymerization at the apical membrane in the pollen tube. Downregulation of profilin decreased the amount of filamentous actin and induced disorganization of apical actin filaments, and reduced tip-directed vesicle transport and accumulation in the pollen tube. Direct visualization of actin dynamics revealed that the elongation of actin filaments originating at the apical membrane decreased in profilin mutant pollen tubes. Mutant profilin that is defective in binding poly-L-proline only partially rescues the actin polymerization defect in profilin mutant pollen tubes, although it fully rescues the actin turnover phenotype. We propose that profilin controls the construction of actin structures at the pollen tube tip, presumably by favoring formin-mediated actin polymerization at the apical membrane.

  16. Arabidopsis microtubule-destabilizing protein 25 functions in pollen tube growth by severing actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Jiejie; Sun, Jingbo; Song, Leina; Mao, Tonglin

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct actin filament arrays in the subapical region of pollen tubes is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and dynamics of the actin filaments in this region remain to be determined. This study shows that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN25 (MDP25) has the actin filament-severing activity of an actin binding protein. This protein negatively regulated pollen tube growth by modulating the organization and dynamics of actin filaments in the subapical region of pollen tubes. MDP25 loss of function resulted in enhanced pollen tube elongation and inefficient fertilization. MDP25 bound directly to actin filaments and severed individual actin filaments, in a manner that was dramatically enhanced by Ca(2+), in vitro. Analysis of a mutant that bears a point mutation at the Ca(2+) binding sites demonstrated that the subcellular localization of MDP25 was determined by cytosolic Ca(2+) level in the subapical region of pollen tubes, where MDP25 was disassociated from the plasma membrane and moved into the cytosol. Time-lapse analysis showed that the F-actin-severing frequency significantly decreased and a high density of actin filaments was observed in the subapical region of mdp25-1 pollen tubes. This study reveals a mechanism whereby calcium enhances the actin filament-severing activity of MDP25 in the subapical region of pollen tubes to modulate pollen tube growth.

  17. Arabidopsis RIC1 Severs Actin Filaments at the Apex to Regulate Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shi, Haifan; Chen, Binqing; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes deliver sperms to the ovule for fertilization via tip growth. The rapid turnover of F-actin in pollen tube tips plays an important role in this process. In this study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana RIC1, a member of the ROP-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein family, regulates pollen tube growth via its F-actin severing activity. Knockout of RIC1 enhanced pollen tube elongation, while overexpression of RIC1 dramatically reduced tube growth. Pharmacological analysis indicated that RIC1 affected F-actin dynamics in pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical assays revealed that RIC1 directly bound and severed F-actin in the presence of Ca2+ in addition to interfering with F-actin turnover by capping F-actin at the barbed ends. In vivo, RIC1 localized primarily to the apical plasma membrane (PM) of pollen tubes. The level of RIC1 at the apical PM oscillated during pollen tube growth. The frequency of F-actin severing at the apex was notably decreased in ric1-1 pollen tubes but was increased in pollen tubes overexpressing RIC1. We propose that RIC1 regulates F-actin dynamics at the apical PM as well as the cytosol by severing F-actin and capping the barbed ends in the cytoplasm, establishing a novel mechanism that underlies the regulation of pollen tube growth. PMID:25804540

  18. Connective tissue growth factor modulates podocyte actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix synthesis and is induced in podocytes upon injury.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf; Ullmann, Sabrina; Zeilbeck, Ludwig F; Baumann, Matti; Junglas, Benjamin; Tamm, Ernst R

    2011-09-01

    Structural changes of podocytes and retraction of their foot processes are a critical factor in the pathogenesis of minimal change nephritis and glomerulosclerosis. Here we tested, if connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is involved in podocyte injury during acute and chronic puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN) as animal models of minimal change nephritis, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, respectively. Rats were treated once (acute PAN) or for 13 weeks (chronic PAN). In both experimental conditions, CTGF and its mRNA were found to be highly upregulated in podocytes. The upregulation correlated with onset and duration of proteinuria in acute PAN, and glomerulosclerosis and high expression of glomerular fibronectin, and collagens I, III, and IV in chronic PAN. In vitro, treatment of podocytes with recombinant CTGF increased amount and density of actin stress fibers, the expression of actin-associated molecules such as podocalyxin, synaptopodin, ezrin, and actinin-4, and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Moreover, we observed increased podocyte expression of mRNA for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, TGF-β receptor II, fibronectin, and collagens I, III, and IV. Treatment of cultured podocytes with puromycin aminonucleoside resulted in loss of actin stress fibers and cell death, effects that were partially prevented when CTGF was added to the culture medium. Depletion of CTGF mRNA in cultured podocytes by RNA interference reduced both the number of actin stress fibers and the expression of actin-associated molecules. We propose that the expression of CTGF is acutely upregulated in podocytes as part of a cellular attempt to repair structural changes of the actin cytoskeleton. When the damaging effects on podocyte structure and function persist chronically, continuous CTGF expression in podocytes is a critical factor that promotes progressive accumulation of glomerular extracellular matrix and

  19. Growth cone-like waves transport actin and promote axonogenesis and neurite branching

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C.; Pak, Chi W.; Shaw, Alisa E.; Bradke, Frank; Bamburg, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Axonogenesis involves a shift from uniform delivery of materials to all neurites to preferential delivery to the putative axon, supporting its more rapid extension. Waves, growth cone-like structures that propagate down the length of neurites, were shown previously to correlate with neurite growth in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Waves are similar to growth cones in their structure, composition and dynamics. Here, we report that waves form in all undifferentiated neurites, but occur more frequently in the future axon during initial neuronal polarization. Moreover, wave frequency and their impact on neurite growth are altered in neurons treated with stimuli that enhance axonogenesis. Coincident with wave arrival, growth cones enlarge and undergo a marked increase in dynamics. Through their engorgement of filopodia along the neurite shaft, waves can induce de novo neurite branching. Actin in waves maintains much of its cohesiveness during transport whereas actin in non-wave regions of the neurite rapidly diffuses as measured by live cell imaging of photoactivated GFP-actin and photoconversion of Dendra-actin. Thus, waves represent an alternative axonal transport mechanism for actin. Waves also occur in neurons in organotypic hippocampal slices where they propagate along neurites in the dentate gyrus and the CA regions and induce branching. Taken together, our results indicate that waves are physiologically relevant and contribute to axon growth and branching via the transport of actin and by increasing growth cone dynamics. PMID:19513994

  20. The effects of collapsing factors on F-actin content and microtubule distribution of Helisoma growth cones.

    PubMed

    Torreano, Paul J; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Cohan, Christopher S

    2005-03-01

    Growth cone collapsing factors induce growth cone collapse or repulsive growth cone turning by interacting with membrane receptors that induce alterations in the growth cone cytoskeleton. A common change induced by collapsing factors in the cytoskeleton of the peripheral domain, the thin lamellopodial area of growth cones, is a decline in the number of radially aligned F-actin bundles that form the core of filopodia. The present study examined whether ML-7, a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, serotonin, a neurotransmitter and TPA, an activator of protein kinase C, which induce growth cone collapse of Helisoma growth cones, depolymerized or debundled F-actin. We report that these collapsing factors had different effects. ML-7 induced F-actin reorganization consistent with debundling whereas serotonin and TPA predominately depolymerized and possibly debundled F-actin. Additionally, these collapsing factors induced the formation of a dense actin-ring around the central domain, the thicker proximal area of growth cones [Zhou and Cohan, 2001: J. Cell Biol. 153:1071-1083]. The formation of the actin-ring occurred subsequent to the loss of actin bundles. The ML-7-induced actin-ring was found to inhibit microtubule extension into the P-domain. Thus, ML-7, serotonin, and TPA induce growth cone collapse associated with a decline in radially aligned F-actin bundles through at least two mechanisms involving debundling of actin filaments and/or actin depolymerization.

  1. Coordinated Movement of Vesicles and Actin Bundles during Nerve Growth Revealed by Superresolution Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nozumi, Motohiro; Nakatsu, Fubito; Katoh, Kaoru; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-02-28

    The growth cone is an essential structure for nerve growth. Although its membrane and cytoskeleton are likely to interact coordinately during nerve growth, the mechanisms are unknown due to their close proximity. Here, we used superresolution microscopy to simultaneously observe vesicles and F-actin in growth cones. We identified a novel vesicular generation mechanism that is independent of clathrin and dependent on endophilin-3- and dynamin-1 and that occurs proximal to the leading edge simultaneously with fascin-1-dependent F-actin bundling. In contrast to conventional clathrin-dependent endocytosis, which occurs distal from the leading edge at the basal surfaces of growth cones, this mechanism was distinctly observed at the apical surface using 3D imaging and was involved in mediating axon growth. Reduced endophilin or fascin inhibited this endocytic mechanism. These results suggest that, at the leading edge, vesicles are coordinately generated and transported with actin bundling during nerve growth.

  2. Nervous Wreck and Cdc42 cooperate to regulate endocytic actin assembly during synaptic growth

    PubMed Central

    Rodal, Avital A.; Motola-Barnes, Rebecca N.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic morphology depends on endocytosis of activated growth signal receptors, but the mechanisms regulating this membrane trafficking event are unclear. Actin polymerization mediated by WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein) and the Arp2/3 (Actin related protein 2/3) complex generates forces at multiple stages of endocytosis. F-BAR/SH3 domain proteins play key roles in this process by coordinating membrane deformation with WASp-dependent actin polymerization. However, it is not known how other WASp ligands, such as the small GTPase Cdc42, coordinate with F-BAR/SH3 proteins to regulate actin polymerization at membranes. Nervous Wreck (Nwk) is a conserved neuronal F-BAR/SH3 protein that localizes to periactive zones at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and is required for regulation of synaptic growth via BMP signaling. Here we show that Nwk interacts with the endocytic proteins dynamin and Dap160 and functions together with Cdc42 to promote WASp-mediated actin polymerization in vitro and to regulate synaptic growth in vivo. Cdc42 function is associated with Rab11-dependent recycling endosomes, and we show that Rab11 co-localizes with Nwk at the NMJ. Taken together, our results suggest that synaptic growth activated by growth factor signaling is controlled at an endosomal compartment via coordinated Nwk and Cdc42-dependent actin assembly. PMID:18701694

  3. ZNF185, an actin-cytoskeleton-associated growth inhibitory LIM protein in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-S; Gong, A; Young, C Y F

    2007-01-04

    We have recently identified ZNF185 as a gene that is downregulated in prostate cancer (PCa), in part via epigenetic alteration, and maybe associated with disease progression. In this study, we cloned the ZNF185 cDNA from normal human prostate tissues and investigated its biological function. We show that ZNF185 is a novel actin-cytoskeleton-associated Lin-l 1, Isl-1 and Mec-3 (LIM) domain-containing protein that localizes to F-actin structures, and is enriched at focal adhesions. We find that the NH(2)-terminal region, which we designate the actin-targeting domain, facilitates ZNF185 binding to actin in vitro and is both necessary and sufficient to mediate actin-cytoskeleton targeting of ZNF185, whereas the LIM domain, which is localized in the COOH-terminus is dispensable for this phenomenon. Interestingly, ectopic expression of full-length ZNF185, but not a mutant lacking the actin-targeting domain, could suppress proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of PCa cells. Together, our data suggest that ZNF185 may function as a tumor-suppressor protein by associating with the actin-cytoskeleton.

  4. Interdependence of endomembrane trafficking and actin dynamics during polarized growth of Arabidopsis pollen tubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During polarized growth of pollen tubes, endomembrane trafficking and actin polymerization are two critical processes that establish membrane/wall homeostasis and maintain growth polarity. Fine-tuned interactions between these two processes are therefore necessary but poorly understood. To better un...

  5. Arabidopsis ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 Severs Actin Filaments and Regulates Actin Cable Turnover to Promote Normal Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-01-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes. PMID:24058157

  6. Arabidopsis Microtubule-Destabilizing Protein 25 Functions in Pollen Tube Growth by Severing Actin Filaments[W

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tao; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Jiejie; Sun, Jingbo; Song, Leina; Mao, Tonglin

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct actin filament arrays in the subapical region of pollen tubes is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and dynamics of the actin filaments in this region remain to be determined. This study shows that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN25 (MDP25) has the actin filament–severing activity of an actin binding protein. This protein negatively regulated pollen tube growth by modulating the organization and dynamics of actin filaments in the subapical region of pollen tubes. MDP25 loss of function resulted in enhanced pollen tube elongation and inefficient fertilization. MDP25 bound directly to actin filaments and severed individual actin filaments, in a manner that was dramatically enhanced by Ca2+, in vitro. Analysis of a mutant that bears a point mutation at the Ca2+ binding sites demonstrated that the subcellular localization of MDP25 was determined by cytosolic Ca2+ level in the subapical region of pollen tubes, where MDP25 was disassociated from the plasma membrane and moved into the cytosol. Time-lapse analysis showed that the F-actin-severing frequency significantly decreased and a high density of actin filaments was observed in the subapical region of mdp25-1 pollen tubes. This study reveals a mechanism whereby calcium enhances the actin filament–severing activity of MDP25 in the subapical region of pollen tubes to modulate pollen tube growth. PMID:24424096

  7. Two-tiered coupling between flowing actin and immobilized N-cadherin/catenin complexes in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mikael; Leduc, Cécile; Lagardère, Matthieu; Argento, Amélie; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones move forward by dynamically connecting actin-based motility to substrate adhesion, but the mechanisms at the individual molecular level remain unclear. We cultured primary neurons on N-cadherin–coated micropatterned substrates, and imaged adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins at the ventral surface of growth cones using single particle tracking combined to photoactivated localization microscopy (sptPALM). We demonstrate transient interactions in the second time scale between flowing actin filaments and immobilized N-cadherin/catenin complexes, translating into a local reduction of the actin retrograde flow. Normal actin flow on micropatterns was rescued by expression of a dominant negative N-cadherin construct competing for the coupling between actin and endogenous N-cadherin. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments confirmed the differential kinetics of actin and N-cadherin, and further revealed a 20% actin population confined at N-cadherin micropatterns, contributing to local actin accumulation. Computer simulations with relevant kinetic parameters modeled N-cadherin and actin turnover well, validating this mechanism. Such a combination of short- and long-lived interactions between the motile actin network and spatially restricted adhesive complexes represents a two-tiered clutch mechanism likely to sustain dynamic environment sensing and provide the force necessary for growth cone migration. PMID:26038554

  8. Actin disruption alters the localization of tau in the growth cones of cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Zmuda, J F; Rivas, R J

    2000-08-01

    Cultured cerebellar granule neurons initially extend a single axon, followed by the extension of a second axon to attain a bipolar morphology. Differentiation culminates with the extension of several short dendrites from the cell body. In the present study, we determined the location of the dephosphorylated form of the microtubule-associated protein tau (dtau) within the growth cones of newly forming axons and examined whether this localization was influenced by the actin cytoskeleton. Following elongation of the initial axon at 2-3 days in vitro, dtau immunoreactivity was present along the entire length of the axon, becoming most intense just proximal to the growth cone. Dtau labeling dropped off dramatically along the microtubules of the growth cone and was undetectable along the most distal tips of these microtubules. As the initial axon continued to elongate at 3-4 days in vitro, the actin-rich growth cone peripheral domain characteristically underwent a dramatic reduction in size. Dtau immunoreactivity extended all the way to the most distal tips of the microtubules in the growth cones of these cells. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A mimicked the effects of this characteristic reduction in growth cone size with regard to dtau localization in the growth cone. Depolymerization of filamentous actin caused the collapse of the peripheral domain and allowed dtau to bind all the way to the most distal tips of microtubules in the axon. Upon removal of the drugs, the peripheral domain of the growth cone rapidly re-formed and dtau was once again excluded from the most distal regions of growth cone microtubules. These findings suggest a novel role for actin in determining the localization of the microtubule-associated protein &tgr; within the growth cones of neurons.

  9. Initial stem cell adhesion on porous silicon surface: molecular architecture of actin cytoskeleton and filopodial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Panayotov, Ivan; Secret, Emilie; Cunin, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Martin, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The way cells explore their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during development and migration is mediated by lamellipodia at their leading edge, acting as an actual motor pulling the cell forward. Lamellipodia are the primary area within the cell of actin microfilaments (filopodia) formation. In this work, we report on the use of porous silicon (pSi) scaffolds to mimic the ECM of mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp (DPSC) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that pSi promoted the appearance of lateral filopodia protruding from the DPSC cell body and not only in the lamellipodia area. The formation of elongated lateral actin filaments suggests that pores provided the necessary anchorage points for protrusion growth. Although MCF-7 cells displayed a lower presence of organized actin network on both pSi and nonporous silicon, pSi stimulated the formation of extended cell protrusions.

  10. Arabidopsis ACT11 modifies actin turnover to promote pollen germination and maintain the normal rate of tube growth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-08-01

    Actin is an ancient conserved protein that is encoded by multiple isovariants in multicellular organisms. There are eight functional actin genes in the Arabidopsis genome, and the precise function and mechanism of action of each isovariant remain poorly understood. Here, we report the characterization of ACT11, a reproductive actin isovariant. Our studies reveal that loss of function of ACT11 causes a delay in pollen germination, but enhances pollen tube growth. Cytological analysis revealed that the amount of filamentous actin decreased, and the rate of actin turnover increased in act11 pollen. Convergence of actin filaments upon the germination aperture was impaired in act11 pollen, consistent with the observed delay of germination. Reduction of actin dynamics with jasplakinolide suppressed the germination and tube growth phenotypes in act11 pollen, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms involve an increase in actin dynamics. Thus, we demonstrate that ACT11 is required to maintain the rate of actin turnover in order to promote pollen germination and maintain the normal rate of pollen tube growth.

  11. MAP18 regulates the direction of pollen tube growth in Arabidopsis by modulating F-actin organization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Kang, Erfang; Xu, Qiangyi; Wang, Miaoying; Rui, Yue; Liu, Baoquan; Yuan, Ming; Fu, Ying

    2013-03-01

    For fertilization to occur in plants, the pollen tube must be guided to enter the ovule via the micropyle. Previous reports have implicated actin filaments, actin binding proteins, and the tip-focused calcium gradient as key contributors to polar growth of pollen tubes; however, the regulation of directional pollen tube growth is largely unknown. We reported previously that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN18 (MAP18) contributes to directional cell growth and cortical microtubule organization. The preferential expression of MAP18 in pollen and in pollen tubes suggests that MAP18 also may function in pollen tube growth. In this study, we demonstrate that MAP18 functions in pollen tubes by influencing actin organization, rather than microtubule assembly. In vitro biochemical results indicate that MAP18 exhibits Ca(2+)-dependent filamentous (F)-actin-severing activity. Abnormal expression of MAP18 in map18 and MAP18 OX plants was associated with disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in the tube apex, resulting in aberrant pollen tube growth patterns and morphologies, inaccurate micropyle targeting, and fewer fertilization events. Experiments with MAP18 mutants created by site-directed mutagenesis suggest that F-actin-severing activity is essential to the effects of MAP18 on pollen tube growth direction. Our study demonstrates that in Arabidopsis, MAP18 guides the direction of pollen tube growth by modulating actin filaments.

  12. Isolation of an efficient actin promoter for use in rice transformation.

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, D; Zhang, W; Cao, J; Wu, R

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized the 5' region of the rice actin 1 gene (Act1) and show that it is an efficient promoter for regulating the constitutive expression of a foreign gene in transgenic rice. By constructing plasmids with 5' regions from the rice Act1 gene fused to the coding sequence of a gene encoding bacterial beta-glucuronidase, we demonstrate that a region 1.3 kilobases upstream of the Act1 translation initiation codon contains all of the 5'-regulatory elements necessary for high-level beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression in transient assays of transformed rice protoplasts. The rice Act1 primary transcript has a noncoding exon separated by a 5' intron from the first coding exon. Fusions that lack this Act1 intron showed no detectable GUS activity in transient assays of transformed rice protoplasts. Deletion analysis of the Act1 5' intron suggests that the intron-mediated stimulation of GUS expression is associated, in part, with an in vivo requirement for efficient intron splicing. PMID:2136633

  13. Nerve growth cone lamellipodia contain two populations of actin filaments that differ in organization and polarity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The organization and polarity of actin filaments in neuronal growth cones was studied with negative stain and freeze-etch EM using a permeabilization protocol that caused little detectable change in morphology when cultured nerve growth cones were observed by video- enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy. The lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton was composed of two distinct subpopulations: a population of 40-100-nm-wide filament bundles radiated from the leading edge, and a second population of branching short filaments filled the volume between the dorsal and ventral membrane surfaces. Together, the two populations formed the three- dimensional structural network seen within expanding lamellipodia. Interaction of the actin filaments with the ventral membrane surface occurred along the length of the filaments via membrane associated proteins. The long bundled filament population was primarily involved in these interactions. The filament tips of either population appeared to interact with the membrane only at the leading edge; this interaction was mediated by a globular Triton-insoluble material. Actin filament polarity was determined by decoration with myosin S1 or heavy meromyosin. Previous reports have suggested that the polarity of the actin filaments in motile cells is uniform, with the barbed ends toward the leading edge. We observed that the actin filament polarity within growth cone lamellipodia is not uniform; although the predominant orientation was with the barbed end toward the leading edge (47-56%), 22-25% of the filaments had the opposite orientation with their pointed ends toward the leading edge, and 19-31% ran parallel to the leading edge. The two actin filament populations display distinct polarity profiles: the longer filaments appear to be oriented predominantly with their barbed ends toward the leading edge, whereas the short filaments appear to be randomly oriented. The different length, organization and polarity of the two filament

  14. Actin depolymerizing factors ADF7 and ADF10 play distinct roles during pollen development and pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Daher, Firas Bou; Geitmann, Anja

    2012-07-01

    An important player in actin remodeling is the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) which increases actin filament treadmilling rates. Previously, we had prepared fluorescent protein fusions of two Arabidopsis pollen specific ADFs, ADF7 and ADF10. These had enabled us to determine the temporal expression patterns and subcellular localization of these proteins during male gametophyte development. Here we generated stable transformants containing both chimeric genes allowing for simultaneous imaging and direct comparison. One of the striking differences between the two proteins was the localization profile in the growing pollen tube apex. Whereas ADF10 was associated with the filamentous actin array forming the subapical actin fringe, ADF7 was present in the same cytoplasmic region, but in diffuse form. This suggests that ADF7 is involved in the high actin turnover that is likely to occur in the fringe by continuously and efficiently depolymerizing filamentous actin and supplying monomeric actin to the advancing end of the fringe. The possibility to visualize both of these pollen-specific ADFs simultaneously opens avenues for future research into the regulatory function of actin binding proteins in pollen.

  15. LRRK2 guides the actin cytoskeleton at growth cones together with ARHGEF7 and Tropomyosin 4.

    PubMed

    Häbig, Karina; Gellhaar, Sandra; Heim, Birgit; Djuric, Verena; Giesert, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walter, Carolin; Hentrich, Thomas; Riess, Olaf; Bonin, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene represent the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, LRRK2 function and molecular mechanisms causing the parkinsonian phenotype remain widely unknown. Most of LRRK2 knockdown and overexpression models strengthen the relevance of LRRK2 in regulating neurite outgrowth. We have recently identified ARHGEF7 as the first guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of LRRK2. This GEF is influencing neurite outgrowth through regulation of actin polymerization. Here, we examined the expression profile of neuroblastoma cells with reduced LRRK2 and ARHGEF7 levels to identify additional partners of LRRK2 in this process. Tropomyosins (TPMs), and in particular TPM4, were the most interesting candidates next to other actin cytoskeleton regulating transcripts in this dataset. Subsequently, enhanced neurite branching was shown using primary hippocampal neurons of LRRK2 knockdown animals. Furthermore, we observed an enhanced number of growth cones per neuron and a mislocalization and dysregulation of ARHGEF7 and TPM4 in these neuronal compartments. Our results reveal a fascinating connection between the neurite outgrowth phenotype of LRRK2 models and the regulation of actin polymerization directing further investigations of LRRK2-related pathogenesis.

  16. [Transforming growth factor of beta-type].

    PubMed

    Stoĭka, R S

    1988-01-01

    Recent data about the structure and properties of the beta-type transforming growth factor as well as evidence about its influence on different target cells are presented. The regulatory action of the factor is shown to depend mainly on the type of tested cells, conditions of their culturing and the presence of other bioregulators of cell proliferation in the medium. The prospects of the beta-type transforming growth factor use in practice are considered.

  17. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes®: potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Trapasso, Elena; Cilurzo, Felisa; Fresta, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Topical application of anticancer drugs for the treatment of malignancies represents a new challenge in dermatology, potentially being an alternative therapeutic approach for the efficacious treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, that is, actinic keratoses, and malignant lesions of the skin caused by ultraviolet radiation. Anti-proliferative and antimitotic drugs, including many of the taxanes, are currently under investigation for the treatment of cutaneous malignant transformation of actinic keratoses, particularly the squamous cell carcinoma. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® are proposed as topical drug delivery systems for the treatment of this pathology due to their suitable physicochemical characteristics and enhanced skin penetration ability for deep dermal delivery. Our in vitro data show that the skin application of paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® improved the permeation of paclitaxel in a stratum corneum-epidermis membrane model and increased its anti-proliferative activity in a squamous cell carcinoma model as compared to the free drug. The results obtained encouraged the use of the paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® as the formulation for the potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

  18. A variational approach to the growth dynamics of pre-stressed actin filament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Stöter, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-09-01

    In order to model the growth dynamics of elastic bodies with residual stresses a thermodynamically consistent approach is needed such that the cross-coupling between growth and mechanics can be correctly described. In the present work we apply a variational principle to the formulation of the interfacial growth dynamics of dendritic actin filament networks growing from biomimetic beads, an experimentally well studied system, where the buildup of residual stresses governs the network growth. We first introduce the material model for the network via a strain energy density for an isotropic weakly nonlinear elastic material and then derive consistently from this model the dynamic equations for the interfaces, i.e. for a polymerizing internal interface in contact with the bead and a depolymerizing external interface directed towards the solvent. We show that (i) this approach automatically preserves thermodynamic symmetry-properties, which is not the case for the often cited ‘rubber-band-model’ (Sekimoto et al 2004 Eur. Phys. J. E 13 247-59, Plastino et al 2004 Eur. Biophys. J. 33 310-20) and (ii) leads to a robust morphological instability of the treadmilling network interfaces. The nature of the instability depends on the interplay of the two dynamic interfaces. Depending on the biochemical conditions the network envelope evolves into a comet-like shape (i.e. the actin envelope thins out at one side and thickens on the opposite side of the bead) via a varicose instability or it breaks the symmetry via higher order zigzag modes. We conclude that morphological instabilities due to mechano-chemical coupling mechanisms and the presences of mechancial pre-stresses can play a major role in locally organizing the cytoskeleton of living cells.

  19. A family of ROP proteins that suppresses actin dynamics, and is essential for polarized growth and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Graham M; Baskin, Tobias I; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2015-07-15

    In plants, the ROP family of small GTPases has been implicated in the polarized growth of tip-growing cells, such as root hairs and pollen tubes; however, most of the data derive from overexpressing ROP genes or constitutively active and dominant-negative isoforms, whereas confirmation by using loss-of-function studies has generally been lacking. Here, in the model moss Physcomitrella patens, we study ROP signaling during tip growth by using a loss-of-function approach based on RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the entire moss ROP family. We find that plants with reduced expression of ROP genes, in addition to failing to initiate tip growth, have perturbed cell wall staining, reduced cell adhesion and have increased actin-filament dynamics. Although plants subjected to RNAi against the ROP family also have reduced microtubule dynamics, this reduction is not specific to loss of ROP genes, as it occurs when actin function is compromised chemically or genetically. Our data suggest that ROP proteins polarize the actin cytoskeleton by suppressing actin-filament dynamics, leading to an increase in actin filaments at the site of polarized secretion.

  20. Cancer cells. 3: Growth factors and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Feramisco, J.; Ozanne, B.; Stiles, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure of Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Expression of Normal and Variant mRNAs in Epdermoid Carcinoma Cells; Tyrosine Kinase Activity Associated with the v-erb-B Gene Product; Cloning and Characterization of Human Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor Gene Sequences in A431 Carcinoma Cells; Anti-oncogenes and the Suppression of Tumor Formation; and Normal Human sis/PDGF-2 Gene Expression Induces Cellular Transformation.

  1. The F-BAR protein Hof1 tunes formin activity to sculpt actin cables during polarized growth

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Brian R.; Yu, Hoi-Ying E.; Alioto, Salvatore L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Ydenberg, Casey A.; Waterman, David P.; Garabedian, Mikael; Goode, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell growth and division rely on polarized actin cytoskeleton remodeling events, the regulation of which is poorly understood. In budding yeast, formins stimulate the assembly of an organized network of actin cables that direct polarized secretion. Here we show that the Fer/Cip4 homology–Bin amphiphysin Rvs protein Hof1, which has known roles in cytokinesis, also functions during polarized growth by directly controlling the activities of the formin Bnr1. A mutant lacking the C-terminal half of Hof1 displays misoriented and architecturally altered cables, along with impaired secretory vesicle traffic. In vitro, Hof1 inhibits the actin nucleation and elongation activities of Bnr1 without displacing the formin from filament ends. These effects depend on the Src homology 3 domain of Hof1, the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain of Bnr1, and Hof1 dimerization, suggesting a mechanism by which Hof1 “restrains” the otherwise flexible FH1-FH2 apparatus. In vivo, loss of inhibition does not alter actin levels in cables but, instead, cable shape and functionality. Thus Hof1 tunes formins to sculpt the actin cable network. PMID:24719456

  2. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  3. Actin organization and gene expression in Beta vulgaris seedlings under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L. Y.; Shevchenko, G. V.; Artemenko, O. A.; Martyn, G. G.; Kordyum, E. L.

    2005-08-01

    Actin microfilaments (MFs) as highly dynamic structure respond by rapid reorganization to different external influences, including gravity. The object of our experiments was to examine both the actin organization and actin gene expression during growth and differentiation of root cells under clinorotation. It was shown that MFs acted as the indicator of changes caused by altered gravity in distal elongation zone (DEZ) cells, particularly actin cytoskeleton is enhanced in cortex cells. The data testify stable actin expression under altered gravity. The F-actin MFs enhancement in cortex cells of the DEZ occurred under clinorotation at the same level of the total actin content as in the stationary conditions is suggested to be caused by transformation of G-actin into F-actin.

  4. Mycosis fungoides patient accompanied actinic keratosis, actinic keratosis with squamous cell carcinoma transformation, and porokeratosis after NBUVB therapy – 1st case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-jie; Abdul-fattah, Bilal; Qu, Xiao-ying; Wang, Cui-yan; Wang, Xia; Ran, Yi; Lai, Ting; Chen, Si-yuan; Huang, Chang-zheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Narrowband ultraviolet B light (NBUVB) is used increasingly in treating MF because of its good toleration and well-established management. Concerns: To discuss the risk factors and underlying pathogenic factors in the patients with secondary skin diseases after NBUVB therapy. Methods: We report in details the first case of a patient with MF accompanied with actinic keratosis (AK), AK with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation and porokeratosis after NBUVB therapy. Meanwhile, Sequence variants in tumor suppressor p53 gene in the patient's specimens were detected. A literature search of the key word “narrowband ultraviolet B light ”and “side effects” was performed on PubMed, 14 cases of this entity were found. A total of 15 patients including our case were reviewed in this study and meaningful conclusion could be drawn. Outcomes: The mean age at diagnosis of secondary skin dermatoses after NBUVB therapy was 62.08 years with a male to female ratio of 2:1. The cases were reported more in Europeans than in Asians (2.75:1), and the Fitzpatrick skin type was mainly Ito III (12/15). The mean cumulative number and cumulative dose of UVB treatments were 43.71 and 42, 400 (mJ/cm2), respectively. There was a positive relationship between Fitzpatrick skin type and cumulative dose of UVB treatments. Among the secondary skin diseases after NBUVB treatment, 12 were tumors, 2 were non-tumorous dermatoses. Only our patient presented with both. By polymerase chain reaction-single nucleotide polymorphism (PCR-SNP) analysis, C–G mutation of exon 4 of p53 was found in AK and MF specimens in our patient. Conclusion: To our knowledge, our case is the first MF patient accompanied with AK, AK with SCC transformation and Porokeratosis after NBUVB treatment. Lower Fitzpatrick skin type may be the risk factor of secondary skin diseases after NBUVB treatment. PMID

  5. Gas7b (growth arrest specific protein 7b) regulates neuronal cell morphology by enhancing microtubule and actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Aina; Hidaka, Masafumi; Hirose, Keiko; Uchida, Takafumi

    2013-11-29

    Neurons undergo several morphological changes as a part of normal neuron maturation process. Alzheimer disease is associated with increased neuroproliferation and impaired neuronal maturation. In this study, we demonstrated that Gas7b (growth arrest specific protein 7b) expression in a neuronal cell line, Neuro 2A, induces cell maturation by facilitating formation of dendrite-like processes and/or filopodia projections and that Gas7b co-localizes with neurite microtubules. Molecular analysis was performed to evaluate whether Gas7b associates with actin filaments and microtubules, and the data revealed two novel roles of Gas7b in neurite outgrowth: we showed that Gas7b enhances bundling of several microtubule filaments and connects microtubules with actin filaments. These results suggest that Gas7b governs neural cell morphogenesis by enhancing the coordination between actin filaments and microtubules. We conclude that lower neuronal Gas7b levels may impact Alzheimer disease progression.

  6. Analysis of microtubule growth dynamics arising from altered actin network structure and contractility in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ory, Eleanor; Bhandary, Lekhana; Boggs, Amanda; Chakrabarti, Kristi; Parker, Joshua; Losert, Wolfgang; Martin, Stuart S

    2017-01-16

    The periphery of epithelial cells is shaped by opposing cytoskeletal physical forces generated predominately by two dynamic force generating systems - growing microtubule ends push against the boundary from the cell center, and the actin cortex contracts the attached plasma membrane. Here we investigate how changes to the structure and dynamics of the actin cortex alter the dynamics of microtubules. Current drugs target actin polymerization and contraction to reduce cell division and invasiveness; however, the impacts on microtubule dynamics remain incompletely understood. Using human MCF-7 breast tumor cells expressing GFP-tagged microtubule end-binding-protein-1 (EB1) and coexpression of cytoplasmic fluorescent protein mCherry, we map the trajectories of growing microtubule ends and cytoplasmic boundary respectively. Based on EB1 tracks and cytoplasmic boundary outlines, we calculate the speed, distance from cytoplasmic boundary, and straightness of microtubule growth. Actin depolymerization with Latrunculin-A reduces EB1 growth speed as well as allows the trajectories to extend beyond the cytoplasmic boundary. Blebbistatin, a direct myosin-II inhibitor, reduced EB1 speed and yielded less straight EB1 trajectories. Inhibiting signaling upstream of myosin-II contractility via the Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, altered EB1 dynamics differently from Blebbistatin. These results indicate that reduced actin cortex integrity can induce distinct alterations in microtubule dynamics. Given recent findings that tumor stem cell characteristics are increased by drugs which reduce actin contractility or stabilize microtubules, it remains important to clearly define how cytoskeletal drugs alter the interactions between these two filament systems in tumor cells.

  7. MAP18 Regulates the Direction of Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis by Modulating F-Actin Organization[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Kang, Erfang; Xu, Qiangyi; Wang, Miaoying; Rui, Yue; Liu, Baoquan; Yuan, Ming; Fu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    For fertilization to occur in plants, the pollen tube must be guided to enter the ovule via the micropyle. Previous reports have implicated actin filaments, actin binding proteins, and the tip-focused calcium gradient as key contributors to polar growth of pollen tubes; however, the regulation of directional pollen tube growth is largely unknown. We reported previously that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN18 (MAP18) contributes to directional cell growth and cortical microtubule organization. The preferential expression of MAP18 in pollen and in pollen tubes suggests that MAP18 also may function in pollen tube growth. In this study, we demonstrate that MAP18 functions in pollen tubes by influencing actin organization, rather than microtubule assembly. In vitro biochemical results indicate that MAP18 exhibits Ca2+-dependent filamentous (F)-actin-severing activity. Abnormal expression of MAP18 in map18 and MAP18 OX plants was associated with disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in the tube apex, resulting in aberrant pollen tube growth patterns and morphologies, inaccurate micropyle targeting, and fewer fertilization events. Experiments with MAP18 mutants created by site-directed mutagenesis suggest that F-actin-severing activity is essential to the effects of MAP18 on pollen tube growth direction. Our study demonstrates that in Arabidopsis, MAP18 guides the direction of pollen tube growth by modulating actin filaments. PMID:23463774

  8. Bisphenol A affects germination and tube growth in Picea meyeri pollen through modulating Ca2+ flux and disturbing actin-dependent vesicular trafficking during cell wall construction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tongjie; Fan, Chengyu; Man, Yi; Zhou, Junhui; Jing, Yanping

    2015-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a widespread pollutant, is reportedly harmful to humans, animals and plants. However, the effect of BPA on plant pollen tube growth, as well as the mechanism involved, remains unclear. Here, we report that BPA significantly inhibited Picea meyeri pollen germination and tube elongation in a dose-dependent manner. Transmission electron microscopy showed that BPA was detrimental to organelles such as mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. Non-invasive detection revealed that BPA inhibited extracellular Ca(2+) influx and promoted intracellular Ca(2+) efflux at the pollen tube tip, thereby inducing a dissipated Ca(2+) gradient. Fluorescence labeling showed that BPA disorganized actin filaments (AFs), which subsequently led to abnormal vesicle trafficking. Furthermore, BPA reduced the activity of acid phosphatase, a typical exocytosis enzyme. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis and subsequent fluorescence labeling revealed that BPA induced an abnormal deposition of cell wall components, including pectins and callose. Taken together, our results indicate that BPA, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, disturbs Ca(2+) flux in P. meyeri pollen tubes, thus disrupting AF organization, resulting in abnormal actin-dependent vesicle trafficking and further affecting the deposition of cell wall components. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism of BPA toxicity in pollen tube tip growth.

  9. Why is Actin Patchy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders

    2009-03-01

    The intracellular protein actin, by reversibly polymerizing into filaments, generates forces for motion and shape changes of many types of biological cells. Fluorescence imaging studies show that actin often occurs in the form of localized patches of size roughly one micrometer at the cell membrane. Patch formation is most prevalent when the free-actin concentration is low. I investigate possible mechanisms for the formation of actin patches by numerically simulating the ``dendritic nucleation'' model of actin network growth. The simulations include filament growth, capping, branching, severing, and debranching. The attachment of membrane-bound activators to actin filaments, and subsequent membrane diffusion of unattached activators, are also included. It is found that as the actin concentration increases from zero, the actin occurs in patches at lower actin concentrations, and the size of the patches increases with increasing actin concentration. At a critical value of the actin concentration, the system undergoes a transition to complete coverage. The results are interpreted within the framework of reaction-diffusion equations in two dimensions.

  10. The Arabidopsis Wave Complex: Mechanisms Of Localized Actin Polymerization And Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Szymanski

    2012-10-23

    The objective of this project was to discover the protein complexes and control mechanisms that determine the location of actin filament roadways in plant cells. Our work provided the first molecular description of protein complexes that are converted from inactive complexes to active actin filament nucleators in the cell. These discoveries provided a conceptual framework to control to roadways in plant cells that determine the location and delivery of plant metabolites and storage molecules that are relevant to the bioenergy economy.

  11. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  12. Distribution of GAP-43, beta-III tubulin and F-actin in developing and regenerating axons and their growth cones in vitro, following neurotrophin treatment.

    PubMed

    Avwenagha, Ovokeloye; Campbell, Gregor; Bird, Margaret M

    2003-11-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) when added to explant cultures of both embryonic and adult retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons exerted a marked effect on their growth cone size and complexity and also on the intensity of GAP-43, beta-III tubulin and F-actin immunoreaction product in their axons. GAP-43 was distributed in axons, lamellipodia, and filopodia whereas beta-III tubulin was distributed along the length of developing and adult regenerating axons and also in the C-domain of their growth cones. BDNF-treated developing RGC growth cones were larger and displayed increased numbers of GAP-43 and microtubule-containing branches. Although filopodia and lamellipodia were lost from both developing and adult RGC growth cones following trkB-IgG treatment, the intensity of the immunoreaction product of all these molecules was reduced and trkB-IgGs had no effect on the axonal distribution of betas-III tubulin and GAP-43. BDNF-treated growth cones also displayed increased numbers of F-actin containing filopodia and axonal protrusions. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that trkB-IgG treatment causes the loss of F-actin in the P-domain of growth cone tips in developing and regenerating RGC axons. Although microtubules and F-actin domains normally remained distinct in cultured growth cones, beta-III tubulin and F-actin overlapped within the growth cone C-domain, and within axonal protrusions of adult RGC axons, under higher concentrations of BDNF. The collapse of RGC growth cones appeared to correlate with the loss of F-actin. In vitro, trkB signalling may therefore be involved in the maintenance and stabilisation of RGC axons, by influencing F-actin polymerisation, stabilisation and distribution.

  13. Axonal actin in action: Imaging actin dynamics in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ladt, Kelsey; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved, key cytoskeletal protein involved in numerous structural and functional roles. In neurons, actin has been intensively investigated in axon terminals-growth cones-and dendritic spines, but details about actin structure and dynamics in axon shafts have remained obscure for decades. A major barrier in the field has been imaging actin. Actin exists as soluble monomers (G-actin) as well as actin filaments (F-actin), and labeling actin with conventional fluorescent probes like GFP/RFP typically leads to a diffuse haze that makes it difficult to discern kinetic behaviors. In a recent publication, we used F-actin selective probes to visualize actin dynamics in axons, resolving striking actin behaviors that have not been described before. However, using these probes to visualize actin dynamics is challenging as they can cause bundling of actin filaments; thus, experimental parameters need to be strictly optimized. Here we describe some practical methodological details related to using these probes for visualizing F-actin dynamics in axons.

  14. Transforming growth factor beta regulates thyroid growth. Role in the pathogenesis of nontoxic goiter.

    PubMed Central

    Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Buchan, G; Sadeghi, R; Kissonerghis, M; Londei, M; Turner, M; Pirich, K; Roka, R; Niederle, B; Kassal, H

    1989-01-01

    The production and growth regulatory activity of transforming growth factor beta were studied in human thyroid tissue. As estimated by its mRNA expression in fresh tissue samples, transforming growth factor beta was produced in normal and in diseased thyroid glands. Transforming growth factor beta mRNA was mainly produced by thyroid follicular cells and in lesser quantities by thyroid infiltrating mononuclear cells. The concentrations of transforming growth factor beta mRNA were lower in iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter than in Graves' disease and normal thyroid tissue. Transforming growth factor beta protein secretion by cultured thyroid follicular cells was also low in nontoxic goiter, but could be increased by addition of sodium iodide (10 microM) to the culture medium. Recombinant transforming growth factor beta did not affect basal tritiated thymidine incorporation in cultured thyroid follicular cells, but inhibited, at a concentration of 10 ng/ml, the growth stimulatory influence of insulin-like growth factor I, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, TSH, and partly that of normal human serum on cultured thyroid follicular cells. This inhibition was greater in Graves' disease than in nontoxic goiter. These results suggest that transforming growth factor beta may act as an autocrine growth inhibitor on thyroid follicular cells. Decreased transforming growth factor beta production and decreased responsiveness to transforming growth factor beta may be cofactors in the pathogenesis of iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter. Images PMID:2921318

  15. Transforming growth factor beta1 and aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kota; Hathaway, Catherine K.; Chang, Albert S.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review It is well established that blocking renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system (RAAS) is effective for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal complications in hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Although the induction of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) by components of RAAS mediates the hypertrophic and fibrogenic changes in cardiovascular-renal complications, it is still controversial as to whether TGFbeta1 can be a target to prevent such complications. Here we review recent findings on the role of TGFbeta1 in fluid homeostasis, focusing on the relationship with aldosterone. Recent findings TGFbeta1 suppresses adrenal production of aldosterone and renal tubular sodium reabsorption. We have generated mice with TGFbeta1 mRNA expression graded in five steps from 10% to 300% normal, and found that blood pressure and plasma volume are negatively regulated by TGFbeta1. Notably, the 10 % hypomorph exhibits primary aldosteronism and sodium and water retention due to markedly impaired urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. Summary These results identify TGFbeta signaling as an important counterregulatory system against aldosterone. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for the suppressive effects of TGFbeta1 on adrenocortical and renal function may further our understanding of primary aldosteronism as well as assist in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for hypertension. PMID:25587902

  16. SV40 transformation of Swiss 3T3 cells can cause a stable reduction in the calcium requirement for growth

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A well-characterized SV40-transformed Swiss 3T3 line, SV101, and its revertants were tested for the ability to grow in reduced Ca++ (0.01 mM). Transformants and revertants did not differ from the parent 3T3 line in their Ca++ requirements. All three classes of cells grew less well in low Ca++ than in regular Ca++ (2.0 mM). SV40 transformants were then selected for the ability to grow in reduced Ca++. This new class of transformants was found to grow in 1% serum, grow in soft agarose, have a reorganized actin cytoskeleton, and express viral T antigens, as well as grow well in low Ca++. One of the selected clones was found to be T antigen-negative, yet was transformed in the serum, anchorage, actin, and Ca++ assays. It is possible that this clone was a spontaneous transformant. However, Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of integrated SV40 DNA. In addition, this analysis revealed the absence of an intact early region fragment, which codes for the viral T antigens. One explanation of this result may be that the mechanism of viral transformation for growth in low Ca++ involves viral- host DNA interactions that may not require a fully functional T antigen. In this case SV40 integration may be acting as a nonspecific cellular mutagen. PMID:6094595

  17. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar); Skin lesion - actinic keratosis ... likely to develop it if you: Have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red ...

  18. Transforming growth factor-β and Smads.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hui Yao; Chung, Arthur C K

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major diabetic complication. Transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) is a key mediator in the development of diabetic complications. It is well known that TGF-β exerts its biological effects by activating downstream mediators, called Smad2and Smad3, which is negatively regulated by an inhibitory Smad7. Recent studies also demonstrated that under disease conditions Smads act as signal integrators and interact with other signaling pathways such as the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. In addition, Smad2and Smad3 can reciprocally regulate target genes of TGF-β signaling. Novel research into microRNA has revealed the complexity of TGF-β signaling during DN. It has been found that TGF-β and elevated glucose concentration can positively regulate miR-192 and miR-377, but negatively regulate miR-29a in a diabetic milieu. These microRNAs are found to contribute to DN. Although targeting TGF-β may exert adverse effects on immune system, therapeutic approach against TGF-β signaling during DN still draws much attention. Blocking TGF-β signaling by neutralizing antibody, anti-sense oligonucleotides, and soluble receptors have been tested, but effects are limited. Gene transfer of Smad7 into diseased kidneys demonstrates a prominent inhibition on renal fibrosis and amelioration of renal impairment. Alteration of TGF-β-regulated microRNA expression in diseased kidneys may provide an alternative therapeutic approach against DN. In conclusion, TGF-β/Smad signaling plays a critical role in DN. A better understanding of the role of TGF-β/Smad signaling in the development of DN should provide an effective therapeutic strategy to combat DN.

  19. Cortactin involvement in the keratinocyte growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 10 promotion of migration and cortical actin assembly in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, Simona; Cardinali, Giorgia; Aspite, Nicaela; Picardo, Mauro; Marchese, Cinzia; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Patrizia . E-mail: patrizia.mancini@uniroma1.it

    2007-05-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF7) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10/KGF2) regulate keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by binding to the tyrosine kinase KGF receptor (KGFR). KGF induces keratinocyte motility and cytoskeletal rearrangement, whereas a direct role of FGF10 on keratinocyte migration is not clearly established. Here we analyzed the motogenic activity of FGF10 and KGF on human keratinocytes. Migration assays and immunofluorescence of actin cytoskeleton revealed that FGF10 is less efficient than KGF in promoting migration and exerts a delayed effect in inducing lamellipodia and ruffles formation. Both growth factors promoted phosphorylation and subsequent membrane translocation of cortactin, an F-actin binding protein involved in cell migration; however, FGF10-induced cortactin phosphorylation was reduced, more transient and delayed with respect to that promoted by KGF. Cortactin phosphorylation induced by both growth factors was Src-dependent, while its membrane translocation and cell migration were blocked by either Src and PI3K inhibitors, suggesting that both pathways are involved in KGF- and FGF10-dependent motility. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of cortactin inhibited KGF- and FGF10-induced migration. These results indicate that cortactin is involved in keratinocyte migration promoted by both KGF and FGF10.

  20. Cholera toxin treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells decreases smooth muscle α-actin content and abolishes the platelet-derived growth factor-BB-stimulated DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sachinidis, Agapios; Seul, Claudia; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Seewald, Stefan; Ko, Yon; Vetter, Hans; Fingerle, Jürgen; Hoppe, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic AMP regulates diverse biological processes such as cell morphology and cell growth. We examined the role of the second messenger cyclic AMP on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) morphology and the intracellular transduction pathway mediated by platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor (PDGF-Rβ). The effect of PDGF-BB on VSMCs growth was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, PLC-γ1, ERK1 and ERK2, p125FAK and paxillin as well as Sm α-actin was examined by the chemiluminescence Western blotting method. Actin mRNA level was quantitated by Northern blotting. Visualization of Sm α-actin filaments, paxillin and PDGF-Rβ was performed by immunfluorescence microscopy. Cholera toxin (CTX; 10 nM) treatment lead to a large and sustained increase in the cyclic AMP concentration after 2 h which correlated with change of VSMC morphology including complete disruption of the Sm α-actin filament array and loss of focal adhesions. Treatment of VSMCs with CTX did not influence tyrosine phosphorylation of p125FAK and paxillin but decreased the content of a Sm α-actin protein. Maximal decrease of 70% was observed after 24 h of treatment. CTX also caused a 90% decrease of the actin mRNA level. CTX treatment completely abolished PDGF-BB stimulated DNA-synthesis although PDGF-Rβ level and subcellular distribution and translocation was not altered. Furthermore CTX attenuated the PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PDGF-Rβ, PI 3′-K, PLC-γ1 and ERK1/2 indicating an action of cyclic AMP on PDGF-β receptor. We conclude that although cyclic AMP attenuates the PDGF-Rβ mediated intracellular transduction pathway, an intact actin filament may be required for the PDGF-BB-induced DNA synthesis in VSMCs. PMID:10928958

  1. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 activation by focal mechanical stimulation requires interaction with the actin cytoskeleton and enhances growth cone motility.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Shouta; Nagasawa, Masami; Kojima, Itaru; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Shibasaki, Koji

    2016-12-22

    We have previously reported that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) can be activated by mechanical stimulation, which enhances axonal outgrowth in developing neurons; however, the molecular mechanisms that govern the contribution of TRPV2 activation to axonal outgrowth remain unclear. In the present study, we examined this mechanism by using PC12 cells as a neuronal model. Overexpression of TRPV2 enhanced axonal outgrowth in a mechanical stimulus-dependent manner. Accumulation of TRPV2 at the cell surface was 4-fold greater in the growth cone compared with the soma. In the growth cone, TRPV2 is not static, but dynamically accumulates (within ∼100 ms) to the site of mechanical stimulation. The dynamic and acute clustering of TRPV2 can enhance very weak mechanical stimuli via focal accumulation of TRPV2. Focal application of mechanical stimuli dramatically increased growth cone motility and caused actin reorganization via activation of TRPV2. We also found that TRPV2 physically interacts with actin and that changes in the actin cytoskeleton are required for its activation. Here, we demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that TRPV2 clustering is induced by mechanical stimulation generated by axonal outgrowth and that TRPV2 activation is triggered by actin rearrangements that result from mechanical stimulation. Moreover, TRPV2 activation enhances growth cone motility and actin accumulation to promote axonal outgrowth. Sugio, S., Nagasawa, M., Kojima, I., Ishizaki, Y., Shibasaki, K. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 activation by focal mechanical stimulation requires interaction with the actin cytoskeleton and enhances growth cone motility.

  2. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  3. Spinoculation Triggers Dynamic Actin and Cofilin Activity That Facilitates HIV-1 Infection of Transformed and Resting CD4 T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Wang, Weifeng; Yu, Dongyang; Wu, Yuntao

    2011-01-01

    Centrifugal inoculation, or spinoculation, is widely used in virology research to enhance viral infection. However, the mechanism remained obscure. Using HIV-1 infection of human T cells as a model, we demonstrate that spinoculation triggers dynamic actin and cofilin activity, probably resulting from cellular responses to centrifugal stress. This actin activity also leads to the upregulation of the HIV-1 receptor and coreceptor, CD4 and CXCR4, enhancing viral binding and entry. We also demonstrate that an actin inhibitor, jasplakinolide, diminishes spin-mediated enhancement. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of LIMK1, a cofilin kinase, decreases the enhancement. These results suggest that spin-mediated enhancement cannot be explained simply by a virus-concentrating effect; rather, it is coupled with spin-induced cytoskeletal dynamics that promote receptor mobilization, viral entry, and postentry processes. Our results highlight the importance of cofilin and a dynamic cytoskeleton for the initiation of viral infection. Our results also indicate that caution needs to be taken in data interpretation when cells are spinoculated; some of the spin-induced cellular permissiveness may be beyond the natural capacity of an infecting virus. PMID:21795326

  4. Salinomycin inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer and cancer cell migration by disruption of actin stress fiber integrity.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Miriam; Aykut, Berk; Teske, Christian; Giese, Nathalia A; Weitz, Juergen; Welsch, Thilo

    2015-03-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by aggressive growth, early metastasis and high resistance to chemotherapy. Salinomycin is a promising compound eliminating cancer stem cells and retarding cancer cell migration. The present study investigated the effectiveness of salinomycin against PDAC in vivo and elucidated the mechanism of PDAC growth inhibition. Salinomycin treatment was well tolerated by the mice and significantly reduced tumor growth after 19 days compared to the control group (each n = 16). There was a trend that salinomycin also impeded metastatic spread to the liver and peritoneum. Whereas salinomycin moderately induced apoptosis and retarded proliferation at 5-10 µM, it strongly inhibited cancer cell migration that was accompanied by a marked loss of actin stress fibers after 6-9 h. Salinomycin silenced RhoA activity, and loss of stress fibers could be reversed by Rho activation. Moreover, salinomycin dislocated fascin from filopodia and stimulated Rac-associated circular dorsal ruffle formation. In conclusion, salinomycin is an effective and promising compound against PDAC. Besides its known stem cell-specific cytotoxic effects, salinomycin blocks cancer cell migration by disrupting stress fiber integrity and affecting the mutual Rho-GTPase balance.

  5. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated. PMID:27385345

  6. Bacterial nucleators: actin' on actin

    PubMed Central

    Bugalhão, Joana N.; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target of numerous microbial pathogens, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses. In particular, bacterial pathogens produce and deliver virulence effector proteins that hijack actin dynamics to enable bacterial invasion of host cells, allow movement within the host cytosol, facilitate intercellular spread or block phagocytosis. Many of these effector proteins directly or indirectly target the major eukaryotic actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, by either mimicking nucleation promoting factors or activating upstream small GTPases. In contrast, this review is focused on a recently identified class of effector proteins from Gram-negative bacteria that function as direct actin nucleators. These effector proteins mimic functional activities of formins, WH2-nucleators and Ena/VASP assembly promoting factors demonstrating that bacteria have coopted the complete set of eukaryotic actin assembly pathways. Structural and functional analyses of these nucleators have revealed several motifs and/or mechanistic activities that are shared with eukaryotic actin nucleators. However, functional effects of these proteins during infection extend beyond plain actin polymerization leading to interference with other host cell functions such as vesicle trafficking, cell cycle progression and cell death. Therefore, their use as model systems could not only help in the understanding of the mechanistic details of actin polymerization but also provide novel insights into the connection between actin dynamics and other cellular pathways. PMID:26416078

  7. A single-cell correlative nanoelectromechanosensing approach to detect cancerous transformation: monitoring the function of F-actin microfilaments in the modulation of the ion channel activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdolahadThe Authors With Same Contributions., Mohammad; Saeidi, Ali; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mashinchian, Omid; Taghinejad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Hossein; Azimi, Soheil; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2015-01-01

    Cancerous transformation may be dependent on correlation between electrical disruptions in the cell membrane and mechanical disruptions of cytoskeleton structures. Silicon nanotube (SiNT)-based electrical probes, as ultra-accurate signal recorders with subcellular resolution, may create many opportunities for fundamental biological research and biomedical applications. Here, we used this technology to electrically monitor cellular mechanosensing. The SiNT probe was combined with an electrically activated glass micropipette aspiration system to achieve a new cancer diagnostic technique that is based on real-time correlation between mechanical and electrical behaviour of single cells. Our studies demonstrated marked changes in the electrical response following increases in the mechanical aspiration force in healthy cells. In contrast, such responses were extremely weak for malignant cells. Confocal microscopy results showed the impact of actin microfilament remodelling on the reduction of the electrical response for aspirated cancer cells due to the significant role of actin in modulating the ion channel activity in the cell membrane.Cancerous transformation may be dependent on correlation between electrical disruptions in the cell membrane and mechanical disruptions of cytoskeleton structures. Silicon nanotube (SiNT)-based electrical probes, as ultra-accurate signal recorders with subcellular resolution, may create many opportunities for fundamental biological research and biomedical applications. Here, we used this technology to electrically monitor cellular mechanosensing. The SiNT probe was combined with an electrically activated glass micropipette aspiration system to achieve a new cancer diagnostic technique that is based on real-time correlation between mechanical and electrical behaviour of single cells. Our studies demonstrated marked changes in the electrical response following increases in the mechanical aspiration force in healthy cells. In contrast, such

  8. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  9. Actinous enigma or enigmatic actin

    PubMed Central

    Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    Being the most abundant protein of the eukaryotic cell, actin continues to keep its secrets for more than 60 years. Everything about this protein, its structure, functions, and folding, is mysteriously counterintuitive, and this review represents an attempt to solve some of the riddles and conundrums commonly found in the field of actin research. In fact, actin is a promiscuous binder with a wide spectrum of biological activities. It can exist in at least three structural forms, globular, fibrillar, and inactive (G-, F-, and I-actin, respectively). G-actin represents a thermodynamically instable, quasi-stationary state, which is formed in vivo as a result of the energy-intensive, complex posttranslational folding events controlled and driven by cellular folding machinery. The G-actin structure is dependent on the ATP and Mg2+ binding (which in vitro is typically substituted by Ca2+) and protein is easily converted to the I-actin by the removal of metal ions and by action of various denaturing agents (pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants). I-actin cannot be converted back to the G-form. Foldable and “natively folded” forms of actin are always involved in interactions either with the specific protein partners, such as Hsp70 chaperone, prefoldin, and the CCT chaperonin during the actin folding in vivo or with Mg2+ and ATP as it takes place in the G-form. We emphasize that the solutions for the mysteries of actin multifunctionality, multistructurality, and trapped unfolding can be found in the quasi-stationary nature of this enigmatic protein, which clearly possesses many features attributed to both globular and intrinsically disordered proteins.

  10. The knock-out of ARP3a gene affects F-actin cytoskeleton organization altering cellular tip growth, morphology and development in moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Finka, Andrija; Saidi, Younousse; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Zrÿd, Jean-Pierre; Schaefer, Didier G

    2008-10-01

    The seven subunit Arp2/3 complex is a highly conserved nucleation factor of actin microfilaments. We have isolated the genomic sequence encoding a putative Arp3a protein of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The disruption of this ARP3A gene by allele replacement has generated loss-of-function mutants displaying a complex developmental phenotype. The loss-of function of ARP3A gene results in shortened, almost cubic chloronemal cells displaying affected tip growth and lacking differentiation to caulonemal cells. In moss arp3a mutants, buds differentiate directly from chloronemata to form stunted leafy shoots having differentiated leaves similar to wild type. Yet, rhizoids never differentiate from stem epidermal cells. To characterize the F-actin organization in the arp3a-mutated cells, we disrupted ARP3A gene in the previously described HGT1 strain expressing conditionally the GFP-talin marker. In vivo observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton during P. patens development demonstrated that loss-of-function of Arp3a is associated with the disappearance of specific F-actin cortical structures associated with the establishment of localized cellular growth domains. Finally, we show that constitutive expression of the P. patens Arp3a and its Arabidopsis thaliana orthologs efficiently complement the mutated phenotype indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservation of the Arp3 function in land plants.

  11. Cells transformed by murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) release compounds with transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity resembling growth factors.

    PubMed

    Šupolíková, M; Staňová, A Vojs; Kúdelová, M; Marák, J; Zelník, V; Golais, F

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the medium of three cell lines transformed with murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) in vitro and in vivo, 68/HDF, 68/NIH3T3, and S11E, for the presence of compounds resembling growth factors of some herpesviruses which have displayed transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in normal and tumor cells. When any of spent medium was added to cell culture we observed the onset of transformed phenotype in baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) cells and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in tumor human epithelial cells (HeLa). In media tested, we have identified the presence of putative growth factor related to MHV-68 (MHGF-68). Its bivalent properties have been blocked entirely by antisera against MHV-68 and two monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein B (gB) of MHV-68 suggesting viral origin of MHGF-68. The results of initial efforts to separate MHGF-68 on FPLC Sephadex G15 column in the absence of salts revealed the loss of its transforming activity but transformed phenotype suppressing activity retained. On the other hand, the use of methanol-water mobile phase on RP-HPLC C18 column allowed separation of MHGF-68 to two compounds. Both separated fractions, had only the transforming activity to normal cells. Further experiments exploring the nature and the structure of hitherto unknown MHGF-68 are now in the progress to characterize its molecular and biological properties.

  12. Botulinum toxin type A targets RhoB to inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated actin reorganization and acetylcholine release in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xieping; Erickson, Kelly; Ray, Prabhati

    2004-09-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) produced by Clostridium botulinum inhibits Ca2+-dependent acetylcholine (ACh) release (neuroexocytosis) at peripheral neuromuscular junctions, sometimes causing neuromuscular paralysis. This inhibitory effect is attributed to its metalloprotease activity to cleave the 25-kDa synaptosomal-associated protein, which is essential for the exocytotic machinery. However, deletion of this protein does not result in a complete block of neuroexocytosis, suggesting that botulinum-mediated inhibition may occur via another mechanism. Rho GTPases, a class of small GTP-binding proteins (G proteins), control actin cytoskeletal organization, thereby regulating a variety of cellular functions in various cells, including neuronal cells. We have shown that the G protein activator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) triggered actin reorganization followed by Ca2+-dependent ACh release in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells and that BoNT/A blocked both events through degradation of RhoB by the proteasome. Overexpression of wild-type RhoB caused actin reorganization and enhanced the release of ACh by LPA to overcome toxin's inhibitory effect on actin reorganization/exocytosis stimulated by LPA, whereas overexpression of a dominant negative RhoB inhibited ACh release, regardless of LPA and/or toxin treatment. Finally, a knockdown of the RhoB gene via sequence-specific, post-transcriptional gene silencing reduced RhoB expression in PC12 cells, resulting in total inhibition of both actin reorganization and ACh release induced by LPA. We conclude that the RhoB signaling pathway regulates ACh release via actin cytoskeletal reorganization and that botulinum toxin inhibits neuroexocytosis by targeting RhoB pathway.

  13. v-src transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts. Inefficient conversion to anchorage-independent growth involves heterogeneity of primary cultures

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To clarify whether a single oncogene can transform primary cells in culture, we compared the transforming effect of a recombinant retrovirus (ZSV) containing the v-src gene in rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) to that in the rat cell line 3Y1. In the focus assay, REFs exhibited resistance to transformation as only six foci were observed in the primary cultures as opposed to 98 in 3Y1 cells. After G418 selection, efficiency of transformation was again somewhat lower with REFs compared to that with 3Y1 cells, but the number of G418-resistant REF colonies was much greater than the number of foci in REF cultures. Furthermore, while 98% of G418-resistant colonies of ZSV-infected REFs were morphologically transformed, only 25% were converted to anchorage- independent growth, as opposed to 100% conversion seen in ZSV-infected 3Y1 cells. The poor susceptibility of REFs to anchorage-independent transformation did not involve differences in expression and subcellular distribution of p60v-src, or its kinase activity in vitro and in vivo. It rather reflected a property of the primary cultures, as cloning of REFs before ZSV infection demonstrated that only 2 out of 6 REF clones tested were permissive for anchorage-independent growth. The nonpermissive phenotype was dominant over the permissive one in somatic hybrid cells, and associated with organized actin filament bundles and a lower growth rate, both before and after ZSV infection. These results indicate that the poor susceptibility of REFs to anchorage-independent transformation by p60v-src reflects the heterogeneity of the primary cultures. REFs can be morphologically transformed by p60v-src with high efficiency but only a small fraction is convertible to anchorage- independent growth. REF resistance seems to involve the presence of a suppressor factor which may emerge from REF differentiation during embryonic development. PMID:8034746

  14. ROCK1 via LIM kinase regulates growth, maturation and actin based functions in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Reuben; Shi, Jianjian; Ghosh, Joydeep; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Sims, Emily; Martin, Holly; Wei, Lei; Mali, Raghuveer Singh

    2016-01-01

    Understanding mast cell development is essential due to their critical role in regulating immunity and autoimmune diseases. Here, we show how Rho kinases (ROCK) regulate mast cell development and can function as therapeutic targets for treating allergic diseases. Rock1 deficiency results in delayed maturation of bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) in response to IL-3 stimulation and reduced growth in response to stem cell factor (SCF) stimulation. Further, integrin-mediated adhesion and migration, and IgE-mediated degranulation are all impaired in Rock1-deficient BMMCs. To understand the mechanism behind altered mast cell development in Rock1−/− BMMCs, we analyzed the activation of ROCK and its downstream targets including LIM kinase (LIMK). We observed reduced activation of ROCK, LIMK, AKT and ERK1/2 in Rock1-deficient BMMCs in response to SCF stimulation. Further, loss of either Limk1 or Limk2 also demonstrated altered BMMC maturation and growth; combined deletion of both Limk1 and Limk2 resulted in further reduction in BMMC maturation and growth. In passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, deficiency of Rock1 or treatment with ROCK inhibitor Fasudil protected mice against IgE-mediated challenge. Our results identify ROCK/LIMK pathway as a novel therapeutic target for treating allergic diseases involving mast cells. PMID:26943578

  15. Formation and Destabilization of Actin Filaments with Tetramethylrhodamine-Modified Actin

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashov, Dmitry S.; Phillips, Martin; Reisler, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Actin labeling at Cys374 with tethramethylrhodamine derivatives (TMR-actin) has been widely used for direct observation of the in vitro filaments growth, branching, and treadmilling, as well as for the in vivo visualization of actin cytoskeleton. The advantage of TMR-actin is that it does not lock actin in filaments (as rhodamine-phalloidin does), possibly allowing for its use in investigating the dynamic assembly behavior of actin polymers. Although it is established that TMR-actin alone is polymerization incompetent, the impact of its copolymerization with unlabeled actin on filament structure and dynamics has not been tested yet. In this study, we show that TMR-actin perturbs the filaments structure when copolymerized with unlabeled actin; the resulting filaments are more fragile and shorter than the control filaments. Due to the increased severing of copolymer filaments, TMR-actin accelerates the polymerization of unlabeled actin in solution also at mole ratios lower than those used in most fluorescence microscopy experiments. The destabilizing and severing effect of TMR-actin is countered by filament stabilizing factors, phalloidin, S1, and tropomyosin. These results point to an analogy between the effects of TMR-actin and severing proteins on F-actin, and imply that TMR-actin may be inappropriate for investigations of actin filaments dynamics. PMID:15298916

  16. Transforming Growth Factor-B Receptors in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    receptor. Nature 370:341-347,1994 60. Wang T, Donahoe P, Zervos AS: Specific interaction of type I receptors of the TGFß family with the immunophilin...Res 56: 44^48,1996 82. Kadin ME. Cavaille-Coll MW, Gertz R. Massague J, Chei- fetz S. George D: Loss of receptors for transforming growth factor ß

  17. Differential in vitro phenotype pattern, transforming growth factor-beta(1) activity and mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1) in Apert osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Locci, P; Baroni, T; Pezzetti, F; Lilli, C; Marinucci, L; Martinese, D; Becchetti, E; Calvitti, M; Carinci, F

    1999-09-01

    The phenotype of Apert osteoblasts differs from that of normal osteoblasts in the accumulation of macromolecules in the extracellular matrix. Apert osteoblasts increase type I collagen, fibronectin and glycosaminoglycans secretion compared with normal osteoblasts. Because the extracellular matrix macromolecule accumulation is greatly modulated by transforming growth factor-beta(1), we examined the ability of normal and Apert osteoblasts to secrete transforming growth factor-beta(1) by CCL-64 assay and to produce transforming growth factor-beta(1 )by analysis of the mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1). Northern blot analysis revealed an increased amount of transforming growth factor-beta(1) mRNA expression in Apert osteoblasts compared with normal ones. Moreover, the level of the active transforming growth factor-beta(1) isoform was higher in Apert than in normal media. In pathologic cells, the increase in transforming growth factor-beta(1) gene expression was associated with a parallel increase in the factor secreted into the medium. The level of transforming growth factor-beta(1) was decreased by the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor. Transforming growth factor-beta(1) is controlled temporally and spatially during skeletal tissue development and produces complex stimulatory and inhibitory changes in osteoblast functions. We hypothesise that in vitro differences between normal and Apert osteoblasts may be correlated to different transforming growth factor-beta(1) cascade patterns, probably due to an altered balance between transforming growth factor-beta(1) and basic fibroblast growth factor.

  18. Transforming growth factor β signaling in uterine development and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily is evolutionarily conserved and plays fundamental roles in cell growth and differentiation. Mounting evidence supports its important role in female reproduction and development. TGFBs1-3 are founding members of this growth factor family, however, the in vivo function of TGFβ signaling in the uterus remains poorly defined. By drawing on mouse and human studies as a main source, this review focuses on the recent progress on understanding TGFβ signaling in the uterus. The review also considers the involvement of dysregulated TGFβ signaling in pathological conditions that cause pregnancy loss and fertility problems in women.

  19. Dynamic actin remodeling during epithelial-mesenchymal transition depends on increased moesin expression.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Jennifer; Srivastava, Jyoti; Madson, Nikki; Wittmann, Torsten; Barber, Diane L

    2011-12-01

    Remodeling of actin filaments is necessary for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, understanding of how this is regulated in real time is limited. We used an actin filament reporter and high-resolution live-cell imaging to analyze the regulated dynamics of actin filaments during transforming growth factor-β-induced EMT of mammary epithelial cells. Progressive changes in cell morphology were accompanied by reorganization of actin filaments from thin cortical bundles in epithelial cells to thick, parallel, contractile bundles that disassembled more slowly but remained dynamic in transdifferentiated cells. We show that efficient actin filament remodeling during EMT depends on increased expression of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein moesin. Cells suppressed for moesin expression by short hairpin RNA had fewer, thinner, and less stable actin bundles, incomplete morphological transition, and decreased invasive capacity. These cells also had less α-smooth muscle actin and phosphorylated myosin light chain in cortical patches, decreased abundance of the adhesion receptor CD44 at membrane protrusions, and attenuated autophosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Our findings suggest that increased moesin expression promotes EMT by regulating adhesion and contractile elements for changes in actin filament organization. We propose that the transciptional program driving EMT controls progressive remodeling of actin filament architectures.

  20. Transforming growth factor-{beta}2 enhances differentiation of cardiac myocytes from embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinender . E-mail: Dinender.Kumar@uvm.edu; Sun, Baiming

    2005-06-24

    Stem cell therapy holds great promise for the treatment of injured myocardium, but is challenged by a limited supply of appropriate cells. Three different isoforms of transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) -{beta}1, -{beta}2, and -{beta}3 exhibit distinct regulatory effects on cell growth, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development. We compared the effects of these three different isoforms on cardiomyocyte differentiation from embryonic stem (ES) cells. In contrast to TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3, treatment of mouse ES cells with TGF-{beta}2 isoform significantly increased embryoid body (EB) proliferation as well as the extent of the EB outgrowth that beat rhythmically. At 17 days, 49% of the EBs treated with TGF-{beta}2 exhibited spontaneous beating compared with 15% in controls. Cardiac myocyte specific protein markers sarcomeric myosin and {alpha}-actin were demonstrated in beating EBs and cells isolated from EBs. In conclusion, TGF-{beta}2 but not TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3 promotes cardiac myocyte differentiation from ES cells.

  1. Curcumin Inhibits Transforming Growth Factor β Induced Differentiation of Mouse Lung Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daishun; Gong, Ling; Zhu, Honglan; Pu, Shenglan; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Guichuan

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key event in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin on TGF-β induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts and explore the underlying mechanism. Mouse lung fibroblasts were cultured and treated with TGF-β2 and curcumin or rosiglitazone. Cell vitality was examined by MTT assay. The secretion of collagen-1 was assessed by ELISA. α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was visualized by immunofluorescence technique. The expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and platelet derived growth factor R β (PDGFR-β) was detected by PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that curcumin and rosiglitazone inhibited the proliferation and TGF-β induced differentiation of mouse lung fibroblasts. In addition, curcumin and rosiglitazone inhibited collagen-1 secretion and α-SMA expression in mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, curcumin and rosiglitazone upregulated PPAR-γ and downregulated PDGFR-β expression in mouse lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study reveals novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits TGF-β2 driven differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Curcumin could potentially be used for effective treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27877129

  2. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  3. Special phase transformation and crystal growth pathways observed in nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Huang, Feng; Finnegan, Michael P; Waychunas, Glenn A; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-01-01

    Phase transformation and crystal growth in nanoparticles may happen via mechanisms distinct from those in bulk materials. We combine experimental studies of as-synthesized and hydrothermally coarsened titania (TiO2) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) with thermodynamic analysis, kinetic modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering, and UV-vis spectroscopy. At low temperatures, phase transformation in titania nanoparticles occurs predominantly via interface nucleation at particle–particle contacts. Coarsening and crystal growth of titania nanoparticles can be described using the Smoluchowski equation. Oriented attachment-based crystal growth was common in both hydrothermal solutions and under dry conditions. MD simulations predict large structural perturbations within very fine particles, and are consistent with experimental results showing that ligand binding and change in aggregation state can cause phase transformation without particle coarsening. Such phenomena affect surface reactivity, thus may have important roles in geochemical cycling.

  4. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  5. Filopodia and actin arcs guide the assembly and transport of two populations of microtubules with unique dynamic parameters in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Andrew W.; Kabir, Nurul; Forscher, Paul

    2002-01-01

    We have used multimode fluorescent speckle microscopy (FSM) and correlative differential interference contrast imaging to investigate the actin–microtubule (MT) interactions and polymer dynamics known to play a fundamental role in growth cone guidance. We report that MTs explore the peripheral domain (P-domain), exhibiting classical properties of dynamic instability. MT extension occurs preferentially along filopodia, which function as MT polymerization guides. Filopodial bundles undergo retrograde flow and also transport MTs. Thus, distal MT position is determined by the rate of plus-end MT assembly minus the rate of retrograde F-actin flow. Short MT displacements independent of flow are sometimes observed. MTs loop, buckle, and break as they are transported into the T-zone by retrograde flow. MT breakage results in exposure of new plus ends which can regrow, and minus ends which rapidly undergo catastrophes, resulting in efficient MT turnover. We also report a previously undetected presence of F-actin arc structures, which exhibit persistent retrograde movement across the T-zone into the central domain (C-domain) at ∼1/4 the rate of P-domain flow. Actin arcs interact with MTs and transport them into the C-domain. Interestingly, although the MTs associated with arcs are less dynamic than P-domain MTs, they elongate efficiently as a result of markedly lower catastrophe frequencies. PMID:12105186

  6. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts retain intact transforming growth factor-{beta} responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yasuji; Hinchcliff, Monique; Wu, Minghua; Warner-Blankenship, Matthew; Lyons, Karen M.

    2008-03-10

    Background: The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) has been implicated in pathological fibrosis, but its physiologic role remains elusive. In vitro, transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) induces CCN2 expression in mesenchymal cells. Because CCN2 can enhance profibrotic responses elicited by TGF-{beta}, it has been proposed that CCN2 functions as an essential downstream signaling mediator for TGF-{beta}. To explore this notion, we characterized TGF-{beta}-induced activation of fibroblasts from CCN2-null (CCN2{sup -/-}) mouse embryos. Methods: The regulation of CCN2 expression was examined in vivo in a model of fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Cellular TGF-{beta} signal transduction and regulation of collagen gene expression were examined in CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs by immunohistochemistry, Northern, Western and RT-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and transient transfection assays. Results: Bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis in the mouse was associated with substantial CCN2 up-regulation in lesional fibroblasts. Whereas in vitro proliferation rate of CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs was markedly reduced compared to wild type MEFs, TGF-{beta}-induced activation of the Smad pathways, including Smad2 phosphorylation, Smad2/3 and Smad4 nuclear accumulation and Smad-dependent transcriptional responses, were unaffected by loss of CCN2. The stimulation of COL1A2 and fibronectin mRNA expression and promoter activity, and of corresponding protein levels, showed comparable time and dose-response in wild type and CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs, whereas stimulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and myofibroblast transdifferentiation showed subtle impairment in MEFs lacking CCN2. Conclusion: Whereas endogenous CCN2 plays a role in regulation of proliferation and TGF-{beta}-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation, it appears to be dispensable for Smad-dependent stimulation of collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis in murine embryonic fibroblasts.

  7. De-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP11, promotes transforming growth factor β-1 signaling through stabilization of transforming growth factor β receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Jacko, A M; Nan, L; Li, S; Tan, J; Zhao, J; Kass, D J; Zhao, Y

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) signaling pathway plays a central role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Two TGFβ-1 receptors, TβRI and TβRII, mediate this pathway. TβRI protein stability, as mediated by the ubiquitin/de-ubiquitination system, has been well studied; however, the molecular regulation of TβRII still remains unclear. Here we reveal that a de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP11, promotes TGFβ-1 signaling through de-ubiquitination and stabilization of TβRII. We elucidate the role that mitoxantrone (MTX), an USP11 inhibitor, has in the attenuation of TGFβ-1 signaling. Inhibition or downregulation of USP11 results in increases in TβRII ubiquitination and reduction of TβRII stability. Subsequently, TGFβ-1 signaling is greatly attenuated, as shown by the decreases in phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 levels as well as that of fibronectin (FN) and smooth muscle actin (SMA). Overexpression of USP11 reduces TβRII ubiquitination and increases TβRII stabilization, thereby elevating phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 and the ultimate expression of FN and SMA. Further, elevated expression of USP11 and TβRII were detected in lung tissues from bleomycin-challenged mice and IPF patients. Therefore, USP11 may contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis by stabilization of TβRII and promotion of TGFβ-1 signaling. This study provides mechanistic evidence for development of USP11 inhibitors as potential antifibrotic drugs for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27853171

  8. A simplified implementation of edge detection in MATLAB is faster and more sensitive than fast fourier transform for actin fiber alignment quantification.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, Steven Frank; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2011-04-01

    Fiber alignment plays a critical role in the structure and function of cells and tissues. While fiber alignment quantification is important to experimental analysis and several different methods for quantifying fiber alignment exist, many studies focus on qualitative rather than quantitative analysis perhaps due to the complexity of current fiber alignment methods. Speed and sensitivity were compared in edge detection and fast Fourier transform (FFT) for measuring actin fiber alignment in cells exposed to shear stress. While edge detection using matrix multiplication was consistently more sensitive than FFT, image processing time was significantly longer. However, when MATLAB functions were used to implement edge detection, MATLAB's efficient element-by-element calculations and fast filtering techniques reduced computation cost 100 times compared to the matrix multiplication edge detection method. The new computation time was comparable to the FFT method, and MATLAB edge detection produced well-distributed fiber angle distributions that statistically distinguished aligned and unaligned fibers in half as many sample images. When the FFT sensitivity was improved by dividing images into smaller subsections, processing time grew larger than the time required for MATLAB edge detection. Implementation of edge detection in MATLAB is simpler, faster, and more sensitive than FFT for fiber alignment quantification.

  9. Detecting transforming growth factor-β release from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-02

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  10. A genome-wide analysis reveals that the Drosophila transcription factor Lola promotes axon growth in part by suppressing expression of the actin nucleation factor Spire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The phylogenetically conserved transcription factor Lola is essential for many aspects of axon growth and guidance, synapse formation and neural circuit development in Drosophila. To date it has been difficult, however, to obtain an overall view of Lola functions and mechanisms. Results We use expression microarrays to identify the lola-dependent transcriptome in the Drosophila embryo. We find that lola regulates the expression of a large selection of genes that are known to affect each of several lola-dependent developmental processes. Among other loci, we find lola to be a negative regulator of spire, an actin nucleation factor that has been studied for its essential role in oogenesis. We show that spire is expressed in the nervous system and is required for a known lola-dependent axon guidance decision, growth of ISNb motor axons. We further show that reducing spire gene dosage suppresses this aspect of the lola phenotype, verifying that derepression of spire is an important contributor to the axon stalling phenotype of embryonic motor axons in lola mutants. Conclusions These data shed new light on the molecular mechanisms of many lola-dependent processes, and also identify several developmental processes not previously linked to lola that are apt to be regulated by this transcription factor. These data further demonstrate that excessive expression of the actin nucleation factor Spire is as deleterious for axon growth in vivo as is the loss of Spire, thus highlighting the need for a balance in the elementary steps of actin dynamics to achieve effective neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:22129300

  11. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  12. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  13. [Photodynamic therapy for actinic cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Comunión, A; Arias, D; Miñano, R; Romero, A; Borbujo, J

    2009-12-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a subtype of actinic keratosis that mainly affects the lower lip and has a higher risk of malignant transformation. Its location on the labial mucosa influences the therapeutic approach. Vermilionectomy requires local or general anesthetic and is associated with a risk of an unsightly scar, and the treatment with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod lasts for several weeks and the inflammatory reaction can be very intense. A number of authors have used photodynamic therapy as an alternative to the usual treatments. We present 3 patients with histologically confirmed actinic cheilitis treated using photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinic acid as the photosensitizer and red light at 630 nm. The clinical response was good, with no recurrences after 3 to 6 months of follow-up. Our experience supports the use of photodynamic therapy as a good alternative for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

  14. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike [Raleigh, NC; Huber, Steven C [Savoy, IL; Larabell, Carolyn A [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  15. Evidence for modulation of pericryptal sheath myofibroblasts in rat descending colon by Transforming Growth Factor β and Angiotensin II.

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Griffiths, Nina M; Pedley, Kevin C; Naftalin, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Background Absorption of water and Na+ in descending colonic crypts is dependent on the barrier function of the surrounding myofibroblastic pericryptal sheath. Here the effects of high and low Na+ diets and exposure to whole body ionising radiation on the growth and activation of the descending colonic pericryptal myofibroblasts are evaluated. In addition the effect of a post-irradiation treatment with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor Captopril was investigated. Methods The levels of Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1), ACE, collagen type IV, transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor (TGF-βR1), OB cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin in both descending colon and caecum were evaluated, using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, in rats fed on high and low Na+ diets (LS). These parameters were also determined during 3 months post-irradiation with 8Gy from a 60Co source in the presence and absence of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, Captopril. Results Increases in AT1 receptor (135.6% ± 18.3, P < 0.001); ACE (70.1% ± 13.1, P < 0.001); collagen type IV (49.6% ± 15.3, P < 0.001); TGF-β1 receptors (291.0% ± 26.5, P < 0.001); OB-cadherin (26.3% ± 13.8, P < 0.05) and α-smooth muscle actin (82.5% ± 12.4, P < 0.001) were observed in the pericryptal myofibroblasts of the descending colon after LS diet. There are also increases in AT1 receptor and TGF-β1 receptor, smooth muscle actin and collagen type IV after irradiation. Captopril reduced all these effects of irradiation on the pericryptal sheath and also decreased the amount of collagen and smooth muscle actin in control rats (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate an activation of descending colonic myofibroblasts to trophic stimuli, or irradiation, which can be attenuated by Captopril, indicative of local trophic control by angiotensin II and TGF-β release. PMID:11872151

  16. Human transforming growth factor. beta. -. cap alpha. /sub 2/-macroglobulin complex is a latent form of transforming growth factor. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.S.; O'Grady, P.; Huang, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor ..beta.. (TGF..beta..) has been shown to be present as a high molecular weight latent form in human serum. Appearance of transforming growth factor activity, along with the change from high molecular weight form to low molecular weight form, was observed following treatment of the latent form of TGF..beta.. with acid or urea, suggesting that the latent form of TGF..beta.. is a complex of TGF..beta.. and a high molecular weight binding protein. Human ..cap alpha../sub 2/-M has been found to be a plasma binding protein for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in serum or plasma. TGF..beta.. and PDGF share similar properties. They, therefore, investigated the interaction between /sup 125/I-TGF..beta.. and ..cap alpha../sub 2/M. /sup 125/I-TGF..beta.. and purified human ..cap alpha../sub 2/M formed a complex as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Most of the /sup 125/I-TGF..beta..-..cap alpha../sub 2/M complex could be dissociated by acid or urea treatment. These results suggest that ..cap alpha../sub 2/M is a binding protein for TGF..beta.. and that TGF..beta..-..cap alpha../sub 2/M complex may be the latent form of TGF..beta.. in serum.

  17. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-. alpha. in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masaki; Wakai, Kae; Shizume, Kazuo ); Iwashita, Mitsutoshi ); Ohmura, Eiji; Kamiya, Yoshinobu; Murakami, Hitomi; Onoda, Noritaka; Tsushima, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{alpha} and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured in human milk by means of homologous radioimmunoassay. As previously reported, EGF concentration in the colostrum was approximately 200 ng/ml and decreased to 50 ng/ml by day 7 postpartum. The value of immunoreactive (IR)-TGF-{alpha} was 2.2-7.2 ng/ml, much lower than that of EGF. In contrast to EGF, the concentration of IR-TGF-{alpha} was fairly stable during the 7 postpartum days. There was no relationship between the concentrations of IR-TGF-{alpha} and IR-EGF, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism in the release of the two growth factors is different. On gel-chromatography using a Sephadex G-50 column, IR-EGF appeared in the fraction corresponding to that of authentic human EGF, while 70%-80% of the IR-TGF-{alpha} was eluted as a species with a molecular weight greater than that of authentic human TGF-{alpha}. Although the physiological role of TGF-{alpha} in milk is not known, it is possible that it is involved in the development of the mammary gland and/or the growth of newborn infants.

  18. Incisional wound healing in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Koch, R M; Roche, N S; Parks, W T; Ashcroft, G S; Letterio, J J; Roberts, A B

    2000-01-01

    Expression of endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is reduced in many animal models of impaired wound healing, and addition of exogenous transforming growth factor-beta has been shown to improve healing. To test the hypothesis that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is essential for normal wound repair, we have studied wound healing in mice in which the transforming growth factor-beta1 gene has been deleted by homologous recombination. No perceptible differences were observed in wounds made in 3-10-day-old neonatal transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice compared to wild-type littermates. To preclude interference from maternally transferred transforming growth factor-beta1, cutaneous wounds were also made on the backs of 30-day-old transforming growth factor-beta1 null and littermate control mice treated with rapamycin, which extends their lifetime and suppresses the inflammatory response characteristic of the transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Again, no impairment in healing was seen in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Instead these wounds showed an overall reduction in the amount of granulation tissue and an increased rate of epithelialization compared to littermate controls. Our data suggest that release of transforming growth factor-beta1 from degranulating platelets or secretion by infiltrating macrophages and fibroblasts is not critical to initiation or progression of tissue repair and that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 may actually function to increase inflammation and retard wound closure.

  19. Actinic Prurigo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Georgina; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Mancheno-Valencia, Alexandra; Solís-Arias, Martha Patricia; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, María Teresa; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis that affects the skin, as well as the labial and conjunctival mucosa in indigenous and mestizo populations of Latin America. It starts predominantly in childhood, has a chronic course, and is exacerbated with solar exposure. Little is known of its pathophysiology, including the known mechanisms of the participation of HLA-DR4 and an abnormal immunologic response with increase of T CD4+ lymphocytes. The presence of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells suggests that it is a hypersensitivity reaction (likely type IVa or b). The diagnosis is clinical, and the presence of lymphoid follicles in the mucosal histopathologic study of mucosa is pathognomonic. The best available treatment to date is thalidomide, despite its secondary effects.

  20. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC.

  1. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  2. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  3. Inhibition of Nb2 T-lymphoma cell growth by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Rayhel, E J; Prentice, D A; Tabor, P S; Flurkey, W H; Geib, R W; Laherty, R F; Schnitzer, S B; Chen, R; Hughes, J P

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, a rat T lymphoma, in response to lactogens and interleukin-2. Prostaglandins may play an important role in the pathway through which TGF-beta exerts its inhibitory actions, because prostaglandin E2 also inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, and indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, reverses the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta on Nb2 cell proliferation. PMID:3262338

  4. Transforming Growth Factor Beta, Bioenergetics and Mitochondria in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gabriella, Casalena; Ilse, Daehn; Erwin, Bottinger

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β ) family is comprised of over 30 family members that are structurally related secreted dimeric cytokines, including TGF-β, activins, and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs)/growth and differentiation factors (GDFs). TGF-β are pluripotent regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and adhesion of many different cell types. TGF-β pathways are highly evolutionarily conserved and control embryogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue homeostasis in invertebrates and vertebrates. Aberrations in TGF-β activity and signaling underlie a broad spectrum of developmental disorders and major pathologies in humans, including cancer, fibrosis and autoimmune diseases. Recent observations indicate an emerging role for TGF-β in regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress responses characteristic of chronic degenerative diseases and ageing. Conversely, energy and metabolic sensory pathways cross-regulate mediators of TGF-β signaling. Here we review TGF-β and regulation of bioenergetic and mitochondrial functions, including energy and oxidant metabolism and apoptotic cell death, as well as their emerging relevance in renal biology and disease. PMID:22835461

  5. Effects of transforming growth factor type beta on expression of cytoskeletal proteins in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lomri, A.; Marie, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many cell types in vitro. We have examined the effects of TGF beta on cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization in relation to parameters of cell proliferation and differentiation in endosteal osteoblastic cells isolated from mouse caudal vertebrae. Treatment of mouse osteoblastic cells cultured in serum free medium for 24 hours with TGF beta (1.5-30 ng/mL) slightly (-23%) inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. In parallel, TGF beta (0.5-30 ng/mL, 24 hours) greatly increased cell replication as evaluated by (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA (157% to 325% of controls). At a median dose (1.5 ng/mL) that affected both alkaline phosphatase and DNA synthesis (235% of controls) TGF beta induced rapid (six hours) cell respreading of quiescent mouse osteoblastic cells. This effect was associated with increased polymerization of actin, alpha actinin, and tubulins, as evaluated by both biochemical and immunofluorescence methods. In addition, TGF beta (1.5 ng/mL) increased the de novo biosynthesis of actin, alpha actinin, vimentin, and tubulins, as determined by {sup 35}S methionine labeling and fractionation of cytoskeletal proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These effects were rapid and transient, as they occurred at six hours and were reversed after 24 hours of TGF beta exposure. The results indicate that the stimulatory effect of TGF beta on DNA synthesis in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells is associated with a transient increase in cell spreading associated with enhanced polymerization and synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins.

  6. RhoA Modulates Smad Signaling during Transforming Growth Factor-β-induced Smooth Muscle Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiyou; Crawford, Michelle; Day, Regina M.; Briones, Victorino R.; Leader, Jennifer E.; Jose, Pedro A.; Lechleider, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    We recently reported that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induced the neural crest stem cell line Monc-1 to differentiate into a spindle-like contractile smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and that Smad signaling played an important role in this phenomenon. In addition to Smad signaling, other pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositol-3 kinase, and RhoA have also been shown to mediate TGF-β actions. The objectives of this study were to examine whether these signaling pathways contribute to TGF-β-induced SMC development and to test whether Smad signaling cross-talks with other pathway(s) during SMC differentiation induced by TGF-β. We demonstrate here that RhoA signaling is critical to TGF-β-induced SMC differentiation. RhoA kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 significantly blocks the expression of multiple SMC markers such as smooth muscle α-actin, SM22α, and calponin in TGF-β-treated Monc-1 cells. In addition, Y27632 reversed the cell morphology and abolished the contractility of TGF-β-treated cells. RhoA signaling was activated as early as 5 min following TGF-β addition. Dominant negative RhoA blocked nuclear translocation of Smad2 and Smad3 because of the inhibition of phosphorylation of both Smads and inhibited Smad-dependent SBE promoter activity, whereas constitutively active RhoA significantly enhanced SBE promoter activity. Consistent with these results, C3 exotoxin, an inhibitor of RhoA activation, significantly attenuated SBE promoter activity and inhibited Smad nuclear translocation. Taken together, these data point to a new role for RhoA as a modulator of Smad activation while regulating TGF-β-induced SMC differentiation. PMID:16317010

  7. Transforming growth factor beta 1, a cytokine with regenerative functions

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Wale; Nguyen, Doan H.

    2016-01-01

    We review the biology and role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in peripheral nerve injury and regeneration, as it relates to injuries to large nerve trunks (i.e., sciatic nerve, brachial plexus), which often leads to suboptimal functional recovery. Experimental studies have suggested that the reason for the lack of functional recovery resides in the lack of sufficient mature axons reaching their targets, which is a result of the loss of the growth-supportive environment provided by the Schwann cells in the distal stump of injured nerves. Using an established chronic nerve injury and delayed repair animal model that accurately mimics chronic nerve injuries in humans, we summarize our key findings as well as others to better understand the pathophysiology of poor functional recovery. We demonstrated that 6 month TGF-β1 treatment for chronic nerve injury significantly improved Schwann cell capacity to support axonal regeneration. When combined with forskolin, the effect was additive, as evidenced by a near doubling of regenerated axons proximal to the repair site. We showed that in vivo application of TGF-β1 and forskolin directly onto chronically injured nerves reactivated chronically denervated Schwann cells, induced their proliferation, and upregulated the expression of regeneration-associated proteins. The effect of TGF-β1 and forskolin on old nerve injuries is quite impressive and the treatment regiment appears to mediate a growth-supportive milieu in the injured peripheral nerves. In summary, TGF-β1 and forskolin treatment reactivates chronically denervated Schwann cells and could potentially be used to extend and prolong the regenerative responses to promote axonal regeneration. PMID:27904475

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta induces endothelin-1 expression through activation of the Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Reimunde, Francisco Manuel; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; Lamas, Santiago

    2004-11-01

    Expression of the endothelin-1 gene is subject to complex regulation by different factors, among which transforming growth factor-beta is one of the most important. We have analyzed the mechanism by which transforming growth factor-beta increases endothelin-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells. Transcriptional activation of the endothelin-1 promoter accounted for the transforming growth factor-beta-induced increase in endothelin-1 mRNA levels. Two DNA elements within the promoter are responsible for this effect: a Smad binding element and a proximal activator protein-1 site. Mutation of both elements abolished transforming growth factor-beta responsiveness. Overexpression of the Smad3 isoform strongly potentiates transforming growth factor-beta- induced endothelin-1 promoter activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that transforming growth factor-beta induces endothelin-1 expression by a functional cooperation between Smads and activator protein-1 through activation of the Smad signaling pathway.

  9. Optimal treatment of actinic keratoses

    PubMed Central

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    The most compelling reason and primary goal of treating actinic keratoses is to prevent malignant transformation into invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and although there are well established guidelines outlining treatment modalities and regimens for squamous cell carcinoma, the more commonly encountered precancerous actinic lesions have no such standard. Many options are available with variable success and patient compliance rates. Prevention of these lesions is key, with sun protection being a must in treating aging patients with sun damage as it is never too late to begin protecting the skin. PMID:23345970

  10. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  11. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible phosphorylation of Smad3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2009-04-10

    Smad proteins transduce the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signal at the cell surface into gene regulation in the nucleus. Upon TGF-beta treatment, the highly homologous Smad2 and Smad3 are phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the SSXS motif in the C-terminal tail. Here we show that in addition to the C-tail, three (S/T)-P sites in the Smad3 linker region, Ser(208), Ser(204), and Thr(179) are phosphorylated in response to TGF-beta. The linker phosphorylation peaks at 1 h after TGF-beta treatment, behind the peak of the C-tail phosphorylation. We provide evidence suggesting that the C-tail phosphorylation by the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the TGF-beta-induced linker phosphorylation. Although the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the linker phosphorylation, the receptor itself does not phosphorylate these sites. We further show that ERK is not responsible for TGF-beta-dependent phosphorylation of these three sites. We show that GSK3 accounts for TGF-beta-inducible Ser(204) phosphorylation. Flavopiridol, a pan-CDK inhibitor, abolishes TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208), suggesting that the CDK family is responsible for phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208) in response to TGF-beta. Mutation of the linker phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable residues increases the ability of Smad3 to activate a TGF-beta/Smad-target gene as well as the growth-inhibitory function of Smad3. Thus, these observations suggest that TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 linker sites inhibits its antiproliferative activity.

  12. Transforming Growth Factor-β and the Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Maozhen; Neil, Jason R.; Schiemann, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is in many respects a process of dysregulated cellular evolution that drives malignant cells to acquire six phenotypic hallmarks of cancer, including their ability to proliferate and replicate autonomously, to resist cytostatic and apoptotic signals, and to induce tissue invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine that functions as a formidable barrier to the development of cancer hallmarks in normal cells and tissues. Paradoxically, tumorigenesis counteracts the tumor suppressing activities of TGF-β, thus enabling TGF-β to stimulate cancer invasion and metastasis. Fundamental gaps exist in our knowledge of how malignant cells overcome the cytostatic actions of TGF-β, and of how TGF-β stimulates the acquisition of cancer hallmarks by developing and progressing human cancers. Here we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the ability of TGF-β to mediate tumor suppression in normal cells, and conversely, to facilitate cancer progression and disease dissemination in malignant cells. PMID:20940046

  13. Transforming growth factor-β and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Maozhen; Neil, Jason R; Schiemann, William P

    2011-06-01

    Tumorigenesis is in many respects a process of dysregulated cellular evolution that drives malignant cells to acquire six phenotypic hallmarks of cancer, including their ability to proliferate and replicate autonomously, to resist cytostatic and apoptotic signals, and to induce tissue invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine that functions as a formidable barrier to the development of cancer hallmarks in normal cells and tissues. Paradoxically, tumorigenesis counteracts the tumor suppressing activities of TGF-β, thus enabling TGF-β to stimulate cancer invasion and metastasis. Fundamental gaps exist in our knowledge of how malignant cells overcome the cytostatic actions of TGF-β, and of how TGF-β stimulates the acquisition of cancer hallmarks by developing and progressing human cancers. Here we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the ability of TGF-β to mediate tumor suppression in normal cells, and conversely, to facilitate cancer progression and disease dissemination in malignant cells.

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Faler, Byron J; Macsata, Robyn A; Plummer, Dahlia; Mishra, Lopa; Sidawy, Anton N

    2006-03-01

    Acute and chronic wounds are a source of significant morbidity for patients, and they demand a growing portion of health-care time and finances to be devoted to their care. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) has surfaced from abundant research as a key signal in orchestrating wound repair. In beginning this review, we discuss the inflammatory, proliferative, and maturational phases of wound healing. We then focus on TGF-beta by first discussing the pathway from its production to the target cell where Smad proteins execute an intracellular signaling cascade. To review TGF-beta's role in wound healing, we discuss the actions of it individually on keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and monocytes, which are the major cell types involved in wound repair. From illustrating these cellular actions of TGF-beta, we summarize its multipotent role in the process of wound repair. As a clinical correlation, we also review research dedicated to the involvement of TGF-beta in venous stasis ulcers.

  15. Modifying muscular dystrophy through transforming growth factor-β.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle, with replacement by scar or fibrotic tissue, resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through both candidate gene approaches and genome-wide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGF-β signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or an altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGF-β pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGF-β pathway and approaches to modulate TGF-β activity to ameliorate muscle disease.

  16. New Aspects of Progesterone Interactions with the Actin Cytoskeleton and Neurosteroidogenesis in the Cerebellum and the Neuronal Growth Cone

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Lisa; Olbrich, Laura; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The impact of progesterone on neuronal tissues in the central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system is of significant scientific and therapeutic interest. Glial and neuronal cells of vertebrates express steroidogenic enzymes, and are able to synthesize progesterone de novo from cholesterol. Progesterone is described to have neuroprotective, neuroreparative, anti-degenerative, and anti-apoptotic effects in the CNS and the PNS. Thus, the first clinical studies promise new therapeutic options using progesterone in the treatment of patients with traumatic brain injury. Additionally, experimental data from different animal models suggest further positive effects of progesterone on neurological diseases such as cerebral ischemia, peripheral nerve injury and amyothropic lateral sclerosis. In regard to this future clinical use of progesterone, we discuss in this review the underlying physiological principles of progesterone effects in neuronal tissues. Mechanisms leading to morphological reorganizations of neurons in the CNS and PNS affected by progesterone are addressed, with special focus on the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, new aspects of a progesterone-dependent regulation of neurosteroidogenesis mediated by the recently described progesterone binding protein PGRMC1 in the nervous system are discussed. PMID:25141866

  17. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in normal human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, S. A.; Elder, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Acid soluble proteins from 23 samples of normal human gastrointestinal mucosa derived from four normal adult organ donors were extracted and subjected to specific radiommunoassays for transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and urogastrone epidermal growth factor (URO-EGF). All tissues were found to contain immunoreactive TGF alpha and levels ranged from 57 to 4,776 pg-1 wet weight of tissue. Although levels varied between tissue donors, the distribution of TGF alpha throughout the gastrointestinal tract appeared similar in all cases. URO-EGF levels were much lower (0-216 pg g-1 wet weight). TGF alpha levels in extracts of gastrointestinal mucosa from a 7-year-old female donor were higher and the observed distribution was markedly different from adult levels. URO-EGF was not detected in mucosal or submucosal tissue extracts from this patient. Further studies in juveniles are indicated. PMID:2803941

  18. Effect of transforming growth factor-β1 on human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsuya; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Arima, Yasuo; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Akimaru, Koho; Tajiri, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the biological effects of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on intrahepatic cholan-giocarcinoma (ICC). METHODS: We investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on human ICC cell lines (HuCCT1, MEC, and HuH-28) by monitoring the influence of TGF-β1 on tumor growth and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in ICC cells. RESULTS: All three human ICC cell lines produced TGF-β1 and demonstrated accelerated growth in the presence of TGF-β1 with no apoptotic effect. Studies on HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced stimulation of the expression of TGF-β1, as well as a decrease in TGF-β1 mRNA expression induced by neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. These results indicate that TGF-β1 stimulates the production and function of TGF-β1 in an autocrine fashion. Further, IL-6 secretion was observed in all three cell lines and exhibited an inhibitory response to neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. Experiments using HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced acceleration of IL-6 protein expression and mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate a functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6. All three cell lines proliferated in the presence of IL-6. In contrast, TGF-β1 induced no growth effect in HuCCT1 in the presence of small interfering RNA against a specific cell surface receptor of IL-6 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. CONCLUSION: ICC cells produce TGF-β1 and confer a TGF-β1-induced growth effect in an autocrine fashion. TGF-β1 activates IL-6 production, and the functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6 contributes to ICC cell growth by TGF-β1. PMID:17072955

  19. Phosphorylation of the growth arrest-specific protein Gas2 is coupled to actin rearrangements during Go-->G1 transition in NIH 3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Growth arrest-specific (Gas2) protein has been shown to be a component of the microfilament system, that is highly expressed in growth arrested mouse and human fibroblasts and is hyperphosphorylated upon serum stimulation of quiescent cells. (Brancolini, C., S. Bottega, and C. Schneider. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 117:1251-1261). In this study we demonstrate that the kinetics of Gas2 phosphorylation, during Go-->G1 transition, as induced by addition of 20% FCS to serum starved NIH 3T3 cells, is temporally coupled to the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton. To better dissect the relationship between Gas2 phosphorylation and the modification of the microfilament architecture we used specific stimuli for both membrane ruffling (PDGF and PMA) and stress fiber formation (L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid LPA) (Ridley, A. J., and A. Hall. 1992. Cell. 70:389-399). All of them, similarly to 20% FCS, are able to downregulate Gas2 biosynthesis. PDGF and PMA induce Gas2 hyperphosphorylation that is temporally coupled with the appearance of membrane ruffling where Gas2 localizes. On the other hand LPA, a specific stimulus for stress fiber formation, fails to induce a detectable Gas2 hyperphosphorylation. Thus, Gas2 hyperphosphorylation is specifically correlated with the formation of membrane ruffling possibly implying a role of Gas2 in this process. PMID:8120096

  20. Growing an actin gel on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Noireaux, V; Golsteyn, R M; Friederich, E; Prost, J; Antony, C; Louvard, D; Sykes, C

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by the motility of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, we have experimentally studied the growth of an actin gel around spherical beads grafted with ActA, a protein known to be the promoter of bacteria movement. On ActA-grafted beads F-actin is formed in a spherical manner, whereas on the bacteria a "comet-like" tail of F-actin is produced. We show experimentally that the stationary thickness of the gel depends on the radius of the beads. Moreover, the actin gel is not formed if the ActA surface density is too low. To interpret our results, we propose a theoretical model to explain how the mechanical stress (due to spherical geometry) limits the growth of the actin gel. Our model also takes into account treadmilling of actin. We deduce from our work that the force exerted by the actin gel on the bacteria is of the order of 10 pN. Finally, we estimate from our theoretical model possible conditions for developing actin comet tails. PMID:10692348

  1. Arabidopsis Villins Promote Actin Turnover at Pollen Tube Tips and Facilitate the Construction of Actin Collars[W

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Hua; Xie, Yurong; Wang, Juan; Chen, Naizhi; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-01-01

    Apical actin filaments are crucial for pollen tube tip growth. However, the specific dynamic changes and regulatory mechanisms associated with actin filaments in the apical region remain largely unknown. Here, we have investigated the quantitative dynamic parameters that underlie actin filament growth and disappearance in the apical regions of pollen tubes and identified villin as the major player that drives rapid turnover of actin filaments in this region. Downregulation of Arabidopsis thaliana VILLIN2 (VLN2) and VLN5 led to accumulation of actin filaments at the pollen tube apex. Careful analysis of single filament dynamics showed that the severing frequency significantly decreased, and the lifetime significantly increased in vln2 vln5 pollen tubes. These results indicate that villin-mediated severing is critical for turnover and departure of actin filaments originating in the apical region. Consequently, the construction of actin collars was affected in vln2 vln5 pollen tubes. In addition to the decrease in severing frequency, actin filaments also became wavy and buckled in the apical cytoplasm of vln2 vln5 pollen tubes. These results suggest that villin confers rigidity upon actin filaments. Furthermore, an observed decrease in skewness of actin filaments in the subapical region of vln2 vln5 pollen tubes suggests that villin-mediated bundling activity may also play a role in the construction of actin collars. Thus, our data suggest that villins promote actin turnover at pollen tube tips and facilitate the construction of actin collars. PMID:23715472

  2. Autocrine growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wimmel, A; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: The role of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in neuroendocrine tumour biology is currently unknown. We therefore examined the expression and biological significance of TGFβ signalling components in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract. Methods: Expression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors, Smads and Smad regulated proteins, was examined in surgically resected NET specimens and human NET cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and ELISA. Activation of TGFβ-1 dependent promoters was tested by transactivation assays. Growth regulation was evaluated by cell numbers, soft agar assays, and cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry. The role of endogenous TGFβ was assessed by a TGFβ neutralising antibody and stable transfection of a dominant negative TGFβR II receptor construct. Results: Coexpression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors TGFβR I and TGFβR II was detected in 67% of human NETs and in all three NET cell lines examined. NET cell lines expressed the TGFβ signal transducers Smad 2, 3, and 4. In two of the three cell lines, TGFβ-1 treatment resulted in transactivation of a TGFβ responsive reporter construct as well as inhibition of c-myc and induction of p21(WAF1) expression. TGFβ-1 inhibited anchorage dependent and independent growth in a time and dose dependent manner in TGFβ-1 responsive cell lines. TGFβ-1 mediated growth inhibition was due to G1 arrest without evidence of induction of apoptosis. Functional inactivation of endogenous TGFβ revealed the existence of an autocrine antiproliferative loop in NET cells. Conclusions: Neuroendocrine tumour cells of the gastroenteropancreatic tract are subject to paracrine and autocrine growth inhibition by TGFβ-1, which may account in part for the low proliferative index of this tumour entity. PMID:12912863

  3. Dendritic Actin Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders

    2010-03-01

    Reversible polymerization of the intracellular protein actin into semiflexible filaments is crucial for cell motion and environmental sensing. Recent studies have shown that polymerized actin can spontaneously form traveling waves and/or moving patches. I investigate possible mechanisms for such phenomena by numerically simulating the ``dendritic nucleation'' model of actin network growth. The simulations treat the growth of an actin network on a flat portion of a cell membrane, using a stochastic-growth method which calculates an explicit three-dimensional network structure. The calculations treat processes including filament growth, capping, branching, severing, and Brownian motion. The dynamics of membrane proteins stimulating actin polymerization are also included: they diffuse in the membrane, and detach/deactivate in the presence of polymerized actin. The simulations show three types of polymerized-actin behavior: 1) traveling waves, 2) coherently moving patches, and 3) random fluctuations with occasional moving patches. Wave formation is favored at low free-actin concentrations by a long reattachment time for the membrane proteins, and by weakness of the attractive interaction between filaments and the membrane. Raising the free-actin concentration results in a randomly varying distribution of polymerized actin. Lowering the free-actin concentration below the optimal value for waves causes the waves to break up into patches which, however, move coherently. Effects of similar magnitude are predicted when other intracellular protein concentrations are varied. Diffusion of the membrane proteins slows the waves, and, if fast enough, stops them completely, resulting in the formation of a static spot.

  4. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  5. Rat alveolar myofibroblasts acquire alpha-smooth muscle actin expression during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vyalov, S. L.; Gabbiani, G.; Kapanci, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of fibroblasts in alveolar septa are characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic bundles of microfilaments that contain cytoplasmic actin isoforms; these cells have been named contractile interstitial cells or V-type myofibroblasts. In the rat, they express desmin as intermediate filament protein. In this study, we explored the possibility that modulation and replication of such septal fibroblasts result in the appearance of alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin-positive myofibroblasts, typical of lung fibrosis. Experimental pulmonary fibrosis was produced by a unique intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to 28 rats. Eight additional rats used as controls received the equivalent volume of saline. Paraffin and frozen sections of lungs were examined at days 1, 3, 5 and 7 after treatment. Microfilaments and intermediate filaments were stained using antibodies against total actin, alpha-SM actin, desmin, vimentin, keratin, and SM myosin. Electron microscopic labeling of desmin and alpha-SM actin using immunogold technique was done on Lowicryl K4M resin-embedded specimens. alpha-SM actin appeared in desmin-positive alveolar fibroblasts as early as 24 hours after intratracheal bleomycin instillation; the modulation of alpha-SM actin in these cells was preceded by a lymphomonocytic infiltration of alveolar septa. Twenty-four hours to 3 days after bleomycin administration, a proliferation of alveolar myofibroblasts occurred. Fibrosis with laying down of collagen fibers took place after the above mentioned cellular modifications. Our results support the view that septal fibroblastic cells can modulate into typical alpha-SM actin-containing myofibroblasts during experimental bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In such a modulation a possible role of cytokines, particularly of transforming growth factor-beta, is considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

  6. Actin filaments align into hollow comets for rapid VASP-mediated propulsion.

    PubMed

    Plastino, Julie; Olivier, Stéphane; Sykes, Cécile

    2004-10-05

    For cells, the growth of a dense array of branched actin filaments organized by the actin-related proteins 2 and 3 (Arp2/3) complex at the plasma membrane offers an explanation as to how movement is produced, and this arrangement is considered to be optimal for motility. Here, we challenged this assumption by using an in vitro system of polystyrene beads in cell extracts that contained a complex mix of actin polymerization proteins as in vivo. We employed the surface of the bead as a reactor where we mixed two different actin polymerization-activating factors, the Arp2/3 complex and the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), to examine their contribution to actin-based movement and filament organization. We varied the coating of the bead surface but left the extracts identical for all assays. We found that the degree of filament alignment in the actin comet tails depended on the surface ratio of VASP to Arp2/3. Alignment of actin filaments parallel to the direction of bead movement in the presence of VASP was accompanied by an abrupt 7-fold increase in velocity that was independent of bead size and by hollowing out of the comets. The actin filament-bundling proteins fimbrin and fascin did not appear to play a role in this transformation. Together with the idea that VASP enhances filament detachment and with the presence of pulling forces at the rear of the bead, a mesoscopic analysis of movement provides a possible explanation for our results.

  7. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  8. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  9. Transforming growth factor β and platelet-derived growth factor modulation of myofibroblast development from corneal fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek; Barbosa, Flavia L; Torricelli, Andre A M; Santhiago, Marcony R; Wilson, Steven E

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that development of mature vimentin+/α-smooth muscle actin+/desmin+ (V+A+D+) myofibroblasts from corneal fibroblasts is regulated by transforming growth factor (TGF) β and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF); and that myofibroblast development in vitro follows a similar developmental pathway as it does in vivo. Mouse corneal stromal fibroblasts (MSF) were isolated from the corneas of Swiss Webster mice and cultured in serum-free media augmented with DMEM/F12 and varying doses of TGFβ (0.1-2.0 ng/ml), with and without mouse PDGF-AA and/or PDGF-BB (2.0 ng/ml), to study the transition of the MSF to V+A+D+ myofibroblasts. The mean percentage of vimentin+, α-SMA+ and desmin+ cells was determined at each time point (2-15 days), with each growth factor concentration. MSF in vitro were noted to undergo the same developmental transition from V+A-D- to V+A+D- to V+A+D+ myofibroblasts as precursors undergo in vivo. TGFβ at a dose of 0.5 ng/ml and 1.0 ng/ml with 2.0 ng/ml PDGF-AA and 2.0 ng/ml PDGF-BB in DMEM/F12 serum-free media was optimal for the development of V+A+D+ myofibroblasts. This study defines optimal in vitro conditions to monitor the development of MSF into myofibroblasts. The combined effects of TGFβ and PDGF promote the full development of V+A+D+ myofibroblasts from MSF.

  10. Exposure to transforming growth factor-β1 after basic fibroblast growth factor promotes the fibroblastic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem/progenitor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kiyomi; Maeda, Hidefumi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naohide; Wada, Naohisa; Monnouchi, Satoshi; Teramatsu, Yoko; Hamano, Sayuri; Koori, Katsuaki; Akamine, Akifumi

    2013-05-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a cytokine that promotes the regeneration of the periodontium, the specialized tissues supporting the teeth. bFGF, does not, however, induce the synthesis of smooth muscle actin alpha 2 (ACTA2), type I collagen (COL1), or COL3, which are principal molecules in periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue, a component of the periodontium. We have suggested the feasibility of using transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) to induce fibroblastic differentiation of PDL stem/progenitor cells (PDLSCs). Here, we investigated the effect of the subsequent application of TGFβ1 after bFGF (bFGF/TGFβ1) on the differentiation of PDLSCs into fibroblastic cells. We first confirmed the expression of bFGF and TGFβ1 in rat PDL tissue and primary human PDL cells. Receptors for both bFGF and TGFβ1 were expressed in the human PDLSC lines 1-11 and 1-17. Exposure to bFGF for 2 days promoted vascular endothelial growth factor gene and protein expression in both cell lines and down-regulated the expression of ACTA2, COL1, and COL3 mRNA in both cell lines and the gene fibrillin 1 (FBN1) in cell line 1-11 alone. Furthermore, bFGF stimulated cell proliferation of these cell lines and significantly increased the number of cells in phase G2/M in the cell lines. Exposure to TGFβ1 for 2 days induced gene expression of ACTA2 and COL1 in both cell lines and FBN1 in cell line 1-11 alone. BFGF/TGFβ1 treatment significantly up-regulated ACTA2, COL1, and FBN1 expression as compared with the group treated with bFGF alone or the untreated control. This method might thus be useful for accelerating the generation and regeneration of functional periodontium.

  11. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE:
    TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  12. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro­tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element. PMID:27307590

  13. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase-8 regulates transforming growth factor-β1 levels in mouse tongue wounds and fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aström, Pirjo; Pirilä, Emma; Lithovius, Riitta; Heikkola, Heidi; Korpi, Jarkko T; Hernández, Marcela; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2014-10-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8)-deficient mice (Mmp8-/-) exhibit delayed dermal wound healing, but also partly contradicting results have been reported. Using the Mmp8-/- mice we investigated the role of MMP-8 in acute wound healing of the mobile tongue, and analyzed the function of tongue fibroblasts in vitro. Interestingly, in the early phase the tongue wounds of Mmp8-/- mice healed faster than those of wild type (wt) mice resulting in significant difference in wound widths (P=0.001, 6-24h). The Mmp8-/- wounds showed no change in myeloperoxidase positive myeloid cell count, but the level of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was significantly increased (P=0.007) compared to the wt tongues. Fibroblasts cultured from wt tongues expressed MMP-8 and TGF-β1. However, higher TGF-β1 levels were detected in Mmp8-/- fibroblasts, and MMP-8 treatment decreased phosphorylated Smad-2 levels and α-smooth muscle actin expression in these fibroblasts suggesting reduced TGF-β1 signaling. Consistently, a degradation of recombinant TGF-β1 by MMP-8 decreased its ability to activate the signaling cascade in fibroblasts. Moreover, collagen gels with Mmp8-/- fibroblasts reduced more in size. We conclude that MMP-8 regulates tongue wound contraction rate and TGF-β1 levels. In vitro analyses suggest that MMP-8 may also play a role in regulating TGF-β1 signaling of stromal fibroblasts.

  15. Sequential analysis of myofibroblast differentiation and transforming growth factor-β1/Smad pathway activation in murine pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Jiro; Matsuda, Kuniko; Azuma, Arata; Kudoh, Shoji; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play a critical role in tissue fibrosis. However, the intracellular signaling pathways in myofibroblast differentiation are poorly understood. Here, we studied the relationship between transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad pathway activation and myofibroblast differentiation in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. In murine bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, nuclear localization of phosphorylated Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3) was observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions 7 days after bleomycin injection, whereas α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA)-positive myofibroblasts appeared in the lesions at 14 days, when the cytoplasmic localization of p-Smad2/3 was observed. We also compared the effects of TGF-β1 on myofibroblast differentiation and on type I collagen expression in a murine lung fibroblast cell line (MLg2908). TGF-β1 induced rapid expression of p-Smad2/3 in nuclei, after which ASMA organization in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts was observed. However, TGF-β1 produced no effect on the quantity of ASMA, either in mRNA levels or protein levels, even after the phosphorylation of Smad2/3. In contrast, TGF-β1 upregulated the expression of type I collagen mRNA. These findings suggest that in pulmonary fibrosis the molecular mechanism of myofibroblast differentiation is complex and that the difference between ASMA expression and type I collagen expression is mediated by the TGF-β/Smad pathway.

  16. Extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch impact human cardiac fibroblast responses to transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed

    Watson, Chris J; Phelan, Dermot; Collier, Patrick; Horgan, Stephen; Glezeva, Nadia; Cooke, Gordon; Xu, Maojia; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Baugh, John A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the impact of extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch on cardiac fibroblast activity is required to help unravel the pathophysiology of myocardial fibrotic diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate pro-fibrotic responses of primary human cardiac fibroblast cells exposed to different extracellular matrix components, including collagen sub-types I, III, IV, VI and laminin. The impact of mechanical cyclical stretch and treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) on collagen 1, collagen 3 and alpha smooth muscle actin mRNA expression on different matrices was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results revealed that all of the matrices studied not only affected the expression of pro-fibrotic genes in primary human cardiac fibroblast cells at rest but also affected their response to TGFβ1. In addition, differential cellular responses to mechanical cyclical stretch were observed depending on the type of matrix the cells were adhered to. These findings may give insight into the impact of selective pathological deposition of extracellular matrix proteins within different disease states and how these could impact the fibrotic environment.

  17. Constitutive activation of transforming growth factor Beta receptor 1 in the mouse uterus impairs uterine morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function.

  18. Time-resolved studies of actin organization by multivalent ions and actin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James R.; Chee Lai Wong, Gerard

    2007-03-01

    Actin is one of the principal components in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, the architecture of which is highly regulated for a wide range of biological functions. In the presence of multivalent salts or actin-binding proteins, it is known that F-actin can organize into bundles or networks. In this work, we use time-resolved confocal microscopy to study the dynamics of actin bundle growth induced by multivalent ions and by espin, a prototypical actin binding protein that is known to induce bundles. For divalent ion induced bundles, we observe a rapid lateral saturation followed by longitudinal growth of bundles, in sharp contrast to the bundling mechanism of espin, which favors finite length bundles.

  19. Attenuated Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling as a Therapeutic for Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    upregulates VEGF expression only. Circulation 1994;90:649-52. 4. Igarashi A, Okochi H , Bradham DM, Grotendorst GR. Regulation of connective tissue growth...2005;65:8887-95. 10. Uhl M, Aulwurm S, Wischhusen J, et al. SD-208, a novel transforming growth factor beta receptor I kinase inhibitor, inhibits growth...cancer. Endocr Relat Cancer 2005;12:805-22. 18. Kawada M, Inoue H , Masuda T, Ikeda D. Insulin-like growth factor I secreted from prostate stromal

  20. Role of polypeptide growth factors in phenotypic transformation of normal rat kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    van Zoelen, E.J.J.; van Oostwaard, T.M.J.; de Laat, S.W.

    1988-01-05

    A serum-free assay has been established for studying the role of polypeptide growth factors in inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. The process has been characterized by measuring the time course of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into confluent, quiescent NRK cultures stimulated by defined polypeptide growth factors, in combination with cell counting studies, increases in DNA content, and cell cycle analysis by means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. It is shown that none of the growth factors tested is able to induce loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth by itself, but strong synergism was observed when combinations of growth factors were tested. None of the above factors was found to be essential, however, since any combination of three of the above four growth factors strongly induced the process. Strong parallels were observed between the growth factor requirements for inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth under serum-free conditions and the requirements for induction of anchorage-independent proliferation under growth factor-defined assay conditions. This indicates that most likely the same cellular processes underlie these two aspects of phenotypic transformation, although data indicate that anchorage-independent proliferation may be a more restricted property of phenotypic transformation than loss of density dependence of proliferation. It is concluded that phenotypic transformation of NRK cells does not require specific polypeptide growth factors, but reflects the ability of these cells to respond to multiple growth factors.

  1. A dynamic formin-dependent deep F-actin network in axons

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Archan; Tang, Yong; Wang, Lina; Ladt, Kelsey; Loi, Jonathan; Dargent, Bénédicte; Leterrier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although actin at neuronal growth cones is well-studied, much less is known about actin organization and dynamics along axon shafts and presynaptic boutons. Using probes that selectively label filamentous-actin (F-actin), we found focal “actin hotspots” along axons—spaced ∼3–4 µm apart—where actin undergoes continuous assembly/disassembly. These foci are a nidus for vigorous actin polymerization, generating long filaments spurting bidirectionally along axons—a phenomenon we call “actin trails.” Super-resolution microscopy reveals intra-axonal deep actin filaments in addition to the subplasmalemmal “actin rings” described recently. F-actin hotspots colocalize with stationary axonal endosomes, and blocking vesicle transport diminishes the actin trails, suggesting mechanistic links between vesicles and F-actin kinetics. Actin trails are formin—but not Arp2/3—dependent and help enrich actin at presynaptic boutons. Finally, formin inhibition dramatically disrupts synaptic recycling. Collectively, available data suggest a two-tier F-actin organization in axons, with stable “actin rings” providing mechanical support to the plasma membrane and dynamic "actin trails" generating a flexible cytoskeletal network with putative physiological roles. PMID:26216902

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulates transforming growth factor-beta-dependent epithelial-mesenchymal transition by promoting hyaluronan-CD44-moesin interaction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eri; Nagano, Osamu; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Yae, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Shinoda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Satoshi; Niwa, Shinichiro; Ikeda, Shun; Koga, Hisashi; Tanihara, Hidenobu; Saya, Hideyuki

    2010-02-05

    Aberrant epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in development of fibrotic disorders and cancer invasion. Alterations of cell-extracellular matrix interaction also contribute to those pathological conditions. However, the functional interplay between EMT and cell-extracellular matrix interactions remains poorly understood. We now show that the inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induces the formation of fibrotic foci by cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells through activation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling in a manner dependent on hyaluronan-CD44-moesin interaction. TNF-alpha promoted CD44 expression and moesin phosphorylation by protein kinase C, leading to the pericellular interaction of hyaluronan and CD44. Formation of the hyaluronan-CD44-moesin complex resulted in both cell-cell dissociation and increased cellular motility through actin remodeling. Furthermore, this complex was found to be associated with TGF-beta receptor II and clathrin at actin microdomains, leading to activation of TGF-beta signaling. We established an in vivo model of TNF-alpha-induced fibrosis in the mouse eye, and such ocular fibrosis was attenuated in CD44-null mice. The production of hyaluronan and its interaction with CD44, thus, play an essential role in TNF-alpha-induced EMT and are potential therapeutic targets in fibrotic disorders.

  3. Chondrocytes Directly Transform into Bone Cells in Mandibular Condyle Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Y.; Zhou, X.; Han, X.; Jing, J.; von der Mark, K.; Wang, J.; de Crombrugghe, B.; Hinton, R.J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, it has been widely accepted that hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo apoptosis prior to endochondral bone formation. However, very recent studies in long bone suggest that chondrocytes can directly transform into bone cells. Our initial in vivo characterization of condylar hypertrophic chondrocytes revealed modest numbers of apoptotic cells but high levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, some dividing cells, and clear alkaline phosphatase activity (early bone marker). Ex vivo culture of newborn condylar cartilage on a chick chorioallantoic membrane showed that after 5 d the cells on the periphery of the explants had begun to express Col1 (bone marker). The cartilage-specific cell lineage–tracing approach in triple mice containing Rosa 26tdTomato (tracing marker), 2.3 Col1GFP (bone cell marker), and aggrecan CreERT2 (onetime tamoxifen induced) or Col10-Cre (activated from E14.5 throughout adult stage) demonstrated the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells in vivo. This transformation was initiated at the inferior portion of the condylar cartilage, in contrast to the initial ossification site in long bone, which is in the center. Quantitative data from the Col10-Cre compound mice showed that hypertrophic chondrocytes contributed to ~80% of bone cells in subchondral bone, ~70% in a somewhat more inferior region, and ~40% in the most inferior part of the condylar neck (n = 4, P < 0.01 for differences among regions). This multipronged approach clearly demonstrates that a majority of chondrocytes in the fibrocartilaginous condylar cartilage, similar to hyaline cartilage in long bones, directly transform into bone cells during endochondral bone formation. Moreover, ossification is initiated from the inferior portion of mandibular condylar cartilage with expansion in one direction. PMID:26341973

  4. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  5. Exploring the Stability Limits of Actin and Its Suprastructures

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher; Erlkamp, Mirko; Ecken, Julian von der; Raunser, Stefan; Winter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Actin is the main component of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells and can be found in distinct morphological states. Global (G)-actin is able to assemble into highly organized, supramolecular cellular structures known as filamentous (F)-actin and bundled (B)-actin. To evaluate the structure and stability of G-, F-, and B-actin over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, laser confocal scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our analysis was designed to provide new (to our knowledge) insights into the stabilizing forces of actin self-assembly and to reveal the stability of the actin polymorphs, including in conditions encountered in extreme environments. In addition, we sought to explain the limited pressure stability of actin self-assembly observed in vivo. G-actin is not only the least temperature-stable but also the least pressure-stable actin species. Under abyssal conditions, where temperatures as low as 1–4°C and pressures up to 1 kbar are reached, G-actin is hardly stable. However, the supramolecular assemblies of actin are stable enough to withstand the extreme conditions usually encountered on Earth. Beyond ∼3–4 kbar, filamentous structures disassemble, and beyond ∼4 kbar, complete dissociation of F-actin structures is observed. Between ∼1 and 2 kbar, some disordering of actin assemblies commences, in agreement with in vivo observations. The limited pressure stability of the monomeric building block seems to be responsible for the suppression of actin assembly in the kbar pressure range. PMID:25517163

  6. Control of transforming growth factor-beta activity: latency vs. activation.

    PubMed

    Harpel, J G; Metz, C N; Kojima, S; Rifkin, D B

    1992-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is a pluripotent regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The growth factor is expressed as a latent complex that must be converted to an active form before interacting with its ubiquitous high affinity receptors. This conversion involves the release of the mature growth factor through disruption of the non-covalent interactions with its pro-peptide or latency associated peptide. The mechanisms for this release in vivo have not been fully characterized but appear to be cell specific and might involve processes such as acidification or proteolysis. Although several factors including transcriptional regulation, receptor modulation and scavenging of the active growth factor have been implicated, the critical step controlling the biological effects of transforming growth factor-beta may be the activation of the latent molecule.

  7. Nanotopography-induced symmetry-breaking and guidance of actin polymerization waves and cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Guven, Can; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Driscoll, Meghan

    2015-03-01

    Many types of eukaryotic cells on a surfaces exhibit reaction diffusion-type waves of actin polymerization. Exposing migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells to asymmetries at a length scale relevant to actin waves (300 nm) results in guidance of actin polymerization and of the migration of the cells themselves. Quantitative measurements of actin wave speed and direction distributions show that actin polymerization is preferentially localized to nanoridges and directed along the ridges, and that the velocity of guided actin polymerization waves decreases with decreasing ridge spacing. A stochastic growth model of actin polymerization dynamics reproduces these key observations. Supported by NSF-PoLS.

  8. The role of transforming growth factor-beta, insulin-like growth factor I, and basic fibroblast growth factor in distraction osteogenesis of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Farhadieh, R D; Dickinson, R; Yu, Y; Gianoutsos, M P; Walsh, W R

    1999-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a viable method for regenerating large amounts of bone. In contrast to fracture healing, the mode of bone formation in distraction osteogenesis is primarily intramembranous ossification. The basic biology of the process is still not well understood. The growth factor cascade is likely to play an important role in distraction. This study examines the growth factor cascade in a lengthened ovine mandible model. Twenty-four animals were divided into four groups with varying rates of distraction (1, 2, 3, and 4 mm/day). A unilateral distractor at the angle of the mandible was used. The mandibles were lengthened to 24 mm and fixed for a period of 5 weeks, after which the animals were killed. The sections were probed for transforming growth factor-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I. The growth factors studied were present in all four groups. Transforming growth factor-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I were present in both the bony matrix of the sections and the cytoplasm of the cells, osteoblasts, and a small number of mesenchymal cells. The sections obtained from groups distracted at faster rates showed stronger presence of the growth factors examined by more intense staining. In fracture healing, the localization of transforming growth factor-beta in stage I of healing corresponded with the precise region of intramembranous ossification in stage II. Diffuse presence of transforming growth factor-beta throughout the lengthened region corresponded with the process of intramembranous ossification observed in distraction. In fracture healing, insulin-like growth factor I and basic fibroblast growth factor have been shown to promote proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts from precursor cells. The intense presence of insulin-like growth factor I and basic fibroblast growth factor in the distracted region may account for osteoblast proliferation and formation from

  9. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  10. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field.

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta1 to the bone.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Katrien; ten Dijke, Peter; Janssens, Sophie; Van Hul, Wim

    2005-10-01

    TGF-beta1 is a ubiquitous growth factor that is implicated in the control of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of many different cell types. It influences such diverse processes as embryogenesis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. In skeletal tissue, TGF-beta1 plays a major role in development and maintenance, affecting both cartilage and bone metabolism, the latter being the subject of this review. Because it affects both cells of the osteoblast and osteoclast lineage, TGF-beta1 is one of the most important factors in the bone environment, helping to retain the balance between the dynamic processes of bone resorption and bone formation. Many seemingly contradictory reports have been published on the exact functioning of TGF-beta1 in the bone milieu. This review provides an overall picture of the bone-specific actions of TGF-beta1 and reconciles experimental discrepancies that have been reported for this multifunctional cytokine.

  12. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Makiko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Akita, Yoichi; Tamada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Yoshinari

    2007-10-01

    Although actinic cheilitis is a common disease, it should be treated carefully because it can undergo malignant transformation. We report a case of actinic cheilitis treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), with satisfactory outcome in both clinical and pathological aspects. Actinic cheilitis is a pathologic condition affecting mainly the lower lip caused by long-term exposure of the lips to the UV radiation in sunlight. Analogous to actinic keratosis of the skin, actinic cheilitis is considered as a precancerous lesion and it may develop into squamous cell carcinoma. We report a case of actinic cheilitis treated with PDT using ALA, with satisfactory outcome in both clinical and pathological aspects.

  13. Requirements for F-BAR proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in actin dynamics and membrane trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte growth and embryonic epidermal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Chiara; Troglio, Flavia; Bai, Zhiyong; Patel, Falshruti B; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D; Soto, Martha C; Grant, Barth D; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-10-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR-containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP-dependent actin-dynamics.

  14. Requirements for F-BAR Proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in Actin Dynamics and Membrane Trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans Oocyte Growth and Embryonic Epidermal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Falshruti B.; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B.; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D.; Soto, Martha C.; Grant, Barth D.; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR–containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell–cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP–dependent actin-dynamics. PMID:19798448

  15. Actin dynamics in Phytophthora infestans; rapidly reorganizing cables and immobile, long-lived plaques.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; Hua, Chenlei; Kots, Kiki; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2014-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic but well-organized intracellular framework that is essential for proper functioning of eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the actin binding peptide Lifeact to investigate the in vivo actin cytoskeleton dynamics in the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Lifeact-eGFP labelled thick and thin actin bundles and actin filament plaques allowing visualization of actin dynamics. All actin structures in the hyphae were cortically localized. In growing hyphae actin filament cables were axially oriented in the sub-apical region whereas in the extreme apex in growing hyphae, waves of fine F-actin polymerization were observed. Upon growth termination, actin filament plaques appeared in the hyphal tip. The distance between a hyphal tip and the first actin filament plaque correlated strongly with hyphal growth velocity. The actin filament plaques were nearly immobile with average lifetimes exceeding 1 h, relatively long when compared to the lifetime of actin patches known in other eukaryotes. Plaque assembly required ∼30 s while disassembly was accomplished in ∼10 s. Remarkably, plaque disassembly was not accompanied with internalization and the formation of endocytic vesicles. These findings suggest that the functions of actin plaques in oomycetes differ from those of actin patches present in other organisms.

  16. The growth and transformation of American ego psychology.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    The roots of ego psychology trace back to Sigmund Freud's The Ego and the Id (1923) and "Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety" (1926), works followed by two additional fundaments, Anna Freud's The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936) and Heinz Hartmann's Ego Psychology and the Problem of Adaptation (1939). It was brought to full flowering in post-World War II America by Hartmann and his many collaborators, and for over two decades it maintained a monolithic hegemony over American psychoanalysis. Within this framework the conceptions of the psychoanalytic psychotherapies evolved as specific modifications of psychoanalytic technique directed to the clinical needs of the spectrum of patients not amenable to psychoanalysis proper. This American consensus on the ego psychology paradigm and its array of technical implementations fragmented several decades ago, with the rise in America of Kohut's self psychology, geared to the narcissistic disorders, and with the importation from Britain of neo-Kleinian and object-relational perspectives, all coinciding with the rapid growth of the varieties of relational psychoanalysis, with its shift in focus to the two-person, interactive, and co-constructed transference-countertransference matrix. Implications of this intermingled theoretical pluralism (as contrasted with the unity of the once dominant ego psychology paradigm) for the evolution of the American ego psychology are spelled out.

  17. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, a v-Jun target gene, induces oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-ling; Bottoli, Ivan; Goller, Martin; Vogt, Peter K.

    1999-01-01

    Jun is a transcription factor belonging to the activator protein 1 family. A mutated version of Jun (v-Jun) transduced by the avian retrovirus ASV17 induces oncogenic transformation in avian cell cultures and sarcomas in young galliform birds. The oncogenicity of Jun probably results from transcriptional deregulation of v-Jun-responsive target genes. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a growth-related v-Jun target, a homolog of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF). HB-EGF is strongly expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by v-Jun. HB-EGF expression is not detectable or is marginal in nontransformed CEF. Using a hormone-inducible Jun-estrogen receptor chimera, we found that HB-EGF expression is correlated with v-Jun activity. In this system, induction of v-Jun is followed within 1 hr by elevated levels of HB-EGF. In CEF infected with various Jun mutants, HB-EGF expression is correlated with the oncogenic potency of the mutant. Constitutive expression of HB-EGF conveys to CEF the ability to grow in soft agar and to form multilayered foci of transformed cells on a solid substrate. These observations suggest that HB-EGF is an effector of Jun-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:10318950

  18. Ionizing radiation predisposes nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells to undergo transforming growth factor beta induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Andarawewa, Kumari L; Erickson, Anna C; Chou, William S; Costes, Sylvain V; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-09-15

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGFbeta activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGFbeta-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Nonmalignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1, and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture or treated with a low concentration of TGFbeta (0.4 ng/mL) or double treated. All double-treated (IR + TGFbeta) HMEC underwent a morphologic shift from cuboidal to spindle shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by a decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin, and vimentin. Furthermore, double treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion, and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel. Neither radiation nor TGFbeta alone elicited EMT, although IR increased chronic TGFbeta signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double-treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes nonmalignant HMEC to undergo TGFbeta-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation was transiently induced by irradiation and persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGFbeta, and treatment with U0126, a MAP/Erk kinase (MEK) inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data show that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  19. Baicalin ameliorates renal fibrosis via inhibition of transforming growth factor β1 production and downstream signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Long; Zhang, Chao; Li, Long; Hu, Chao; Hu, Mushuang; Sidikejiang, Niyazi; Wang, Xuanchuan; Lin, Miao; Rong, Ruiming

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential antifibrotic effects of baicalin in vitro, via examination of 21 compounds isolated from plants. However, its biological activity and underlying mechanisms of action in vivo remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of baicalin on renal fibrosis in vivo, and the potential signaling pathways involved. A unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)‑induced renal fibrosis model was established using Sprague‑Dawley rats. Baicalin was administrated intraperitoneally every 2 days for 10 days. The degree of renal damage and fibrosis was investigated by histological assessment, and detection of fibronectin and collagen I mRNA expression levels. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels and downstream phosphorylation of mothers against decapentaplegic 2/3 (Smad2/3) were examined in vivo and in an NRK‑52E rat renal tubular cell line in vitro. Baicalin was demonstrated to markedly ameliorate renal fibrosis and suppress EMT, as evidenced by reduced interstitial collagen accumulation, decreased fibronectin and collagen I mRNA expression levels, upregulation of N‑ and E‑cadherin expression levels, and downregulation of α‑smooth muscle actin and vimentin expression. Furthermore, baicalin decreased TGF‑β1 expression levels in serum and kidney tissue following UUO, and suppressed Smad2/3 phosphorylation in rat kidney tissue. In vitro studies identified that baicalin may inhibit the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 under the same TGF‑β1 concentration. In conclusion, baicalin may protect against renal fibrosis, potentially via inhibition of TGF‑β1 production and its downstream signal transduction.

  20. Normal Human Lung Epithelial Cells Inhibit Transforming Growth Factor-β Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation via Prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Epa, Amali P.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Wahl, Lindsay A.; Lyda, Elizabeth; Kottmann, R. M.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive disease with very few effective treatments. The key effector cells in fibrosis are believed to be fibroblasts, which differentiate to a contractile myofibroblast phenotype with enhanced capacity to proliferate and produce extracellular matrix. The role of the lung epithelium in fibrosis is unclear. While there is evidence that the epithelium is disrupted in IPF, it is not known whether this is a cause or a result of the fibroblast pathology. We hypothesized that healthy epithelial cells are required to maintain normal lung homeostasis and can inhibit the activation and differentiation of lung fibroblasts to the myofibroblast phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we employed a novel co-culture model with primary human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts to investigate whether epithelial cells inhibit myofibroblast differentiation. Measurements and Main Results In the presence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, fibroblasts co-cultured with epithelial cells expressed significantly less α-smooth muscle actin and collagen and showed marked reduction in cell migration, collagen gel contraction, and cell proliferation compared to fibroblasts grown without epithelial cells. Epithelial cells from non-matching tissue origins were capable of inhibiting TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation in lung, keloid and Graves’ orbital fibroblasts. TGF-β promoted production of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in lung epithelial cells, and a PGE2 neutralizing antibody blocked the protective effect of epithelial cell co-culture. Conclusions We provide the first direct experimental evidence that lung epithelial cells inhibit TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation and pro-fibrotic phenotypes in fibroblasts. This effect is not restricted by tissue origin, and is mediated, at least in part, by PGE2. Our data support the hypothesis that the epithelium plays a crucial role in maintaining lung homeostasis

  1. Environmental Particulate (PM2.5) Augments Stiffness-Induced Alveolar Epithelial Cell Mechanoactivation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Dysart, Marilyn M.; Galvis, Boris R.; Russell, Armistead G.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional pulmonary homeostasis and repair, including diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tumorigenesis have been increasing over the past decade, a fact that heavily implicates environmental influences. Several investigations have suggested that in response to increased transforming growth factor - beta (TGFβ) signaling, the alveolar type II (ATII) epithelial cell undergoes phenotypic changes that may contribute to the complex pathobiology of PF. We have previously demonstrated that increased tissue stiffness associated with PF is a potent extracellular matrix (ECM) signal for epithelial cell activation of TGFβ. The work reported here explores the relationship between tissue stiffness and exposure to environmental stimuli in the activation of TGFβ. We hypothesized that exposure of ATII cells to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) will result in enhanced cell contractility, TGFβ activation, and subsequent changes to ATII cell phenotype. ATII cells were cultured on increasingly stiff substrates with or without addition of PM2.5. Exposure to PM2.5 resulted in increased activation of TGFβ, increased cell contractility, and elongation of ATII cells. Most notably, on 8 kPa substrates, a stiffness greater than normal but less than established fibrotic lung, addition of PM2.5 resulted in increased cortical cell stiffness, enhanced actin staining and cell elongation; a result not seen in the absence of PM2.5. Our work suggests that PM2.5 exposure additionally enhances the existing interaction between ECM stiffness and TGFβ that has been previously reported. Furthermore, we show that this additional enhancement is likely a consequence of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to increased TGFβ signaling events. These results highlight the importance of both the micromechanical and biochemical environment in lung disease initiation and suggest that individuals in early stages of lung remodeling

  2. Effect of sulodexide on plasma transforming growth factor-beta1 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Dubowski, Miroslaw; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2010-02-01

    It is unknown whether the glycosaminoglycan drug sulodexide interferes with transforming growth factor-beta1--a member of heparin-binding family and a potent regulator of human biology and diseases. Hence, a 2-week pilot study was performed in 11 healthy men. Sulodexide was initially administered intravenously in a single dose, then--orally for 12 days and--again intravenously on study completion. Initial injection had no effect on activated form of the growth factor measured in plasma after 10 and 120 min; no change was also observed after 120 min from drug ingestion on day 7. On final intravenous administration, the growth factor levels increased by almost 60% after 10 min and remained elevated; the 120-min levels directly correlated with sulodexide dosage. Baseline cytokine levels decreased during the 2-week trial by more than 50%. In conclusion, transforming growth factor-beta1 release and likely downregulation of its expression may constitute novel pharmacological effects of sulodexide.

  3. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  4. Newly developed rat brain pericyte cell line, TR-PCT1, responds to transforming growth factor-beta1 and beta-glycerophosphate.

    PubMed

    Asashima, Tomoko; Iizasa, Hisashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Tetsuka, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Masatsugu; Obinata, Masuo; Nakashima, Emi

    2002-03-01

    Brain pericytes form an incomplete envelope around endothelial cells and within the microvascular basement membrane of capillaries and postcapillary venules. Recently, it has been reported that brain pericytes exhibit pluripotency, regulation of endothelial cell activity, and macrophage activity. However, many molecular and cellular aspects of brain pericytes remain unclear. In this study, we have tried to establish a conditionally immortalized brain pericyte cell line (TR-PCT) derived from the brain capillary of a transgenic rat harboring a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 T antigen gene. One of the clones was named TR-PCT1, and we established 6 clones of pericyte-like cells from a 16 week-old tsA58 transgenic rat. For comparison, primary pericytes from a Wistar rat were also studied. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta, angiopoietin-1, osteopontin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in TR-PCT1 was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Transforming growth factor-beta1 enhanced a-smooth muscle actin expression in TR-PCT1, but this expression was reduced by subsequent treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor. When TR-PCT1 was seeded on type I collagen plates and treated with beta-glycerophosphate, nodules developed in the cells and these nodules reacted positively to von Kossa stain used as a marker of calcification. We believe that TR-PCT1 will help us gain a better understanding of the physiological and/or pathophysiological role of pericytes.

  5. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  6. Surface proteome analysis identifies platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha as a critical mediator of transforming growth factor-beta-induced collagen secretion.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Noskovičová, Nina; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Lindner, Michael; Hatz, Rudolf; Hauck, Stefanie M; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblasts are extracellular matrix-producing cells in the lung. Fibroblast activation by transforming growth factor-beta leads to myofibroblast-differentiation and increased extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of pulmonary fibrosis. While fibroblast function with respect to migration, invasion, and extracellular matrix deposition has been well-explored, little is known about the surface proteome of lung fibroblasts in general and its specific response to fibrogenic growth factors, in particular transforming growth factor-beta. We thus performed a cell-surface proteome analysis of primary human lung fibroblasts in presence/absence of transforming growth factor-beta, followed by characterization of our findings using FACS analysis, Western blot, and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments. We identified 213 surface proteins significantly regulated by transforming growth factor-beta, platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha being one of the top down-regulated proteins. Transforming growth factor beta-induced downregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha induced upregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-beta expression and phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream target of platelet derived growth factor signaling. Importantly, collagen type V expression and secretion was strongly increased after forced knockdown of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha, an effect that was potentiated by transforming growth factor-beta. We therefore show previously underappreciated cross-talk of transforming growth factor-beta and platelet derived growth factor signaling in human lung fibroblasts, resulting in increased extracellular matrix deposition in a platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha dependent manner. These findings are of particular importance for the treatment of lung fibrosis patients with high pulmonary transforming growth factor-beta activity.

  7. Reverse Austenite Transformation and Grain Growth in a Low-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Thomas; Ueda, Keiji; Militzer, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms controlling the reverse austenite transformation and the subsequent grain growth are examined in a low-carbon steel during slow continuous heating. The ex-situ metallographic analysis of quenched samples is complemented by in-situ dilatometry of the phase transformation and real-time laser ultrasonic measurements of the austenite grain size. Although the initial state of the microstructure (bainite or martensite) has only limited impact on the austenite transformation temperature, it has significant influence on the mean austenite grain size and the rate of grain growth. The coarsening of austenite islands during reverse transformation occurring from the martensitic microstructure is responsible for a large austenite grain structure at the completion of the austenite formation. On the other hand, a much finer austenite grain size is obtained when the austenite transforms from the bainite microstructure. Upon further heating, the rate of austenite grain growth is limited by the presence of nanometric precipitates present in the bainite microstructure leading to a significantly finer austenite grain size. These results give important guidance for the design of thermomechanical-controlled processing of heavy-gage steel plates.

  8. Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E

    2010-01-01

    The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: a) traveling waves, b) moving patches, and c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism which does not require myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated. PMID:20867207

  9. Immune Cells, if Rendered Insensitive to Transforming Growth Factorbeta, Can Cure Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    insensitive bone marrow transplants have met with the same fate by developing autoimmune syndrome , although these animals were able to eliminate challenged......Rendered Insensitive to Transforming Growth Factor-beta, Can 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cure Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0166 5c. PROGRAM

  10. Atomic mechanisms of diffusional nucleation and growth and comparisons with their counterparts in shear transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaronson, Hubert I.

    1993-02-01

    An integrated overview is presented of a viewpoint on the present understanding of nucleation and growth mechanisms in both diffusional and shear (martensitic) transformations. Special emphasis is placed on the roles played by the anisotropy of interphase boundary structure and energy and also upon elastic shear strain energy in both types of transformation. Even though diffusional nucleation is based on random statistical fluctuations, use of the time reversal principle shows that interfacial energy anisotropy leads to accurately reproducible orientation relationships and hence to partially or fully coherent boundaries, even when nucleation at a grain boundary requires an irrational orientation relationship to obtain. Since the fully coherent boundary areas separating most linear misfit compensating defects are wholly immobile during diffusional growth because of the improbability of moving substitutional atoms even temporarily into interstitial sites under conditions normally encountered, partially and fully coherent interphase boundaries should be immovable without the intervention of growth ledges. These ledges, however, must be heavily kinked and usually irregular in both spacing and path if they, too, are not to be similarly trapped. On the other hand, the large shear strain energy usually associated with martensite requires that its formation be initiated through a process which avoids the activation barrier associated with nucleation, perhaps by the Olson-Cohen matrix dislocation rearrangement mechanism. During growth, certain ledges on martensite plates serve as transformation dislocations and perform the crystal structure change (Bain strain). However, the terraces between these ledges in martensite (unlike those present during diffusional growth) are also mobile during non-fcc/hcp transformations; glissile dislocations on these terraces perform the lattice invariant deformation. Growth ledges operative during both diffusional and shear growth probably

  11. CD43 promotes cells transformation by preventing merlin-mediated contact inhibition of growth.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Concha, Nohemi; Olivos-Ortiz, Amiel; Nuñez-Rivera, Alfredo; Pedroza-Saavedra, Adolfo; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, Lourdes; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    In normal tissues, strict control of tissue size is achieved by regulating cell numbers. The mechanism that controls total cell number is known as contact inhibition of growth and it depends on the NF2/Merlin pathway. Negative regulation of this pathway by deleterious mutations or by oncogenes results in cell transformation and tumor progression. Here we provide evidence that the CD43 sialomucin cooperates with oncogenic signals to promote cell transformation by abrogating the contact inhibition of growth through a molecular mechanism that involves AKT-dependent Merlin phosphorylation and degradation. Accordingly, inhibition of endogenous CD43 expression by RNA interference in lung, cervix and colon human cancer cells impaired tumor growth in vivo. These data underscore a previously unidentified role for CD43 in non-hematopoietic tumor progression.

  12. CD43 Promotes Cells Transformation by Preventing Merlin-Mediated Contact Inhibition of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Concha, Nohemi; Olivos-Ortiz, Amiel; Nuñez-Rivera, Alfredo; Pedroza-Saavedra, Adolfo; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, Lourdes; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    In normal tissues, strict control of tissue size is achieved by regulating cell numbers. The mechanism that controls total cell number is known as contact inhibition of growth and it depends on the NF2/Merlin pathway. Negative regulation of this pathway by deleterious mutations or by oncogenes results in cell transformation and tumor progression. Here we provide evidence that the CD43 sialomucin cooperates with oncogenic signals to promote cell transformation by abrogating the contact inhibition of growth through a molecular mechanism that involves AKT-dependent Merlin phosphorylation and degradation. Accordingly, inhibition of endogenous CD43 expression by RNA interference in lung, cervix and colon human cancer cells impaired tumor growth in vivo. These data underscore a previously unidentified role for CD43 in non-hematopoietic tumor progression. PMID:24260485

  13. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  14. Solution growth of spherulitic rod and platelet calcium phosphate assemblies through polymer-assisted mesoscopic transformations.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Vassiliki A; Beltsios, Konstantinos G

    2013-05-01

    Solution growth of apatite its precursors in the presence of urea commercial gelatin is found to lead, under appropriate conditions, to a rich spectrum of morphologies, among them high aspect ratio needles in uniform sturdy spherulitic assemblies resulting from a herein documented morphological 'Chrysalis Transformation'; the latter transformation involves the growth of parallel arrays of high aspect ratio needles within micron-scale tablets the formation of a radial needle arrangement upon disruption of tablet wrapping. A different level of gelatin leads to the formation of sturdy platelet-based spherulites through another morphological transformation. We also probe the role of four simple synthetic water-soluble polymers; we find that three of them (poly(vinyl alcohol), polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyacrylamide)) also affect substantially the assembly habits of apatite; the effect is similar to that of gelatin but the attained control is less perfect/complete. The case of poly(vinyl alcohol) provides, through variation of the degree of hydrolysis, insights as regards the chain architecture features that might favor morphological transformations. Morphological transformations of particle assemblies documented herein constitute novel ways of generating dense quasi-isotropic reinforcements with high aspect ratio ceramic particles; it becomes possible to tailor calcium phosphate phases at the structural level of crystal assembly.

  15. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  16. Actin is an essential component of plant gravitropic signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Markus; Hauslage, Jens; Limbach, Christoph

    2003-08-01

    A role of the actin cytoskeleton in the different phases of gravitropism in higher plant organs seems obvious, but experimental evidence is still inconclusive and contradictory. In gravitropically tip-growing rhizoids and protonemata, however, it is well documented that actin is an essential component of the tip-growth machinery and is involved either in the cellular mechanisms that lead to gravity sensing and in the processes of the graviresponses that result in the reorientation of the growth direction. All these processes depend on a complexly organized and highly dynamic organization of actin filaments whose diverse functions are coordinated by numerous associated proteins. Actin filaments and myosins mediate the transport of secretory vehicles to the growing tip and precisely control the delivery of cell wall material. In addition, both cell types use a very efficient actomyosin-based system to control and correct the position of their statoliths and to direct sedimenting statoliths to confined graviperception sites at the plasma membrane. The studies presented in this paper provide evidence for the essential role of actin in plant gravity sensing and the gravitropic responses. A unique actin-organizing center exists in the tip of characean rhizoids and protonemata which is associated with and dynamically regulated by a specific set of actin-dynamizing proteins. It is concluded that this highly dynamic apical actin array is an essential prerequisite for gravity sensing and gravity-oriented tip growth.

  17. Handling Arabidopsis plants: growth, preservation of seeds, transformation, and genetic crosses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz; Scholl, Randy; Holomuzki, Nicholas; Crist, Deborah; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Growing healthy plants is essential for the advancement of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) research. Over the last 20 years, the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) has collected and developed a series of best-practice protocols, some of which are presented in this chapter. Arabidopsis can be grown in a variety of locations, growth media, and environmental conditions. Most laboratory accessions and their mutant or transgenic derivatives flower after 4-5 weeks and set seeds after 7-8 weeks, under standard growth conditions (soil, long day, 23 ºC). Some mutant genotypes, natural accessions, and Arabidopsis relatives require strict control of growth conditions best provided by growth rooms, chambers, or incubators. Other lines can be grown in less-controlled greenhouse settings. Although the majority of lines can be grown in soil, certain experimental purposes require utilization of sterile solid or liquid growth media. These include the selection of primary transformants, identification of homozygous lethal individuals in a segregating population, or bulking of a large amount of plant material. The importance of controlling, observing, and recording growth conditions is emphasized and appropriate equipment required to perform monitoring of these conditions is listed. Proper conditions for seed harvesting and preservation, as well as seed quality control, are also described. Plant transformation and genetic crosses, two of the methods that revolutionized Arabidopsis genetics, are introduced as well.

  18. Actin, actin-related proteins and profilin in diatoms: a comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Aumeier, Charlotte; Polinski, Ellen; Menzel, Diedrik

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are heterokont unicellular algae with a widespread distribution throughout all aquatic habitats. Research on diatoms has advanced significantly over the last decade due to available genetic transformation methods and publicly available genome databases. Yet up to now, proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton in diatoms are largely unknown. Consequently, this work focuses on actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs) encoded in the diatom genomes of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Thalassiosira oceanica, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Our comparative genomic study revealed that most diatoms possess only a single conventional actin and a small set of ARPs. Among these are the highly conserved cytoplasmic Arp1 protein and the nuclear Arp4 as well as Arp6. Diatom genomes contain genes coding for two structurally different homologues of Arp4 that might serve specific functions. All diatom species examined here lack ARP2 and ARP3 proteins, suggesting that diatoms are not capable of forming the Arp2/3 complex, which is essential in most eukaryotes for actin filament branching and plus-end dynamics. Interestingly, none of the sequenced representatives of the Bacillariophyta phylum code for profilin. Profilin is an essential actin-binding protein regulating the monomer actin pool and is involved in filament plus-end dynamics. This is the first report of organisms not containing profilin.

  19. An actin-binding protein, LlLIM1, mediates calcium and hydrogen regulation of actin dynamics in pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huei-Jing; Wan, Ai-Ru; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2008-08-01

    Actin microfilaments are crucial for polar cell tip growth, and their configurations and dynamics are regulated by the actions of various actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We explored the function of a lily (Lilium longiflorum) pollen-enriched LIM domain-containing protein, LlLIM1, in regulating the actin dynamics in elongating pollen tube. Cytological and biochemical assays verified LlLIM1 functioning as an ABP, promoting filamentous actin (F-actin) bundle assembly and protecting F-actin against latrunculin B-mediated depolymerization. Overexpressed LlLIM1 significantly disturbed pollen tube growth and morphology, with multiple tubes protruding from one pollen grain and coaggregation of FM4-64-labeled vesicles and Golgi apparatuses at the subapex of the tube tip. Moderate expression of LlLIM1 induced an oscillatory formation of asterisk-shaped F-actin aggregates that oscillated with growth period but in different phases at the subapical region. These results suggest that the formation of LlLIM1-mediated overstabilized F-actin bundles interfered with endomembrane trafficking to result in growth retardation. Cosedimentation assays revealed that the binding affinity of LlLIM1 to F-actin was simultaneously regulated by both pH and Ca(2+): LlLIM1 showed a preference for F-actin binding under low pH and low Ca(2+) concentration. The potential functions of LlLIM1 as an ABP sensitive to pH and calcium in integrating endomembrane trafficking, oscillatory pH, and calcium circumstances to regulate tip-focused pollen tube growth are discussed.

  20. Onset and progression of pathological lesions in transforming growth factor-beta 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, G. P.; O'Toole, B. A.; Orsmby, I. E.; Diebold, R. J.; Eis, M. J.; Doetschman, T.; Kier, A. B.

    1995-01-01

    Null-mutant (knockout) mice were obtained through disruption of the sixth exon of the endogenous transforming growth factor-beta 1 allele in murine embryonic stem cells via homologous recombination. Mice lacking transforming growth factor-beta 1 (mutants) were born grossly indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. With time, mutant mice exhibited a wasting phenotype that manifested itself in severe weight loss and dishevelled appearance (between 15 and 36 days of age). Examination of these moribund mice histologically revealed that transforming growth factor-beta 1-deficient mice exhibit a moderate to severe, multifocal, organ-dependent, mixed inflammatory cell response adversely affecting the heart, stomach, diaphragm, liver, lung, salivary gland, and pancreas. Because of the known multifunctional nature of transforming growth factor-beta 1 on the control of growth and differentiation of many different cell types, it is important to determine the degree to which the inflammatory response interacts with or masks other deficiencies that are present. To this end, we examined the extent and nature of the inflammatory lesions in different ages of neonatal knockout mice (5, 7, 10, and 14 days of age) and older moribund mice (> 15 days of age) and compared them with the histology seen in wild-type normal animals. Mild inflammatory infiltrates were first observed in 5-day mutant mice in the heart, by day 7 in the lung, salivary gland, and pancreas, and by day 14 inflammatory lesions were found in almost all organs examined. Moderate to severe inflammation was not present until the mice were 10 to 14 days old. In the older animals, there was a slight increase in the severity of the inflammatory lesions as the mice aged. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7856734

  1. T-cell growth transformation by herpesvirus saimiri is independent of STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Heck, Elke; Lengenfelder, Doris; Schmidt, Monika; Müller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Biesinger, Brigitte; Ensser, Armin

    2005-05-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (saimirine herpesvirus 2) (HVS), a T-lymphotropic tumor virus, induces lymphoproliferative disease in several species of New World primates. In addition, strains of HVS subgroup C are able to transform T cells of Old World primates, including humans, to permanently growing T-cell lines. In concert with the Stp oncoprotein, the tyrosine kinase-interacting protein (Tip) of HVS C488 is required for T-cell transformation in vitro and lymphoma induction in vivo. Tip was previously shown to interact with the protein tyrosine kinase Lck. Constitutive activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) has been associated with oncogenesis and has also been detected in HVS-transformed T-cell lines. Furthermore, Tip contains a putative consensus YXPQ binding motif for the SH2 (src homology 2) domains of STAT1 and STAT3. Tip tyrosine phosphorylation at this site was required for binding of STATs and induction of STAT-dependent transcription. Here we sought to address the relevance of STAT activation for transformation of human T cells by introducing a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation in the YXPQ motif of Tip of HVS C488. Unexpectedly, the recombinant virus was still able to transform human T lymphocytes, but it had lost its capability to activate STAT3 as well as STAT1. This demonstrates that growth transformation by HVS is independent of STAT3 activation.

  2. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  3. Photodynamic therapy: treatment of choice for actinic cheilitis?

    PubMed

    Rossi, R; Assad, G Bani; Buggiani, G; Lotti, T

    2008-01-01

    The major therapeutic approaches (5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, vermilionectomy, and CO(2) Laser ablation) for actinic cheilitis are aimed at avoiding and preventing a malignant transformation into invasive squamous cell carcinoma via destruction/removal of the damaged epithelium. Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a therapeutic modality for epithelial skin tumors, with good efficacy/safety profile and good cosmetic results. Regarding actinic cheilitis, PDT could be considered a new therapeutic option? The target of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of PDT in actinic cheilitis, using a methyl-ester of aminolevulinic acid (MAL) as topical photosensitizing agent and controlled the effects of the therapy for a 30-month follow-up period. MAL-PDT seems to be the ideal treatment for actinic cheilitis and other actinic keratosis, especially on exposed parts such as the face, joining tolerability and clinical efficacy with an excellent cosmetic outcome.

  4. Early growth response 3 (Egr-3) is induced by transforming growth factor-β and regulates fibrogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Feng; Shangguan, Anna J; Kelly, Kathleen; Wei, Jun; Gruner, Katherine; Ye, Boping; Wang, Wenxia; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Varga, John

    2013-10-01

    Members of the early growth response (Egr) gene family of transcription factors have nonredundant biological functions. Although Egr-3 is implicated primarily in neuromuscular development and immunity, its regulation and role in tissue repair and fibrosis has not been studied. We now show that in normal skin fibroblasts, Egr-3 was potently induced by transforming growth factor-β via canonical Smad3. Moreover, transient Egr-3 overexpression was sufficient to stimulate fibrotic gene expression, whereas deletion of Egr-3 resulted in substantially attenuated transforming growth factor-β responses. Genome-wide expression profiling in fibroblasts showed that genes associated with tissue remodeling and wound healing were prominently up-regulated by Egr-3. Notably, <5% of fibroblast genes regulated by Egr-1 or Egr-2 were found to be coregulated by Egr-3, revealing substantial functional divergence among these Egr family members. In a mouse model of scleroderma, development of dermal fibrosis was accompanied by accumulation of Egr-3-positive myofibroblasts in the lesional tissue. Moreover, skin biopsy samples from patients with scleroderma showed elevated Egr-3 levels in the dermis, and Egr-3 mRNA levels correlated with the extent of skin involvement. These results provide the first evidence that Egr-3, a functionally distinct member of the Egr family with potent effects on inflammation and immunity, is up-regulated in scleroderma and is necessary and sufficient for profibrotic responses, suggesting important and distinct roles in the pathogenesis of fibrosis.

  5. A synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing F-actin formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Mao, Xinjian; Xu, Baiyao; Yang, Li; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2014-03-10

    Tendon injuries are common in sports and are frequent reasons for orthopedic consultations. The management of damaged tendons is one of the most challenging problems in orthopedics. Mechano-growth factor (MGF), a recently discovered growth repair factor, plays positive roles in tissue repair through the improvement of cell proliferation and migration and the protection of cells against injury-induced apoptosis. However, it remains unclear whether MGF has the potential to accelerate tendon repair. We used a scratch wound assay in this study to demonstrate that MGF-C25E (a synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide) promotes the migration of rat tenocytes and that this promotion is accompanied by an elevation in the expression of the following signaling molecules: focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibitors of the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways inhibited the MGF-C25E-induced tenocyte migration, indicating that MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration through the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The analysis of the mechanical properties showed that the Young's modulus of tenocytes was decreased through treatment of MGF-C25E, and an obvious formation of pseudopodia and F-actin was observed in MGF-C25E-treated tenocytes. The inhibition of the FAK or ERK1/2 signals restored the decrease in Young's modulus and inhibited the formation of pseudopodia and F-actin. Overall, our study demonstrated that MGF-C25E promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing pseudopodia formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Mechano-growth factor E peptide (MGF-C25E) promotes migration of rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E activates the FAK-ERK1/2 pathway in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E induces the actin remodeling and the formation of pseudopodia, and decreases the stiffness in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration via altering stiffness and forming pseudopodia by the activation of the FAK-ERK1

  6. Calcium Regulation of an Actin Spring

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Barney K.; Shin, Jennifer H.; Pfeiffer, Emily; Matsudaira, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Calcium is essential for many biological processes involved in cellular motility. However, the pathway by which calcium influences motility, in processes such as muscle contraction and neuronal growth, is often indirect and complex. We establish a simple and direct mechanochemical link that shows how calcium quantitatively regulates the dynamics of a primitive motile system, the actin-based acrosomal bundle of horseshoe crab sperm. The extension of this bundle requires the continuous presence of external calcium. Furthermore, the extension rate increases with calcium concentration, but at a given concentration, we find that the volumetric rate of extension is constant. Our experiments and theory suggest that calcium sequentially binds to calmodulin molecules decorating the actin filaments. This binding leads to a collective wave of untwisting of the actin filaments that drives bundle extension. PMID:19686660

  7. Growth factor expression in degenerated intervertebral disc tissue. An immunohistochemical analysis of transforming growth factor beta, fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Jukka; Grönblad, Mats; Vanharanta, Heikki; Virri, Johanna; Guyer, Richard D; Rytömaa, Tapio; Karaharju, Erkki O

    2006-05-01

    Degenerated intervertebral disc has lost its normal architecture, and there are changes both in the nuclear and annular parts of the disc. Changes in cell shape, especially in the annulus fibrosus, have been reported. During degeneration the cells become more rounded, chondrocyte-like, whereas in the normal condition annular cells are more spindle shaped. These chondrocyte-like cells, often forming clusters, affect extracellular matrix turnover. In previous studies transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) -1 and -2, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) have been highlighted in herniated intervertebral disc tissue. In the present study the same growth factors are analysed immunohistochemically in degenerated intervertebral disc tissue. Disc material was obtained from 16 discs operated for painful degenerative disc disease. Discs were classified according to the Dallas Discogram Description. Different disc regions were analysed in parallel. As normal control disc tissue material from eight organ donors was used. Polyclonal antibodies against different growth factors and TGFbeta receptor type II were used, and the immunoreaction was detected by the avidin biotin complex method. All studied degenerated discs showed immunoreactivity for TGFbeta receptor type II and bFGF. Fifteen of 16 discs were immunopositive for TGFbeta-1 and -2, respectively, and none showed immunoreaction for PDGF. Immunopositivity was located in blood vessels and in disc cells. In the nucleus pulposus the immunoreaction was located almost exclusively in chondrocyte-like disc cells, whereas in the annular region this reaction was either in chondrocyte-like disc cells, often forming clusters, or in fibroblast-like disc cells. Chondrocyte-like disc cells were especially prevalent in the posterior disrupted area. In the anterior area of the annulus fibrosus the distribution was more even between these two cell types. bFGF was expressed in the anterior annulus

  8. Transforming Growth Factor β/activin signalling induces epithelial cell flattening during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brigaud, Isabelle; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Chlasta, Julien; Le Bail, Sandrine; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the regulation of epithelial morphogenesis is essential for the formation of tissues and organs in multicellular organisms, little is known about how signalling pathways control cell shape changes in space and time. In the Drosophila ovarian epithelium, the transition from a cuboidal to a squamous shape is accompanied by a wave of cell flattening and by the ordered remodelling of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. We show that activation of the TGFβ pathway is crucial to determine the timing, the degree and the dynamic of cell flattening. Within these cells, TGFβ signalling controls cell-autonomously the formation of Actin filament and the localisation of activated Myosin II, indicating that internal forces are generated and used to remodel AJ and to promote cytoskeleton rearrangement. Our results also reveal that TGFβ signalling controls Notch activity and that its functions are partly executed through Notch. Thus, we demonstrate that the cells that undergo the cuboidal-to-squamous transition produce active cell-shaping mechanisms, rather than passively flattening in response to a global force generated by the growth of the underlying cells. Thus, our work on TGFβ signalling provides new insights into the mechanisms through which signal transduction cascades orchestrate cell shape changes to generate proper organ structure. PMID:25681395

  9. Transforming Growth Factor β/activin signalling induces epithelial cell flattening during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brigaud, Isabelle; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Chlasta, Julien; Le Bail, Sandrine; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of epithelial morphogenesis is essential for the formation of tissues and organs in multicellular organisms, little is known about how signalling pathways control cell shape changes in space and time. In the Drosophila ovarian epithelium, the transition from a cuboidal to a squamous shape is accompanied by a wave of cell flattening and by the ordered remodelling of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. We show that activation of the TGFβ pathway is crucial to determine the timing, the degree and the dynamic of cell flattening. Within these cells, TGFβ signalling controls cell-autonomously the formation of Actin filament and the localisation of activated Myosin II, indicating that internal forces are generated and used to remodel AJ and to promote cytoskeleton rearrangement. Our results also reveal that TGFβ signalling controls Notch activity and that its functions are partly executed through Notch. Thus, we demonstrate that the cells that undergo the cuboidal-to-squamous transition produce active cell-shaping mechanisms, rather than passively flattening in response to a global force generated by the growth of the underlying cells. Thus, our work on TGFβ signalling provides new insights into the mechanisms through which signal transduction cascades orchestrate cell shape changes to generate proper organ structure.

  10. [THE ROLE OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-B IN IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF DISEASES OF CONNECTIVE TISSUE].

    PubMed

    Rudoi, A S; Moskalev, A V; Sboitchakov, V B

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies of molecular physiology of fibrillin and pathophysiology of inherent disorders of structure and function of connective tissue such as dissection and aneurysm of aorta, myxomatously altered cusps and prolapses of mitral valve, syndrome of hyper-mobility of joints, demonstrated that important role in development of these malformations play alterations of transfer of signals by growth factors and matrix cellular interaction. These conditions under manifesting Marfan's syndrome can be a consequence of anomalies of fibrillin-1 which deficiency unbrakes process of activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). The involvement of TGFβ in pathogenesis of Marfan's syndrome permits consider antagonists of angiotensin-transforming enzymes as potential pharmaceuticals in therapy of this disease. The article presents analysis of publications' data related to this problem.

  11. Emerging Roles of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarah E; Lee, Nam Y

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus affecting about one third of diabetic adults. Despite its prevalence, treatment options are limited and often implemented only in the later stages of the disease. To date, the pathogenesis of DR has been extensively characterized in the context of elevated glucose, insulin, and VEGF signaling, although a growing number of other growth factors and molecules, including transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) are being recognized as important contributors and/or therapeutic targets. Here, we review the complex roles of TGF-β signaling in DR pathogenesis and progression. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 486-489, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Insights into the Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathway in Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Perrot, Carole Yolande; Javelaud, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic growth factor with broad tissue distribution that plays critical roles during embryonic development, normal tissue homeostasis, and cancer. While its cytostatic activity on normal epithelial cells initially defined TGF-β signaling as a tumor suppressor pathway, there is ample evidence indicating that TGF-β is a potent pro-tumorigenic agent, acting via autocrine and paracrine mechanisms to promote peri-tumoral angiogenesis, together with tumor cell migration, immune escape, and dissemination to metastatic sites. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the implication of TGF-β signaling in melanoma. PMID:23717002

  13. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. [Effects of nitrogen regulators on fertilizer nitrogen transformation in meadow cinnamon soil and on pakchoi growth].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Mei; Zhang, Kuo; Liu, Jian-Tao; Si, Huan-Sen; Wang, Yan-Qun

    2012-09-01

    Soil incubation test and pot experiment were conducted to investigate the effects of dicyandiamide (DCD) and its combination with nano-carbon on the transformation of fertilizers (urea and ammonium bicarbonate) nitrogen (N) in meadow cinnamon soil, a typical soil type in North China Plain, and on the growth of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis). In the first two weeks after applying urea and ammonium bicarbonate, the soil NH4+-N and NO3(-)-N contents varied greatly, but little variation was observed since then. The effects of the applied fertilizer N on the pakchoi growth and its N use efficiency differed significantly at early growth stages, but had little difference at harvesting stage. The DCD inhibited the transformation of the fertilizer N (especially ammonium bicarbonate N) into nitrate markedly, and this effect increased with increasing DCD dose. Under the conditions of our experiment, the optimal application rate of DCD was 1.0-1.5% of applied fertilize N, which could increase the pakchoi yield significantly, improve the leaf color, decrease the plant nitrate contents, and increase the fertilizer N use efficiency. The combination of DCD and nano-carbon exerted a synergistic effect on inhibiting soil ammonium oxidation, and also, promoted the pakchoi growth and N utilization at early growth stages significantly and decreased the plant nitrate level at harvesting stage.

  15. Epithelium-dependent extracellular matrix synthesis in transforming growth factor-beta 1-growth-inhibited mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, G B; Strickland, P; Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1990-06-01

    Exogenous transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) was shown in earlier studies to reversibly inhibit mouse mammary ductal growth. Using small plastic implants to treat regions of developing mammary glands in situ, we now report that TGF-beta 1 growth inhibition is associated with an ectopic accumulation of type I collagen messenger RNA and protein, as well as the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate. Both macromolecules are normal components of the ductal extracellular matrix, which, under the influence of exogenous TGF-beta 1, became unusually concentrated immediately adjacent to the epithelial cells at the tip of the ductal growth points, the end buds. Stimulation of extracellular matrix was confined to aggregations of connective tissue cells around affected end buds and was not present around the TGF-beta 1 implants themselves, indicating that the matrix effect was epithelium dependent. Ectopic matrix synthesis was specific for TGF-beta 1 insofar as it was absent at ducts treated with other growth inhibitors, or at ducts undergoing normal involution in response to endogenous regulatory processes. These findings are consistent with the matrix-stimulating properties of TGF-beta 1 reported for other systems, but differ in their strict dependence upon epithelium. A possible role for endogenous TGF-beta 1 in modulating a mammary epithelium-stroma interaction is suggested.

  16. CRMP-5 interacts with actin to regulate neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIAOBING; TAN, MINGHUI; GAO, YUAN; CHEN, KEEN; GUO, GUOQING

    2016-01-01

    CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are abundantly expressed in the developing nervous system mediating growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity and axon elongation. CRMP-5 has been indicated to serve a critical role in neurite outgrowth. However, the detailed mechanisms of how CRMP-5 regulates neurite outgrowth remain unclear. In the current study, co-immunoprecipitation was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 interacted with the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton networks in the growth cones of developing hippocampal neurons. CRMP-5 exhibited increased affinity towards actin when compared with microtubules. Immunocytochemistry was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 colocalized with actin predominantly in the C-domain and T-zone in growth cones. In addition, genetic inhibition of CRMP-5 by siRNA suppressed the expression of actin, growth cone development and neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of CRMP-5 promoted the interaction with actin, growth cone development and hippocampal neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these data suggest that CRMP-5 is able to interact with the actin cytoskeleton network in the growth cone and affect growth cone development and neurite outgrowth via this interaction in developing hippocampal neurons. PMID:26677106

  17. Extended Squire's transformation and its consequences for transient growth in a confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John Soundar Jerome, J.; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-01

    The classical Squire transformation is extended to the entire eigenfunction structure of both Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire modes. For arbitrary Reynolds numbers Re, this transformation allows the solution of the initial-value problem for an arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) disturbance via a two-dimensional (2D) initial-value problem at a smaller Reynolds number Re2D. Its implications for the transient growth of arbitrary 3D disturbances is studied. Using the Squire transformation, the general solution of the initial-value problem is shown to predict large-Reynolds-number scaling for the optimal gain at all optimization times t with t/Re finite or large. This result is an extension of the well-known scaling laws first obtained by Gustavsson (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 224, 1991, pp. 241-260) and Reddy & Henningson (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 252, 1993, pp. 209-238) for arbitrary \\alpha Re, where \\alpha is the streamwise wavenumber. The Squire transformation is also extended to the adjoint problem and, hence, the adjoint Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire modes. It is, thus, demonstrated that the long-time optimal growth of 3D perturbations as given by the exponential growth (or decay) of the leading eigenmode times an extra gain representing its receptivity, may be decomposed as a product of the gains arising from purely 2D mechanisms and an analytical contribution representing 3D growth mechanisms equal to 1+(\\beta Re/Re2D)2G, where \\beta is the spanwise wavenumber and G is a known expression. For example, when the leading eigenmode is an Orr-Sommerfeld mode, it is given by the product of respective gains from the 2D Orr mechanism and an analytical expression representing the 3D lift-up mechanism. Whereas if the leading eigenmode is a Squire mode, the extra gain is shown to be solely due to the 3D lift-up mechanism.

  18. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  19. Organization and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in the pollen tube

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaolu; Jiang, Yuxiang; Chang, Ming; Liu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-01-01

    Proper organization of the actin cytoskeleton is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the precise mechanisms by which the actin cytoskeleton regulates pollen tube growth remain to be further elucidated. The functions of the actin cytoskeleton are dictated by its spatial organization and dynamics. However, early observations of the distribution of actin filaments at the pollen tube apex were quite perplexing, resulting in decades of controversial debate. Fortunately, due to improvements in fixation regimens for staining actin filaments in fixed pollen tubes, as well as the adoption of appropriate markers for visualizing actin filaments in living pollen tubes, this issue has been resolved and has given rise to the consensus view of the spatial distribution of actin filaments throughout the entire pollen tube. Importantly, recent descriptions of the dynamics of individual actin filaments in the apical region have expanded our understanding of the function of actin in regulation of pollen tube growth. Furthermore, careful documentation of the function and mode of action of several actin-binding proteins expressed in pollen have provided novel insights into the regulation of actin spatial distribution and dynamics. In the current review, we summarize our understanding of the organization, dynamics, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in the pollen tube. PMID:25620974

  20. Effects of transforming growth factor beta-1 on growth-regulatory genes in tumour-derived human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, I. C.; Patel, V.; Sandy, J. R.; Prime, S. S.; Yeudall, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1) on c-myc, RB1, junB and p53 expression together with pRb phosphorylation, in carcinoma-derived and normal human oral keratinocytes with a range of inhibitory responses to this ligand. Amplification of c-myc was observed in eight of eight tumour-derived cell lines and resulted in corresponding mRNA expression. The down-regulation of c-myc expression by TGF-beta 1 predominantly reflected growth inhibition by TGF-beta 1, but in two of eight tumour-derived cell lines which were partially responsive to TGF-beta 1 c-myc expression was unaltered by this ligand. While RB1 mRNA levels were unaltered by TGF-beta 1, the ligand caused the accumulation of the underphosphorylated form of the Rb protein in all cells irrespective of TGF-beta 1-induced growth arrest. junB expression was up-regulated by TGF-beta 1 in cells with a range of growth inhibitory responses. All cells contained mutant p53. TGF-beta 1 did not affect p53 mRNA expression in both tumour-derived and normal keratinocytes and there was no alteration in p53 protein levels in keratinocytes expressing stable p53 protein following TGF-beta 1 treatment. The data indicate that TGF-beta-induced growth control can exist independently of the presence of mutant p53 and the control of Rb phosphorylation and c-myc down-regulation. It may be that TGF-beta growth inhibition occurs via multiple mechanisms and that the loss of one pathway during tumour progression does not necessarily result in the abrogation of TGF-beta-induced growth control. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7547241

  1. Directed actin assembly and motility.

    PubMed

    Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Galland, Rémi; Suarez, Cristian; Guérin, Christophe; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key component of the cellular architecture. However, understanding actin organization and dynamics in vivo is a complex challenge. Reconstitution of actin structures in vitro, in simplified media, allows one to pinpoint the cellular biochemical components and their molecular interactions underlying the architecture and dynamics of the actin network. Previously, little was known about the extent to which geometrical constraints influence the dynamic ultrastructure of these networks. Therefore, in order to study the balance between biochemical and geometrical control of complex actin organization, we used the innovative methodologies of UV and laser patterning to design a wide repertoire of nucleation geometries from which we assembled branched actin networks. Using these methods, we were able to reconstitute complex actin network organizations, closely related to cellular architecture, to precisely direct and control their 3D connections. This methodology mimics the actin networks encountered in cells and can serve in the fabrication of innovative bioinspired systems.

  2. Phase transformation process and step growth mechanism of hydroxyapatite whiskers under constant impulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changlian; Li, Jianqiu; Huang, Zhiliang; Cheng, Xiaokun; Yu, Jun; Wang, Han; Chi, Ru-an; Hu, Yuehua

    2011-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) whiskers were synthesized using urea as the precipitator by a phase transformation method, and their phase transformation process and growth mechanism were investigated. The results showed that with the decomposition of urea and the corresponding increase of pH value of the reaction system, dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) were precipitated at pH of 3.3-4.3; then Ca 2+ and HPO42- ions began to be released from DCPA at pH values greater than 4.5. Finally HAP whiskers heterogeneously nucleated and grew up into short column crystals along the surface of the OCP flakes. In the absence of the ionic resources, DCPA gradually dissolved and the OCP flakes transformed into HAP continuously and the short columnar HAP whiskers grew up. The aspect ratio of the HAP whiskers with length of 20-100 μm and diameter of 1-2 μm was about 25. The HRTEM and AFM images showed that HAP whiskers grew along the c-axis direction, the (1 0 0) steps were clearly observed at their heads and the straight step lines instead of helical Frank ones were present on the side face of the (1 0 0) steps. The calculation on the basis of the surface energy of the HAP crystal showed that the growth rate of the (0 0 1) plane was the fastest, the growth rate at the homogeneous twist sites was the second and that at heterogeneous twist sites could be the slowest, which were the main factors finally leading to the preferential growth of HAP whiskers along the c-axis direction as well as the formation of the growth steps.

  3. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and lung branching morphogenesis. Role of polyamines and transforming growth factor beta1.

    PubMed

    Stabellini, G; Locci, P; Calvitti, M; Evangelisti, R; Marinucci, L; Bodo, M; Caruso, A; Canaider, S; Carinci, P

    2001-01-01

    Lung branching morphogenesis is a result of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, which are in turn dependent on extracellular matrix composition and cytokine regulation. Polyamines have recently been demonstrated as able to modify chick embryo skin differentiation. In this work we have examined the effects of putrescine and spermidine during chick embryo lung morphogenesis in organotypic cultures by morphological, histochemical and biochemical examination. To verify the role of polyamines, we used specific inhibitors, such as bis-cyclohexylammonium sulphate and alfa-difluoromethylornithine, and transforming growth factor beta1, an ornithine decarboxylase and polyamine stimulator. Our data show that lung morphogenesis is significantly altered following the induced mesenchymal glycosaminoglycan changes. The increase of mesenchymal glycosaminoglycans is correlated with a stimulation of lung development in the presence of polyamines, and with its inhibition when transforming growth factor beta1 is added to the culture medium. The morphometric data show a uniform increase of both the mesenchyme and epithelial branching with spermidine and putrescine stimulus, whereas the mesenchymal substance alone is significantly increased in apical-median lung sections with transforming growth factor beta1 and transforming growth factor beta1 + spermidine lung cultures. Transforming growth factor beta1 and transforming growth factor beta1 + spermidine confirm the blocking of epithelial branching formations and fibroblast activation, and show that polyamines are unable to prevent the blocking of epithelial cells due to the inhibitory effect of transforming growth factor beta1.

  4. [Transforming growth factor-β1 and Snail1 mediate tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition in diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Fang, Kai-Yun; Lou, Jing-Lei; Xiao, Ying; Shi, Ming-Juan; Gui, Hua-Zheng; Guo, Bing; Zhang, Guo-Zhong

    2008-02-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the expressions of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and Snail1 in renal tissues of diabetic rats, and their role in tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition (TEMT). Induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into 2-, 4-, 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, 24-week and 16wA, 20wA, 24wA groups. The rats in 16wA, 20wA and 24wA groups were treated with insulin to control blood glucose to the normal level from the 13th week. The age-matched rats were set as controls. Blood glucose, 24-hour urine protein, serum creatinine (Scr), kidney index of rats were measured. PAS staining was used to observe the renal pathological changes. Immunohistochemical staining and (or) Western blot were employed to determine the expressions of TGF-β1, Snail1, E-cadherin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibronectin (FN) proteins. The expressions of Snail1 and E-cadherin mRNAs in renal cortex were examined by RT-PCR. Blood glucose, 24-hour urine protein, Scr and kidney index increased remarkably in diabetic rats as compared with those in the control groups (P<0.05, P<0.01) and insulin-treated rats (P<0.01). TGF-β1 and Snail1 protein expressions could not be detected by immunohistochemical staining in the normal renal tissues, however, the strongly positive staining was observed in diabetic rat renal tubules. A time-dependent loss of TGF-β1 and Snail1 expressions was detected in the kidney of insulin-treated rats. In diabetic rats tubular α-SMA positive staining was seen at the 16th week. E-cadherin expression was lost in diabetic rats. The expressions of TGF-β1, Snail1 proteins and Snail1 mRNA were significantly up-regulated in diabetic rats, while down-regulated in insulin-treated rats (P<0.01). The expressions of E-cadherin protein and mRNA in the cortex were contrary to the expressions of TGF-β1 and Snail1. Therefore, TGF-β1 and Snail1 are possibly involved in the pathogenesis of TEMT in diabetic nephropathy rats.

  5. Transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) is an anti-adhesive protein regulating the invasive growth of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Pirjo; Lammi, Johanna; Soikkeli, Johanna; Saksela, Olli; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Hölttä, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    Melanoma is a malignancy characterized by high invasive/metastatic potential, with no efficient therapy after metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the invasive/metastatic tendency is therefore important. Our genome-wide gene expression analyses revealed that human melanoma cell lines WM793 and especially WM239 (vertical growth phase and metastatic cells, respectively) overexpress the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein transforming growth factor β induced (TGFBI). In adhesion assays, recombinant TGFBI was strongly anti-adhesive for both melanoma cells and skin fibroblasts. TGFBI further impaired the adhesion of melanoma cells to the adhesive ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen-I, and laminin, known to interact with it. Unexpectedly, WM239 cells migrated/invaded more effectively in three-dimensional collagen-I and Matrigel cultures after knockdown of TGFBI by shRNA expression. However, in the physiological subcutaneous microenvironment in nude mice, after TGFBI knockdown, these cells showed markedly impaired tumor growth and invasive capability; the initially formed small tumors later underwent myxoid degeneration and completely regressed. By contrast, the expanding control tumors showed intense TGFBI staining at the tumor edges, co-localizing with the fibrillar fibronectin/tenascin-C/periostin structures that characteristically surround melanoma cells at invasion fronts. Furthermore, TGFBI was found in similar fibrillar structures in clinical human melanoma metastases as well, co-localizing with fibronectin. These data imply an important role for TGFBI in the ECM deposition and invasive growth of melanoma cells, rendering TGFBI a potential target for therapeutic interventions.

  6. Impact of epidermal growth factor receptor and transforming growth factor-α on hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Afkar Abdel-Ghany; El-Hindawi, Ali; Hammam, Olfat; Moussa, Mona; Gabal, Samia; Said, Noha

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor system plays a central hepato-protective and pro-regenerative role in liver. Transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) is an important autocrine growth regulator of hepatocytes that plays a role in development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study was done on 40 core liver biopsies from patients with CHC, 20 liver specimens from HCC cases on top of CHC as well as five normal controls. All were immunohistochemically stained with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and TGF-α antibodies. Some selected HCC cases were submitted for FISH technique to detect EGFR gene alteration. By immunohistochemistry EGFR and TGF-α were overexpressed in HCC and cirrhotic cases compared to CHC cases without cirrhosis. Also, their expression was stronger in CHC cases with higher grades of activity and stages of fibrosis compared to lower ones. FISH positive results for EGFR were detected in 33.3% of the examined HCC cases. EGFR and TGF-α can be used as predictive markers for activity, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis in CHC patients. Overexpression of EGFR in HCC patients can be promising in selecting those who can get benefit from anti-EGFR target therapy.

  7. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  8. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  9. Synthesis of a 35-Member Stereoisomer Library of Bistramide A: Evaluation of Effects on Actin State, Cell Cycle and Tumor Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wrona, Iwona E.; Lowe, Jason T.; Turbyville, Thomas J.; Johnson, Tanya R.; Beignet, Julien; Beutler, John A.; Panek, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of a 35-member library of bistramide A stereoisomers are reported. All eight stereoisomers of the C1-C13 tetrahydropyran fragment of the molecule were prepared utilizing crotylsilane reagents 9 and 10 in our [4+2]-annulation methodology. In addition, the four isomers of the C14-C18 γ-amino acid unit were accessed via a Lewis acid mediated crotylation reaction using both enantiomers of organosilane 11. The spiroketal subunit of bistramide A was modified at the C39-alcohol to give another point of stereochemical diversification. The fragments were coupled using standard peptide coupling protocol to provide 35 stereoisomers of the natural product. These stereochemical analogs were screened for their effects on cellular actin and cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines (UO-31 renal and SF-295 CNS). The results of these assays identified one analog, 1.21, with enhanced potency relative to the natural product, bistramide A. PMID:19191575

  10. Actinic keratosis. Current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Jeffes, E W; Tang, E H

    2000-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are hyperkeratotic skin lesions that represent focal abnormal proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Some actinic keratoses evolve into squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, while others resolve spontaneously. The conversion rate of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma is not accurately known, but appears to be in the range of 0.25 to 1% per year. Although there is a low rate of conversion of actinic keratoses to squamous cell carcinoma, 60% of squamous cell carcinomas of the skin probably arise from actinic keratoses. The main cause of actinic keratoses in otherwise healthy Caucasians appears to be the sun. Therapy for actinic keratoses begins with prevention which starts with sun avoidance and physical protection. Sunprotection with sunscreens actually slows the return of actinic keratoses in patients already getting actinic keratoses. Interestingly, a few studies are available that demonstrate that a high fat diet is associated with the production of more actinic keratoses than is a low fat diet. One of the mainstays of therapy has been local destruction of the actinic keratoses with cryotherapy, and curettage and electrodesiccation. A new addition to this group of therapies to treat individual actinic keratoses is photodynamic therapy with topical aminolevulinic acid and light. In patients who have numerous actinic keratoses in an area of severely sun damaged skin, therapies which are applied to the whole actinic keratosis area are used. The goal of treating such an area of skin is to treat all of the early as well as the numerous clinically evident actinic keratoses at the same time. The classical approaches for treating areas of photodamaged skin without treating actinic keratoses individually include: the use of topically applied fluorouracil cream, dermabrasion, and cutaneous peels with various agents like trichloroacetic acid. Both topically as well as orally administered retinoids have been used to treat actinic keratoses but

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-related protein Arp2 is involved in the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Arp2p is an essential yeast actin-related protein. Disruption of the corresponding ARP2 gene leads to a terminal phenotype characterized by the presence of a single large bud. Thus, Arp2p may be important for a late stage of the cell cycle (Schwob, E., and R.P. Martin, 1992. Nature (Lond.). 355:179-182). We have localized Arp2p by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific peptide antibodies revealed punctate staining under the plasma membrane, which partially colocalizes with actin. Temperature-sensitive arp2 mutations were created by PCR mutagenesis and selected by an ade2/SUP11 sectoring screen. One temperature-sensitive mutant that was characterized, arp2-H330L, was osmosensitive and had an altered actin cytoskeleton at a nonpermissive temperature, suggesting a role of Arp2p in the actin cytoskeleton. Random budding patterns were observed in both haploid and diploid arp2- H330L mutant cells. Endocytosis, as judged by Lucifer yellow uptake, was severely reduced in the mutant, at all temperatures. In addition, genetic interaction was observed between temperature-sensitive alleles arp2-H330L and cdc10-1. CDC10 is a gene encoding a neck filament- associated protein that is necessary for polarized growth and cytokinesis. Overall, the immunolocalization, mutant phenotypes, and genetic interaction suggest that the Arp2 protein is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton that is involved in membrane growth and polarity, as well as in endocytosis. PMID:8698808

  12. Transcriptional pathways associated with the slow growth phenotype of transformed Anaplasma marginale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to genetically manipulate bacteria has been fundamentally important for both basic biological discovery and translational research to develop new vaccines and antibiotics. Experimental alteration of the genetic content of prokaryotic pathogens has revealed both expected functional relationships and unexpected phenotypic consequences. Slow growth phenotypes have been reported for multiple transformed bacterial species, including extracellular and intracellular pathogens. Understanding the genes and pathways responsible for the slow growth phenotype provides the opportunity to develop attenuated vaccines as well as bacteriostatic antibiotics. Transformed Anaplasma marginale, a rickettsial pathogen, exhibits slow growth in vitro and in vivo as compared to the parent wild type strain, providing the opportunity to identify the underlying genes and pathways associated with this phenotype. Results Whole genome transcriptional profiling allowed for identification of specific genes and pathways altered in transformed A. marginale. Genes found immediately upstream and downstream of the insertion site, including a four gene operon encoding key outer membrane proteins, were not differentially transcribed between wild type and transformed A. marginale. This lack of significant difference in transcription of flanking genes and the large size of the insert relative to the genome were consistent with a trans rather than a cis effect. Transcriptional profiling across the complete genome identified the most differentially transcribed genes, including an iron transporter, an RNA cleaving enzyme and several genes involved in translation. In order to confirm the trend seen in translation-related genes, K-means clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) were applied. These algorithms allowed evaluation of the behavior of genes as groups that share transcriptional status or biological function. Clustering and GSEA confirmed the initial observations and

  13. Resveratrol inhibits transforming growth factor-β2-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by suppressing the Smad pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Long; Chen, Yi-Hao; Tai, Ming-Cheng; Liang, Chang-Min; Lu, Da-Wen; Chen, Jiann-Torng

    2017-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the main cause of failure following retinal detachment surgery. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in the development of PVR, and EMT inhibition decreases collagen gel contraction and fibrotic membrane formation, resulting in prevention of PVR. Resveratrol is naturally found in red wine and has inhibitory effects on EMT. Resveratrol is widely used in cardioprotection, neuroprotection, chemotherapy, and antiaging therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol on TGF-β2-induced EMT in ARPE-19 cells in vitro. We found that resveratrol suppressed the decrease of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and caused an increase of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in TGF-β2-treated ARPE-19 cells, assessed using Western blots; moreover, it also suppressed the decrease in ZO-1 and the increase of vimentin expression, observed using immunocytochemistry. Resveratrol attenuated TGF-β2-induced wound closure and cell migration in ARPE-19 cells in a scratch wound test and modified Boyden chamber assay, respectively. We also found that resveratrol reduced collagen gel contraction – assessed by collagen matrix contraction assay – and suppressed the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 in TGF-β2-treated ARPE-19 cells. These results suggest that resveratrol mediates anti-EMT effects, which could be used in the prevention of PVR. PMID:28138219

  14. Expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in neonatal rats with hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia and its relationship with lung development.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Zhong, W; He, Q M; Zhang, S Y; Yu, J K; Pan, Y L

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this study was to detect the expression of transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1) in neonatal rats with hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and to explore its relationship with lung development. Forty-eight rats (2-3 days old) were randomly divided into a hyperoxia group and a control group (N = 24) which were then fed in ≥95% oxygen atmosphere and air, respectively. On the 1st, 3rd and 7th days of hyperoxia exposure, morphological changes of lung tissues were observed under an optical microscope. TGF-ß1 mRNA and protein levels in lung tissues were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. With increasing time of hyperoxia exposure, the hyperoxia group gradually suffered from pathological changes such as poor development of lung tissues, alveolar simplification, decrease in the number of alveoli, and hindered pulmonary microvascular development. On the 7th day of hyperoxia exposure, TGF-ß1 mRNA and protein levels (relative to b-actin) of the hyperoxia group (0.34 ± 0.19 and 0.21 ± 0.09, respectively) were significantly lower than those of the control group (0.83 ± 0.45 and 0.57 ± 0.45, respectively; P < 0.05). TGF-ß1 participates in the pathogenesis of BPD as an important regulatory factor during pulmonary vascular development.

  15. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:28129393

  16. Actin interaction and regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p35 complex activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiqing; Tsutsumi, Koji; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Estes, Katherine A; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) plays a critical role during neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 activity depends on association with neuronal proteins p35 and p25, a proteolytic product of p35. Cdk5 regulates the actin cytoskeletal dynamics that are essential for neuronal migration, neuritic growth, and synaptogenesis. However, little is known about the interaction of actin and Cdk5 and its effect on neuronal Cdk5 activity. In a previous study, we observed that Cdk5/p35 activity is negatively correlated with co-immunoprecipitated F-actin (filamentous actin) amounts in the mouse brain, and suggested that F-actin inhibits the formation of the Cdk5/p35 complex [Journal of Neuroscience (2008) vol. 28, p. 14511]. The experiments reported here were undertaken to elucidate the relationship between actin and the formation of the Cdk5/p35 complex and its activity. Instead of an F-actin-mediated inhibition, we propose that G-actin (globular actin) in the F-actin preparations is responsible for inhibiting Cdk5/p35 and Cdk5/p25 kinase activity. We found that F-actin binds to p35 but not p25 or Cdk5. We have shown that G-actin binds directly to Cdk5 without disrupting the formation of the Cdk5/p35 or Cdk5/p25 complexes. G-actin potently suppressed Cdk5/p35 and Cdk5/p25 activity when either histone H1 or purified human tau protein were used as substrates, indicating a substrate-independent inhibitory effect of G-actin on Cdk5 activity. Finally, G-actin suppressed the activity of Cdk5 immunoprecipitated from wild type and p35-deficient mouse brain, suggesting that G-actin suppresses endogenous Cdk5 activity in a p35-independent manner. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of actin cytoskeletal regulation of Cdk5/p35 activity.

  17. Interaction of microtubules with the actin cytoskeleton via cross-talk of EB1-containing +TIPs and γ-actin in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dugina, Vera; Alieva, Irina; Khromova, Natalya; Kireev, Igor; Gunning, Peter W.; Kopnin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Actin microfilaments and microtubules are both highly dynamic cytoskeleton components implicated in a wide range of intracellular processes as well as cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. The interactions of actin filaments with the microtubule system play an important role in the assembly and maintenance of 3D cell structure. Here we demonstrate that cytoplasmic actins are differentially distributed in relation to the microtubule system. LSM, 3D-SIM, proximity ligation assay (PLA) and co-immunoprecipitation methods applied in combination with selective depletion of β- or γ-cytoplasmic actins revealed a selective interaction between microtubules and γ-, but not β-cytoplasmic actin via the microtubule +TIPs protein EB1. EB1-positive comet distribution analysis and quantification have shown more effective microtubule growth in the absence of β-actin. Our data represent the first demonstration that microtubule +TIPs protein EB1 interacts mainly with γ-cytoplasmic actin in epithelial cells. PMID:27683037

  18. Interaction of microtubules with the actin cytoskeleton via cross-talk of EB1-containing +TIPs and γ-actin in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dugina, Vera; Alieva, Irina; Khromova, Natalya; Kireev, Igor; Gunning, Peter W; Kopnin, Pavel

    2016-11-08

    Actin microfilaments and microtubules are both highly dynamic cytoskeleton components implicated in a wide range of intracellular processes as well as cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. The interactions of actin filaments with the microtubule system play an important role in the assembly and maintenance of 3D cell structure. Here we demonstrate that cytoplasmic actins are differentially distributed in relation to the microtubule system. LSM, 3D-SIM, proximity ligation assay (PLA) and co-immunoprecipitation methods applied in combination with selective depletion of β- or γ-cytoplasmic actins revealed a selective interaction between microtubules and γ-, but not β-cytoplasmic actin via the microtubule +TIPs protein EB1. EB1-positive comet distribution analysis and quantification have shown more effective microtubule growth in the absence of β-actin. Our data represent the first demonstration that microtubule +TIPs protein EB1 interacts mainly with γ-cytoplasmic actin in epithelial cells.

  19. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in normal and dyschondroplastic articular growth cartilage of the young horse.

    PubMed

    Henson, F M; Schofield, P N; Jeffcott, L B

    1997-11-01

    This study describes the distribution pattern of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) mRNA and protein in normal pre- and post natal growth cartilage and alterations present in lesions of dyschondroplasia (osteochondrosis). TGF-beta 1 expression and immunoreactivity have been investigated by in situ hybridisation and immunolocalisation in the articular/epiphyseal growth cartilage of the lateral trochlear ridge of the distal femur. Cartilage was obtained from 19 normal Thoroughbred horses (5 prenatal and 14 post natal horses) and 15 post natal horses with dyschondroplasia (DCP). TGF-beta 1 mRNA expression and immunoreactivity were detected in the proliferative and upper hypertrophic zones in both pre- and post natal normal articular/epiphyseal cartilage. However, mRNA itself was only detected in the mid- and lower hypertrophic zones. Immunoreactivity was identified intracellularly with some nuclear staining observed. In focal lesions of DCP mRNA expression and immunoreactivity were reduced compared to normal cartilage, but strong mRNA expression was observed in the chondrocyte clusters immediately surrounding a lesion of DCP. The results described in this study demonstrate alterations in TGF-beta 1 dyschondroplastic lesions and indicate that it could be involved in the pathogenesis of this condition in the horse.

  20. Control of human glioma cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Merzak, A.; McCrea, S.; Koocheckpour, S.; Pilkington, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    Factors involved in the control of the biological properties of gliomas, the major form of brain tumour in man, are poorly documented. We investigated the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in the control of proliferation of human glioma cell lines as well as normal human fetal brain cells. The data presented show that TGF-beta 1 exerts a growth-inhibitory action on both human fetal brain cells and three cell lines derived from human glioma of different grades of malignancy. In addition, this growth-inhibitory effect is dose dependent and serum independent. Since TGF-beta 1 is known to be involved in the control of cell migration during ontogenesis and oncogenesis, we investigated the role of this factor in the motile and invasive behaviour that characterises human gliomas in vivo. TGF-beta 1 was found to elicit a strong stimulation of migration and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro. In combination with recent data showing an inverse correlation between TGF-beta 1 expression in human gliomas and survival, these findings may suggest that TGF-beta 1 plays an important role in the malignant progression of gliomas in man. A study of the molecular mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative action and the invasion-promoting action of TGF-beta 1 may help to identify new targets in therapy for brain tumours. A combined antiproliferative and anti-invasive therapy could be envisaged. Images Figure 3 PMID:8054266

  1. Increased expression of transforming growth factor α precursors in acute experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, P; Zeeh, J; Lakshmanan, J; Wu, V; Procaccino, F; Reinshagen, M; McRoberts, J; Eysselein, V

    1997-01-01

    Background and aim—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor α (TGF-α), members of the EGF family of growth factors, protect rat gastric and colonic mucosa against injury. Having shown previously that exogenously applied EGF protects rat colonic mucosa against injury, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the endogenously expressed ligand mediating the protective effect of EGF/TGF-α in vivo. 
Methods—In an experimental model of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)/ ethanol induced colitis in rats EGF and TGF-α expression was evaluated using a ribonuclease protection assay, northern blot analysis, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. 
Results—TGF-α mRNA increased 3-4 times at 4-8 hours after induction of colitis and returned to control levels within 24 hours. TGF-α immunoreactive protein with a molecular size of about 28kDa representing TGF-α precursors increased markedly after induction of colitis with a peak at 8-12 hours. No fully processed 5.6 kDa TGF-α protein was detected in normal or inflamed colon tissue. Only a weak signal for EGF mRNA expression was detected in the rat colon and no EGF protein was observed by immunohistochemistry or western blot analysis. 
Conclusions—TGF-α precursors are the main ligands for the EGF receptor in acute colitis. It is hypothesised that TGF-α precursors convey the biological activity of endogenous TGF-α peptides during mucosal defence and repair. 

 Keywords: transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α); epidermal growth factor (EGF); precursor molecules; colitis; rat PMID:9301498

  2. The evidence for the role of transforming growth factor-beta in the formation of abnormal scarring.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Richard L

    2011-06-01

    The complex biological and physiological mechanisms that result in poor quality scarring are still not fully understood. This review looks at current evidence of the role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) in this pathological process.

  3. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  4. Arabidopsis FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in the pollen tube

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Ruihui; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of pollen tube growth. Actin filaments have distinct distribution patterns and dynamic properties within different regions of the pollen tube. Apical actin filaments are highly dynamic and crucial for pollen tube growth. However, how apical actin filaments are generated and properly constructed remains an open question. Here we showed that Arabidopsis fimbrin5 (FIM5) decorates filamentous structures throughout the entire tube but is apically concentrated. Apical actin structures are disorganized to different degrees in the pollen tubes of fim5 loss-of-function mutants. Further observations suggest that apical actin structures are not constructed properly because apical actin filaments cannot be maintained at the cortex of fim5 pollen tubes. Actin filaments appeared to be more curved in fim5 pollen tubes and this was confirmed by measurements showing that the convolutedness and the rate of change of convolutedness of actin filaments was significantly increased in fim5 pollen tubes. This suggests that the rigidity of the actin filaments may be compromised in fim5 pollen tubes. Further, the apical cell wall composition is altered, implying that tip-directed vesicle trafficking events are impaired in fim5 pollen tubes. Thus, we found that FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in order to drive polarized pollen tube growth. PMID:27117336

  5. Efficient synthesis of human type alpha transforming growth factor: its physical and biological characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J P; Sheikh, M A; Solomon, D S; Ossowski, L

    1986-01-01

    Human transforming growth factor type alpha (TGF-alpha) was synthesized by a stepwise solid-phase method with an overall yield of 26%. Synthetic TGF-alpha, consisting of 50 amino acid residues deduced from a cDNA precursor sequence, was purified in a single HPLC step. The homogeneity and primary structure were confirmed by several criteria including Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. Synthetic TGF-alpha was as active as murine epidermal growth factor in binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor and in stimulation of anchorage-dependent and of anchorage-independent growth of normal indicator cells in culture. Synthetic TGF-alpha stimulated plasminogen activator production in A 431 and HeLa cells; the stimulation was similar to that induced by epidermal growth factor. Furthermore, synthetic human TGF-alpha showed similar immunoreactivity when compared with rat TGF-alpha. Thus, the 50-amino acid TGF-alpha is likely to be the bioactive principle produced and secreted by tumor cell lines. PMID:3490662

  6. Expression of transforming growth factor-β2in vitreous body and adjacent tissues during prenatal development of human eye.

    PubMed

    Sukhikh, G T; Panova, I G; Smirnova, Yu A; Milyushina, L A; Firsova, N V; Markitantova, Yu V; Poltavtseva, R A; Zinov'eva, R D

    2010-12-01

    Expression of transforming growth factor-β2 was detected by PCR in the vitreous body, lens, retina, and ciliary-iris complex of human eye at early stages of fetal development. Immunochemical assay of the corresponding protein in eye tissues revealed a correlation between the localization of transforming growth factor-β2 and the development of intraocular hyaloid vascular network, its regression, formation of the vitreous body, and development of definite retinal vessels.

  7. Transforming growth factor β as regulator of cancer stemness and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Claudia; Caja, Laia; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    Key elements of cancer progression towards metastasis are the biological actions of cancer stem cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment. Cross-communication between tumour and stromal cells is mediated by secreted cytokines, one of which, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), regulates essentially every cell within the malignant tissue. In this article, we focus on the actions of TGFβ on cancer stem cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and immune cells that assist the overall process of metastatic dissemination. We aim at illustrating intricate connections made by various cells in the tumour tissue and which depend on the action of TGFβ. PMID:27537386

  8. Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that the vapor-crystal phase transition is actually a superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with variable density and a second-order phase transition with variable ordering. The latter, being a diffuse phase transition, results in the formation of a new, "pretransition," phase irreversibly spent in the course of the transition, which ends in the appearance of orthorhombic crystals. X-ray diffraction data and micrograph are presented.

  9. Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor–Beta in Diabetic Nephropathy: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanqing; Kataoka Usui, Hitomi; Sharma, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The recognition of the drivers of matrix accumulation as a therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy is accepted by the Nephrology and pharmaceutical community. Interventions focused around Transforming Growth Factor–beta (TGF–β) will likely be an important area of clinical investigation in the near future. Understanding the various pathways involved in stimulating TGF–β in the diabetic kidney is of paramount importance in devising strategies to combat the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review we highlight the major pathways involved in stimulating TGF–β production by elevated glucose and discuss the therapeutic implications. PMID:17418684

  10. Transforming growth factor-β in breast cancer: too much, too late

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Akhurst, Rosemary J

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of transforming growth factor (TGF)β to breast cancer has been studied from a myriad perspectives since seminal studies more than two decades ago. Although the action of TGFβ as a canonical tumor suppressor in breast is without a doubt, there is compelling evidence that TGFβ is frequently subverted in a malignant plexus that drives breast cancer. New knowledge that TGFβ regulates the DNA damage response, which underlies cancer therapy, reveals another facet of TGFβ biology that impedes cancer control. Too much TGFβ, too late in cancer progression is the fundamental motivation for pharmaceutical inhibition. PMID:19291273

  11. Symmetry breaking in actin gels - Implications for cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2007-03-01

    The physical origin of cell motility is not fully understood. Recently minimal model systems have shown, that polymerizing actin itself can produce a motile force, without the help of motor proteins. Pathogens like Shigella or Listeria use actin to propel themselves forward in their host cell. The same process can be mimicked with polystyrene beads covered with the activating protein ActA, which reside in a solution containing actin monomers. ActA induces the growth of an actin gel at the bead surface. Initially the gel grows symmetrically around the bead until a critical size is reached. Subsequently one observes a symmetry breaking and the gel starts to grow asymmetrically around the bead developing a tail of actin at one side. This symmetry breaking is accompanied by a directed movement of the bead, with the actin tail trailing behind the bead. Force generation relies on the combination of two properties: growth and elasticity of the actin gel. We study this phenomenon theoretically within the framework of a linear elasticity theory and linear flux-force relationships for the evolution of an elastic gel around a hard sphere. Conditions for a parity symmetry breaking are identified analytically and illustrated numerically with the help of a phasefield model.

  12. Harnessing High Density Lipoproteins to Block Transforming Growth Factor Beta and to Inhibit the Growth of Liver Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Fioravanti, Jessica; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Frank, Kathrin; Aranda, Fernando; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Dotor, Javier; Umansky, Viktor; Prieto, Jesús; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a powerful promoter of cancer progression and a key target for antitumor therapy. As cancer cells exhibit active cholesterol metabolism, high density lipoproteins (HDLs) appear as an attractive delivery system for anticancer TGFβ-inhibitory molecules. We constructed a plasmid encoding a potent TGF-β-blocking peptide (P144) linked to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) through a flexible linker (pApoLinkerP144). The ApoLinkerP144 sequence was then incorporated into a hepatotropic adeno-associated vector (AAVApoLinkerP144). The aim was to induce hepatocytes to produce HDLs containing a modified ApoA-I capable of blocking TGF-β. We observed that transduction of the murine liver with pApoLinkerP144 led to the appearance of a fraction of circulating HDL containing the fusion protein. These HDLs were able to attenuate TGF-β signaling in the liver and to enhance IL-12 -mediated IFN-γ production. Treatment of liver metastasis of MC38 colorectal cancer with AAVApoLinkerP144 resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth and enhanced expression of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in cancerous tissue. ApoLinkerP144 also delayed MC38 liver metastasis in Rag2−/−IL2rγ−/− immunodeficient mice. This effect was associated with downregulation of TGF-β target genes essential for metastatic niche conditioning. Finally, in a subset of ret transgenic mice, a model of aggressive spontaneous metastatic melanoma, AAVApoLinkerP144 delayed tumor growth in association with increased CD8+ T cell numbers in regional lymph nodes. In conclusion, modification of HDLs to transport TGF-β-blocking molecules is a novel and promising approach to inhibit the growth of liver metastases by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. PMID:24797128

  13. Immunocytochemical study of transforming growth factor expression in benign and malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, V.; Barrett, J. M.; Bockman, S.; Pantazis, C. G.; Allen, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    Immunocytochemical studies using polyclonal antibodies to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) alpha and beta were performed on 20 cases of human gliomas. EGF immunoreactive material was detected in both benign and malignant glial tumors. In addition, EGF immunoreactive material was detected in normal brain. TGF-beta was detected in both benign and malignant tumors, but was not detected in normal brain. In contrast, TGF-alpha was highly conserved in its expression, occurring predominantly in malignant compared with benign or normal brain tissue (P less than 0.0001). In malignant gliomas, glioblastomas contained 76% TGF-alpha reactivity (immunoreactive product), and anaplastic types contained 85% reactivity. Benign gliomas contained only 13% TGF-alpha reactivity. These findings support the role of TGF-alpha as an oncoprotein marker in brain neoplasms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2705509

  14. Rho/Rock cross-talks with transforming growth factor-β/Smad pathway participates in lung fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Tang, Haiying; Lin, Hongli; Mao, Jingwei; Gao, Lili; Liu, Jia; Wu, Taihua

    2014-11-01

    The differentiation of fibroblasts, which are promoted by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad, is involved in the process of pulmonary fibrosis. The Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein kinase (Rock) pathway may regulate the fibroblast differentiation and myofibroblast expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), however, the mechanism is not clear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of Rho/Rock and TGF-β/Smad in TGF-β1-induced lung fibroblasts differentiation. Human embryonic lung fibroblasts were stimulated by TGF-β1, Y-27632 (inhibitor of Rho/Rock signaling) and staurosporine (inhibitor of TGF-β/Smad signaling). The α-SMA expression, cell cycle progression, content of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in cell culture supernatants and the expression of RhoA, RhoC, Rock1 and Smad2 were detected. The results demonstrated that α-SMA-positive cells significantly increased following TGF-β1 stimulation. Rho/Rock and TGF-β/Smad inhibitors suppressed TGF-β1-induced lung fibroblast differentiation. The inhibitors increased G0/G1 and decreased S and G2/M percentages. The concentrations of the ECM proteins in the supernatant were significantly increased by TGF-β1 stimulation, whereas they were decreased by inhibitor stimulation. RhoA, RhoC, Rock1, Smad2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were upregulated by TGF-β1 stimulation. The Rho/Rock inhibitor downregulated Smad2 expression and the TGF-β/Smad inhibitor downregulated RhoA, RhoC and Rock1 expression. Therefore, the Rho/Rock pathway and Smad signaling were involved in the process of lung fibroblasts transformation, induced by TGF-β1, to myofibroblasts. The two pathways may undergo cross-talk in the lung fibroblasts differentiation in vitro.

  15. Calcium regulation of actin crosslinking is important for function of the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ruth; Maselli, Andrew; Thomson, Susanne A M; Lim, Rita W L; Stokes, John V; Fechheimer, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is sensitive to changes in calcium, which affect contractility, actin-severing proteins, actin-crosslinking proteins and calmodulin-regulated enzymes. To dissect the role of calcium control on the activity of individual proteins from effects of calcium on other processes, calcium-insensitive forms of these proteins were prepared and introduced into living cells to replace a calcium-sensitive form of the same protein. Crosslinking and bundling of actin filaments by the Dictyostelium 34 kDa protein is inhibited in the presence of micromolar free calcium. A modified form of the 34 kDa protein with mutations in the calcium binding EF hand (34 kDa deltaEF2) was prepared using site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in E. coli. Equilibrium dialysis using [(45)Ca]CaCl(2) revealed that the wild-type protein is able to bind one calcium ion with a Kd of 2.4 microM. This calcium binding is absent in the 34 kDa deltaEF2 protein. The actin-binding activity of the 34 kDa deltaEF2 protein was equivalent to wildtype but calcium insensitive in vitro. The wild-type and 34 kDa deltaEF2 proteins were expressed in 34-kDa-null and 34 kDa/alpha-actinin double null mutant Dictyostelium strains to test the hypothesis that calcium regulation of actin crosslinking is important in vivo. The 34 kDa deltaEF2 failed to supply function of the 34 kDa protein important for control of cell size and for normal growth to either of these 34-kDa-null strains. Furthermore, the distribution of the 34 kDa protein and actin were abnormal in cells expressing 34 kDa deltaEF2. Thus, calcium regulation of the formation and/or dissolution of crosslinked actin structures is required for dynamic behavior of the actin cytoskeleton important for cell structure and growth.

  16. Hic-5 Regulates Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Expression of Fibrogenic Markers and Myocilin in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan Paranji; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of inducible focal adhesion (FA) protein Hic-5 in actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FA formation, fibrogenic activity, and expression of myocilin in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Methods Using primary cultures of human TM (HTM) cells, the effects of various external factors on Hic-5 protein levels, as well as the effects of recombinant Hic-5 and Hic-5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on actin cytoskeleton, FAs, myocilin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and collagen-1 were determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses. Results Hic-5 distributes discretely to the FAs in HTM cells and throughout the TM and Schlemm's canal of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow pathway. Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and RhoA significantly increased Hic-5 protein levels in HTM cells in association with reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and FAs. While recombinant Hic-5 induced actin stress fibers, FAs, αv integrin redistribution to the FAs, increased levels of αSMA, collagen-1, and myocilin, Hic-5 siRNA suppressed most of these responses in HTM cells. Hic-5 siRNA also suppressed TGF-β2-induced fibrogenic activity and dexamethasone-induced myocilin expression in HTM cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results reveal that Hic-5, whose levels were increased by various external factors implicated in elevated intraocular pressure, induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FAs, expression of fibrogenic markers, and myocilin in HTM cells. These characteristics of Hic-5 in TM cells indicate its importance in regulation of AH outflow through the TM in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26313302

  17. Roles for Transforming Growth Factor Beta Superfamily Proteins in Early Folliculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Trombly, Daniel J.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Mayo, Kelly E.

    2010-01-01

    Primordial follicle formation and the subsequent transition of follicles to the primary and secondary stages encompass the early events during folliculogenesis in mammals. These processes establish the ovarian follicle pool and prime follicles for entry into subsequent growth phases during the reproductive cycle. Perturbations during follicle formation can affect the size of the primordial follicle pool significantly, and alterations in follicle transition can cause follicles to arrest at immature stages or result in premature depletion of the follicle reserve. Determining the molecular events that regulate primordial follicle formation and early follicle growth may lead to the development of new fertility treatments. Over the last decade, many of the growth factors and signaling proteins that mediate the early stages of folliculogenesis have been identified using mouse genetic models, in vivo injection studies, and ex vivo organ culture approaches. These studies reveal important roles for the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins in the ovary. This article reviews these roles for TGF-β family proteins and focuses in particular on work from our laboratories on the functions of activin in early folliculogenesis. PMID:19197801

  18. Cripto Binds Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) and Inhibits TGF-β Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Shani, Gidi; Aung, Kevin; Kelber, Jonathan; Vale, Wylie

    2006-01-01

    Cripto is a developmental oncoprotein and a member of the epidermal growth factor-Cripto, FRL-1, Cryptic family of extracellular signaling molecules. In addition to having essential functions during embryogenesis, Cripto is highly expressed in tumors and promotes tumorigenesis. During development, Cripto acts as an obligate coreceptor for transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) ligands, including nodals, growth and differentiation factor 1 (GDF1), and GDF3. As an oncogene, Cripto is thought to promote tumor growth via mechanisms including activation of mitogenic signaling pathways and antagonism of activin signaling. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel mechanism in which Cripto inhibits the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β. Cripto bound TGF-β and reduced the association of TGF-β with its type I receptor, TβRI. Consistent with its ability to block receptor assembly, Cripto suppressed TGF-β signaling in multiple cell types and diminished the cytostatic effects of TGF-β in mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, targeted disruption of Cripto expression by use of small inhibitory RNA enhanced TGF-β signaling, indicating that endogenous Cripto plays a role in restraining TGF-β responses. PMID:17030617

  19. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  20. Global treadmilling coordinates actin turnover and controls the size of actin networks.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Marie-France; Shekhar, Shashank

    2017-03-01

    Various cellular processes (including cell motility) are driven by the regulated, polarized assembly of actin filaments into distinct force-producing arrays of defined size and architecture. Branched, linear, contractile and cytosolic arrays coexist in vivo, and cells intricately control the number, length and assembly rate of filaments in these arrays. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed novel molecular mechanisms that regulate the number of filament barbed and pointed ends and their respective assembly and disassembly rates, thus defining classes of dynamically different filaments, which coexist in the same cell. We propose that a global treadmilling process, in which a steady-state amount of polymerizable actin monomers is established by the dynamics of each network, is responsible for defining the size and turnover of coexisting actin networks. Furthermore, signal-induced changes in the partitioning of actin to distinct arrays (mediated by RHO GTPases) result in the establishment of various steady-state concentrations of polymerizable monomers, thereby globally influencing the growth rate of actin filaments.

  1. P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Metastasis Associated With Transforming Growth Factor Beta

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    NMuMG cells was labeled by using cyanine 3-dUTP (Cy3), and the RNA samples from TGF01-treated cells were sults in the disruption of actin stress...fibers and focal adhe- labeled with cyanine 5-dUTP (Cy5). This experiment was performed in trip- sions, whereas restoration of actin stress fibers...lb (GenBank accession M34137). The CpG islands of both human and mouse TPM1 conformed to the CpG island definition (Antequera and Bird, 1993; Cross and

  2. Retinoic acid modulates rat Ito cell proliferation, collagen, and transforming growth factor beta production.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Kramer, R T; Davidson, N O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin A plays an inhibitory role with respect to "activation" of the hepatic Ito cell, a likely effector of hepatic fibrogenesis. Ito cell "activation" during fibrogenesis is characterized by a decrease in intracellular vitamin A and an increase in cellular proliferation and collagen production. To explore the hypothesis that retinoids have the capacity to diminish Ito cell activation, cultured Ito cells were exposed to retinoic acid and its effects assessed on three key features: cell proliferation, collagen protein production and mRNA abundance, and transforming growth factor beta protein production. Retinoic acid was 100-1,000X more potent than retinol with respect to inhibition of Ito cell proliferation. Interstitial collagen and transforming growth factor beta production were also reduced by 10(-6) M retinoic acid. The relative abundance of type I collagen mRNA however, was not significantly altered. By contrast, retinoic acid administration to rats caused a marked reduction in the abundance of type I collagen mRNA in both total hepatic and purified Ito cell RNA. The relative abundance of rat hepatic fibronectin or apolipoprotein E mRNA was not significantly altered. These studies demonstrate that retinoic acid can differentially modulate several key features of hepatic fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2254460

  3. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  4. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered “solid-cored” CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  5. Genetic Analysis of Connective Tissue Growth Factor as an Effector of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling and Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Accornero, Federica; van Berlo, Jop H.; Correll, Robert N.; Elrod, John W.; Sargent, Michelle A.; York, Allen; Rabinowitz, Joseph E.; Leask, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The matricellular secreted protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is upregulated in response to cardiac injury or with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) stimulation, where it has been suggested to function as a fibrotic effector. Here we generated transgenic mice with inducible heart-specific CTGF overexpression, mice with heart-specific expression of an activated TGF-β mutant protein, mice with heart-specific deletion of Ctgf, and mice in which Ctgf was also deleted from fibroblasts in the heart. Remarkably, neither gain nor loss of CTGF in the heart affected cardiac pathology and propensity toward early lethality due to TGF-β overactivation in the heart. Also, neither heart-specific Ctgf deletion nor CTGF overexpression altered cardiac remodeling and function with aging or after multiple acute stress stimuli. Cardiac fibrosis was also unchanged by modulation of CTGF levels in the heart with aging, pressure overload, agonist infusion, or TGF-β overexpression. However, CTGF mildly altered the overall cardiac response to TGF-β when pressure overload stimulation was applied. CTGF has been proposed to function as a critical TGF-β effector in underlying tissue remodeling and fibrosis throughout the body, although our results suggest that CTGF is of minimal importance and is an unlikely therapeutic vantage point for the heart. PMID:25870108

  6. Constitutive Smad linker phosphorylation in melanoma: a mechanism of resistance to transforming growth factor-β-mediated growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Merrigan, Kim T; Chan, Joseph L-K; Goydos, James S; Chen, Wenjin; Foran, David J; Liu, Fang; Lasfar, Ahmed; Reiss, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Melanoma cells are resistant to transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ)-induced cell-cycle arrest. In this study, we investigated a mechanism of resistance involving a regulatory domain, called linker region, in Smad2 and Smad3, main downstream effectors of TGFβ. Melanoma cells in culture and tumor samples exhibited constitutive Smad2 and Smad3 linker phosphorylation. Treatment of melanoma cells with the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, or the two pan-CDK and GSK3 inhibitors, Flavopiridol and R547, resulted in decreased linker phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3. Overexpression of the linker phosphorylation-resistant Smad3 EPSM mutant in melanoma cells resulted in an increase in expression of p15(INK4B) and p21(WAF1) , as compared with cells transfected with wild-type (WT) Smad3. In addition, the cell numbers of EPSM Smad3-expressing melanoma cells were significantly reduced compared with WT Smad3-expressing cells. These results suggest that the linker phosphorylation of Smad3 contributes to the resistance of melanoma cells to TGFβ-mediated growth inhibition.

  7. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN.

  8. Parabens enable suspension growth of MCF-10A immortalized, non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sugandha; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are used extensively as preservatives in consumer products, and intact esters have been measured in several human tissues. Concerns of a potential link between parabens and breast cancer have been raised, but mechanistic studies have centred on their oestrogenic activity and little attention has been paid to any carcinogenic properties. In the present study, we report that parabens can induce anchorage-independent growth of MCF-10A immortalized but non-transformed human breast epithelial cells, a property closely related to transformation and a predictor of tumour growth in vivo. In semi-solid methocel suspension culture, MCF-10A cells produced very few colonies and only of a small size but the addition of 5 × 10(-4) M methylparaben, 10(-5) M n-propylparaben or 10(-5) M n-butylparaben resulted in a greater number of colonies per dish (P < 0.05 in each case) and an increased average colony size (P < 0.001 in each case). Dose-responses showed that concentrations as low as 10(-6) M methylparaben, 10(-7) M n-propylparaben and 10(-7) M n-butylparaben could increase colony numbers (P = 0.016, P = 0.010, P = 0.008, respectively): comparison with a recent measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue samples from 40 mastectomies (Barr et al., 2012) showed that 22/40 of the patients had at least one of the parabens at the site of the primary tumour at or above these concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that parabens can induce a transformed phenotype in human breast epithelial cells in vitro, and further investigation is now justified into a potential link between parabens and breast carcinogenesis.

  9. Role of actin in auxin transport and transduction of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Basu, S.; Brady, S.; Muday, G.

    Transport of the plant hormone auxin is polar and the direction of the hormone movement appears to be controlled by asymmetric distribution of auxin transport protein complexes. Changes in the direction of auxin transport are believed to drive asymmetric growth in response to changes in the gravity vector. To test the possibility that asymmetric distribution of the auxin transport protein complex is mediated by attachment to the actin cytoskeleton, a variety of experimental approaches have been used. The most direct demonstration of the role of the actin cytoskeleton in localization of the protein complex is the ability of one protein in this complex to bind to affinity columns containing actin filaments. Additionally, treatments of plant tissues with drugs that fragment the actin c toskeleton reducey polar transport. In order to explore this actin interaction and the affect of gravity on auxin transport and developmental polarity, embryos of the brown alga, Fucus have been examined. Fucus zygotes are initially symmetrical, but develop asymmetry in response to environmental gradients, with light gradients being the best- characterized signal. Gravity will polarize these embryos and gravity-induced polarity is randomized by clinorotation. Auxin transport also appears necessary for environmental controls of polarity, since auxin efflux inhibitors perturb both photo- and gravity-polarization at a very discrete temporal window within six hours after fertilization. The actin cytoskeleton has previously been shown to reorganize after fertilization of Fucus embryos leading to formation of an actin patch at the site of polar outgrowth. These actin patches still form in Fucus embryos treated with auxin efflux inhibitors, yet the position of these patches is randomized. Together, these results suggest that there are connections between the actin cytoskeleton, auxin transport, and gravity oriented growth and development. (Supported by NASA Grant: NAG2-1203)

  10. Fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes in vitro mitral valve interstitial cell repair through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Gotlieb, Avrum I

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 both promote repair in valve interstitial cell (VIC) injury models; however, the relationship between TGF-β and FGF-2 in wound repair are not well understood. VIC confluent monolayers were wounded by mechanical injury and incubated separately or in combination with FGF-2, neutralizing antibody to FGF-2, neutralizing antibody to TGF-β, and betaglycan antibody for 24 hours after wounding. Phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3) was localized at the wound edge (WE) and at the monolayer away from the WE. Down-regulation of pSmad2/3 protein expression via small-interfering RNA transfection was performed. The extent of wound closure was monitored for up to 96 hours. FGF-2 incubation resulted in a significant increase in nuclear pSmad2/3 staining at the WE. Neutralizing antibody to TGF-β alone or with FGF-2 present resulted in a similar significant decrease in pSmad2/3. Neutralizing antibody to FGF-2 alone or with FGF-2 present showed a similar significant decrease in pSmad2/3; however, significantly more staining was observed than treatment with neutralizing antibody to TGF-β. Incubation with betaglycan antibody inhibited FGF-2-mediated pSmad2/3 signaling. Wound closure corresponded with pSmad2/3 staining at the WE. Down-regulation of pSmad2/3 via small-interfering RNA transfection significantly reduced the extent to which FGF-2 promoted wound closure. Fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes in vitro VIC wound repair, at least in part, through the TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling pathway.

  11. A Gly65Val substitution in an actin, GhACT_LI1, disrupts cell polarity and membrane anchoring of F-actin resulting in dwarf, lintless Li1 cotton plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Actin polymerizes to form the cytoskeleton and organize polar growth in all eukaryotic cells. Species with numerous actin genes are especially useful for the dissection of actin molecular function due to redundancy and neofunctionalization. Here, we investigated the role of a cotton (Gossypium hi...

  12. Hammerhead Ribozyme-Mediated Knockdown of mRNA for Fibrotic Growth Factors: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paulette M.; Blalock, Timothy D.; Yuan, Rong; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive scarring (fibrosis) is a major cause of pathologies in multiple tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, heart, cornea, and skin. The transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) system has been shown to play a key role in regulating the formation of scar tissue throughout the body. Furthermore, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been shown to mediate most of the fibrotic actions of TGF- β, including stimulation of synthesis of extracellular matrix and differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Currently, no approved drugs selectively and specifically regulate scar formation. Thus, there is a need for a drug that selectively targets the TGF- β cascade at the molecular level and has minimal off-target side effects. This chapter focuses on the design of hammerhead ribozymes, measurement of kinetic activity, and assessment of knockdown mRNAs of TGF- β and CTGF in cell cultures. PMID:22131029

  13. The actin cytoskeleton is a suppressor of the endogenous skewing behaviour of Arabidopsis primary roots in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, J; Liao, F; Sparks, J A; Tang, Y; Blancaflor, E B

    2014-01-01

    Before plants can be effectively utilised as a component of enclosed life-support systems for space exploration, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which they develop in microgravity. Using the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware on board the second to the last flight of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-131 mission), we studied how microgravity impacts root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Ground-based studies showed that the actin cytoskeleton negatively regulates root gravity responses on Earth, leading us to hypothesise that actin might also be an important modulator of root growth behaviour in space. We investigated how microgravity impacted root growth of wild type (ecotype Columbia) and a mutant (act2-3) disrupted in a root-expressed vegetative actin isoform (ACTIN2). Roots of etiolated wild-type and act2-3 seedlings grown in space skewed vigorously toward the left, which was unexpected given the reduced directional cue provided by gravity. The left-handed directional root growth in space was more pronounced in act2-3 mutants than wild type. To quantify differences in root orientation of these two genotypes in space, we developed an algorithm where single root images were converted into binary images using computational edge detection methods. Binary images were processed with Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), and histogram and entropy were used to determine spectral distribution, such that high entropy values corresponded to roots that deviated more strongly from linear orientation whereas low entropy values represented straight roots. We found that act2-3 roots had a statistically stronger skewing/coiling response than wild-type roots, but such differences were not apparent on Earth. Ultrastructural studies revealed that newly developed cell walls of space-grown act2-3 roots were more severely disrupted compared to space-grown wild type, and ground control wild-type and act2-3 roots. Collectively, our results provide

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta as a differentiating factor for cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gawaziuk, J P; X; Sheikh, F; Cheng, Z-Q; Cattini, P A; Stephens, N L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of supercontractile smooth muscle cells, contributing to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways in asthmatic patients, is due to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In cultured smooth muscle cells starved by removal of 10% foetal bovine serum for 7 days, growth arrest was seen; 30% became elongated and demonstrated super contractility. Study of conditioned medium suggested that the differentiating factor was TGF-beta. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out on conditioned medium from the arrested cells. Two protein bands were identified as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and TGF-beta1. To determine second messenger signalling by SMAD2, Western blotting and confocal microscopy were employed. Conditioned medium from arrested cultures showed the presence of MMP-2 and TGF-beta1, as revealed by SDS-PAGE; 68- and 25-kDa bands were seen. Differentiation was confirmed by upregulation of marker proteins, smooth muscle type myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain kinase. Confirmation was obtained by downregulating these proteins with decorin treatment, which reduces the levels of active TGF-beta and an adenoviral dominant-negative vector coding for a mutated type II TGF-beta-receptor. Activation of second messenger signalling was demonstrated immunocytochemically by the presence of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD4. Transforming growth factor-beta is likely to be the differentiating factor responsible for the development of these supercontractile smooth muscle cells. The development of such cells in vivo after cessation of an asthmatic attack could contribute to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways seen in patients.

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta, transforming growth factor-beta receptor II, and p27Kip1 expression in nontumorous and neoplastic human pituitaries.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Qian, X.; Kulig, E.; Sanno, N.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Kovacs, K.; Young, W. F.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been implicated in the regulation of normal and neoplastic anterior pituitary cell function. TGF-beta regulates the expression of various proteins, including p27Kip1 (p27), a cell cycle inhibitory protein. We examined TGF-beta, TGF-beta type II receptor (TGF-beta-RII), and p27 expression in normal pituitaries, pituitary adenomas, and carcinomas to analyze the possible roles of these proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis. Normal pituitary, pituitary adenomas, and pituitary carcinomas all expressed TGF-beta and TGF-beta-RII immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 isoforms and TGF-beta-RII in normal pituitaries and pituitary adenomas. Pituitary adenomas cells cultured for 7 days in defined media showed a biphasic response to TGF-beta with significant inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at higher concentrations (10(-9) mol/L) and stimulation of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at lower concentrations (10(-13) mol/L) of TGF-beta 1 in gonadotroph adenomas. Immunohistochemical analysis for p27 protein expression showed the highest levels in nontumorous pituitaries with decreased immunoreactivity in adenomas and carcinomas. When nontumorous pituitaries and various adenomas were analyzed for p27 and specific hormone production, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone cells and tumors had the highest percentages of cells expressing p27, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells and tumors had the lowest percentages. Immunoblotting analysis showed that adrenocorticotrophic hormone adenomas also had the lowest levels of p27 protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization analysis did not show significant differences in p27 mRNA expression in the various types of adenomas or in nontumorous pituitaries. In situ hybridization for p27 mRNA showed similar

  16. Pin1 promotes transforming growth factor-beta-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Isao; Chiang, Keng-Nan; Lai, Chen-Yu; He, Dongming; Wang, Guannan; Ramkumar, Romila; Uchida, Takafumi; Ryo, Akihide; Lu, Kunping; Liu, Fang

    2010-01-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological activities. It induces potent growth-inhibitory responses in normal cells but promotes migration and invasion of cancer cells. Smads mediate the TGF-beta responses. TGF-beta binding to the cell surface receptors leads to the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in their C terminus as well as in the proline-rich linker region. The serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in the linker region are followed by the proline residue. Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, recognizes phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motifs. Here we show that Smad2/3 interacts with Pin1 in a TGF-beta-dependent manner. We further show that the phosphorylated threonine 179-proline motif in the Smad3 linker region is the major binding site for Pin1. Although epidermal growth factor also induces phosphorylation of threonine 179 and other residues in the Smad3 linker region the same as TGF-beta, Pin1 is unable to bind to the epidermal growth factor-stimulated Smad3. Further analysis suggests that phosphorylation of Smad3 in the C terminus is necessary for the interaction with Pin1. Depletion of Pin1 by small hairpin RNA does not significantly affect TGF-beta-induced growth-inhibitory responses and a number of TGF-beta/Smad target genes analyzed. In contrast, knockdown of Pin1 in human PC3 prostate cancer cells strongly inhibited TGF-beta-mediated migration and invasion. Accordingly, TGF-beta induction of N-cadherin, which plays an important role in migration and invasion, is markedly reduced when Pin1 is depleted in PC3 cells. Because Pin1 is overexpressed in many cancers, our findings highlight the importance of Pin1 in TGF-beta-induced migration and invasion of cancer cells.

  17. Valproic acid overcomes transforming growth factor-β-mediated sorafenib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Wakai, Toshifumi; Kubota, Masayuki; Osawa, Mami; Hirose, Yuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Fujimaki, Shun; Takamura, Masaaki; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor approved for hepatocellular carcinoma, but rarely causes tumor regression in patients with chronic liver diseases. To investigate whether growth factor-mediated signaling is involved in sorafenib resistance, HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells were exposed to epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) prior to treatment with sorafenib. Furthermore, to identify an effective combination treatment with sorafenib, growth factor-sensitized cells were treated with sorafenib alone or in combination with celecoxib, lovastatin or valproic acid (VPA). Trypan blue staining and Annexin V assays showed that the cytotoxic effect of sorafenib was inhibited by 15-54% in cells sensitized to TGF-β (P<0.05). Western blotting analysis showed that TGF-β significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated AKT signaling, and sorafenib failed to suppress both ERK and AKT in TGF-β-sensitized cells. The decreased anti-tumor effect of sorafenib was rescued by chemical inhibition of ERK and AKT. When TGF-β-sensitized cells were treated with sorafenib plus VPA, the levels of phosphorylated ERK and AKT were considerably suppressed and the numbers of dead cells were increased by 3.7-5.7-fold compared with those exposed to sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Moreover, low dose sorafenib-induced cell migration was effectively suppressed by combination treatment with sorafenib and VPA. Collectively, TGF-β/ERK/AKT signaling might play a critical role in sorafenib resistance in hepatoma cells, and combination treatment with VPA may be effective against this drug resistance. PMID:24817927

  18. Early stage reversed crystal growth of zeolite A and its phase transformation to sodalite.

    PubMed

    Greer, Heather; Wheatley, Paul S; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Morris, Russell E; Zhou, Wuzong

    2009-12-16

    Microstructural analysis of the early stage crystal growth of zeolite A in hydrothermal synthetic conditions revealed a revised crystal growth route from surface to core in the presence of the biopolymer chitosan. The mechanism of this extraordinary crystal growth route is discussed. In the first stage, the precursor and biopolymer aggregated into amorphous spherical particles. Crystallization occurred on the surface of these spheres, forming the typical cubic morphology associated with zeolite A with a very thin crystalline cubic shell and an amorphous core. With a surface-to-core extension of crystallization, sodalite nanoplates were crystallized within the amorphous cores of these zeolite A cubes, most likely due to an increase of pressure. These sodalite nanoplates increased in size, breaking the cubic shells of zeolite A in the process, leading to the phase transformation from zeolite A to sodalite via an Ostwald ripening process. Characterization of specimens was performed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, supported by other techniques including X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and N(2) adsorption/desorption.

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor signal via c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent Smad2/3 phosphorylation in rat hepatic stellate cells after acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Mori, Shigeo; Tahashi, Yoshiya; Yamagata, Hideo; Furukawa, Fukiko; Seki, Toshihito; Nishizawa, Mikio; Fujisawa, Junichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2005-04-01

    After liver injury, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) regulate the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and tissue remodeling. Mechanisms of PDGF signaling in the TGF-beta-triggered cascade are not completely understood. TGF-beta signaling involves phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 at linker and C-terminal regions. Using antibodies to distinguish Smad2/3 phosphorylated at linker regions from those phosphorylated at C-terminal regions, we investigated Smad2/3-mediated signaling in rat liver injured by CCl(4) administration and in cultured HSCs. In acute liver injury, Smad2/3 were transiently phosphorylated at both regions. Although linker-phosphorylated Smad2 remained in the cytoplasm of alpha-smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive mesenchymal cells adjacent to necrotic hepatocytes in centrilobular areas, linker-phosphorylated Smad3 accumulated in the nuclei. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated HSCs directly phosphorylated Smad2/3 at linker regions. Co-treatment of primary cultured HSCs with TGF-beta and PDGF activated the JNK pathway, subsequently inducing endogenous linker phosphorylation of Smad2/3. The JNK pathway may be involved in migration of resident HSCs within the space of Disse to the sites of tissue damage because the JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited HSC migration induced by TGF-beta and PDGF signals. Moreover, treatment of HSCs with both TGF-beta and PDGF increased transcriptional activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 through linker phosphorylation of Smad3. In conclusion, TGF-beta and PDGF activate HSCs by transmitting their signals through JNK-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation at linker regions, both in vivo and in vitro.

  20. Control of actin filament dynamics at barbed ends by WH2 domains: from capping to permissive and processive assembly.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Marie-France; Pernier, Julien; Avvaru, Balendu Sankara

    2013-10-01

    WH2 domains are multifunctional regulators of actin assembly that can either sequester G-actin or allow polarized barbed end growth. They all bind similarly to a hydrophobic pocket at the barbed face of actin. Depending on their electrostatic environment, WH2 domains can nucleate actin assembly by facilitating the formation of prenuclei dimers along the canonical spontaneous assembly pathway. They also modulate filament barbed end dynamics in a versatile fashion, acting either as barbed end cappers or assisting barbed end growth like profilin or uncapping barbed ends and potentially mediating processive elongation like formins when they are dimerized. Tandem repeats of WH2 domains can sever filaments and either remain bound to created barbed ends like gelsolin, or strip off an ADP-actin subunit from the severed polymer end, depending on their relative affinity for terminal ADP-F-actin or ADP-G-actin. In summary, WH2 domains recapitulate all known elementary regulatory functions so far found in individual actin-binding proteins. By combining different discrete sets of these multifunctional properties, they acquire specific functions in various actin-based processes, and participate in activities as diverse as filament branching, filopodia extension, or actin remodeling in ciliogenesis and asymmetric meiotic division. They also integrate these functions with other actin-binding motifs present either in the same protein or in a complex with another protein, expanding the range of complexity in actin regulation. The details of their molecular mechanisms and the underlying structural basis provide exciting avenues in actin research.

  1. The Drosophila javelin Gene Encodes a Novel Actin-Associated Protein Required for Actin Assembly in the Bristle ▿

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shira; Bakhrat, Anna; Bitan, Amir; Abdu, Uri

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster bristle is a highly polarized cell that builds specialized cytoskeletal structures. Whereas actin is required for increasing bristle length, microtubules are essential for bristle axial growth. To identify new proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization during bristle development, we focused on identifying and characterizing the javelin (jv) locus. We found that in a jv mutant, the bristle tip is swollen and abnormal organization of bristle grooves is seen over the entire bristle. Using confocal and electron microscopy, we found that in jv mutant bristles, actin bundles do not form properly due to a loss of actin filaments within the bundle. We show that jv is an allele of the predicted CG32397 gene that encodes a protein with no homologs outside insects. Expression of the Jv protein fused to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) shows that the protein is colocalized with actin bundles in the bristle. Moreover, expression of Jv-GFP within the germ line led to the formation of ectopic actin bundles that surround the nucleus of nurse cells. Thus, we report that Jv is a novel actin-associated protein required for actin assembly during Drosophila bristle development. PMID:21930794

  2. Differential effects of transforming growth factor type beta on the growth and function of adrenocortical cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, M; Baird, A

    1986-01-01

    Transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) suppresses basal as well as corticotropin (ACTH)-stimulated steroid formation by bovine adrenocortical cells in culture. The effect is dose dependent and is not accompanied by any change in adrenocortical cell growth. The minimum effective dose of TGF-beta is 4 X 10(-13) M (10 pg/ml), and maximal inhibition is observed at a concentration of 4 X 10(-11) M (1 ng/ml). A 16- to 20-hr incubation with TGF-beta is required to decrease steroidogenesis, and 12-18 hr are required before cells treated with TGF-beta recover complete responsiveness to corticotropin. Increases in cAMP mediated by corticotropin, forskolin, and isobutylmethylxanthine are not modified by the addition of TGF-beta; thus adenylate cyclase activity is unaffected by TGF-beta. Although TGF-beta inhibits the formation of all of the delta 4-steroids measured (including cortisol, corticosterone, aldosterone, and androstenedione), its effect can be completely reversed by the addition of 25-hydroxycholesterol, pregnenolone, or progesterone to the cells. In contrast, the addition of low density lipoprotein has no effect suggesting that TGF-beta targets the conversion of cholesterol precursors to cholesterol. The results demonstrate a highly potent effect of TGF-beta on the differentiated function of the adrenocortical cell. The inhibition of steroidogenesis can be dissociated from any effect on cell proliferation, and it occurs distal to the formation of cAMP but proximal to the formation of cholesterol. The results suggest that in the adrenal, TGF-beta or TGF-beta-like proteins may be playing an important role in modifying the differentiated state of the adrenocortical cell. PMID:3020557

  3. Role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF) beta in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gil, Elena; Galindo-Izquierdo, María

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Although its role in rheumatoid arthritis is not well defined, TGF-β activation leads to functional immunomodulatory effects according to environmental conditions. The function of TGF-β in the development of arthritis in murine models has been extensively studied with controversial results. Recent findings point to a non-relevant role for TGF-β in a mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. The study of TGF-β on T-cell responses has shown controversial results as an inhibitor or promoter of the inflammatory response. This paper presents a review of the role of TGF-β in animal models of arthritis.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of transforming growth factor-β in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coomes, Stephanie M; Moore, Bethany B

    2010-12-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a pleiotropic cytokine with beneficial and detrimental effects posthematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. TGF-β is increased in specific sites postengraftment and can suppress immune responses and maintain peripheral tolerance. Thus, TGF-β may promote allograft acceptance. However, TGF-β is also the central pathogenic cytokine in fibrotic disease and likely promotes pneumonitis. Although TGF-β can enhance leukocyte recruitment and IgA production, it inhibits both innate and adaptive immune cell function and antiviral host defense posthematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. This review will focus on the current understanding of TGF-β biology and the numerous ways it can impact outcomes posttransplant.

  5. Connective Tissue Disorders and Cardiovascular Complications: The indomitable role of Transforming Growth Factor-beta signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Jason B.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Marfan Syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz Syndrome (LDS) represent heritable connective tissue disorders that cosegregate with a similar pattern of cardiovascular defects (thoracic aortic aneurysm, mitral valve prolapse/regurgitation, and aortic dilatation with regurgitation). This pattern of cardiovascular defects appears to be expressed along a spectrum of severity in many heritable connective tissue disorders and raises suspicion of a relationship between the normal development of connective tissues and the cardiovascular system. Given the evidence of increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling in MFS and LDS, this signaling pathway may represent the common link in this relationship. To further explore this hypothetical link, this chapter will review the TGF-β signaling pathway, heritable connective tissue syndromes related to TGF-β receptor (TGFBR) mutations, and discuss the pathogenic contribution of TGF-β to these syndromes with a primary focus on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24443024

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  7. Transforming growth factor Beta-releasing scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Johnstone, Brian; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-04-01

    The maintenance of a critical threshold concentration of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) for a given period of time is crucial for the onset and maintenance of chondrogenesis. Thus, the development of scaffolds that provide temporal and/or spatial control of TGF-β bioavailability has appeal as a mechanism to induce the chondrogenesis of stem cells in vitro and in vivo for articular cartilage repair. In the past decade, many types of scaffolds have been designed to advance this goal: hydrogels based on polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid, and alginate; protein-based hydrogels such as fibrin, gelatin, and collagens; biopolymeric gels and synthetic polymers; and solid and hybrid composite (hydrogel/solid) scaffolds. In this study, we review the progress in developing strategies to deliver TGF-β from scaffolds with the aim of enhancing chondrogenesis. In the future, such scaffolds could prove critical for tissue engineering cartilage, both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Effect of transforming growth factor-alpha on inositol phospholipid metabolism in human epidermoid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Takenawa, T.; Twardzik, D.R.

    1988-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) stimulates (in a dose-dependent manner) the incorporation of (/sup 32/P)Pi into phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), and phosphatidic acid (PA) in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line (A431). The effect of TGF-alpha on the incorporation was found to be similar to that of EGF. On the other hand, a striking difference in the activation of diacylglycerol (DG) kinase activity was seen between TGF-alpha and EGF. At least 100 times more TGF-alpha was required to achieve maximal stimulation of DG kinase activity relative to EGF. These results suggest that the activation of DG kinase by TGF-alpha may involve a mechanism independent from or subsequent to activation of the EGF receptor.

  9. MicroRNAs, transforming growth factor beta-1, and tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Timothy; Jenkins, Robert H; Fraser, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNA regulators that repress synthesis of their targets post-transcriptionally. On average, each microRNA is estimated to regulate several hundred protein-coding genes, and about 60% of proteins are thought to be regulated by microRNAs in total. A subset of these genes, including the key profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), exhibits particularly strong levels of post-transcriptional control of protein synthesis, involving microRNAs and other mechanisms. Changes in microRNA expression pattern are linked to profound effects on cell phenotype, and microRNAs have an emerging role in diverse physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we provide an overview of microRNA biology with a focus on their emerging role in diseases typified by organ fibrosis.

  10. Transforming growth factor-β1 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with distinct neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Junko; Koide, Takuya; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Takei, Yosuke; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    A chronic inflammatory condition may underlie neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, both PD and AD patients show an increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). TGF-β1 is a cytokine that inhibits inflammation. In the present study, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested the hypothesis that the level of TGF-β1 in the CSF of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), or multiple system atrophy-cerebellar subtype (MSA-C) would be elevated compared with that of normal controls. We found that TGF-β1 levels in the CSF were not significantly different between these patients and normal controls. Our data suggest that the level of TGF-β1 in the CSF is an unreliable biomarker of ALS, SCD, and MSA-C.

  11. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  12. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianshuang; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic, helical bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction of virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated conditions, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β regulates various biological processes, including cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. This review focuses on the potential etiological roles of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis. PMID:26583078

  13. The Role of Transforming Growth Factor β1 in the Regulation of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kota; Hathaway, Catherine K.; Lawrence, Marlon G.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Although human association studies suggest a link between polymorphisms in the gene encoding transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and differing blood pressure levels, a causative mechanism for this correlation remains elusive. Recently we have generated a series of mice with graded expression of TGFβ1, ranging from approximately 10% to 300% compared to normal. We have found that blood pressure and plasma volume are negatively regulated by TGFβ1. Of note, the 10% hypomorph exhibits primary aldosteronism and markedly impaired urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. We here review previous literature highlighting the importance of TGFβ signaling as a natriuretic system, which we postulate is a causative mechanism explaining how polymorphisms in TGFβ1 could influence blood pressure levels. PMID:25801626

  14. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on the Release of Transforming Growth Factor-β.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Rika; Mizumoto, Naoko; Kanno, Nana; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is released by activated platelets and induces the differentiation of T-helper 17 from naïve T cells. Contact between blood and cellulose acetate (CA) beads induces cytokine release, although their inflammatory effects on TGF-β release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on the release of TGF-β in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured platelets and TGF-β. Compared with blood samples incubated without beads, the platelet count and amount of TGF-β significantly decreased in blood samples incubated with CA beads. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited the release of TGF-β from adsorbed platelets. The biological effects of this reduction of TGF-β release during platelet adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  15. Phosphorylation of the human-transforming-growth-factor-beta-binding protein endoglin.

    PubMed Central

    Lastres, P; Martín-Perez, J; Langa, C; Bernabéu, C

    1994-01-01

    Endoglin is an homodimeric membrane antigen with capacity to bind transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Phosphorylation of human endoglin was demonstrated in endothelial cells as well as in mouse fibroblast transfectants expressing two isoforms, L-endoglin or S-endoglin, with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The extent of L-endoglin phosphorylation was found to be 8-fold higher than that of S-endoglin, and phosphopeptide analyses revealed at least three different phosphorylation sites for L-endoglin, whereas S-endoglin produces only one phosphopeptide. The immunoprecipitated L-endoglin was found to be phosphorylated mainly on serine, and, to a minor extent, on threonine, residues. Treatment of the cells with TGF-beta 1 or the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 resulted in a reduction of the levels of endoglin phosphorylation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8053900

  16. Inhibition of spermidine synthase gene expression by transforming growth factor-beta 1 in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Y; Kar, S; Wiest, L; Pegg, A E; Carr, B I

    1997-01-01

    We screened genes responsive to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta 1) protein in a human hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) using a PCR-mediated differential display technique, in order to investigate the mechanisms involved in TGF-beta-induced growth suppression. We found a gene that was down-regulated by TGF-beta 1 to be completely identical in an approx. 620 bp segment to the gene for the enzyme spermidine synthase, which mediates the conversion of putrescine into spermidine. Both spermidine synthase mRNA expression and its enzyme activity were decreased after TGF-beta 1 treatment of Hep3B cells. The inhibition of spermidine synthase gene expression by TGF-beta 1 protein was also observed in other hepatoma cell lines. The expression of genes for other biosynthetic enzymes in polyamine metabolism (ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase) was also inhibited to the same extent as for spermidine synthase, while the gene expression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, a catabolic enzyme, was relatively resistant to TGF-beta 1. Spermine levels in Hep3B cells were decreased by TGF-beta 1 treatment, although the levels of spermidine and putrescine were unchanged, probably due to compensation by remaining spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase activity. Exogenously added spermidine or spermine, but not putrescine, partially antagonized the growth-inhibitor effects of TGF-beta 1 on Hep3B cells. Our data suggest that down-regulation of gene expression of the enzymes involved in polyamine metabolism, including spermidine synthase, may be associated with the mechanism of TGF-beta-induced growth suppression. PMID:9020892

  17. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors attenuate transforming-growth-factor-beta 1-stimulated capillary organization in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Papapetropoulos, A.; Desai, K. M.; Rudic, R. D.; Mayer, B.; Zhang, R.; Ruiz-Torres, M. P.; García-Cardeña, G.; Madri, J. A.; Sessa, W. C.

    1997-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process involving endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, migration, differentiation, and organization into patent capillary networks. Nitric oxide (NO), an EC mediator, has been reported to be antigenic as well as proangiogenic in different models of in vivo angiogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the role of NO in capillary organization using rat microvascular ECs (RFCs) grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen gels. RFCs placed in 3D cultures exhibited extensive tube formation in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1. Addition of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-nitro-arginine methylester (L-NAME, 1 mmol/L) or L-monomethyl-nitro-l-arginine (1 mmol/L) inhibited tube formation and the accumulation of nitrite in the media by approximately 50%. Incubation of the 3D cultures with excess L-arginine reversed the inhibitory effect of L-NAME on tube formation. In contrast to the results obtained in 3D cultures, inhibition of NO synthesis by L-NAME did not influence RFC proliferation in two-dimensional (2D) cultures or antagonize the ability of transforming growth factor-beta 1 to suppress EC proliferation in 2D cultures. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed the constitutive expression of all three NOS isoforms, neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs, in 2D and 3D cultures. Moreover, Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive protein for all NOS isoforms in 3D cultures of RFCs. In addition, in the face of NOS blockade, co-treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or the stable analog of cGMP, 8-bromo-cGMP, restored capillary tube formation. Thus, the autocrine production of NO and the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase are necessary events in the process of differentiation and in vitro capillary tube organization of RFCs. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9137106

  18. Dissolution and transformation of cerium oxide nanoparticles in plant growth media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, Franziska; Schulin, Rainer; Rupper, Patrick; Rotzetter, Aline; Stark, Wendelin; Nowack, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    From environmental modeling of engineered nanomaterial (ENM) release, it is clear that ENMs will enter soils, where they interact with soil compounds as well as plant roots. We analyzed three different size groups of cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs) in respect to chemical changes in the most common plant growth medium, Hoagland solution. We created a simple environmental model using liquid dispersions of 9-, 23-, and 64-nm-uncoated CeO2-NPs. We found that CeO2-NPs release dissolved Ce when the pH of the medium is below 4.6 and in the presence of strong chelating agents even at pH of 8. In addition, we found that in reaction with Fe2+-ions, equimolar amounts of Ce were released from NPs. We could elucidate the involvement of the CeO2-NPs surface redox cycle between Ce3+ and Ce4+ to explain particle transformation. The chemical transformation of CeO2-NPs was summarized in four probable reactions: dissolution, surface reduction, complexation, and precipitation on the NP surface. The results show that CeO2-NPs are clearly not insoluble as often stated but can release significant amounts of Ce depending on the composition of the surrounding medium.

  19. Ring closure in actin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  20. Accelerated actin filament polymerization from microtubule plus-ends

    PubMed Central

    Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L.; Rankova, Aneliya; Eskin, Julian A.; Kenny, Katelyn; Goode, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules govern actin network remodeling in a wide range of biological processes, yet the mechanisms underlying this cytoskeletal crosstalk have remained obscure. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to show that the microtubule plus-end associated protein CLIP-170 binds tightly to formins to accelerate actin filament elongation. Furthermore, we observed mDia1 dimers and CLIP-170 dimers co-tracking growing filament ends for minutes. CLIP-170-mDia1 complexes promoted actin polymerization approximately 18 times faster than free barbed end growth, while simultaneously enhancing protection from capping protein. We used a microtubule-actin dynamics co-reconstitution system to observe CLIP-170-mDia1 complexes being recruited to growing microtubule ends by EB1. The complexes triggered rapid growth of actin filaments that remained attached to the microtubule surface. These activities of CLIP-170 were required in primary neurons for normal dendritic morphology. Thus, our results reveal a cellular mechanism whereby growing microtubule plus-ends direct rapid actin assembly. PMID:27199431

  1. Growing actin networks regulated by obstacle size and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Bo; Lin, Ji; Qian, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Growing actin networks provide the driving force for the motility of cells and intracellular pathogens. Based on the molecular-level processes of actin polymerization, branching, capping, and depolymerization, we have developed a modeling framework to simulate the stochastic and cooperative behaviors of growing actin networks in propelling obstacles, with an emphasis on the size and shape effects on work capacity and filament orientation in the growing process. Our results show that the characteristic size of obstacles changes the protrusion power per unit length, without influencing the orientation distribution of actin filaments in growing networks. In contrast, the geometry of obstacles has a profound effect on filament patterning, which influences the orientation of filaments differently when the drag coefficient of environment is small, intermediate, or large. We also discuss the role of various parameters, such as the aspect ratio of obstacles, branching rate, and capping rate, in affecting the protrusion power of network growth.

  2. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  3. Cilia assembly: a role for F-actin in IFT recruitment.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, Lynne

    2014-09-08

    Ciliary growth rates are limited by the availability of precursors at the growing tip. A new paper reveals that the early rapid growth of nascent cilia is supported by F-actin-facilitated delivery of IFT proteins to basal bodies.

  4. Regulation of proliferation of embryonic heart mesenchyme: Role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and the interstitial matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, M.; Armstrong, M.T.; Armstrong, P.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Proliferation of atrioventricular cushion mesenchyme of the embryonic avian heart maintained in three-dimensional aggregate culture is stimulated by interaction with the interstitial matrix. Chicken serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1, which stimulates proliferation, induces matrix deposition in regions of the aggregate showing high labeling indices with tritiated thymidine. Dispersed heart mesenchyme interstitial matrix introduced into serum-free culture is incorporated into the aggregate and stimulates cellular proliferation similar to serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1. Proliferation is reversibly inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. It is suggested that transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates the production of interstitial matrix and that a sufficient stimulus for proliferation in this system is the presence of the matrix, which acts as the adhesive support for cellular anchorage.

  5. Structural polymorphism of the actin-espin system: a prototypical system of filaments and linkers in stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Kirstin R; Bartles, James R; Wong, Gerard C L

    2007-02-02

    We examine the interaction between cytoskeletal F-actin and espin 3A, a prototypical actin bundling protein found in sensory cell microvilli, including ear cell stereocilia. Espin induces twist distortions in F-actin as well as facilitates bundle formation. Mutations in one of the two F-actin binding sites of espin, which have been implicated in deafness, can tune espin-actin interactions and radically transform the system's phase behavior. These results are compared to recent theoretical work on the general phase behavior linker-rod systems.

  6. Structural Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin System: A Prototypical System of Filaments and Linkers in Stereocilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin R.; Bartles, James R.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2007-02-01

    We examine the interaction between cytoskeletal F-actin and espin 3A, a prototypical actin bundling protein found in sensory cell microvilli, including ear cell stereocilia. Espin induces twist distortions in F-actin as well as facilitates bundle formation. Mutations in one of the two F-actin binding sites of espin, which have been implicated in deafness, can tune espin-actin interactions and radically transform the system’s phase behavior. These results are compared to recent theoretical work on the general phase behavior linker-rod systems.

  7. Structural Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin System: A Prototypical System of Filaments and Linkers in Stereocilia

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, Kirstin R.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Bartles, James R.

    2007-02-02

    We examine the interaction between cytoskeletal F-actin and espin 3A, a prototypical actin bundling protein found in sensory cell microvilli, including ear cell stereocilia. Espin induces twist distortions in F-actin as well as facilitates bundle formation. Mutations in one of the two F-actin binding sites of espin, which have been implicated in deafness, can tune espin-actin interactions and radically transform the system's phase behavior. These results are compared to recent theoretical work on the general phase behavior linker-rod systems.

  8. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  9. Visualization of actin polymerization in invasive structures of macrophages and carcinoma cells using photoconvertible β-actin-Dendra2 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Dovas, Athanassios; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Chen, Xiaoming; Entenberg, David; Condeelis, John; Cox, Dianne

    2011-02-14

    Actin polymerization controls a range of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility and invasion. Generation and elongation of free barbed ends defines the regions of actively polymerizing actin in cells and, consequently, is of importance in the understanding of the mechanisms through which actin dynamics are regulated. Herein we present a method that does not involve cell permeabilization and provides direct visualization of growing barbed ends using photoswitchable β-actin-Dendra2 constructs expressed in murine macrophage and rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines. The method exploits the ability of photoconverted (red) G-actin species to become incorporated into pre-existing (green) actin filaments, visualized in two distinct wavelengths using TIRF microscopy. In growing actin filaments, photoconverted (red) monomers are added to the barbed end while only green monomers are recycled from the pointed end. We demonstrate that incorporation of actin into intact podosomes of macrophages occurs constitutively and is amenable to inhibition by cytochalasin D indicating barbed end incorporation. Additionally, actin polymerization does not occur in quiescent invadopodial precursors of carcinoma cells suggesting that the filaments are capped and following epidermal growth factor stimulation actin incorporation occurs in a single but extended peak. Finally, we show that Dendra2 fused to either the N- or the C-terminus of β-actin profoundly affects its localization and incorporation in distinct F-actin structures in carcinoma cells, thus influencing the ability of monomers to be photoconverted. These data support the use of photoswitchable actin-Dendra2 constructs as powerful tools in the visualization of free barbed ends in living cells.

  10. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  11. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient.

  12. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass.

    PubMed

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.

  13. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    PubMed Central

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc. PMID:26988919

  14. Mutational activation of BRAF confers sensitivity to transforming growth factor beta inhibitors in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Spender, Lindsay C.; Ferguson, G. John; Liu, Sijia; Cui, Chao; Girotti, Maria Romina; Sibbet, Gary; Higgs, Ellen B.; Shuttleworth, Morven K.; Hamilton, Tom; Lorigan, Paul; Weller, Michael; Vincent, David F.; Sansom, Owen J.; Frame, Margaret; Dijke, Peter ten; Marais, Richard; Inman, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data implicate elevated transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signalling in BRAF inhibitor drug-resistance mechanisms, but the potential for targeting TGFβ signalling in cases of advanced melanoma has not been investigated. We show that mutant BRAFV600E confers an intrinsic dependence on TGFβ/TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFBR1) signalling for clonogenicity of murine melanocytes. Pharmacological inhibition of the TGFBR1 blocked the clonogenicity of human mutant BRAF melanoma cells through SMAD4-independent inhibition of mitosis, and also inhibited metastasis in xenografted zebrafish. When investigating the therapeutic potential of combining inhibitors of mutant BRAF and TGFBR1, we noted that unexpectedly, low-dose PLX-4720 (a vemurafenib analogue) promoted proliferation of drug-naïve melanoma cells. Pharmacological or pharmacogenetic inhibition of TGFBR1 blocked growth promotion and phosphorylation of SRC, which is frequently associated with vemurafenib-resistance mechanisms. Importantly, vemurafenib-resistant patient derived cells retained sensitivity to TGFBR1 inhibition, suggesting that TGFBR1 could be targeted therapeutically to combat the development of vemurafenib drug-resistance. PMID:27835901

  15. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-01

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. The ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.

  16. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    DOE PAGES

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; ...

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach.more » In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. Lastly, the ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.« less

  17. Demonstration of single crystal growth via solid-solid transformation of a glass

    SciTech Connect

    Savytskii, Dmytro; Knorr, Brian; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jain, Himanshu

    2016-03-18

    Many advanced technologies have relied on the availability of single crystals of appropriate material such as silicon for microelectronics or superalloys for turbine blades. Similarly, many promising materials could unleash their full potential if they were available in a single crystal form. However, the current methods are unsuitable for growing single crystals of these oftentimes incongruently melting, unstable or metastable materials. Here we demonstrate a strategy to overcome this hurdle by avoiding the gaseous or liquid phase, and directly converting glass into a single crystal. Specifically, Sb2S3 single crystals are grown in Sb-S-I glasses as an example of this approach. In this first unambiguous demonstration of an all-solid-state glass → crystal transformation, extraneous nucleation is avoided relative to crystal growth via spatially localized laser heating and inclusion of a suitable glass former in the composition. Lastly, the ability to fabricate patterned single-crystal architecture on a glass surface is demonstrated, providing a new class of micro-structured substrate for low cost epitaxial growth, active planar devices, etc.

  18. Characterization of latent transforming growth factor-beta 2 from monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lioubin, M N; Madisen, L; Roth, R A; Purchio, A F

    1991-05-01

    Serum-free medium conditioned by BSC-40 cells was analyzed for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF beta 2)-related proteins. Western blot analysis was performed using site-specific antipeptide antibodies directed against the pro- and mature regions of the TGF beta 2 precursor. When conditioned medium was analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, proteins with mol wt of 53 kDa (containing both mature and proregion sequences), 34-38 kDa (containing proregion sequences only), and 12 kDa (containing mature sequences) were detected. Under nonreducing conditions, complexes of 60- to 80-kDa, 160- to 200-kDa, as well as 24-kDa mature dimers were seen. Cleavage of mature TGF beta 2 from its precursor was inhibited by monensin and chloroquin, but not by ammonium chloride or methylamine. Two peaks of bioactivity were detected after fractionation on a TSK column corresponding to mol wt of 130 and 400 kDa. These peaks contained TGF beta 2 and pro-TGF beta 2 proteins. Partial purification of the 130-kDa complex followed by N-glyconase digestion indicated that the pro-TGF beta 2 proteins were glycosylated. These data demonstrate that BSC-40 cells secrete mature TGF beta 2 complexed with proregion-containing proteins and suggest that this association may contribute to the latency phenomena observed with respect to this growth regulator.

  19. Promotion of embryonic chick limb cartilage differentiation by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Kulyk, W M; Rodgers, B J; Greer, K; Kosher, R A

    1989-10-01

    This study represents a first step in investigating the possible involvement of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in the regulation of embryonic chick limb cartilage differentiation. TGF-beta 1 and 2 (1-10 ng/ml) elicit a striking increase in the accumulation of Alcian blue, pH 1-positive cartilage matrix, and a corresponding twofold to threefold increase in the accumulation of 35S-sulfate- or 3H-glucosamine-labeled sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) by high density micromass cultures prepared from the cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds or the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge mesenchyme of stage 25 wing buds. Moreover, TGF-beta causes a striking (threefold to sixfold) increase in the steady-state cytoplasmic levels of mRNAs for cartilage-characteristic type II collagen and the core protein of cartilage-specific proteoglycan. Only a brief (2 hr) exposure to TGF-beta at the initiation of culture is sufficient to stimulate chondrogenesis, indicating that the growth factor is acting at an early step in the process. Furthermore, TGF-beta promotes the formation of cartilage matrix and cartilage-specific gene expression in low density subconfluent spot cultures of limb mesenchymal cells, which are situations in which little, or no chondrogenic differentiation normally occurs. These results provide strong incentive for considering and further investigating the role of TGF-beta in the control of limb cartilage differentiation.

  20. Theory of Crystal Growth, Kinetics of Dissolution and Transformation of Calcium Phosphates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwu

    The kink density along a (01) step on the (001) face of a Kossel crystal is derived from a kinetic steady state approach by considering the elementary events at the step. When the kink formation energy, epsilon , is very high compared with the thermal energy kT, the kink density, rho, is found to be a function of the saturation ratio, S. For S > 1, rho = 2a-1S^ {1over 2}exp(-epsilon /kT) while for S < 1, rho = 2a^{-1}exp( -epsilon/kT)/(2-S)^ {1over 2}. This finding may provide a theoretical background for interpreting the observed growth kinetics of many sparingly soluble salts in aqueous solutions. The above approach is extended to analyze the configuration of a surface step of an AB crystal with NaCl type of lattice. It is found that the growth rate of an electrolyte crystal cannot be defined solely by the thermodynamic driving forces even when integration is the rate determining step. The rate also depends on the lattice ion activity ratio and relative frequencies of integration of A and B ions into kink sites on a step. At a given driving force, a maximum growth rate can be attained at a certain ratio of lattice ion activities. The dual constant composition (DCC) method is developed which enables the kinetics of phase transformation to be studied at constant driving forces. The applicability of this novel approach is verified in the investigation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP) transformation. In these studies, the concentrations of total calcium and phosphate are maintained constant to within 2% with the pH held to within +/-0.003 during the reaction. The dissolution kinetics of DCPD and OCP has been investigated using CC method at 37^circ C over a wide range of experimental conditions. Both processes can be generally described by a combined volume and surface diffusion mechanism with varying degrees of volume resistance at different pH's and solution hydrodynamics. The decrease in the dissolution rate with the extent of

  1. Inhibition of liver fibrosis by solubilized coenzyme Q10: Role of Nrf2 activation in inhibiting transforming growth factor-beta1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Lim, Sung Chul; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kwak, Mi Kyong; Kang, Keon Wook

    2009-11-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an endogenous antioxidant, is important in oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. It has anti-diabetic and anti-cardiovascular disease effects, but its ability to protect against liver fibrosis has not been studied. Here, we assessed the ability of solubilized CoQ10 to improve dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrogenesis in mice. DMN treatments for 3 weeks produced a marked liver fibrosis as assessed by histopathological examination and tissue 4-hydroxyproline content. Solubilized CoQ10 (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly inhibited both the increases in fibrosis score and 4-hydroxyproline content induced by DMN. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited increases in the transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) mRNA and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) protein by DMN. Interestingly, hepatic glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione S-transferase A2 (GSTA2) were up-regulated in mice treated with CoQ10. Solubilized CoQ10 also up-regulated antioxidant enzymes such as catalytic subunits of GCL and GSTA2 via activating NF-E2 related factor2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Moreover, CoQ10's inhibition of alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 expressions disappeared in Nrf2-null MEF cells. In contrast, Nrf2 overexpression significantly decreased the basal expression levels of alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 in Nrf2-null MEF cells. These results demonstrated that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited DMN-induced liver fibrosis through suppression of TGF-beta1 expression via Nrf2/ARE activation.

  2. Reduction of Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Liver Fibrosis by the Novel Gene Regulator PI Polyamide Targeting Transforming Growth Factor β1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Inami, Makiko; Fukushima, Akiko; Ueno, Takahiro; Yamada, Tsutomu; Tsunemi, Akiko; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Fukuda, Noboru; Soma, Masayoshi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide is a novel gene regulating agent that competitively inhibits transcription factor binding to the promoter of the specific target gene. Liver fibrosis is an integral stage in the development of chronic liver disease, and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is known to play a central role in the progression of this entity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 on rat liver fibrosis. PI polyamide was designed to inhibit activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor binding to the TGFβ1 gene promoter. The effect of PI polyamide on hepatic stellate cells was evaluated by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in RI-T cells. To determine the effect of PI polyamide in vivo, PI polyamide was intravenously administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg/week in dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced rat model of liver fibrosis. Treatment of RI-T cells with 1.0 µM PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 significantly inhibited TGFβ1 mRNA expression. Azan staining showed that DMN treatment significantly increased areas of fibrous materials compared with controls. PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 significantly decreased the fibrous area compared with DMN group. mRNA expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were significantly increased in DMN-treated group compared with control. Treatment with TGFβ1 PI polyamide significantly decreased mRNA expression of these genes compared with DMN group. The novel gene regulator PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 may be a feasible therapeutic agent for the treatment of chronic liver disease.

  3. Attenuation of Tubular Injury and Renal Fibrosis by TI-HU-YIN via Reduction in Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Expression in Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Mice.

    PubMed

    Tarng, Der-Cherng; Liu, I-Shan; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Chen, Nien-Jung

    2015-12-31

    TI-HU-YIN (JCKD), a compound composed of many Chinese herbs, is hypothesized to attenuate renal tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. Moreover, its renoprotective effects were assessed in animal and in vitro studies. First, male C57BL/6 mice were under sham operation or unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) surgery, and then treated with phosphate buffer solution (PBS), aliskirin and valsartan (A+V), and JCKD for 14 days. At 7 and 14 days, mice were sacrificed and the kidney tissues were assessed for histopathological changes and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression. As compared to sham group, UUO-PBS group had more serious tubular dilatation and injury, α-smooth muscle actin-positive areas, F4/80-positive macrophages, and interstitial fibrosis. Impressively, these pathologic changes were significantly attenuated in UUO mice both treated with JCKD and A+V as compared to UUO-PBS group. At 14 days, TGF-β1 expression was significantly suppressed in kidney tissues of UUO-JCKD group as well as in UUO-A+V group. Second, TGF-β1 production was increased in macrophage J774 cells and NRK-52E proximal tubular cells stimulated by angiotensin (Ang)-II at 10 nM for 24 h and at 1 nM for 48 h, respectively. JCKD (≥ 400 μg/ml) inhibited the TGF-β1 production at baseline and stimulated by Ang II in both cell lines. Our study showed that JCKD reduced renal injury, macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis possibly through suppressing the TGF-β1 expression in UUO mice. Accordingly, JCKD is potential to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease. Further studies are needed to validate its renoprotective effects in the inhibition of TGF-β1 expression and the amelioration of renal fibrosis.

  4. Response of Fibroblasts to Transforming Growth Factor-β1 on Two-Dimensional and in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), an important cytokine with multiple functions, is secreted during wound healing. Previous studies have utilized two-dimensional (2D) cell culture to elucidate the functions of TGF-β1; however, 2D culture does not represent the complex three-dimensional (3D) in vivo environment. Using a synthetic hyaluronan (HA) extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel, we investigated the effect of TGF-β1 on fibroblasts cultured in three conditions—on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), on HA (2D), and in HA (3D). After TGF-β1 treatment (0.1 to 20 ng/mL), morphological features and ECM regulation were analyzed by immunocytochemistry, Western blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and zymogram assays. On TCP, cells showed the typical spindle shape with strong alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) staining of cytoplasmic myofilaments along the cell axes after TGF-β1 treatment; on HA (2D), spindle-shape cells showed little α-SMA staining; in HA (3D), cells were smaller and rounded with less α-SMA deposition. The α-SMA gene and protein expression on TCP were significantly upregulated by TGF-β1, but TGF-β1 did not induce α-SMA expression in the presence of HA (both 2D and 3D). 3D HA culture significantly downregulated collagen I, III, and fibronectin expression, increased matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 2 (MMP1/MMP2) activity, upregulated MMP1 mRNA and downregulated TIMP3 mRNA expression. This study suggested that exogenous HA, particularly in 3D culture, appears to suppress ECM production, enhances ECM degradation and remodeling, and inhibits myofibroblast differentiation without decreasing TGF-β receptor expression. PMID:22734649

  5. Lactic Acid is Elevated in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Induces Myofibroblast Differentiation Via pH-Dependent Activation of Transforming Growth Factor-β

    SciTech Connect

    Kottman, R. M.; Kulkarni, Ajit A.; Smolnycki, Katie A.; Lyda, Elizabeth; Dahanayake, Thinesh; Salibi, Rami; Honnons, Sylvie; Jones, Carolyn; Isern, Nancy G.; Hu, Jian Z.; Nathan, Steven D.; Grant, Geraldine; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2012-10-15

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex disease for which the pathogenesis is poorly understood. In this study, we identified lactic acid as a metabolite that is elevated in the lung tissue of patients with IPF. Objectives: This study examines the effect of lactic acid on myofibroblast differentiation and pulmonary fibrosis. Methods:We used metabolomic analysis to examine cellular metabolism in lung tissuefrom patients with IPFanddeterminedthe effects of lactic acid and lactate dehydrogenase-5 (LDH5) overexpression on myofibroblast differentiation and transforming growth factor (TGF)-b activation in vitro. Measurements and Main Results: Lactic acid concentrations from healthy and IPF lung tissue were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; a-smooth muscle actin, calponin, and LDH5 expression were assessed by Western blot of cell culture lysates. Lactic acid and LDH5 were significantly elevated in IPF lung tissue compared with controls. Physiologic concentrations of lactic acid induced myofibroblast differentiation via activation of TGF-b. TGF-b induced expression of LDH5 via hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF1a). Importantly, overexpression of both HIF1a and LDH5 in human lung fibroblasts induced myofibroblast differentiation and synergized with low dose TGF-b to induce differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of both HIF1a and LDH5 inhibited TGF-b–induced myofibroblast differentiation. Conclusions: We have identified the metabolite lactic acid as an important mediator of myofibroblast differentiation via a pHdependent activation of TGF-b. We propose that the metabolic milieu of the lung, and potentially other tissues, is an important driving force behind myofibroblast differentiation and potentially the initiation and progression of fibrotic disorders.

  6. S-adenosylmethionine blocks collagen I production by preventing transforming growth factor-beta induction of the COL1A2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Natalia; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2005-09-02

    To study the anti-fibrogenic mechanisms of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transgenic mice harboring the -17 kb to +54 bp of the collagen alpha2 (I) promoter (COL1A2) cloned upstream from the beta-gal reporter gene were injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to induce fibrosis and coadministered either AdoMet or saline. Control groups received AdoMet or mineral oil. AdoMet lowered the pathology in CCl4-treated mice as shown by transaminase levels, hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome staining, and collagen I expression. beta-Galactosidase activity indicated activation of the COL1A2 promoter in stellate cells from CCl4-treated mice and repression of such activation by AdoMet. Lipid peroxidation, transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) expression, and decreases in glutathione levels were prevented by AdoMet. Incubation of primary stellate cells with AdoMet down-regulated basal and TGFbeta-induced collagen I and alpha-smooth muscle actin proteins. AdoMet metabolites down-regulated collagen I protein and mRNA levels. AdoMet repressed basal and TGFbeta-induced reporter activity in stellate cells transfected with COL1A2 promoter deletion constructs. AdoMet blocked TGFbeta induction of the -378 bp region of the COL1A2 promoter and prevented the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and the binding of Sp1 to the TGFbeta-responsive element. These observations unveil a novel mechanism by which AdoMet could ameliorate liver fibrosis.

  7. Neurons promote macrophage proliferation by producing transforming growth factor-beta2.

    PubMed

    Dobbertin, A; Schmid, P; Gelman, M; Glowinski, J; Mallat, M

    1997-07-15

    The infiltration of bone marrow-derived macrophages into the CNS contributes to growth and reactions of microglia during development or after brain injury. The proliferation of microglial cells is stimulated by colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), an astrocyte-produced growth factor that acts on mononuclear phagocytes. In the present study, we have shown, using an in vitro model system, that rodent neurons obtained from the developing cerebral cortex produce a soluble factor that strongly enhances the proliferation of macrophages cultured in the presence of CSF-1. Both macrophages isolated from the developing brain and those from the adult bone marrow were stimulated. Kinetic analyses of [3H]thymidine incorporation into macrophages indicated that their response to the neuron-derived factor involved a shortening of the cycle of proliferating cells. The effect of neurons on macrophages was blocked in the presence of antibodies neutralizing transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2), whereas recombinant TGF-beta2 stimulated macrophage proliferation in the presence of CSF-1. Neuronal secretion of TGF-beta2 was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR detection of TGF-beta2 transcripts and immunodetection of the protein within neurons and in their culture medium. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical experiments showed neuronal expression of TGF-beta2 in sections of cerebral cortex obtained from 6-d-old rats, an age at which extensive developmental recruitment of macrophages occurs in this cerebral region. Altogether, our results provide direct evidence that neurons have the capacity to promote brain macrophage proliferation and demonstrate the role of TGF-beta2 in this neuronal function.

  8. Effect of transforming growth factor beta on synthesis of glycosaminoglycans by human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dubaybo, B.A.; Thet, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The processes of lung growth, injury, and repair are characterized by alterations in fibroblast synthesis and interstitial distribution of extracellular matrix components. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), which is postulated to play a role in modulating lung repair, alters the distribution of several matrix components such as collagen and fibronectin. We studied the effect of TGF-beta on the synthesis and distribution of the various glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and whether these effects may explain its role in lung repair. Human diploid lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) were exposed to various concentrations of TGF-beta (0-5 nM) for variable periods of time (0-18 h). Newly synthesized GAGs were labeled with either (3H)glucosamine or (35S)sulfate. Individual GAGs were separated by size exclusion chromatography after serial enzymatic and chemical digestions and quantitated using scintillation counting. There was a dose-dependent increase in total GAG synthesis with maximal levels detected after 6 h of exposure. This increase was noted in all individual GAG types measured and was observed in both the cell associated GAGs (cell-matrix fraction) as well as the GAGs released into the medium (medium fraction). In the cell-matrix fraction, TGF-beta increased the proportion of heparan sulfate that was membrane bound as well as the proportion of dermatan sulfate in the intracellular compartment. In the medium fraction, TGF-beta increased the proportion of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate released. We conclude that the role of TGF-beta in lung growth and repair may be related to increased synthesis of GAGs by human lung fibroblasts as well as alterations in the distribution of individual GAGs.

  9. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β signaling promotes epiblast formation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-02-15

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways--TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)--significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only.

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta: its role in ovarian follicle development.

    PubMed

    Rosairo, Davina; Kuyznierewicz, Ileana; Findlay, Jock; Drummond, Ann

    2008-12-01

    Ovarian follicular growth and differentiation in response to transforming growth factor-beta (TGFB) was investigated using postnatal and immature ovarian models. TGFB ligand and receptor mRNAs were present in the rat ovary 4-12 days after birth and at day 25. In order to assess the impact of TGFB1 on follicle growth and transition from the primordial through to the primary and preantral stages of development, we established organ cultures with 4-day-old rat ovaries. After 10 days in culture with FSH, TGFB1, or a combination of the two, ovarian follicle numbers were counted and an assessment of atresia was undertaken using TUNEL. Preantral follicle numbers declined significantly when treated with the combination of FSH and TGFB1, consistent with our morphological appraisal suggesting an increase in atretic primary and preantral follicles. To investigate the mechanisms behind the actions of TGFB1, we isolated granulosa cells and treated them with FSH and TGFB1. Markers of proliferative, steroidogenic, and apoptotic capacity were measured by real-time PCR. Cyclin D2 mRNA expression by granulosa cells was significantly increased in response to the combination of FSH and TGFB. The expression of forkhead homolog in rhabdomyosarcoma (Foxo1) mRNA by granulosa cells was significantly reduced in the presence of both FSH and TGFB1, individually and in combination regimes. By contrast, the expression of steroidogenic enzymes/proteins was largely unaffected by TGFB1. These data suggest an inhibitory role for TGFB1 (in the presence of FSH) in follicle development and progression.

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta stimulates the expression of fibronectin by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Persichitte, K A; Baskin, J B; Nielsen, L D; Clark, R A

    1988-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a 25-kD protein which has regulatory activity over a variety of cell types. It is distinct from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF analogs, and exerts its action via a distinct receptor. Its effect on proliferation or differentiation can be positive or negative depending on the cell type and the presence of other growth factors. It also modulates the expression of cellular products. TGF-beta causes fibroblasts to increase their production of the extracellular matrix components, fibronectin and collagen. Human keratinocytes (HK) are known to have TGF-beta receptors. We wished to study the effect of TGF-beta on the production of extracellular matrix proteins by human keratinocytes in culture. Human keratinocytes were grown in serum-free defined medium (MCDB-153) to about 70% confluence. Following a 16-h incubation in medium lacking EGF and TGF-beta, cells were incubated for 12 h in medium containing varying concentrations of EGF and TGF-beta. Cells were then labeled with 35S-methionine for 10 h in the same conditions. Labeled proteins from the medium were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. TGF-beta at 10 ng/ml induced a sixfold increase in the secretion of fibronectin, as well as an unidentified 50-kD protein. Thrombospondin production was also increased, but not over a generalized twofold increase in the production of all other proteins. EGF, at 10 ng/ml, caused a smaller additive effect. TGF-beta may be an important stimulator of extracellular matrix production by human keratinocytes.

  12. Novel actin depolymerizing macrolide aplyronine A.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Watabe, S; Ozaki, H; Kigoshi, H; Yamada, K; Fusetani, N; Karaki, H

    1996-09-01

    Aplyronine A is a macrolide isolated from Aplysia kurodai. By monitoring fluorescent intensity of pyrenyl-actin, it was found that aplyronine A inhibited both the velocity and the degree of actin polymerization. Aplyronine A also quickly depolymerized F-actin. The kinetics of depolymerization suggest that aplyronine A severs F-actin. The relationship between the concentration of total actin and F-actin at different concentrations of aplyronine A suggests that aplyronine A forms a 1:1 complex with G-actin. From these results, it is concluded that aplyronine A inhibits actin polymerization and depolymerizes F-actin by nibbling. Comparison of the chemical structure of aplyronine A and another actin-depolymerizing macrolide, mycalolide B, suggests that the side-chain but not the macrolide ring of aplyronine A may account for its actin binding and severing activity.

  13. Bacterial Actins and Their Interactors.

    PubMed

    Gayathri, Pananghat

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial actins polymerize in the presence of nucleotide (preferably ATP), form a common arrangement of monomeric interfaces within a protofilament, and undergo ATP hydrolysis-dependent change in stability of the filament-all of which contribute to performing their respective functions. The relative stability of the filament in the ADP-bound form compared to that of ATP and the rate of addition of monomers at the two ends decide the filament dynamics. One of the major differences between eukaryotic actin and bacterial actins is the variety in protofilament arrangements and dynamics exhibited by the latter. The filament structure and the polymerization dynamics enable them to perform various functions such as shape determination in rod-shaped bacteria (MreB), cell division (FtsA), plasmid segregation (ParM family of actin-like proteins), and organelle positioning (MamK). Though the architecture and dynamics of a few representative filaments have been studied, information on the effect of interacting partners on bacterial actin filament dynamics is not very well known. The chapter reviews some of the structural and functional aspects of bacterial actins, with special focus on the effect that interacting partners exert on the dynamics of bacterial actins, and how these assist them to carry out the functions within the bacterial cell.

  14. Long-range conformational effects of proteolytic removal of the last three residues of actin.

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecka-Gołaszewska, H; Mossakowska, M; Woźniak, A; Moraczewska, J; Nakayama, H

    1995-01-01

    Truncated derivatives of actin devoid of either the last two (actin-2C) or three residues (actin-3C) were used to study the role of the C-terminal segment in the polymerization of actin. The monomer critical concentration and polymerization rate increased in the order: intact actin < actin-2C < actin-3C. Conversely, the rate of hydrolysis of actin-bound ATP during spontaneous polymerization of Mg-actin decreased in the same order, so that, for actin-3C, the ATP hydrolysis significantly lagged behind the polymer growth. Probing the conformation of the nucleotide site in the monomer form by measuring the rates of the bound nucleotide exchange revealed a similar change upon removal of either the two or three residues from the C-terminus. The C-terminal truncation also resulted in a slight decrease in the rate of subtilisin cleavage of monomeric actin within the DNAse-I binding loop, whereas in F-actin subunits the susceptibility of this and of another site within this loop, specifically cleaved by a proteinase from Escherichia coli A2 strain, gradually increased upon sequential removal of the two and of the third residue from the C-terminus. From these and other observations made in this work it has been concluded that perturbation of the C-terminal structure in monomeric actin is transmitted to the cleft, where nucleotide and bivalent cation are bound, and to the DNAse-I binding loop on the top of subdomain 2. Further changes at these sites, observed on the polymer level, seem to result from elimination of the intersubunit contact between the C-terminal residues and the DNAse-I binding loop. It is suggested that formation of this contact plays an essential role in regulating the hydrolysis of actin-bound ATP associated with the polymerization process. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:7733893

  15. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  16. K-Ras promotes growth transformation and invasion of immortalized human pancreatic cells by Raf and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M; Groehler, Angela L; Lee, Kwang M; Ouellette, Michel M; Khazak, Vladimir; Der, Channing J

    2007-03-01

    Mutational activation of the K-Ras oncogene is well established as a key genetic step in the development and growth of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the mechanism by which aberrant Ras signaling promotes uncontrolled pancreatic tumor cell growth remains to be fully elucidated. The recent use of primary human cells to study Ras-mediated oncogenesis provides important model cell systems to dissect this mechanism. We have used a model of telomerase-immortalized human pancreatic duct-derived cells (E6/E7/st) to study mechanisms of Ras growth transformation. First, we found that human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes, which block the function of the p53 and Rb tumor suppressors, respectively, and SV40 small t antigen were required to allow mutant K-Ras(12D) growth transformation. Second, K-Ras(12D) caused growth transformation in vitro, including enhanced growth rate and loss of density dependency for growth, anchorage independence, and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane proteins, and tumorigenic transformation in vivo. Third, we determined that the Raf, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Ral guanine nucleotide exchange factor effector pathways were activated, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was not up-regulated persistently. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK and PI3K signaling impaired K-Ras-induced anchorage-independent growth and invasion. In summary, our studies established, characterized, and validated E6/E7/st cells for the study of Ras-induced oncogenesis.

  17. Functional mapping of quantitative trait loci underlying growth trajectories using a transform-both-sides logistic model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongling; Ma, Chang-Xing; Lin, Min; Wang, Zuoheng; Casella, George

    2004-09-01

    The incorporation of developmental control mechanisms of growth has proven to be a powerful tool in mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying growth trajectories. A theoretical framework for implementing a QTL mapping strategy with growth laws has been established. This framework can be generalized to an arbitrary number of time points, where growth is measured, and becomes computationally more tractable, when the assumption of variance stationarity is made. In practice, however, this assumption is likely to be violated for age-specific growth traits due to a scale effect. In this article, we present a new statistical model for mapping growth QTL, which also addresses the problem of variance stationarity, by using a transform-both-sides (TBS) model advocated by Carroll and Ruppert (1984, Journal of the American Statistical Association 79, 321-328). The TBS-based model for mapping growth QTL cannot only maintain the original biological properties of a growth model, but also can increase the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation and the power to detect a QTL responsible for growth differentiation. Using the TBS-based model, we successfully map a QTL governing growth trajectories to a linkage group in an example of forest trees. The statistical and biological properties of the estimates of this growth QTL position and effect are investigated using Monte Carlo simulation studies. The implications of our model for understanding the genetic architecture of growth are discussed.

  18. Actin cytoskeleton: putting a CAP on actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, V A; Theurkauf, W E

    2000-10-05

    Two recent studies have identified a Drosophila homolog of cyclase-associated protein (CAP) as a developmentally important negative regulator of actin polymerization that may also directly mediate signal transduction.

  19. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  20. Actin dynamics and cofilin-actin rods in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bamburg, James R.; Bernstein, Barbara W.

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal abnormalities and synaptic loss, typical of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), are induced by diverse stresses such as neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and energetic stress, each of which may be initiated or enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines or amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Extracellular Aβ-containing plaques and intracellular phospho-tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles are postmortem pathologies required to confirm AD and have been the focus of most studies. However, AD brain, but not normal brain, also have increased levels of cytoplasmic rod-shaped bundles of filaments composed of ADF/cofilin-actin in a 1:1 complex (rods). Cofilin, the major ADF/cofilin isoform in mammalian neurons, severs actin filaments at low cofilin/actin ratios and stabilizes filaments at high cofilin/actin ratios. It binds cooperatively to ADP-actin subunits in F-actin. Cofilin is activated by dephosphorylation and may be oxidized in stressed neurons to form disulfide-linked dimers, required for bundling cofilin-actin filaments into stable rods. Rods form within neurites causing synaptic dysfunction by sequestering cofilin, disrupting normal actin dynamics, blocking transport, and exacerbating mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Aβ and proinflammatory cytokines induce rods through a cellular prion protein-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase and production of reactive oxygen species. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of cofilin biochemistry, rod formation, and the development of cognitive deficits. We will then discuss rod formation as a molecular pathway for synapse loss that may be common between all three prominent current AD hypotheses, thus making rods an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26873625

  1. Increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial fibrosis in transgenic goats expressing transforming growth factor - B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in people with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong association between atrial fibrosis and AF. Transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1) is an essential mediator of atrial fibrosis in animal models and human pat...

  2. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor counteracts transforming growth factor-beta1, through attenuation of connective tissue growth factor induction, and prevents renal fibrogenesis in 5/6 nephrectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsutomu; Okada, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Nishida, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Ueno, Munehisa; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2003-02-01

    We investigated the mechanism of the anti-fibrotic effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the kidney, with respect to its effect on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a down-stream, profibrotic mediator of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). In wild-type (WT) mice with 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx), HGF and TGF-beta1 mRNAs increased transiently in the remnant kidney by week 1 after the Nx, returned to baseline levels, and increased again at weeks 4 to 12. In contrast, CTGF and alpha1(I) procollagen (COLI) mRNAs increased in parallel with HGF and TGF-beta1 during the early stage, but did not re-increase during the late stage. In the case of TGF-beta1 transgenic (TG) mice with 5/6 Nx, excess TGF-beta1 derived from the transgene enhanced CTGF expression significantly in the remnant kidney, accordingly accelerating renal fibrogenesis. Administration of dHGF (5.0 mg/kg/day) to TG mice with 5/6 Nx for 4 weeks from weeks 2 to 6 suppressed CTGF expression in the remnant kidney, attenuating renal fibrosis and improving the survival rate. In an experiment in vitro, renal tubulointerstitial fibroblasts (TFB) were co-cultured with proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC). Pretreatment with HGF reduced significantly CTGF induction in PTEC by TGF-beta1, consequently suppressing COLI synthesis in TFB. In conclusion, HGF can block, at least partially, renal fibrogenesis promoted by TGF-beta1 in the remnant kidney, via attenuation of CTGF induction.

  4. Differential Regulation of Human Thymosin Beta 15 Isoforms by Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1

    PubMed Central

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Barrows, Courtney; Zetter, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified an additional isoform of human thymosin beta 15 (also known as NB-thymosin beta, gene name TMSB15A) transcribed from an independent gene, and designated TMSB15B. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these isoforms were differentially expressed and functional. Our data show that the TMSB15A and TMSB15B isoforms have distinct expression patterns in different tumor cell lines and tissues. TMSB15A was expressed at higher levels in HCT116, DU145, LNCaP and LNCaP-LN3 cancer cells. In MCF-7, SKOV-3, HT1080 and PC-3MLN4 cells, TMSB15A and TMSB15B showed approximately equivalent levels of expression, while TMSB15B was the predominant isoform expressed in PC-3, MDA-MB-231, NCI-H322 and Caco-2 cancer cells. In normal human prostate and prostate cancer tissues, TMSB15A was the predominant isoform expressed. In contrast, normal colon and colon cancer tissue expressed predominantly TMSB15B. The two gene isoforms are also subject to different transcriptional regulation. Treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with transforming growth factor beta 1 repressed TMSB15A expression but had no effect on TMSB15B. siRNA specific to the TMSB15B isoform suppressed cell migration of prostate cancer cells to epidermal growth factor, suggesting a functional role for this second isoform. In summary, our data reveal different expression patterns and regulation of a new thymosin beta 15 gene paralog. This may have important consequences in both tumor and neuronal cell motility. PMID:19296525

  5. Correlation of fibrosis and transforming growth factor-beta type 2 levels in the eye.

    PubMed

    Connor, T B; Roberts, A B; Sporn, M B; Danielpour, D; Dart, L L; Michels, R G; de Bustros, S; Enger, C; Kato, H; Lansing, M

    1989-05-01

    Approximately 1 out of every 10 eyes undergoing surgery for retinal detachment develops excessive intraocular fibrosis that can lead to traction retinal detachment and ultimate blindness. This disease process has been termed proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). The ability to monitor and grade this fibrotic response accurately within the eye as well as the ability to aspirate vitreous cavity fluid bathing the fibrotic tissue makes this an ideal setting in which to investigate the development of fibrosis. Although laboratory studies have recently shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) can enhance fibrosis, little clinical evidence is yet available correlating the level of this or other growth factors with the degree of fibrosis in a clinical setting. We have found that vitreous aspirates from eyes with intraocular fibrosis associated with PVR have more than three times the amount of TGF-beta (1,200 +/- 300 pM [SEM]) found in eyes with uncomplicated retinal detachments without intraocular fibrosis (360 +/- 91 pM [SEM]). Using an in vitro assay, 84-100% of the TGF-beta activity could be blocked with specific antibodies against TGF-beta 2, whereas only 10-21% could be blocked by specific antibodies against TGF-beta 1. TGF-beta 1 was used in an animal model of traction retinal detachment. Since beta 1 and beta 2 have essentially identical biologic effects and only human beta 1 was available in quantities required, beta 1 was chosen for these in vivo studies. The injection of TGF-beta1 plus fibronectin (FN) but not TGF-beta1 alone into the vitreous cavity of rabbits resulted in the increased formation of intraocular fibrosis and traction retinal detachments as compared to control eyes. In previous studies, intravitreal FN levels were also found to be elevated in eyes with intraocular fibrosis.

  6. Potassium inhibits dietary salt-induced transforming growth factor-beta production.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W

    2009-11-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-beta. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-beta demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-beta in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-beta but did not affect production of TGF-beta by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the alpha subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-beta but did not alter TGF-beta production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake.

  7. Impairment of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling in Caveolin-1-deficient Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Rafael; Valverde, Ángela M.; Llorente Izquierdo, Cristina; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Boscá, Lisardo; Martín-Sanz, Paloma

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is the main structural protein of caveolae and plays an important role in various cellular processes such as vesicular transport, cholesterol homeostasis, and signal transduction pathways. The expression and functional role of Cav-1 have been reported in liver and in hepatocyte cell lines, in human cirrhotic liver, and in hepatocellular carcinomas. Previous studies demonstrated that Cav-1 was dispensable for liver regeneration, because Cav-1−/− animals survived and fully regenerated liver function and size after partial hepatectomy. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which the lack of Cav-1 accelerates liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. The data show that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling is impaired in regenerating liver of Cav-1−/− mice and in hepatocytes derived from these animals. TGF-β receptors I and II do not colocalize in the same membrane fraction in the hepatocytes derived from Cav-1−/− mice, as Smad2/3 signaling decreased in the absence of Cav-1 at the time that the transcriptional corepressor SnoN accumulates. Accordingly, the expression of TGF-β target genes, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, is decreased due to the presence of the high levels of SnoN. Moreover, hepatocyte growth factor inhibited TGF-β signaling in the absence of Cav-1 by increasing SnoN expression. Taken together, these data might help to unravel why Cav-1-deficient mice exhibit an accelerated liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy and add new insights on the molecular mechanisms controlling the initial commitment to hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:19966340

  8. Transforming growth factor beta abrogates the effects of hematopoietins on eosinophils and induces their apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Hematopoietins, interleukin (IL)-3, IL-5, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have previously been shown to prolong eosinophil survival and abrogate apoptosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) on eosinophil survival and apoptosis. Eosinophils from peripheral blood of mildly eosinophilic donors were isolated to > 97% purity using discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Eosinophils were cultured with hematopoietins with or without TGF-beta for 4 d and their viability was assessed. We confirmed previous observations that hematopoietins prolonged eosinophil survival and inhibited apoptosis. TGF-beta at concentrations > or = 10(-12) M abrogated the survival- prolonging effects of hematopoietins in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis as determined by DNA fragmentation in agarose gels. The effect of TGF-beta was blocked by an anti-TGF-beta antibody. The anti-TGF-beta antibody also prolonged eosinophil survival on its own. The culture of eosinophils with IL-3 and GM-CSF stimulated the synthesis of GM-CSF and IL-5, respectively, suggesting an autocrine mechanism of growth factor production. TGF-beta inhibited the synthesis of GM-CSF and IL-5 by eosinophils. TGF-beta did not have any effect on the expression of GM-CSF receptors on eosinophils. We also studied the effect of TGF-beta on eosinophil function and found that TGF-beta inhibited the release of eosinophil peroxidase. Thus, TGF-beta seems to inhibit eosinophil survival and function. The inhibition of endogenous synthesis of hematopoietins may be one mechanism by which TGF-beta blocks eosinophil survival and induces apoptosis. PMID:8113672

  9. Intracellular processing of transforming growth factor-beta in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Ceol, M; Vianello, D; Baggio, B; Meani, A; Schleicher, E; Anglani, F; Gambaro, G

    1998-03-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a multifunctional regulator of cell-growth, differentiation and extracellular matrix formation in several physiological conditions. It plays a crucial role in the process of glomerulosclerosis. Mature TGF-beta 1 is secreted as a latent form associated with the latency associated peptide (LAP), and its activation occurs through the LAP cleavage. The intracellular localization and the mechanisms of activation of TGF-beta 1 protein have not been elucidated in the mesangial cell. In the present report we examined the intracellular processing from TGF-beta 1 precursor to the latent-TGF-beta 1 in cultured mesangial cells by immunocytochemistry, using three rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against different epitopes of human TGF-beta 1. The anti-LAP-TGF-beta 1 precursor Ab stained mesangial cells in the perinuclear region and in the cytoplasm in the area corresponding to the rough endoplasmic reticulum; the anti-COOH-terminal fragment of TGF-beta 1 Ab reacted in the same area, in vesicular structures located in the cytoplasm and furthermore, in the mesangial cell clusters, so-called hillocks, with an extracellular pattern; the anti-NH2-terminal fragment of TGF-beta 1 Ab stained only large exocytotic vesicles at the periphery of the cytoplasma. Our investigations suggest a conformational rearrangement of pro-TGF-beta 1 molecule occurring between the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the TGF-beta 1 secretion and support the idea that in mesangial cells the activation of TGF-beta 1 occurs during the secretion process. In conclusion, the processing of TGF-beta 1 in mesangial cells seems to be similar to that one observed in other mesenchymal cells.

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta during carcinogenesis: the shift from epithelial to mesenchymal signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2006-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), changing unphosphorylated Smad3 to its phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). While the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells, JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling is involved in invasion by activated mesenchymal cells. During sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis, TGF-beta signaling confers a selective advantage on tumor cells by shifting from the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway characteristic of mature epithelial cells to the JNK/pSmad3L pathway, which is more characteristic of the state of flux shown by the activated mesenchymal cells. JNK acts as a regulator of TGF-beta signaling by increasing the basal level of pSmad3L available for action in the nuclei of the invasive adenocarcinoma, in the meantime shutting down TGF-beta-dependent nuclear activity of pSmad3C. Loss of epithelial homeostasis and acquisition of a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype are essential for tumor invasion. From the viewpoint of TGF-beta signaling, a key therapeutic aim in cancer would be restoration of the lost tumor suppressor function observed in normal colorectal epithelial cells at the expense of effects promoting aggressive behavior of the adenocarcinoma. Specific inhibitors of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway might prove useful in this respect. In the case of molecularly targeted therapy for human cancer, pSmad3L and pSmad3C could be assessed as biomarkers to evaluate the likely benefit from specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway.

  11. Potassium Inhibits Dietary Salt-Induced Transforming Growth Factor-β Production

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-β. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-β demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-β in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-β but did not affect production of TGF-β by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the α subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-β but did not alter TGF-β production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake. PMID:19738156

  12. Dual pools of actin at presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Bleckert, Adam; Photowala, Huzefa; Alford, Simon

    2012-06-01

    We investigated actin's function in vesicle recycling and exocytosis at lamprey synapses and show that FM1-43 puncta and phalloidin-labeled filamentous actin (F-actin) structures are colocalized, yet recycling vesicles are not contained within F-actin clusters. Additionally, phalloidin also labels a plasma membrane-associated cortical actin. Injection of fluorescent G-actin revealed activity-independent dynamic actin incorporation into presynaptic synaptic vesicle clusters but not into cortical actin. Latrunculin-A, which sequesters G-actin, dispersed vesicle-associated actin structures and prevented subsequent labeled G-actin and phalloidin accumulation at presynaptic puncta, yet cortical phalloidin labeling persisted. Dispersal of presynaptic F-actin structures by latrunculin-A did not disrupt vesicle clustering or recycling or alter the amplitude or kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). However, it slightly enhanced release during repetitive stimulation. While dispersal of presynaptic actin puncta with latrunculin-A failed to disperse synaptic vesicles or inhibit synaptic transmission, presynaptic phalloidin injection blocked exocytosis and reduced endocytosis measured by action potential-evoked FM1-43 staining. Furthermore, phalloidin stabilization of only cortical actin following pretreatment with latrunculin-A was sufficient to inhibit synaptic transmission. Conversely, treatment of axons with jasplakinolide, which induces F-actin accumulation but disrupts F-actin structures in vivo, resulted in increased synaptic transmission accompanied by a loss of phalloidin labeling of cortical actin but no loss of actin labeling within vesicle clusters. Marked synaptic deficits seen with phalloidin stabilization of cortical F-actin, in contrast to the minimal effects of disruption of a synaptic vesicle-associated F-actin, led us to conclude that two structurally and functionally distinct pools of actin exist at presynaptic sites.

  13. Involvement of β- and γ-actin isoforms in actin cytoskeleton organization and migration abilities of bleb-forming human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Simiczyjew, Aleksandra; Mazur, Antonina Joanna; Dratkiewicz, Ewelina; Nowak, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Amoeboid movement is characteristic for rounded cells, which do not form strong adhesion contacts with the ECM and use blebs as migratory protrusions. It is well known that actin is the main component of mature forms of these structures, but the exact role fulfilled by non-muscle actin isoforms β- and γ- in bleb formation and migration of these cells is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to establish the role of β- and γ-actin in migration of bleb-forming cancer cells using isoform-specific antibodies and expression of fluorescently tagged actin isoforms. We observed, after staining with monoclonal antibodies, that both actins are present in these cells in the form of a cortical ring as well as in the area of blebs. Additionally, using simultaneous expression of differentially tagged β- and γ-actin in cells, we observed that the actin isoforms are present together in a single bleb. They were involved during bleb expansion as well as retraction. Also present in the area of these protrusions formed by both isoforms were the bleb markers–ezrin and myosin II. The overexpression of β- or γ-actin led to actin cytoskeletal rearrangement followed by the growth of migration and invasion abilities of examined human colon cancer cells, LS174T line. In summary these data prove that both actin isoforms have an impact on motility of bleb-forming cancer cells. Moreover, we conclude that monoclonal antibodies directed against actin isoforms in combination with the tagged actins are good tools to study their role in important biological processes. PMID:28333953

  14. Regulation of actin catch-slip bonds with a RhoA-formin module

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cho-yin; Lou, Jizhong; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Chien, Shu; Ono, Shoichiro; Zhu, Cheng; McIntire, Larry V.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated cooperatively by force and biochemical signaling. We previously demonstrated that actin depolymerization under force is governed by catch-slip bonds mediated by force-induced K113:E195 salt-bridges. Yet, the biochemical regulation as well as the functional significance of actin catch bonds has not been elucidated. Using AFM force-clamp experiments, we show that formin controlled by RhoA switches the actin catch-slip bonds to slip-only bonds. SMD simulations reveal that the force does not induce the K113:E195 interaction when formin binds to actin K118 and E117 residues located at the helical segment extending to K113. Actin catch-slip bonds are suppressed by single residue replacements K113E and E195K that interrupt the force-induced K113:E195 interaction; and this suppression is rescued by a K113E/E195K double mutant (E/K) restoring the interaction in the opposite orientation. These results support the biological significance of actin catch bonds, as they corroborate reported observations that RhoA and formin switch force-induced actin cytoskeleton alignment and that either K113E or E195K induces yeast cell growth defects rescued by E/K. Our study demonstrates how the mechano-regulation of actin dynamics is modulated by biochemical signaling molecules, and suggests that actin catch bonds may be important in cell functions. PMID:27731359

  15. Mechanical detection of a long-range actin network emanating from a biomimetic cortex.

    PubMed

    Bussonnier, Matthias; Carvalho, Kevin; Lemière, Joël; Joanny, Jean-François; Sykes, Cécile; Betz, Timo

    2014-08-19

    Actin is ubiquitous globular protein that polymerizes into filaments and forms networks that participate in the force generation of eukaryotic cells. Such forces are used for cell motility, cytokinesis, and tissue remodeling. Among those actin networks, we focus on the actin cortex, a dense branched network beneath the plasma membrane that is of particular importance for the mechanical properties of the cell. Here we reproduce the cellular cortex by activating actin filament growth on a solid surface. We unveil the existence of a sparse actin network that emanates from the surface and extends over a distance that is at least 10 times larger than the cortex itself. We call this sparse actin network the "actin cloud" and characterize its mechanical properties with optical tweezers. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the actin cloud is mechanically relevant and that it should be taken into account because it can sustain forces as high as several picoNewtons (pN). In particular, it is known that in plant cells, actin networks similar to the actin cloud have a role in positioning the nucleus; in large oocytes, they play a role in driving chromosome movement. Recent evidence shows that such networks even prevent granule condensation in large cells.

  16. Regulation of actin catch-slip bonds with a RhoA-formin module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cho-Yin; Lou, Jizhong; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Chien, Shu; Ono, Shoichiro; Zhu, Cheng; McIntire, Larry V.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated cooperatively by force and biochemical signaling. We previously demonstrated that actin depolymerization under force is governed by catch-slip bonds mediated by force-induced K113:E195 salt-bridges. Yet, the biochemical regulation as well as the functional significance of actin catch bonds has not been elucidated. Using AFM force-clamp experiments, we show that formin controlled by RhoA switches the actin catch-slip bonds to slip-only bonds. SMD simulations reveal that the force does not induce the K113:E195 interaction when formin binds to actin K118 and E117 residues located at the helical segment extending to K113. Actin catch-slip bonds are suppressed by single residue replacements K113E and E195K that interrupt the force-induced K113:E195 interaction; and this suppression is rescued by a K113E/E195K double mutant (E/K) restoring the interaction in the opposite orientation. These results support the biological significance of actin catch bonds, as they corroborate reported observations that RhoA and formin switch force-induced actin cytoskeleton alignment and that either K113E or E195K induces yeast cell growth defects rescued by E/K. Our study demonstrates how the mechano-regulation of actin dynamics is modulated by biochemical signaling molecules, and suggests that actin catch bonds may be important in cell functions.

  17. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  18. Spatial signalling mediated by the transforming growth factor-β signalling pathway during tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Yu; Sun, Ke; Xu, Ruo-Shi; Tan, Jia-Li; Pi, Cai-Xia; Wan, Mian; Peng, Yi-Ran; Ye, Ling; Zheng, Li-Wei; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tooth development relies on sequential and reciprocal interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues, and it is continuously regulated by a variety of conserved and specific temporal-spatial signalling pathways. It is well known that suspensions of tooth germ cells can form tooth-like structures after losing the positional information provided by the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. However, the particular stage in which the tooth germ cells start to form tooth-like structures after losing their positional information remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the reassociation of tooth germ cells suspension from different morphological stages during tooth development and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in this process. Four tooth morphological stages were designed in this study. The results showed that tooth germ cells formed odontogenic tissue at embryonic day (E) 14.5, which is referred to as the cap stage, and they formed tooth-like structures at E16.5, which is referred to as the early bell stage, and E18.5, which is referred to as the late bell stage. Moreover, the transforming growth factor-β signalling pathway might play a role in this process. PMID:27982023

  19. Integration of sexual trauma in a religious narrative: Transformation, resolution and growth among contemplative nuns

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Roland; Leavey, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The psychological consequences of sexual abuse are generally serious and enduring, particularly when the perpetrator is known and trusted by the survivor. This paper explores the experiences of five contemplative nuns who were sexually abused by priests and the spiritual journeys that followed. In the context of an ethnographic study of contemplative practice, participant observation and in-depth interviews were used to examine the ways that the nuns sought to make sense of their experiences through a long process of solitary introspection. The pursuit of meaning was shaped by religious beliefs relating to forgiveness, sacrifice, and salvation. Thus, trauma was transformed into a symbolic religious narrative that shaped their sense of identity. They were able to restructure core beliefs and to manage their current relationships with priests more securely. They described regaining their spiritual well-being in ways that suggest a form of posttraumatic spiritual growth. We conclude by discussing the findings in the light of the existing literature on the interaction of trauma and spirituality. PMID:23296289

  20. Ion beam-induced amorphous-to-tetragonal phase transformation and grain growth of nanocrystalline zirconia.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Zhang, Jiaming; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen; Lu, Fengyuan; Haider, Hani; Garvin, Kevin; Weber, W J; Ewing, Rodney C

    2009-06-17

    Nanocrystalline zirconia has recently attracted extensive research interest due to its unique mechanical, thermal and electrical properties as compared with bulk zirconia counterparts, and it is of particular importance for controlling the phase stability of different polymorphs (amorphous, cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic phases) in different size regimes. In this work, we performed ion beam bombardments on bilayers (amorphous and cubic) of nano-zirconia using 1 MeV Kr2+ irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis reveals that amorphous zirconia transforms to a tetragonal structure under irradiation at room temperature, suggesting that the tetragonal phase is more energetically favorable under these conditions. The final grain size of the tetragonal zirconia can be controlled by irradiation conditions. A slower kinetics in the grain growth from cubic nanocrystalline zirconia was found as compared with that for the tetragonal grains recrystallized from the amorphous layer. The radiation-induced nanograins of tetragonal ZrO2 are stable at ambient conditions and maintain their physical integrity over a long period of time after irradiation. These results demonstrated that ion beam methods provide the means to control the phase stability and structure of zirconia polymorphs.

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  2. Seeded growth of metal-doped plasmonic oxide heterodimer nanocrystals and their chemical transformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingchen; Reifsnyder Hickey, Danielle; Fei, Jiayang; Diroll, Benjamin T; Paik, Taejong; Chen, Jun; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-04-02

    We have developed a generalized seeded-growth methodology for the synthesis of monodisperse metal-doped plasmonic oxide heterodimer nanocrystals (NCs) with a near-unity morphological yield. Using indium-doped cadmium oxide (ICO) as an example, we show that a wide variety of preformed metal NCs (Au, Pt, Pd, FePt, etc.) can serve as the seeds for the tailored synthesis of metal-ICO heterodimers with exquisite size, shape, and composition control, facilitated by the delayed nucleation mechanism of the CdO phase. The metal-ICO heterodimers exhibit broadly tunable near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonances, and dual plasmonic bands are observed for Au-ICO heterodimers. We further demonstrate that the oxide domain of the Au-ICO heterodimers can be selectively and controllably transformed into a series of partially and completely hollow cadmium chalcogenide nanoarchitectures with unprecedented structural complexity, leaving the metal domain intact. Our work not only represents an exciting addition to the rapidly expanding library of chemical reactions that produce colloidal hybrid NCs, but it also provides a general route for the bottom-up chemical design of multicomponent metal-oxide-semiconductor NCs in a rational and sequential manner.

  3. Transforming Growth Factors β Coordinate Cartilage and Tendon Differentiation in the Developing Limb Mesenchyme*

    PubMed Central

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I.; Montero, Juan A.; Martinez-Cue, Carmen; Garcia-Porrero, Juan A.; Hurle, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling has an increasing interest in regenerative medicine as a potential tool to repair cartilages, however the chondrogenic effect of this pathway in developing systems is controversial. Here we have analyzed the function of TGFβ signaling in the differentiation of the developing limb mesoderm in vivo and in high density micromass cultures. In these systems highest signaling activity corresponded with cells at stages preceding overt chondrocyte differentiation. Interestingly treatments with TGFβs shifted the differentiation outcome of the cultures from chondrogenesis to fibrogenesis. This phenotypic reprogramming involved down-regulation of Sox9 and Aggrecan and up-regulation of Scleraxis, and Tenomodulin through the Smad pathway. We further show that TGFβ signaling up-regulates Sox9 in the in vivo experimental model system in which TGFβ treatments induce ectopic chondrogenesis. Looking for clues explaining the dual role of TGFβ signaling, we found that TGFβs appear to be direct inducers of the chondrogenic gene Sox9, but the existence of transcriptional repressors of TGFβ signaling modulates this role. We identified TGF-interacting factor Tgif1 and SKI-like oncogene SnoN as potential candidates for this inhibitory function. Tgif1 gene regulation by TGFβ signaling correlated with the differential chondrogenic and fibrogenic effects of this pathway, and its expression pattern in the limb marks the developing tendons. In functional experiments we found that Tgif1 reproduces the profibrogenic effect of TGFβ treatments. PMID:19717568

  4. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Contreras, Julio; Celaya, Adelaida M.; Camarero, Guadalupe; Rivera, Teresa; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-β as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-β1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-β1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-β1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage. PMID:25852546

  5. Molecular and functional characterization of goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed

    Haddad, George; Hanington, Patrick C; Wilson, Elaine C; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a pleiotropic cytokine with important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, migration, activation and de-activation. It is one of the first cytokines released during an immune response and plays a strong immunomodulatory role in the activation and subsequent de-activation of macrophages and other immune cells. TGF-beta is a highly conserved molecule, and members of the TGF superfamily can be found in organisms as evolutionarily distant as arthropods. In this manuscript, we described the identification of a goldfish TGF-beta molecule, which was highly expressed in the skin, kidney and spleen of the goldfish and its expression was up-regulated in macrophages treated with LPS or recombinant goldfish TNF-alpha. Goldfish TGF-beta shared a high amino acid identity with, and was phylogenetically related to, TGF-beta1 of other teleost fish, birds, amphibians and mammals. Recombinant goldfish TGF-beta (rTGF-beta) induced the proliferation of a goldfish fibroblast cell line (CCL71) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, rTGF-beta down-regulated the nitric oxide response of TNF-alpha-activated macrophages. This is the first report of teleost TGF-beta function in an ectothermic vertebrate.

  6. Recruitment and development of the follicle; the roles of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily.

    PubMed

    Findlay, J K; Drummond, A E; Dyson, M L; Baillie, A J; Robertson, D M; Ethier, J-F

    2002-05-31

    Peripheral endocrine hormones and local paracrine and autocrine factors contribute, in a coordinated fashion, to the processes of recruitment, development or atresia, selection and ovulation of follicles. Among the local ovarian factors, there is growing evidence from genetic and experimental data that many members of the transforming growth factor (TGFbeta) superfamily have a biological role to play in folliculogenesis. These members include activin, inhibin, TGFbeta, BMP, GDF9 and perhaps MIS. In this review, we discuss the potential roles of the TGFbeta superfamily members, in particular activin, during folliculogenesis. Since the actions of these factors are determined by ligand availability, receptor expression and modulation of their signal transduction pathways, we also collate information on the expression of their signalling components in the follicle. We conclude that the TGFbeta superfamily signalling pathways, in particular activin's pathway, reside in the ovary. Furthermore, follistatin and beta-glycan-components of the accessory binding protein system that modifies activin action-are also present in follicles. In the post-natal rat ovary, the changes in receptor/Smad expression coincide with granulosa cell proliferation and antrum formation. We hypothesise that these pathway components are expressed in a temporal and cell-specific manner to meet the changing demands of cells during follicular development. The analysis of the components of the signal transduction pathways of the TGFbeta family members in populations of defined follicles and the identification of activated pathways in individually stimulated follicles should help clarify the roles of the TGFbeta members in folliculogenesis.

  7. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  8. Adaptive and innate transforming growth factor beta signaling impact herpes simplex virus 1 latency and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Mott, Kevin R; Wechsler, Steven L; Flavell, Richard A; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-11-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play important protective roles by combating herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a key negative cytokine regulator of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Yet, it is unknown whether TGF-β signaling in either immune compartment impacts HSV-1 replication and latency. We undertook genetic approaches to address these issues by infecting two different dominant negative TGF-β receptor type II transgenic mouse lines. These mice have specific TGF-β signaling blockades in either T cells or innate cells. Mice were ocularly infected with HSV-1 to evaluate the effects of restricted innate or adaptive TGF-β signaling during acute and latent infections. Limiting innate cell but not T cell TGF-β signaling reduced virus replication in the eyes of infected mice. On the other hand, blocking TGF-β signaling in either innate cells or T cells resulted in decreased latency in the trigeminal ganglia of infected mice. Furthermore, inhibiting TGF-β signaling in T cells reduced cell lysis and leukocyte infiltration in corneas and trigeminal ganglia during primary HSV-1 infection of mice. These findings strongly suggest that TGF-β signaling, which generally functions to dampen immune responses, results in increased HSV-1 latency.

  9. Transforming growth factor alpha induces collagen degradation and cell migration in differentiating human epidermal raft cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Turksen, K; Choi, Y; Fuchs, E

    1991-01-01

    When cultured on plastic and treated with transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), human keratinocytes exhibit an increase in proliferation at the colony periphery, apparently as a consequence of enhanced cell migration (Barrandon and Green, 1987). To investigate the effects of TGF alpha on a differentiating stratified squamous epithelium and to begin to examine the molecular basis mediating this influence, we cultured human epidermal cells on a gelled lattice of collagen and fibroblasts, floating on the air-liquid interface. Under these conditions, raft cultures differentiate and exhibit morphological and biochemical features of human skin in vivo (Asselineau et al., 1986; Kopan et al., 1987). When 3-wk-old raft cultures were treated with TGF alpha, basal cells showed a marked increase in cell proliferation. At elevated concentrations of TGF alpha, the organization of cells within the artificial tissue changed and islands of basal cells entered the collagen matrix. Biochemical analysis of the response revealed that type I collagenase and gelatinase were induced by keratinocytes within 12 h after TGF alpha treatment. In contrast, invasion of basal cells into the collagen matrix was not significant until 48-72 h post-treatment, suggesting that collagenase and gelatinase production may be a prerequisite to this phenomenon. These results have important implications for the possible role of TGF alpha in squamous cell carcinoma and tumor invasion. Images PMID:1663788

  10. Metformin is a novel suppressor for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Zhang, Jianshu; Xu, Zhonghe; Feng, Yenan; Zhang, Mingliang; Liu, Jianli; Chen, Ruifei; Shen, Jing; Wu, Jimin; Lu, Zhizhen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Jingyuan; Zhang, Youyi

    2016-06-01

    Metformin is a widely used first-line antidiabetic drug that has been shown to protect against a variety of specific diseases in addition to diabetes, including cardiovascular disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the diverse therapeutic effects of metformin remain elusive. Here, we report that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, is a novel target of metformin. Using a surface plasmon resonance-based assay, we identified the direct binding of metformin to TGF-β1 and found that metformin inhibits [125I]-TGF-β1 binding to its receptor. Furthermore, based on molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, metformin was predicted to interact with TGF-β1 at its receptor-binding domain. Single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed that metformin reduces the binding probability but not the binding force of TGF-β1 to its type II receptor. Consequently, metformin suppresses type II TGF-β1 receptor dimerization upon exposure to TGF-β1, which is essential for downstream signal transduction. Thus, our results indicate that metformin is a novel TGF-β suppressor with therapeutic potential for numerous diseases in which TGF-β1 hyperfunction is indicated.

  11. Transforming growth factor-β2 is sequestered in preterm human milk by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Coffing, Hayley P; Sankaranarayanan, Nehru Viji; Jin, Yingzi; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Frost, Brandy L; Blanco, Cynthia L; Patel, Aloka L; Meier, Paula P; Garzon, Steven A; Desai, Umesh R; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-08-01

    Human milk contains biologically important amounts of transforming growth factor-β2 isoform (TGF-β2), which is presumed to protect against inflammatory gut mucosal injury in the neonate. In preclinical models, enterally administered TGF-β2 can protect against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis, an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In this study, we investigated whether TGF-β bioactivity in human preterm milk could be enhanced for therapeutic purposes by adding recombinant TGF-β2 (rTGF-β2) to milk prior to feeding. Milk-borne TGF-β bioactivity was measured by established luciferase reporter assays. Molecular interactions of TGF-β2 were investigated by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and immunoblots, computational molecular modeling, and affinity capillary electrophoresis. Addition of rTGF-β2 (20-40 nM) to human preterm milk samples failed to increase TGF-β bioactivity in milk. Milk-borne TGF-β2 was bound to chondroitin sulfate (CS) containing proteoglycan(s) such as biglycan, which are expressed in high concentrations in milk. Chondroitinase treatment of milk increased the bioactivity of both endogenous and rTGF-β2, and consequently, enhanced the ability of preterm milk to suppress LPS-induced NF-κB activation in macrophages. These findings provide a mechanism for the normally low bioavailability of milk-borne TGF-β2 and identify chondroitinase digestion of milk as a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of preterm milk.

  12. Transforming Growth Factor β Drives Hemogenic Endothelium Programming and the Transition to Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rui; Pinheiro, Philip; Joseph, Nicola; Peterkin, Tessa; Koth, Jana; Repapi, Emmanouela; Bonkhofer, Florian; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are self-renewing multipotent stem cells that generate mature blood lineages throughout life. They, together with hematopoietic progenitor cells (collectively known as HSPCs), emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the floor of the embryonic dorsal aorta by an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is required for HSPC specification and that it regulates the expression of the Notch ligand Jagged1a in endothelial cells prior to EHT, in a striking parallel with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The requirement for TGFβ is two fold and sequential: autocrine via Tgfβ1a and Tgfβ1b produced in the endothelial cells themselves, followed by a paracrine input of Tgfβ3 from the notochord, suggesting that the former programs the hemogenic endothelium and the latter drives EHT. Our findings have important implications for the generation of HSPCs from pluripotent cells in vitro.

  13. Gene polymorphism in transforming growth factor-beta codon 10 is associated with susceptibility to Giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, H; Hajilooi, M; Fallah, M; Khyabanchi, O; Haidari, M

    2009-12-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies have a central role in anti-Giardial defence. It has been demonstrated that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) stimulates B lymphocytes to produce and secrete S-IgA. We sought to determine the association between TGF-beta1 polymorphism (T+869C) with susceptibility to Giardiasis. The TGF-beta1 genotypes and levels of salivary (S-IgA) were analysed in individuals with Giardiasis (97 symptomatic and 57 asymptomatic) and controls (n = 92). Individuals with symptomatic Giardiasis had the lowest levels of S-IgA compared to individuals in asymptomatic Giardiasis and control groups (97%, 73% and 43%, <1 g L(-1), respectively, P = 0.002). The frequency of allele C and CC genotypes of TGF-beta1 polymorphism was significantly higher among symptomatic patients than asymptomatic and control groups. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the individuals homozygous for allele C of TGF-beta1 had a significantly higher risk for symptomatic Giardiasis with odds ratio of 2.76 (95% CI: 3.88, 1.71, P = 0.007). Among the participants with TT genotype per cent of individuals with S-IgA level of more than 1 g L(-1) was almost twice the percentage in CC genotype individuals (14% versus 7% respectively P = 0.01). Our data suggest that CC genotype of TGF-beta1 polymorphism at codon 10 is associated with occurrence of Giardiasis.

  14. Aberrant Transforming Growth Factor-β Activation Recruits Mesenchymal Stem Cells During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Xie, Liang; Tintani, Francis; Xie, Hui; Li, Changjun; Cui, Zhuang; Wan, Mei; Zu, Xiongbing; Qi, Lin; Cao, Xu

    2017-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the overgrowth of prostate tissues with high prevalence in older men. BPH pathogenesis is not completely understood, but it is believed to be a result of de novo overgrowth of prostatic stroma. In this study, we show that aberrant activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mobilizes mesenchymal/stromal stem cells (MSCs) in circulating blood, which are recruited for the prostatic stromal hyperplasia. Elevated levels of active TGF-β were observed in both a phenylephrine-induced prostatic hyperplasia mouse model and human BPH tissues. Nestin lineage tracing revealed that 39.6% ± 6.3% of fibroblasts and 73.3% ± 4.2% smooth muscle cells were derived from nestin(+) cells in Nestin-Cre, Rosa26-YFP(flox/+) mice. Nestin(+) MSCs were increased in the prostatic hyperplasia mice. Our parabiosis experiment demonstrate that nestin(+) MSCs were mobilized and recruited to the prostatic stroma of wild-type mice and gave rise to the fibroblasts. Moreover, injection of a TGF-β neutralizing antibody (1D11) inhibits mobilization of MSCs, their recruitment to the prostatic stroma and hyperplasia. Importantly, knockout of TβRII in nestin(+) cell lineage ameliorated stromal hyperplasia. Thus, elevated levels of TGF-β-induced mobilization and recruitment of MSCs to the reactive stroma resulting in overgrowth of prostate tissues in BPH and, thus, inhibition of TGF-β activity could be a potential therapy for BPH. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:394-404.

  15. Structure-function analysis of synthetic and recombinant derivatives of transforming growth factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Wegrzyn, R J; Vuocolo, G A; Baker, A E; Payne, L S; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Riemen, M W

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) is a 50-amino-acid peptide that stimulates cell proliferation via binding to cell surface receptors. To identify the structural features of TGF-alpha that govern receptor-ligand interactions, we prepared synthetic peptide fragments and recombinant mutant proteins of TGF-alpha. These TGF-alpha derivatives were tested in receptor binding and mitogenesis assays. Synthetic peptides representing the N terminus, the C terminus, or the individual disulfide constrained rings of TGF-alpha did not exhibit receptor-binding or mitogenic activity. Replacement of the cysteines with alanines at positions 8 and 21, 16 and 32, and 34 and 43 or at positions 8 and 21 and 34 and 43 yielded inactive mutant proteins. However, mutant proteins containing substitutions or deletions in the N-terminal region retained significant biologic activity. Conservative amino acid changes at residue 29 or 38 or both and a nonconservative amino acid change at residue 12 had little effect on binding or mitogenesis. However, nonconservative amino acid changes at residues 15, 38, and 47 produced dramatic decreases in receptor binding (23- to 71-fold) and mitogenic activity (38- to 125-fold). These studies indicate that at least three distinct regions of TGF-alpha contribute to biologic activity. PMID:2850475

  16. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 transcriptionally suppresses hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinke; Zhang, Geng; Lin, Yong; Xie, Zhanglian; Liu, Hongyan; Tang, Libo; Lu, Mengji; Yan, Ran; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Jian; Hou, Jinlin; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) replication in hepatocytes is restricted by the host innate immune system and related intracellular signaling pathways. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key mediator of toll-like receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling pathways. Here, we report that silencing or inhibition of endogenous TAK1 in hepatoma cell lines leads to an upregulation of HBV replication, transcription, and antigen expression. In contrast, overexpression of TAK1 significantly suppresses HBV replication, while an enzymatically inactive form of TAK1 exerts no effect. By screening TAK1-associated signaling pathways with inhibitors and siRNAs, we found that the MAPK-JNK pathway was involved in TAK1-mediated HBV suppression. Moreover, TAK1 knockdown or JNK pathway inhibition induced the expression of farnesoid X receptor α, a transcription factor that upregulates HBV transcription. Finally, ectopic expression of TAK1 in a HBV hydrodynamic injection mouse model resulted in lower levels of HBV DNA and antigens in both liver and serum. In conclusion, our data suggest that TAK1 inhibits HBV primarily at viral transcription level through activation of MAPK-JNK pathway, thus TAK1 represents an intrinsic host restriction factor for HBV replication in hepatocytes. PMID:28045080

  17. Transforming growth factor-β1 in carcinogenesis, progression, and therapy in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Sun, Luzhe; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional cytokine that plays important roles in cervical tumor formation, invasion, progression, and metastasis. TGF-β1 functions as a tumor inhibitor in precancerous lesions and early stage cancers of cervix whereas as a tumor promoter in later stage. This switch from a tumor inhibitor to a tumor promoter might be due to various alterations in TGF-β signaling pathway, such as mutations or loss of expression of TGF-β receptors and SMAD proteins. Additionally, the oncoproteins of human papillomaviruses have been shown to stimulate TGF-β1 expression, which in turn suppresses host immune surveillance. Thus, in addition to driving tumor cell migration and metastasis, TGF-β1 is believed to play a key role in promoting human papillomavirus infection by weakening host immune defense. In this article, we will discuss the role of TGF-β1 in the expression, carcinogenesis, progression, and therapy in cervical cancers. A better understanding of this cytokine in cervical carcinogenesis is essential for critical evaluation of this cytokine as a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target.

  18. Hepatic stem cells and transforming growth factor β in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Avijit; Curley, Steven A.; Wu, Xifeng; Brown, Powel; Hwang, Jessica P.; Shetty, Kirti; Yao, Zhi-Xing; He, Aiwu Ruth; Li, Shulin; Katz, Lior; Farci, Patrizia; Mishra, Lopa

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal cancers worldwide. It arises from modulation of multiple genes by mutations, epigenetic regulation, noncoding RNAs and translational modifications of encoded proteins. Although >40% of HCCs are clonal and thought to arise from cancer stem cells (CSCs), the precise identification and mechanisms of CSC formation remain poorly understood. A functional role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling in liver and intestinal stem cell niches has been demonstrated through mouse genetics. These studies demonstrate that loss of TGF-β signalling yields a phenotype similar to a human CSC disorder, Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome. Insights into this powerful pathway will be vital for developing new therapeutics in cancer. Current clinical approaches are aimed at establishing novel cancer drugs that target activated pathways when the TGF-β tumour suppressor pathway is lost, and TGF-β itself could potentially be targeted in metastases. Studies delineating key functional pathways in HCC and CSC formation could be important in preventing this disease and could lead to simple treatment strategies; for example, use of vitamin D might be effective when the TGF-β pathway is lost or when wnt signalling is activated. PMID:22710573

  19. Regulation of the transforming growth factor β pathway by reversible ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Salihi, Mazin A.; Herhaus, Lina; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling pathway plays a central role during embryonic development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It regulates gene transcription through a signalling cascade from cell surface receptors to intracellular SMAD transcription factors and their nuclear cofactors. The extent, duration and potency of signalling in response to TGFβ cytokines are intricately regulated by complex biochemical processes. The corruption of these regulatory processes results in aberrant TGFβ signalling and leads to numerous human diseases, including cancer. Reversible ubiquitylation of pathway components is a key regulatory process that plays a critical role in ensuring a balanced response to TGFβ signals. Many studies have investigated the mechanisms by which various E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate the turnover and activity of TGFβ pathway components by ubiquitylation. Moreover, recent studies have shed new light into their regulation by deubiquitylating enzymes. In this report, we provide an overview of current understanding of the regulation of TGFβ signalling by E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitylases. PMID:22724073

  20. Subcellular localization of (latent) transforming growth factor beta and the latent TGF-beta binding protein in rat hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Roth-Eichhorn, S; Kühl, K; Gressner, A M

    1998-12-01

    Recently, the existence of the large latent transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) complex, consisting of TGF-beta, the N-terminal part of its precursor (latency-associated peptide [LAP]), and the latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP), was demonstrated in rat liver parenchymal cells (PC) and stellate cells (HSC). However, in contrast to HSC, in freshly isolated PC, no message of these proteins is detectable. This study was performed to investigate the subcellular distribution of the proteins forming the latent TGF-beta complex in PC and HSC from rat liver to obtain more information about their origin and potential intracellular functions. PC and HSC were isolated from rat liver by protease reperfusion and investigated for TGF-beta1,-2,-3, beta1-LAP, and LTBP-1 after cultivation using double-immunofluorescent staining, followed by high-resolution confocal microscopic analysis. Subcellular fractions obtained by standard differential centrifugation of rat liver homogenate were analyzed using a TGF-beta1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting for beta1-LAP and LTBP-1. By confocal microscopy, a diffuse distribution of TGF-beta and LAP in the cytoplasm of PC is noticed, whereas the LTBP immunostaining predominates at plasma membranes. In PC, distinct intracellular granules were superimposed with TGF-beta, LAP, and LTBP stainings identified as lysosomal compartments and mitochondria by ELISA and immunoblotting of subcellular fractions. In HSC, stainings of colocalized TGF-beta, LAP, and LTBP are strongest in the perinuclear area, indicating synthesis and secretion via endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, respectively. Partially, the proteins were also found in HSC nuclei. During the transformation of HSC to myofibroblasts, LAP and LTBP become strongly colocalized with other components of the cytoskeletal network like smooth muscle--actin, desmin, and talin. The results confirm biochemical data about the existence and expression of the large latent

  1. Rho GTPases, phosphoinositides, and actin

    PubMed Central

    Croisé, Pauline; Estay-Ahumada, Catherine; Gasman, Stéphane; Ory, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are well known regulators of the actin cytoskeleton that act by binding and activating actin nucleators. They are therefore involved in many actin-based processes, including cell migration, cell polarity, and membrane trafficking. With the identification of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases as potential binding partners or effectors, Rho GTPases also appear to participate in the regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism. Since both actin dynamics and phosphoinositide turnover affect the efficiency and the fidelity of vesicle transport between cell compartments, Rho GTPases have emerged as critical players in membrane trafficking. Rho GTPase activity, actin remodeling, and phosphoinositide metabolism need to be coordinated in both space and time to ensure the progression of vesicles along membrane trafficking pathways. Although most molecular pathways are still unclear, in this review, we will highlight recent advances made in our understanding of how Rho-dependent signaling pathways organize actin dynamics and phosphoinositides and how phosphoinositides potentially provide negative feedback to Rho GTPases during endocytosis, exocytosis and membrane exchange between intracellular compartments. PMID:24914539

  2. Synthetic chondramide A analogues stabilize filamentous actin and block invasion by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher I; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Maier, Martin E; Sept, David; Sibley, L David

    2013-09-27

    Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii rely on actin-based motility to cross biological barriers and invade host cells. Key structural and biochemical differences in host and parasite actins make this an attractive target for small-molecule inhibitors. Here we took advantage of recent advances in the synthesis of cyclic depsipeptide compounds that stabilize filamentous actin to test the ability of chondramides to disrupt growth of T. gondii in vitro. Structural modeling of chondramide A (2) binding to an actin filament model revealed variations in the binding site between host and parasite actins. A series of 10 previously synthesized analogues (2b-k) with substitutions in the β-tyrosine moiety blocked parasite growth on host cell monolayers with EC₅₀ values that ranged from 0.3 to 1.3 μM. In vitro polymerization assays using highly purified recombinant actin from T. gondii verified that synthetic and natural product chondramides target the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, chondramide treatment blocked parasite invasion into host cells and was more rapidly effective than pyrimethamine, a standard therapeutic agent. Although the current compounds lack specificity for parasite vs host actin, these studies provide a platform for the future design and synthesis of synthetic cyclic peptide inhibitors that selectively disrupt actin dynamics in parasites.

  3. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S.; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L.; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y.; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2−/− mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2−/− SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations. PMID:23591991

  4. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Papke, Christina L; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2(-/-) mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2(-/-) SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations.

  5. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  6. Myxoma Virus Oncolytic Efficiency Can Be Enhanced Through Chemical or Genetic Disruption of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.; Favis, Nicole A.; Agopsowicz, Kate C.; Hitt, Mary M.; Evans, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L+) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies. PMID:24391902

  7. Simvastatin inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced expression of type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA in keloid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Jae-Ho; Kim, Moon-Bum; Ko, Hyun-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor, is used to reduce cholesterol levels. Accumulating evidence has revealed the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of simvastatin that prevent cardiovascular diseases. In addition, the beneficial effects of statins on fibrosis of various organs have been reported. However, the functional effect of statins on dermal fibrosis of keloids has not yet been explored. The objective of this study was to determine whether simvastatin could affect dermal fibrosis associated with keloids. We examined the effect of simvastatin on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced production of type I collagen, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF or CCN2), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Keloid fibroblasts were cultured and exposed to different concentrations of simvastatin in the presence of TGF-β1, and the effects of simvastatin on TGF-β1-induced collagen and CTGF production in keloid fibroblasts were determined. The type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA expression levels and the Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation levels were assessed by Western blotting. The effect of simvastatin on cell viability was evaluated by assessing the colorimetric conversion of 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Simvastatin suppressed TGF-β1-induced type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA production in a concentration-dependent manner. The TGF-β1-induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation levels were abrogated by simvastatin pretreatment. The inhibition of type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA expression by simvastatin was reversed by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, suggesting that the simvastatin-induced cellular responses were due to inhibition of small GTPase Rho involvement. A RhoA activation assay showed that preincubation with simvastatin significantly blocked TGF-β1-induced RhoA activation. The Rho-associated coiled kinase inhibitor Y27632 abrogated TGF-β1-induced production of type I collagen

  8. Differences in G-actin containing bound ATP or ADP: the Mg2+-induced conformational change requires ATP.

    PubMed

    Frieden, C; Patane, K

    1985-07-16

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the Mg2+-induced conformational change of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin has been investigated by comparing actin containing bound ADP with actin containing bound ATP. As previously described [Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886], N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled G-actin containing ATP undergoes a time-dependent Mg2+-induced fluorescence change that reflects a conformational change in the actin. Addition of Mg2+ to labeled G-actin containing ADP gives no fluorescence change, suggesting that the conformational change does not occur. The fluorescence change can be restored on the addition of ATP. Examination of the time courses of these experiments suggests that ATP must replace ADP prior to the Mg2+-induced change. The Mg2+-induced polymerization of actin containing ADP is extraordinarily slow compared to that of actin containing ATP. The lack of the Mg2+-induced conformational change, which is an essential step in the Mg2+-induced polymerization, is probably the cause for the very slow polymerization of actin containing ADP. On the other hand, at 20 degrees C, at pH 8, and in 2 mM Mg2+, the elongation rate from the slow growing end of an actin filament, measured by using the protein brevin to block growth at the fast growing end, is only 4 times slower for actin containing ADP than for actin containing ATP.

  9. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  10. Aqueous Date Flesh or Pits Extract Attenuates Liver Fibrosis via Suppression of Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines, Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Angiogenic Markers in Carbon Tetrachloride-Intoxicated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rasheed, Nouf M.; Attia, Hala A.; Mohamad, Raeesa A.; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M.; Al-Amin, Maha A.; AL-Onazi, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Previous data indicated the protective effect of date fruit extract on oxidative damage in rat liver. However, the hepatoprotective effects via other mechanisms have not been investigated. This study was performed to evaluate the antifibrotic effect of date flesh extract (DFE) or date pits extract (DPE) via inactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reducing the levels of inflammatory, fibrotic and angiogenic markers. Coffee was used as reference hepatoprotective agent. Liver fibrosis was induced by injection of CCl4 (0.4 mL/kg) three times weekly for 8 weeks. DFE, DPE (6 mL/kg), coffee (300 mg/kg), and combination of coffee + DFE and coffee + DPE were given to CCl4-intoxicated rats daily for 8 weeks. DFE, DPE, and their combination with coffee attenuated the elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. The increased levels of transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen deposition in injured liver were alleviated by both extracts. CCl4-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin was suppressed indicating HSCs inactivation. Increased angiogenesis was ameliorated as revealed by reduced levels and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD31. We concluded that DFE or DPE could protect liver via different mechanisms. The combination of coffee with DFE or DPE may enhance its antifibrotic effects. PMID:25945106

  11. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  12. Effect of Flumorph on F-Actin Dynamics in the Potato Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chenlei; Kots, Kiki; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine; Meijer, Harold J G

    2015-04-01

    Oomycetes are fungal-like pathogens that cause notorious diseases. Protecting crops against oomycetes requires regular spraying with chemicals, many with an unknown mode of action. In the 1990s, flumorph was identified as a novel crop protection agent. It was shown to inhibit the growth of oomycete pathogens including Phytophthora spp., presumably by targeting actin. We recently generated transgenic Phytophthora infestans strains that express Lifeact-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), which enabled us to monitor the actin cytoskeleton during hyphal growth. For analyzing effects of oomicides on the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, the P. infestans Lifeact-eGFP strain is an excellent tool. Here, we confirm that flumorph is an oomicide with growth inhibitory activity. Microscopic analyses showed that low flumorph concentrations provoked hyphal tip swellings accompanied by accumulation of actin plaques in the apex, a feature reminiscent of tips of nongrowing hyphae. At higher concentrations, swelling was more pronounced and accompanied by an increase in hyphal bursting events. However, in hyphae that remained intact, actin filaments were indistinguishable from those in nontreated, nongrowing hyphae. In contrast, in hyphae treated with the actin depolymerizing drug latrunculin B, no hyphal bursting was observed but the actin filaments were completely disrupted. This difference demonstrates that actin is not the primary target of flumorph.

  13. Role of transforming growth factor beta 1 on hepatic regeneration and apoptosis in liver diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Takiya, S; Tagaya, T; Takahashi, K; Kawashima, H; Kamiya, M; Fukuzawa, Y; Kobayashi, S; Fukatsu, A; Katoh, K; Kakumu, S

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the effects of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on regeneration and induction of apoptosis of liver cell and bile duct in various liver diseases. METHODS--Formalin fixed paraffin wax sections of 18 liver tissue samples were obtained by needle biopsy, surgery, or necropsy; these included six liver cirrhosis, three obstructive jaundice; five fulminant hepatitis, one subacute hepatitis, and three normal liver. Expression of TGF-beta 1, apoptosis related Le(y) antigen, Fas antigen, a receptor for tumour necrosis factor, and biotin nick end labelling with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP (TUNEL) for locating DNA fragmentation, was investigated histochemically. RESULTS--TGF-beta 1 was expressed in areas of atypical bile duct proliferation, where bile duct continuously proliferated from liver cells. In occlusive jaundice and fulminant hepatitis, TUNEL was positive in nuclei and cytoplasm of metaplastic cells which formed incomplete bile ducts, and these cells appeared to extend from TGF-beta 1 expressing liver cells. Fas antigen was found only on the cell membrane of proliferated bile duct in fulminant hepatitis, which differed from TGF-beta 1 and TUNEL positive areas. Le(y) antigen was expressed in liver cell and bile duct at the areas with atypical bile duct proliferation, but its coexpression with TUNEL was rare. CONCLUSIONS--TGF-beta 1 plays a role in the arrest of liver cell regeneration and atypical bile duct proliferation, and in areas of rapidly progressing atypical bile duct proliferation, such as in fulminant hepatitis or bile retention. Apoptosis appears to be induced by TGF-beta 1. This phenomenon may account for the inadequate hepatic regeneration that occurs with liver disease. Images PMID:8567993

  14. Transforming growth factor-ß1 genotype and susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Chau, J; Young, R; Pokorny, V; Mills, G; Hopkins, R; McLean, L; Black, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Only a few long term smokers develop symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and this may be due, at least in part, to genetic susceptibility to the disease. Transforming growth factor ß1 (TGF-ß1) has a number of actions that make it a candidate for a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. We have investigated a single nucleotide polymorphism at exon 1 nucleotide position 29 (T→C) of the TGF-ß1 gene that produces a substitution at codon 10 (Leu→Pro). Methods: The frequency of this polymorphism was determined in 165 subjects with COPD, 140 healthy blood donors, and 76 smokers with normal lung function (resistant smokers) using the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism. Results: The distribution of genotypes was Leu-Leu (41.8%), Leu-Pro (50.3%), and Pro-Pro (7.9%) for subjects with COPD, which was significantly different from the control subjects (blood donors: Leu-Leu (29.3%), Leu-Pro (52.1%) and Pro-Pro (18.6%), p = 0.006; resistant smokers: Leu-Leu (28.9%), Leu-Pro (51.3%) and Pro-Pro (19.7%), p = 0.02). The Pro10 allele was less common in subjects with COPD (33%) than in blood donors (45%; OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.86, p = 0.005) and resistant smokers (45%; OR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.88, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The proline allele at codon 10 of the TGF-ß1 gene occurs more commonly in control subjects than in individuals with COPD. This allele is associated with increased production of TGF-ß1 which raises the possibility that TGF-ß1 has a protective role in COPD. PMID:14760152

  15. Transforming growth factor-β signaling in hypertensive remodeling of porcine aorta

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Natasa; Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Neiger, Jessemy D.; Hu, Jin-Jia; Vannucci, Marina; Mo, Qianxing; Trzeciakowski, Jerome; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2009-01-01

    A porcine aortic coarctation model was used to examine regulation of gene expression in early hypertensive vascular remodeling. Aortic segments were collected proximal (high pressure) and distal (low pressure) to the coarctation after 2 wk of sustained hypertension (mean arterial pressure > 150 mmHg). Porcine 10K oligoarrays used for gene expression profiling of the two regions of aorta revealed downregulation of cytoskeletal and upregulation of extracellular region genes relative to the whole genome. A genomic database search for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) control elements showed that 19% of the genes that changed expression due to hypertension contained putative TGF-β control elements. Real-time RT-PCR and microarray analysis showed no change in expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, or bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and -4, yet immunohistochemical staining for phosphorylated SMAD2, an indicator of TGF-β signaling, and for phosphorylated SMAD1/5/8, an indicator of signaling through the bone morphogenetic proteins, showed the highest percentage of positively stained cells in the proximal aortic segments of occluded animals. For TGF-β signaling, this increase was significantly different than for sham-operated controls. Western blot analysis showed no difference in total TGF-β1 protein levels with respect to treatment or aortic segment. Immunohistochemistry showed that the protein levels of latency-associated peptide was decreased in proximal segments of occluded animals. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of TGF-β, but not altered expression, may be a major mechanism regulating early hypertensive vascular remodeling. PMID:19717726

  16. Gene Expression Changes during the Development of Acute Lung Injury Role of Transforming Growth Factor β

    PubMed Central

    Wesselkamper, Scott C.; Case, Lisa M.; Henning, Lisa N.; Borchers, Michael T.; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Mason, John M.; Dragin, Nadine; Medvedovic, Mario; Sartor, Maureen A.; Tomlinson, Craig R.; Leikauf, George D.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury can occur from multiple causes, resulting in high mortality. The pathophysiology of nickel-induced acute lung injury in mice is remarkably complex, and the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. Objectives: To integrate molecular pathways and investigate the role of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in acute lung injury in mice. Methods: cDNA microarray analyses were used to identify lung gene expression changes after nickel exposure. MAPPFinder analysis of the microarray data was used to determine significantly altered molecular pathways. TGF-β1 protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as the effect of inhibition of TGF-β, was assessed in nickel-exposed mice. The effect of TGF-β on surfactant-associated protein B (Sftpb) promoter activity was measured in mouse lung epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Genes that decreased the most after nickel exposure play important roles in lung fluid absorption or surfactant and phospholipid synthesis, and genes that increased the most were involved in TGF-β signaling. MAPPFinder analysis further established TGF-β signaling to be significantly altered. TGF-β–inducible genes involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix function and fibrinolysis were significantly increased after nickel exposure, and TGF-β1 protein was also increased in the lavage fluid. Pharmacologic inhibition of TGF-β attenuated nickel-induced protein in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, treatment with TGF-β1 dose-dependently repressed Sftpb promoter activity in vitro, and a novel TGF-β–responsive region in the Sftpb promoter was identified. Conclusions: These data suggest that TGF-β acts as a central mediator of acute lung injury through the alteration of several different molecular pathways. PMID:16100012

  17. Genetic variation in Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Van den Berg, David; Hsu, Chris; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) plays a critical role in normal mammary development and morphogenesis. Decreased TGF-β signaling has been associated with increased mammographic density. Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is a strong risk factor and predictor of breast cancer risk. PMD is highly heritable, but few genetic determinants have been identified. We investigated the association between genetic variation in TGFB1 and PMD using a cross-sectional study of 2,038 women who were members of the population-based Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort. We assessed PMD using a computer-assisted method. We used linear regression to examine the association between 9 tagging SNPs of TGFB1 and PMD and their interaction with parity, adjusting for age, BMI, and dialect group. We calculated ‘P-values adjusted for correlated tests’ (PACT) to account for multiple testing. The strongest association was observed for rs2241716. Adjusted PMD was higher by 1.5% per minor allele (PACT =0.04). When stratifying by parity, this association was limited to nulliparous women. For nulliparous women, adjusted PMD was higher by 8.6% per minor allele (PACT=0.003; P for interaction with parity=0.002). Three additional TGFB1 tagging SNPs, which were in linkage disequilibrium with rs2241716, were statistically significantly associated with adjusted PMD (PACT<0.05) for nulliparous women. However, none of these three SNPs showed statistically significant association after adjusting for rs2241716. Our data support that TGFB1 genetic variation may be an important genetic determinant of mammographic density measure that predicts breast cancer risk, particularly in nulliparous women. PMID:23333936

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of active transforming growth factor-beta in situ using engineered tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Kalia, M.; Jirtle, R.; Flanders, K.; Tsang, M. L.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The biological activity of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta) is governed by dissociation from its latent complex. Immunohistochemical discrimination of active and latent TGF-beta could provide insight into TGF-beta activation in physiological and pathological processes. However, evaluation of immunoreactivity specificity in situ has been hindered by the lack of tissue in which TGF-beta status is known. To provide in situ analysis of antibodies to differentiate between these functional forms, we used xenografts of human tumor cells modified by transfection to overexpress latent TGF-beta or constitutively active TGF-beta. This comparison revealed that, whereas most antibodies did not differentiate between TGF-beta activation status, the immunoreactivity of some antibodies was activation dependent. Two widely used peptide antibodies to the amino-terminus of TGF-beta, LC(1-30) and CC(1-30) showed marked preferential immunoreactivity with active TGF-beta versus latent TGF-beta in cryosections. However, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, discrimination of active TGF-beta by CC(1-30) was lost and immunoreactivity was distinctly extracellular, as previously reported for this antibody. Similar processing-dependent extracellular localization was found with a neutralizing antibody raised to recombinant TGF-beta. Antigen retrieval recovered cell-associated immunoreactivity of both antibodies. Two antibodies to peptides 78-109 showed mild to moderate preferential immunoreactivity with active TGF-beta only in paraffin sections. LC(1-30) was the only antibody tested that discriminated active from latent TGF-beta in both frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue. Thus, in situ discrimination of active versus latent TGF-beta depends on both the antibody and tissue preparation. We propose that tissues engineered to express a specific form of a given protein provide a physiological setting in which to evaluate antibody reactivity with specific functional forms of a

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor-3 is associated with pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Craig P; Hansel, Nadia N; Barnes, Kathleen C; Lomas, David A; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Coxson, Harvey O; Mathias, Rasika A; Rafaels, Nicholas M; Wise, Robert A; Connett, John E; Klanderman, Barbara J; Jacobson, Francine L; Gill, Ritu; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Reilly, John J; Silverman, Edwin K

    2009-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous syndrome, including emphysema and airway disease. Phenotypes defined on the basis of chest computed tomography (CT) may decrease disease heterogeneity and aid in the identification of candidate genes for COPD subtypes. To identify these genes, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis in extended pedigrees from the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, stratified by emphysema status (defined by chest CT scans) of the probands, followed by genetic association analysis of positional candidate genes. A region on chromosome 1p showed strong evidence of linkage to lung function traits in families of emphysema-predominant probands in the stratified analysis (LOD score = 2.99 in families of emphysema-predominant probands versus 1.98 in all families). Association analysis in 949 individuals from 127 early-onset COPD pedigrees revealed association for COPD-related traits with an intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in transforming growth factor-beta receptor-3 (TGFBR3) (P = 0.005). This SNP was significantly associated with COPD affection status comparing 389 cases from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial to 472 control smokers (P = 0.04), and with FEV(1) (P = 0.004) and CT emphysema (P = 0.05) in 3,117 subjects from the International COPD Genetics Network. Gene-level replication of association with lung function was seen in 427 patients with COPD from the Lung Health Study. In conclusion, stratified linkage analysis followed by association testing identified TGFBR3 (betaglycan) as a potential susceptibility gene for COPD. Published human microarray and murine linkage studies have also demonstrated the importance of TGFBR3 in emphysema and lung function, and our group and others have previously found association of COPD-related traits with TGFB1, a ligand for TGFBR3.

  20. Characterization of the rat transforming growth factor alpha gene and identification of promoter sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blasband, A J; Rogers, K T; Chen, X R; Azizkhan, J C; Lee, D C

    1990-01-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of rat transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) mRNA and characterized the six exons that encode this transcript. These six exons span approximately 85 kilobases of genomic DNA, with exons 1 to 3 separated by particularly large introns. What had previously been thought to represent a species-specific difference in the size of the TGF alpha precursor (proTGF alpha) is now shown to be due to microheterogeneity in the splicing of exons 2 and 3. This results from a tandem duplication of the acceptor CAG and gives rise to two alternate forms (159 and 160 amino acids) of the integral membrane precursor. Exon 6, which encodes the 3' untranslated region of TGF alpha mRNA, also encodes, on the opposite strand, a small (approximately 200-nucleotide) transcript whose sequence predicts an open reading frame of 51 amino acids. Expression of this latter transcript does not appear to be coregulated with that of TGF alpha mRNA. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses of authentic TGF alpha transcripts revealed two major and multiple minor 5' ends which span more than 200 base pairs of DNA in a G + C-rich region that lacks canonical CCAAT or TATA sequences. The 5' ends of six independently derived cDNAs localized to five different sites in this same region. Restriction fragments that overlap these transcription start sites and extend approximately 300 base pairs in the 5' direction faithfully promote transcription in vitro with HeLa cell nuclear extracts. In addition, they direct the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in transient-transfection assays. Images PMID:2325647

  1. Urinary transforming growth factor beta1 in children and adolescents with congenital solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Anna; Zoch-Zwierz, Walentyna; Taranta-Janusz, Katarzyna

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess urinary transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF beta1) level in children and adolescents with congenital solitary kidney (CSK), depending on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and compensatory overgrowth of the kidney. The study group (I) consisted of 65 children and young adults, 0.5-22 years of age (median 10.0 years) with CSK and no other urinary defects. The control group (C) contained 44 healthy children and adolescents, 0.25-21 years old (median 10.3 years). We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the urinary level of TGF beta1, the Jaffe method to assess creatinine concentration, and the Schwartz formula to estimate GFR. Kidney length was measured while the patient was in a supine position, and overgrowth (O%) was calculated with reference to the charts. Urinary TGF beta1 level in CSK patients was more than twice as high as that in controls (P < 0.05). Also, eGFR in patients with CSK exceeded the values in the control group (P < 0.01). Compensatory overgrowth of the solitary kidney was found (median 19.44%). Urinary TGF beta1 concentration was positively correlated with eGFR (r = 0.247, P < 0.05), uric acid concentration (r = 0.333, P < 0.01), and percentage of overgrowth (r = 0.338, P < 0.01) and body mass index (BMI) centile (r = 0.274, P < 0.05). We concluded that, although proteinuria and progressive renal insufficiency is not observed in patients with CSK during childhood, the renal haemodynamic changes are present and may be a risk factor for impairment of renal function and hypertension in future life.

  2. Transforming growth factor beta 1: an autocrine regulator of adrenocortical steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feige, J J; Cochet, C; Savona, C; Shi, D L; Keramidas, M; Defaye, G; Chambaz, E M

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) is a member of a large family of structurally related regulatory polypeptides which comprises both functionally similar (TGF beta 1, TGF beta 2, TGF beta 3, TGF beta 4 and TGF beta 5) and functionally distinct proteins. In the past few years, TGF beta 1 has emerged as a multifunctional protein. One of its remarkable properties is its capacity to negatively modulate the differentiated, steroidogenic adrenocortical functions. We present here a review of the results from our recent work related to the effects of TGF beta 1 on bovine adrenocortical cell (zona fasciculata-reticularis) functions. We identified the steroid 17 alpha-hydroxylase (P-450 17 alpha) biosynthetic enzyme and the angiotensin II receptor as major targets whose expression are negatively regulated by TGF beta 1 in these cells. We characterized TGF beta 1 receptors at the surface of adrenocortical cells (mainly type I and type III receptors) and observed that their number is increased under ACTH treatment. Furthermore, we could detect the presence of immunoreactive TGF beta 1 in the bovine adrenal cortex whereas it was undetectable in the adrenal medulla and in the capsule. We also observed that adrenocortical cells secrete TGF beta 1 under a latent form together with large amounts of alpha 2-macroglobulin, a protease inhibitor known to be implied in the latency of TGF beta in serum. Taken together, these observations led us to a working hypothesis, proposing TGF beta 1 as an autocrine and/or paracrine regulator of adrenocortical steroidogenic functions. This concept points out the physiological activation of the latent TGF beta 1 complex as the important limiting step controlling its action in the adrenal cortex.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in rheumatoid synovial membrane and cartilage/pannus junction.

    PubMed

    Chu, C Q; Field, M; Abney, E; Zheng, R Q; Allard, S; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1991-12-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been shown to promote tissue repair and have immunosuppressive actions, and has been proposed to have a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using immunohistochemical techniques with rabbit F(ab')2 antibodies raised against recombinant human TGF-beta 1, we have detected TGF-beta 1 in the synovial tissue and cartilage/pannus junction (CPJ) from 18/18 patients with RA. TGF-beta 1 was found predominantly in the thickened synovial lining layer in RA, but also detected in a perivascular pattern in the synovial interstitium as well as in occasional cells in the lymphoid aggregates. At the CPJ it was found both in cells at the distinct junction as well as in the transitional region of the diffuse fibroblastic zone. The cells staining for TGF-beta 1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining as being from the monocyte/macrophage series as well as the type B synovial lining cells. TGF-beta 1 was also detected in the synovial membrane sections from 4/4 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus/mixed connective tissue disease and 5/8 patients with osteoarthritis, in a similar distribution to that seen in RA, and in the lining layer of 1/7 normal synovial membranes. These results add to histological evidence confirming that TGF-beta 1 is present in RA synovial cells and those from other arthritides. The distributions of TGF-beta 1 in RA synovial membrane reflects its known actions, as it can be detected at the CPJ, where it could induce repair, and close to activated cells upon which it may exert an immunosuppressive action.

  4. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Dix, T. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced EMT via Wnt/Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lin; Peng, Wen; Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has anti-fibrotic potential in lung, kidney and other organs. The exogenous H2S is released from sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and can influence the renal fibrosis by blocking the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. But whether H2S affects renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Our study is aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of H2S on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cells) and the associated mechanisms. The induced EMT is assessed by Western blotting analysis on the expressions of α-SMA, E-cadherin and fibronectin. HK-2 cells were treated with NaHS before incubating with TGF-β1 to investigate its effect on EMT and the related molecular mechanism. Results demonstrated that NaHS decreased the expression of α-SMA and fibronectin, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. NaHS reduced the expression of TGF-β receptor type I (TβR I) and TGF-β receptor type II (TβR II). In addition, NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced increase of β-catenin expression and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, it inhibited the TGF-β1-induced nuclear translocation of ββ-catenin. These effects of NaHS on fibronectin, E-cadherin and TβR I were abolished by the ERK inhibitor U0126 or β-catenin inhibitor XAV939, or β-catenin siRNA interference. We get the conclusion that NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced EMT in HK-2 cells through both ERK-dependent and β-catenin-dependent pathways.

  6. Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor-β1–driven Lung Fibrosis by Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Alison C.; Gibbons, Michael A.; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Leffler, Hakon; Nilsson, Ulf J.; Delaine, Tamara; Simpson, A. John; Forbes, Stuart J.; Hirani, Nik; Gauldie, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic dysregulated response to alveolar epithelial injury with differentiation of epithelial cells and fibroblasts into matrix-secreting myofibroblasts resulting in lung scaring. The prognosis is poor and there are no effective therapies or reliable biomarkers. Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside binding lectin that is highly expressed in fibrotic tissue of diverse etiologies. Objectives: To examine the role of galectin-3 in pulmonary fibrosis. Methods: We used genetic deletion and pharmacologic inhibition in well-characterized murine models of lung fibrosis. Further mechanistic studies were performed in vitro and on samples from patients with IPF. Measurements and Main Results: Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis was dramatically reduced in mice deficient in galectin-3, manifest by reduced TGF-β1–induced EMT and myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Galectin-3 reduced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of β-catenin but had no effect on Smad2/3 phosphorylation. A novel inhibitor of galectin-3, TD139, blocked TGF-β–induced β-catenin activation in vitro and in vivo and attenuated the late-stage progression of lung fibrosis after bleomycin. There was increased expression of galectin-3 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum from patients with stable IPF compared with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis and controls, which rose sharply during an acute exacerbation suggesting that galectin-3 may be a marker of active fibrosis in IPF and that strategies that block galectin-3 may be effective in treating acute fibrotic exacerbations of IPF. Conclusions: This study identifies galectin-3 as an important regulator of lung fibrosis and provides a proof of principle for galectin-3 inhibition as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for IPF. PMID:22095546

  7. Transforming growth factor-β in normal nociceptive processing and pathological pain models.

    PubMed

    Lantero, Aquilino; Tramullas, Mónica; Díaz, Alvaro; Hurlé, María A

    2012-02-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily is a multifunctional, contextually acting family of cytokines that participate in the regulation of development, disease and tissue repair in the nervous system. The TGF-β family is composed of several members, including TGF-βs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins. In this review, we discuss recent findings that suggest TGF-β function as important pleiotropic modulators of nociceptive processing both physiologically and under pathological painful conditions. The strategy of increasing TGF-β signaling by deleting "BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor" (BAMBI), a TGF-β pseudoreceptor, has demonstrated the inhibitory role of TGF-β signaling pathways in normal nociception and in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. In particular, strong evidence suggests that TGF-β1 is a relevant mediator of nociception and has protective effects against the development of chronic neuropathic pain by inhibiting the neuroimmune responses of neurons and glia and promoting the expression of endogenous opioids within the spinal cord. In the peripheral nervous system, activins and BMPs function as target-derived differentiation factors that determine and maintain the phenotypic identity and circuit assembly of peptidergic nociceptors. In this context, activin is involved in the complex events of neuroinflammation that modulate the expression of pain during wound healing. These findings have provided new insights into the physiopathology of nociception. Moreover, specific members of the TGF-β family and their signaling effectors and modulator molecules may be promising molecular targets for novel therapeutic agents for pain management.

  8. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  9. Transforming growth factor beta-independent shuttling of Smad4 between the cytoplasm and nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pierreux, C E; Nicolás, F J; Hill, C S

    2000-12-01

    Smad4 plays a pivotal role in all transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signaling pathways. Here we describe six widely expressed alternatively spliced variants of human Smad4 with deletions of different exons in the linker, the region of Smad4 that separates the two well-conserved MH1 and MH2 domains. All these Smad4 variants form complexes with activated Smad2 and Smad3 and are incorporated into DNA-binding complexes with the transcription factor Fast-1, regardless of the amount of linker they contain. However, sequences encoded by exons 5 to 7 in the linker are essential for transcriptional activation. Most importantly, our observation that different Smad4 isoforms have different subcellular localizations has led us to the identification of a functional CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in the Smad4 linker and a constitutively active nuclear localization signal in the N-terminal MH1 domain. In the absence of TGF-beta signaling, we conclude that Smad4 is rapidly and continuously shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the distribution of Smad4 between the nucleus and the cytoplasm being dictated by the relative strengths of the nuclear import and export signals. We demonstrate that inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export by treatment of cells with leptomycin B results in endogenous Smad4 accumulating very rapidly in the nucleus. Endogenous Smad2 and Smad3 are completely unaffected by leptomycin B treatment, indicating that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is specific for Smad4. We propose that, upon TGF-beta signaling, complex formation between Smad4 and activated Smad2 or -3 leads to nuclear accumulation of Smad4 through inhibition of its nuclear export. We demonstrate that after prolonged TGF-beta signaling Smad2 becomes dephosphorylated and Smad2 and Smad4 accumulate back in the cytoplasm.

  10. Modulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor levels on microvascular endothelial cells during in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S; Mahooti-Brooks, N; Bensen, L; McCarthy, T L; Centrella, M; Madri, J A

    1996-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells (RFCs) cultured in two-dimensional (2D) cultures proliferate rapidly and exhibit an undifferentiated phenotype. Addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) increases fibronectin expression and inhibits proliferation. RFCs cultured in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels proliferate slowly and are refractory to the anti-proliferative effects of TGF beta1. TGF beta1 promotes tube formation in 3D cultures. TGF beta1 increases fibronectin expression and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels in 3D cultures. Since the TGF beta type I and II receptors have been reported to regulate different activities induced by TGF beta1, we compared the TGF beta receptor profiles on cells in 2D and 3D cultures. RFCs in 3D cultures exhibited a significant loss of cell surface type II receptor compared with cells in 2D cultures. The inhibitory effect of TGF beta1 on proliferation is suppressed in transfected 2D cultures expressing a truncated form of the type II receptor, while its stimulatory effect on fibronectin production is reduced in both 2D and 3D transfected cultures expressing a truncated form of the type I receptor. These data suggest that the type II receptor mediates the antiproliferative effect of TGF beta1 while the type I receptor mediates the matrix response of RFCs to TGF beta1 and demonstrate that changes in the matrix environment can modulate the surface expression of TGF beta receptors, altering the responsiveness of RFCs to TGF beta1. PMID:8617876

  11. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Resistance of human squamous carcinoma cells to transforming growth factor beta 1 is a recessive trait.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, M; Muñoz-Antonia, T; Cowan, J M; Wilkins, P C; Zhou, Z L; Vellucci, V F

    1993-01-01

    Because most human squamous carcinoma cell lines of the aerodigestive and genital tracts are refractory to the antiproliferative action of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) in vitro, we have begun to identify the causes for resistance of squamous carcinoma cell lines to TGF beta 1 by using somatic cell genetics. Two stable hybrid cell lines (FaDu-HKc.1 and FaDu-HKc.2) were obtained by fusing a TGF beta 1-resistant human squamous carcinoma cell line, FaDu-HygR, with a human papilloma virus 16-immortalized, TGF beta 1-sensitive, human foreskin keratinocyte cell line, HKc-neoR. Whereas TGF beta 1 did not inhibit DNA synthesis in parental FaDu-HygR cells, it reduced DNA synthetic activity of HKc-neoR, FaDu-HKc.1, and FaDu-HKc.2 cells by 75-85% (IC50, 2-5 pM). Although squamous carcinoma cells express lower than normal levels of TGF beta 1 type II receptors on their cell surface, TGF beta 1 type II receptor mRNA was detected in all four cell lines. Recessive genes involved in TGF beta 1 signaling may be localized to the distal portion of chromosome 18q, as this was the sole chromosomal region of homozygous deletion in parental FaDu-HygR cells. Furthermore, our previous observation that mutant p53 decreases sensitivity of keratinocytes to TGF beta 1 was supported by the finding that the level of the mutant p53 protein expressed by the hybrid cell lines was greatly reduced. In summary, TGF beta 1 resistance of FaDu cells appears to be recessive and is presumably due to the loss of one or more post-receptor elements of the signaling pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8327510

  13. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and inflammation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bierie, Brian; Moses, Harold L.

    2009-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been studied with regard to the regulation of cell behavior for over three decades. A large body of research has been devoted to the regulation of epithelial cell and derivative carcinoma cell populations in vitro and in vivo. TGF-β has been shown to inhibit epithelial cell cycle progression and promote apoptosis that together significantly contribute to the tumor suppressive role for TGF-β during carcinoma initiation and progression. However, TGF-β is also able to promote an epithelial to mesenchymal transition that has been associated with increased tumor cell motility, invasion and metastasis. However, it has now been shown that loss of carcinoma cell responsiveness to TGF-β stimulation can also promote metastasis. Interestingly, the enhanced metastasis in the absence of a carcinoma cell response to TGF-β stimulation has been shown to involve increased chemokine production resulting in recruitment of pro-metastatic myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations to the tumor microenvironment at the leading invasive edge. When present, MDSCs enhance angiogenesis, promote immune tolerance and provide matrix degrading enzymes that promote tumor progression and metastasis. Further, the recruitment of MDSC populations in this context likely enhances the classic role for TGF-β in immune suppression since the MDSCs are an abundant source of TGF-β production. Importantly, it is now clear that carcinoma-immune cell cross-talk initiated by TGF-β signaling within the carcinoma cell is a significant determinant worth consideration when designing therapeutic strategies to manage tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:20018551

  14. The role of transforming growth factor alpha in rat craniofacial development and chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Solursh, M; Sandra, A

    1996-08-01

    To explore the possible role of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in craniofacial development, its expression in the craniofacial region of rat embryos from embryonic day (d) 9 to d 20 was examined by in situ hybridisation and immunostaining. The TGF-alpha transcripts were first detected in the neural fold of embryonic d 9 and 10 embryos. In the craniofacial region, the TGF-alpha transcripts were not detected until embryonic d 16 in mesenchyme surrounding the olfactory bulb, within the olfactory bulb, the nasal capsule, vomeronasal organ, and vibrissal follicle. In addition, TGF-alpha message was detected in mesenchyme in the vicinity of Meckel's cartilage, and in the dental epithelium and lamina. This expression pattern of TGF-alpha transcripts persisted until embryonic d 17 but disappeared by d 18. The presence of TGF-alpha protein largely coincided with TGF-alpha message although, unlike the message, it persisted throughout later embryogenesis in the craniofacial region. The possible function of TGF-alpha in chondrogenesis was explored by employing the micromass culture technique. Cartilage nodule formation in mesenchymal cells cultured from rat mandibles in the presence of TGF-alpha was significantly inhibited. This inhibitory effect of TGF-alpha on chondrogenesis was reversed by addition of antibody against the EGF receptor, which crossreacts with the TGF-alpha receptor. The inhibitory effect of TGF-alpha on chondrogenesis in vitro was further confirmed by micromass culture using mesenchymal cells from rat embryonic limb bud. Taken together, these results demonstrate the involvement of TGF-alpha in chondrogenesis during embryonic development, possibly by way of a specific inhibition of cartilage formation from mesenchymal precursor cells.

  15. The role of transforming growth factor alpha in rat craniofacial development and chondrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Solursh, M; Sandra, A

    1996-01-01

    To explore the possible role of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in craniofacial development, its expression in the craniofacial region of rat embryos from embryonic day (d) 9 to d 20 was examined by in situ hybridisation and immunostaining. The TGF-alpha transcripts were first detected in the neural fold of embryonic d 9 and 10 embryos. In the craniofacial region, the TGF-alpha transcripts were not detected until embryonic d 16 in mesenchyme surrounding the olfactory bulb, within the olfactory bulb, the nasal capsule, vomeronasal organ, and vibrissal follicle. In addition, TGF-alpha message was detected in mesenchyme in the vicinity of Meckel's cartilage, and in the dental epithelium and lamina. This expression pattern of TGF-alpha transcripts persisted until embryonic d 17 but disappeared by d 18. The presence of TGF-alpha protein largely coincided with TGF-alpha message although, unlike the message, it persisted throughout later embryogenesis in the craniofacial region. The possible function of TGF-alpha in chondrogenesis was explored by employing the micromass culture technique. Cartilage nodule formation in mesenchymal cells cultured from rat mandibles in the presence of TGF-alpha was significantly inhibited. This inhibitory effect of TGF-alpha on chondrogenesis was reversed by addition of antibody against the EGF receptor, which crossreacts with the TGF-alpha receptor. The inhibitory effect of TGF-alpha on chondrogenesis in vitro was further confirmed by micromass culture using mesenchymal cells from rat embryonic limb bud. Taken together, these results demonstrate the involvement of TGF-alpha in chondrogenesis during embryonic development, possibly by way of a specific inhibition of cartilage formation from mesenchymal precursor cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 PMID:8771398

  16. Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathway in Patients with Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Chisato; Jain, Sonia; Lin, Kevin O.; Molkara, Delaram; Frazer, Jeffrey R.; Sun, Shelly; Baker, Annette L.; Newburger, Jane W.; Rowley, Anne H.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Davila, Sonia; Hibberd, Martin L.; Burgner, David; Breunis, Willemijn B.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Eleftherohorinou, Hariklia; Coin, Lachlan; Popper, Stephen J.; Relman, David A.; Fury, Wen; Lin, Calvin; Mellis, Scott; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Burns, Jane C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a multifunctional peptide that is important in T-cell activation and cardiovascular remodeling, both of which are important features of Kawasaki disease (KD). We postulated that variation in TGF-β signaling might be important in KD susceptibility and disease outcome. Methods and Results We investigated genetic variation in 15 genes belonging to the TGF-β pathway in a total 771 KD subjects of mainly European descendent from the US, UK, Australia and the Netherlands. We analyzed transcript abundance patterns using microarray and RT-PCR for these same genes and measured TGF-β2 protein levels in plasma. Genetic variants in TGFB2, TGFBR2 and SMAD3 and their haplotypes were consistently and reproducibly associated with KD susceptibility, coronary artery aneurysm formation, aortic root dilatation, and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment response in different cohorts. A SMAD3 haplotype associated with KD susceptibility replicated in two independent cohorts and an intronic SNP in a separate haplotype block was also strongly associated (A/G, rs4776338) (p=0.000022, OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.25-1.81). Pathway analysis using all 15 genes further confirmed the importance of the TGF-β pathway in KD pathogenesis. Whole blood transcript abundance for these genes and TGF-β2 plasma protein levels changed dynamically over the course of the illness. Conclusions These studies suggest that genetic variation in the TGF-β pathway influences KD susceptibility, disease outcome, and response to therapy and that aortic root and coronary artery Z scores can be used for phenotype/genotype analyses. Analysis of transcript abundance and protein levels further support the importance of this pathway in KD pathogenesis. PMID:21127203

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor requirements for the induction of the endothelin-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Castañares, Cristina; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; Magan-Marchal, Noemi; Lamas, Santiago; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    Expression of the endothelin (ET)-1 gene is subject to complex regulation by numerous factors, among which the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is one of the most important. TGF-beta action is based on the activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad proteins activate transcription of the gene by cooperation with activator protein-1 (AP-1) at specific sites on the ET-1 promoter. Smad signaling pathway is initiated by binding of the cytokine to a heteromeric complex of type I and type II receptors. Signal is then propagated to the nucleus by specific members of the Smad family. Most cell types contain a type I receptor known as ALK5. However, endothelial cells are unique because they coexpress an additional type I receptor named ALK1. These forms do not constitute redundant receptors with the same function, but they actually activate different Smad-mediated expression programs that lead to specific endothelial phenotypes. TGF-beta/ALK5/Smad3 pathway is associated to a mature endothelium because it leads to inhibition of cell migration/proliferation. Conversely, TGF-beta/ALK1/Smad5 activates both processes and is more related to the angiogenic state. We have analyzed the TGF-beta receptor subtype requirements for the activation of the ET-1 gene. For that purpose, we have overexpressed type I receptor and Smad isoforms in endothelial cells and analyzed the effect on ET-1 expression. Our experiments indicate that TGF-beta induces ET-1 expression preferentially through the activation of the ALK5/Smad3 pathway and, therefore, the expression of the vaso-constrictor may be associated to a quiescent and mature endothelial phenotype.

  18. Transforming growth factor Beta 1 stimulates profibrotic activities of luteal fibroblasts in cows.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Dulce; Davis, John S

    2012-11-01

    Luteolysis is characterized by angioregression, luteal cell apoptosis, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix characterized by deposition of collagen 1. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1) is a potent mediator of wound healing and fibrotic processes through stimulation of the synthesis of extracellular matrix components. We hypothesized that TGFB1 stimulates profibrotic activities of luteal fibroblasts. We examined the actions of TGFB1 on luteal fibroblast proliferation, extracellular matrix production, floating gel contraction, and chemotaxis. Fibroblasts were isolated from the bovine corpus luteum. Western blot analysis showed that luteal fibroblasts expressed collagen 1 and prolyl 4-hydroxylase but did not express markers of endothelial or steroidogenic cells. Treatment of fibroblasts with TGFB1 stimulated the phosphorylation of SMAD2 and SMAD3. [(3)H]thymidine incorporation studies showed that TGFB1 caused concentration-dependent reductions in DNA synthesis in luteal fibroblasts and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the proliferative effect of FGF2 and fetal calf serum. However, TGFB1 did not reduce the viability of luteal fibroblasts. Treatment of luteal fibroblasts with TGFB1 induced the expression of laminin, collagen 1, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 as determined by Western blot analysis and gelatin zymography of conditioned medium. TGFB1 increased the chemotaxis of luteal fibroblasts toward fibronectin in a transwell system. Furthermore, TGFB1 increased the fibroblast-mediated contraction of floating bovine collagen 1 gels. These results suggest that TGFB1 contributes to the structural regression of the corpus luteum by stimulating luteal fibroblasts to remodel and contract the extracellular matrix.

  19. Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the Sera of Postmenopausal Osteoporotic Females

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Aazam; Abtahi, Shabnam; Ghaderi, Abbas; Samsami Dehaghani, Alamtaj

    2016-01-01

    Background Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity in postmenopausal females. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin 18 (IL-18) play complex roles in normal bone metabolism, and in pathophysiology of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Objectives The aim of this study was to design an analytic cross sectional study in order to further clarify the role of TGF-β1 and IL-18 in osteoporosis of postmenopausal females. Methods A cross sectional study including 65 postmenopausal osteoporotic females as cases and 69 postmenopausal females of similar age without osteoporosis as controls was conducted. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine bone mass density (BMD) of participants and T-scoring was applied to establish whether the patient has osteoporosis or not. Serum TGF-β1 and IL-18 levels were measured by quantitative sandwich Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Serum TGF-β1 levels were significantly higher in osteoporotic postmenopausal females than non-osteoporotic individuals (23.8 vs. 15.8 ng/mL; P = 0.009). There was no difference between IL-18 levels in the sera of osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic postmenopausal females in this study. There was a positive correlation between body mass index (BMI) and serum level of TGF-β1 (P = 0.04). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that TGF-β1 serum levels is higher in osteoporotic postmenopausal females than non-osteoporotic ones, and probably aberrant increase in TGF-β1 in postmenopausal females can result in uncoupled bone resorption and formation, which leads to osteoporosis. PMID:28123435

  20. Anti-transforming growth factor-beta monoclonal antibodies prevent lung injury in hemorrhaged mice.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Coulson, W F; Abraham, E

    1994-09-01

    Acute lung injury, characterized as the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is a common clinical occurrence following blood loss and injury. We previously found increased levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 mRNA in murine intraparenchymal mononuclear cells and in alveolar macrophages within 1 h after hemorrhage. Because TGF-beta has potent proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties, we investigated the effect of blocking TGF-beta with mAb on hemorrhage-induced pathology, cytokine mRNA levels in lungs, as well as survival from pneumonia. Mice treated with anti-TGF-beta mAb showed normal pulmonary histology 3 days after hemorrhage and resuscitation in contrast to the mononuclear and neutrophil infiltrates, intraalveolar hemorrhage, and interstitial edema found in hemorrhaged mice either treated with control antibody or not treated with any antibody. Decreased mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-gamma as compared with untreated, hemorrhaged controls were present in intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells following therapy with anti-TGF-beta. In contrast, therapy with anti-TGF-beta increased mRNA levels for IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha in alveolar macrophages and for TGF-beta in peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected 3 days after hemorrhage. Administration of anti-TGF-beta to hemorrhaged mice did not correct the enhanced susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia that exists after hemorrhage. These results suggest that TGF-beta has an important role in hemorrhage-induced acute lung injury, but does not contribute to the post-hemorrhage depression in pulmonary antibacterial response.

  1. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... growths on the skin caused by too much sun exposure). Diclofenac is in a class of medications ... plan to avoid exposure to real and artificial sunlight (sun lamps) and to wear protective clothing and ...

  2. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  3. Actin-based gravity-sensing mechanisms in unicellular plant model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Markus; Limbach, Christoph

    2005-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying gravity sensing and gravity-oriented polarized growth in single-celled rhizoids and protonemata of the characean algae. It is well known that the actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in these processes. Numerous actin-binding proteins control apical actin polymerization and the dynamic remodeling of the actin arrangement. An actomyosin-based system mediates the delivery and incorporation of secretory vesicles at the growing tip and coordinates the tip-high gradient of cytoplasmic free calcium which is required for local exocytosis. Additionally, the actomyosin system precisely controls the position of statoliths and, upon a change in orientation relative to the gravity vector, directs sedimenting statoliths to the confined graviperception sites of the plasma membrane where gravitropic signalling is initiated. The upward growth response of protonemata is preceded by an actin-dependent relocalization of the Ca2+-gradient to the upper flank. The downward growth response of rhizoids, however, is caused by differential growth of the opposite flankes due to a local reduction of cytoplasmic free calcium limited to the plasma membrane area where statoliths are sedimented. Thus, constant actin polymerization in the growing tip and the spatiotemporal control of actin remodeling are essential for gravity sensing and gravity-oriented polarized growth of characean rhizoids and protonemata.

  4. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  5. G-actin regulates rapid induction of actin nucleation by mDia1 to restore cellular actin polymers.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Chiharu; Suetsugu, Shiro; Tsuji, Takahiro; Monypenny, James; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2008-10-15

    mDia1 belongs to the formin family of proteins that share FH1 and FH2 domains. Although formins play a critical role in the formation of many actin-based cellular structures, the physiological regulation of formin-mediated actin assembly within the cell is still unknown. Here we show that cells possess an acute actin polymer restoration mechanism involving mDia1. By using single-molecule live-cell imaging, we found that several treatments including low-dose G-actin-sequestering drugs and unpolymerizable actin mutants activate mDia1 to initiate fast directional movement. The FH2 region, the core domain for actin nucleation, is sufficient to respond to latrunculin B (LatB) to increase its actin nucleation frequency. Simulation analysis revealed an unexpected paradoxical effect of LatB that leads to a several fold increase in free G-actin along with an increase in total G-actin. These results indicate that in cells, the actin nucleation frequency of mDia1 is enhanced not only by Rho, but also strongly through increased catalytic efficiency of the FH2 domain. Consistently, frequent actin nucleation by mDia1 was found around sites of vigorous actin disassembly. Another major actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, was not affected by the G-actin increase induced by LatB. Taken together, we propose that transient accumulation of G-actin works as a cue to promote mDia1-catalyzed actin nucleation to execute rapid reassembly of actin filaments.

  6. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  7. Lovastatin, a cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor, inhibits the growth of human H-ras oncogene transformed cells in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Sebti, S M; Tkalcevic, G T; Jani, J P

    1991-05-01

    Post-translational modification of oncogenic p21ras proteins with farnesyl, a lipid intermediate in cholesterol biosynthesis, is required for p21ras membrane association and for the ability of p21ras to transform cultured cells. We have tested the ability of lovastatin, a specific inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, to inhibit the growth of ras oncogene-transformed cells in vivo. Balb/c mouse 3T3 cells, transfected with H-ras oncogene from human EJ bladder carcinoma, were highly tumorigenic in nude mice. Immunoprecipitation studies with transformed EJ cells showed that lovastatin (1-100 microM) inhibited p21ras membrane association in a concentration-dependent manner and that a 10 microM concentration reduced the amount of p21ras bound to the membrane by 50%. Lovastatin also inhibited EJ cell growth in a concentration range that closely paralleled that required for inhibition of p21ras membrane association. Treatment of nude mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c.) EJ tumors with lovastatin (50 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the abilities of these tumors to grow as early as four days and, by day 12, the lovastatin treated group of animals had tumors with an average size that was 3-fold smaller than those in the saline treated group. Western blotting studies showed that lovastatin (50 mg/kg) was also able to inhibit p21ras membrane association in EJ tumors implanted s.c. in nude mice. These results demonstrate that lovastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, inhibited in vivo tumor growth of H-ras oncogene transformed cells. The results also suggest that inhibition of p21ras membrane association, an essential step in ras oncogene neoplastic transformation, is one mechanism by which lovastatin may express its antitumor activity.

  8. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  9. 14-3-3 sigma and 14-3-3 zeta plays an opposite role in cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Young; Jeon, Woo-Kwang; Bae, Eun-Jin; Kim, Shin-Tae; Lee, Ho-Jae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2010-03-01

    The expression of 14-3-3 proteins is dysregulated in various types of cancer. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of 14-3-3 zeta and 14-3-3 sigma on cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Mouse mammary epithelial cells (Eph4) that are transformed with oncogenic c-H-Ras (EpRas) and no longer sensitive to TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition displayed increased expression of 14-3-3 zeta and decreased expression of 14-3-3 sigma compared with parental Eph4 cells. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta, we showed that 14-3-3 sigma is required for TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition whereas 14-3-3 zeta negatively modulates this growth inhibitory response. Notably, overexpression of 14-3-3 zeta increased the level of Smad3 protein that is phosphorylated at linker regions and cannot mediate the TGF-beta1 growth inhibitory response. Consistent with this finding, mutation of the 14-3-3 zeta phosphorylation sites in Smad3 markedly reduced the 14-3-3 zeta-mediated inhibition of TGF-beta1-induced p15 promoter-reporter activity and cell cycle arrest, suggesting that these residues are critical targets of 14-3-3 zeta in the suppression of TGF-beta1-mediated growth. Taken together, our findings indicate that dysregulation of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta contributes to TGF-beta1 resistance in cancer cells.

  10. Characterization and regulation of an additional actin-filament-binding site in large isoforms of the stereocilia actin-bundling protein espin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lili; Beeler, Dina M; Bartles, James R

    2014-03-15

    The espin actin-bundling proteins, which are produced as isoforms of different sizes from a single gene, are required for the growth of hair cell stereocilia. We have characterized an additional actin-filament-binding site present in the extended amino-termini of large espin isoforms. Constitutively active in espin 2, the site increased the size of actin bundles formed in vitro and inhibited actin fluorescence recovery in microvilli. In espin 1, which has an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain, the site was autoinhibited by binding between the ankyrin repeat domain and a peptide near the actin-binding site. Deletion of this peptide from espin 1 activated its actin-binding site. The peptide resembled tail homology domain I of myosin III, a ligand of the ankyrin repeat domain localized with espin 1 at the tip of stereocilia. A myosin III tail homology domain I peptide, but not scrambled control peptides, inhibited internal binding of the ankyrin repeat domain and released the espin 1 actin-binding site from autoinhibition. Thus, this regulation could result in local activation of the additional actin-binding site of espin 1 by myosin III in stereocilia.

  11. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima.

  12. Directional Transport of a Bead Bound to Lamellipodial Surface Is Driven by Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Nobezawa, Daisuke; Ikeda, Sho-ichi; Wada, Eitaro; Nagano, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The force driving the retrograde flow of actin cytoskeleton is important in the cellular activities involving cell movement (e.g., growth cone motility in axon guidance, wound healing, or cancer metastasis). However, relative importance of the forces generated by actin polymerization and myosin II in this process remains elusive. We have investigated the retrograde movement of the poly-d-lysine-coated bead attached with the optical trap to the edge of lamellipodium of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The velocity of the attached bead drastically decreased by submicromolar concentration of cytochalasin D, latrunculin A, or jasplakinolide, indicating the involvement of actin turnover. On the other hand, the velocity decreased only slightly in the presence of 50 μM (−)-blebbistatin and Y-27632. Comparative fluorescence microscopy of the distribution of actin filaments and that of myosin II revealed that the inhibition of actin turnover by cytochalasin D, latrunculin A, or jasplakinolide greatly diminished the actin filament network. On the other hand, inhibition of myosin II activity by (−)-blebbistatin or Y-27632 little affected the actin network but diminished stress fibers. Based on these results, we conclude that the actin polymerization/depolymerization plays the major role in the retrograde movement, while the myosin II activity is involved in the maintenance of the dynamic turnover of actin in lamellipodium. PMID:28246604

  13. Profilin-Dependent Nucleation and Assembly of Actin Filaments Controls Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in plant cells are incredibly dynamic; they undergo incessant remodeling and assembly or disassembly within seconds. These dynamic events are choreographed by a plethora of actin-binding proteins, but the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we dissect the contribution of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PROFILIN1 (PRF1), a conserved actin monomer-binding protein, to actin organization and single filament dynamics during axial cell expansion of living epidermal cells. We found that reduced PRF1 levels enhanced cell and organ growth. Surprisingly, we observed that the overall frequency of nucleation events in prf1 mutants was dramatically decreased and that a subpopulation of actin filaments that assemble at high rates was reduced. To test whether profilin cooperates with plant formin proteins to execute actin nucleation and rapid filament elongation in cells, we used a pharmacological approach. Here, we used Small Molecule Inhibitor of Formin FH2 (SMIFH2), after validating its mode of action on a plant formin in vitro, and observed a reduced nucleation frequency of actin filaments in live cells. Treatment of wild-type epidermal cells with SMIFH2 mimicked the phenotype of prf1 mutants, and the nucleation frequency in prf1-2 mutant was completely insensitive to these treatments. Our data provide compelling evidence that PRF1 coordinates the stochastic dynamic properties of actin filaments by modulating formin-mediated actin nucleation and assembly during plant cell expansion. PMID:26574597

  14. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  15. A high-affinity interaction with ADP-actin monomers underlies the mechanism and in vivo function of Srv2/cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Pieta K; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Kugler, Jamie; Moseley, James B; Almo, Steven C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2004-11-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP), also called Srv2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved actin monomer-binding protein that promotes cofilin-dependent actin turnover in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this function. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae CAP binds with strong preference to ADP-G-actin (Kd 0.02 microM) compared with ATP-G-actin (Kd 1.9 microM) and competes directly with cofilin for binding ADP-G-actin. Further, CAP blocks actin monomer addition specifically to barbed ends of filaments, in contrast to profilin, which blocks monomer addition to pointed ends of filaments. The actin-binding domain of CAP is more extensive than previously suggested and includes a recently solved beta-sheet structure in the C-terminus of CAP and adjacent sequences. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we define evolutionarily conserved residues that mediate binding to ADP-G-actin and demonstrate that these activities are required for CAP function in vivo in directing actin organization and polarized cell growth. Together, our data suggest that in vivo CAP competes with cofilin for binding ADP-actin monomers, allows rapid nucleotide exchange to occur on actin, and then because of its 100-fold weaker binding affinity for ATP-actin compared with ADP-actin, allows other cellular factors such as profilin to take the handoff of ATP-actin and facilitate barbed end assembly.

  16. Automated Detection of Actinic Keratoses in Clinical Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Hames, Samuel C.; Sinnya, Sudipta; Tan, Jean-Marie; Morze, Conrad; Sahebian, Azadeh; Soyer, H. Peter; Prow, Tarl W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis is known to have intra- and inter-observer variability, and there is currently no non-invasive and objective measure to diagnose these lesions. Objective The aim of this pilot study was to determine if automatically detecting and circumscribing actinic keratoses in clinical photographs is feasible. Methods Photographs of the face and dorsal forearms were acquired in 20 volunteers from two groups: the first with at least on actinic keratosis present on the face and each arm, the second with no actinic keratoses. The photographs were automatically analysed using colour space transforms and morphological features to detect erythema. The automated output was compared with a senior consultant dermatologist’s assessment of the photographs, including the intra-observer variability. Performance was assessed by the correlation between total lesions detected by automated method and dermatologist, and whether the individual lesions detected were in the same location as the dermatologist identified lesions. Additionally, the ability to limit false positives was assessed by automatic assessment of the photographs from the no actinic keratosis group in comparison to the high actinic keratosis group. Results The correlation between the automatic and dermatologist counts was 0.62 on the face and 0.51 on the arms, compared to the dermatologist’s intra-observer variation of 0.83 and 0.93 for the same. Sensitivity of automatic detection was 39.5% on the face, 53.1% on the arms. Positive predictive values were 13.9% on the face and 39.8% on the arms. Significantly more lesions (p<0.0001) were detected in the high actinic keratosis group compared to the no actinic keratosis group. Conclusions The proposed method was inferior to assessment by the dermatologist in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value. However, this pilot study used only a single simple feature and was still able to achieve sensitivity of detection of 53

  17. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes.

  18. Transforming growth factor beta1 regulates melanocyte proliferation and differentiation in mouse neural crest cells via stem cell factor/KIT signaling.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tamihiro; Soma, Yoshinao; Kawa, Yoko; Ito, Masaru; Yamasaki, Emiko; Watabe, Hidenori; Hosaka, Eri; Yajima, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kayoko; Mizoguchi, Masako

    2002-03-01

    Stem cell factor is essential to the migration and differentiation of melanocytes during embryogenesis based on the observation that mutations in either the stem cell factor gene, or its ligand, KIT, result in defects in coat pigmentation in mice. Stem cell factor is also required for the survival of melanocyte precursors while they are migrating towards the skin. Transforming growth factor beta1 has been implicated in the regulation of both cellular proliferation and differentiation. NCC-melb4, an immortal cloned cell line, was cloned from a mouse neural crest cell. NCC-melb4 cells provide a model to study the specific stage of differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes. They also express KIT as a melanoblast marker. Using the NCC-melb4 cell line, we investigated the effect of transforming growth factor beta1 on the differentiation and proliferation of immature melanocyte precursors. Immunohistochemically, NCC-melb4 cells showed transforming growth factor beta1 expression. The anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody inhibited the cell growth, and downregulated the KIT protein and mRNA expression. To investigate further the activation of autocrine transforming growth factor beta1, NCC-melb4 cells were incubated in nonexogenous transforming growth factor beta1 culture medium. KIT protein decreased with anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that in NCC-melb4 cells, transforming growth factor beta1 promotes melanocyte precursor proliferation in autocrine and/or paracrine regulation. We further investigated the influence of transforming growth factor beta1 in vitro using a neural crest cell primary culture system from wild-type mice. Anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody decreased the number of KIT positive neural crest cell. In addition, the anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody supplied within the wild-type neural crest explants abolished the growth of the neural

  19. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  20. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Groen, Christopher M.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5–9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  1. Albumin acts like transforming growth factor β1 in microbubble-based drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yueh-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Tien-Kuei; Lin, Ching-Jung; Li, Pai-Chi

    2014-04-01

    Unlike lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs), albumin-shelled microbubbles (MBs) have not been reported to be actively targeted to cells without the assistance of antibodies. Recent studies indicate that the albumin molecule is similar to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) both structurally and functionally. The TGF-β superfamily is important during early tumor outgrowth, with an elevated TGF-β being tumor suppressive; at later stages, this switches to malignant conversion and progression, including breast cancer. TGF-β receptors I and II play crucial roles in both the binding and endocytosis of albumin. However, until now, no specific albumin receptor has been found. On the basis of the above-mentioned information, we hypothesized that non-antibody-conjugated albumin-shelled MBs can be used to deliver drugs to breast cancer cells. We also studied the possible roles of TGF-β1 and radiation force in the behavior of cells and albumin-shelled MBs. The results indicate that albumin-shelled MBs loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) induce breast cancer cell apoptosis without the specific targeting produced by an antibody. Applying either an acoustic radiation force or cavitation alone to cells with PTX-loaded albumin MBs increased the apoptosis rate to 23.2% and 26.3% (p < 0.05), respectively. We also found that albumin-shelled MBs can enter MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and remain there for at least 24 h, even in the presence of PTX loading. Confocal micrographs revealed that 70.5% of the breast cancer cells took up albumin-shelled MBs spontaneously after 1 d of incubation. Applying an acoustic radiation force further increased the percentage to 91.9% in our experiments. However, this process could be blocked by TGF-β1, even with subsequent exposure to the radiation force. From these results, we conclude that TGF-β1 receptors are involved in the endocytotic process by which albumin-shelled MBs enter breast cancer cells. The acoustic radiation force increases the contact

  2. Activation of transforming growth factor-beta1 and early atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michelle; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Bruce, Ian N; Coupes, Beatrice; Brenchley, Paul E C

    2006-01-01

    The efficiency of activating latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may control the balance between inflammation and fibrosis, modulating the disease phenotype. To test this hypothesis we studied the ability to activate TGF-beta1 in SLE patients and control individuals within the context of inflammatory disease activity, cumulative organ damage and early atherosclerosis. An Activation Index (AI) for TGF-beta1 was determined for 32 patients with SLE and 33 age-matched and sex-matched control individuals by quantifying the increase in active TGF-beta1 under controlled standard conditions. Apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured using standard Doppler ultrasound. These measures were compared between patients and control individuals. In an analysis conducted in patients, we assessed the associations of these measures with SLE phenotype, including early atherosclerosis. Both intima-media thickness and TGF-beta1 AI for SLE patients were within the normal range. There was a significant inverse association between TGF-beta1 AI and levels of apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after 24 hours in culture for both SLE patients and control individuals. Only in SLE patients was there a significant negative correlation between TGF-beta1 AI and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.404; P = 0.022) and between TGF-beta1 AI and carotid artery intima-media thickness (r = -0.587; P = 0.0004). A low AI was associated with irreversible damage (SLICC [Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics] Damage Index > or = 1) and was inversely correlated with disease duration. Intima-media thickness was significantly linked to total cholesterol (r = 0.371; P = 0.037). To conclude, in SLE low normal TGF-beta1 activation was linked with increased lymphocyte apoptosis, irreversible organ damage, disease duration

  3. Add-on angiotensin II receptor blockade lowers urinary transforming growth factor-beta levels.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Siva, Senthuran; Dunn, Stephen R; Sharma, Kumar

    2002-03-01

    Progression of renal failure, despite renoprotection with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in patients with proteinuric nephropathies, may be caused by persistent renal production of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) through the angiotensin II subtype 1 (AT1) receptors. We tested the hypothesis that AT1-receptor blocker therapy added to a background of chronic maximal ACE inhibitor therapy will result in a reduction in urinary TGF-beta1 levels in such patients. Sixteen patients completed a two-period, crossover, randomized, controlled trial, details of which have been previously reported. All patients were administered lisinopril, 40 mg/d, with either losartan, 50 mg/d, or placebo. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor. Overnight specimens of urine were analyzed for urine TGF-beta1, protein, and creatinine concentrations. Mean age of the study population was 53 +/- 9 (SD) years; body mass index, 38 +/- 5.7 kg/m2; seated BP, 156 +/- 18/88 +/- 12 mm Hg; and urine protein excretion, 3.6 +/- 0.71 g/g of creatinine. Twelve patients had diabetic nephropathy, and the remainder had chronic glomerulonephritis. At baseline, urinary TGF-beta1 levels were significantly increased in the study population compared with healthy controls (13.2 +/- 1.2 versus 1.7 +/- 1.1 ng/g creatinine; P < 0.001). There was a strong correlation between baseline urine protein excretion and urinary TGF-beta1 level (r2 = 0.53; P = 0.001), as well as systolic BP and urinary TGF-beta1 level (r2 = 0.57; P < 0.001). After 4 weeks of add-on losartan therapy, there was a 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16% to 55%) decline in urinary TGF-beta1 levels (13.3 [95% CI, 11.4 to 15.5] to 8.2 pg/mg creatinine [95% CI, 6.2 to 10.7]). The reduction in urinary TGF-beta1 levels occurred independent of changes in mean urinary protein excretion or BP. Thus, proteinuric patients with renal failure, despite maximal ACE inhibition, had increased urinary levels of

  4. Transcriptional Regulation of Human Transforming Growth Factor-α in Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Johnson, James; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2017-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) is known to play multifunctional roles in the central nervous system (CNS), including the provision of neurotropic properties that protect neurons against various neurotoxic insults. Previously, we reported that TGF-α mediates estrogen-induced enhancement of glutamate transporter GLT-1 function in astrocytes. However, the regulatory mechanism of TGF-α at the transcriptional level remains to be established. Our findings revealed that the human TGF-α promoter contains consensus sites for several transcription factors, such as NF-κB and yin yang 1 (YY1). NF-κB served as a positive regulator of TGF-α promoter activity, corroborated by observations that overexpression of NF-κB p65 increased, while mutation in the NF-κB binding sites in the TGF-α promoter reduced the promoter activity in rat primary astrocytes. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; 50 μM) or quinazoline (QNZ; 10 μM) also abolished TGF-α promoter activity, and NF-κB directly bound to its consensus site in the TGF-α promoter as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Dexamethasone (DX) increased TGF-α promoter activity by activation of NF-κB. Treatment of astrocytes with 100 nM of DX for 24 h activated its glucocorticoid receptor and signaling proteins, including MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and PKA, via non-genomic pathways, to enhance TGF-α promoter activity and expression. YY1 served as a critical negative regulator of the TGF-α promoter as overexpression of YY1 decreased, while mutation of YY1 binding site in the promoter increased TGF-α promoter activity. Treatment for 3 h with 250 μM of manganese (Mn), an environmental neurotoxin, decreased astrocytic TGF-α expression by activation of YY1. Taken together, our results suggest that NF-κB is a critical positive regulator, whereas YY1 is a negative regulator of the TGF-α promoter. These findings identify potential molecular targets for

  5. Low dose radiation interactions with the transformation growth factor (TFG)-beta pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, Amy Jesse

    A major limiting factor for long-term, deep-space missions is the radiation dose to astronauts. Because the dose to the astronauts is a mixed field of low- and high-LET radiation, there is a need to understand the effects of both radiation types on whole tissue; however, there are limited published data on the effects of high-LET (linear-energy-transfer) radiation on tissue. Thus, we designed a perfusion chamber system for rat trachea in order to mimic in vivo respiratory tissue. We successfully maintained the perfused tracheal tissue ex vivo in a healthy and viable condition for up to three days. In addition, this project studied the effects of high-LET Fe particles on the overall transformation growth factor (TGF)-beta response after TGF-beta inactivation and compared the results to the TGF-beta response post x-ray irradiation. It was found that a TGF-beta response could be measured in the perfused tracheal tissue, for x-ray and Fe particle irradiations, despite the high autofluorescent background intrinsic to tissue. However, after comparing the TGF-beta response of x-ray irradiation to High-Z-High-energy (HZE) irradiation, there was not a significant difference in radiation types. The TGF-beta response in x-ray and HZE irradiated perfusion chambers was also measured over time post irradiation. It was found that for 6 hour and 8 hour post irradiation, the TGF-beta response was higher for lower doses of radiation than for higher doses. This is in contrast to the 0 hour fixation which found the TGF-beta response to increase with increased dose. The inverse relationship found for 6 hour and 8 hour fixation times may indicate a threshold response for TGF-beta response; i.e., for low doses, a threshold of dose must be reached for an immediate TGF-beta response, otherwise the tissue responds more slowly to the irradiation damage. This result was unexpected and will require further investigation to determine if the threshold can be determined for the 250 kVp x-rays and

  6. Vascular remodeling in primary pulmonary hypertension. Potential role for transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Botney, M. D.; Bahadori, L.; Gold, L. I.

    1994-01-01

    Active exogenous transforming growth factor-beta s (TGF-beta s) are potent modulators of extracellular matrix synthesis in cell culture and stimulate matrix synthesis in wounds and other remodeling tissues. The role of endogenous TGF-beta s in remodeling tissues is less well defined. Vascular remodeling in the pulmonary arteries of patients with primary pulmonary hypertension is characterized, in part, by abnormal deposition of immunohistochemically detectable procollagen, thereby identifying actively remodeling vessels. We used this marker of active matrix synthesis to begin defining the in vivo role of TGF-beta in the complex milieu of actively remodeling tissues. Immunohistochemistry using isoform-specific anti-TGF-beta antibodies was performed to determine whether TGF-beta was present in actively remodeling hypertensive pulmonary arteries 20 to 500 microns in diameter. Intense, cell-associated TGF-beta 3 immunoreactivity was observed in the media and neointima of these hypertensive muscular arteries. Immunostaining was present, but less intense, in normal arteries of comparable size. TGF-beta 2 immunoreactivity was observed in normal vessels and was increased slightly in hypertensive vessels, in a pattern resembling TGF-beta 3 immunoreactivity. No staining was associated with the adventitia. TGF-beta 1 immunostaining was either faint or absent in both normal and hypertensive vessels. Comparison of procollagen and TGF-beta localization demonstrated that TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3 colocalized at all sites of procollagen synthesis. However, TGF-beta was observed in vessels, or vascular compartments, where there was no procollagen synthesis. Procollagen immunoreactivity was not present in normal vessels that showed immunoreactivity for TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3. These observations suggest: a) the stimulation of procollagen synthesis by TGF-beta in vivo is more complex than suggested by in vitro studies and b) a potential role for TGF-beta 2 or TGF-beta 3, but not

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor-dependent cellular transformation requires either phospholipase Cgamma or phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase.

    PubMed

    DeMali, K A; Whiteford, C C; Ulug, E T; Kazlauskas, A

    1997-04-04

    Although it has been well established that constitutive activation of receptor tyrosine kinases leads to cellular transformation, the signal relay pathways involved have not been systematically investigated. In this study we used a panel of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta receptor mutants (beta-PDGFR), which selectively activate various signal relay enzymes to define which signaling pathways are required for PDGF-dependent growth of cells in soft agar. The host cell line for these studies was Ph cells, a 3T3-like cell that expresses normal levels of the beta-PDGFR but no PDGF-alpha receptor (alpha-PDGFR). Hence, this cell system can be used to study signaling of mutant alphaPDGFRs or alpha/beta chimeras. We constructed chimeric receptors containing the alphaPDGFR extracellular domain and the betaPDGFR cytoplasmic domain harboring various phosphorylation site mutations. The mutants were expressed in Ph cells, and their ability to drive PDGF-dependent cellular transformation (growth in soft agar) was assayed. Cells infected with an empty expression vector failed to grow in soft agar, whereas introduction of the chimera with a wild-type beta-PDGFR cytoplasmic domain gave rise to a large number of colonies. In contrast, the N2F5 chimera, in which the binding sites for phospholipase Cgamma (PLC-gamma), RasGTPase-activating protein, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), and SHP-2 were eliminated, failed to trigger proliferation. Restoring the binding sites for RasGTPase-activating protein or SHP-2 did not rescue the PDGF-dependent response. In contrast, receptors capable of associating with either PLC-gamma or PI3K relayed a growth signal that was comparable to wild-type receptors in the soft agar growth assay. These findings indicate that the PDGF receptor activates multiple signaling pathways that lead to cellular transformation, and that either PI3K or PLC-gamma are key initiators of such signal relay cascades.

  8. Generation of an isogenic collection of yeast actin mutants and identification of three interrelated phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Whitacre, J; Davis, D; Toenjes, K; Brower, S; Adams, A

    2001-01-01

    A large collection of yeast actin mutations has been previously isolated and used in numerous studies of actin cytoskeletal function. However, the various mutations have been in congenic, rather than isogenic, backgrounds, making it difficult to compare the subtle phenotypes that are characteristic of these mutants. We have therefore placed 27 mutations in an isogenic background. We used a subset of these mutants to compare the degree to which different actin alleles are defective in sporulation, endocytosis, and growth on NaCl-containing media. We found that the three phenotypes are highly correlated. The correlations are specific and not merely a reflection of general growth defects, because the phenotypes are not correlated with growth rates under normal conditions. Significantly, those actin mutants exhibiting the most severe phenotypes in all three processes have altered residues that cluster to a small region of the actin crystal structure previously defined as the fimbrin (Sac6p)-binding site. We examined the relationship between endocytosis and growth on salt and found that shifting wild-type or actin mutant cells to high salt reduces the rate of alpha-factor internalization. These results suggest that actin mutants may be unable to grow on salt because of additive endocytic defects (due to mutation and salt). PMID:11156976

  9. Involvement of LIM kinase 1 in actin polarization in human CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehua; Guo, Jia; Vorster, Paul; Wu, Yuntao

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine binding to cognate receptors induces actin dynamics that are a major driving force for T cell migration and chemotactic motility. HIV-1 binding to the chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 initiates chemotactic signaling, mimicking chemokine-induced actin dynamics to facilitate infection processes such as entry, early DNA synthesis, and nuclear migration. Recently, we identified that HIV-triggered early actin polymerization is mediated through the Rac1-PAK1/2-LIMK1-cofilin pathway. Inhibition of LIMK1 (LIM domain kinase 1), a kinase phosphorylating cofilin, through shRNA knockdown decreases actin polymerization and T cell chemotaxis toward SDF-1. The LIMK1 knockdown T cells also supported lower viral entry, DNA synthesis and nuclear migration, suggesting a critical role of LIMK1-mediated actin dynamics in the initiation of HIV-1 infection. Surprisingly, LIMK1 knockdown in CEM-SS T cells did not lead to an overall change in the ratio of phospho-cofilin to total cofilin although there was a measurable decrease in the amount of actin filaments in cells. The decrease in filamentous actin in LIMK1 knockdown cells was found to mainly occur in polarized cap region rich in F-actin. These results suggest that LIMK1 may be involved in spontaneous actin polarization in transformed T cells. The inhibition of T cell chemotaxis by LIMK1 knockdown likely result from inhibition of localized LIMK1 activation and cofilin phosphorylation that are required for polarized actin polymerization for directional cell migration. The inhibition of HIV-1 infection by LIMK1 knockdown may also result from the decrease of actin-rich membrane protrusions that may be preferred viral entry sites in T cells. PMID:23060964

  10. Effect of transforming growth factor-beta1 on decorin expression and muscle morphology during chicken embryonic and posthatch growth and development.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Velleman, S G

    2009-02-01

    During skeletal muscle development, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent inhibitor of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation, as well as a regulator of extracellular matrix (ECM) production. Decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich ECM proteoglycans, binds to TGF-beta1 and modulates TGF-beta1-dependent cell growth stimulation or inhibition. The expression of decorin can be regulated by TGF-beta1 during muscle proliferation and differentiation. How TGF-beta1 affects decorin and muscle growth, however, has not been well documented in vivo. The present study investigated the effect of TGF-beta1 on decorin expression and intracellular connective tissue development during skeletal muscle growth. Exogenous TGF-beta1 significantly decreased the number of myofibers in a given area at both 1 d and 6 wk posthatch. The TGF-beta1-treated muscle had a significant decrease in decorin mRNA expression at embryonic day (ED) 10, whereas protein amounts decreased at 17 ED and 1 d posthatch compared to the control muscle. Decorin was localized in both the endomysium and perimysium in the control pectoralis major muscle. Transforming growth factor-beta1 reduced decorin in both the endomysium and perimysium from 17 ED to 6 wk posthatch. Compared to the control muscle, the perimysium space in the pectoralis major muscle was dramatically decreased by TGF-beta1 during embryonic development through posthatch growth. Because decorin regulates collagen fibrillogenesis, a major component of the ECM, the reduction of decorin by TGF-beta1 treatment may cause the irregular formation of collagen fibrils, leading to the decrease in endomysium and perimysium space. The results from the current study suggest that the effect of TGF-beta1 on decorin expression and localization was likely associated with altered development of the perimysium and the regulation of muscle fiber development.

  11. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on growth and differentiation of the continuous rat thyroid follicular cell line, FRTL-5

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.C. III; Ranganathan, G.; Hay, I.D.; Nelson, R.E.; Jiang, N.S.

    1988-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many widely varied cell types in vitro, including some that are endocrinologically active. We have investigated the previously unknown effects of this unique growth factor in the differentiated rat thyroid follicular cell line FRTL-5. The cells demonstrated specific, high affinity binding of TGF beta, and as with other epithelial cells, the growth of these thyroid follicular cells was potently inhibited by addition of TGF beta to the culture medium. TGF beta caused a significant reduction in TSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in the cells. The addition of (Bu)2cAMP along with the growth factor to cultures partially reversed the characteristic morphological changes seen with TGF beta, but did not reverse the growth inhibition. To further investigate the possible mechanisms of the effects of TGF beta on the cells, we measured the influence of the growth factor on (125I)TSH binding. TGF beta did not compete for specific TSH-binding sites; however, exposure of the cells to TGF beta for 12 or more h resulted in a dose-dependent down-regulation of TSH receptors that was fully reversible. While cellular proliferation was potently inhibited by TGF beta, differentiated function, as manifest by iodine-trapping ability, was stimulated by the growth factor. This stimulation of iodine uptake was independent of, and additive to, the stimulatory effects of TSH. Finally, FRTL-5 cells in serum-free medium and in response to TSH were shown to secrete TGF beta-like activity that competed for (125I)TGF beta in a RRA. These studies suggest that TGF beta may represent an autocrine mechanism of controlling the growth response to TSH in thyroid follicular cells, while allowing the continuance of differentiated function.

  12. A 16-amino acid peptide from human alpha2-macroglobulin binds transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor-BB.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, D. J.; Roadcap, D. W.; Dhakephalkar, A.; Gonias, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) is a major carrier of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in vitro and in vivo. By screening glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with overlapping sequences, we localized the TGFbeta-binding site to aa 700-738 of the mature human alpha2M subunit. In separate experiments, we screened overlapping synthetic peptides corresponding to aa 696-777 of alpha2M and identified a single 16-mer (718-733) that binds TGF-beta1. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) bound to the same peptide, even though TGF-beta and PDGF-BB share almost no sequence identity. The sequence of the growth factor-binding peptide, WDLVVVNSAGVAEVGV, included a high proportion of hydrophobic amino acids. The analogous peptide from murinoglobulin, a human alpha2M homologue that does not bind growth factors, contained only three nonconservative amino acid substitutions; however, the MUG peptide failed to bind TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB. These results demonstrate that a distinct and highly-restricted site in alpha2M, positioned near the C-terminal flank of the bait region, mediates growth factor binding. At least part of the growth factor-binding site is encoded by exon 18 of the alpha2M gene, which is notable for a 5' splice site polymorphism that has been implicated in Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:11106172

  13. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  14. Transforming growth factor-β-sphingosine kinase 1/S1P signaling upregulates microRNA-21 to promote fibrosis in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiujuan; Hong, Quan; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Yanyan; Zou, Xin; Xu, Lihong

    2016-02-01

    Renal fibrosis is a progressive pathological change characterized by tubular cell apoptosis, tubulointerstitial fibroblast proliferation, and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). miR-21 has been implicated in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-stimulated tissue fibrosis. Recent studies showed that sphingosine kinase/sphingosine-1-phosphate (SphK/S1P) are also critical for TGF-β-stimulated tissue fibrosis; however, it is not clear whether SphK/S1P interacts with miR-21 or not. In this study, we hypothesized that SphK/S1P signaling is linked to upregulation of miR-21 by TGF-β. To verify this hypothesis, we first determined that miR-21 was highly expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) stimulated with TGF-β by using qRT-PCR and Northern blotting. Simultaneously, inhibition of miR-21, mediated by the corresponding antimir, markedly decreased the expression and deposition of type I collagen, fibronectin (Fn), cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), α-smooth muscle actin, and fibroblast-specific protein1 in TGF-β-treated TECs. ELISA and qRT-PCR were used to measure the S1P and SphK1 levels in TECs. S1P production was induced by TGF-β through activation of SphK1. Furthermore, it was observed that TGF-β-stimulated upregulation of miR-21 was abolished by SphK1 siRNA and was restored by the addition of exogenous S1P. Blocking S1PR2 also inhibited upregulation of miR-21. Additionally, miR-21 overexpression attenuated the repression of TGF-β-stimulated ECM deposition and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by SphK1 and S1PR2 siRNA. In summary, our study demonstrates a link between SphK1/S1P and TGF-β-induced miR-21 in renal TECs and may represent a novel therapeutic target in renal fibrosis.

  15. Astragalus and Paeoniae Radix Rubra extract (APE) inhibits hepatic stellate cell activation by modulating transforming growth factor-β/smad pathway

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, WEIJUAN; LI, LIN; TIAN, XIAOPENG; YAN, JINJIN; YANG, XINZHENG; WANG, XINLONG; LIAO, GUOZHEN; QIU, GENQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Astragalus and Paeoniae Radix Rubra extract (APE) is capable of protecting against liver fibrosis in rats. The hypothesis of the present study was that APE exerts its anti-fibrotic effect by mediating the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling pathway. In order to investigate this hypothesis, a series of assays were designed to detect the effects of APE on cell proliferation, cell invasion and the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In addition, the effects of APE on the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway were explored, with the aim of elucidating the underlying mechanisms. HSCs were initially isolated from normal rat liver. A number of assays were then employed in order to evaluate the effects of APE on the function of these cells. Cell proliferation was investigated using an MTT assay and cell invasion was observed with the use of transwell invasion chambers. Collagen synthesis was measured with a 3H-proline incorporation assay and expression of α-smooth muscle actin was used to determine the extent of HSC activation. Protein expression induced by TGF-β1 in HSCs was investigated by western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type1 (PAI-1) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) transcriptional activity was measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that APE (5–80 μg/ml) significantly inhibited fetal bovine serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Cell invasion and activation of HSCs induced by TGF-β1 were disrupted by treatment with APE in a dose-dependent manner. TGF-β1 was observed to increase the phosphorylation of Smad2/3, while APE administered at higher doses produced inhibitory effects on Smad2/3 phosphorylation. In addition, administration of APE abrogated the TGF-β1-induced reduction in Smad-7 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The results further indicated that APE treatment not only

  16. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c–regulated dynamic actin filament arrays

    PubMed Central

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  17. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c-regulated dynamic actin filament arrays.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network.

  18. Cloning the promoter for transforming growth factor-beta type III receptor. Basal and conditional expression in fetal rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; McCarthy, T. L.; Centrella, M.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta binds to three high affinity cell surface molecules that directly or indirectly regulate its biological effects. The type III receptor (TRIII) is a proteoglycan that lacks significant intracellular signaling or enzymatic motifs but may facilitate transforming growth factor-beta binding to other receptors, stabilize multimeric receptor complexes, or segregate growth factor from activating receptors. Because various agents or events that regulate osteoblast function rapidly modulate TRIII expression, we cloned the 5' region of the rat TRIII gene to assess possible control elements. DNA fragments from this region directed high reporter gene expression in osteoblasts. Sequencing showed no consensus TATA or CCAAT boxes, whereas several nuclear factors binding sequences within the 3' region of the promoter co-mapped with multiple transcription initiation sites, DNase I footprints, gel mobility shift analysis, or loss of activity by deletion or mutation. An upstream enhancer was evident 5' proximal to nucleotide -979, and a silencer region occurred between nucleotides -2014 and -2194. Glucocorticoid sensitivity mapped between nucleotides -687 and -253, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 2 sensitivity co-mapped within the silencer region. Thus, the TRIII promoter contains cooperative basal elements and dispersed growth factor- and hormone-sensitive regulatory regions that can control TRIII expression by osteoblasts.

  19. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  20. Antibodies to Actin in Autoimmune Neutropenia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    protein as actin. Purified Acanthamoeba actin by anti-neutrophil antibodies in autoimmune neutropenia, comigrated with the protein and was specifically...anti-rabbit IgG were obtained from ICN Immunobiolog- formed using purified Acanthamoeba actin (gift of Dr Blair Bowers. icals, Naperville, IL. Cells...preparations𔃼 1 - was the protein recognized by these anti-neutrophil antibody 6 .2- positive sera, lgG, and F(ab’) 2. Purified Acanthamoeba actin