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Sample records for actin volume fraction

  1. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  2. Volume Fraction Effects in Electroacoustic Measurements.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, Mikael

    2001-08-15

    We measured the dynamic mobility of a polystyrene latex at 1 MHz as a function of volume fraction using the ESA-8000. The volume fraction dependence is compared with a semiempirical equation as well as with some theoretical predictions. It turns out that our polystyrene latex exhibits a volume fraction dependence much weaker than that predicted by any of the theories. This suggests that (polystyrene) latices may not be the ideal model system and that the centrifugation process may influence the surface structure of the particles. We also measured the dynamic mobility spectrum of a silica sol as a function of volume fraction using the Acoustosizer. The experimental spectrum of the silica sol was found to agree reasonably well with the semiempirical and theoretical spectra, especially below φ=0.144. At higher volume fractions we observed positive phase angles that were not predicted by the semiempirical method nor the cell model. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11482951

  3. Myosin-induced volume increase of the hyper-mobile water surrounding actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Siddique, Md Shahjahan Parvez; Nazia, Umme Salma; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kodama, Takao

    2004-09-10

    Microwave dielectric spectroscopy can measure the rotational mobility of water molecules that hydrate proteins and the hydration-shell volume. Using this technique, we have recently shown that apart from typical hydrating water molecules with lowered mobility there are other water molecules around the actin filaments (F-actin) which have a much higher mobility than that of bulk water [Biophys. J. 85 (2003) 3154]. We report here that the volume of this water component (hyper-mobile water) markedly increases without significant change of the volume of the ordinary hydration shell when the myosin motor-domain (S1, myosin subfragment-1) binds to F-actin. No hyper-mobile component was found in the hydration shell of S1 itself. The present results strongly suggest that the solvent space around S1 bound to F-actin is diffusionally asymmetric, which supports our model of force generation by actomyosin proposed previously [op. cit.]. PMID:15313212

  4. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes.

    PubMed

    Amato, E; Lizio, D; Baldari, S

    2011-01-21

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as (90)Y and to (131)I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  5. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  6. Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis improved with fractional 1927-nm laser treatments.

    PubMed

    Ross, Nicholas A; Rosenbaum, Lara E; Saedi, Nazanin; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is an inherited disorder of keratinization readily diagnosed through clinical and histologic examination. While generally benign in nature, the lesions can have profound psychosocial implications for patients. Although no cure exists, a number of treatment modalities, from topical medications to laser and light devices, have been reported with variable success. The authors report two cases of DSAP treated with the 1927-nm thulium fiber fractional laser along with a review of the treatment literature for DSAP. This therapy is convenient and safe with nearly no downtime or morbidity associated with pigment or textural changes. PMID:26820042

  7. Photodynamic Therapy with Ablative Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser in Treatment of Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Dong Jun; Shin, Jaeyoung; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). However, a major limitation of PDT is the long incubation time required to allow penetration of the photosensitizer. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if pretreatment with an ablative carbon dioxide (CO2) fractional laser can reduce the incubation time of the photosensitizer. Methods Initially, 29 patients with a total of 34 AK lesions were treated with an ablative CO2 fractional laser at Ajou University Hospital between January and December 2010. Immediately after the laser treatment, topical 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid or methyl-aminolevulinate was applied to the AK lesions and incubated for 70 to 90 minutes. Then, the treated areas were illuminated with a red light source. Improvement was clinically or histologically assessed eight weeks after the treatment. Results In spite of the short incubation time, 24 lesions (70.6%) showed a complete response (CR) within three sessions of PDT (10 lesions a clinical CR and 14 lesions a clinical/histological CR). There were no significant side effects associated with the combination of ablative CO2 fractional laser and PDT. Conclusion Ablative CO2 fractional laser may be considered an additional treatment option for reducing the incubation time of the photosensitizer in PDT. PMID:24371387

  8. Changes in molar volume and heat capacity of actin upon polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Quirion, F; Gicquaud, C

    1993-01-01

    We have used densimetry and microcalorimetry to measure the changes in molar volume and heat capacity of the actin molecule during Mg(2+)-induced polymerization. Molar volume is decreased by 720 ml/mol. This result is in contradiction with previous measurements by Ikkai and Ooi [(1966) Science 152, 1756-1757], and by Swezey and Somero [(1985) Biochemistry 24, 852-860]: both of these groups reported increases in actin volume during polymerization, of 391 ml/mol and 63 ml/mol respectively. We also observed a decrease in heat capacity of about 69.5 kJ.K-1.mol-1 during polymerization. This is in agreement with the concept of conformational fluctuation of proteins proposed by Lumry and Gregory [(1989) J.Mol. Liq. 42, 113-144]whereby either ligand binding by a protein or monomer-monomer interaction decreases the protein's conformational flexibility. PMID:8240275

  9. Actin Filaments at the Leading Edge of Cancer Cells Are Characterized by a High Mobile Fraction and Turnover Regulation by Profilin I

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Gisela; Syriani, Emilio; Morales, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Cellular motility is the basis for cancer cell invasion and metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer among women, metastasis represents the most devastating stage of the disease. The central role of cellular motility in cancer development emphasizes the importance of understanding the specific mechanisms involved in this process. In this context, tumor development and metastasis would be the consequence of a loss or defect of the mechanisms that control cytoskeletal remodeling. Profilin I belongs to a family of small actin binding proteins that are thought to assist in actin filament elongation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Traditionally, Profilin I has been considered to be an essential control element for actin polymerization and cell migration. Expression of Profilin I is down-regulated in breast and various other cancer cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a breast cancer cell line, further inhibition of Profilin I expression promotes hypermotility and metastatic spread, a finding that contrasts with the proposed role of Profilin in enhancing polymerization. In this report, we have taken advantage of the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-actin to quantify and compare actin dynamics at the leading edge level in both cancer and non-cancer cell models. Our results suggest that (i) a high level of actin dynamics (i.e., a large mobile fraction of actin filaments and a fast turnover) is a common characteristic of some cancer cells; (ii) actin polymerization shows a high degree of independence from the presence of extracellular growth factors; and (iii) our results also corroborate the role of Profilin I in regulating actin polymerization, as raising the intracellular levels of Profilin I decreased the mobile fraction ratio of actin filaments and slowed their polymerization rate; furthermore, increased Profilin levels also led to reduced individual cell velocity and directionality. PMID:24465723

  10. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  11. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOEpatents

    Jandrasits, W.G.; Kikta, T.J.

    1998-03-17

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction. 9 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOEpatents

    Jandrasits, Walter G.; Kikta, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction.

  13. Nuclear Volume-Dependent Fractionation of Uranium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, S.; Schauble, E. A.; Anbar, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    Chemical reactions can fractionate isotopes because the magnitudes of equilibrium and rate constants are subtly sensitive to nuclear mass. Geoscientists have exploited this fact to learn about modern environmental processes and past environmental conditions by precisely measuring variations in the isotope compositions of a wide range of elements in natural materials. Here we present evidence from natural terrestrial samples that processes related to ¡°nuclear volume¡± rather than ¡°nuclear mass¡± significantly fractionate the isotope composition of the heaviest primordial element ¨C uranium. The isotopic composition of U in nature is generally assumed to be invariant. Here, we report variations of the 238U/235U isotope ratio in natural samples (basalts, granites, seawater, corals, black shales, suboxic sediments, ferro-manganese crusts/nodules and BIFs), which span a range of δ238U values of ~ 1.3 ‰, exceeding by far the analytical precision of our method (¡Ö 0.06‰, 2SD, based on replicate measurements of individual samples). The largest isotope variations found in our survey are between oxidized and reduced depositional environments, with seawater and suboxic sediments falling in between. U isotopes were analyzed with MC-ICP-MS. A mixed 236U-233U isotopic tracer (double spike) was used to correct for isotope fractionation during sample purification and instrumental mass bias. Sediments formed in oxic environments, such as manganese crusts from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, display δ238U of -0.54 to -0.62 ‰, slightly lighter than that of seawater (-0.41 ‰). However, sediments from reducing environments, such as black shales from the Black Sea (unit I and unit II) and the Cariaco basin, display heavy U isotope compositions with δ238U of up to +0.43 ‰ (0.84 ‰ heavier than seawater). Uranium enrichment in these sediments probably occurred during the reduction of soluble U(VI) (from seawater) to insoluble U(IV). Intriguingly, isotope

  14. VOFI - A library to initialize the volume fraction scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bnà, S.; Manservisi, S.; Scardovelli, R.; Yecko, P.; Zaleski, S.

    2016-03-01

    The VOFI library has been developed to accurately calculate the volume fraction field demarcated by implicitly-defined fluid interfaces in Cartesian grids with cubic cells. The method enlists a number of algorithms to compute the integration limits and the local height function, that is the integrand of a double Gauss-Legendre integration with a variable number of nodes. Tests in two and three dimensions are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and are provided in the software distribution with C/C++ and FORTRAN interfaces.

  15. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-07-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization. In contrast, the previously reported shrinkage-induced actin polymerization [Pedersen et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 252, 63-74] was independent of Rho kinase, p38, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and protein kinase C (PKC), which thus do not exert their effects on the shrinkage-activated transporters via effects on F-actin. The subsequent F-actin depolymerization, however, appeared MLCK- and PKC-dependent, and the initial swelling-induced F-actin depolymerization was MLCK-dependent; both effects were apparently secondary to kinase-mediated effects on cell volume changes. NHE1 in EATC is activated both by osmotic shrinkage and by the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A (CL-A). Both stimuli caused Rho kinase-dependent myosin II relocation to the cortical cytoplasm, but in contrast to the shrinkage-induced F-actin polymerization, CL-A treatment elicited a slight F-actin depolymerization. Moreover, Rho kinase inhibition did not significantly affect NHE1 activation, neither by shrinkage nor by CL-A. Implications for the possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation are discussed. PMID:12061817

  16. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ(0). We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45° angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ(0)∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕ(c), defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)<0, slopes experienced short, rapid, precursor compaction events prior to the onset of a sustained avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ(0)=7.7±1.4° and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θ(m)=28.5±1.0°. Granular material at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ(0)=32.1±1.5° prior to the onset of an avalanche at θ(m)=35.9±0.7°. Both θ(0) and θ(m) increased with ϕ(0) and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θ(R)=22±2°, was independent of ϕ(0). From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ(0), with ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)<0 precursor flow extending deeper into the granular bed and occurring more rapidly than precursor flow at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions-including volume fraction-are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches. PMID:25314432

  17. Influence of volume fraction on the dynamics of granular impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Yang, Ding; Goldman, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Variation of the volume fraction φ of non-cohesive granular media causes disproportionate changes in the forces exerted on impacting objects and, consequently, the impact kinematics. In our experiments, a computer controlled air fluidized granular bed is used to vary φ from 0.58 (low) to 0.62 (high) for 0.3 mm diameter glass spheres and 1̃ mm poppy seeds. An accelerometer attached to a 4.0 cm diameter steel sphere measures collision forces for initial impact velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 m/s. As an example of the dramatic changes produced by varying φ, time series of the force during impact with poppy seeds at an impact velocity of 1 m/s change from monotonically increasing with slope 100 N/s at φ=0.59 to monotonically decreasing with slope -100 N/s at φ=0.62; glass beads show similar behavior. Increasing φ from low to high at fixed collision velocity causes the penetration depth to decrease monotonically by approximately 50%. However, for the same parameters, the collision duration changes little, decreasing by 10% as φ is increased from 0.58 to 0.6 and then increasing by about 3% as φ is increased to 0.63. Our impact simulations exhibit the same collision dynamics vs. φ and reveal qualitative differences in grain velocity fields and local volume fraction changes between low and high φ states. Support by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Army Research Lab MAST CTA.

  18. Extracellular volume fraction in coronary chronic total occlusion patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin Yin; Zhang, Wei Guo; Yang, Shan; Yun, Hong; Deng, Sheng Ming; Fu, Cai Xia; Zeng, Meng Su; Jin, Hang; Guo, Liang

    2015-08-01

    (1) To assess extracellular volume fraction (ECV) and regional systolic function in patients presenting with coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) in areas without significant late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), and (2) to investigate the correlation between angiography collateral flow and ECV in territories supplied by CTO vessels. A total of 50 angiographically documented CTO patients and 15 age- and sex-matched normal controls were recruited to the study. Myocardial ECV, was calculated in infarcted, global non-infarcted and the entire myocardium respectively. Segmental ECV was calculated from myocardial segments within the perfusion territory of a CTO vessel. The global and regional systolic function was evaluated using ejection fraction and percent systolic thickening. ECVs in global myocardium and global non-infarcted myocardium were significantly elevated in comparison with that in controls (29.1 ± 4.2% and 26.6 ± 2.6% vs. 23.3 ± 2.0%, all P < 0.005). Global ECV significantly correlated with LV ejection fraction (r = -0.56, P < 0.001) and ECV inversely correlated with systolic thickening in global non-infarcted myocardium (r = -0.31, P < 0.05). The lower segmental ECV was associated with the presence of well-developed collaterals (P = 0.004), and multivariate binary logistic analysis demonstrated that mean segmental ECV and course of disease were the independent discriminator of collateral flow with overall diagnostic accuracy of 74.4%. In patients with CTO, ECV is found to be increased beyond that observed with LGE, and correlates with LV regional wall motion abnormality, which appears to reflect diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Mean segmental ECV value, combined with course of disease, may serve as good predictors of collateral flow. PMID:25985941

  19. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ0. We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45∘ angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ0∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕc, defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ0-ϕc<0, slopes experienced short, rapid, precursor compaction events prior to the onset of a sustained avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ0=7.7±1.4∘ and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θm=28.5±1.0∘. Granular material at ϕ0-ϕc>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ0=32.1±1.5∘ prior to the onset of an avalanche at θm=35.9±0.7∘. Both θ0 and θm increased with ϕ0 and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θR=22±2∘, was independent of ϕ0. From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ0, with ϕ0-ϕc<0 precursor flow extending deeper into the granular bed and occurring more rapidly than precursor flow at ϕ0-ϕc>0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions—including volume fraction—are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches.

  20. Coarsening in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The coarsening behavior of the gamma-prime precipitate has been examined in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys aged at elevated temperatures for times of up to 5000 h. Although the cube rate law was observed during coarsening, none of the presently available coarsening theories showed complete agreement with the experimental particle size distributions (PSDs). These discrepancies were thought to be due to elastic coherency strains which were not considered by the available models. Increasing the Mo content significantly influenced the PSDs and decreased the coarsening rate of the gamma-prime cubes, as a result of increasing the magnitude of the lattice mismatch. After extended aging times, the gamma-prime cubes underwent massive coalescence into plates at a rate which was much faster than the cuboidal coarsening rate. Once the gamma-prime plates were formed, further coarsening was not observed, and this stabilization of the microstructure was attributed to the development of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces.

  1. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  2. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-03-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner supplied algorithm (method I). A significant deviation of volume fraction from method I was found: both the y-intercept and the slope of the regression line were significantly different from those of the Archimedes-based volume fraction (p < 0.001). New individual thresholds were determined based on a calibration of volume fraction to the Archimedes-based volume fractions (method II). The mean thresholds of the two methods were applied to segment 20 randomly selected specimens. The results showed that volume fraction using the mean threshold of method I was underestimated by 4% (p = 0.001), whereas the mean threshold of method II yielded accurate values. The precision of the measurement was excellent. Our data show that care must be taken when applying thresholds in generating 3-D data, and that a fixed threshold may be used to obtain reliable volume fraction data. This fixed threshold may be determined from the Archimedes-based volume fraction of a subgroup of specimens. The threshold may vary between different materials, and so it should be determined whenever a study series is performed. PMID:10093033

  3. Modeling of soft interfacial volume fraction in composite materials with complex convex particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2014-01-21

    The influence of the soft interfacial volume fraction on physical properties of composite materials has been found to be significant. However, the soft interfacial volume fraction is difficultly determined by traditional experimental methods and simple models proposed so far. This article addresses the problem by means of theoretical and numerical approaches that start at a microscopic scale of composite materials, which are regarded as a three-phase composite structure with polydisperse convex particles, soft interfaces, and a matrix. A theoretical scheme for the soft interfacial volume fraction is proposed by a theory of the nearest-surface distribution functions and geometrical configurations of polydisperse convex particles. The theoretical scheme represents a generalized model for the soft interfacial volume fraction in that it cannot only determine the interfacial volume fraction around convex polyhedral particles but also to derive that around ellipsoidal and spherical particles. In order to test the theoretical scheme, a numerical model that adopts the three-phase composite structure and a numerical Monte Carlo integration scheme is presented. Also, theoretical and numerical results of the soft interfacial volume fraction around ellipsoidal and spherical particles in the literature are further compared. By way of application, it is shown that the developed model provides a quantitative means to evaluate the dependence of the soft interfacial volume fraction on various factors, such as geometrical configurations of particles and the interfacial thickness.

  4. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the brine volume fraction. We differentiate micro bubbles (Ø < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 mm < Ø < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  5. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables

    PubMed Central

    Ayan, Ahmet S.; Mo, Xiaokui; Williams, Terence M.; Mayr, Nina A.; Grecula, John C.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Xu-Welliver, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning. Methods and Materials Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules) treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45–54 Gy in 3–5 fractions) in the year of 2011–2012. Spearman's (ρ) correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR) and q-values were reported. Results All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV) for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029). The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV) as well as internal target volumes (ITV) (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively) and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID) in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049). The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122). Conclusions We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID), and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained

  6. Multilayer piezocomposite structures with piezoceramic volume fractions determined by mathematical optimisation.

    PubMed

    Abrar, A; Cochran, S

    2004-04-01

    Piezocomposite materials are now widely used in broadband underwater sonar for ultrasound generation and detection because of their recognised advantages over piezoceramic devices. However, it is difficult to make single-layer piezocomposite devices to operate effectively at frequencies below 100 kHz. Instead, multilayer composite stacks can be used. If this solution is adopted, interesting effects can be achieved by choosing appropriate ceramic volume fractions for different layers in the stack, as volume fraction plays a key role in achieving the desired performance. In this paper we describe a theoretical study of 1-3 piezocomposite transducers with five layers each with a different volume fraction. Our work is based mainly on our own special purpose computer code which solves the one-dimensional wave equation by matrix manipulation, with additional support from the PZ Flex finite element analysis package. The choice of volume fractions is difficult because of the multifaceted nature of the problem, with a very large number of possible combinations and complex dependence of material properties, and hence transducer sensitivity and frequency response on the volume fractions. Therefore, we have used the stochastic optimisation technique of simulated annealing implemented in MATLAB code to determine the volume fraction of each layer. The optimisation cost function we have used is maximisation of gain-bandwidth product. We have found that significant increases in gain-bandwidth product can be achieved compared with the use of the same volume fraction in each layer, far exceeding the 35% reported previously with trial-and-error volume fraction adjustment. This suggests that improvements in practical device performance are possible.

  7. Correlation of cell volume fractions with cell concentrations in fermentation media.

    PubMed

    Ju, L K; Ho, C S

    1988-06-20

    Cell volume fractions and cell concentrations were measured in submerged cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, and Penicillium chrysogenum. Correlations for cell volume fractions with cell concentrations in fermentation media of the microorganisms were established accordingly. Other key properties of microorganisms, such as cell water content, wet cell density, and dry cell density, can also be obtained with the use of the current method. The results are in good agreement with data available in the literature.

  8. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  9. Fractional volume integration in two-dimensional NMR spectra: CAKE, a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Romano, Rocco; Paris, Debora; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio; Motta, Andrea

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative information from multi-dimensional NMR experiments can be obtained by peak volume integration. The standard procedure (selection of a region around the chosen peak and addition of all values) is often biased by poor peak definition because of peak overlap. Here we describe a simple method, called CAKE, for volume integration of (partially) overlapping peaks. Assuming the axial symmetry of two-dimensional NMR peaks, as it occurs in NOESY and TOCSY when Lorentz-Gauss transformation of the signals is carried out, CAKE estimates the peak volume by multiplying a volume fraction by a factor R. It represents a proportionality ratio between the total and the fractional volume, which is identified as a slice in an exposed region of the overlapping peaks. The volume fraction is obtained via Monte Carlo Hit-or-Miss technique, which proved to be the most efficient because of the small region and the limited number of points within the selected area. Tests on simulated and experimental peaks, with different degrees of overlap and signal-to-noise ratios, show that CAKE results in improved volume estimates. A main advantage of CAKE is that the volume fraction can be flexibly chosen so as to minimize the effect of overlap, frequently observed in two-dimensional spectra. PMID:18396078

  10. Fractional volume integration in two-dimensional NMR spectra: CAKE, a Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Paris, Debora; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio; Motta, Andrea

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative information from multi-dimensional NMR experiments can be obtained by peak volume integration. The standard procedure (selection of a region around the chosen peak and addition of all values) is often biased by poor peak definition because of peak overlap. Here we describe a simple method, called CAKE, for volume integration of (partially) overlapping peaks. Assuming the axial symmetry of two-dimensional NMR peaks, as it occurs in NOESY and TOCSY when Lorentz-Gauss transformation of the signals is carried out, CAKE estimates the peak volume by multiplying a volume fraction by a factor R. It represents a proportionality ratio between the total and the fractional volume, which is identified as a slice in an exposed region of the overlapping peaks. The volume fraction is obtained via Monte Carlo Hit-or-Miss technique, which proved to be the most efficient because of the small region and the limited number of points within the selected area. Tests on simulated and experimental peaks, with different degrees of overlap and signal-to-noise ratios, show that CAKE results in improved volume estimates. A main advantage of CAKE is that the volume fraction can be flexibly chosen so as to minimize the effect of overlap, frequently observed in two-dimensional spectra.

  11. Fractional volume integration in two-dimensional NMR spectra: CAKE, a Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Paris, Debora; Motta, Andrea; Barone, Fabrizio

    2009-03-01

    Quantitative information from multidimensional NMR experiments can be obtained by peak volume integration. The standard procedure (selection of a region around the chosen peak and addition of all values) is often biased by poor peak definition because of peak overlap. Here we describe a simple method, called CAKE, for volume integration of (partially) overlapping peaks. Assuming the axial symmetry of two-dimensional NMR peaks, as it occurs in NOESY and TOCSY when Lorentz-Gauss transformation of the signals is carried out, CAKE estimates the peak volume by multiplying a volume fraction by a factor R. It represents a proportionality ratio between the total and the fractional volume, which is identified as a slice in an exposed region of the overlapping peaks. The volume fraction is obtained via Monte Carlo Hit-or-Miss technique, which proved to be the most efficient because of the small region and the limited number of points within the selected area. Tests on simulated and experimental peaks, with different degrees of overlap and signal-to-noise ratios, show that CAKE results in improved volume estimates. A main advantage of CAKE is that the volume fraction can be flexibly chosen so as to minimize the effect of overlap, frequently observed in two-dimensional spectra.

  12. The coupled effect of fiber volume fraction and void fraction on hydraulic fluid absorption of quartz/BMI laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdelbrink, Keith R.; Anderson, Jacob P.; Siddique, Zahed; Altan, M. Cengiz

    2016-03-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin with quartz (AQ581) fiber reinforcement is a composite material frequently used in aerospace applications, such as engine cowlings and radomes. Various composite components used in aircrafts are exposed to different types of hydraulic fluids, which may lead to anomalous absorption behavior over the service life of the composite. Accurate predictive models for absorption of liquid penetrants are particularly important as the composite components are often exposed to long-term degradation due to absorbed moisture, hydraulic fluids, or similar liquid penetrants. Microstructural features such as fiber volume fraction and void fraction can have a significant effect on the absorption behavior of fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, hydraulic fluid absorption characteristics of quartz/BMI laminates fabricated from prepregs preconditioned at different relative humidity and subsequently cured at different pressures are presented. The composite samples are immersed into hydraulic fluid at room temperature, and were not subjected to any prior degradation. To generate process-induced microvoids, prepregs were conditioned in an environmental chamber at 2% or 99% relative humidity at room temperature for a period of 24 hours prior to laminate fabrication. To alter the fiber volume fraction, the laminates were fabricated at cure pressures of 68.9 kPa (10 psi) or 482.6 kPa (70 psi) via a hot-press. The laminates are shown to have different levels of microvoids and fiber volume fractions, which were observed to affect the absorption dynamics considerably and exhibited clear non-Fickian behavior. A one-dimensional hindered diffusion model (HDM) was shown to be successful in predicting the hydraulic fluid absorption. Model prediction indicates that as the fabrication pressure increased from 68.9 kPa to 482.6 kPa, the maximum fluid content (M∞) decreased from 8.0% wt. to 1.0% wt. The degree of non-Fickian behavior, measured by hindrance coefficient (

  13. Effects of Retained Austenite Stability and Volume Fraction on Deformation Behaviors of TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-10-02

    In this paper, the separate effects of austenite stability and its volume fraction on the deformation behaviors of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels are investigated based on the microstructure-based finite element modeling method. The effects of austenite stability on the strength, ductility and formability of TRIP steels are first examined based on the microstructure of a commercial TRIP 800 steel. Then, the separate effects of the austenite volume fraction on the overall deformation behaviors of TRIP steels are examined based on the various representative volume elements (RVEs). The computational results suggest that the higher austenite stability is helpful to increase the ductility and formability, but not the UTS. However, the increase of austenite volume fraction alone is not helpful in improving the performance of TRIP steels. This may indicate that various other material factors should also be concurrently adjusted during thermo-mechanical manufacturing process in a way to increase the performance of TRIP steels, which needs further investigation.

  14. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  15. The relative impact of circumferential and longitudinal shortening on left ventricular ejection fraction and stroke volume

    PubMed Central

    MacIver, David H

    2012-01-01

    In vivo data have been unable to provide conclusive results with regard to the relative impact of circumferential and longitudinal shortening on stroke volume. The objective of the present study was to assess the relative contribution of circumferential and longitudinal myocardial shortening to left ventricular stroke volume and ejection fraction, and to evaluate the effect of left ventricular hypertrophy. A two-shell, three-dimensional mathematical model was used to assess the individual contributions of longitudinal and midwall circumferential shortening (or strain) to stroke volume and ejection fraction. Reducing either circumferential or longitudinal shortening resulted in a reduced ejection fraction and stroke volume. The stroke volume fell by 43% when circumferential strain was reduced from −20% to −5%, but only by 19% when longitudinal strain was similarly reduced. The sole contribution of circumferential and longitudinal shortening to stroke volume was 67% and 33%, respectively. These proportions were independent of wall thickness. The present study demonstrated that both longitudinal and midwall circumferential shortening contribute to different extents depending on the degree of abnormality of myocardial shortening. Contrary to most previous studies, the present study shows that circumferential shortening has a relatively greater contribution to stroke volume (ie, two-thirds) and ejection fraction than longitudinal shortening. These observations have important clinical and research implications in the assessment of left ventricular function. PMID:23204893

  16. Measuring local volume fraction, long-wavelength correlations, and fractionation in a phase-separating polydisperse fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J. J.; Evans, R. M. L.

    2014-10-28

    We dynamically simulate fractionation (partitioning of particle species) during spinodal gas-liquid separation of a size-polydisperse colloid, using polydispersity up to ∼40% and a skewed parent size distribution. We introduce a novel coarse-grained Voronoi method to minimise size bias in measuring local volume fraction, along with a variety of spatial correlation functions which detect fractionation without requiring a clear distinction between the phases. These can be applied whether or not a system is phase separated, to determine structural correlations in particle size, and generalise easily to other kinds of polydispersity (charge, shape, etc.). We measure fractionation in both mean size and polydispersity between the phases, its direction differing between model interaction potentials which are identical in the monodisperse case. These qualitative features are predicted by a perturbative theory requiring only a monodisperse reference as input. The results show that intricate fractionation takes place almost from the start of phase separation, so can play a role even in nonequilibrium arrested states. The methods for characterisation of inhomogeneous polydisperse systems could in principle be applied to experiment as well as modelling.

  17. Volume fraction dependent magnetic behaviour of ferrofluids for rotating seal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinteie, G.; Palade, P.; Vekas, L.; Iacob, N.; Bartha, C.; Kuncser, V.

    2013-10-01

    Ferrofluid samples consisting of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) coated with oleic acid and dispersed in a non-polar organic solvent have been synthesized by chemical routes. Different volume fractions, φ, of magnetic NPs were considered. The overall structural characterization of NPs has been performed by x-ray diffractometry, with lattice parameters and average coherence lengths evaluated via Rietveld refinements. The magnetic properties of different samples have been analysed by SQUID magnetometry and temperature-dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy and finally explained by adequate magnetic relaxation mechanisms. Zero field cooling-field cooling protocols provided useful information about specific volume fraction dependent magnetic relaxation and de-freezing processes, the lack of the Verwey transition and stronger dipolar interactions at higher volume fractions. Anisotropy energies as obtained by both temperature dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry data are compared and a new procedure for a quantitative characterization of the dipolar interactions is proposed.

  18. Reconstruction of soot temperature and volume fraction profiles of an asymmetric flame using stereoscopic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qun-xing; Wang, Fei; Liu, Dong; Ma, Zeng-yi; Yan, Jian-hua; Chi, Yong; Cen, Ke-fa

    2009-03-15

    The present study attempts to reconstruct soot temperature and volume fraction distributions for the asymmetric diffusive flame using a tomography technique. A high-resolution camera equipped with a stereo adapter was employed to capture stereoscopic flame images, which were used to obtain monochromatic line-of-sight flame emission projections within the visible range. A matrix-decomposition-based least squares algorithm was introduced to reconstruct the emission intensity distributions in the flame sections. The retrieved intensities were used to infer local soot temperature and volume fraction. Numerical assessments show that for soot volume fraction measurement, the system signal-to-noise ratio should be larger than 62.5 dB. The proposed tomography system was found to be capable of symmetric and asymmetric flame measurements. (author)

  19. A Novel Semiautomated Fractional Limb Volume Tool for Rapid and Reproducible Fetal Soft Tissue Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mack, Lauren M; Kim, Sung Yoon; Lee, Sungmin; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lee, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the reproducibility and efficiency of a semiautomated image analysis tool that rapidly provides fetal fractional limb volume measurements. Fifty pregnant women underwent 3-dimensional sonographic examinations for fractional arm and thigh volumes at a mean menstrual age of 31.3 weeks. Manual and semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements were calculated, with the semiautomated measurements calculated by novel software (5D Limb Vol; Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea). The software applies an image transformation method based on the major axis length, minor axis length, and limb center coordinates. A transformed image is used to perform a global optimization technique for determination of an optimal limb soft tissue boundary. Bland-Altman analysis defined bias with 95% limits of agreement (LOA) between methods, and timing differences between manual versus automated methods were compared by a paired t test. Bland-Altman analysis indicated an acceptable bias with 95% LOA between the manual and semiautomated methods: mean arm volume ± SD, 1.7% ± 4.6% (95% LOA, -7.3% to 10.7%); and mean thigh volume, 0.0% ± 3.8% (95% LOA, -7.5% to 7.5%). The computer-assisted software completed measurements about 5 times faster compared to manual tracings. In conclusion, semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements are significantly faster to calculate when compared to a manual procedure. These results are reproducible and are likely to reduce operator dependency. The addition of computer-assisted fractional limb volume to standard biometry may improve the precision of estimated fetal weight by adding a soft tissue component to the weight estimation process. PMID:27269002

  20. A Novel Semiautomated Fractional Limb Volume Tool for Rapid and Reproducible Fetal Soft Tissue Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mack, Lauren M; Kim, Sung Yoon; Lee, Sungmin; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lee, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the reproducibility and efficiency of a semiautomated image analysis tool that rapidly provides fetal fractional limb volume measurements. Fifty pregnant women underwent 3-dimensional sonographic examinations for fractional arm and thigh volumes at a mean menstrual age of 31.3 weeks. Manual and semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements were calculated, with the semiautomated measurements calculated by novel software (5D Limb Vol; Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea). The software applies an image transformation method based on the major axis length, minor axis length, and limb center coordinates. A transformed image is used to perform a global optimization technique for determination of an optimal limb soft tissue boundary. Bland-Altman analysis defined bias with 95% limits of agreement (LOA) between methods, and timing differences between manual versus automated methods were compared by a paired t test. Bland-Altman analysis indicated an acceptable bias with 95% LOA between the manual and semiautomated methods: mean arm volume ± SD, 1.7% ± 4.6% (95% LOA, -7.3% to 10.7%); and mean thigh volume, 0.0% ± 3.8% (95% LOA, -7.5% to 7.5%). The computer-assisted software completed measurements about 5 times faster compared to manual tracings. In conclusion, semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements are significantly faster to calculate when compared to a manual procedure. These results are reproducible and are likely to reduce operator dependency. The addition of computer-assisted fractional limb volume to standard biometry may improve the precision of estimated fetal weight by adding a soft tissue component to the weight estimation process.

  1. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Actinic keratosis is caused by exposure to sunlight. You are more likely to develop it if you: Have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Had a ...

  2. Hippocampal volume and cingulum bundle fractional anisotropy are independently associated with verbal memory in older adults.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, Ali; Katz, Mindy J; Lipton, Michael L; Zimmerman, Molly E; Lipton, Richard B

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) volumetrics as well as fractional anisotropy of the cingulum angular bundle (CAB) and the cingulum cingulate gyrus (CCG) bundle to performance on measures of verbal memory in non-demented older adults. The participants were 100 non-demented adults over the age of 70 years from the Einstein Aging Study. Volumetric data were estimated from T1-weighted images. The entire cingulum was reconstructed using diffusion tensor MRI and probabilistic tractography. Association between verbal episodic memory and MRI measures including volume of hippocampus (HIP), entorhinal cortex (ERC), PCC and fractional anisotropy of CAB and CCG bundle were modeled using linear regression. Relationships between atrophy of these structures and regional cingulum fractional anisotropy were also explored. Decreased HIP volume on the left and decreased fractional anisotropy of left CAB were associated with lower memory performance. Volume changes in ERC, PCC and CCG disruption were not associated with memory performance. In regression models, left HIP volume and left CAB-FA were each independently associated with episodic memory. The results suggest that microstructural changes in the left CAB and decreased left HIP volume independently influence episodic memory performance in older adults without dementia. The importance of these findings in age and illness-related memory decline require additional exploration. PMID:26424564

  3. Two-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in children

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, J.C.; DiSessa, T.G.; Jarmakani, J.M.; Nakanishi, T.; Hiraishi, S.; Isabel-Jones, J.; Friedman, W.F.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of two-dimensional echocardiography to measure left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction was evaluated in 25 children with congenital heart disease. Dimensions and planimetered areas were obtained in the short-axis view at the mitral valve and high and low papillary muscle levels and in the apical two- and four-chamber views. Eight algorithms using five geometric models were assessed. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and ejection fraction were compared with data from biplane cineangiocardiograms. The correlation varied with the algorithm used. Algorithms using short-axis views appeared superior to those using only apical long-axis views. Four algorithms estimated left ventricular volumes with equal accuracy (Simpson's rule, assuming the ventricle to be a truncated cone; Simpson's rule, algorithm that best estimated left ventricular ejection fraction was the ellipsoid biplane formula using the short-axis view at the papillary muscle level (r = 0.91, slope = 0.94, SEE = 6.7%). Thus, two-dimensional echocardiography can accurately assess left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in children with congenital heart disease.

  4. Effect of Oil Palm Fibres Volume Fraction on Mechanical Properties of Polyester Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, B. F.

    The effect of two types of oil palm fibres (bunch and fruit) on mechanical properties of polyester composites is examined in the current work considering different volume fractions. Tensile, compression, and flexural properties of the composites were investigated. In addition to that, tensile strengths were calculated theoretically using Hirsch model. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the fracture mechanism of the specimens. Single fibre pull-out tests were performed to determine the interfacial shear strength between polyester resin and both types of oil palm fibres. Results revealed that both types of oil palm fibres enhanced the mechanical performance of polyester composites. At a higher volume fraction (40-50%), tensile strength of the polyester composite was improved, i.e., 2.5 times improvement in the tensile strength value. Experimental tensile strength values of oil palm bunch/polyester composites have a good correlation with the theoretical results, especially at low volume fractions of fibre. Flexural strength of polyester worsened with oil palm fibres at all volume fractions of fibre.

  5. Planar measurements of soot volume fraction and OH in a JP-8 pool fire

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Tara L.; Ring, Terry A.; Eddings, Eric G.; Nathan, Graham J.; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.; Qamar, Nader

    2009-07-15

    The simultaneous measurement of soot volume fraction by laser induced incandescence (LII) and qualitative imaging of OH by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was performed in a JP-8 pool fire contained in a 152 mm diameter pan. Line of sight extinction was used to calibrate the LII system in a laminar flame, and to provide an independent method of measuring average soot volume fraction in the turbulent flame. The presence of soot in the turbulent flame was found to be approximately 50% probable, resulting in high levels of optical extinction, which increased slightly through the flame from approximately 30% near the base, to approximately 50% at the tip. This high soot loading pushes both techniques toward their detection limit. Nevertheless, useful accuracy was obtained, with the LII measurement of apparent extinction in the turbulent flame being approximately 21% lower than a direct measurement, consistent with the influence of signal trapping. The axial and radial distributions of soot volume fraction are presented, along with PDFs of volume fraction, and new insight into the behavior of soot sheets in pool fires are sought from the simultaneous measurements of OH and LII. (author)

  6. Volume Fraction Determination in Cast Superalloys and DS Eutectic Alloys by a New Practice for Manual Point Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    Volume fraction of a constituent or phase was estimated in six specimens of conventional and DS-eutectic superalloys, using ASTM E562-76, a new standard recommended practice for determining volume fraction by systematic manual point count. Volume fractions determined ranged from 0.086 to 0.36, and with one exception, the 95 percent relative confidence limits were approximately 10 percent of the determined volume fractions. Since the confidence-limit goal of 10 percent, which had been arbitrarily chosen previously, was achieved in all but one case, this application of the new practice was considered successful.

  7. Actinic Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a precancerous condition related to cumulative lifetime sun exposure. The lower lip is most often affected. Individuals ... Wearing barrier clothing (eg, wide-brimmed hats) and sunscreen-containing lip balms can aid in preventing actinic ...

  8. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Sinha, Dipen N.; Osterhoudt, Curtis F.

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  9. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  10. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  11. Damping behavior of polymer composites with high volume fraction of NiMnGa powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaogang; Song, Jie; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoning; Xie, Chaoying

    2011-03-01

    Polymer composites inserted with high volume fraction (up to 70 Vol%) of NiMnGa powders were fabricated and their damping behavior was investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis. It is found that the polymer matrix has little influence on the transformation temperatures of NiMnGa powders. A damping peak appears for NiMnGa/epoxy resin (EP) composites accompanying with the martensitic transformation or reverse martensitic transformation of NiMnGa powders during cooling or heating. The damping capacity for NiMnGa/EP composites increases linearly with the increase of volume fraction of NiMnGa powders and, decreases dramatically as the test frequency increases. The fracture strain of NiMnGa/EP composites decrease with the increase of NiMnGa powders.

  12. Influence of Martensite Volume Fraction on Impact Properties of Triple Phase (TP) Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Ahmad; Ekrami, A.

    2013-03-01

    Ferrite-bainite-martensite triple phase (TP) microstructures with different volume fractions of martensite were obtained by changing heat treatment time during austempering at 300 °C. Room temperature impact properties of TP steels with different martensite volume fractions ( V M) were determined by means of Charpy impact testing. The effects of test temperature on impact properties were also investigated for two selected microstructures containing 0 (the DP steel) and 8.5 vol.% martensite. Test results showed reduction in toughness with increasing V M in TP steels. Fracture toughness values for the DP and TP steels with 8.5 vol.% martensite were obtained from correlation between fracture toughness and the Charpy impact energy. Fractography of Charpy specimens confirmed decrease in TP steels' toughness with increasing V M by considering and comparing radial marks and crack initiation regions at the fracture surfaces of the studied steels.

  13. Sparger Effects on Gas Volume Fraction Distributions in Vertical Bubble-Column Flows as Measured by Gamma-Densitometry Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-01-18

    Gamma-densitometry tomography is applied to study the effect of sparger hole geometry, gas flow rate, column pressure, and phase properties on gas volume fraction profiles in bubble columns. Tests are conducted in a column 0.48 m in diameter, using air and mineral oil, superficial gas velocities ranging from 5 to 30 cm s{sup -1}, and absolute column pressures from 103 to 517 kPa. Reconstructed gas volume fraction profiles from two sparger geometries are presented. The development length of the gas volume fraction profile is found to increase with gas flow rate and column pressure. Increases in gas flow rate increase the local gas volume fraction preferentially on the column axis, whereas increases in column pressure produce a uniform rise in gas volume fraction across the column. A comparison of results from the two spargers indicates a significant change in development length with the number and size of sparger holes.

  14. Effect of Martensite Volume Fraction on Forming Limit Diagrams of Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeimi, Mohammad; Basti, Ali; Alitavoli, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Prediction of the onset of failure due to localized necking has an important role on the determination of the formability of sheet metal, especially dual-phase steels, because of their increasing applications in the automotive industry. In the present study, a new application of the M-K model and theoretical forming limit diagram has been proposed. It is shown that this model can be useful in predicting the effect of microstructural aspects on the formability of dual-phase steels. For this purpose, the limiting strains of the dual-phase (ferrite-martensite) steel under different martensite volume fractions have been calculated. Furthermore, the effect of the heating rate on the formability of the DP samples has been predicted. To solve the non-linear system of equations, the modified Newton-Raphson method has been used. The results show that the limiting strains decrease by increasing the amount of martensite volume fractions. Furthermore, by increasing the heating rate, the dependence of the forming limit curves on the martensite volume fraction will be decreased.

  15. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Nacif, Marcelo S.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  16. Soot volume fraction in a piloted turbulent jet non-premixed flame of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Qamar, N.H.; Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Chan, Q.N.; Nathan, G.J.; Roekaerts, D.

    2009-07-15

    Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) has been used to measure soot volume fraction in a well-characterised, piloted, turbulent non-premixed flame known as the ''Delft Flame III''. Simulated Dutch natural gas was used as the fuel to produce a flame closely matching those in which a wide range of previous investigations, both experimental and modelling, have been performed. The LII method was calibrated using a Santoro-style burner with ethylene as the fuel. Instantaneous and time-averaged data of the axial and radial soot volume fraction distributions of the flame are presented here along with the Probability Density Functions (PDFs) and intermittency. The PDFs were found to be well-characterised by a single exponential distribution function. The distribution of soot was found to be highly intermittent, with intermittency typically exceeding 97%, which increases measurement uncertainty. The instantaneous values of volume fraction are everywhere less than the values in strained laminar flames. This is consistent with the soot being found locally in strained flame sheets that are convected and distorted by the flow. (author)

  17. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  18. [Volume fraction of gas vesicle and floating characteristics of cyanobacteria in Taihu Lake under different pressures].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cong, Hai-Bing; Xu, Ya-Jun; Chen, Wen-Jing; Xu, Si-Tao; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Xin-Yue

    2014-08-01

    In order to ascertain the volumetric change of gas vesicles in cyanobacteria and the floating characteristics, capillary pressure method and image analysis method were used to study burst situation and remanent volume fraction of gas vesicles in cyanobacteria under different pressures. The reform situation after pressuring was also analyzed in this research. The results showed that the volume fraction of gas vesicles in Taihu Lake were 29.52%, 5.73%, 4.43%, 2.71%, 2.46%, 2.19% under 0 MPa, 0.3 MPa, 0.4 MPa, 0.5 MPa, 0.6 MPa, 0.7 MPa determined by the image analysis, and were 10.93%, 1.14%, 0.90%, 0.27%, 0.14%, 0.04% determined by the capillary pressure method; cyanobacteria sank due to the gas vesicles' bursting when the pressure was greater than 0.4 MPa. Gas vesicles and structure after pressure were reformed with the lapse of time, under 1 000 lx, 25 degrees C, after 8 h, 24 h, 48 h, the reformed gas vesicles accounted for 31.02%, 45.68%, 81.05% of total gas vesicles before pressuring. Image analysis method is more accurate in the determination for cyanobacteria gas vesicles' volume, while the volume is smaller measured by traditional capillary pressure method.

  19. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  20. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times t_{eq} needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of t_{eq} are longer than the α-relaxation time τ_{α} at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time t_{eq} is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the

  1. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N -isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times teq needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of teq are longer than the α -relaxation time τα at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time teq is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the dynamics

  2. A novel optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Luca; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Carleo, Luigi; Tai, Yih-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical phenomena, such as debris flows, pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches, involve the rapid flow of granular mixtures. Today the dynamics of these flows is far from being deeply understood, due to their huge complexity compared to clear water or monophasic fluids. To this regard, physical models at laboratory scale represent important tools for understanding the still unclear properties of granular flows and their constitutive laws, under simplified experimental conditions. Beside the velocity and the shear rate, the volume fraction is also strongly interlinked with the rheology of granular materials. Yet, a reliable estimation of this quantity is not easy through non-invasive techniques. In this work a novel cost-effective optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction is presented and, then, applied to a laboratory study on steady-state granular flows. A preliminary numerical investigation, through Monte-Carlo generations of grain distributions under controlled illumination conditions, allowed to find the stochastic relationship between the near-wall volume fraction, c3D, and a measurable quantity (the two-dimensional volume fraction), c2D, obtainable through an appropriate binarization of gray-scale images captured by a camera placed in front of the transparent boundary. Such a relation can be well described by c3D = aexp(bc2D), with parameters only depending on the angle of incidence of light, ζ. An experimental validation of the proposed approach is carried out on dispersions of white plastic grains, immersed in various ambient fluids. The mixture, confined in a box with a transparent window, is illuminated by a flickering-free LED lamp, placed so as to form a given ζ with the measuring surface, and is photographed by a camera, placed in front of the same window. The predicted exponential law is found to be in sound agreement with experiments for a wide range of ζ (10° <ζ<45°). The technique is, then, applied to steady-state dry

  3. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium (202)Hg/(198)Hg, (205)Tl/(203)Tl, (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of [formula in text] for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb(4+)-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb(2+)-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of (208)Pb/(206)Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb(2+)-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., [formula in text]) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., [formula in text) are almost the same but with opposite signs. PMID:26224248

  4. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. > 20 ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter < 2 µm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1 – 5 ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter ~ 1.27 – 5.54 µm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (< 2.5 µm). This study establishes a framework for quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons. PMID:25225002

  5. Variation of bone layer thicknesses and trabecular volume fraction in the adult male human calvarium.

    PubMed

    Boruah, Sourabh; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S; Subit, Damien L; Salzar, Robert S; Crandall, Jeff R

    2015-08-01

    The human calvarium is a sandwich structure with two dense layers of cortical bone separated by porous cancellous bone. The variation of the three dimensional geometry, including the layer thicknesses and the volume fraction of the cancellous layer across the population, is unavailable in the current literature. This information is of particular importance to mathematical models of the human head used to simulate mechanical response. Although the target geometry for these models is the median geometry of the population, the best attempt so far has been the scaling of a unique geometry based on a few median anthropometric measurements of the head. However, this method does not represent the median geometry. This paper reports the average three dimensional geometry of the calvarium from X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging and layer thickness and trabecular volume fraction from micro CT (μCT) imaging of ten adult male post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS). Skull bone samples have been obtained and μCT imaging was done at a resolution of 30 μm. Monte Carlo simulation was done to estimate the variance in these measurements due to the uncertainty in image segmentation. The layer thickness data has been averaged over areas of 5mm(2). The outer cortical layer was found to be significantly (p < 0.01; Student's t test) thicker than the inner layer (median of thickness ratio 1.68). Although there was significant location to location difference in all the layer thicknesses and volume fraction measurements, there was no trend. Average distribution and the variance of these metrics on the calvarium have been shown. The findings have been reported as colormaps on a 2D projection of the cranial vault. PMID:25920690

  6. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  7. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-01

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  8. Actinic Keratoses

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are common intra-epidermal neoplasms that lie on a continuum with squamous cell carcinoma. Tightly linked to ultraviolet irradiation, they occur in areas of chronic sun exposure, and early treatment of these lesions may prevent their progression to invasive disease. A large variety of effective treatment modalities exist, and the optimal therapeutic choice is dependent on a variety of patient- and physician-associated variables. Many established and more recent approaches are discussed in this review with a focus on efficacy and administration techniques. Several previously experimental options, such as imiquimod and photodynamic therapy, have become incorporated as first-line options for the treatment of actinic keratoses, while combination treatment strategies have been gaining in popularity. The goal of all therapies is to ultimately limit the morbidity and mortality of squamous cell carcinoma. (J Clin Aesthetic Dermatol. 2009;2(7):43–48.) PMID:20729970

  9. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment.

  10. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment. PMID:26455950

  11. Effects of Mass and Volume Fraction Skewness in Variable Density Mixing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Among the parameters characterizing mixing by variable density turbulence of fluids involving density variations of a factor of 5 to 10 are the Atwood, Froude, Schmidt, and Reynolds numbers. There is evidence that the amount of each fluid present when the two pure fluids mix, as described by the probability density function of the mass or molar (volume) fraction, also strongly affects the mixing process. To investigate this phenomena, implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) are performed for binary fluid mixtures in statistically homogenous environments under constant acceleration. These coarse grained simulations are used as data for theory validation and mix model development. ILES has been demonstrated to accurately capture the mixing behavior of a passive scalar field through stirring and advection by a turbulent velocity field. The present work advances that research and studies the extent to which an under-resolved active scalar drives the subsequent fluid motion and determines the nature of the mixing process. Effects of initial distributions of the mass and molar (volume) fraction probability density function on the resulting variable density turbulence and mixing are investigated and compared to direct numerical simulations from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Database. Funded by the LANL LDRD-ER on ``Inserting Nonlinear N-Material Coupling PDF Information into Turbulent Mixing Models'' through exploratory research project number 20150498ER.

  12. Theoretical investigations of uranium isotope fractionation caused by nuclear volume effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Because the half-life times of uranium isotopes are all very long, e.g., 4.5Ga for 238U and 0.7Ga for 235U, people actually treat uranium isotope system as a stable one in many young geologic systems (e.g., Bopp et al., 2010; Basu et al., 2014). There is an increasing trend of using U isotope method to study surface geochemistry problems. For example, people start to use U isotopes as a new tracer to determine the change of redox conditions (Holmden et al., 2015; Wang et al., 2015). However, there are only a few equilibrium U isotope fractionation factors available right now. The new enterprise of U isotope method requires a much expanded data-base of equilibrium U isotope fractionation factor. Many evidences showed that heavy isotope systems could be significantly fractionated as the consequence of the nuclear volume effect (NVE) or so-called nuclear field shift effect,which is a driving force of mass-independent fractionation induced by differences in nuclear size and nuclear shape of isotopes. Here we theoretically estimate the magnitude of equilibrium isotope fractionation factors of U-bearing gaseous and solid compounds caused by NVE via density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemistry methods with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects. Our calculation results show the NVE drives 238U/235U fractionations can be up to -4.43‰ between U(VI) and U(IV) species, or can be up to -1.68‰ between U(IV) and U(III) species, at room temperature. The U4+-bearing species or phases tend to enrich heavier isotopes (i.e., 238U) relative to the oxidized phases (U6+-bearing), and enrich lighter isotopes (i.e., 235U) relative to the reduced U(III) phases (U3+-bearing), which generally agree with the recent experimental results (Wang et al., 2015). Our results provide a base for broad applications of equilibrium U isotope fractionation in surface environments.

  13. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    .3, and thus more than one mass-independent isotope effect is inferred. MIF of mercury can be caused by the nuclear volume effect. Schauble, 2007 has calculated nuclear volume fractionation scaling factors for a number of common mercury chemical species in equilibrium with Hg° vapor. From his calculations the nuclear field shift effect is larger in Δ199Hg than in Δ201Hg by approximately a factor of two. The predominant mercury chemical species in fish is methylmercury cysteine. From the experimental studies of Buchachenko and others (2004) on the reaction of methylmercury chloride with creatine kinase it seems reasonable to predicted that the thiol functional groups of cysteine gets enriched in 199Hg and 201Hg. Here the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) produces a kinetic partial separation of isotopes with non-zero nuclear spin quantum numbers from the even-N isotopes. The ratio of enrichment of Δ201Hg /Δ199Hg is predicted from theory to be 1.11, which is the ratio of the magnetic moments of 199Hg and 201Hg. Because mercury possesses two odd-N isotopes, it is possible to detect and evaluate the effects of two distinct, mass-independent isotope fractionating processes. From the data obtained on fish samples, we can deconvolute the contributions of the isotope effects of nuclear mass, spin and volume. For these samples the role of spin or the magnetic isotope effect is the most dominant.

  14. Validation of quantitative estimation of tissue oxygen extraction fraction and deoxygenated blood volume fraction in phantom and in vivo experiments by using MRI.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2010-04-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent signal of cerebral tissue can be theoretically derived using a network model formed by randomly oriented infinitely long cylinders. The validation of this model by phantom and in vivo experiments is still an object of research. A network phantom was constructed of solid polypropylene strings immersed in silicone oil, which essentially eliminated the effect of spin diffusion. The volume fraction and magnetic property of the string network was predetermined by independent methods. Ten healthy volunteers were measured for in vivo demonstration. The gradient echo sampled spin echo signal was evaluated with the cylinder network model. We found a strong interdependency between the two network characterizing parameters deoxygenated blood volume and oxygen extraction fraction. Here, different sets of deoxygenated blood volume/oxygen extraction fraction values were able to describe the measured signal equally well. However, by setting one parameter constant to a predetermined value, reasonable estimates of the other parameter were obtained. The same behavior was found for the in vivo demonstration. The signal theory of the cylinder network was validated by a well-characterized phantom. However, the found interdependency that was found between deoxygenated blood volume and oxygen extraction fraction requires an independent estimation of one variable to determine reliable values of the other parameter. PMID:20373392

  15. Applying Linear and Non-Linear Methods for Parallel Prediction of Volume of Distribution and Fraction of Unbound Drug

    PubMed Central

    del Amo, Eva M.; Ghemtio, Leo; Xhaard, Henri; Yliperttula, Marjo; Urtti, Arto; Kidron, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Volume of distribution and fraction unbound are two key parameters in pharmacokinetics. The fraction unbound describes the portion of free drug in plasma that may extravasate, while volume of distribution describes the tissue access and binding of a drug. Reliable in silico predictions of these pharmacokinetic parameters would benefit the early stages of drug discovery, as experimental measuring is not feasible for screening purposes. We have applied linear and nonlinear multivariate approaches to predict these parameters: linear partial least square regression and non-linear recursive partitioning classification. The volume of distribution and fraction of unbound drug in plasma are predicted in parallel within the model, since the two are expected to be affected by similar physicochemical drug properties. Predictive models for both parameters were built and the performance of the linear models compared to models included in the commercial software Volsurf+. Our models performed better in predicting the unbound fraction (Q2 0.54 for test set compared to 0.38 with Volsurf+ model), but prediction accuracy of the volume of distribution was comparable to the Volsurf+ model (Q2 of 0.70 for test set compared to 0.71 with Volsurf+ model). The nonlinear classification models were able to identify compounds with a high or low volume of distribution (sensitivity 0.81 and 0.71, respectively, for test set), while classification of fraction unbound was less successful. The interrelationship between the volume of distribution and fraction unbound is investigated and described in terms of physicochemical descriptors. Lipophilicity and solubility descriptors were found to have a high influence on both volume of distribution and fraction unbound, but with an inverse relationship. PMID:24116008

  16. Actin in xenopus oocytes: II. intracellular distribution and polymerizability

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, RW; Clark, TG

    1978-01-01

    The largest oocytes of Xenopus Laevis were broken open in the absence of shearing forces which might transfer actin from particulate to supernatant fractions. Particulate and postmitochondrial supernatant fractions were prepared by centrifugation. SDS-electrophoretic fractionation on polyacrylamide gels and quantitative scanning techniques were used to separate actin and to assay its amount in cellular fractions. The actin has been identified in electrophoretograms by its molecular weight and its binding to DNase I. oocytes contain 1.4-1.7 {um}g of actin per cell, of which up to 88 percent is recovered in the postmitochondrial supernate under a variety of conditions. In the soluble fraction, it represents about 8.8 percent of the total protein. Its concentration in native cytoplasm was directly assayed at 4.1 mg/ml. There is no detectable actin that can be transferred from the particulate to the soluble phase by neutral detergents or ionic conditions that would depolymerize muscle actin. Centrifugation of the soluble oocyte fractions showed that 75-95 percent of the actin can not be sedimented under forces that would pellet filamentous actin. Addition of potassium and magnesium to the cytoplasm, to concentrations that would polymerize muscle actin, does not increase the amount of sedimentable actin. Roughly one-third of the soluble actin is recovered from Sephadex columns at about the position of monomer. About two- thirds is in complexes of 100,000 daltons or greater. PMID:565782

  17. High-Pressure Torsion of Ti: Synchrotron characterization of phase volume fraction and domain sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolmaro, Raúl E.; Sordi, Vitor L.; Ferrante, Maurizio; Brokmeier, Heinz-Günter; Kawasaki, Megumi; Langdon, Terence G.

    2014-08-01

    Rods of grade 2 Ti were processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) (phi = 120° at 573 K) employing 2, 4 and 6 passes. The same billets were further deformed by High- Pressure Torsion (HPT) at room temperature, varying both the hydrostatic pressure (1 and 6 GPa) and the number of rotations (n = 1 and 5). The ECAP and HPT samples were studied by synchrotron radiation at DESY-Petra III GEMS line. On the ECAP samples, textures were thus determined while for both ECAP and HPT samples the measurements were further analyzed by MAUD. Domain sizes and phase volume fractions were determined as a function of the radial direction of the samples. Alpha and Omega phases were detected in different amounts depending mostly on hydrostatic pressure and shear deformation. These transition phases can be pressure-induced during HPT processing and the results of Vickers microhardness measurements were related to the processing parameters and to the amounts of these phases.

  18. In situ synthesis of calcium phosphate-polycaprolactone nanocomposites with high ceramic volume fractions.

    PubMed

    Makarov, C; Gotman, I; Jiang, X; Fuchs, S; Kirkpatrick, C J; Gutmanas, E Y

    2010-06-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate-PCL nanocomposite powders with unusually high ceramic volume fractions (80-95%) and uniform PCL distribution were synthesized by a non-aqueous chemical reaction in the presence of the dissolved polymer. No visible polymer separation occurred during processing. Depending on the reagents combination, either dicalcium phosphate (DCP) or Ca-deficient HA (CDHA) was obtained. CDHA-PCL composite powders were high pressure consolidated at room temperature yielding dense materials with high compressive strengths. Such densification route provides the possibility of incorporating drug and proteins without damaging their biological activity. The CDHA-PCL composites were tested in osteoblastic and endothelial cell line cultures and were found to support the attachment and proliferation of both cell types.

  19. Effect of cooling rate on leucite volume fraction in dental porcelains.

    PubMed

    Mackert, J R; Evans, A L

    1991-02-01

    Prasad et al. (1988) have shown that slow cooling of dental porcelain produces increases in thermal expansion sufficient to make a compatible metal-porcelain system incompatible. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the increase in porcelain thermal expansion might be attributable to crystallization of additional leucite during slow cooling of the porcelain. Eight x-ray diffraction specimens for each of six commercial dental porcelains and for the Component No. 1 frit of the Weinstein and Weinstein (1962) and Weinstein et al. (1962) patents were fabricated and divided into two groups. Specimens in the first group (termed fast-cooled) were cooled in the conventional manner by removing them from the furnace at the maximum firing temperature immediately into room air. Specimens in the second group (termed slow-cooled) were cooled slowly by interrupting power to the furnace muffle and allowing them to cool inside the closed furnace. Quantitative x-ray diffraction was performed on the fast- and slow-cooled porcelain specimens with standards containing leucite volume fractions of 0.111, 0.223, 0.334, and 0.445. Unpaired, one-tailed t tests were performed on the fast- and slow-cool data, and a significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the amount of leucite (as a function of the slow cooling) was found for each of the porcelains. The increases in the leucite volume fractions resulting from the slow cooling ranged from a low of 8.5% to a high of 55.8%, with an average increase of 26.9%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1991871

  20. A transient method for measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow using acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dehua; Wang, Xiuming; Che, Chengxuan; Cong, Jiansheng; Xu, Delong; Wang, Xiaomin

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow by using an acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) method in a transient way is studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the effects of sizes and locations of a single air bubble in a cylindrical cavity with two open ends on resonant frequencies are investigated numerically. Then, a transient measurement system for ARS is established, and the trends of the resonant frequencies (RFs) and resonant amplitudes (RAs) in the cylindrical cavity with gas flux inside are investigated experimentally. The measurement results by the proposed transient method are compared with those by steady-state ones and numerical ones. The numerical results show that the RFs of the cavity are highly sensitive to the volume of the single air bubble. A tiny bubble volume perturbation may cause a prominent RF shift even though the volume of the air bubble is smaller than 0.1% of that of the cavity. When the small air bubble moves, the RF shift will change and reach its maximum value as it is located at the middle of the cavity. As the gas volume fraction of the two-phase flow is low, both the RFs and RAs from the measurement results decrease dramatically with the increasing gas volume, and this decreasing trend gradually becomes even as the gas volume fraction increases further. These experimental results agree with the theoretical ones qualitatively. In addition, the transient method for ARS is more suitable for measuring the gas volume fraction with randomness and instantaneity than the steady-state one, because the latter could not reflect the random and instant characteristics of the mixed fluid due to the time consumption for frequency sweeping. This study will play a very important role in the quantitative measurement of the gas volume fraction of multiphase flows.

  1. Strong Dependence of Hydration State of F-Actin on the Bound Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Imao, Asato; Mogami, George; Chishima, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Takaya; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Wazawa, Tetsuichi

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the hydration state is an important issue in the chemomechanical energetics of versatile biological functions of polymerized actin (F-actin). In this study, hydration-state differences of F-actin by the bound divalent cations are revealed through precision microwave dielectric relaxation (DR) spectroscopy. G- and F-actin in Ca- and Mg-containing buffer solutions exhibit dual hydration components comprising restrained water with DR frequency f2 (fw). The hydration state of F-actin is strongly dependent on the ionic composition. In every buffer tested, the HMW signal Dhyme (≡ (f1 - fw)δ1/(fwδw)) of F-actin is stronger than that of G-actin, where δw is DR-amplitude of bulk solvent and δ1 is that of HMW in a fixed-volume ellipsoid containing an F-actin and surrounding water in solution. Dhyme value of F-actin in Ca2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Ca(2+)) is markedly higher than in Mg2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Mg(2+)). Moreover, in the presence of 2 mM Mg(2+), the hydration state of F-actin is changed by adding a small fraction of Ca(2+) (∼0.1 mM) and becomes closer to that of the Ca-bound form in Ca2.0-buffer. This is consistent with the results of the partial specific volume and the Cotton effect around 290 nm in the CD spectra, indicating a change in the tertiary structure and less apparent change in the secondary structure of actin. The number of restrained water molecules per actin (N2) is estimated to be 1600-2100 for Ca2.0- and F-buffer and ∼2500 for Mg2.0-buffer at 10-15 °C. These numbers are comparable to those estimated from the available F-actin atomic structures as in the first water layer. The number of HMW molecules is roughly explained by the volume between the equipotential surface of -kT/2e and the first water layer of the actin surface by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation using UCSF Chimera. PMID:27332748

  2. Affinity chromatography of immobilized actin and myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, R C; Trayer, I P

    1975-01-01

    Actin and myosin were immobilized by coupling them to agarose matrices. Both immobilized G-actin and immobilized myosin retain most of the properties of the proteins in free solution and are reliable over long periods of time. Sepharose-F-actin, under the conditions used in this study, has proved unstable and variable in its properties. Sepharose-G-actin columns were used to bind heavy meromyosin and myosin subfragment 1 specifically and reversibly. The interaction involved is sensitive to variation in ionic strength, such that myosin itself is not retained by the columns at the high salt concentration required for its complete solubilization. Myosin, rendered soluble at low ionic strength by polyalanylation, will interact successfully with the immobilized actin. The latter can distinguish between active and inactive fractions of the proteolytic and polyalanyl myosin derivatives, and was used in the preparation of these molecules. The complexes formed between the myosin derivatives and Sepharose-G-actin can be dissociated by low concentrations of ATP, ADP and pyrophosphate in both the presence and the absence of Mg2+. The G-actin columns were used to evaluate the results of chemical modifications of myosin subfragments on their interactions with actin. F-Actin in free solution is bound specifically and reversibly to columns of insolubilized myosin. Thus, with elution by either ATP or pyrophosphate, actin has been purified in one step from extracts of acetone-dried muscle powder. PMID:241335

  3. [Actinic Keratosis].

    PubMed

    Dejaco, D; Hauser, U; Zelger, B; Riechelmann, H

    2015-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is a cutaneous lesion characterized by proliferation of atypical epidermal keratinocytes due to prolonged exposure to exogenous factors such as ultraviolet radiation. AKs are in-situ-squamous cell carcinomas (PEC) of the skin. AK typically presents as erythematous, scaly patch or papule (classic AK), occasionally as thick, adherent scale on an erythematous base. Mostly fair-skinned adults are affected. AKs typically occur in areas of frequent sun exposure (balding scalp, face, "H-region", lateral neck, décolleté, dorsum of the hand and lower extremities). Actinic Cheilitis is the term used for AKs appearing on the lips. The diagnosis of AK is based on clinical examination including inspection and palpation. The typical palpable rough surface of AK often precedes a visible lesion. Dermoscopy may provide additional information. If diagnosis is uncertain and invasion suspected, biopsy and histopathologic evaluation should be performed. The potential for progression to invasive PECs mandates therapeutic intervention. Treatment options include topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies are classified into physical, medical and combined physical-chemical approaches and a sequential combination of treatment modalities is possible. Topical-physical cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for isolated, non-hypertrophic AK. Topical-medical treatment, e. g. 5-fluoruracil (5FU) cream or Imiquomod or Ingenolmebutat application is used for multiple, non-hypertrophic AKs. For hypertrophic AKs, a dehorning pretreatment with salicinated vaseline is recommended. Isolated hypertrophic AKs often need cryotherapy with prolonged freezing time or several consecutive applications. Sequentially combined approaches are recommended for multiple, hypertrophic AKs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as example for a combined physical-chemical approach is an established treatment for multiple, non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic AKs. Prevention includes avoidance of sun and

  4. Purification and Characterization of Actin from Maize Pollen 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Yen, Lung-Fei

    1992-01-01

    Pollen is an excellent source of actin for biochemical and physiological studies of the actomyosin system in higher plants. We have developed an efficient method to prepare relatively high levels of actin from the pollen of maize (Zea mays L.). The procedures of purification include acetone powder preparation, saturated ammonium sulfate fractionation, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose chromatography, a cycle of polymerization-depolymerization, and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration. The average yield of actin is 19 milligrams per 100 grams of pollen grains extracted. This is comparable with those of Acanthamoeba castellanii and human platelets. The purified pollen actin is electrophoretically homogeneous and its molecular mass is 42 kilodaltons. The amino acid composition and circular dichroism spectrum of pollen actin are identical to those of muscle actin. The actin purified from pollen is able to polymerize to F-actin. The pollen F-actin activated the activity of the muscle myosin ATPase sevenfold. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668982

  5. Applicability of ultrasonic testing for the determination of volume fraction of particulates in alumina-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.K.; Fang, R.L.; Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1999-10-01

    An ultrasonic testing technique was employed to determine the volume fraction of alumina particulate reinforcement in 6061 aluminum matrix composites. this study was performed on various composites with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nominal volume fractions of 10, 15, and 20%. For comparison, other techniques were employed as well, including the Archimedes method, metallographic image analysis, X-ray diffraction, and acid dissolution. Observations indicated that ultrasonic testing and acid dissolution methods are more reliable than the other techniques, while ultrasonic testing is faster than the acid dissolution method.

  6. Rheological modelling of complex fluids. I. The concept of effective volume fraction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quemada, D.

    1998-01-01

    Number of complex fluids (as slurries, drilling muds, paints and coatings, many foods, cosmetics, biofluids...) can approximately be described as concentrated dispersions of Structural Units (SUs). Due to shear forces, SUs are assumed to be approximately spherical in shape and uniform in size under steady flow conditions, so that a complex fluid can be considered as a roughly monodisperse dispersion of roughly spherical SUs (with a shear-dependent mean radius), what allows to generalize hard sphere models of monodisperse suspensions to complex fluids. A rheological model of such dispersions of SUs is based on the concept of the effective volume fraction, φ_{eff} which depends on flow conditions. Indeed, in competition with particle interactions, hydrodynamic forces can modify (i) S, the number fraction of particles that all SUs contain, (ii) both SUs arrangements and their internal structure, especially the SU's compactness, \\varphi. As a structural variable, S is governed by a kinetic equation. Through the shear-dependent kinetic rates involved in the latter, the general solution S depends on Γ, a dimensionless shear variable, leading to φ_{eff}(t, Γ; \\varphi). The structural modelling is achieved by introducing this expression of φ_{eff} into a well-established viscosity model of hard sphere suspensions. Using the steady state solution of the kinetic equation, S_{eq}(Γ ), allows to model non-Newtonian behaviors of complex fluids under steady shear conditions, as pseudo-plastic, plastic, dilatant ... ones. In this model, the ratio of high shear to low shear limiting viscosities appears as a key variable. Different examples of application will be discussed.

  7. Enlarged Thalamic Volumes and Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Thalamic Radiations in Veterans with Suicide Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa; King, Jace B.; McGlade, Erin; Bueler, Elliott; Stoeckel, Amanda; Epstein, Daniel J.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem studies have suggested a link between the thalamus, psychiatric disorders, and suicide. We evaluated the thalamus and anterior thalamic radiations (ATR) in a group of Veterans with and without a history of suicidal behavior (SB) to determine if thalamic abnormalities were associated with an increased risk of SB. Forty Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and no SB (TBI-SB), 19 Veterans with mild TBI and a history of SB (TB + SB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning including a structural and diffusion tensor imaging scan. SBs were evaluated utilizing the Columbia Suicide Rating Scale and impulsivity was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Differences in thalamic volumes and ATR fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined between (1) TBI + SB versus HC and (2) TBI + SB versus combined HC and TBI-SB and (3) between TBI + SB and TBI-SB. Left and right thalamic volumes were significantly increased in those with TBI + SB compared to the HC, TBI-SB, and the combined group. Veterans with TBI + SB had increased FA bilaterally compared to the HC, HC and TBI-SB group, and the TBI-SB only group. Significant positive associations were found for bilateral ATR and BIS in the TBI + SB group. Our findings of thalamic enlargement and increased FA in individuals with TBI + SB suggest that this region may be a biomarker for suicide risk. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence indicating that suicide may be associated with behavioral disinhibition and frontal-thalamic-limbic dysfunction and suggest a neurobiologic mechanism that may increase vulnerability to suicide. PMID:23964245

  8. Segmentation-based method incorporating fractional volume analysis for quantification of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deming; Doddrell, David M.

    2001-07-01

    Partial volume effect is a major problem in brain tissue segmentation on digital images such as magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this paper, special attention has been paid to partial volume effect when developing a method for quantifying brain atrophy. Specifically, partial volume effect is minimized in the process of parameter estimation prior to segmentation by identifying and excluding those voxels with possible partial volume effect. A quantitative measure for partial volume effect was also introduced through developing a model that calculates fractional volumes for voxels with mixtures of two different tissues. For quantifying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes, fractional volumes are calculated for two classes of mixture involving gray matter and CSF, and white matter and CSF. Tissue segmentation is carried out using 1D and 2D thresholding techniques after images are intensity- corrected. Threshold values are estimated using the minimum error method. Morphological processing and region identification analysis are used extensively in the algorithm. As an application, the method was employed for evaluating rates of brain atrophy based on serially acquired structural brain MR images. Consistent and accurate rates of brain atrophy have been obtained for patients with Alzheimer's disease as well as for elderly subjects due to normal aging process.

  9. Quantification of Left Ventricular Volumes, Mass and Ejection Fraction using Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Kramer, Sage P.; Skrinjar, Oskar; Binkley, Cassi M.; Powell, David K.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that magnitude images from cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI can accurately quantify left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction. Materials and Methods Thirteen mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged using a 7T ClinScan MRI. A short-axis stack of cine T2-weighted black blood (BB) images was acquired for calculation of left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) using the gold standard sum-of-slices methodology. DENSE images were acquired during the same imaging session in three short-axis (basal, mid, apical) and two long-axis orientations. A custom surface fitting algorithm was applied to epicardial and endocardial borders from the DENSE magnitude images to calculate volumes, mass, and EF. Agreement between the DENSE-derived measures and BB-derived measures was assessed via coefficient of variation (CoV). Results 3D surface reconstruction was completed on the order of seconds from segmented images, and required fewer slices to be segmented. Volumes, mass, and EF from DENSE-derived surfaces matched well with BB data (CoVs ≤11%). Conclusion LV mass, volumes, and ejection fraction in mice can be quantified through sparse (5 slices) sampling with DENSE. This consolidation significantly reduces the time required to assess both mass/volume-based measures of cardiac function and advanced cardiac mechanics. PMID:24923710

  10. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Single-Fraction Partial-Volume Irradiation: A Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation in swine. Methods and Materials: A 5-cm-long cervical segment was irradiated in 38-47-week-old Yucatan minipigs using a dedicated, image-guided radiosurgery linear accelerator. The radiation was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter that was positioned lateral to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. The dose was prescribed to the 90% isodose line. A total of 26 pigs were stratified into eight dose groups of 12-47 Gy. The mean maximum spinal cord dose was 16.9 {+-} 0.1, 18.9 {+-} 0.1, 21.0 {+-} 0.1, 23.0 {+-} 0.2, and 25.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy in the 16-, 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-Gy dose groups, respectively. The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 43% {+-} 3%, 48% {+-} 4%, 51% {+-} 2%, 57% {+-} 2%, and 59% {+-} 4%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait during a 1-year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a median effective dose for the maximum dose point of 20.0 Gy (95% confidence interval, 18.3-21.7). Excellent agreement was observed between the occurrence of neurologic change and the presence of histologic change. All the minipigs with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of the gray matter. The histologic findings were unremarkable in the minipigs with normal neurologic status. Conclusions: Our results have indicated that for a dose distribution with a steep lateral gradient, the pigs had a lower median effective dose for paralysis than has been observed in rats and more closely resembles that for rats, mice, and guinea pigs receiving uniform spinal cord irradiation.

  11. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  12. Soft nanostructured films with an ultra-low volume fraction of percolating hard phase.

    PubMed

    Chenal, Marion; Rieger, Jutta; Véchambre, Cyril; Chenal, Jean-Marc; Chazeau, Laurent; Creton, Costantino; Bouteiller, Laurent

    2013-10-01

    In this study, aqueous emulsion polymerization of n-butyl acrylate is performed in batch conditions without surfactants using a poly(acrylic acid)-trithiocarbonate macro-RAFT agent to control the polymerization and to stabilize the emulsion. According to the polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) approach, well-defined amphiphilic PAA-b-PBA diblock copolymers form and self-assemble during synthesis to yield highly stable core-shell particles with an extremely thin hard PAA shell. For the first time, we report here the specific properties of films obtained from these particular latexes. After drying the aqueous dispersion, tough and transparent films are obtained. Although the films are not chemically cross-linked, they do not dissolve in good solvents for PBA. Moreover, they remain transparent even after immersion in water. Rheology shows that the films are both stiff and ductile, thanks to the nanostructured but very low volume fraction (less than 3 wt%) of PAA forming a percolating network in the soft PBA. Compared with conventional core-shell-based films, this approach affords for the first time a route to a thin percolating honeycomb nanostructure with a sharp and strong interface between the two phases. The versatility of the synthetic procedure opens perspectives for a large range of functional materials.

  13. A Volume-Fraction Based Two-Phase Constitutive Model for Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Rui; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Hund, S.J.; •Antaki, J.F.

    2008-06-01

    Mechanically-induced blood trauma such as hemolysis and thrombosis often occurs at microscopic channels, steps and crevices within cardiovascular devices. A predictive mathematical model based on a broad understanding of hemodynamics at micro scale is needed to mitigate these effects, and is the motivation of this research project. Platelet transport and surface deposition is important in thrombosis. Microfluidic experiments have previously revealed a significant impact of red blood cell (RBC)-plasma phase separation on platelet transport [5], whereby platelet localized concentration can be enhanced due to a non-uniform distribution of RBCs of blood flow in a capillary tube and sudden expansion. However, current platelet deposition models either totally ignored RBCs in the fluid by assuming a zero sample hematocrit or treated them as being evenly distributed. As a result, those models often underestimated platelet advection and deposition to certain areas [2]. The current study aims to develop a two-phase blood constitutive model that can predict phase separation in a RBC-plasma mixture at the micro scale. The model is based on a sophisticated theory known as theory of interacting continua, i.e., mixture theory. The volume fraction is treated as a field variable in this model, which allows the prediction of concentration as well as velocity profiles of both RBC and plasma phases. The results will be used as the input of successive platelet deposition models.

  14. Monomer volume fraction profiles in pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Yang, Yubo; Deodhar, Chaitra V.; Ankner, John Francis; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Kilbey, II, S. Michael; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-03-06

    Spatial dependencies of monomer volume fraction profiles of pH responsive polyelectrolyte brushes were investigated using field theories and neutron reflectivity experiments. In particular, planar polyelectrolyte brushes in good solvent were studied and direct comparisons between predictions of the theories and experimental measurements are presented. The comparisons between the theories and the experimental data reveal that solvent entropy and ion-pairs resulting from adsorption of counterions from the added salt play key roles in affecting the monomer distribution and must be taken into account in modeling polyelectrolyte brushes. Furthermore, the utility of this physics-based approach based on these theories for the predictionmore » and interpretation of neutron reflectivity profiles in the context of pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes such as polybasic poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and polyacidic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes is demonstrated. The approach provides a quantitative way of estimating molecular weights of the polymers polymerized using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.« less

  15. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low dose cardiac CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Songtao; Bluemke, David A.; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has been well validated and allows quantification of myocardial fibrosis in comparison to overall mass of the myocardium. Unfortunately, CMRI is relatively expensive and is contraindicated in patients with intracardiac devices. Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for detection of scar and myocardial stress/rest perfusion. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the potential of low dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. A novel framework was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation, which consists of three main steps. First, a shape constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation for post-contrast image. Second, the symmetric Demons deformable registrations method was applied to register pre-contrast to post-contrast images. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 7 clinical low dose CCT datasets with pre-contrast and post-contrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Role of cardiac CTA in estimating left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Robin Man; Singh, Balkrishna Man; Mehta, Jawahar Lal

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is an important predictor of cardiac outcome and helps in making important diagnostic and therapeutic decisions such as the treatment of different types of congestive heart failure or implantation of devices like cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator. LVEF can be measured by various techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, contrast ventriculography, radionuclide techniques, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomographic angiography (CTA). The development of cardiac CTA using multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has seen a very rapid improvement in the technology for identifying coronary artery stenosis and coronary artery disease in the last decade. During the acquisition, processing and analysis of data to study coronary anatomy, MDCT provides a unique opportunity to measure left ventricular volumes and LVEF simultaneously with the same data set without the need for additional contrast or radiation exposure. The development of semi-automated and automated software to measure LVEF has now added uniformity, efficiency and reproducibility of practical value in clinical practice rather than just being a research tool. This article will address the feasibility, the accuracy and the limitations of MDCT in measuring LVEF. PMID:25276310

  17. Quantitative BOLD: Mapping of Human Cerebral Deoxygenated Blood Volume and Oxygen Extraction Fraction: Default State

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2014-01-01

    Since Ogawa et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1990;87:9868–9872) made the fundamental discovery of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast in MRI, most efforts have been directed toward the study of dynamic BOLD (i.e., temporal changes in the MRI signal during changes in brain activity). However, very little progress has been made in elucidating the nature of BOLD contrast during the resting or baseline state of the brain, which is important for understanding normal human performance because it accounts for most of the enormous energy budget of the brain. It is also crucial for deciphering the consequences of baseline-state impairment by cerebral vascular diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a BOLD MR-based method that allows quantitative evaluation of tissue hemodynamic parameters, such as the blood volume, deoxyhemoglobin concentration, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The proposed method, which we have termed quantitative BOLD (qBOLD), is based on an MR signal model that incorporates prior knowledge about brain tissue composition and considers signals from gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood. A 2D gradient-echo sampling of spin-echo (GESSE) pulse sequence is used for the acquisition of the MRI signal. The method is applied to estimate the hemodynamic parameters of the normal human brain in the baseline state. PMID:17191227

  18. The actinome of Dictyostelium discoideum in comparison to actins and actin-related proteins from other organisms.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jayabalan M; Fey, Petra; Ramalingam, Nagendran; Liu, Xiao I; Rohlfs, Meino; Noegel, Angelika A; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Glöckner, Gernot; Schleicher, Michael

    2008-07-09

    Actin belongs to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotic cells which harbor usually many conventional actin isoforms as well as actin-related proteins (Arps). To get an overview over the sometimes confusing multitude of actins and Arps, we analyzed the Dictyostelium discoideum actinome in detail and compared it with the genomes from other model organisms. The D. discoideum actinome comprises 41 actins and actin-related proteins. The genome contains 17 actin genes which most likely arose from consecutive gene duplications, are all active, in some cases developmentally regulated and coding for identical proteins (Act8-group). According to published data, the actin fraction in a D. discoideum cell consists of more than 95% of these Act8-type proteins. The other 16 actin isoforms contain a conventional actin motif profile as well but differ in their protein sequences. Seven actin genes are potential pseudogenes. A homology search of the human genome using the most typical D. discoideum actin (Act8) as query sequence finds the major actin isoforms such as cytoplasmic beta-actin as best hit. This suggests that the Act8-group represents a nearly perfect actin throughout evolution. Interestingly, limited data from D. fasciculatum, a more ancient member among the social amoebae, show different relationships between conventional actins. The Act8-type isoform is most conserved throughout evolution. Modeling of the putative structures suggests that the majority of the actin-related proteins is functionally unrelated to canonical actin. The data suggest that the other actin variants are not necessary for the cytoskeleton itself but rather regulators of its dynamical features or subunits in larger protein complexes.

  19. Analytical and modeling investigations of volume fraction of interfacial layers around ellipsoidal aggregate particles in multiphase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. X.; Chen, H. S.

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the volume fraction of interfacial layers is very significant for assessing the quantitative relationship between the microstructure and macroscopic physical properties of complex multiphase materials. In this work, based on a three-phase composite structure, an approximate analytical model for the volume fraction of interfacial layers around ellipsoidal aggregate particles is presented in detail. To verify the accuracy and reliability of the derived analytical model, a numerical model is introduced by means of random packing of polydispersed ellipsoidal aggregate particles, in which the relative spatial position between an arbitrary point and an ellipsoidal particle is precisely and conveniently determined. With the analytical and numerical models applied, the dependence of the volume fraction of interfacial layers on various factors, such as the particle shape, the volume fraction and the maximum particle size of aggregates, and the thickness of the interfacial layers, is evaluated. Furthermore, the results from the analytical model and the numerical model with these factors are compared. It is found that the theoretical results are favorably consistent with the simulated results.

  20. Predicting Rectal and Bladder Overdose During the Course of Prostate Radiotherapy Using Dose-Volume Data From Initial Treatment Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Vedang; Shukla, Pragya; Adurkar, Pranjal; Master, Zubin; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether information from the initial fractions can determine which patients are likely to consistently exceed their planning dose-volume constraints during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were recontoured on their daily megavoltage computed tomography scans and the dose was recalculated. The bladder and rectal volumes (in mL) receiving {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose in each fraction and in the original plans were recorded. A fraction for which the difference between planned and delivered was more than 2 mL was considered a volume failure. Similarly if the difference in the planned and delivered maximum dose (D{sub max}) was {>=}1% for the rectum and bladder, the fraction was considered a dose failure. Each patient's first 3 to 5 fractions were analyzed to determine if they correctly identified those patients who would consistently fail (i.e., {>=}20% of fractions) during the course of their radiotherapy. Results: Six parameters were studied; the rectal volume (RV) and bladder volumes (BV) (in mL) received {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose and maximum dose to 2 mL of the rectum and bladder. This was given by RV{sub 100}, RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, BV{sub 70}, RD{sub max}, and BD{sub max}, respectively. When more than 1 of the first 3 fractions exceed the planning constraint as defined, it accurately predicts consistent failures through the course of the treatment. This method is able to correctly identify the consistent failures about 80% (RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, and RV{sub 100}), 90% (BV{sub 70}), and 100% (RD{sub max} and BD{sub max}) of the times. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method accurately identifying patients who are likely to consistently exceed the planning constraints during the course of their

  1. ECG-gated blood pool tomography in the determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, S.R.; Ell, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    ECG-gated blood pool tomography promises to provide a ''gold standard'' for noninvasive measurement of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion. This study compares these measurements with those from planar radionuclide imaging and contrast ventriculography. End diastolic and end systolic blood pool images were acquired tomographically using an IGE400A rotating gamma camera and Star computer, and slices were reconstructed orthogonal to the long axis of the heart. Left ventricular volume was determined by summing the areas of the slices, and wall motion was determined by comparison of end diastolic and end systolic contours. In phantom experiments this provided an accurate measurement of volume (r=0.98). In 32 subjects who were either normal or who had coronary artery disease left ventricular volume (r=0.83) and ejection fraction (r=0.89) correlated well with those using a counts based planar technique. In 16 of 18 subjects who underwent right anterior oblique X-ray contrast ventriculography, tomographic wall motion agreed for anterior, apical, and inferior walls, but abnormal septal motion which was not apparent by contrast ventriculography, was seen in 12 subjects tomographically. All 12 had disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery and might have been expected to have abnormal septal motion. ECG-gated blood pool tomography can thus determine left ventricular volume and ejection fraction accurately, and provides a global description of wall motion in a way that is not possible from any single planar image.

  2. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: implications for ash dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Scollo, S.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first report of experimental measurements of the enhanced settling velocity of volcanic particles as function of particle volume fraction. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behavior of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments using natural basaltic and phonolitic ash. By releasing ash particles at different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement, we measured their terminal velocity, size, and particle volume fraction with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. Enhanced settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle volume fraction. This suggests that particle clustering during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. We provide a quantitative empirical model that allows to calculate, from a given particle size and density, the enhanced velocity resulting from a given particle volume fraction. The proposed model has the potential to serve as a simple tool for the prediction of the terminal velocity of ash of an hypothetical distribution of ash of known particle size and volume fraction. This is of particular importance for advection-diffusion transport model of ash where generally a one-way coupling is adopted, considering only the flow effects on particles. To better quantify the importance of the enhanced settling velocity in ash dispersal, we finally introduced the new formulation in a Lagrangian model calculating for realistic eruptive conditions the resulting ash concentration in the atmosphere and on the ground.

  3. Predicting trabecular bone elastic properties from measures of bone volume fraction and fabric on the basis of micromagnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Wald, Michael J; Magland, Jeremy F; Rajapakse, Chamith S; Bhagat, Yusuf A; Wehrli, Felix W

    2012-08-01

    The relationship between fabric (a measure of structural anisotropy) and elastic properties of trabecular bone was examined by invoking morphology and homogenization theory on the basis of micromagnetic resonance images from the distal tibia in specimens (N = 30) and human subjects (N = 16) acquired at a 160 × 160 × 160 μm(3) voxel size. The fabric tensor was mapped in 7.5 × 7.5 × 7.5 mm(3) cubic subvolumes by a three-dimensional mean-intercept-length method. Elastic constants (three Young's and three shear moduli) were derived from linear microfinite element simulations of three-dimensional grayscale bone volume fraction-mapped images. In the specimen data, moduli fit power laws of bone volume fraction (bone volume/total volume) for all three test directions and subvolumes (R(2) = 0.92-0.98) with exponents ranging from 1.3 to 1.8. Weaker linear relationships were found for the in vivo data because of a narrower range in bone volume/total volume. When pooling the data for all test directions and subvolumes, bone volume/total volume predicted elastic moduli less well in the specimens (mean R(2) = 0.74) and not at all in vivo. A model of bone volume/total volume and fabric was highly predictive of microfinite element-derived Young's moduli: mean R(2) s of 0.98 and 0.82 (in vivo). The results show that fabric, an important predictor of bone mechanical properties, can be assessed in the limited resolution and signal-to-noise ratio regime of micromagnetic resonance images.

  4. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  5. Nucleation and growth of micellar polycrystals under time-dependent volume fraction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louhichi, Ameur; Tamborini, Elisa; Ghofraniha, Neda; Caton, François; Roux, Denis; Oberdisse, Julian; Cipelletti, Luca; Ramos, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    We study the freezing kinetics of colloidal polycrystals made of micelles of Pluronic F108, a thermosensitive copolymer, to which a small amount of silica nanoparticles of a size comparable to that of the micelles are added. We use rheology and calorimetry to measure Tc, the crystallization temperature, and find that Tc increases with the heating rate Ṫ used to crystallize the sample. To rationalize our results, we first use viscosity measurements to establish a linear mapping between temperature T and the effective volume fraction, φ, of the micelles, treated as hard spheres. Next, we reproduce the experimental Ṫ dependence of the crystallization temperature with numerical calculations based on standard models for the nucleation and growth of hard-sphere crystals, classical nucleation theory and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov theory. The models have been adapted to account for the peculiarities of our experiments: the presence of nanoparticles that are expelled in the grain boundaries and the steady increase of T and, hence, φ during the experiment. We moreover show that the polycrystal grain size obtained from the calculations is in good agreement with light microscopy data. Finally, we find that the φ dependence of the nucleation rate for the micellar polycrystal is in remarkable quantitative agreement with that found in previous experiments on colloidal hard spheres. These results suggests that deep analogies exist between hard-sphere colloidal crystals and Pluronics micellar crystals, in spite of the difference in particle softness. More generally, our results demonstrate that crystallization processes can be quantitatively probed using standard rheometry.

  6. SU-E-T-429: Uncertainties of Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of cell surviving fraction reconstructed from tumor-volume variation curves during radiation therapy using sensitivity analysis based on linear perturbation theory. Methods: The time dependent tumor-volume functions V(t) have been calculated using a twolevel cell population model which is based on the separation of entire tumor cell population in two subpopulations: oxygenated viable and lethally damaged cells. The sensitivity function is defined as S(t)=[δV(t)/V(t)]/[δx/x] where δV(t)/V(t) is the time dependent relative variation of the volume V(t) and δx/x is the relative variation of the radiobiological parameter x. The sensitivity analysis was performed using direct perturbation method where the radiobiological parameter x was changed by a certain error and the tumor-volume was recalculated to evaluate the corresponding tumor-volume variation. Tumor volume variation curves and sensitivity functions have been computed for different values of cell surviving fractions from the practically important interval S{sub 2}=0.1-0.7 using the two-level cell population model. Results: The sensitivity functions of tumor-volume to cell surviving fractions achieved a relatively large value of 2.7 for S{sub 2}=0.7 and then approached zero as S{sub 2} is approaching zero Assuming a systematic error of 3-4% we obtain that the relative error in S{sub 2} is less that 20% in the range S2=0.4-0.7. This Resultis important because the large values of S{sub 2} are associated with poor treatment outcome should be measured with relatively small uncertainties. For the very small values of S2<0.3, the relative error can be larger than 20%; however, the absolute error does not increase significantly. Conclusion: Tumor-volume curves measured during radiotherapy can be used for evaluation of cell surviving fractions usually observed in radiation therapy with conventional fractionation.

  7. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro-tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element.

  8. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro­tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element. PMID:27307590

  9. A preconditioned fast finite volume scheme for a fractional differential equation discretized on a locally refined composite mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Numerical methods for fractional differential equations generate full stiffness matrices, which were traditionally solved via Gaussian type direct solvers that require O (N3) of computational work and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. We develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite volume schemes defined on a locally refined composite mesh for fractional differential equations to resolve boundary layers of the solutions. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  10. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect I: Effects of variations of the fuel particle volume fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Yan, Xiaoqing; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-05-01

    A new method of modeling the in-pile mechanical behaviors of dispersion nuclear fuel elements is proposed. Considering the irradiation swelling together with the thermal effect, numerical simulations of the in-pile mechanical behaviors are performed with the developed finite element models for different fuel particle volume fractions of the fuel meat. The effects of the particle volume fractions on the mechanical performances of the fuel element are studied. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the particle volume fractions at each burnup; the locations of the maximum first principal stresses shift with increasing burnup; at low burnups, the maximum first principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while at high burnups, the 20% volume fraction case holds the lowest value; (2) at the cladding, the maximum equivalent plastic strains and the tensile principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while the maximum Mises stresses do not follow this order at high burnups; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles increase with the particle volume fractions, and the particles will engender plastic strains until the particle volume fraction reaches high enough.

  11. Expanded Lever Rule for Phase Volume Fraction Calculation of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel in Thermal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuanwei; Huang, Jihua; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-06-01

    The principle of the lever rule on the dilatation curve and its application to the corresponding differential dilatation curve were introduced in a nonoverlapped two-phase continuous cooling process. The lever rule was further expanded in the case of an overlapped two-phase process. The application of the expanded lever rule was based on the approximate symmetry treatment on the differential dilatation curve, which shows reasonably both on the theoretical calculation and in the experimental results. High-strength low-alloy steels were thermal simulated with Gleeble 3500. The transformed phase volume fractions in different cooling processes were calculated by the expanded lever rule and metallography analysis. The results showed the expanded lever rule could calculate reliable phase volume fractions as metallography analysis.

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Enhanced dc conductivity of low volume-fraction nano-particulate suspensions in silicone and perfluorinated oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, S. A.; Libor, Z.; Skordos, A. A.; Zhang, Q.

    2009-03-01

    The dc conductivities of several different types of nanoparticles (nickel, barium titanate and magnetite) suspended in both silicone and perfluorinated oils have been measured and contrasted. Enhanced dc conductivity through interaction between the particles and the fluid has been demonstrated, even at quite moderate fields, and different types of nanoparticles have been shown to exhibit different behavioural trends. Whilst the dc enhancement is partly related to the concentration (or spatial arrangement) of the particles as expected, there is clear evidence that energy-activated (electric field activated) processes also play a major role. It can be said that effective-medium theories based solely on the electrical properties and volume fractions of the component materials have limited applicability when assessing the dc conductivities of these nanoparticle-fluid combinations at low volume fractions.

  13. Confidence bounds for the estimation of the volume phase fraction from a single image in a nickel base superalloy.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Rémi; Baylou, Pierre; Germain, Christian; Da Costa, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    We propose an image-based framework to evaluate the uncertainty in the estimation of the volume fraction of specific microstructures based on the observation of a single section. These microstructures consist of cubes organized on a cubic mesh, such as monocrystalline nickel base superalloys. The framework is twofold: a model-based stereological analysis allows relating two-dimensional image observations to three-dimensional microstructure features, and a spatial statistical analysis allows computing approximate confidence bounds while assessing the representativeness of the image. The reliability of the method is assessed on synthetic models. Volume fraction estimation variances and approximate confidence intervals are computed on real superalloy images in the context of material characterization. PMID:20350338

  14. Confidence bounds for the estimation of the volume phase fraction from a single image in a nickel base superalloy.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Rémi; Baylou, Pierre; Germain, Christian; Da Costa, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    We propose an image-based framework to evaluate the uncertainty in the estimation of the volume fraction of specific microstructures based on the observation of a single section. These microstructures consist of cubes organized on a cubic mesh, such as monocrystalline nickel base superalloys. The framework is twofold: a model-based stereological analysis allows relating two-dimensional image observations to three-dimensional microstructure features, and a spatial statistical analysis allows computing approximate confidence bounds while assessing the representativeness of the image. The reliability of the method is assessed on synthetic models. Volume fraction estimation variances and approximate confidence intervals are computed on real superalloy images in the context of material characterization.

  15. Diffraction efficiency of unbleached phase and amplitude holograms as a function of volume fraction of metallic silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, R. F.; Blaya, L. Carretero S.; Ulibarrena, M.; Beléndez, A.; Fimia, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical and experimental study of diffraction efficiency of unbleached holograms, showing that the volume fraction of metallic silver inside the gelatin after development ( q) is the main parameter in the behavior of the holographic grating properties. Using this fact, and the obtained relationship between pH and q, we have found values of diffraction efficiencies near 30% with a developing time of 3 min without bleaching step.

  16. Blood volume, heart rate, and left ventricular ejection fraction changes in dogs before and after exercise during endurance training

    SciTech Connect

    Mackintosh, I.C.; Dormehl, I.C.; van Gelder, A.L.; du Plessis, M.

    1983-10-01

    In Beagles after 7 weeks' endurance training, resting blood volume increased by an average of 13.1%. Resting heart rates were not significantly affected, but heart rates measured 2 minutes after exercise were significantly lower after the endurance training than before. Left ventricular ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography from 2 minutes after exercise showed no significant changes in response to a single exercise period or over the 50 days' training.

  17. Fractionation in normal tissues: the (α/β)eff concept can account for dose heterogeneity and volume effects.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Nahum, Alan E

    2013-10-01

    The simple Linear-Quadratic (LQ)-based Withers iso-effect formula (WIF) is widely used in external-beam radiotherapy to derive a new tumour dose prescription such that there is normal-tissue (NT) iso-effect when changing the fraction size and/or number. However, as conventionally applied, the WIF is invalid unless the normal-tissue response is solely determined by the tumour dose. We propose a generalized WIF (gWIF) which retains the tumour prescription dose, but replaces the intrinsic fractionation sensitivity measure (α/β) by a new concept, the normal-tissue effective fractionation sensitivity, [Formula: see text], which takes into account both the dose heterogeneity in, and the volume effect of, the late-responding normal-tissue in question. Closed-form analytical expressions for [Formula: see text] ensuring exact normal-tissue iso-effect are derived for: (i) uniform dose, and (ii) arbitrary dose distributions with volume-effect parameter n = 1 from the normal-tissue dose-volume histogram. For arbitrary dose distributions and arbitrary n, a numerical solution for [Formula: see text] exhibits a weak dependence on the number of fractions. As n is increased, [Formula: see text] increases from its intrinsic value at n = 0 (100% serial normal-tissue) to values close to or even exceeding the tumour (α/β) at n = 1 (100% parallel normal-tissue), with the highest values of [Formula: see text] corresponding to the most conformal dose distributions. Applications of this new concept to inverse planning and to highly conformal modalities are discussed, as is the effect of possible deviations from LQ behaviour at large fraction sizes. PMID:24029492

  18. A filtration and column-adsorption system for onsite concentration and fractionation of organic substances from large volumes of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1984-01-01

    A portable filtration and column-adsorption system which can concentrate suspended sediment and dissolved-aqueous organic substances onsite was developed. Organic solutes also are fractionated into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-acid, base, and neutral fractions. Subsequent isolation of organic solutes from fraction concentrates and extraction of organic constituents in suspended sediment entrained on filter tubes is performed by a variety of procedures in the laboratory. Three surface-water samples and one ground-water sample ranging in volume from 300 to 1,100 liters were processed through the filtration and column-adsorption system, yielding from about 0.8 to 3.0 grams of recovered organic carbon per sample.

  19. Modeling the collagen fibril network of biological tissues as a nonlinearly elastic material using a continuous volume fraction distribution function

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Reza; Vena, Pasquale; Sah, Robert L.; Klisch, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite distinct mechanical functions, biological soft tissues have a common microstructure in which a ground matrix is reinforced by a collagen fibril network. The microstructural properties of the collagen network contribute to continuum mechanical tissue properties that are strongly anisotropic with tensile-compressive asymmetry. In this study, a novel approach based on a continuous distribution of collagen fibril volume fractions is developed to model fibril reinforced soft tissues as a nonlinearly elastic and anisotropic material. Compared with other approaches that use a normalized number of fibrils for the definition of the distribution function, this representation is based on a distribution parameter (i.e. volume fraction) that is commonly measured experimentally while also incorporating pre-stress of the collagen fibril network in a tissue natural configuration. After motivating the form of the collagen strain energy function, examples are provided for two volume fraction distribution functions. Consequently, collagen second-Piola Kirchhoff stress and elasticity tensors are derived, first in general form and then specifically for a model that may be used for immature bovine articular cartilage. It is shown that the proposed strain energy is a convex function of the deformation gradient tensor and, thus, is suitable for the formation of a polyconvex tissue strain energy function. PMID:23390357

  20. The Effect of Fiber Strength Stochastics and Local Fiber Volume Fraction on Multiscale Progressive Failure of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Jr., Thomas E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous fiber unidirectional polymer matrix composites (PMCs) can exhibit significant local variations in fiber volume fraction as a result of processing conditions that can lead to further local differences in material properties and failure behavior. In this work, the coupled effects of both local variations in fiber volume fraction and the empirically-based statistical distribution of fiber strengths on the predicted longitudinal modulus and local tensile strength of a unidirectional AS4 carbon fiber/ Hercules 3502 epoxy composite were investigated using the special purpose NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC); local effective composite properties were obtained by homogenizing the material behavior over repeating units cells (RUCs). The predicted effective longitudinal modulus was relatively insensitive to small (8%) variations in local fiber volume fraction. The composite tensile strength, however, was highly dependent on the local distribution in fiber strengths. The RUC-averaged constitutive response can be used to characterize lower length scale material behavior within a multiscale analysis framework that couples the NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver. Such an approach can be effectively used to analyze the progressive failure of PMC structures whose failure initiates at the RUC level. Consideration of the effect of local variations in constituent properties and morphologies on progressive failure of PMCs is a central aspect of the application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) principles for composite materials.

  1. Effects of Retained Austenite Volume Fraction, Morphology, and Carbon Content on Strength and Ductility of Nanostructured TRIP-assisted Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Qiu, LN; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-06-01

    With a suite of multi-modal and multi-scale characterization techniques, the present study unambiguously proves that a substantially-improved combination of ultrahigh strength and good ductility can be achieved by tailoring the volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of the retained austenite (RA) in a transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steel with the nominal chemical composition of 0.19C-0.30Si-1.76Mn-1.52Al (weight percent, wt.%). After intercritical annealing and bainitic holding, a combination ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1,100 MPa and true strain of 50% has been obtained, as a result of the ultrafine RA lamellae, which are alternately arranged in the bainitic ferrite around junction regions of ferrite grains. For reference, specimens with a blocky RA, prepared without the bainitic holding, yield a low ductility (35%) and a low UTS (800 MPa). The volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of RA have been characterized using various techniques, including magnetic probing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interrupted tensile tests, mapped using EBSD in conjunction with the kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis, reveal that the lamellar RA is the governingmicrostructure component responsible for the higher mechanical stability, compared to the blocky one. By coupling these various techniques, we quantitatively demonstrate that in addition to the RA volume fraction, its morphology and carbon content are equally important in optimizing the strength and ductility of TRIP-assisted steels.

  2. Insight into interfacial effect on effective physical properties of fibrous materials. I. The volume fraction of soft interfaces around anisotropic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Wang, Han; Niu, Yanze; Bai, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    With advances in interfacial properties characterization technologies, the interfacial volume fraction is a feasible parameter for evaluating effective physical properties of materials. However, there is a need to determine the interfacial volume fraction around anisotropic fibers and a need to assess the influence of such the interfacial property on effective properties of fibrous materials. Either ways, the accurate prediction of interfacial volume fraction is required. Towards this end, we put forward both theoretical and numerical schemes to determine the interfacial volume fraction in fibrous materials, which are considered as a three-phase composite structure consisting of matrix, anisotropic hard spherocylinder fibers, and soft interfacial layers with a constant dimension coated on the surface of each fiber. The interfacial volume fraction actually represents the fraction of space not occupied by all hard fibers and matrix. The theoretical scheme that adopts statistical geometry and stereological theories is essentially an analytic continuation from spherical inclusions. By simulating such three-phase chopped fibrous materials, we numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction. The theoretical and numerical schemes provide a quantitative insight that the interfacial volume fraction depends strongly on the fiber geometries like fiber shape, geometric size factor, and fiber size distribution. As a critical interfacial property, the present contribution can be further drawn into assessing effective physical properties of fibrous materials, which will be demonstrated in another paper (Part II) of this series.

  3. Insight into interfacial effect on effective physical properties of fibrous materials. I. The volume fraction of soft interfaces around anisotropic fibers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Wang, Han; Niu, Yanze; Bai, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    With advances in interfacial properties characterization technologies, the interfacial volume fraction is a feasible parameter for evaluating effective physical properties of materials. However, there is a need to determine the interfacial volume fraction around anisotropic fibers and a need to assess the influence of such the interfacial property on effective properties of fibrous materials. Either ways, the accurate prediction of interfacial volume fraction is required. Towards this end, we put forward both theoretical and numerical schemes to determine the interfacial volume fraction in fibrous materials, which are considered as a three-phase composite structure consisting of matrix, anisotropic hard spherocylinder fibers, and soft interfacial layers with a constant dimension coated on the surface of each fiber. The interfacial volume fraction actually represents the fraction of space not occupied by all hard fibers and matrix. The theoretical scheme that adopts statistical geometry and stereological theories is essentially an analytic continuation from spherical inclusions. By simulating such three-phase chopped fibrous materials, we numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction. The theoretical and numerical schemes provide a quantitative insight that the interfacial volume fraction depends strongly on the fiber geometries like fiber shape, geometric size factor, and fiber size distribution. As a critical interfacial property, the present contribution can be further drawn into assessing effective physical properties of fibrous materials, which will be demonstrated in another paper (Part II) of this series. PMID:26747814

  4. [Automatic calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT--basic evaluation using phantom].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Y; Nanbu, I; Tohyama, J; Ooba, S

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated accuracy of Quantitative Gated SPECT Program that enabled calculation of the left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction by automatically tracing the contour of the cardiac surface. Cardiac phantoms filled with 99mTc-solution were used. Data acquisition was made by 180-degree projection in L type and 360-degree projection in opposed type. Automatic calculation could be done in all processes, which required 3-4 minutes. Reproducibility was sufficient. The adequate cut off value of a prefilter was 0.45. At this value LV volume was 93% of the actual volume in L type acquisition and 95.9% in opposed type acquisition. The LV volume obtained in L type was smaller than that obtained in opposed type (p < 0.05). The tracing of the defects was fair, on the cardiac phantoms with all of 90-degree defects and 180-degree defects of the septal and lateral wall. The LV volume was estimated to be larger on the phantom with 180-degree defect of the anterior wall, and to be smaller on the phantom of 180-degree defect of the inferoposterior wall. Because tracing was deviated anteriorly at the defects. In the patients with similar conditions to 180-degree defect of the anterior wall or inferoposterior wall, the LV volume should be carefully evaluated.

  5. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  6. Numerical simulation of effects of sand grain diameters and volume fractions on mass transferring from the water-liquid to the water-vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiguo; Han, Xiangdong; Liu, Ming; Zheng, Yingjie

    2016-05-01

    The paper analyzed the effects of sand grain diameters and volume fractions on the mass transferring from the water-liquid to the water-vapor in a two-dimensional nozzle. Based on the mixture model, k-ɛ turbulence model and Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model, the solid-liquid-vapor three phases’ cavitation flows were simulated. When the grain mean diameters were defined as constants, volume fractions were changed to investigate the effects of them. The grain mean diameters were 0.013mm, 0.025mm and 0.05mm. Volume fractions were 0.02, 0.04, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.10. Results indicated that cavitation occurred at the beginning spots of the narrow part of the nozzle, low pressure regions. With the different grain mean diameters and volume fractions, effects of the sand on the mass transferring from the water-liquid to the water-vapor were diverse, proved by the curves of the cavitation numbers with the volume fractions of the sand and the curves of the volume fractions of the water-vapor with the volume fractions of the sand, reflecting the distinctions of interactions between the bubbles and the sand grains.

  7. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin; Huber, Christian

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  8. The Volume Regulation Graph versus the Ejection Fraction as Metrics of Left Ventricular Performance in Heart Failure with and without a Preserved Ejection Fraction: A Mathematical Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Theo JC; Kerkhof, Peter LM

    2015-01-01

    In left ventricular heart failure, often a distinction is made between patients with a reduced and a preserved ejection fraction (EF). As EF is a composite metric of both the end-diastolic volume (EDV) and the end-systolic ventricular volume (ESV), the lucidity of the EF is sometimes questioned. As an alternative, the ESV–EDV graph is advocated. This study identifies the dependence of the EF and the EDV–ESV graph on the major determinants of ventricular performance. Numerical simulations were made using a model of the systemic circulation, consisting of an atrium–ventricle valves combination; a simple constant pressure as venous filling system; and a three-element Windkessel extended with a venous system. ESV–EDV graphs and EFs were calculated using this model while varying one by one the filling pressure, diastolic and systolic ventricular elastances, and diastolic pressure in the aorta. In conclusion, the ESV–EDV graph separates between diastolic and systolic dysfunction while the EF encompasses these two pathologies. Therefore, the ESV–EDV graph can provide an advantage over EF in heart failure studies. PMID:26052232

  9. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, Yasutaka; Mizuta, Masahiro; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L.; Date, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  10. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 1: Thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    The cryogenic refrigerator thermal design calculations establish design approach and basic sizing of the machine's elements. After the basic design is defined, effort concentrates on matching the thermodynamic design with that of the heat transfer devices (heat exchangers and regenerators). Typically, the heat transfer device configurations and volumes are adjusted to improve their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. These adjustments imply that changes be made to the active displaced volumes, compensating for the influence of the heat transfer devices on the thermodynamic processes of the working fluid. Then, once the active volumes are changed, the heat transfer devices require adjustment to account for the variations in flows, pressure levels, and heat loads. This iterative process is continued until the thermodynamic cycle parameters match the design of the heat transfer devices. By examing several matched designs, a near-optimum refrigerator is selected.

  11. Actin in Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kari L.; Baines, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Actin is important for a variety of cellular processes, including uptake of extracellular material and intracellular transport. Several emerging lines of evidence indicate that herpesviruses exploit actin and actin-associated myosin motors for viral entry, intranuclear transport of capsids, and virion egress. The goal of this review is to explore these processes and to highlight potential future directions for this area of research. PMID:21994736

  12. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  13. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  14. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  15. Extracellular Volume Fraction Is More Closely Associated With Altered Regional Left Ventricular Velocities Than Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jeremy; Sommerville, Cort; Magrath, Patrick; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Freed, Benjamin H; Benzuly, Keith H; Gordon, Robert; Vidula, Himabindu; Lee, Dan C; Yancy, Clyde; Carr, James; Markl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) is a common cause of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to non-invasively evaluate changes in segmental LV extracellular volume fraction (ECV), LV velocities, myocardial scar, and wall motion in NICM patients. Methods and Results Cardiac MRI including pre- and post-contrast myocardial T1-mapping and velocity quantification (tissue phase mapping, TPM) of the LV (basal, mid-ventricular, apical short axis) was applied in 31 patients with NICM (50±18years). Analysis based on the 16-segment AHA model was employed to evaluate the segmental distribution of ECV, peak systolic and diastolic myocardial velocities, scar determined by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), and wall motion abnormalities. LV segments with scar or impaired wall motion were significantly associated with elevated ECV (r=0.26, p<0.001) and reduced peak systolic radial velocities (r=−0.43, p<0.001). Regional myocardial velocities and ECV were similar for patients with reduced (n=12, ECV=0.28±0.06) and preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF) (n=19, ECV=0.30±0.09). Patients with preserved LVEF showed significant relationships between increasing ECV and reduced systolic (r=−0.19, r=−0.30) and diastolic (r=0.34, r=0.26) radial and long-axis peak velocities (p<0.001). Even after excluding myocardial segments with LGE, significant relationships between ECV and segmental LV velocities were maintained indicating the potential of elevated ECV to identify regional diffuse fibrosis not visible by LGE which was associated with impaired regional LV function Conclusions Regionally elevated ECV negatively impacted myocardial velocities. The association of elevated regional ECV with reduced myocardial velocities independent of LVEF suggests a structure-function relationship between altered ECV and segmental myocardial function in NICM. PMID:25552491

  16. Transmission electron microscopy convergent beam measurement of S-phase volume fraction in Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy (8090)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.W. ): Xiaoxin, X. )

    1990-12-01

    A statistical study of S-phase particle distribution in thin foils, measuring foil thickness by a transmission electron microscopy convergent beam technique, has shown the change of S-phase average length and volume fraction by varying treatments prior to artificial aging. The investigation shows that the average length and volume fraction of S-phase particles increases with increasing degrees of predeformation in the Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy studied.

  17. Reconstitution and Protein Composition Analysis of Endocytic Actin Patches

    PubMed Central

    Michelot, Alphée; Costanzo, Michael; Sarkeshik, Ali; Boone, Charles; Yates, John R.; Drubin, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Clathrin-actin-mediated endocytosis in yeast involves the progressive assembly of at least 60 different proteins at cortical sites. More than half of these proteins are involved in the assembly of a branched network of actin filaments to provide the forces required for plasma membrane invagination. Results To gain insights into the regulation of endocytic actin patch dynamics, we developed an in vitro actin assembly assay using microbeads functionalized with the nucleation promoting factor (NPF) Las17 (yeast WASP). When incubated in a yeast extract, these beads assembled actin networks and a significant fraction became motile. Multi dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) showed that the recruitment of actin binding proteins to these Las17-derived actin networks is selective. None of the proteins known to exclusively regulate the in vivo formation of actin cables or the actin contractile ring were identified. Intriguingly, our analysis also identified components of three other cortical structures, eisosomes, PIK patches and the TORC2 complex, establishing intriguing biochemical connections between four different yeast cortical complexes. Finally, we identified Aim3 as a regulator of actin dynamics at endocytic sites. Conclusions WASP is sufficient to trigger assembly of actin networks composed selectively of actin-patch proteins. These experiments establish that the protein composition of different F-actin structures is determined by the protein factor that initiates the network. The identification of binding partners revealed new biochemical connections between WASP derived networks and other cortical complexes and identified Aim3 as a novel regulator of the endocytic actin patch. PMID:21035341

  18. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  19. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  20. A Review of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Matrix Syntactic Foams—Effect of Hollow Particle Wall Thickness and Volume Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Pinisetty, Dinesh

    2013-02-01

    Hollow-particle-filled composites called syntactic foams are lightweight particulate composites that are useful in weight-sensitive applications such as aerospace and marine structures. Extensive literature is now available on the mechanical properties of syntactic foams. The upcoming applications for syntactic foams in aerospace structures require understanding of their thermal properties, such as the thermal conductivity. The present review article summarizes the available experimental results and theoretical models related to the thermal conductivity of syntactic foams. Experimental results are available for only a few compositions of syntactic foams. Basic understating of the relationship between thermal conductivity of syntactic foams and the material parameters, such as hollow particle volume fraction and wall thickness, is not available through experimental results at this point. Four theoretical models are tested with the experimental data and found to provide close predictions. These models are used to conduct parametric studies. It is observed that the thermal conductivity of syntactic foams decreases as the volume fraction of thin-walled particles is increased. An inverse relationship is observed for thick-walled, hollow-particle-filled syntactic foams. These models can help in designing syntactic foams with required thermal conductivity.

  1. A probabilistic method for determining the volume fraction of pre-embedded capsules in self-healing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhong; Chen, Huisu

    2014-10-01

    Autonomous healing of cracks using pre-embedded capsules containing healing agent is becoming a promising approach to restore the strength of damaged structures. In addition to the material properties, the size and volume fraction of capsules influence crack healing in the matrix. Understanding the crack and capsule interaction is critical in the development and design of structures made of self-healing materials. Assuming that the pre-embedded capsules are randomly dispersed we theoretically model flat ellipsoidal crack interaction with capsules and determine the probability of a crack intersecting the pre-embedded capsules i.e. the self-healing probability. We also develop a probabilistic model of a crack simultaneously meeting with capsules and catalyst carriers in two-component self-healing system matrix. Using a risk-based healing approach, we determine the volume fraction and size of the pre-embedded capsules that are required to achieve a certain self-healing probability. To understand the effect of the shape of the capsules on self-healing we theoretically modeled crack interaction with spherical and cylindrical capsules. We compared the results of our theoretical model with Monte-Carlo simulations of crack interaction with capsules. The formulae presented in this paper will provide guidelines for engineers working with self-healing structures in material selection and sustenance.

  2. Direct dynamin–actin interactions regulate the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changkyu; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Weins, Astrid; Osborn, Teresia; Reiser, Jochen; Pollak, Martin; Hartwig, John; Sever, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin assembles into higher order structures that are thought to promote endocytosis. Dynamin also regulates the actin cytoskeleton through an unknown, GTPase-dependent mechanism. Here, we identify a highly conserved site in dynamin that binds directly to actin filaments and aligns them into bundles. Point mutations in the actin-binding domain cause aberrant membrane ruffling and defective actin stress fibre formation in cells. Short actin filaments promote dynamin assembly into higher order structures, which in turn efficiently release the actin-capping protein (CP) gelsolin from barbed actin ends in vitro, allowing for elongation of actin filaments. Together, our results support a model in which assembled dynamin, generated through interactions with short actin filaments, promotes actin polymerization via displacement of actin-CPs. PMID:20935625

  3. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  4. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  5. SU-E-T-480: Radiobiological Dose Comparison of Single Fraction SRS, Multi-Fraction SRT and Multi-Stage SRS of Large Target Volumes Using the Linear-Quadratic Formula

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, C; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Meyer, J; Timmerman, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiobiological effect on large tumors and surrounding normal tissues from single fraction SRS, multi-fractionated SRT, and multi-staged SRS treatment. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with a centrally located large volume target (18.2 cm{sup 3}) was scanned using a 16 slice large bore CT simulator. Scans were imported to the Multiplan treatment planning system where a total prescription dose of 20Gy was used for a single, three staged and three fractionated treatment. Cyber Knife treatment plans were inversely optimized for the target volume to achieve at least 95% coverage of the prescription dose. For the multistage plan, the target was segmented into three subtargets having similar volume and shape. Staged plans for individual subtargets were generated based on a planning technique where the beam MUs of the original plan on the total target volume are changed by weighting the MUs based on projected beam lengths within each subtarget. Dose matrices for each plan were export in DICOM format and used to calculate equivalent dose distributions in 2Gy fractions using an alpha beta ratio of 10 for the target and 3 for normal tissue. Results: Singe fraction SRS, multi-stage plan and multi-fractionated SRT plans had an average 2Gy dose equivalent to the target of 62.89Gy, 37.91Gy and 33.68Gy, respectively. The normal tissue within 12Gy physical dose region had an average 2Gy dose equivalent of 29.55Gy, 16.08Gy and 13.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The single fraction SRS plan had the largest predicted biological effect for the target and the surrounding normal tissue. The multi-stage treatment provided for a more potent biologically effect on target compared to the multi-fraction SRT treatments with less biological normal tissue than single-fraction SRS treatment.

  6. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Dynamin at actin tails.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; De Camilli, Pietro

    2002-01-01

    Dynamin, the product of the shibire gene of Drosophila, is a GTPase critically required for endocytosis. Some studies have suggested a functional link between dynamin and the actin cytoskeleton. This link is of special interest, because there is evidence implicating actin dynamics in endocytosis. Here we show that endogenous dynamin 2, as well as green fluorescence protein fusion proteins of both dynamin 1 and 2, is present in actin comets generated by Listeria or by type I PIP kinase (PIPK) overexpression. In PIPK-induced tails, dynamin is further enriched at the interface between the tails and the moving organelles. Dynamin mutants harboring mutations in the GTPase domain inhibited nucleation of actin tails induced by PIPK and moderately reduced their speed. Although dynamin localization to the tails required its proline-rich domain, expression of a dynamin mutant lacking this domain also diminished tail formation. In addition, this mutant disrupted a membrane-associated actin scaffold (podosome rosette) previously shown to include dynamin. These findings suggest that dynamin is part of a protein network that controls nucleation of actin from membranes. At endocytic sites, dynamin may couple the fission reaction to the polymerization of an actin pool that functions in the separation of the endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane. PMID:11782545

  8. Nial-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Whittenberger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 mm to about 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAY and FeAl.

  9. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  10. Pseudosolid, shear-thinning gel formation in binary dispersions of metal oxide nanoparticles at low volume fractions.

    PubMed

    Weston, J S; Venkataramani, D; Aichele, C P; Grady, B P; Harwell, J; Resasco, D

    2014-12-16

    Hydroxyl groups on the surface of metal oxide nanoparticles (nps) can be protonated or deprotonated depending on solution pH, changing both the magnitude and sign of the nps' surface charge. Binary mixtures of fumed metal oxide nps, dispersed in water at a solution pH where one species is positively charged and the other is negatively charged, form pseudosolid gels at volume fractions as low as 1.5 vol %. This work maps out regions of gel formation for binary mixtures of silica and alumina nps, silica and titania nps, and alumina and titania nps. The microscopic structure of these gels is investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), acoustic spectroscopy, and light microscopy.

  11. MRI measurement of oxygen extraction fraction, mean vessel size and cerebral blood volume using serial hyperoxia and hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Germuska, Michael; Bulte, Daniel P

    2014-05-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging measures signal increases arising from a variety of interrelated effects and physiological sources. Recently there has been some success in disentangling this signal in order to quantify baseline physiological parameters, including the resting oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean vessel size. However, due to the complicated nature of the signal, each of these methods relies on certain physiological assumptions to derive a solution. In this work we present a framework for the simultaneous, voxelwise measurement of these three parameters. The proposed method removes the assumption of a fixed vessel size from the quantification of OEF and CBV, while simultaneously removing the need for an assumed OEF in the calculation of vessel size. The new framework is explored through simulations and validated with a pilot study in healthy volunteers. The MRI protocol uses a combined hyperoxia and hypercapnia paradigm with a modified spin labelling sequence collecting multi-slice gradient echo and spin echo data.

  12. Effect of fiber volume fraction on the off-crack-plane fracture energy in strain-hardening engineered cementitious composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maalej, M.; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Li, V.C.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper, the results of an experimental study on the effect of fiber volume fraction on the off-crack-plane fracture energy in a strain-hardening engineered cementitious composite (ECC) are presented. Unlike the well-known quasi-brittle behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete, ECC exhibits quasi-ductile response by developing a large damage zone prior to fracture localization. In the damage zone, the material is microcracked but continues to strain-harden locally. The areal dimension of the damage zone has been observed to be on the order of 1,000 cm{sup 2} in double cantilever beam specimens. The energy absorption of the off-crack-plane inelastic deformation process has been measured to be more than 50% of the total fracture energy of up to 34 kJ/m{sup 2}. This magnitude of fracture energy is the highest ever reported for a fiber cementitious composite.

  13. Quantifying uncertainty in soot volume fraction estimates using Bayesian inference of auto-correlated laser-induced incandescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwin, Paul J.; Sipkens, T. A.; Thomson, K. A.; Liu, F.; Daun, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Auto-correlated laser-induced incandescence (AC-LII) infers the soot volume fraction (SVF) of soot particles by comparing the spectral incandescence from laser-energized particles to the pyrometrically inferred peak soot temperature. This calculation requires detailed knowledge of model parameters such as the absorption function of soot, which may vary with combustion chemistry, soot age, and the internal structure of the soot. This work presents a Bayesian methodology to quantify such uncertainties. This technique treats the additional "nuisance" model parameters, including the soot absorption function, as stochastic variables and incorporates the current state of knowledge of these parameters into the inference process through maximum entropy priors. While standard AC-LII analysis provides a point estimate of the SVF, Bayesian techniques infer the posterior probability density, which will allow scientists and engineers to better assess the reliability of AC-LII inferred SVFs in the context of environmental regulations and competing diagnostics.

  14. Local shear stress and its correlation with local volume fraction in concentrated non-Brownian suspensions: lattice Boltzmann simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ki; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2014-12-01

    The local shear stress of non-Brownian suspensions was investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method coupled with the smoothed profile method. Previous studies have only focused on the bulk rheology of complex fluids because the local rheology of complex fluids was not accessible due to technical limitations. In this study, the local shear stress of two-dimensional solid particle suspensions in Couette flow was investigated with the method of planes to correlate non-Newtonian fluid behavior with the structural evolution of concentrated particle suspensions. Shear thickening was successfully captured for highly concentrated suspensions at high particle Reynolds number, and both the local rheology and local structure of the suspensions were analyzed. It was also found that the linear correlation between the local particle stress and local particle volume fraction was dramatically reduced during shear thickening. These results clearly show how the change in local structure of suspensions influences the local and bulk rheology of the suspensions. PMID:25615103

  15. Determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Reconstructed three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography is an accurate and reproducible method of assessing left ventricular (LV) functions. However, it has limitations for clinical study due to the requirement of complex computer and echocardiographic analysis systems, electrocardiographic/respiratory gating, and prolonged imaging times. Real-time 3-D echocardiography has a major advantage of conveniently visualizing the entire cardiac anatomy in three dimensions and of potentially accurately quantifying LV volumes, ejection fractions, and myocardial mass in patients even in the presence of an LV aneurysm. Although the image quality of the current real-time 3-D echocardiographic methods is not optimal, its widespread clinical application is possible because of the convenient and fast image acquisition. We review real-time 3-D echocardiographic image acquisition and quantitative analysis for the evaluation of LV function and LV mass.

  16. Quantifying axon diameter and intra-cellular volume fraction in excised mouse spinal cord with q-space imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Henry H.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2010-01-01

    Q-space magnetic resonance imaging (QSI) can quantify white matter (WM) axonal architecture at the cellular level non-destructively, unlike histology, but currently has several limitations. First, current methodology does not differentiate between diffusing molecules occupying extra- or intra-cellular spaces (ECS and ICS, respectively). Second, accurate assessment of axonal architecture requires high-gradient amplitudes not clinically available. Third, the only direct QSI marker of axonal architecture has been mean axon diameter (MAD), even though other direct markers would be valuable as well. The objective was to investigate three QSI-based methods that address the above limitations. Method 1 employs a two-compartment model to account for signal from ECS and ICS. Method 2 uses data only from low q-values thereby obviating the need for high-gradient amplitudes. Method 3 empirically estimates ICS volume fraction and provides an additional metric of axonal architecture. We implemented each method on data from excised healthy adult mouse spinal cords collected previously using a home-built 50T/m z-gradient yielding sub-micron displacement resolution. Through comparison with histology, each method was evaluated for accuracy in assessing axonal architecture. MAD measured with Methods 1 and 2 showed good correlation with histology (R2=0.99 (p<0.0001), and 0.77 (p<0.01), respectively) and Bland-Altman analysis indicates that measurements from the two methods are not significantly different from histology. The third method measured ICS volume fractions (0.64±0.07) that were highly correlated (R2=0.92, p<0.05) with measurements from histology (0.68±0.07). These methods may provide insight into axonal architecture in normal and abnormal WM tissue but additional validation with more samples will be needed. PMID:20350604

  17. Dissociation of F-actin induced by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C R; Amaral Júnior, J A; Abrahamsohn, P; Verjovski-Almeida, S

    1992-11-01

    F-actin purified from rabbit skeletal muscle undergoes reversible dissociation when subjected to hydrostatic pressures up to 240 MPa. Dissociation and reversibility were detected by the following procedures: fluorescence spectral changes observed under pressure, when either intrinsic tryptophan or pyrenyl emission of N-(1-pyrenyl)iodoacetamide-labeled actin were monitored; electron microscopy of samples fixed under pressure; size-exclusion HPLC of pressurized actin. The effect of pressure upon F-actin that had been polymerized in the presence of either Mg2+, Ca2+ or K+ was studied. The standard volume changes for the association of actin subunits, calculated from pressure/dissociation curves were 74 +/- 14 ml/mol for Mg-F-actin, 79 +/- 12 ml/mol for Ca-F-actin and 328 +/- 63 ml/mol for K-F-actin, indicating that actin subunits are packed differently in the polymer depending on which cation is present. All pressure/dissociation data could be fitted by a model for dissociation of a dimer, which suggests that in the F-actin filament there is a predominant intersubunit interaction interface, most likely the head-to-tail intrastrand interaction between two subunits which repeats itself along the polymer. A tenfold change in total protein concentration from 20 micrograms to 200 micrograms/ml Mg-F-actin did not cause a change in the pressure required for half-maximal dissociation. This indicates a heterogeneity of free energy of association among actin monomers in the Mg-F-actin polymer, suggesting that, in addition to the predominant intersubunit interaction, the disordered interactions in the filament significantly contribute to the heterogeneity of microenvironments in the interface between the subunits. PMID:1425683

  18. End-systolic Pressure–Volume Relation, Ejection Fraction, and Heart Failure: Theoretical Aspect and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shoucri, Rachad M

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical formalism describing the nonlinear end-systolic pressure–volume relation (ESPVR) is used to derive new indexes that can be used to assess the performance of the heart left ventricle by using the areas under the ESPVR (units of energy), the ordinates of the ESPVR (units of pressure), or from slopes of the curvilinear ESPVR. New relations between the ejection fraction (EF) and the parameters describing the ESPVR give some insight into the problem of heart failure (HF) with normal or preserved ejection fraction. Relations between percentage occurrence of HF and indexes derived from the ESPVR are also discussed. When ratios of pressures are used, calculation can be done in a noninvasive way with the possibility of interesting applications in routine clinical work. Applications to five groups of clinical data are given and discussed (normal group, aortic stenosis, aortic valvular regurgitation, mitral valvular regurgitation, miscellaneous cardiomyopathies). No one index allows a perfect segregation between all clinical groups, it is shown that appropriate use of two indexes (bivariate analysis) can lead to better separation of different clinical groups. PMID:26244035

  19. Actin Automata with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Adamatzky, Andy

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in eukaryotic. The actin filaments play the roles of cytoskeleton, motility units, information processing and learning. We model actin filament as a double chain of finite state machines, nodes, which take states “0” and “1”. The states are abstractions of absence and presence of a subthreshold charge on actin units corresponding to the nodes. All nodes update their state in parallel to discrete time. A node updates its current state depending on states of two closest neighbors in the node chain and two closest neighbors in the complementary chain. Previous models of actin automata consider momentary state transitions of nodes. We enrich the actin automata model by assuming that states of nodes depend not only on the current states of neighboring node but also on their past states. Thus, we assess the effect of memory of past states on the dynamics of acting automata. We demonstrate in computational experiments that memory slows down propagation of perturbations, decrease entropy of space-time patterns generated, transforms traveling localizations to stationary oscillators, and stationary oscillations to still patterns.

  20. Nuclear and cytoplasmic actin in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, M O; Ausseil, J; Géraud, M L

    1996-01-01

    Experiments using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-actin antibodies allowed us to demonstrate the presence of F- or G-actin in original protists, dinoflagellates, either by biochemistry, immunofluorescence and in TEM. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and immunoblottings made either from total or nuclear protein extracts revealed the presence of a 44-kDa band reacting with monoclonal anti-actin antibody in two species, Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii, and thus demonstrated the presence of actin in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. After squash preparation of P micans cells, actin was identified within the nucleus and in some regions of the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. Labelling of both the nucleolus and the centrosome region was evident together with amorphous nucleoplasmic material surrounding the chromosomes. The use of cryosections of intact P micans and C cohnii cells for immunofluorescence along with staining with DAPI to delineate the chromosomes themselves, yielded finer resolution of the intranuclear network labelling pattern and allowed us to complete our observations, in particular on the cytoplasmic labelling. In P micans, in addition to the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels passing through the nucleus in dividing cells are labelled. In C cohnii, the cortex, the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels, the region surrounding the nucleus, the filaments linking it to the cortex and the cleavage furrow are also labelled. In the nucleus of the two species, there is a prominent "weft' of fine actin filaments in the nucleoplasm forming a matrix of varying density around the persistent chromosomes. This actin matrix, of unknown function, is most conspicuous at the end of the S-phase of the cell cycle. Fluorescent derivatives of phalloidin, used as diagnostic cytochemical probes for polymeric actin (F-actin), gave similar results. Positive TEM immunolabelling of intranuclear actin confirms its presence in the nucleoplasm, in the

  1. The Molecular Evolution of Actin

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, Robin C.; Meagher, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular evolution of plant and nonplant actin genes comparing nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 20 actin genes. Nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid substitutions (replacement substitutions) ranged from 3–7% for all pairwise comparisons of animal actin genes with the following exceptions. Comparisons between higher animal muscle actin gene sequences and comparisons between higher animal cytoplasmic actin gene sequences indicated <3% divergence. Comparisons between plant and nonplant actin genes revealed, with two exceptions, 11–15% replacement substitution. In the analysis of plant actins, replacement substitution between soybean actin genes SAc1, SAc3, SAc4 and maize actin gene MAc1 ranged from 8–10%, whereas these members within the soybean actin gene family ranged from 6–9% replacement substitution. The rate of sequence divergence of plant actin sequences appears to be similar to that observed for animal actins. Furthermore, these and other data suggest that the plant actin gene family is ancient and that the families of soybean and maize actin genes have diverged from a single common ancestral plant actin gene that originated long before the divergence of monocots and dicots. The soybean actin multigene family encodes at least three classes of actin. These classes each contain a pair of actin genes that have been designated kappa (SAc1, SAc6), lambda (SAc2, SAc4) and mu (SAc3, SAc7). The three classes of soybean actin are more divergent in nucleotide sequence from one another than higher animal cytoplasmic actin is divergent from muscle actin. The location and distribution of amino acid changes were compared between actin proteins from all sources. A comparison of the hydropathy of all actin sequences, except from Oxytricha, indicated a strong similarity in hydropathic character between all plant and nonplant actins despite the greater number of replacement substitutions in plant actins. These protein sequence

  2. Recent achievements in measurements of soot volume fraction and temperatures in a coflow, diffuse Ethylene-air flame by visible image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huai-Chun; Lou, Chun; Lu, Jing

    2009-02-01

    In this review paper, the recent achievements in measurements of soot volume fraction and temperatures in a coflow, diffuse Ethylene-air flame by visible image processing are briefly outlined. For the inverse analysis of the radiative properties and temperatures, different methods show different features. The least-squares method, a regularization method and a linear programming method are all suitable for this problem, and a linear programming method can give more reasonable results. The red, green and blue flame images, which can be captured by some colour CCD camera, can be taken approximately as monochromatic images, and can be used to reconstruct temperature and soot volume fraction. But more ideal is the true monochromatic images filtered by filters at certain wavelengths. Finally, the optically-thin assumption, which is adopted widely, will cause large errors, about 100 K for temperature and 50% for soot volume fraction, as the absorption of the flame medium is neglected.

  3. Internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin subfragment-1 studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Arata, Toshiaki; Oda, Toshiro; Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Satoru

    2015-04-10

    Various biological functions related to cell motility are driven by the interaction between the partner proteins, actin and myosin. To obtain insights into how this interaction occurs, the internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin subfragment-1 (S1) were characterized by the quasielastic neutron scattering measurements on the solution samples of F-actin and S1. Contributions of the internal motions of the proteins to the scattering spectra were separated from those of the global macromolecular diffusion. Analysis of the spectra arising from the internal dynamics showed that the correlation times of the atomic motions were about two times shorter for F-actin than for S1, suggesting that F-actin fluctuates more rapidly than S1. It was also shown that the fraction of the immobile atoms is larger for S1 than for F-actin. These results suggest that F-actin actively facilitates the binding of myosin by utilizing the more frequent conformational fluctuations than those of S1. - Highlights: • We studied the internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin S1 by neutron scattering. • The correlation times of the atomic motions were smaller for F-actin than for S1. • The fraction of the immobile atoms was also smaller for F-actin than for S1. • Our results suggest that mobility of atoms in F-actin is higher than that in S1. • We propose that high flexibility of F-actin facilitates the binding of myosin.

  4. Quality-assured evaluation of effective porosity using fit-for-purpose estimates of clay-mineral volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Paul F.

    2010-05-01

    Reservoirs that contain dispersed clay minerals traditionally have been evaluated petrophysically using either the effective or the total porosity system. The major weakness of the former is its reliance on "shale" volume fraction ( Vsh) as a clay-mineral indicator in the determination of effective porosity from well logs. Downhole clay-mineral indicators have usually delivered overestimates of fractional clay-mineral volume ( Vcm) because they use as a reference nearby shale beds that are often assumed to comprise clay minerals exclusively, whereas those beds also include quartzitic silts and other detritus. For this reason, effective porosity is often underestimated significantly, and this shortfall transmits to computed hydrocarbons in place and thence to estimates of ultimate recovery. The problem is overcome here by using, as proxy groundtruths, core porosities that have been upscaled to match the spatial resolutions of porosity logs. Matrix and fluid properties are established over clean intervals in the usual way. Log-derived values of Vsh are tuned so that, on average, the resulting log-derived porosities match the corresponding core porosities over an evaluation interval. In this way, Vsh is rendered fit for purpose as an indicator of clay-mineral content Vcm for purposes of evaluating effective porosity. The method is conditioned to deliver a value of effective porosity that shows overall agreement with core porosity to within the limits of uncertainty of the laboratory measurements. This is achieved through function-, reservoir- and tool-specific Vsh reduction factors that can be applied to downhole estimates of clay-mineral content over uncored intervals of similar reservoir character. As expected, the reduction factors can also vary for different measurement conditions. The reduction factors lie in the range of 0.29-0.80, which means that in its raw form, log-derived Vsh can overestimate the clay-mineral content by more than a factor of three. This

  5. Intranuclear Actin Regulates Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Uzer, Gunes; Thompson, William R.; Styner, Maya; Wu, Xin; Rubin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton induces nuclear trafficking of regulatory proteins and global effects on gene transcription. We here show that in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cytochalasin D treatment causes rapid cofilin-/importin-9-dependent transfer of G-actin into the nucleus. The continued presence of intranuclear actin, which forms rod-like structures that stain with phalloidin, is associated with induction of robust expression of the osteogenic genes osterix and osteocalcin in a Runx2-dependent manner, and leads to acquisition of osteogenic phenotype. Adipogenic differentiation also occurs, but to a lesser degree. Intranuclear actin leads to nuclear export of Yes-associated protein (YAP); maintenance of nuclear YAP inhibits Runx2 initiation of osteogenesis. Injection of cytochalasin into the tibial marrow space of live mice results in abundant bone formation within the space of 1 week. In sum, increased intranuclear actin forces MSC into osteogenic lineage through controlling Runx2 activity; this process may be useful for clinical objectives of forming bone. PMID:26140478

  6. Volume fraction and location of voids and gaps in ultraconservative restorations by X-ray computed micro-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lagouvardos, Panagiotis; Nikolinakos, Nick; Oulis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volume fraction (Vf) and location of internal voids and gaps in relation to material type and cavity dimensions in ultraconservative restorations were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight round cavities of 1.3 mm mean diameter and 2.6 mm mean depth were made on buccal and lingual surfaces of recently extracted human teeth. These were filled and thermocycled with two low viscosity composites (AeliteFlo LV [AF], PermaFlo [PF]), one high viscosity composite (Aelite aesthetic enamel [AA]) and one glass-ionomer (GCFuji IX GP). X-ray microtomography, following a specific procedure, was applied to all cavities before and after their restoration, using SkyScan-1072 microtomographer. Vf percent (Vf%) and location of voids and gaps were recorded and analysed statistically at a = 0.05. Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's correlation analysis were used to analyze data. Results: Cavities filled with AF and PF showed significantly lower Vf % of voids and gaps than all other restorations (P < 0.05). Only for the cavities filled with AA, cavity width and depth was significantly correlated with Vf % (P < 0.05). 50-75% of the filled cavities contained internal voids regardless of the restorative material (P > 0.05). The proportion of cavities with gaps at the bottom and side walls was lower in those filled with AF and PF (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Cavities filled with low viscosity composites presented the lowest amount of internal voids and gaps. Glass-ionomer and high viscosity composite restorative materials showed the highest amount of interfacial gaps. Only in the high viscosity composite restorations the amount of voids and gaps correlated with the cavity depth, width and volume. PMID:26759587

  7. Simulation on simultaneous estimation of non-uniform temperature and soot volume fraction distributions in axisymmetric sooting flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yu-hua; Zhou, Huai-chun

    2005-02-01

    For visualizing non-uniform absorbing, emitting, non-scattering, axisymmetric sooting flames, because conventional two-color emission methods are no longer suitable, a three-color emission method for the simultaneous estimation of temperature and soot volume fraction distributions in these flames is studied in this paper. The spectral radiation intensities at wavelengths of red, green, and blue, which may be derived from color flame images, are simulated for the inverse analysis. Then the simultaneous estimation is carried out from the spectral radiation intensities by using a Newton-type iteration algorithm and the least-squares method. In this method, a factor is used to balance the wide variation of spectral radiation intensities due to both the wide ranges of temperature and wavelength of the flame radiation. The results indicate that the three-color method is suited for the reconstruction of flame structures with single or double peaks with small difference between the peak and valley. For a double-peaked flame structure with larger peak and valley difference, reasonable result can be obtained just when the mean square deviations of measurement data are small, for example, not more than 0.01.

  8. Drebrin Inhibits Cofilin-Induced Severing of F-Actin

    PubMed Central

    Grintsevich, Elena E.; Reisler, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Molecular cross-talk between neuronal drebrin A and cofilin is believed to be a part of the activity-dependent cytoskeleton-modulating pathway in dendritic spines. Impairments in this pathway are implicated also in synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, epilepsy, and normal aging. However, up to now the molecular interplay between cofilin and drebrin has not been elucidated. TIRF microscopy and solution experiments revealed that full length drebrin A or its actin binding core (Drb1-300) inhibits, but do not abolish cofilin-induced severing of actin filaments. Cosedimentation experiments showed that F-actin can be fully occupied with combination of these two proteins. The dependence of cofilin binding on fractional saturation of actin filaments with drebrin suggests direct competition between these two proteins for F-actin binding. This implies that cofilin and drebrin can either overcome or reverse the allosteric changes in F-actin induced by the competitor’s binding. The ability of cofilin to displace drebrin from actin filaments is pH dependent and is facilitated at acidic pH (6.8). Pre-steady state kinetic experiments reveal that both binding and dissociation of drebrin to/from actin filaments is faster than that reported for cooperative binding of cofilin. We found, that drebrin displacement by cofilin is greatly inhibited when actin severing is abolished, which might be linked to the cooperativity of drebrin binding to actin filaments. Our results contribute to molecular understanding of the competitive interactions of drebrin and cofilin with actin filaments. PMID:25047716

  9. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials.

  10. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  11. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  12. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  13. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young's modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility.

  14. Bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy are better determinants of trabecular bone stiffness than other morphological variables.

    PubMed

    Maquer, Ghislain; Musy, Sarah N; Wandel, Jasmin; Gross, Thomas; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-06-01

    As our population ages, more individuals suffer from osteoporosis. This disease leads to impaired trabecular architecture and increased fracture risk. It is essential to understand how morphological and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone are related. Morphology-elasticity relationships based on bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric anisotropy explain up to 98% of the variation in elastic properties. Yet, other morphological variables such as individual trabeculae segmentation (ITS) and trabecular bone score (TBS) could improve the stiffness predictions. A total of 743 micro-computed tomography (μCT) reconstructions of cubic trabecular bone samples extracted from femur, radius, vertebrae, and iliac crest were analyzed. Their morphology was assessed via 25 variables and their stiffness tensor (CFE) was computed from six independent load cases using micro finite element (μFE) analyses. Variance inflation factors were calculated to evaluate collinearity between morphological variables and decide upon their inclusion in morphology-elasticity relationships. The statistically admissible morphological variables were included in a multiple linear regression model of the dependent variable CFE. The contribution of each independent variable was evaluated (ANOVA). Our results show that BV/TV is the best determinant of CFE(r(2) adj  = 0.889), especially in combination with fabric anisotropy (r(2) adj  = 0.968). Including the other independent predictors hardly affected the amount of variance explained by the model (r(2) adj  = 0.975). Across all anatomical sites, BV/TV explained 87% of the variance of the bone elastic properties. Fabric anisotropy further described 10% of the bone stiffness, but the improvement in variance explanation by adding other independent factors was marginal (<1%). These findings confirm that BV/TV and fabric anisotropy are the best determinants of trabecular bone stiffness and show, against common belief, that other

  15. Effects of Cr and B Contents on Volume Fraction of (Cr,Fe)2B and Hardness in Fe-Based Alloys Used for Powder Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Jeonghyeon; Lee, Hyuk-Joong; Jeon, Changwoo; Ha, Dae Jin; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Sunghak; Shin, Yang Su

    2012-07-01

    In the current study, Fe-based alloys were used for powder injection molding (PIM) parts with various qualities and hardness ranges by varying chemical compositions according to thermodynamically calculated phase diagrams. Their microstructure and hardness values were analyzed and compared with those of the PIM specimens made from conventional Fe-based alloy powders or stainless steel powders. The Cr-to-B ratio ( X Cr/ X B) and the sum of Fe, Cr, and B content ( X Fe+ X Cr+ X B) were varied to design nine Fe-based alloy compositions based on the composition of Armacor "M" alloy powders (Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA). According to the microstructural analysis results of the cast and heat-treated Fe-based alloys, large amounts of (Cr,Fe)2B were formed in the tempered martensite matrix. The volume fraction of (Cr,Fe)2B was varied from 42 pct to 91 pct with alloy compositions, and these results were well matched with the thermodynamically calculated volume fractions of (Cr,Fe)2B. The hardness of the fabricated alloys was varied from 300 VHN to 1600 VHN with alloy compositions, and this value increased linearly with the increasing volume fraction of (Cr,Fe)2B. From the correlation data between the volume fraction of (Cr,Fe)2B and hardness, the high-temperature equilibrium phase diagram, which could be used for the design of Fe-based alloys with various fractions and hardness values of (Cr,Fe)2B, was made.

  16. Guardians of the actin monomer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Robinson, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a universal force provider in eukaryotic cells. Biological processes harness the pressure generated from actin polymerization through dictating the time, place and direction of filament growth. As such, polymerization is initiated and maintained via tightly controlled filament nucleation and elongation machineries. Biological systems integrate force into their activities through recruiting and activating these machineries. In order that actin function as a common force generating polymerization motor, cells must maintain a pool of active, polymerization-ready monomeric actin, and minimize extemporaneous polymerization. Maintenance of the active monomeric actin pool requires the recycling of actin filaments, through depolymerization, nucleotide exchange and reloading of the polymerization machineries, while the levels of monomers are constantly monitored and supplemented, when needed, via the access of a reserve pool of monomers and through gene expression. Throughout its monomeric life, actin needs to be protected against gratuitous nucleation events. Here, we review the proteins that act as custodians of monomeric actin. We estimate their levels on a tissue scale, and calculate the implied concentrations of each actin complex based on reported binding affinities. These estimations predict that monomeric actin is rarely, if ever, alone. Thus, the guardians keep the volatility of actin in check, so that its explosive power is only released in the controlled environments of the nucleation and polymerization machineries. PMID:24268205

  17. Assessment of vasodilator therapy in patients with severe congestive heart failure: limitations of measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, B.G.; Dehmer, G.J.; Markham, R.V. Jr.; Willerson, J.T.; Hillis, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    Although noninvasive techniques are often used to assess the effect of vasodilator therapy in patients with congestive heart failure, it is unknown whether changes in noninvasively determined left ventricular ejection fraction, volume, or dimension reliably reflect alterations in intracardiac pressure and flow. Accordingly, we compared the acute effect of sodium nitroprusside on left ventricular volume and ejection fraction (determined scintigraphically) with its effect on intracardiac pressure and forward cardiac index (determined by thermodilution) in 12 patients with severe, chronic congestive heart failure and a markedly dilated left ventricle. Nitroprusside (infused at 1.3 +/- 1.1 (mean +/- standard deviation) microgram/kg/min) caused a decrease in mean systemic arterial, mean pulmonary arterial, and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure as well as a concomitant increase in forward cardiac index. Simultaneously, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes decreased, but the scintigraphically determined cardiac index did not change significantly. Left ventricular ejection fraction averaged 0.19 +/- 0.05 before nitroprusside administration and increased by less than 0.05 units in response to nitroprusside in 11 of 12 patients. The only significant correlation between scintigraphically and invasively determined variables was that between the percent change in end-diastolic volume index and the percent change in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (r . 0.68, p . 0.01). Although nitroprusside produced changes in scintigraphically determined left ventricular ejection fraction, end-systolic volume index, and cardiac index, these alterations bore no predictable relation to changes in intracardiac pressure, forward cardiac index, or vascular resistance. Furthermore, nitroprusside produced a considerably greater percent change in the invasively measured variables than in the scintigraphically determined ones.

  18. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  19. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  20. Actin dynamics in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ballestrem, C; Wehrle-Haller, B; Imhof, B A

    1998-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton maintains the cellular architecture and mediates cell movements. To explore actin cytoskeletal dynamics, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was fused to human &bgr ;-actin. The fusion protein was incorporated into actin fibers which became depolymerized upon cytochalasin B treatment. This functional EGFP-actin construct enabled observation of the actin cytoskeleton in living cells by time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Stable expression of the construct was obtained in mammalian cell lines of different tissue origins. In stationary cells, actin rich, ring-like structured 'actin clouds' were observed in addition to stress fibers. These ruffle-like structures were found to be involved in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. In migratory cells, EGFP-actin was found in the advancing lamellipodium. Immobile actin spots developed in the lamellipodium and thin actin fibers formed parallel to the leading edge. Thus EGFP-actin expressed in living cells unveiled structures involved in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Fullerenol Nanoparticles with Structural Activity Induce Variable Intracellular Actin Filament Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junjiang; Dong, Ying; Wang, Ying; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Bai, Xue; Chang, Yanan; Zhang, Mingyi; Chen, Kui; Li, Juan; Zhao, Lina; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    Fullerenol nanoparticles are promising for various biological applications; many studies have shown that they induce variable and diverse biological effects including side effects. Separation and purification of two fractions of fullerenols has demonstrated that they have varied chemical structures on the surfaces of their carbon cages. Actin is an important structural protein that is able to transform functional structures under varied physiological conditions. We assessed the abilities of the two fractions of fullerenols to attach to actin and induce variable morphological features in actin filament structures. Specifically the fullerenol fraction with a surface electric charge of -1.913 ± 0.008q (x10(-6) C) has percentages of C-OH and C=O on the carbon cage of 16.14 ± 0.60 and 17.55 ± 0.69. These features allow it to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with actin at a stoichiometric ratio of four fullerenols per actin subunit. Molecular simulations revealed these specific binding sites and binding modes in atomic details in the interaction between the active fullerenol and actin filament. Conversely, these interactions were not possible for the other fraction of fullerenol with that percentages of C-OH and C=O on the carbon cage were 15.59 ± 0.01 and 1.94 ± 0.11. Neither sample induced appreciable cytotoxicity or acute cell death. After entering cells, active fullerenol binding to actin induces variable morphological features and may transform ATP-actin to ADP-actin. These changes facilitate the binding of ADF/cofilin, allowing cofilin to sever actin filaments to form cofilin/actin/fullerenol rods. Our findings suggest that fullerenol with structural activity binding disturbs actin filament structure, which may inhibit locomotion of cell or induce chronic side effects in to cells. PMID:27319217

  2. Simultaneous, noninvasive measurements of convective heat transfer and solid volume fraction at the wall of an entrained gas-solid suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, A. Elizabeth; Louge, Michel; Mohd-Yusof, Jamaludin

    2000-07-01

    We describe an instrument for local, instantaneous, noninvasive, simultaneous measurements of solid volume fraction and convective heat transfer at the wall of a vertical tube containing a relatively dense, entrained suspension of gas and fine solids. The instrument combines a small platinum coil and a guarded capacitance sensor. The capacitance sensor records instantaneous solid volume fraction in the near vicinity of the wall. The coil is maintained at constant temperature by a rapid anemometer bridge circuit. The vessel is wrapped in electric heaters to avoid artificially high rates associated with developing heat transfer and to minimize conduction losses from the coil. Using a model capturing these losses, convective heat transfer rates are inferred from the power input to the coil. The instrument is tested in a cold circulating fluidized bed riser. The temporal response of the thermal sensor is faster than 30 ms. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  4. Wear Behavior of Al-Mg2Si Cast In-situ Composite: Effect of Mg2Si Different Volume Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiasinejad, J.; Emamy, M.; Ghorbani, M. R.; Malekan, A.

    2010-06-01

    Al-Mg2Si in situ composites are great candidates for automobile brake discs due to their low density, reasonably high young's modulus and low thermal expansion coefficient. Thus, understanding wear properties of this composite is of a great importance. In this study wear behavior of an in-situ Al-Mg2Si composite, prepared from a simple casting route, has been investigated using a pin-on-disc configuration concerning the effect of Mg2Si volume fractions, 15, 20 and 25% respectively. It was found that the weight loss increases with increase in reinforce volume fraction which can be due to a coarse morphology of primary Mg2Si particles. It was found that the variations of weight loss with sliding distance comprise different regimes of which the mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Adjustable magnetoelectric effect of self-assembled vertical multiferroic nanocomposite films by the in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huaping; Chai, Guozhong; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Zheng; Kitamura, Takayuki; Zhou, Haomiao

    2014-03-21

    The strain-mediated magnetoelectric (ME) property of self-assembled vertical multiferroic nanocomposite films epitaxially grown on cubic substrates was calculated by a nonlinear thermodynamic theory combined with the elastic theory. The dependent relations of phase state of ferroelectric films with the in-plane misfit strain, out-of-plane misfit strain, temperature, and volume fraction of ferromagnetic phase were confirmed. The effects of in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction on the polarization and dielectric constant of ferroelectric films at room temperature were elaborately analyzed for the vertical BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and PbTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films. Our calculated results confirmed the relationship among ME effect and in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction in the nanocomposite films. The ME voltage coefficients of vertical BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and PbTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films displayed various maximums and abrupt points at special phases and phase transition boundaries. The ME voltage coefficients of lead-free BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films epitaxially grown on different substrates could reach a comparative value of ∼2 V·cm{sup −1}·Oe{sup −1} under the controllable in-plane misfit strain induced by substrate clamping. Our results provided an available method for the optimal design of vertical multiferroic nanocomposites with adjustable ME effect by optimizing the ferromagnetic volume fraction and substrate type.

  6. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  7. Possible association of actin filaments with chloroplasts of spinach mesophyll cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kumatani, T; Sakurai-Ozato, N; Miyawaki, N; Yokota, E; Shimmen, T; Terashima, I; Takagi, S

    2006-11-01

    In palisade mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) kept under low-intensity white light, chloroplasts were apparently immobile and seemed to be surrounded by fine bundles of actin filaments. High-intensity blue light induced actin-dependent chloroplast movement concomitant with the appearance of a couple of long, straight bundles of actin filaments in each cell, whereas high-intensity red light was essentially ineffective in inducing these responses. The actin organization observed under low-intensity white light has been postulated to function in anchoring chloroplasts at proper intracellular positions through direct interaction with the chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts, which retained their outer envelopes, were isolated after homogenization of leaves and Percoll centrifugation. No endogenous actin was detected by immunoblotting in the final intact-chloroplast fraction prepared from the leaves kept under low-intensity white light or in darkness. In cosedimentation assays with exogenously added skeletal muscle filamentous actin, however, actin was detected in the intact-chloroplast fraction precipitated after low-speed centrifugation. The association of actin with chloroplasts was apparently dependent on incubation time and chloroplast density. After partial disruption of the outer envelope of isolated chloroplasts by treatment with trypsin, actin was no longer coprecipitated. The results suggest that chloroplasts in spinach leaves can directly interact with actin, and that this interaction may be involved in the regulation of intracellular positioning of chloroplasts.

  8. [Effect of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas on the adsorption behaviors adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon and kinetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji-xian; Wang, Tie-feng; Wang, Jin-fu

    2010-05-01

    The influence of SO2 dynamic adsorption behaviors using ZL50 activated carbon for flue gas desulphurization and denitrification under different SO2 volume fraction was investigated experimentally, and the kinetic analysis was conducted by kinetic models. With the increase of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas, the SO2 removal ratio and the activity ratio of ZL50 activated carbon decreased, respectively, and SO2 adsorption rate and capacity increased correspondingly. The calculated results indicate that Bangham model has the best prediction effect, the chemisorption processes of SO2 was significantly affected by catalytic oxidative reaction. The adsorption rate constant of Lagergren's pseudo first order model increased with the increase of inlet SO, volume fraction, which indicated that catalytic oxidative reaction of SO2 adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon may be the rate controlling step in earlier adsorption stage. The Lagergren's and Bangham's initial adsorption rate were deduced and defined, respectively. The Ho's and Elovich's initial adsorption rate were also deduced in this paper. The Bangham's initial adsorption rate values were defined in good agreement with those of experiments. The defined Bangham's adsorptive reaction kinetic model can describe the SO2 dynamic adsorption rate well. The studied results indicated that the SO2 partial order of initial reaction rate was one or adjacent to one, while the O2 and water vapor partial order of initial reaction rate were constants ranging from 0.15-0.20 and 0.45-0.50, respectively.

  9. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine. PMID:26881098

  10. Role of gelsolin in actin depolymerization of adherent human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J S; Coburn, J P; Tauber, A I; Zaner, K S

    1997-01-01

    Human neutrophils generally function adherent to an extracellular matrix. We have previously reported that upon adhesion to laminin- or fibronectin-coated, but not uncoated, plastic there is a depolymerization of actin in neutrophils. This phenomenon was not affected by inhibitors of the more well-studied components of the signal transduction pathway, specifically, pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G-proteins, H-7 or staurosporine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, or herbimycin A, an inhibitor of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. We therefore focused our attention on actin-binding proteins and measured the changes in the partitioning of gelsolin between the Triton X-100-soluble and -insoluble cellular fractions which occur upon neutrophil adhesion by means of quantitating anti-gelsolin antibody binding to aliquots of these fractions. It was found that approximately 90% of the total cellular gelsolin was found in the Triton X-100-soluble fraction in suspended cells, but that upon adherence to either fibronectin- or laminin-coated plastic about 40% of the soluble gelsolin could be detected in the insoluble fraction. This effect was not observed in cells adherent to uncoated plastic, wherein more than 90% of the gelsolin was found in the soluble fraction. Results of immunofluorescence microscopy of these cell preparations was consistent with this data. A gelsolin translocation to the insoluble cellular actin network may account for a part of the observed actin depolymerization. Images PMID:9017600

  11. The nuclear F-actin interactome of Xenopus oocytes reveals an actin-bundling kinesin that is essential for meiotic cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Samwer, Matthias; Dehne, Heinz-Jürgen; Spira, Felix; Kollmar, Martin; Gerlich, Daniel W; Urlaub, Henning; Görlich, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Nuclei of Xenopus laevis oocytes grow 100 000-fold larger in volume than a typical somatic nucleus and require an unusual intranuclear F-actin scaffold for mechanical stability. We now developed a method for mapping F-actin interactomes and identified a comprehensive set of F-actin binders from the oocyte nuclei. Unexpectedly, the most prominent interactor was a novel kinesin termed NabKin (Nuclear and meiotic actin-bundling Kinesin). NabKin not only binds microtubules but also F-actin structures, such as the intranuclear actin bundles in prophase and the contractile actomyosin ring during cytokinesis. The interaction between NabKin and F-actin is negatively regulated by Importin-β and is responsive to spatial information provided by RanGTP. Disconnecting NabKin from F-actin during meiosis caused cytokinesis failure and egg polyploidy. We also found actin-bundling activity in Nabkin's somatic paralogue KIF14, which was previously shown to be essential for somatic cell division. Our data are consistent with the notion that NabKin/KIF14 directly link microtubules with F-actin and that such link is essential for cytokinesis. PMID:23727888

  12. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles. PMID:25219775

  13. Actin Assembly at Model-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Heath, George R.; Johnson, Benjamin R.G.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Connell, Simon D.; Evans, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the use of supported lipid bilayers to reveal dynamics of actin polymerization from a nonpolymerizing subphase via cationic phospholipids. Using varying fractions of charged lipid, lipid mobility, and buffer conditions, we show that dynamics at the nanoscale can be used to control the self-assembly of these structures. In the case of fluid-phase lipid bilayers, the actin adsorbs to form a uniform two-dimensional layer with complete surface coverage whereas gel-phase bilayers induce a network of randomly oriented actin filaments, of lower coverage. Reducing the pH increased the polymerization rate, the number of nucleation events, and the total coverage of actin. A model of the adsorption/diffusion process is developed to provide a description of the experimental data and shows that, in the case of fluid-phase bilayers, polymerization arises equally due to the adsorption and diffusion of surface-bound monomers and the addition of monomers directly from the solution phase. In contrast, in the case of gel-phase bilayers, polymerization is dominated by the addition of monomers from solution. In both cases, the filaments are stable for long times even when the G-actin is removed from the supernatant—making this a practical approach for creating stable lipid-actin systems via self-assembly. PMID:24268147

  14. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  15. The effects of formins on the conformation of subdomain 1 in actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Ujfalusi, Zoltán; Barkó, Szilvia; Hild, Gábor; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2010-01-21

    In this study we investigated the effects of formins on the conformation of actin filaments by using the method of fluorescence quenching. Actin was labelled with IAEDANS at Cys(374) and the quencher was acrylamide. The results showed that formin binding induced structural changes in the subdomain 1 of actin protomers which were reflected by greater quenching constants (K(SV)). Simultaneously the fraction of the fluorophore population accessible for the quencher (alpha) decreased. These observations suggest that the conformational distribution characteristic for the actin protomers became broader after the binding of formins, for which the structural framework was provided by a more flexible protein matrix in the microenvironment of the label. The effects of formins depended on the formin:actin molar ratio, and also on the ionic strength of the medium. These observations are in agreement with previous results and underline the importance of the intramolecular conformational changes induced by formins in the structure of actin filaments.

  16. {sup 11}C-methionine PET improves the target volume delineation of meningiomas treated with stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Astner, Sabrina T.; Adam, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) in target volume delineation for meningiomas and to determine the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Two independent observers performed treatment planning in 10 patients according to a prospective written protocol. In the first step, they used coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the second step, MET-PET was added to CT/MRI (image fusion based on mutual information). Results: The correlation between gross tumor volume (GTVs) delineated by the two observers based on CT/MRI was r = 0.855 (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p = 0.002) and r = 0.988 (p = 0.000) when MET-PET/CT/MRI were used. The number of patients with agreement in more then 80% of the outlined volume increased with the availability of MET-PET from 1 in 10 to 5 in 10. The median volume of intersection between the regions delineated by two observers increased significantly from 69% (from the composite volume) to 79%, by the addition of MET-PET (p = 0.005). The information of MET-PET was useful to delineate GTV in the area of cavernous sinus, orbit, and base of the skull. Conclusions: The hypothesis-generating findings of potential normal tissue sparing and reduced interobserver variability provide arguments for invasive studies of the correlation between MET-PET images and histologic tumor extension and for prospective trials of target volume delineation with CT/MRI/MET-PET image fusion.

  17. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Effect of volume fraction and size of fine-gamma prime particles on raising the creep strength of a DS nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. L.; Yao, D. L.; Lin, X. J.; Sun, C. Q.

    1986-01-01

    The creep behavior of a directionally solidifified nickel-base superalloy, DKS3, has been investigated as a function of the volume fraction and size of the gamma-prime phase at 760 and 950 C. The dislocation structure and morphology of gamma-prime was examined by transmission electron microscopy at the primary, secondary and tertiary creep stages at 73.8 kgf/sq mm. Experimental results are described in terms of a high temperature creep model in the range of temperatures and applied stresses where shearing of the gamma-prime phase does not control the straining process.

  19. Thermal Cycle Stability of a Novel Glass-Mica Composite Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effect of Glass Volume Fraction and Stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2005-12-01

    A novel glass-mica composite seal was developed based on a previously of ''infiltrated'' mica seals for solid oxide fuel cells. Ba-Al-Ca silicate sealing glass-mica composite seals. The seals were leak tested for short-term thermal cyfunction of glass volume fraction. Composite seals with 10 v% and 20 v% glatested under compressive stresses from 3 psi to 100 psi and voltage tests on dense 8YSZ electrolyte with the glas-mica composite seal showed very good thermal cycle stability.

  20. On the influence of local fluctuations in volume fraction of constituents on the effective properties of nonlinear composites. Application to porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gărăjeu, M.; Suquet, P.

    2007-04-01

    Composite materials often exhibit local fluctuations in the volume fraction of their individual constituents. This paper studies the influence of such small fluctuations on the effective properties of composites. A general asymptotic expansion of these properties in terms of powers of the amplitude of the fluctuations is given first. Then, this general result is applied to porous materials. As is well-known, the effective yield surface of ductile voided materials is accurately described by Gurson's criterion. Suitable extensions for viscoplastic solids have also been proposed. The question addressed in the present study pertains to nonuniform distributions of voids in a typical volume element or in other words to the presence of matrix-rich and pore-rich zones in the material. It is shown numerically and analytically that such deviations from a uniform distribution result in a weakening of the macroscopic carrying capacity of the material.

  1. Do X-ray determined cardiac volume and signs of congestive heart failure provide additional prognostic information after myocardial infarction if the left ventricular ejection fraction is known?

    PubMed

    Rollag, A; Mangschau, A; Jonsbu, J; Aase, O; Nerdrum, H J; Erikssen, J

    1989-04-01

    Cardiac volume (CV) was measured and indices of pulmonary congestion (PCG) were judged from routine chest films taken post myocardial infarction (AMI) in a consecutive series of 477 patients (340 first and 137 recurrent AMIs). Cardiac volume (CV) and signs of PCG were compared to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), measured with isotope technique, and the prognostic value of all the parameters was assessed after 1 and 5 years. The accuracy of CV and PCG in predicting impaired LVEF was low (62% and 50% respectively). Although specificity is suboptimal, however, these parameters provided valuable prognostic information. For example, patients with signs of PCG had a very high 1 and 5 years' mortality, and two-thirds of those who died during the first year of observation had enlarged CV. The independent value of LVEF determination was mainly observed in re-AMI patients. A more restricted use of this expensive procedure may therefore be recommended. PMID:2498456

  2. Macromolecular crowding gives rise to microviscosity, anomalous diffusion and accelerated actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Rafi; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Raghunath, Michael; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    Macromolecular crowding (MMC) has been used in various in vitro experimental systems to mimic in vivo physiology. This is because the crowded cytoplasm of cells contains many different types of solutes dissolved in an aqueous medium. MMC in the extracellular microenvironment is involved in maintaining stem cells in their undifferentiated state (niche) as well as in aiding their differentiation after they have travelled to new locations outside the niche. MMC at physiologically relevant fractional volume occupancies (FVOs) significantly enhances the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during chemically induced adipogenesis. The mechanism by which MMC produces this enhancement is not entirely known. In the context of extracellular collagen deposition, we have recently reported the importance of optimizing the FVO while minimizing the bulk viscosity. Two opposing properties will determine the net rate of a biochemical reaction: the negative effect of bulk viscosity and the positive effect of the excluded volume, the latter being expressed by the FVO. In this study we have looked more closely at the effect of viscosity on reaction rates. We have used fluorimetry to measure the rate of actin polymerization and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure diffusion of various probes in solutions containing the crowder Ficoll at physiological concentrations. Similar to its effect on collagen, Ficoll enhanced the actin polymerization rate despite increasing the bulk viscosity. Our FCS measurements reveal a relatively minor component of anomalous diffusion. In addition, our measurements do suggest that microviscosity becomes relevant in a crowded environment. We ruled out bulk viscosity as a cause of the rate enhancement by performing the actin polymerization assay in glycerol. These opposite effects of Ficoll and glycerol led us to conclude that microviscosity becomes relevant at the length scale of the reacting

  3. Macromolecular crowding gives rise to microviscosity, anomalous diffusion and accelerated actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Rafi; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Raghunath, Michael; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-04-30

    Macromolecular crowding (MMC) has been used in various in vitro experimental systems to mimic in vivo physiology. This is because the crowded cytoplasm of cells contains many different types of solutes dissolved in an aqueous medium. MMC in the extracellular microenvironment is involved in maintaining stem cells in their undifferentiated state (niche) as well as in aiding their differentiation after they have travelled to new locations outside the niche. MMC at physiologically relevant fractional volume occupancies (FVOs) significantly enhances the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during chemically induced adipogenesis. The mechanism by which MMC produces this enhancement is not entirely known. In the context of extracellular collagen deposition, we have recently reported the importance of optimizing the FVO while minimizing the bulk viscosity. Two opposing properties will determine the net rate of a biochemical reaction: the negative effect of bulk viscosity and the positive effect of the excluded volume, the latter being expressed by the FVO. In this study we have looked more closely at the effect of viscosity on reaction rates. We have used fluorimetry to measure the rate of actin polymerization and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure diffusion of various probes in solutions containing the crowder Ficoll at physiological concentrations. Similar to its effect on collagen, Ficoll enhanced the actin polymerization rate despite increasing the bulk viscosity. Our FCS measurements reveal a relatively minor component of anomalous diffusion. In addition, our measurements do suggest that microviscosity becomes relevant in a crowded environment. We ruled out bulk viscosity as a cause of the rate enhancement by performing the actin polymerization assay in glycerol. These opposite effects of Ficoll and glycerol led us to conclude that microviscosity becomes relevant at the length scale of the reacting

  4. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  5. Effects of particle size distribution, shape and volume fraction of aggregates on the wall effect of concrete via random sequential packing of polydispersed ellipsoidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. X.; Lv, Z.; Chen, H. S.

    2013-02-01

    Concrete can be viewed as granular materials at the mesoscopic level. A specific distribution of aggregate particles in boundary layers, known as the wall effect, plays an important role in the mechanical properties and durability of concrete. However, the detailed and systematic experimental and simulated data about the wall effect of concrete is hardly adequate yet. Specially, the modeling study of spherical and two-dimensional (2D) elliptical aggregates distribution for the wall effect has been focused on in previous work, little is known about three-dimensional (3D) ellipsoidal aggregates. In the present work, based on a mesostructure model of concrete, the wall effect of concrete is quantified by configuration parameters such as the volume fraction, the specific surface area and the meaning free spacing of the solid phase. In addition, the influences of ellipsoidal particle size distribution (EPSD), shape and volume fraction (Vf) of ellipsoidal aggregates on the configuration parameters are evaluated by stereological methods and serial section analysis technique. Furthermore, the effect mechanisms of EPSD, shape and Vf are analyzed and discussed in this paper. The reliability of the statistical results is verified by experimental data and theoretical analytical results.

  6. A novel local thresholding algorithm for trabecular bone volume fraction mapping in the limited spatial resolution regime of in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Vasilic, Branimir; Wehrli, Felix W

    2005-12-01

    Recent advances in micro-magnetic resonance imaging have shown the possibility of in vivo assessment of trabecular bone architecture. However, the small feature size and relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achievable in vivo cause the intensity histogram to be unimodal. The critical first step in the processing of these images is the extraction of bone volume fraction for each voxel. Here, we propose a local threshold algorithm (LTA) that determines the marrow intensity value in the neighborhood of each voxel based on nearest-neighbor statistics. Using the local marrow intensities we threshold the image and scale the intensities of voxels partially occupied by bone to produce a marrow volume fraction map of the trabecular bone region. We show that structural parameters derived with the LTA are highly correlated with those obtained with the previously published histogram deconvolution algorithm (HDA) and that the LTA is robust to image noise corruption. The LTA is found to correctly identify trabeculae with a significantly higher reliability than HDA. Finally, we demonstrate that the LTA is superior in preserving connectivity by showing for 75 in vivo images that the genus of the trabecular bone surface is always higher than when processed with the HDA.

  7. Regulation of an Actin Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Barney; Shin, Jennifer; Brau, Ricardo; Lang, Matthew; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-03-01

    To produce motion, cells rely on the conversion of potential energy into mechanical work. One such example is the dramatic process involving the acrosome reaction of Limulus sperm, whereby a 60 μm-long bundle of actin filaments straightens from a coiled conformation to extend out of the cell in five seconds. This cellular engine and the motion it produces represent a third type of actin-based motility fundamentally different from polymerization or myosin-driven processes. The motive force for this extension originates from stored elastic energy in the overtwisted, pre-formed coil---much like a compressed mechanical spring. When the actin bundle untwists, this energy is converted to mechanical work powering the extension. We report on experiments probing the regulation of this actin spring by extracellular calcium. We find that extracellular calcium needs to be present for the spring to activate, and that calcium regulates the velocity of the extension.

  8. Impact of Volume Fraction and Size of Reinforcement Particles on the Grain Size in Metal-Matrix Micro and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Lopez, Hugo F.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Cho, Kyu; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2014-08-01

    In metal-matrix micro and nanocomposites (MMCs and MMNCs), the presence and interactions of various strengthening mechanisms are not well understood, but grain boundary strengthening is considered as one of the primary means of improving the yield strength of composites. Owing to the importance of grain size on mechanical properties, it is necessary to be able to describe how incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) in both powder metallurgy (PM) and solidification processing (SP) affects this critical property. In the present work, we provide a basis for an empirical equation that relates particle fraction and particle size to MMNC grain size for both PM and SP synthesis methods. The model suggests that NPs retard grain coarsening in PM MMNCs and also seems to describe the effect of reinforcement concentration on grain size in SP MMCs and MMNCs.

  9. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multi-frequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Hunkeler, P. A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise and accumulate beneath nearby sea ice to form a several meter thick sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator for ice - ocean interactions. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and sub-ice platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions from platelet-layer conductivities using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drill-hole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction also yielded plausible results. Our findings imply that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties. However, we emphasize that the successful application of this technique requires a break with traditional EM sensor calibration strategies due to the need of absolute calibration with respect to a physical forward model.

  10. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  11. Three's company: the fission yeast actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kovar, David R; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    How the actin cytoskeleton assembles into different structures to drive diverse cellular processes is a fundamental cell biological question. In addition to orchestrating the appropriate combination of regulators and actin-binding proteins, different actin-based structures must insulate themselves from one another to maintain specificity within a crowded cytoplasm. Actin specification is particularly challenging in complex eukaryotes where a multitude of protein isoforms and actin structures operate within the same cell. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe possesses a single actin isoform that functions in three distinct structures throughout the cell cycle. In this review we explore recent studies in fission yeast that help unravel how different actin structures operate in cells.

  12. Structural insights into de novo actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many cellular functions depend on rapid and localized actin polymerization/depolymerization. Yet, the de novo polymerization of actin in cells is kinetically unfavorable because of the instability of polymerization intermediates (small actin oligomers) and the actions of actin monomer binding proteins. Cells use filament nucleation and elongation factors to initiate and sustain polymerization. Structural biology is beginning to shed light on the diverse mechanisms by which these unrelated proteins initiate polymerization, undergo regulation, and mediate the transition of monomeric actin onto actin filaments. A prominent role is played by the W domain, which in some of these proteins occurs in tandem repeats that recruit multiple actin subunits. Pro-rich regions are also abundant and mediate the binding of profilin-actin complexes, which are the main source of polymerization competent actin in cells. Filament nucleation and elongation factors frequently interact with Rho family GTPases, which relay signals from membrane receptors to regulate actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:20096561

  13. Comparison of transesophageal echocardiographic and scintigraphic estimates of left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and ejection fraction in patients following coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanowicz, J.H.; Shaaban, M.J.; Cohen, N.H.; Cahalan, M.K.; Botvinick, E.H.; Chatterjee, K.; Schiller, N.B.; Dae, M.W.; Matthay, M.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has become a commonly used monitor of left ventricular (LV) function and filling during cardiac surgery. Its use is based on the assumption that changes in LV short-axis ID reflect changes in LV volume. To study the ability of TEE to estimate LV volume and ejection immediately following CABG, 10 patients were studied using blood pool scintigraphy, TEE, and thermodilution cardiac output (CO). A single TEE short-axis cross-sectional image of the LV at the midpapillary muscle level was used for area analysis. Between 1 and 5 h postoperatively, simultaneous data sets (scintigraphy, TEE, and CO) were obtained three to five times in each patient. End-diastolic (EDa) and end-systolic (ESa) areas were measured by light pen. Ejection fraction area (EFa) was calculated (EFa = (EDa - ESa)/EDa). When EFa was compared with EF by scintigraphy, correlation was good (r = 0.82 SEE = 0.07). EDa was taken as an indicator of LV volume and compared with LVEDVI which was derived from EF by scintigraphy and CO. Correlation between EDa and LVEDVI was fair (r = 0.74 SEE = 3.75). The authors conclude that immediately following CABG, a single cross-sectional TEE image provides a reasonable estimate of EF but not LVEDVI.

  14. Actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement modulates proton-induced uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Nadav; Korenstein, Rafi

    2013-04-15

    Recently it has been shown that elevating proton concentration at the cell surface stimulates the formation of membrane invaginations and vesicles accompanied by an enhanced uptake of macromolecules. While the initial induction of inward membrane curvature was rationalized in terms of proton-based increase of charge asymmetry across the membrane, the mechanisms underlying vesicle formation and its scission are still unknown. In light of the critical role of actin in vesicle formation during endocytosis, the present study addresses the involvement of cytoskeletal actin in proton-induced uptake (PIU). The uptake of dextran-FITC is used as a measure for the factual fraction of inward invaginations that undergo scission from the cell's plasma membrane. Our findings show that the rate of PIU in suspended cells is constant, whereas the rate of PIU in adherent cells is gradually increased in time, saturating at the level possessed by suspended cells. This is consistent with pH induced gradual degradation of stress-fibers in adherent cells. Wortmannin and calyculin-A are able to elevate PIU by 25% in adherent cells but not in suspended cells, while cytochalasin-D, rapamycin and latrunculin-A elevate PIU both in adherent and suspended cells. However, extensive actin depolymerization by high concentrations of latrunculin-A is able to inhibit PIU. We conclude that proton-induced membrane vesiculation is restricted by the actin structural resistance to the plasma membrane bending. Nevertheless, a certain degree of cortical actin restructuring is required for the completion of the scission process. - Highlights: ► Acidification of cells' exterior enhances uptake of macromolecules by the cells. ► Disruption of actin stress fibers leads to enhancement of proton induced uptake. ► Extensive depolymerization of cellular actin attenuates proton-induced uptake.

  15. Liposome-encapsulated actin-hemoglobin (LEAcHb) artificial blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuliang; Nickels, Jonathan; Palmer, Andre Francis

    2005-06-01

    A new approach to enhance the circulation persistence of liposomes has been applied to develop liposome-encapsulated actin-hemoglobin (LEAcHb) dispersions as potential blood substitutes by introducing an actin matrix into the liposome aqueous core. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle static light scattering was used to study the shape, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency of liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEHb) and LEAcHb dispersions. By polymerizing monomeric actin into filamentous actin inside the liposome aqueous core, LEAcHb particles transformed into a disk-like shape. We studied the effect of an encapsulated actin matrix on the size distribution, hemoglobin (Hb) encapsulation efficiency, oxygen affinity, and methemoglobin (MetHb) level of LEAcHb dispersions, and compared them with plain LEHb dispersions (without actin). LEHb, and LEAcHb dispersions extruded through 400 nm membranes were injected into rats and it was observed that LEAcHb dispersions with 1mg/mL of actin enhanced the circulatory half-life versus LEHb dispersions. The circulatory characteristics of empty PEGylated and non-PEGylated actin-containing liposomes (without Hb) were studied as controls for the LEHb and LEAcHb dispersions in this paper, which displayed maximum circulatory half-lives greater than 72 h. Taken together the results of this study supports our hypothesis that a lipid membrane supported by an underlying actin matrix will extend the circulatory half-life of LEHb dispersions.

  16. How do jet time, pressure and bone volume fraction influence the drilling depth when waterjet drilling in porcine bone?

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Steven; Dankelman, Jenny; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2016-09-01

    Using water jets for orthopedic procedures that require bone drilling can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. Previously, the influence of the water jet diameter and bone architectural properties on the drilling depth have been determined. To develop water jet instruments that can safely drill in orthopedic surgery, the impact of the two remaining primary factors were determined: the jet time (tjet [s]) and pressure (P [MPa]). To this end, 84 holes were drilled in porcine tali and femora with water jets using Ø 0.4mm nozzle. tjet was varied between 1, 3 and 5s and P between 50 and 70MPa. Drilling depths Lhole (mm), diameters Dhole (mm) and the volume of mineralized bone per unit volume (BV/TV) were determined with microCT scans. A non-linear regression analysis resulted in the predictive equation: Lhole= 0.22 * tjet(0.18) * (1.2-BV/TV) * (P-29) (R(2)=0.904). The established relation between the machine settings and drilling depth allows surgeons to adjust jet time and pressure for the patient׳s BV/TV to drill holes at a predetermined depth. For developers, the relation allows design decisions to be made that influence the dimensions, flexibility and accuracy of water jet instruments. For a pressure of 50MPa, the potential hole depth spread indicated by the 95% confidence interval is <1.6mm for all tested jet times. This maximum variance is smaller than the accuracy required for bone debridement treatments (2-4mm deep), which confirms that water jet drilling can be applied in orthopedic surgery to drill holes in bone with controlled depth.

  17. How do jet time, pressure and bone volume fraction influence the drilling depth when waterjet drilling in porcine bone?

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Steven; Dankelman, Jenny; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2016-09-01

    Using water jets for orthopedic procedures that require bone drilling can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. Previously, the influence of the water jet diameter and bone architectural properties on the drilling depth have been determined. To develop water jet instruments that can safely drill in orthopedic surgery, the impact of the two remaining primary factors were determined: the jet time (tjet [s]) and pressure (P [MPa]). To this end, 84 holes were drilled in porcine tali and femora with water jets using Ø 0.4mm nozzle. tjet was varied between 1, 3 and 5s and P between 50 and 70MPa. Drilling depths Lhole (mm), diameters Dhole (mm) and the volume of mineralized bone per unit volume (BV/TV) were determined with microCT scans. A non-linear regression analysis resulted in the predictive equation: Lhole= 0.22 * tjet(0.18) * (1.2-BV/TV) * (P-29) (R(2)=0.904). The established relation between the machine settings and drilling depth allows surgeons to adjust jet time and pressure for the patient׳s BV/TV to drill holes at a predetermined depth. For developers, the relation allows design decisions to be made that influence the dimensions, flexibility and accuracy of water jet instruments. For a pressure of 50MPa, the potential hole depth spread indicated by the 95% confidence interval is <1.6mm for all tested jet times. This maximum variance is smaller than the accuracy required for bone debridement treatments (2-4mm deep), which confirms that water jet drilling can be applied in orthopedic surgery to drill holes in bone with controlled depth. PMID:27288662

  18. Actin Filaments Regulate Exocytosis at the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Marie; Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2016-01-20

    Exocytosis at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse is achieved through the functional coupling between calcium channels and glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles. Using membrane capacitance measurements, we investigated whether the actin network regulates the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles at the mouse auditory hair cell. Our results suggest that actin network disruption increases exocytosis and that actin filaments may spatially organize a subfraction of synaptic vesicles with respect to the calcium channels. Significance statement: Inner hair cells (IHCs), the auditory sensory cells of the cochlea, release glutamate onto the afferent auditory nerve fibers to encode sound stimulation. To achieve this task, the IHC relies on the recruitment of glutamate-filled vesicles that can be located in close vicinity to the calcium channels or more remotely from them. The molecular determinants responsible for organizing these vesicle pools are not fully identified. Using pharmacological tools in combination with membrane capacitance measurements, we show that actin filament disruption increases exocytosis in IHCs and that actin filaments most likely position a fraction of vesicles away from the calcium channels. PMID:26791198

  19. Polymerization of Actin from Maize Pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Yen, L. F.; Liu, X.; Cai, S.

    1995-01-01

    Here we describe the in vitro polymerization of actin from maize (Zea mays) pollen. The purified actin from maize pollen reported in our previous paper (X. Liu, L.F. Yen [1992] Plant Physiol 99: 1151-1155) is biologically active. In the presence of ATP, KCl, and MgCl2 the purified pollen actin polymerized into filaments. During polymerization the spectra of absorbance at 232 nm increased gradually. Polymerization of pollen actin was evidently accompanied by an increase in viscosity of the pollen actin solution. Also, the specific viscosity of pollen F-actin increased in a concentration-dependent manner. The ultraviolet difference spectrum of pollen actin is very similar to that of rabbit muscle actin. The activity of myosin ATPase from rabbit muscle was activated 7-fold by the polymerized pollen actin (F-actin). The actin filaments were visualized under the electron microscope as doubly wound strands of 7 nm diameter. If cytochalasin B was added before staining, no actin filaments were observed. When actin filaments were treated with rabbit heavy meromyosin, the actin filaments were decorated with an arrowhead structure. These results imply that there is much similarity between pollen and muscle actin. PMID:12228343

  20. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated. PMID:27385345

  1. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-08-15

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated.

  2. Analysis of rhodamine and fluorescein-labeled F-actin diffusion in vitro by fluorescence photobleaching recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J R; Gough, A; Urbanik, E; Wang, F; Lanni, F; Ware, B R; Taylor, D L

    1988-01-01

    Properties of filamentous acetamidofluorescein-labeled actin and acetamidotetramethylrhodamine-labeled actin (AF and ATR-actin, respectively) were examined to resolve discrepancies in the reported translational diffusion coefficients of F-actin measured in vitro by FPR and other techniques. Using falling-ball viscometry and two independent versions of fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR), the present data indicate that several factors are responsible for these discrepancies. Gel filtration chromatography profoundly affects the viscosity of actin solutions and filament diffusion coefficients. ATR-actin and, to a lesser degree, AF-actin show a reduction in viscosity in proportion to the fraction labeled, presumably due to filament shortening. Actin filaments containing AF-actin or ATR-actin are susceptible to photoinduced damage, including a covalent cross-linking of actin protomers within filaments and an apparent cleavage of filaments detected by a decrease of the measured viscosity and an increase in the measured filament diffusion coefficients. Quantum yields of the two photoinduced effects are quite different. Multiple cross-links are produced relative to each photobleaching event, whereas less than 1% filament cleavage occurs. Substantial differences in the filament diffusion coefficients measured by FPR are also the result of differences in illumination geometry and sampling time. However, under controlled conditions, FPR can be used as a quantitative tool for measuring the hydrodynamic properties of actin filaments. Incremented filament shortening caused by photoinduced cleavage or incremental addition of filament capping proteins produces a continuous and approximately linear increase of filament diffusion coefficients, indicating that filaments are not associated in solution. Our results indicate that actin filaments exhibit low mobilities and it is inferred that actin filaments formed in vitro by column-purified actin, under standard conditions, are

  3. Actin polymerization and intracellular solvent flow in cell surface blebbing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The cortical actin gel of eukaryotic cells is postulated to control cell surface activity. One type of protrusion that may offer clues to this regulation are the spherical aneurysms of the surface membrane known as blebs. Blebs occur normally in cells during spreading and alternate with other protrusions, such as ruffles, suggesting similar protrusive machinery is involved. We recently reported that human melanoma cell lines deficient in the actin filament cross-linking protein, ABP-280, show prolonged blebbing, thus allowing close study of blebs and their dynamics. Blebs expand at different rates of volume increase that directly predict the final size achieved by each bleb. These rates decrease as the F-actin concentration of the cells increase over time after plating on a surface, but do so at lower concentrations in ABP-280 expressing cells. Fluorescently labeled actin and phalloidin injections of blebbing cells indicate that a polymerized actin structure is not present initially, but appears later and is responsible for stopping further bleb expansion. Therefore, it is postulated that blebs occur when the fluid-driven expansion of the cell membrane is sufficiently rapid to initially outpace the local rate of actin polymerization. In this model, the rate of intracellular solvent flow driving this expansion decreases as cortical gelation is achieved, whether by factors such as ABP-280, or by concentrated actin polymers alone, thereby leading to decreased size and occurrence of blebs. Since the forces driving bleb extension would always be present in a cell, this process may influence other cell protrusions as well. PMID:7790356

  4. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, Sean P.; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Winters, Caroline; Farias, Paul Abraham; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  5. Effects of nano anatase-rutile TiO2 volume fraction with natural dye containing anthocyanin on the dye sensitized solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustini, S.; Wahyuono, R. A.; Sawitri, D.; Risanti, D. D.

    2013-09-01

    Since its first development, efforts to improve efficiency of Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) are continuously carried out, either through selection of dye materials, the type of semiconductor, counter electrode design or the sandwiched structure. It is widely known that anatase and rutile are phases of TiO2 that often being used for fabrication of DSSC. Rutile is thermodynamically more stable phase having band-gap suitable for absorption of sunlight spectrum. On the other hand, anatase has higher electrical conductivity, capability to adsorp dye as well as higher electron diffusion coefficient than those of rutile. Present research uses mangosteen pericarp and Rhoeo spathacea extracted in ethanol as natural dye containing anthocyanin. These dyes were characterized by using UV-Vis and FTIR, showing that the absorption maxima peaks obtained at 389 nm and 413 nm, for mangosteen and Rhoeo spathacea, respectively. The nano TiO2 was prepared by means of co-precipitation method. The particle size were 9-11 nm and 54.5 nm for anatase and rutile, respectively, according to Scherrer's equation. DSSCs were fabricated in various volume fractions of anatase and rutile TiO2. The fabricated DSSCs were tested under 17 mW/cm2 of solar irradiation. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of DSSCs employing 75%: 25% volume fraction of anatase and rutile TiO2 have outstanding result than others. The highest conversion efficiencies of 0.037% and 0.013% are obtained for DSSC employing natural dye extract from mangosteen pericarp and Rhoeo spathacea, respectively.

  6. Measurement of Mechanical Coherency Temperature and Solid Volume Fraction in Al-Zn Alloys Using In Situ X-ray Diffraction During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Mireux, Bastien; Kurtuldu, Güven; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-09-01

    During solidification of metallic alloys, coalescence leads to the formation of solid bridges between grains or grain clusters when both solid and liquid phases are percolated. As such, it represents a key transition with respect to the mechanical behavior of solidifying alloys and to the prediction of solidification cracking. Coalescence starts at the coherency point when the grains begin to touch each other, but are unable to sustain any tensile loads. It ends up at mechanical coherency when the solid phase is sufficiently coalesced to transmit macroscopic tensile strains and stresses. Temperature at mechanical coherency is a major input parameter in numerical modeling of solidification processes as it defines the point at which thermally induced deformations start to generate internal stresses in a casting. This temperature has been determined for Al-Zn alloys using in situ X-ray diffraction during casting in a dog-bone-shaped mold. This setup allows the sample to build up internal stress naturally as its contraction is prevented. The cooling on both extremities of the mold induces a hot spot at the middle of the sample which is irradiated by X-ray. Diffraction patterns were recorded every 0.5 seconds using a detector covering a 426 × 426 mm2 area. The change of diffraction angles allowed measuring the general decrease of the lattice parameter of the fcc aluminum phase. At high solid volume fraction, a succession of strain/stress build up and release is explained by the formation of hot tears. Mechanical coherency temperatures, 829 K to 866 K (556 °C to 593 °C), and solid volume fractions, ca. 98 pct, are shown to depend on solidification time for grain refined Al-6.2 wt pct Zn alloys.

  7. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  8. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  9. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  10. Stereology of backscatter electron images of etched surfaces for characterization of particle size distributions and volume fractions: Estimation of imaging bias via Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Payton, E.J. Mills, M.J.

    2011-06-15

    On metallic specimens in which a secondary phase has been selectively removed by a chemical etchant, the use of backscatter electron (BSE) imaging yields images that are more readily segmented with image processing algorithms than other modes of imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The contrast mechanisms in this imaging mode, however, produce a bias in the observation of particle sizes and volume fractions due to the effects of the electron interaction volume in the specimen. This stereological bias is quantified using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of backscatter images. It is observed that the overprojection of features with centroids residing beneath the plane of polish is largely canceled out by the reduced segmentation size of features with centroids residing above the plane of polish. - Research Highlights: {yields} Backscatter imaging of selectively-etched surfaces can facilitate segmentation. {yields} Backscatter imaging of voids is simulated to estimate imaging/observation biases. {yields} The biases are quantified and incorporated into the stereological calculation. {yields} Systematic errors and imaging biases are observed to counteract one another. {yields} Results are illustrated using a bimodal gamma prime distribution in a Ni superalloy.

  11. Moving and stationary actin filaments are involved in spreading of postmitotic PtK2 cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated spreading of postmitotic PtK2 cells and the behavior of actin filaments in this system by time-lapse microscopy and photoactivation of fluorescence. During mitosis PtK2 cells round up and at cytokinesis the daughter cells spread back to regain their interphase morphology. Normal spreading edges are quite homogenous and are not comprised of two distinct areas (lamellae and lamellipodia) as found in moving edges of interphase motile cells. Spreading edges are connected to a network of long, thin, actin-rich fibers called retraction fibers. A role for retraction fibers in spreading was tested by mechanical disruption of fibers ahead of a spreading edge. Spreading is inhibited over the region of disruption, but not over neighboring intact fibers. Using photoactivation of fluorescence to mark actin filaments, we have determined that the majority of actin filaments move forward in spreading edges at the same rate as the edge. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that forward movement of a cell edge has been correlated with forward movement of actin filaments. In contrast, actin filaments in retraction fibers remain stationary with respect to the substrate. Thus there are at least two dynamic populations of actin polymer in spreading postmitotic cells. This is supported by the observation that actin filaments in some spreading edges not only move forward, but also separate into two fractions or broaden with time. A small fraction of postmitotic cells have a spreading edge with a distinct lamellipodium. In these edges, marked actin polymer fluxes backward with respect to substrate. We suggest that forward movement of actin filaments may participate in generating force for spreading in postmitotic cells and perhaps more generally for cell locomotion. PMID:8349733

  12. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  13. Membrane-associated actin in the rhabdomeral microvilli of crayfish photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Infiltration of compound eyes of crayfish, Cherax destructor, with the thiol protease inhibitor Ep-475 or with trifluoperazine prior to fixation for electron microscopy was found to stabilize an axial filament of 6-12 nm diam within each rhabdomeral microvillus of the photoreceptors. Rhabdoms isolated from retinal homogenates by sucrose gradient centrifugation under conditions that stabilize cytoskeletal material contained large amounts of a 42-kd polypeptide that co- migrated with insect flight muscle actin in one- and two-dimensional PAGE, inhibited pancreatic DNase l, and bound to vertebrate myosin. Vertebrate skeletal muscle actin added to retinal homogenates did not co-purify with rhabdoms, implying that actin was not a contaminant from nonmembranous structures. DNase l inhibition assays of detergent-lysed rhabdoms indicated the presence of large amounts of filamentous actin provided ATP was present. Monomeric actin in such preparations was completely polymerizable only after 90 min incubation with equimolar phalloidin. More than half of the actin present could be liberated from the membrane by sonication, indicating a loose association with the membrane. However, a large proportion of the actin was tightly bound to the rhabdomeral membrane, and washing sonicated membrane fractions with solutions of a range of ionic strengths and nonionic detergents failed to remove it. Antibodies to scallop actin only bound to frozen sections of rhabdoms after gentle permeabilization and very long incubation periods, probably because of steric hindrance and the hydrophobicity of the structure. The F-actin probe nitrobenzoxadiazol phallacidin bound to rhabdoms and labeled F-actin aggregates in other retinal components, but rhabdom fluorescence was not abolished by preincubation with phalloidin. The biochemical data indicate the existence of two distinct actin-based cytoskeletal systems, one being closely membrane associated. The other may possibly constitute the axial filament

  14. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kelpsch, Daniel J; Groen, Christopher M; Fagan, Tiffany N; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L

    2016-10-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5-9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved.

  15. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kelpsch, Daniel J; Groen, Christopher M; Fagan, Tiffany N; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L

    2016-10-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5-9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  16. The reconstitution of actin polymerization on liposomes.

    PubMed

    Stamnes, Mark; Xu, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated actin polymerization is of considerable interest due to its role in cell migration and the motility of intracellular organelles. Intensive research efforts are underway to investigate the physiological role of membrane-associated actin as well as the regulation and mechanics of actin assembly. Branched actin polymerization on membranes is catalyzed by the Arp2/3 complex. Signaling events leading to the activation of the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein Cdc42 stimulate Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization. We have studied the role of Cdc42 at the Golgi apparatus in part by reconstituting actin polymerization on isolated Golgi membranes and on liposomes. In this manner, we showed that cytosolic proteins are sufficient for actin assembly on a phospholipid bilayer. Here we describe methods for the cell-free reconstitution of membrane-associated actin polymerization using liposomes and brain cytosol.

  17. Dynamic actin structures stabilized by profilin.

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, T; Theriot, J A; Dise, K R; Tomaselli, G F; Goldschmidt-Clermont, P J

    1994-01-01

    We describe the production and analysis of clonal cell lines in which we have overexpressed human profilin, a small ubiquitous actin monomer binding protein, to assess the role of profilin on actin function in vivo. The concentration of filamentous actin is increased in cells with higher profilin levels, and actin filament half-life measured in these cells is directly proportional to the steady-state profilin concentration. The distribution of actin filaments is altered by profilin overexpression. While parallel actin bundles crossing the cells are virtually absent in cells overexpressing profilin, the submembranous actin network of these cells is denser than in control cells. These results suggest that in vivo profilin regulates the stability, and thereby distribution, of specific dynamic actin structures. Images PMID:8108438

  18. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  19. Disassembly of actin structures by nanosecond pulsed electric field is a downstream effect of cell swelling.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Semenov, Iurii; Kuipers, Marjorie A; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton structures was reported as one of the characteristic effects of nanosecond-duration pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in both mammalian and plant cells. We utilized CHO cells that expressed the monomeric fluorescent protein (mApple) tagged to actin to test if nsPEF modifies the cell actin directly or as a consequence of cell membrane permeabilization. A train of four 600-ns pulses at 19.2 kV/cm (2 Hz) caused immediate cell membrane poration manifested by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, gradual cell rounding and swelling. Concurrently, bright actin features were replaced by dimmer and uniform fluorescence of diffuse actin. To block the nsPEF-induced swelling, the bath buffer was isoosmotically supplemented with an electropore-impermeable solute (sucrose). A similar addition of a smaller, electropore-permeable solute (adonitol) served as a control. We demonstrated that sucrose efficiently blocked disassembly of actin features by nsPEF, whereas adonitol did not. Sucrose also attenuated bleaching of mApple-tagged actin in nsPEF-treated cells (as integrated over the cell volume), although did not fully prevent it. We conclude that disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton was a result of cell swelling, which, in turn, was caused by cell permeabilization by nsPEF and transmembrane diffusion of solutes which led to the osmotic imbalance. PMID:24507565

  20. T2’-Imaging to Assess Cerebral Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Carotid Occlusive Disease: Influence of Cerebral Autoregulation and Cerebral Blood Volume

    PubMed Central

    Deichmann, Ralf; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Hattingen, Elke; Singer, Oliver C.; Wagner, Marlies

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative T2'-mapping detects regional changes of the relation of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) by using their different magnetic properties in gradient echo imaging and might therefore be a surrogate marker of increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in cerebral hypoperfusion. Since elevations of cerebral blood volume (CBV) with consecutive accumulation of Hb might also increase the fraction of deoxygenated Hb and, through this, decrease the T2’-values in these patients we evaluated the relationship between T2’-values and CBV in patients with unilateral high-grade large-artery stenosis. Materials and Methods Data from 16 patients (13 male, 3 female; mean age 53 years) with unilateral symptomatic or asymptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis/occlusion were analyzed. MRI included perfusion-weighted imaging and high-resolution T2’-mapping. Representative relative (r)CBV-values were analyzed in areas of decreased T2’ with different degrees of perfusion delay and compared to corresponding contralateral areas. Results No significant elevations in cerebral rCBV were detected within areas with significantly decreased T2’-values. In contrast, rCBV was significantly decreased (p<0.05) in regions with severe perfusion delay and decreased T2’. Furthermore, no significant correlation between T2’- and rCBV-values was found. Conclusions rCBV is not significantly increased in areas of decreased T2’ and in areas of restricted perfusion in patients with unilateral high-grade stenosis. Therefore, T2’ should only be influenced by changes of oxygen metabolism, regarding our patient collective especially by an increase of the OEF. T2’-mapping is suitable to detect altered oxygen consumption in chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:27560515

  1. Actin in hair cells and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Meghan C; Belyantseva, Inna A; Friderici, Karen H; Friedman, Thomas B

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary deafness is genetically heterogeneous such that mutations of many different genes can cause hearing loss. This review focuses on the evidence and implications that several of these deafness genes encode actin-interacting proteins or actin itself. There is a growing appreciation of the contribution of the actin interactome in stereocilia development, maintenance, mechanotransduction and malfunction of the auditory system.

  2. LeftyA decreases Actin Polymerization and Stiffness in Human Endometrial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salker, Madhuri S.; Schierbaum, Nicolas; Alowayed, Nour; Singh, Yogesh; Mack, Andreas F.; Stournaras, Christos; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    LeftyA, a cytokine regulating stemness and embryonic differentiation, down-regulates cell proliferation and migration. Cell proliferation and motility require actin reorganization, which is under control of ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). The present study explored whether LeftyA modifies actin cytoskeleton, shape and stiffness of Ishikawa cells, a well differentiated endometrial carcinoma cell line. The effect of LeftyA on globular over filamentous actin ratio was determined utilizing Western blotting and flow cytometry. Rac1 and PAK1 transcript levels were measured by qRT-PCR as well as active Rac1 and PAK1 by immunoblotting. Cell stiffness (quantified by the elastic modulus), cell surface area and cell volume were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a result, 2 hours treatment with LeftyA (25 ng/ml) significantly decreased Rac1 and PAK1 transcript levels and activity, depolymerized actin, and decreased cell stiffness, surface area and volume. The effect of LeftyA on actin polymerization was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 and PAK1. In the presence of the Rac1 or PAK1 inhibitor LeftyA did not lead to significant further actin depolymerization. In conclusion, LeftyA leads to disruption of Rac1 and Pak1 activity with subsequent actin depolymerization, cell softening and cell shrinkage. PMID:27404958

  3. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  4. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  5. Mechanics of F-actin characterized with microfabricated cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiumei; Pollack, Gerald H

    2002-11-01

    In this report we characterized the longitudinal elasticity of single actin filaments manipulated by novel silicon-nitride microfabricated levers. Single actin filaments were stretched from zero tension to maximal physiological tension, P(0). The obtained length-tension relation was nonlinear in the low-tension range (0-50 pN) with a resultant strain of approximately 0.4-0.6% and then became linear at moderate to high tensions (approximately 50-230 pN). In this region, the stretching stiffness of a single rhodamine-phalloidin-labeled, 1-microm-long F-actin is 34.5 +/- 3.5 pN/nm. Such a length-tension relation could be characterized by an entropic-enthalpic worm-like chain model, which ascribes most of the energy consumed in the nonlinear portion to overcoming thermal undulations arising from the filament's interaction with surrounding solution and the linear portion to the intrinsic stretching elasticity. By fitting the experimental data with such a worm-like chain model, an estimation of persistence length of approximately 8.75 microm was derived. These results suggest that F-actin is more compliant than previously thought and that thin filament compliance may account for a substantial fraction of the sarcomere's elasticity.

  6. Actinic review of EUV masks: Status and recent results of the AIMS EUV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Markus R.; Hellweg, Dirk; Koch, Markus; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Perlitz, Sascha; Garetto, Anthony; Magnusson, Krister; Capelli, Renzo; Jindal, Vibhu

    2015-03-01

    The EUV mask infrastructure is of key importance for the successful introduction of EUV lithography into volume production. In particular, for the production of defect free masks an actinic review of potential defect sites is required. To realize such an actinic review tool, Carl Zeiss and the SEMATECH EUVL Mask Infrastructure consortium started a development program for an EUV aerial image metrology system, the AIMS™ EUV. In this paper, we discuss the current status of the prototype integration and show recent results.

  7. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  8. Simultaneous changes in gray matter volume and white matter fractional anisotropy in Alzheimer's disease revealed by multimodal CCA and joint ICA.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, X; Chen, K; Yao, L; Hu, B; Wu, X; Ye, Q; Guo, X

    2015-08-20

    The prominent morphometric alterations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) occur both in gray matter and in white matter. Multimodal fusion can examine joint information by combining multiple neuroimaging datasets to identify the covariant morphometric alterations in AD in greater detail. In the current study, we conducted a multimodal canonical correlation analysis and joint independent component analysis to identify the covariance patterns of the gray and white matter by fusing structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data of 39 AD patients (23 males and 16 females, mean age: 74.91±8.13years) and 41 normal controls (NCs) (20 males and 21 females, mean age: 73.97±6.34years) derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The results revealed 25 joint independent components (ICs), of which three joint ICs exhibited strong links between the gray matter volume and the white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and significant differences between the AD and NC group. The joint IC maps revealed that the simultaneous changes in the gray matter and FA values primarily involved the following areas: (1) the temporal lobe/hippocampus-cingulum, (2) the frontal/cingulate gyrus-corpus callosum, and (3) the temporal/occipital/parietal lobe-corpus callosum/corona radiata. Our findings suggest that gray matter atrophy is associated with reduced white matter fiber integrity in AD and possibly expand the understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms in AD.

  9. Performance of a hydrogen burner to simulate air entering scramjet combustors. [simulation of total temperature, total pressure, and volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russin, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the performance of a hydrogen burner used to produce a test gas that simulates air entering a scramjet combustor at various flight conditions. The test gas simulates air in that it duplicates the total temperature, total pressure, and the volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions. The main objective of the tests was to determine the performance of the burner as a function of the effective exhaust port area. The conclusions were: (1) pressure oscillations of the chugging type were reduced in amplitude to plus or minus 2 percent of the mean pressure level by proper sizing of hydrogen, oxygen, and air injector flow areas; (2) combustion efficiency remained essentially constant as the exhaust port area was increased by a factor of 3.4; (3) the mean total temperature determined from integrating the exit radial gas property profiles was within plus or minus 5 percent of the theoretical bulk total temperature; (4) the measured exit total temperature profile had a local peak temperature more than 30 percent greater than the theoretical bulk total temperature; and (5) measured heat transfer to the burner liner was 75 percent of that predicted by theory based on a flat radial temperature profile.

  10. Large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations for phase coarsening at ultrahigh volume fraction on high-performance architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui; Wang, K. G.; Jones, Jim E.

    2016-06-01

    A parallel algorithm for large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations of phase coarsening is developed and implemented on high-performance architectures. From the large-scale simulations, a new kinetics in phase coarsening in the region of ultrahigh volume fraction is found. The parallel implementation is capable of harnessing the greater computer power available from high-performance architectures. The parallelized code enables increase in three-dimensional simulation system size up to a 5123 grid cube. Through the parallelized code, practical runtime can be achieved for three-dimensional large-scale simulations, and the statistical significance of the results from these high resolution parallel simulations are greatly improved over those obtainable from serial simulations. A detailed performance analysis on speed-up and scalability is presented, showing good scalability which improves with increasing problem size. In addition, a model for prediction of runtime is developed, which shows a good agreement with actual run time from numerical tests.

  11. Effect of anatomical noise on the detectability of cone beam CT images with different slice direction, slice thickness, and volume glandular fraction.

    PubMed

    Han, Minah; Park, Subok; Baek, Jongduk

    2016-08-22

    We investigate the effect of anatomical noise on the detectability of cone beam CT (CBCT) images with different slice directions, slice thicknesses, and volume glandular fractions (VGFs). Anatomical noise is generated using a power law spectrum of breast anatomy, and spherical objects with diameters from 1mm to 11mm are used as breast masses. CBCT projection images are simulated and reconstructed using the FDK algorithm. A channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels is used to evaluate detectability for the signal-known-exactly (SKE) binary detection task. Detectability is calculated for various slice thicknesses in the transverse and longitudinal planes for 15%, 30% and 60% VGFs. The optimal slice thicknesses that maximize the detectability of the objects are determined. The results show that the β value increases as the slice thickness increases, but that thicker slices yield higher detectability in the transverse and longitudinal planes, except for the case of a 1mm diameter spherical object. It is also shown that the longitudinal plane with a 0.1mm slice thickness provides higher detectability than the transverse plane, despite its higher β value. With optimal slice thicknesses, the longitudinal plane exhibits better detectability for all VGFs and spherical objects. PMID:27557168

  12. The actin of muscle and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P J

    1976-01-01

    The isolation and quantification of an 18-residue peptide from the N-terminal region of chicken actin was used to quantify the amount of actin in acetone-dried powders of chicken breast muscle and chicken-embryo fibroblasts. Either isotope dilution or double labelling can be used for peptide quantification. About 17% of the protein of chicken breast muscle was estimated to be actin. However, only 0.25% of the protein of chicken-embryo fibroblasts was determined to be actin by quantification of this peptide. The actin content of fibroblasts may be low or the amino acid sequences of muscle and fibroblast actin may differ in the N-terminal region. The methodology used can be extended to examine whether other regions of muscle actin sequence are present in fibroblasts or other cell types. PMID:938480

  13. Quantifying actin wave modulation on periodic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parker, Joshua; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Actin is the essential builder of the cell cytoskeleton, whose dynamics are responsible for generating the necessary forces for the formation of protrusions. By exposing amoeboid cells to periodic topographical cues, we show that actin can be directionally guided via inducing preferential polymerization waves. To quantify the dynamics of these actin waves and their interaction with the substrate, we modify a technique from computer vision called ``optical flow.'' We obtain vectors that represent the apparent actin flow and cluster these vectors to obtain patches of newly polymerized actin, which represent actin waves. Using this technique, we compare experimental results, including speed distribution of waves and distance from the wave centroid to the closest ridge, with actin polymerization simulations. We hypothesize the modulation of the activity of nucleation promotion factors on ridges (elevated regions of the surface) as a potential mechanism for the wave-substrate coupling. Funded by NIH grant R01GM085574.

  14. Accuracy of relocation, evaluation of geometric uncertainties and clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial tumors using relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame.

    PubMed

    Das, Saikat; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B; Ravindran, B Paul; Singh, Rabi Raja; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at determination of accuracy of relocation of Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The study aims to quantitatively determine the magnitudes of error in anteroposterior, mediolateral and craniocaudal directions, and determine the margin between clinical target volume to planning target volume based on systematic and random errors. Daily relocation error was measured using depth helmet and measuring probe. Based on the measurements, translational displacements in anteroposterior (z), mediolateral (x), and craniocaudal (y) directions were calculated. Based on the displacements in x, y and z directions, systematic and random error were calculated and three-dimensional radial displacement vector was determined. Systematic and random errors were used to derive CTV to PTV margin. The errors were within ± 2 mm in 99.2% cases in anteroposterior direction (AP), in 99.6% cases in mediolateral direction (ML), and in 97.6% cases in craniocaudal direction (CC). In AP, ML and CC directions, systematic errors were 0.56, 0.38, 0.42 mm and random errors were 1.86, 1.36 and 0.73 mm, respectively. Mean radial displacement was 1.03 mm ± 0.34. CTV to PTV margins calculated by ICRU formula were 1.86, 1.45 and 0.93 mm; by Stroom's formula they were 2.42, 1.74 and 1.35 mm; by van Herk's formula they were 2.7, 1.93 and 1.56 mm (AP, ML and CC directions). Depth helmet with measuring probe provides a clinically viable way for assessing the relocation accuracy of GTC frame. The errors were within ± 2 mm in all directions. Systematic and random errors were more along the anteroposterior axes. According to the ICRU formula, a margin of 2 mm around the tumor seems to be adequate. PMID:21587166

  15. Correction to "What is a fractional derivative?" by Ortigueira and Machado [Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 293, 15 July 2015, Pages 4-13. Special issue on Fractional PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katugampola, Udita N.

    2016-09-01

    There is a debate among contemporary mathematicians about what it really means by a fractional derivative. The question arose as a consequence of introducing a 'new' definition of a fractional derivative in [1]. In a reply, Ortigueira and Machado [2] came up with several very important criteria to determine whether a given derivative is a fractional derivative. According to their criterion, the new fractional derivative, called conformable fractional derivative, introduced by Khalil et al. [1] turns out not to be a fractional derivative, but rather a controlled or conformable derivative. In proving the claim the authors in [2] use an example [2, p. 6]. It turns out that the explanation given there needs some corrections and it is the sole purpose of this note.

  16. Size distribution of linear and helical polymers in actin solution analyzed by photon counting histogram.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naofumi; Shimozawa, Togo; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2007-03-15

    Actin is a ubiquitous protein that is a major component of the cytoskeleton, playing an important role in muscle contraction and cell motility. At steady state, actin monomers and filaments (F-actin) coexist, and actin subunits continuously attach and detach at the filament ends. However, the size distribution of actin oligomers in F-actin solution has never been clarified. In this study, we investigated the size distribution of actin oligomers using photon-counting histograms. For this purpose, actin was labeled with a fluorescent dye, and the emitted photons were detected by confocal optics (the detection volume was of femtoliter (fL) order). Photon-counting histograms were analyzed to obtain the number distribution of actin oligomers in the detection area from their brightness, assuming that the brightness of an oligomer was proportional to the number of protomers. We found that the major populations at physiological ionic strength were 1-5mers. For data analysis, we successfully applied the theory of linear and helical aggregations of macromolecules. The model postulates three states of actin, i.e., monomers, linear polymers, and helical polymers. Here we obtained three parameters: the equilibrium constants for polymerization of linear polymers, K(l)=(5.2 +/- 1.1) x 10(6) M(-1), and helical polymers, K(h)=(1.6 +/- 0.5) x 10(7) M(-1); and the ratio of helical to linear trimers, gamma = (3.6 +/- 2.3) x 10(-2). The excess free energy of transforming a linear trimer to a helical trimer, which is assumed to be a nucleus for helical polymers, was calculated to be 2.0 kcal/mol. These analyses demonstrate that the oligomeric phase at steady state is predominantly composed of linear 1-5mers, and the transition from linear to helical polymers occurs on the level of 5-7mers. PMID:17172301

  17. Evidence for a species of nuclear actin distinct from cytoplasmic and muscles actins.

    PubMed

    Bremer, J W; Busch, H; Yeoman, L C

    1981-03-31

    Nuclear actin (protein BJ) has been isolated from the chromatin of Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells and purified to homogeneity by selective extraction, Sepharose CL-6B chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A comparison of nuclear and cytoplasmic actins from Novikoff hepatoma cells and rabbit muscle actin was made by amino acid analysis, isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and two-dimensional peptide mapping procedures. By these criteria, all of the proteins compared are actins, but each is chemically distinct. It was concluded, therefore, that nuclear actin is similar to, but not identical with, cytoplasmic actin isolated from Novikoff hepatoma cells. A striking similarity in peptide charge and migration as shown by peptide map analysis was observed for nuclear and rabbit skeletal muscle actins. This may indicate that nuclear actin has the capacity for contractile function. In addition, the actins synthesized in Novikoff hepatoma cells may results from more than two structural genes.

  18. Purification and properties of a 90-kDa nuclear actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, L C; Bremer, J W

    1986-04-01

    A 90 kDa actin-binding nuclear protein (ABNP) with a pI of 5.2 has been purified from the 0.7 M NaCl extracted residue fraction of chromatin prepared from Novikoff hepatoma cell nuclei. This residue fraction was previously shown to contain nuclear actin. Although twice the size, similar in pI, and similar in amino acid composition to actin, the tryptic peptide map for ABNP is distinct and contains the appropriate number of tyrosine-containing tryptic peptides for a protein of 90,000 molecular weight. A comparison of the amino acid composition of ABNP with those reported in the literature for gelsolin and villin, using a calculation of S delta Q as an indication of relatedness, results in values of 30 and 27, respectively. Actin-binding activity, however, was demonstrated for both crude and gel purified ABNP using a gel-overlay technique that employs 125I-G-actin to detect specific actin-binding proteins.

  19. Comparison of ejection fraction and pulmonary blood volume ratio as markers of left ventricular dysfunction with single vessel coronary disease before and after PTCA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Kiess, M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Exercise induced increases in pulmonary blood volume (PBV) have been shown to correlate with transient exercised-induced increase in left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. To analyze the impact of single vessel disease on LV function, ejection fraction (EF) and PBV were measured by serial supine exercise gated scans (GBPS) on 53 patients with left anterior descending artery disease undergoing coronary angioplasty (PTCA). EF was defined by standard methods. The PBV ratio was taken as the exercise to rest counts from the lung regions of interest as previously reported. Regional wall motion (WM) was quantified by averaging the results of 5-point score system in each region from 3 observers. Normal was defined as: rest EF greater than or equal to .50 and increase in EF with exercise, PBV less than or equal to 1.06 and no deterioration in WM on exercise. Of the 53 patients, 54% were found to be abnormal by EF, but 83% by PBV (p<.01). Abnormal PBV ratio was also highly associated with exercise induced deterioration in WM on GBPS (p<.05). After PTCA, the proportion of patients with abnormal EF remained unchanged (50%), whereas those with abnormal PBV ratio decreased significantly (to 38%, p<0.01). The authors conclude: (1) PBV ratio (filling pressures) is more frequently abnormal than EF (systolic function) in single vessel disease; (2) There is a significant improvement of PBV ratio after PTGA; (3) This discordance of parameters of systolic and diastolic function suggests that PBV (and hence diastolic function) is a more sensitive indicator of changes in ventricular function following an intervention than EF.

  20. Fluorescent actin analogs with a high affinity for profilin in vitro exhibit an enhanced gradient of assembly in living cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Constitutive centripetal transport of the actin-based cytoskeleton has been detected in cells spreading on a substrate, locomoting fibroblasts and keratocytes, and non-locomoting serum-deprived fibroblasts. These results suggest a gradient of actin assembly, highest in the cortex at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and lowest in the non-cortical perinuclear cytoplasm. We predicted that such a gradient would be maintained in part by phosphoinositide-regulated actin binding proteins because the intracellular free Ca2+ and pH are low and spatially constant in serum-deprived cells. The cytoplasm-membrane interface presents one surface where the assembly of actin is differentially regulated relative to the non-cortical cytoplasm. Several models, based on in vitro biochemistry, propose that phosphoinositide-regulated actin binding proteins are involved in local actin assembly. To test these models in living cells using imaging techniques, we prepared a new fluorescent analog of actin that bound profilin, a protein that interacts with phosphoinositides and actin-monomers in a mutually exclusive manner, with an order of magnitude greater affinity (Kd = 3.6 microM) than cys-374-labeled actin (Kd > 30 microM), yet retained the ability to inhibit DNase I. Hence, we were able to directly compare the distribution and activity of a biochemical mutant of actin with an analog possessing closer to wild-type activity. Three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy of the fluorescent analog of actin with a high affinity for profilin revealed that it incorporated into cortical cytoplasmic fibers and was also distributed diffusely in the non- cortical cytoplasm consistent with a bias of actin assembly near the surface of the cell. Fluorescence ratio imaging revealed that serum- deprived and migrating fibroblasts concentrated the new actin analog into fibers up to four-fold in the periphery and leading edge of these cells, respectively, relative to a soluble fluorescent dextran volume marker

  1. Dynamic in vivo analysis of drug induced actin cytoskeleton degradation by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnekenburger, Juergen; Bredebusch, Ilona; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Domschke, Wolfram; von Bally, Gert; Kemper, Björn

    2007-07-01

    The actin cytoskeleton mediates a variety of crucial cellular functions as migration, intracellular transport, exocytosis, endocytosis and force generation. The highly dynamic actin fibers are therefore targets for several drugs and toxins. However the study of actin interfering processes by standard microscopy techniques fails in the detailed resolution of dynamic spatial alterations required for a deeper understanding of toxic effects. Here we applied digital holographic microscopy in the online functional analysis of the actin cytoskeleton disrupting marine toxin Latrunculin B. SEM and fluorescence microscopy showed rapid Latrunculin B induced alterations in cell morphology and actin fiber degradation in pancreas tumor cells. The dynamic digital holographic in vivo analysis of the drug dependent cellular processes demonstrated differences in the actin cytoskeleton stability of highly differentiated and dedifferentiated pancreas tumor cell lines. The spatial resolution of the morphological alterations revealed unequal changes in cell morphology. While cells with a low metastatic potential showed Latrunculin B induced cell collapse within 4 h the metastatic tumor cells were increased in cell volume indicating Latrunculin B effects also on cell water content. These data demonstrate that marker free, non-destructive online analysis of cellular morphology and dynamic spatial processes in living cells by digital holography offers new insights in actin dependent cellular mechanisms. Digital holographic microscopy was shown to be a versatile tool in the screening of toxic drug effects and cancer cell biology.

  2. Multiple actin binding domains of Ena/VASP proteins determine actin network stiffening.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Brian S; van der Meulen, Stef; Noguera, Philippe; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Plastino, Julie; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2012-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) is an actin binding protein, important for actin dynamics in motile cells and developing organisms. Though VASP's main activity is the promotion of barbed end growth, it has an F-actin binding site and can form tetramers, and so could additionally play a role in actin crosslinking and bundling in the cell. To test this activity, we performed rheology of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of wild-type VASP or mutants lacking the ability to tetramerize or to bind G-actin and/or F-actin. We show that increasing amounts of wild-type VASP increase network stiffness up to a certain point, beyond which stiffness actually decreases with increasing VASP concentration. The maximum stiffness is 10-fold higher than for pure actin networks. Confocal microscopy shows that VASP forms clustered actin filament bundles, explaining the reduction in network elasticity at high VASP concentration. Removal of the tetramerization site results in significantly reduced bundling and bundle clustering, indicating that VASP's flexible tetrameric structure causes clustering. Removing either the F-actin or the G-actin binding site diminishes VASP's effect on elasticity, but does not eliminate it. Mutating the F-actin and G-actin binding site together, or mutating the F-actin binding site and saturating the G-actin binding site with monomeric actin, eliminates VASP's ability to increase network stiffness. We propose that, in the cell, VASP crosslinking confers only moderate increases in linear network elasticity, and unlike other crosslinkers, VASP's network stiffening activity may be tuned by the local concentration of monomeric actin.

  3. Kinetic Insights into the Elongation Reaction of Actin Filaments as a Function of Temperature, Pressure, and Macromolecular Crowding.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mimi; Winter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    Actin polymerization is an essential process in eukaryotic cells that provides a driving force for motility and mechanical resistance for cell shape. By using preformed gelsolin-actin nuclei and applying stopped-flow methodology, we quantitatively studied the elongation kinetics of actin filaments as a function of temperature and pressure in the presence of synthetic and protein crowding agents. We show that the association of actin monomers to the pointed end of double-stranded helical actin filaments (F-actin) proceeds via a transition state that requires an activation energy of 56 kJ mol(-1) for conformational and hydration rearrangements, but exhibits a negligible activation volume, pointing to a compact transition state that is devoid of packing defects. Macromolecular crowding causes acceleration of the F-actin elongation rate and counteracts the deteriorating effect of pressure. The results shed new light on the combined effect of these parameters on the polymerization process of actin, and help us understand the temperature and pressure sensitivity of actin polymerization under extreme conditions.

  4. The actin cytoskeleton in endothelial cell phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Prasain, Nutan; Stevens, Troy

    2009-01-01

    Endothelium forms a semi-permeable barrier that separates blood from the underlying tissue. Barrier function is largely determined by cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions that define the limits of cell borders. Yet, such cell-cell and cell-matrix tethering is critically reliant upon the nature of adherence within the cell itself. Indeed, the actin cytoskeleton fulfills this essential function, to provide a strong, dynamic intracellular scaffold that organizes integral membrane proteins with the cell’s interior, and responds to environmental cues to orchestrate appropriate cell shape. The actin cytoskeleton is comprised of three distinct, but interrelated structures, including actin cross-linking of spectrin within the membrane skeleton, the cortical actin rim, and actomyosin-based stress fibers. This review addresses each of these actin-based structures, and discusses cellular signals that control the disposition of actin in different endothelial cell phenotypes. PMID:19028505

  5. Filopodia-like actin cables position nuclei in association with perinuclear actin in Drosophila nurse cells.

    PubMed

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H

    2013-09-30

    Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery.

  6. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  7. Stochastic model of profilin-actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Brandon; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    A driving factor in cell motility and other processes that involve changes of cell shape is the rapid polymerization of actin subunits into long filaments. This process is regulated by profilin, a protein which binds to actin subunits and regulates elongation of actin filaments. Whether profilin stimulates polymerization by coupling to hydrolysis of ATP-bound actin is debated. Previous studies have proposed indirect coupling to ATP hydrolysis using rate equations, but did not include the effects of fluctuations that are important near the critical concentration. We developed stochastic simulations using the Gillespie algorithm to study single filament elongation at the barbed end in the presence of profilin. We used recently measured rate constants and estimated the rate of profilin binding to the barbed end such that detailed balance is satisfied. Fast phosphate release at the tip of the filament was accounted for. The elongation rate and length diffusivity as functions of profilin and actin concentration were calculated and used to extract the critical concentrations of free actin and of total actin. We show under what conditions profilin leads to an increase in the critical concentration of total actin but a decrease in the critical concentration of free actin.

  8. Contribution of nuclear actin to transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-06-01

    Actin, an integral component of the cytoskeleton, plays crucial roles in a variety of cell functions, including cell migration, adhesion, polarity and shape change. Studies performed during the last couple of decades have revealed that the actin also exists in the nucleus. However, the function and properties of nuclear actin remained elusive so far. Recently, we showed that an actin tagged with EYFP and fused with a nuclear localization signal (EYFP-NLS-actin) formed visible filamentous (F)-actin bundles in cells. To obtain further details about the individual genes that are affected by the nuclear actin, we have used the microarray analysis to determine the changes in the expression levels of RNAs in HeLa cells as a result of EYFP-NLS-actin expression. Our results suggest that the nuclear actin plays a role in the activation of genes rather than their repression. The data has been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the accession number GSE59799.

  9. Phosphorylation and actin activation of brain myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Barylko, B; Sobieszek, A

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for obtaining brain myosin that shows significant actin activation, after phosphorylation with chicken gizzard myosin light chain kinase. Myosin with this activity could be obtained only via the initial purification of brain actomyosin. The latter complex, isolated by a method similar to that used for smooth muscle, contained actin, myosin, tropomyosin of the non-muscle type and another actin-binding protein of approximately 100,000 daltons. From the presence of a specific myosin light chain kinase and phosphatase in brain tissue it is suggested that the regulation of actin-myosin interaction operates via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of myosin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:11894951

  10. Architecture and Connectivity Govern Actin Network Contractility.

    PubMed

    Ennomani, Hajer; Letort, Gaëlle; Guérin, Christophe; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Cao, Wenxiang; Nédélec, François; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Actomyosin contractility plays a central role in a wide range of cellular processes, including the establishment of cell polarity, cell migration, tissue integrity, and morphogenesis during development. The contractile response is variable and depends on actomyosin network architecture and biochemical composition. To determine how this coupling regulates actomyosin-driven contraction, we used a micropatterning method that enables the spatial control of actin assembly. We generated a variety of actin templates and measured how defined actin structures respond to myosin-induced forces. We found that the same actin filament crosslinkers either enhance or inhibit the contractility of a network, depending on the organization of actin within the network. Numerical simulations unified the roles of actin filament branching and crosslinking during actomyosin contraction. Specifically, we introduce the concept of "network connectivity" and show that the contractions of distinct actin architectures are described by the same master curve when considering their degree of connectivity. This makes it possible to predict the dynamic response of defined actin structures to transient changes in connectivity. We propose that, depending on the connectivity and the architecture, network contraction is dominated by either sarcomeric-like or buckling mechanisms. More generally, this study reveals how actin network contractility depends on its architecture under a defined set of biochemical conditions.

  11. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks. PMID:26915738

  12. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks.

  13. Is actin a transcription initiation factor for RNA polymerase B?

    PubMed Central

    Egly, J M; Miyamoto, N G; Moncollin, V; Chambon, P

    1984-01-01

    We have previously reported that two fractions derived from HeLa cell S100 extracts, the heparin flow-through and the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate are required in vitro for efficient and accurate transcription by RNA polymerase class B (II). We have further purified a factor present in the heparin flow-through fraction, which markedly stimulates specific transcription catalyzed by the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate. We report here that some of the properties of the stimulatory factor present in our most purified fractions are strikingly similar to those of actin. We demonstrate also that this factor acts at the pre-initiation level of the transcription reaction. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. PMID:6499833

  14. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  15. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  16. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin – for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling

  17. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Lovander, Kaylee E; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools--Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin--for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling tool

  18. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  19. Effect of alpha-actinin on actin structure. Actin ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Goll, D E; Robson, R M

    1981-08-28

    Alpha-Actinin increases the ATPase activity of actin by up to 84%, depending un pH, divalent cations present and the added Mg2+: ATP ratio. Dithiothreitol decreases actin ATPase activity approx. 20% but does not reduce the ability of alpha-actinin to increase actin ATP activity. Increasing amounts of added alpha-actinin up to 1 mos alpha-actinin to 49 mol actin cause in increasing increment in actin ATPase activity, but adding alpha-actinin beyond 1 mol alpha-actinin to 49 mol actin elicits only small additional increments in activity. Actin ATPase activity ranges from approx 100 nmol Pi/mg actin per h (4.3 mol Pi/mol actin per h) at high levels (10 mM) of ATP in the presence of lower amounts (1 mM) of added mg2+ to approx. 12.5 nmol Pi/mg actin per h (0.52 mol Pi/mol actin per h) at high pH (8.5) or at low levels (0.5-1.0 mM) of ATP in the presence of higher amounts (10 mM) of added Mg2+ ATp uncomplexed with Mg2+ inhibits the ability of alpha-actinin to increase F-actin ATPase activity. Activities with different divalent cations showed that the actin ATPase in these studies, which was 1/100 as great as Mg2+-modified actomyosin ATPase activity, was not due to trace amounts of myosin contaminating the actin preparations. The results are consistent with the concept that alpha-actinin can alter the structure of actin monomers. PMID:6456018

  20. Change in the actin-myosin subfragment 1 interaction during actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chaussepied, P; Kasprzak, A A

    1989-12-01

    To better characterize the conformational differences of G- and F-actin, we have compared the interaction between G- and F-actin with myosin subfragment 1 (S1) which had part of its F-actin binding site (residues 633-642) blocked by a complementary peptide or "antipeptide" (Chaussepied, P., and Morales, M. F. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 7471-7475). Light scattering, sedimentation, and electron microscopy measurements showed that, with the antipeptide covalently attached to the S1 heavy chain, S1 was not capable of inducing G-actin polymerization in the absence of salt. Moreover, the antipeptide-carrying S1 did not change the fluorescence polarization of 5-[2-(iodoacetyl)-aminoethyl]aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS)-labeled G-actin or of 1,5-IAEDANS-labeled actin dimer, compared to the control S1. This result, interpreted as a lack of interaction between G-actin and antipeptide-carrying S1, was confirmed further by the following experiments: in the presence of G-actin, antipeptide.S1 heavy chain was not protected against trypsin and papain proteolysis, and G-actin could not be cross-linked to antipeptide.S1 by 1-ethyl-3[-3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide. In contrast, similar experiments showed that antipeptide.S1 was able to interact with nascent F-actin and with F-actin. Thus, blocking the stretch 633-642 of S1 heavy chain by the antipeptide strongly inhibits G-actin-S1 interaction but only slightly alters F-actin-S1 contact. We, therefore postulate that this stretch of skeletal S1 heavy chain is essential for G-actin-S1 interaction and that the G-F transformation generates new S1 binding site(s) on the actin molecule.

  1. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. {yields} These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). {yields} Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. {yields} Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  2. Update on photodynamic treatment for actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Wiegell, Stine Regin

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive treatment option for actinic keratoses (AKs), as large skin areas can be treated with high response rates and superior cosmetic outcome. The efficacy of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-PDT and methyl aminolevulinate (MAL)-PDT for AK has been proven in multiple studies, and this treatment is recommended in numerous consensus works and therapy guidelines. Moreover, a self-adhesive ALA patch has been approved for the PDT of AK. In a phase III study, ALA-patch-PDT was superior to cryotherapy and placebo in the treatment of mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp, and pre-treatment of the lesions and additional light occlusion was unnecessary when using the patch. ALA with a proprietary nanoemulsion is another newly marketed ALA gel that has been approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AK on the head. ALA was combined with a nanoemulsion to achieve increased chemical stability of the active ingredient and to enhance skin penetration. One study found that ALA was superior to MAL in the treatment of AK on the face or scalp. Daylight-PDT is a simpler and more tolerable treatment procedure for PDT, and three randomised studies have shown that daylight-PDT is an effective and pain-free treatment for AK; however, the procedure is limited by the need for a sufficient light dose and outdoor temperature. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing prior to MAL has been used to improve the PDT response of thick AK. However, more intense acute skin reactions and long-term adverse events in ablative fractional laser resurfacing-PDT compared with PDT-treated skin were found, which might limit the use of the intensified treatment.

  3. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike; Huber, Steven C; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  4. SHIP-2 forms a tetrameric complex with filamin, actin, and GPIb-IX-V: localization of SHIP-2 to the activated platelet actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Jennifer M; Munday, Adam D; Kong, Anne M; Huysmans, Richard D; Matzaris, Maria; Layton, Meredith J; Nandurkar, Harshal H; Berndt, Michael C; Mitchell, Christina A

    2003-08-01

    The platelet receptor for the von Willebrand factor (VWF) glycoprotein Ib-IX-V (GPIb-IX-V) complex mediates platelet adhesion at sites of vascular injury. The cytoplasmic tail of the GPIbalpha subunit interacts with the actin-binding protein, filamin, anchoring the receptor in the cytoskeleton. In motile cells, the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) induces submembraneous actin remodeling. The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase-2 (SHIP-2), hydrolyzes PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 forming phosphatidylinositol 3,4 bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2) and regulates membrane ruffling via complex formation with filamin. In this study we investigate the intracellular location and association of SHIP-2 with filamin, actin, and the GPIb-IX-V complex in platelets. Immunoprecipitation of SHIP-2 from the Triton-soluble fraction of unstimulated platelets demonstrated association between SHIP-2, filamin, actin, and GPIb-IX-V. SHIP-2 associated with filamin or GPIb-IX-V was active and demonstrated PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase activity. Following thrombin or VWF-induced platelet activation, detection of the SHIP-2, filamin, and receptor complex decreased in the Triton-soluble fraction, although in control studies the level of SHIP-2, filamin, or GPIb-IX-V immunoprecipitated by their respective antibodies did not change following platelet activation. In activated platelets spreading on a VWF matrix, SHIP-2 localized intensely with actin at the central actin ring and colocalized with actin and filamin at filopodia and lamellipodia. In spread platelets, GPIb-IX-V localized to the center of the platelet and showed little colocalization with filamin at the plasma membrane. These studies demonstrate a functionally active complex between SHIP-2, filamin, actin, and GPIb-IX-V that may orchestrate the localized hydrolysis of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and thereby regulate cortical and submembraneous actin.

  5. Probing the actin-auxin oscillator

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The directional transport of the plant hormone auxin depends on transcellular gradients of auxin-efflux carriers that continuously cycle between plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. This cycling has been proposed to depend on actin filaments. However, the role of actin for the polarity of auxin transport has been disputed. To get insight into this question, actin bundling was induced by overexpression of the actin-binding domain of talin in tobacco BY-2 cells and in rice plants. This bundling can be reverted by addition of auxins, which allows to address the role of actin organization on the flux of auxin. In both systems, the reversion of a normal actin configuration can be restored by addition of exogenous auxins and this fully restores the respective auxin-dependent functions. These findings lead to a model of a self-referring regulatory circuit between polar auxin transport and actin organization. To further dissect the actin-auxin oscillator, we used photoactivated release of caged auxin in tobacco cells to demonstrate that auxin gradients can be manipulated at a subcellular level. PMID:20023411

  6. Actin cytoskeleton redox proteome oxidation by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Orr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies associate environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure with the risk of lung diseases. Although mechanisms are not fully elucidated, several studies demonstrate Cd effects on actin and actin-associated proteins. In a recent study of Cd at concentrations similar to environmental exposures, we found that redox-dependent inflammatory signaling by NF-κB was sensitive to the actin-disrupting agent, cytochalasin D. The goal of the present study was to use mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics to investigate Cd effects on the actin cytoskeleton proteome and related functional pathways in lung cells at low environmental concentrations. The results showed that Cd under conditions that did not alter total protein thiols or glutathione redox state caused significant oxidation of peptidyl Cys of proteins regulating actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence microscopy of lung fibroblasts and pulmonary artery endothelial cells showed that low-dose Cd exposure stimulated filamentous actin formation and nuclear localization of destrin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Taken together, the results show that redox states of peptidyl Cys in proteins associated with actin cytoskeleton pathways are selectively oxidized in lung by Cd at levels thought to occur from environmental exposure. PMID:24077948

  7. Colchicine activates actin polymerization by microtubule depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Jung, H I; Shin, I; Park, Y M; Kang, K W; Ha, K S

    1997-06-30

    Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts were treated with the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine to study any interaction between microtubule dynamics and actin polymerization. Colchicine increased the amount of filamentous actin (F-actin), in a dose- and time-dependent manner with a significant increase at 1 h by about 130% over control level. Confocal microscopic observation showed that colchicine increased F-actin contents by stress fiber formation without inducing membrane ruffling. Colchicine did not activate phospholipase C and phospholipase D, whereas lysophosphatidic acid did, indicating that colchicine may have a different mechanism of actin polymerization regulation from LPA. A variety of microtubule-disrupting agents stimulated actin polymerization in Swiss 3T3 and Rat-2 fibroblasts as did colchicine, but the microtubule-stabilizing agent taxol inhibited actin polymerization induced by the above microtubule-disrupting agents. In addition, colchicine-induced actin polymerization was blocked by two protein phosphatase inhibitors, okadaic acid and calyculin A. These results suggest that microtubule depolymerization activates stress fiber formation by serine/threonine dephosphorylation in fibroblasts. PMID:9264034

  8. Formin DAAM1 Organizes Actin Filaments in the Cytoplasmic Nodal Actin Network

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weiwei; Lieu, Zi Zhao; Manser, Ed; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    A nodal cytoplasmic actin network underlies actin cytoplasm cohesion in the absence of stress fibers. We previously described such a network that forms upon Latrunculin A (LatA) treatment, in which formin DAAM1 was localized at these nodes. Knock down of DAAM1 reduced the mobility of actin nodes but the nodes remained. Here we have investigated DAAM1 containing nodes after LatA washout. DAAM1 was found to be distributed between the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. The membrane binding likely occurs through an interaction with lipid rafts, but is not required for F-actin assembly. Interesting the forced interaction of DAAM1 with plasma membrane through a rapamycin-dependent linkage, enhanced F-actin assembly at the cell membrane (compared to the cytoplasm) after the LatA washout. However, immediately after addition of both rapamycin and LatA, the cytoplasmic actin nodes formed transiently, before DAAM1 moved to the membrane. This was consistent with the idea that DAAM1 was initially anchored to cytoplasmic actin nodes. Further, photoactivatable tracking of DAAM1 showed DAAM1 was immobilized at these actin nodes. Thus, we suggest that DAAM1 organizes actin filaments into a nodal complex, and such nodal complexes seed actin network recovery after actin depolymerization. PMID:27760153

  9. Actin-binding proteins: the long road to understanding the dynamic landscape of cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Pekka

    2016-08-15

    The actin cytoskeleton supports a vast number of cellular processes in nonmuscle cells. It is well established that the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are controlled by a large array of actin-binding proteins. However, it was only 40 years ago that the first nonmuscle actin-binding protein, filamin, was identified and characterized. Filamin was shown to bind and cross-link actin filaments into higher-order structures and contribute to phagocytosis in macrophages. Subsequently many other nonmuscle actin-binding proteins were identified and characterized. These proteins regulate almost all steps of the actin filament assembly and disassembly cycles, as well as the arrangement of actin filaments into diverse three-dimensional structures. Although the individual biochemical activities of most actin-regulatory proteins are relatively well understood, knowledge of how these proteins function together in a common cytoplasm to control actin dynamics and architecture is only beginning to emerge. Furthermore, understanding how signaling pathways and mechanical cues control the activities of various actin-binding proteins in different cellular, developmental, and pathological processes will keep researchers busy for decades. PMID:27528696

  10. Integration of linear and dendritic actin nucleation in Nck-induced actin comets

    PubMed Central

    Borinskaya, Sofya; Velle, Katrina B.; Campellone, Kenneth G.; Talman, Arthur; Alvarez, Diego; Agaisse, Hervé; Wu, Yi I.; Loew, Leslie M.; Mayer, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    The Nck adaptor protein recruits cytosolic effectors such as N-WASP that induce localized actin polymerization. Experimental aggregation of Nck SH3 domains at the membrane induces actin comet tails—dynamic, elongated filamentous actin structures similar to those that drive the movement of microbial pathogens such as vaccinia virus. Here we show that experimental manipulation of the balance between unbranched/branched nucleation altered the morphology and dynamics of Nck-induced actin comets. Inhibition of linear, formin-based nucleation with the small-molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 or overexpression of the formin FH1 domain resulted in formation of predominantly circular-shaped actin structures with low mobility (actin blobs). These results indicate that formin-based linear actin polymerization is critical for the formation and maintenance of Nck-dependent actin comet tails. Consistent with this, aggregation of an exclusively branched nucleation-promoting factor (the VCA domain of N-WASP), with density and turnover similar to those of N-WASP in Nck comets, did not reconstitute dynamic, elongated actin comets. Furthermore, enhancement of branched Arp2/3-mediated nucleation by N-WASP overexpression caused loss of the typical actin comet tail shape induced by Nck aggregation. Thus the ratio of linear to dendritic nucleation activity may serve to distinguish the properties of actin structures induced by various viral and bacterial pathogens. PMID:26609071

  11. Integration of linear and dendritic actin nucleation in Nck-induced actin comets.

    PubMed

    Borinskaya, Sofya; Velle, Katrina B; Campellone, Kenneth G; Talman, Arthur; Alvarez, Diego; Agaisse, Hervé; Wu, Yi I; Loew, Leslie M; Mayer, Bruce J

    2016-01-15

    The Nck adaptor protein recruits cytosolic effectors such as N-WASP that induce localized actin polymerization. Experimental aggregation of Nck SH3 domains at the membrane induces actin comet tails--dynamic, elongated filamentous actin structures similar to those that drive the movement of microbial pathogens such as vaccinia virus. Here we show that experimental manipulation of the balance between unbranched/branched nucleation altered the morphology and dynamics of Nck-induced actin comets. Inhibition of linear, formin-based nucleation with the small-molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 or overexpression of the formin FH1 domain resulted in formation of predominantly circular-shaped actin structures with low mobility (actin blobs). These results indicate that formin-based linear actin polymerization is critical for the formation and maintenance of Nck-dependent actin comet tails. Consistent with this, aggregation of an exclusively branched nucleation-promoting factor (the VCA domain of N-WASP), with density and turnover similar to those of N-WASP in Nck comets, did not reconstitute dynamic, elongated actin comets. Furthermore, enhancement of branched Arp2/3-mediated nucleation by N-WASP overexpression caused loss of the typical actin comet tail shape induced by Nck aggregation. Thus the ratio of linear to dendritic nucleation activity may serve to distinguish the properties of actin structures induced by various viral and bacterial pathogens. PMID:26609071

  12. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  13. The actin-related protein Act3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is located in the nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, V; Harata, M; Hauser, H; Wintersberger, U

    1995-01-01

    Actin-related proteins, a group of protein families that exhibit about 50% sequence identity among each other and to conventional actin, have been found in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes for one conventional actin (ACT1) and for three actin-related proteins (ACT2, ACT3, and ACT5) are known. ACT3, which we recently discovered, is an essential gene coding for a polypeptide of 489 amino acids (Act3p), with a calculated molecular mass of 54.8 kDa. Besides its homology to conventional actin, Act3p possesses a domain exhibiting weak similarity to the chromosomal protein HMG-14 as well as a potential nuclear localization signal. An antiserum prepared against a specific segment of the ACT3 gene product recognizes a polypeptide band of approximately 55 kDa in yeast extract. Indirect immunofluorescence experiments with this antiserum revealed that Act3p is located in the nucleus. Nuclear staining was observed in all cells regardless of the stage of the cell cycle. Independently, immunoblotting experiments with subcellular fractions showed that Act3p is indeed highly enriched in the nuclear fraction. We suggest that Act3p is an essential constituent of yeast chromatin. Images PMID:8573785

  14. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    PubMed

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  15. Probing actin incorporation into myofibrils using Asp11 and His73 actin mutants.

    PubMed

    Xia, D; Peng, B; Sesok, D A; Peng, I

    1993-01-01

    We used a cell free system Bouché et al.: J. Cell Biol. 107:587-596, 1988] to study the incorporation of actin into myofibrils. We used alpha-skeletal muscle actin and actins with substitutions of either His73 [Solomon and Rubenstein: J. Biol.Chem. 262:11382, 1987], or Asp11 [Solomon et al.: J. Biol. Chem. 263:19662, 1988]. Actins were translated in reticulocyte lysate and incubated with myofibrils. The incorporated wild type actin could be cross-linked into dimers using N,N'-1,4-phenylenebismaleimide (PBM), indicating that the incorporated actin is actually inserted into the thin filaments of the myofibril. The His73 mutants incorporated to the same extent as wild type actin and was also cross-linked with PBM. Although some of the Asp11 mutants co-assembled with carrier actin, only 1-3% of the Asp11 mutant actins incorporated after 2 min and did not increase after 2 hr. Roughly 17% of wild type actin incorporated after 2 min and 31% after 2 hr. ATP increased the release of wild type actin from myofibrils, but did not increase the release of Asp11 mutants. We suggest that (1) the incorporation of wild type and His73 mutant actins was due to a physiological process whereas association of Asp11 mutants with myofibrils was non-specific, (2) the incorporation of wild type actin involved a rapid initial phase, followed by a slower phase, and (3) since some of the Asp11 mutants can co-assemble with wild type actin, the ability to self-assemble was not sufficient for incorporation into myofibrils. Thus, incorporation probably includes interaction between actin and a thin filament associated protein. We also showed that incorporation occurred at actin concentrations which would cause disassembly of F-actin. Since the myofibrils did not show large scale disassembly but incorporated actin, filament stability and monomer incorporation are likely to be mediated by actin associated proteins of the myofibril. PMID:8287497

  16. Dynamics of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Christophe; Mahadevan, L.; Shin, Jennifer; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosome of the sperm of the horseshoe crab (Limulus Polyphemus) is an unusual actin based system that shows a spectacular dynamical transition in the presence of Ca++ that is present in abundance in the neighborhood of the egg. During this process, the bundle, which is initially bent and twisted uncoils and becomes straight in a matter of a few seconds. Based on microstructural data, we propose a model for the dynamics of uncoiling that is best represented by a triple-well potential corresponding to the different structural arrangements of the supertwisted filaments. Each of the false, true and coiled states corresponds to a local minimum of the energy, with the true state being the one with the lowest energy. Using an evolution equation derived by balancing torques, we investigate the nucleation and propagation of the phase transition and compare the results with those of experiments. Our model quantifies the hypothesis that the acrosomal bundle behaves like a mechano-chemical spring.

  17. Chloride channel activity of ClC-2 is modified by the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, N; Ramjeesingh, M; Wong, S; Varga, A; Garami, E; Bear, C E

    2000-01-01

    The chloride channel ClC-2 has been implicated in essential physiological functions, including cell-volume regulation and fluid secretion by specific epithelial tissues. Although ClC-2 is known to be activated by hyperpolarization and hypo-osmotic shock, the molecular basis for the regulation of this channel remains unclear. Here we show in the Xenopus oocyte expression system that the chloride-channel activity of ClC-2 is enhanced after treatment with the actin-disrupting agents cytochalasin and latrunkulin. These findings suggest that the actin cytoskeleton normally exerts an inhibitory effect on ClC-2 activity. An inhibitory domain was previously defined in the N-terminus of ClC-2, so we sought to determine whether this domain might interact directly with actin in binding assays in vitro. We found that a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the inhibitory domain was capable of binding actin in overlay and co-sedimentation assays. Further, the binding of actin to this relatively basic peptide (pI 8.4) might be mediated through electrostatic interactions because binding was inhibited at high concentrations of NaCl with a half-maximal decrease in signal at 180 mM NaCl. This work suggests that electrostatic interactions between the N-terminus of ClC-2 and the actin cytoskeleton might have a role in the regulation of this channel. PMID:11104687

  18. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Robert Y.; McDonald, Nancy Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  19. Advances in the detection capability on actinic blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Noriaki; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Mori, Ichro; Ino, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Takehisa, Kiwamu; Miyai, Hiroki; Kusunose, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    Improvements in the detection capability of a high-volume-manufacturing (HVM) actinic blank inspection (ABI) prototype for native defects caused by illumination numerical aperture (NA) enlargement were evaluated. A mask blank was inspected by varying the illumination NA. The defect signal intensity increased with illumination NA enlargement as predicted from simulation. The mask blank was also inspected with optical tools, and no additional phase defect was detected. All of the printable phase defects were verified to have been detected by the HVM ABI prototype.

  20. Actin depolymerizing factor controls actin turnover and gliding motility in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Simren; Sibley, L. David

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites rely on actin-based gliding motility to move across the substratum, cross biological barriers, and invade their host cells. Gliding motility depends on polymerization of parasite actin filaments, yet ∼98% of actin is nonfilamentous in resting parasites. Previous studies suggest that the lack of actin filaments in the parasite is due to inherent instability, leaving uncertain the role of actin-binding proteins in controlling dynamics. We have previously shown that the single allele of Toxoplasma gondii actin depolymerizing factor (TgADF) has strong actin monomer–sequestering and weak filament-severing activities in vitro. Here we used a conditional knockout strategy to investigate the role of TgADF in vivo. Suppression of TgADF led to accumulation of actin-rich filaments that were detected by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Parasites deficient in TgADF showed reduced speed of motility, increased aberrant patterns of motion, and inhibition of sustained helical gliding. Lack of TgADF also led to severe defects in entry and egress from host cells, thus blocking infection in vitro. These studies establish that the absence of stable actin structures in the parasite are not simply the result of intrinsic instability, but that TgADF is required for the rapid turnover of parasite actin filaments, gliding motility, and cell invasion. PMID:21346192

  1. Reversible stress softening of actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Parekh, Sapun H.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells play an essential role in numerous physiological processes. Organized networks of semiflexible actin filaments determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes. Although numerous actin-binding proteins have been identified that organize networks, the mechanical properties of actin networks with physiological architectures and concentrations have been difficult to measure quantitatively. Studies of mechanical properties in vitro have found that crosslinked networks of actin filaments formed in solution exhibit stress stiffening arising from the entropic elasticity of individual filaments or crosslinkers resisting extension. Here we report reversible stress-softening behaviour in actin networks reconstituted in vitro that suggests a critical role for filaments resisting compression. Using a modified atomic force microscope to probe dendritic actin networks (like those formed in the lamellipodia of motile cells), we observe stress stiffening followed by a regime of reversible stress softening at higher loads. This softening behaviour can be explained by elastic buckling of individual filaments under compression that avoids catastrophic fracture of the network. The observation of both stress stiffening and softening suggests a complex interplay between entropic and enthalpic elasticity in determining the mechanical properties of actin networks.

  2. Bidirectional interactions between NOX2-type NADPH oxidase and the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Munnamalai, Vidhya; Weaver, Cory J; Weisheit, Corinne E; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Quinn, Mark T; Suter, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    NADPH oxidases are important for neuronal function but detailed subcellular localization studies have not been performed. Here, we provide the first evidence for the presence of functional NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-type complex in neuronal growth cones and its bidirectional relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. NADPH oxidase inhibition resulted in reduced F-actin content, retrograde F-actin flow, and neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of NADPH oxidase via protein kinase C activation increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in the growth cone periphery. The main enzymatic NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2/gp91(phox) localized to the growth cone plasma membrane and showed little overlap with the regulatory subunit p40(phox) . p40(phox) itself exhibited colocalization with filopodial actin bundles. Differential subcellular fractionation revealed preferential association of NOX2/gp91(phox) and p40(phox) with the membrane and the cytoskeletal fraction, respectively. When neurite growth was evoked with beads coated with the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, we observed a significant increase in colocalization of p40(phox) with NOX2/gp91(phox) at apCAM adhesion sites. Together, these findings suggest a bidirectional functional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones, which contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth. We have previously shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical for actin organization and dynamics in neuronal growth cones as well as neurite outgrowth. Here, we report that the cytosolic subunit p40(phox) of the NOX2-type NADPH oxidase complex is partially associated with F-actin in neuronal growth cones, while ROS produced by this complex regulates F-actin dynamics and neurite growth. These findings provide evidence for a bidirectional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones. PMID:24702317

  3. Structure-based analysis of high pressure adaptation of alpha-actin.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takami

    2003-07-25

    Deep-sea fishes occur to depths of several thousand meters, and at these abyssal depths encounter pressures that shallower living fishes cannot tolerate. Tolerance of abyssal pressures by deep-sea fish is likely to depend in part on adaptive modifications of proteins. However, the types of structural modifications to proteins that allow function at high pressure have not been discovered. To elucidate the mechanisms of protein adaptation to high pressure, we cloned the alpha-skeletal actin cDNAs from two abyssal Coryphaenoides species, C. armatus and C. yaquinae, and identified three amino acid substitutions, V54A or L67P, Q137K, and A155S, that distinguish these abyssal actins from orthologs of alpha-actin from non-abyssal Coryphaenoides. These substitutions, Q137K and A155S, prevent the dissociation reactions of ATP and Ca2+ from being influenced by high pressure. In particular, the lysine residue at position 137 results in a much smaller apparent volume change in the Ca2+ dissociation reaction. The V54A or L67P substitution reduces the volume change associated with actin polymerization and has a role in maintaining the DNase I activity of actin at high pressure. Together, these results indicate that a few amino acid substitutions in key functional positions can adaptively alter the pressure sensitivity of a protein. PMID:12740368

  4. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phasukthaworn, Ruedee; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2016-01-01

    Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies. PMID:27293392

  5. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  6. Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gressin, Laurène; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes, including morphogenesis, polarization, and motility, rely on a variety of actin-based structures. Although the biochemical composition and filament organization of these structures are different, they often emerge from a common origin. This is possible because the actin structures are highly dynamic. Indeed, they assemble, grow, and disassemble in a time scale of a second to a minute. Therefore, the reorganization of a given actin structure can promote the formation of another. Here, we discuss such transitions and illustrate them with computer simulations. PMID:26989473

  7. Comparison of Echocardiographic and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements of Functional Single Ventricular Volumes, Mass, and Ejection Fraction (From the Pediatric Heart Network Multicenter Fontan Cross-Sectional Study)

    PubMed Central

    Margossian, Renee; Schwartz, Marcy L.; Prakash, Ashwin; Wruck, Lisa; Colan, Steven D.; Atz, Andrew M.; Bradley, Timothy J.; Fogel, Mark A.; Hurwitz, Lynne M.; Marcus, Edward; Powell, Andrew J.; Printz, Beth F.; Puchalski, Michael D.; Rychik, Jack; Shirali, Girish; Williams, Richard; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Geva, Tal

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of the size and function of the functional single ventricle (FSV) is a key element in the management of patients following the Fontan procedure. Measurement variability of ventricular mass, volume and ejection fraction between observers by echocardiography and CMR and their reproducibility between readers in these patients has not been described. From the 546 patients enrolled in the Pediatric Heart Network Fontan Cross-Sectional Study (mean age 11.9±3.4 years), 100 echocardiograms and 50 CMR studies were assessed for measurement reproducibility; 124 subjects with paired studies were selected for comparison between modalities. Inter-observer agreement for qualitative grading of ventricular function by echocardiography was modest for left ventricular (LV) morphology (kappa= 0.42) and weak for right ventricular (RV) morphology (kappa= 0.12). For quantitative assessment, high intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were found for echocardiographic inter-observer (LV= 0.87–0.92; RV= 0.82–0.85) agreement of systolic and diastolic volumes, respectively. In contrast, ICCs for LV and RV mass were moderate (LV= 0.78; RV= 0.72). The corresponding ICCs by CMR were high (LV= 0.96; RV= 0.85). Volumes by echocardiography averaged 70% of CMR values. Interobserver reproducibility of EF was similar for both modalities. Although the absolute mean difference between modalities for ejection fraction was small (<2%), 95% limits of agreement were wide. In conclusion, agreement between observers of qualitative FSV function by echocardiography is modest. Measurements of FSV volume by 2D echocardiography underestimate CMR measurements but their reproducibility is high. Echocardiographic and CMR measurements of FSV EF demonstrate similar interobserver reproducibility whereas measurements of FSV mass and LV diastolic volume are more reproducible by CMR. PMID:19616678

  8. 40 CFR 63.2854 - How do I determine the weighted average volume fraction of HAP in the actual solvent loss?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Solvent Extraction for Vegetable Oil Production Compliance Requirements § 63.2854... fraction of HAP in extraction solvent received for use in your vegetable oil production process. By the end... recovered from off-site oil. To determine the HAP content of the material in each delivery of solvent,...

  9. 40 CFR 63.2854 - How do I determine the weighted average volume fraction of HAP in the actual solvent loss?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Solvent Extraction for Vegetable Oil Production Compliance Requirements § 63.2854... fraction of HAP in extraction solvent received for use in your vegetable oil production process. By the end... recovered from off-site oil. To determine the HAP content of the material in each delivery of solvent,...

  10. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  11. Correlation between polymerizability and conformation in scallop beta-like actin and rabbit skeletal muscle alpha-actin.

    PubMed

    Khaitlina, S; Antropova, O; Kuznetsova, I; Turoverov, K; Collins, J H

    1999-08-01

    In order to investigate the structural basis for functional differences among actin isoforms, we have compared the polymerization properties and conformations of scallop adductor muscle beta-like actin and rabbit skeletal muscle alpha-actin. Polymerization of scallop Ca(2+)-actin was slower than that of skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-actin. Cleavage of the actin polypeptide chain between Gly-42 and Val-43 with Escherichia coli protease ECP 32 impaired the polymerization of scallop Mg(2+)-actin to a greater extent than skeletal muscle Mg(2+)-actin. When monomeric scallop and skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-actins were subjected to limited proteolysis with trypsin, subtilisin, or ECP 32, no differences in the conformation of actin subdomain 2 were detected. At the same time, local differences in the conformations of scallop and skeletal muscle actin subdomains 1 were revealed as intrinsic fluorescence differences. Replacement of tightly bound Ca(2+) with Mg(2+) resulted in more extensive proteolysis of segment 61-69 of scallop actin than in the case of skeletal muscle actin. Furthermore, segment 61-69 was more accessible to proteolysis with subtilisin in polymerized scallop Ca(2+)-actin than in polymerized skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-actin, indicating that, in the polymeric form, the nucleotide-containing cleft is in a more open conformation in beta-like scallop actin than in skeletal muscle alpha-actin. We suggest that this difference between scallop and skeletal muscle actins is due to a less efficient shift of scallop actin subdomain 2 to the position it has in the polymer. The possible consequences of amino acid substitutions in actin subdomain 1 in the allosteric regulation of the actin cleft, and hence in the different stabilities of polymers formed by different actins, are discussed. PMID:10415117

  12. Structural Differences Explain Diverse Functions of Plasmodium Actins

    PubMed Central

    Vahokoski, Juha; Martinez, Silvia Muñico; Ignatev, Alexander; Lepper, Simone; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Sidén-Kiamos, Inga; Sachse, Carsten; Kursula, Inari

    2014-01-01

    Actins are highly conserved proteins and key players in central processes in all eukaryotic cells. The two actins of the malaria parasite are among the most divergent eukaryotic actins and also differ from each other more than isoforms in any other species. Microfilaments have not been directly observed in Plasmodium and are presumed to be short and highly dynamic. We show that actin I cannot complement actin II in male gametogenesis, suggesting critical structural differences. Cryo-EM reveals that Plasmodium actin I has a unique filament structure, whereas actin II filaments resemble canonical F-actin. Both Plasmodium actins hydrolyze ATP more efficiently than α-actin, and unlike any other actin, both parasite actins rapidly form short oligomers induced by ADP. Crystal structures of both isoforms pinpoint several structural changes in the monomers causing the unique polymerization properties. Inserting the canonical D-loop to Plasmodium actin I leads to the formation of long filaments in vitro. In vivo, this chimera restores gametogenesis in parasites lacking actin II, suggesting that stable filaments are required for exflagellation. Together, these data underline the divergence of eukaryotic actins and demonstrate how structural differences in the monomers translate into filaments with different properties, implying that even eukaryotic actins have faced different evolutionary pressures and followed different paths for developing their polymerization properties. PMID:24743229

  13. Actin filament organization of foot processes in vertebrate glomerular podocytes.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the actin filament organization and immunolocalization of actin-binding proteins (alpha-actinin and cortactin) in the podocyte foot processes of eight vertebrate species (lamprey, carp, newt, frog, gecko, turtle, quail, and rat). Three types of actin cytoskeleton were found in these foot processes. (1) A cortical actin network with cortactin filling the space between the plasma membrane and the other actin cytoskeletons described below was found in all of the species examined here. The data indicated that the cortical actin network was the minimal essential actin cytoskeleton for the formation and maintenance of the foot processes in vertebrate podocytes. (2) An actin bundle with alpha-actinin existing along the longitudinal axis of foot process above the level of slit diaphragms was only observed in quail and rat. (3) An actin fascicle consisting of much fewer numbers of actin filaments than that of the actin bundle was observed in the species other than quail and rat, but at various frequencies. These findings suggest that the actin bundle is an additional actin cytoskeleton reflecting a functional state peculiar to quail and rat glomeruli. Considering the higher intraglomerular pressure and the extremely thin filtration barrier in birds and mammals, the foot processes probably mainly protect the thinner filtration barrier from the higher internal pressure occurring in quail and rat glomeruli. Therefore, we consider that the actin bundle plays a crucial role in the mechanical protection of the filtration barrier. Moreover, the actin fascicle may be a potential precursor of the actin bundle.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: actin-accumulation myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 7(3):160-8. Citation on PubMed Laing NG, Dye DE, Wallgren-Pettersson C, Richard G, Monnier ... Vigneron J, Wallgren-Pettersson C, Beggs AH, Laing NG. Mutations in the skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene ...

  15. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field. PMID:19824469

  16. Structural Dynamics of an Actin Spring

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, L.; Riera, C.S.; Shin, Jennifer H.

    2011-01-01

    Actin-based motility in cells is usually associated with either polymerization/depolymerization in the presence of cross-linkers or contractility in the presence of myosin motors. Here, we focus on a third distinct mechanism involving actin in motility, seen in the dynamics of an active actin spring that powers the acrosomal reaction of the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) sperm. During this process, a 60-μm bent and twisted bundle of cross-linked actin uncoils and becomes straight in a few seconds in the presence of Ca2+. This straightening, which occurs at a constant velocity, allows the acrosome to forcefully penetrate the egg. Synthesizing ultrastructural information with the kinetics, energetics, and imaging of calcium binding allows us to construct a dynamical theory for this mechanochemical engine consistent with our experimental observations. It also illuminates the general mechanism by which energy may be stored in conformational changes and released cooperatively in ordered macromolecular assemblies. PMID:21320427

  17. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  18. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  19. Nematic textures in F-actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.; Roy, J.; Chakrabarti, N.; Basu, S.; Das, U.

    2002-05-01

    Actin filaments, which are protein polymers occurring abundantly and ubiquitously in muscle and nonmuscle cells, are known to align in a shear flow, and with an external magnetic field. They form a nematic liquid crystal of the athermal type at a low concentration. Typical defects and textures of the nematic actin liquid crystal are described in this work. The generation of well-aligned nematic single crystals has been reported, in the vicinity of an air-water interface, with the actin filaments spontaneously aligning normal to the interface. Away from the air-water interface nematic single crystal domains are due to the alignment of the actin filaments parallel to the glass surface. The twist-bend nature of the disclination line of integral strength (m=1) has been attributed to the relative magnitudes of the anisotropic curvature elastic constants, which reflect the filaments' semirigidity.

  20. Actinic review of EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Heiko; Ruoff, Johannes; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kaiser, Winfried

    2010-04-01

    Management of mask defects is a major challenge for the introduction of EUV for HVM production. Once a defect has been detected, its printing impact needs to be predicted. Potentially the defect requires some repair, the success of which needs to be proven. This defect review has to be done with an actinic inspection system that matches the imaging conditions of an EUV scanner. During recent years, several concepts for such an aerial image metrology system (AIMS™) have been proposed. However, until now no commercial solution exists for EUV. Today, advances in EUV optics technology allow envisioning a solution that has been discarded before as unrealistic. We present this concept and its technical cornerstones.While the power requirement for the EUV source is less demanding than for HVM lithography tools, radiance, floor space, and stability are the main criteria for source selection. The requirement to emulate several generations of EUV scanners demands a large flexibility for the ilumination and imaging systems. New critical specifications to the EUV mirrors in the projection microscope can be satisfied using our expertise from lithographic mirrors. In summary, an EUV AIMS™ meeting production requirements seems to be feasible.

  1. Elasticity of F-actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret Lise

    This thesis presents a study of the elasticity and microstructure of three filamentous actin (F-actin) based materials. Using bulk rheology, microrheology, multiple particle tracking and imaging techniques, we study the microscopic origins of the mechanical properties of F-actin networks. We briefly introduce aspects of F-actin and rheology essential to provide a background for and motivate this thesis in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we describe the materials and methods used. An introduction to microrheology is given in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, we study solutions of entangled F-actin. We elucidate the microscopic origins of bulk elasticity using microrheology techniques. We also show that multiple particle tracking can also probe the dynamics of the F-actin solution microstructure. We explore the effect of rigid, incompliant chemical cross-links between actin filaments in Chapter 5. We explore changes in the network microstructure as the concentration of cross-links is varied. We find that the elastic stiffness of these networks is extremely sensitive to small changes in cross-link density. Despite this large variation, the linear viscoelasticity of all networks can be scaled onto a universal master curve; this scaling reveals that the mechanical dissipation of the networks is due to thermal fluctuations of F-actin. At large stresses, the mechanical stiffness of these networks diverges. The form of this stress stiffening response is consistent with the non-linear force extension of a single semi-flexible polymer. Thus, over a large range of conditions, the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of rigidly cross-linked networks is entropic in origin. Finally, at very low cross-link and filament densities, we observe a transition to a qualitatively different type of elasticity; this is consistent with a transition to an enthalpic network elasticity dominated by bending of F-actin. In Chapter 6, we study the elastic properties of F-actin networks assembled with a

  2. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  3. Actin: its cumbersome pilgrimage through cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Michael; Jockusch, Brigitte M

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we follow the history of one of the most abundant, most intensely studied proteins of the eukaryotic cells: actin. We report on hallmarks of its discovery, its structural and functional characterization and localization over time, and point to present days' knowledge on its position as a member of a large family. We focus on the rather puzzling number of diverse functions as proposed for actin as a dual compartment protein. Finally, we venture on some speculations as to its origin.

  4. Structural dynamics of actin during active interaction with myosin: different effects of weakly and strongly bound myosin heads.

    PubMed

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Walseth, Timothy F; Thomas, David D

    2004-08-24

    We have used optical spectroscopy (transient phosphorescence anisotropy, TPA, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, FRET) to detect the effects of weakly bound myosin S1 on actin during the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The changes in actin were reported by (a) a phosphorescent probe (ErIA) attached to Cys 374 and (b) a FRET donor-acceptor pair, IAEDANS attached to Cys 374 and a nucleotide analogue (TNPADP) in the nucleotide-binding cleft. Strong interactions were detected in the absence of ATP, and weak interactions were detected in the presence of ATP or its slowly hydrolyzed analogue ATP-gamma-S, under conditions where a significant fraction of weakly bound acto-S1 complex was present and the rate of nucleotide hydrolysis was low enough to enable steady-state measurements. The results show that actin in the weakly bound complex with S1 assumes a new structural state in which (a) the actin filament has microsecond rotational dynamics intermediate between that of free actin and the strongly bound complex and (b) S1-induced changes are not propagated along the actin filament, in contrast to the highly cooperative changes due to the strongly bound complex. We propose that the transition on the acto-myosin interface from weak to strong binding is accompanied by transitions in the structural dynamics of actin parallel to transitions in the dynamics of interacting myosin heads.

  5. Changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry before the 25th fraction during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Shan Guoping; Wang Wei; Yu Changhui; Wang Biyun; Shao Minghai; Wang Jianhua; Yang Weifang

    2012-07-01

    To quantify changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry, and to illustrate the inferiority of non-replanning during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Fifty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled in this prospective trial. Before the 25th fraction, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the initial plan. Significant reduction of the transverse diameter of the nasopharyngeal, the neck, and 2 parotid glands volume was observed on second CT compared with the first CT (mean reduction 7.48 {+-} 4.45 mm, 6.80 {+-} 15.14 mm, 5.70 {+-} 6.26 mL, and 5.04 {+-} 5.85 mL, respectively; p < 0.01). The maximum dose and V-40 of the spinal cord, mean dose, and V30 of the left and right parotid, and V-50 of the brain stem were increased significantly in the phantom plan compared with the initial plan (mean increase 4.75 {+-} 5.55 Gy, 7.18 {+-} 10.07%, 4.51 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 6.59 {+-} 17.82%, 5.33 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 11.68 {+-} 17.11% and 1.48 {+-} 3.67%, respectively; p < 0.01). On the basis of dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, the dose of the normal critical structures for 52.83% (28/53) of the phantom plans were out of limit compared with 1.89% (1/53) of the initial plans (p < 0.0001). Because of the significant change in anatomy and dose before the 25th fraction during IMRT, replanning should be necessary during IMRT with NPC.

  6. Nonrandom turnover of actin and tubulin in cultured rabbit cardiac fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mostow, W.R.; Ferguson, A.G.; Lesch, M.; Decker, R.S.; Samarel, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    Total protein fractional rates of growth, synthesis, and degradation were assessed in primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts. Differences in fractional growth rates were produced by subculturing cells at low density and growing them to confluence. Total protein fractional degradative rates were then derived by subtracting fractional growth rates from measured fractional synthetic rates (obtained in (3H)leucine pulse-labeling experiments). Actin and tubulin degradation were studied in similar rapidly and slowly growing cultures. (35S)methionine pulse-chase experiments, followed by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, fluorography, and densitometry were used to determine the amount of labeled actin and tubulin remaining in cultures at various times during the chase (0-96 h). The indirect study showed a substantially lower total protein fractional degradative rate during rapid vs. slow growth (0.04 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.42 +/- 0.01 d-1 at 2 and 15 days after subculture, respectively; P less than 0.01). At both growth rates, the disappearance of labeled actin and tubulin was delayed, suggesting a more complex model for their degradation than random decay. Serum deprivation of slowly growing fibroblasts increased the rate of disappearance of both proteins by eliminating the delay in their breakdown. Thus the suppression of protein degradation during rapid growth appears to result from the presence of relatively greater amounts of new actin and tubulin (and possible other long-lived proteins) that are kinetically distinct from the total intracellular pools of these proteins with respect to their susceptibility to proteolysis.

  7. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  8. AKAP-Independent Localization of Type-II Protein Kinase A to Dynamic Actin Microspikes

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Robert L.; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIα subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIα and a GFP-RIIα fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIα-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIα to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIα are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIα and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIα is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIα fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity. PMID:19536823

  9. Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements in Arabidopsis roots under stress and during gravitropic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhvanov, Gregory; Medvedev, Sergei; Suslov, Dmitry; Demidchik, Vadim

    Among environmental factors, gravity vector is the only one which is constant in direction and accompanies the whole plant ontogenesis. That said, gravity vector can be considered as an essential factor for correct development of plants. Gravitropism is a plant growth response against changing its position relative to the gravity vector. It is well estableshed that gravitropism is directed by auxin redistribution across the gravistimulated organ. In addition to auxin, actin cytoskeleton was shown to be involved in gravitropism at different stages: gravity perception, signal transduction and gravitropic bending formation. However, the relationship between IAA and actin is still under discussion. In this work we studied rearrangements of actin cytoskeleton during root gravitropic response. Actin microfilaments were visualized in vivo in GFP-fABD2 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and their angle distribution was acquired from MicroFilament Analyzer software. The curvature of actin microfilaments in root elongation zone was shown to be increased within 30-60 min of gravistimulation, the fraction of axially oriented microfilaments decreased with a concomitant increase in the fraction of oblique and transversally oriented microfilaments. In particular, the fraction of transversally oriented microfilaments (i.e. parallel to the gravity vector) increased 3-5 times. Under 10 min of sub-lethal salt stress impact, actin microfilament orientations widened from an initial axial orientation to a set of peaks at 15(°) , 45(°) and 90(°) . We conclude that the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements observed are associated with the regulation of basic mechanisms of cell extension growth by which the gravitropic bending is formed. Having common stress-related features, gravity-induced actin cytoskeleton rearrangement is slower but results in higher number of g-vector-parallel microfilaments when compared to salt stress-induced rearrangement. Also, differences in gravistimulated root

  10. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  11. Serotonin binds specifically and saturably to an actin-like protein isolated from rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D H; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    A soluble serotonin-binding protein was identified in a high-speed supernatant fraction of an osmotically shocked rat brain synaptosome (P2) preparation. The binding of serotonin was saturable (Bmax = 6.0 nmol per mg of protein) and was specific for serotonin and a few structurally related compounds including dopamine and norepinephrine. Binding of serotonin (1 microM) was inhibited approximately equal to 40% by chlorpromazine (10 microM). The affinity of serotonin for the binding protein was low in the crude extract (Kd = 1.7 X 10(-3)M). However, on purification by chromatography on a column of phenothiazine agarose, a higher affinity (Kd = 10(-5) M) binding component was also observed. The purified protein was greatly enriched in a polypeptide of Mr of 43,000 that comigrated on polyacrylamide gel with skeletal muscle actin. Muscle actin also bound serotonin, and the binding to actin was similar to that of the purified protein in both the specificity of the binding and the affinity for serotonin. It is likely that the serotonin-binding protein is identical to cytoplasmic G-actin or an actin-like protein of similar molecular weight. PMID:6583691

  12. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  13. Abnormal movement of tropomyosin and response of myosin heads and actin during the ATPase cycle caused by the Arg167His, Arg167Gly and Lys168Glu mutations in TPM1 gene.

    PubMed

    Borovikov, Yurii S; Rysev, Nikita A; Chernev, Aleksey A; Avrova, Stanislava V; Karpicheva, Olga E; Borys, Danuta; Śliwińska, Małgorzata; Moraczewska, Joanna

    2016-09-15

    Amino acid substitutions: Arg167His, Arg167Gly and Lys168Glu, located in a consensus actin-binding site of the striated muscle tropomyosin Tpm1.1 (TM), were used to investigate mechanisms of the thin filament regulation. The azimuthal movement of TM strands on the actin filament and the responses of the myosin heads and actin subunits during the ATPase cycle were studied using fluorescence polarization of muscle fibres. The recombinant wild-type and mutant TMs labelled with 5-IAF, 1,5-IAEDANS-labelled S1and FITC-phalloidin F-actin were incorporated into the ghost muscle fibres to acquire information on the orientation of the probes relative to the fibre axis. The substitutions Arg167Gly and Lys168Glu shifted TM strands into the actin filament centre, whereas Arg167His moved TM towards the periphery of the filament. In the presence of Arg167Gly-TM and Lys168Glu-TM the fraction of actin monomers that were switched on and the number of the myosin heads strongly bound to F-actin were abnormally high even under conditions close to relaxation. In contrast, Arg167His-TM decreased the fraction of switched on actin and reduced the formation of strongly bound myosin heads throughout the ATPase cycle. We concluded that the altered TM-actin contacts destabilized the thin filament and affected the actin-myosin interactions.

  14. Abnormal movement of tropomyosin and response of myosin heads and actin during the ATPase cycle caused by the Arg167His, Arg167Gly and Lys168Glu mutations in TPM1 gene.

    PubMed

    Borovikov, Yurii S; Rysev, Nikita A; Chernev, Aleksey A; Avrova, Stanislava V; Karpicheva, Olga E; Borys, Danuta; Śliwińska, Małgorzata; Moraczewska, Joanna

    2016-09-15

    Amino acid substitutions: Arg167His, Arg167Gly and Lys168Glu, located in a consensus actin-binding site of the striated muscle tropomyosin Tpm1.1 (TM), were used to investigate mechanisms of the thin filament regulation. The azimuthal movement of TM strands on the actin filament and the responses of the myosin heads and actin subunits during the ATPase cycle were studied using fluorescence polarization of muscle fibres. The recombinant wild-type and mutant TMs labelled with 5-IAF, 1,5-IAEDANS-labelled S1and FITC-phalloidin F-actin were incorporated into the ghost muscle fibres to acquire information on the orientation of the probes relative to the fibre axis. The substitutions Arg167Gly and Lys168Glu shifted TM strands into the actin filament centre, whereas Arg167His moved TM towards the periphery of the filament. In the presence of Arg167Gly-TM and Lys168Glu-TM the fraction of actin monomers that were switched on and the number of the myosin heads strongly bound to F-actin were abnormally high even under conditions close to relaxation. In contrast, Arg167His-TM decreased the fraction of switched on actin and reduced the formation of strongly bound myosin heads throughout the ATPase cycle. We concluded that the altered TM-actin contacts destabilized the thin filament and affected the actin-myosin interactions. PMID:27480605

  15. Interactions of actin, myosin, and an actin-binding protein of chronic myelogenous leukemia leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, L A; Stossel, T P

    1976-01-01

    Actin, myosin, and a high molecular weight actin-binding protein were purified from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) leukocytes. CML leukocyte actin resembled skeletal muscle and other cytoplasmic actins by its subunit molecular weight, by its ability to polymerize in the presence of salts, and to activate the Mg2+-ATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin. CML leukocyte myosin was similar to other vertebrate cytoplasmic myosins in having heavy chains and two light subunits. However, its apparent heavy-chain molecular weight and Stokes radius suggested that it was variably degraded during purification. Purified CML leukocyte myosin had average specific EDTA- AND Ca2+-activated ATPase activities of 125 and 151 nmol Pi released/mg protein per min, respectively and low specific Mg2+-ATPase activity. The Mg2+-ATPase activity of CML myosin was increased 200-fold by rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin, but the specific activity relative to that of actin-activated rabbit skeletal muscle myosin was low. CML leukocyte myosin, like other vertebrate cytoplasmic myosins, formed filaments in 0.1 M KCl solutions. Reduced and denatured CML leukocyte-actin-binding protein had a single high molecular weight subunit like a recently described actin-binding protein of rabbit pulmonary macrophages which promotes the polymerization and gelation of actin. Cytoplasmic extracts of CML leukocytes prepared with ice-cold 0.34-M sucrose solutions containing Mg2+-ATP, dithiothreitol, and EDTA at pH 7.0 underwent rapid gelation when warmed to 25 degrees C. Initially, the gel could be liquified by cooling to ice-bath temperature. With time, warmed cytoplasmic extract gels shrunk ("contracted") into aggregates. The following findings indicated that CML leukocyte actin-binding protein promoted the temperature-dependent gelation of actin in the cytoplasmic extracts and that CML leukocyte myosin was involved in the contraction of the actin gels: (a) Cytoplasmic extract gels initially contained

  16. Identification and developmental expression of a smooth-muscle gamma-actin in postmeiotic male germ cells of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E; Waters, S H; Hake, L E; Hecht, N B

    1989-01-01

    Mouse testis contains two size classes of actin mRNAs of 2.1 and 1.5 kilobases (kb). The 2.1-kb actin mRNA codes for cytoplasmic beta- and gamma-actin and is found throughout spermatogenesis, while the 1.5-kb actin mRNA is first detected in postmeiotic cells. Here we identify the testicular postmeiotic actin encoded by the 1.5-kb mRNA as a smooth-muscle gamma-actin (SMGA) and present its cDNA sequence. The amino acid sequence deduced from the postmeiotic actin cDNA sequence was nearly identical to that of a chicken gizzard SMGA, with one amino acid replacement at amino acid 359, where glutamine was substituted for proline. The nucleotide sequence of the untranslated region of the SMGA differed substantially from those of other isotypes of mammalian actins. By using the 3' untranslated region of the testicular SMGA, a highly specific probe was obtained. The 1.5-kb mRNA was detected in RNA from mouse aorta, small intestine, and uterus, but not in RNA isolated from mouse brain, heart, and spleen. Testicular SMGA mRNA was first detected and increased substantially in amount during spermiogenesis in the germ cells, in contrast to the decrease of the cytoplasmic beta- and gamma-actin mRNAs towards the end of spermatogenesis. Testicular SMGA mRNA was present in the polysome fractions, indicating that it was translated. These studies demonstrate the existence of an SMGA in male haploid germ cells. The implications of the existence of an SMGA in male germ cells are discussed. Images PMID:2747639

  17. Defining a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins critical for actin-based motility of Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Serio, Alisa W; Jeng, Robert L; Haglund, Cat M; Reed, Shawna C; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-05-20

    Many Rickettsia species are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use actin-based motility for spread during infection. However, while other bacteria assemble actin tails consisting of branched networks, Rickettsia assemble long parallel actin bundles, suggesting the use of a distinct mechanism for exploiting actin. To identify the underlying mechanisms and host factors involved in Rickettsia parkeri actin-based motility, we performed an RNAi screen targeting 115 actin cytoskeletal genes in Drosophila cells. The screen delineated a set of four core proteins-profilin, fimbrin/T-plastin, capping protein, and cofilin--as crucial for determining actin tail length, organizing filament architecture, and enabling motility. In mammalian cells, these proteins were localized throughout R. parkeri tails, consistent with a role in motility. Profilin and fimbrin/T-plastin were critical for the motility of R. parkeri but not Listeria monocytogenes. Our results highlight key distinctions between the evolutionary strategies and molecular mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to assemble and organize actin. PMID:20478540

  18. SelR reverses Mical-mediated oxidation of actin to regulate F-actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ruei-Jiun; Spaeth, Christopher S; Yesilyurt, Hunkar Gizem; Terman, Jonathan R

    2013-12-01

    Actin's polymerization properties are markedly altered by oxidation of its conserved Met 44 residue. Mediating this effect is a specific oxidation-reduction (redox) enzyme, Mical, that works with Semaphorin repulsive guidance cues and selectively oxidizes Met 44. We now find that this actin-regulatory process is reversible. Employing a genetic approach, we identified a specific methionine sulfoxide reductase (MsrB) enzyme SelR that opposes Mical redox activity and Semaphorin-Plexin repulsion to direct multiple actin-dependent cellular behaviours in vivo. SelR specifically catalyses the reduction of the R isomer of methionine sulfoxide (methionine-R-sulfoxide) to methionine, and we found that SelR directly reduced Mical-oxidized actin, restoring its normal polymerization properties. These results indicate that Mical oxidizes actin stereospecifically to generate actin Met-44-R-sulfoxide (actin(Met(R)O-44)), and also implicate the interconversion of specific Met/Met(R)O residues as a precise means to modulate protein function. Our results therefore uncover a specific reversible redox actin regulatory system that controls cell and developmental biology.

  19. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly.

  20. Septins promote F-actin ring formation by crosslinking actin filaments into curved bundles.

    PubMed

    Mavrakis, Manos; Azou-Gros, Yannick; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Alvarado, José; Bertin, Aurélie; Iv, Francois; Kress, Alla; Brasselet, Sophie; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Lecuit, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis requires a contractile ring of crosslinked actin filaments and myosin motors. How contractile rings form and are stabilized in dividing cells remains unclear. We address this problem by focusing on septins, highly conserved proteins in eukaryotes whose precise contribution to cytokinesis remains elusive. We use the cleavage of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo as a model system, where contractile actin rings drive constriction of invaginating membranes to produce an epithelium in a manner akin to cell division. In vivo functional studies show that septins are required for generating curved and tightly packed actin filament networks. In vitro reconstitution assays show that septins alone bundle actin filaments into rings, accounting for the defects in actin ring formation in septin mutants. The bundling and bending activities are conserved for human septins, and highlight unique functions of septins in the organization of contractile actomyosin rings.

  1. Arabidopsis ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 Severs Actin Filaments and Regulates Actin Cable Turnover to Promote Normal Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-01-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes. PMID:24058157

  2. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  3. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  4. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paves, Heiti; Truve, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area. PMID:15102327

  5. The EGF receptor is an actin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a number of recent studies it has been shown that in vivo part of the EGF receptor (EGFR) population is associated to the actin filament system. In this paper we demonstrate that the purified EGFR can be cosedimented with purified filamentous actin (F-actin) indicating a direct association between EGFR and actin. A truncated EGFR, previously shown not to be associated to the cytoskeleton, was used as a control and this receptor did not cosediment with actin filaments. Determination of the actin-binding domain of the EGFR was done by measuring competition of either a polyclonal antibody or synthetic peptides on EGFR cosedimentation with F-actin. A synthetic peptide was made homologous to amino acid residues 984-996 (HL-33) of the EGFR which shows high homology with the actin-binding domain of Acanthamoeba profilin. A polyclonal antibody raised against HL-33 was found to prevent cosedimentation of EGFR with F-actin. This peptide HL-33 was shown to bind directly to actin in contrast with a synthetic peptide homologous to residues 1001-1013 (HL-34). During cosedimentation, HL-33 competed for actin binding of the EGFR and HL-34 did not, indicating that the EGFR contains one actin-binding site. These results demonstrate that the EGFR is an actin-binding protein which binds to actin via a domain containing amino acids residues 984-996. PMID:1383230

  6. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-08-01

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus. PMID:27457955

  7. Impact of Carbon Nanomaterials on Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Li, Xin; Zhao, Lina

    2016-03-01

    Many nanomaterials have entered people's daily lives and impact the normal process of biological entities consequently. As one kind of the important nanomaterials, carbon based nanomaterials have invoked a lot of concerns from scientific researches because of their unique physicochemical properties. In eukaryotes, actin is the most abundantly distributed protein in both cytoplasm and cell nucleus, and closely controls the cell proliferation and mobility. Recently, many investigations have found some carbon based nanomaterials can affect actin cytoskeleton remarkably, including fullerenes derivatives, carbon nanotubes, graphene and its derivatives. However, these interaction processes are complicated and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood clearly. In this review, we discussed the different mechanisms of carbon nanomaterials impact on actin polymerization into three pathways, as triggering the signaling pathways from carbon nanomaterials outside of cells, increasing the production of reactive oxygen species from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells and direct interaction from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells. As a result, the dimension and size of carbon nanomaterials play a key role in regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, we forecasted the possible investigation strategy for meeting the challenges of the future study on this topic. We hope the findings are helpful in understanding the molecular mechanism in carbon nanomaterials regulating actin polymerization, and provide new insight in novel nanomedicine development for inhibition tumor cell migration. PMID:27455649

  8. Development of the FMT chemical transport simulator: Advective transport sensitivity to aqueous density and mineral volume fraction coupled to phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.

    1993-12-31

    The Fracture-Matrix Transport (FMT) code couples saturated porous media advection and diffusion with mechanistic chemical models for speciation and interphase reactions. FMT is being developed to support actinide solubility and retardation studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), USDOE facility for demonstrating safe disposal of transuranic waste. Hydrologic studies of water-bearing units above the WIPP indicate double-porosity transport behavior in some locations, with groundwater concentrations ranging which potable to highly concentrated. Previously, FMT simulated such systems in two-dimensions on the continuum from advection- to diffusion-dominated, with a user-specified velocity field that allows double-porosity transport. However, aqueous density was assumed constant, and reactive minerals were assumed to occupy negligible volume. Both of these assumptions can be considered poor for evaporite systems, where large changes in porosity and aqueous density can result from high mineral solubilities. Therefore, further development of FMT has relaxed these restrictions, allowing aqueous density to vary with phase composition, and allowing void volume to change as minerals dissolve and precipitate. This paper describes the additional mathematical complexity required to simulate such systems. The sensitivity of advection-dominated transport to these variables is explored through an extended example.

  9. A new F-actin structure in fungi: actin ring formation around the cell nucleus of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, Marie; Kawamoto, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    The F-actin cytoskeleton of Cryptococcus neoformans is known to comprise actin cables, cortical patches and cytokinetic ring. Here, we describe a new F-actin structure in fungi, a perinuclear F-actin collar ring around the cell nucleus, by fluorescent microscopic imaging of rhodamine phalloidin-stained F-actin. Perinuclear F-actin rings form in Cryptococcus neoformans treated with the microtubule inhibitor Nocodazole or with the drug solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or grown in yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD) medium, but they are absent in cells treated with Latrunculin A. Perinuclear F-actin rings may function as 'funicular cabin' for the cell nucleus, and actin cables as intracellular 'funicular' suspending nucleus in the central position in the cell and moving nucleus along the polarity axis along actin cables.

  10. Structural Transitions of F-Actin:Espin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Espin is an actin bundling protein involved in the formation of the parallel bundles of filamentous actin in hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in espin are implicated in deafness phenotypes in mice and humans. We present measurements of the F-actin structures induced by wild type and by mutated espin obtained via small angle x-ray scattering and fluorescence microscopy. We found that wild type espin induced a paracrystalline hexagonal array of twisted F-actin, whereas the mutated espin only condensed the F-actin into a nematic-like phase. The possibility of coexisting nematic and bundled actin in mixtures containing both mutant and wild type espins was also investigated.

  11. Nuclear actin and lamins in viral infections.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Jakub; Fraiberk, Martin; Forstova, Jitka

    2012-03-01

    Lamins are the best characterized cytoskeletal components of the cell nucleus that help to maintain the nuclear shape and participate in diverse nuclear processes including replication or transcription. Nuclear actin is now widely accepted to be another cytoskeletal protein present in the nucleus that fulfills important functions in the gene expression. Some viruses replicating in the nucleus evolved the ability to interact with and probably utilize nuclear actin for their replication, e.g., for the assembly and transport of capsids or mRNA export. On the other hand, lamins play a role in the propagation of other viruses since nuclear lamina may represent a barrier for virions entering or escaping the nucleus. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the roles of nuclear actin and lamins in viral infections.

  12. Actin Filament Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Huang, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for actin filament segmentation in 2D TIRFM image sequences. This problem is difficult because actin filaments dynamically change shapes during their growth, and the TIRFM images are usually noisy. We ask a user to specify the two tips of a filament of interest in the first frame. We then model the segmentation problem in an image sequence as a temporal chain, where its states are tip locations; given candidate tip locations, actin filaments' body points are inferred by a dynamic programming method, which adaptively generates candidate solutions. Combining candidate tip locations and their inferred body points, the temporal chain model is efficiently optimized using another dynamic programming method. Evaluation on noisy TIRFM image sequences demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of this approach. PMID:21761674

  13. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  14. Finite-volume energy spectrum, fractionalized strings, and low-energy effective field theory for the quantum dimer model on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Bögli, M.; Hofmann, C. P.; Jiang, F.-J.; Widmer, P.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We present detailed analytic calculations of finite-volume energy spectra, mean-field theory, as well as a systematic low-energy effective field theory for the square lattice quantum dimer model. An emergent approximate spontaneously broken SO(2 ) symmetry gives rise to a pseudo-Goldstone boson. Remarkably, this soft phononlike excitation, which is massless at the Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) point, exists far beyond this point. The Goldstone physics is captured by a systematic low-energy effective field theory. We determine its low-energy parameters by matching the analytic effective field theory with exact diagonalization results. This confirms that the model exists in the columnar (and not in a plaquette or mixed) phase all the way to the RK point.

  15. A Coupled Mean Field / Gurson-Tvergaard Micromechanical Model For Ductile Fracture In Multiphase Materials With Large Volume Fraction of Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoof, Thibaut; Piérard, Olivier; Lani, Frédéric

    2007-04-01

    In the framework of the European project PROHIPP (New design and manufacturing processes for high pressure fluid power product — NMP 2-CT-2004-50546), CENAERO develops a library of constitutive models used to predict the mechanical response of a family of cast iron. The present contribution focuses on one particular microstructure, corresponding to a ferrite matrix containing spheroidal graphite and isolated inclusions of pearlite. An incremental mean field homogenisation scheme such as the one developed by Doghri and Ouaar is used. In the present application, the ferrite matrix is described by a Gurson type constitutive law (porous plasticity) while the pearlite inclusions are assumed to obey the classical isotropic J2 plasticity. The predictions of the micromechanical model are compared to the results of Finite Element simulations performed on three-dimensional representative volume elements (RVEs).

  16. Human Muscle LIM Protein Dimerizes along the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cross-Links Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André

    2014-01-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. PMID:24934443

  17. Fatal congenital myopathy with actin filament deposits.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, A; Petersen, M B; Schmalbruch, H

    1996-07-01

    We present the clinical and morphological findings in a case of progressive congenital myopathy. The symptoms present at birth included severe general muscular hypotonia, diffuse muscular atrophy, arthrogryposis, absence of spontaneous movements, and left ventricular hypertrophy. A biopsy specimen taken from the gastrocnemius muscle when the patient was 2 weeks old revealed deposits which consisted of actin filaments as shown by electron microscopy. The infant was occasionally respirator dependent but was mostly able to breathe unassisted. At the age of 5 months he died of respiratory failure. The actin filament deposits may explain the clinical findings.

  18. Actin Age Orchestrates Myosin-5 and Myosin-6 Runlengths

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies where motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and the two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1–3]. Myosin-5 walks towards the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks towards the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling towards the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3 to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, while myosin-6 takes 1.7 to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  19. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins. PMID:21757693

  20. Actin nucleators in the nucleus: an emerging theme.

    PubMed

    Weston, Louise; Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2012-08-01

    Actin is an integral component of the cytoskeleton, forming a plethora of macromolecular structures that mediate various cellular functions. The formation of such structures relies on the ability of actin monomers to associate into polymers, and this process is regulated by actin nucleation factors. These factors use monomeric actin pools at specific cellular locations, thereby permitting rapid actin filament formation when required. It has now been established that actin is also present in the nucleus, where it is implicated in chromatin remodelling and the regulation of eukaryotic gene transcription. Notably, the presence of typical actin filaments in the nucleus has not been demonstrated directly. However, studies in recent years have provided evidence for the nuclear localisation of actin nucleation factors that promote cytoplasmic actin polymerisation. Their localisation to the nucleus suggests that these proteins mediate collaboration between the cytoskeleton and the nucleus, which might be dependent on their ability to promote actin polymerisation. The nature of this cooperation remains enigmatic and it will be important to elucidate the physiological relevance of the link between cytoskeletal actin networks and nuclear events. This Commentary explores the current evidence for the nuclear roles of actin nucleation factors. Furthermore, the implication of actin-associated proteins in relaying exogenous signals to the nucleus, particularly in response to cellular stress, will be considered.

  1. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin subunits within sarcomeric actin filaments are dynamically exchanged without altering overall sarcomeric structures. A number of regulators for actin dynamics have been identified, and malfunction of these regulators often result in disorganization of myofibril structures or muscle diseases. Therefore, proper regulation of actin dynamics in striated muscle is critical for assembly and maintenance of functional myofibrils. Recent studies have suggested that both enhancers of actin dynamics and stabilizers of actin filaments are important for sarcomeric actin organization. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanism of actin dynamics in striated muscle should be a key to understanding how myofibrils develop and operate. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20737540

  2. Actin3 promoter reveals undulating F-actin bundles at shanks and dynamic F-actin meshworks at tips of tip-growing pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Jásik, Ján; Mičieta, Karol; Siao, Wei; Voigt, Boris; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Schmelzer, Elmon; Turňa, Ján; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton of pollen tubes is both the driver of the tip growth and the organizer of cell polarity. In order to understand this fast re-arranging cytoskeletal system, we need reliable constructs expressed under relevant promoters. Here we are reporting that the Lifeact reporter, expressed under the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter, visualizes very dynamic F-actin elements both in germinating pollen grains and tip-growing pollen tubes. Importantly, we have documented very active actin polymerization at the cell periphery, especially in the bulging area during pollen germination and in the apical clear zone. Expression of the Lifeact reporter under control of the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter revealed 2 new aspects: (i) long F-actin bundles in pollen tube shanks are dynamic, showing undulating movements, (ii) subapical 'actin collars' or 'fringes' are absent.

  3. Actin3 promoter reveals undulating F-actin bundles at shanks and dynamic F-actin meshworks at tips of tip-growing pollen tubes

    PubMed Central

    Jásik, Ján; Mičieta, Karol; Siao, Wei; Voigt, Boris; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Schmelzer, Elmon; Turňa, Ján; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dynamic actin cytoskeleton of pollen tubes is both the driver of the tip growth and the organizer of cell polarity. In order to understand this fast re-arranging cytoskeletal system, we need reliable constructs expressed under relevant promoters. Here we are reporting that the Lifeact reporter, expressed under the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter, visualizes very dynamic F-actin elements both in germinating pollen grains and tip-growing pollen tubes. Importantly, we have documented very active actin polymerization at the cell periphery, especially in the bulging area during pollen germination and in the apical clear zone. Expression of the Lifeact reporter under control of the pollen-specific Actin3 promoter revealed 2 new aspects: (i) long F-actin bundles in pollen tube shanks are dynamic, showing undulating movements, (ii) subapical ‘actin collars’ or ‘fringes’ are absent. PMID:26980067

  4. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  5. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  6. Intrastrand cross-linked actin between Gln-41 and Cys-374. I. Mapping of sites cross-linked in F-actin by N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl) putrescine.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, G; Mák, M; Kim, E; Elzinga, M; Muhlrad, A; Reisler, E

    1998-12-22

    A new heterobifunctional photo-cross-linking reagent, N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)-putrescine (ANP), was synthesized and covalently bound to Gln-41 of rabbit skeletal muscle actin by a bacterial transglutaminase-mediated reaction. Up to 1.0 mol of the reagent was incorporated per mole of G-actin; at least 90% of it was bound to Gln-41 while a minor fraction (about 8%) was attached to Gln-59. The labeled G-actin was polymerized, and the resulting F-actin was intermolecularly cross-linked by irradiation with UV light. The labeled and cross-linked peptides were isolated from either a complete or limited tryptic digest of cross-linked actin. In the limited digest the tryptic cleavage was restricted to arginine by succinylation of the lysyl residues. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry indicated that the cross-linked peptides contained residues 40-50 (or 40-62 in the arginine limited digest) and residues 373-375, and that the actual cross-linking took place between Gln-41 and Cys-374. This latter finding was also supported by the inhibition of Cys-374 labeling with a fluorescent probe in the cross-linked actin. The dynamic length of ANP, between 11.1 and 12.5 A, constrains to that range the distance between the gamma-carboxyl group of Gln-41 in one monomer and the sulfur atom of Cys-374 in an adjacent monomer. This is consistent with the distances between these two residues on adjacent monomers of the same strand in the long-pitch helix in the structural models of F-actin [Holmes, K. C., Popp, D., Gebhard, W., and Kabsch, W. (1990) Nature 347, 44-49 and Lorenz, M., Popp, D., and Holmes, K. C. (1993) J. Mol. Biol. 234, 826-836]. The effect of cross-linking on the function of actin is described in the companion papers. PMID:9922144

  7. Actin dynamics at the living cell submembrane imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence photobleaching.

    PubMed Central

    Sund, S E; Axelrod, D

    2000-01-01

    Although reversible chemistry is crucial to dynamical processes in living cells, relatively little is known about relevant chemical kinetic rates in vivo. Total internal reflection/fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (TIR/FRAP), an established technique previously demonstrated to measure reversible biomolecular kinetic rates at surfaces in vitro, is extended here to measure reversible biomolecular kinetic rates of actin at the cytofacial (subplasma membrane) surface of living cells. For the first time, spatial imaging (with a charge-coupled device camera) is used in conjunction with TIR/FRAP. TIR/FRAP imaging produces both spatial maps of kinetic parameters (off-rates and mobile fractions) and estimates of kinetic correlation distances, cell-wide kinetic gradients, and dependences of kinetic parameters on initial fluorescence intensity. For microinjected rhodamine actin in living cultured smooth muscle (BC3H1) cells, the unbinding rate at or near the cytofacial surface of the plasma membrane (averaged over the entire cell) is measured at 0.032 +/- 0.007 s(-1). The corresponding rate for actin marked by microinjected rhodamine phalloidin is very similar, 0.033 +/- 0.013 s(-1), suggesting that TIR/FRAP is reporting the dynamics of entire filaments or protofilaments. For submembrane fluorescence-marked actin, the intensity, off-rate, and mobile fraction show a positive correlation over a characteristic distance of 1-3 microm and a negative correlation over larger distances greater than approximately 7-14 microm. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters display a statistically significant cell-wide gradient, with the cell having a "fast" and "slow" end with respect to actin kinetics. PMID:10969025

  8. Purification from Acanthamoeba castellanii of proteins that induce gelation and syneresis of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Maruta, H; Korn, E D

    1977-01-10

    From Acanthamoeba castellanii, we have purified four proteins each of which alone causes a solution of F-actin to gel. The four active proteins have subunit molecular weights of about 23,000, 28,000, 32,000 and 38,000, respectively; the last three may be dimers in their native proteins. Together, these four proteins account for about 97% of the gelation activity of the whole extract; not more than about 3% of the total activity of the unfractionated extract can be due to a 250,000-dalton polypeptide. Another protein fraction, purified by agarose chromatography, induces shrinking (syneresis) of gels formed from F-actin and any of the gelation factors. That fraction contains a high Ca2+-, low (K+,EDTA)-ATPase and a major polypeptide of 170,000 daltons both of which bind to actin in the shrunken gel pellet. The active fraction does not contain the previously described Acanthamoeba myosin (Pollard, T. D., and Korn, E. D. (1973) J. Biol. Chem. 248, 4682-4690).

  9. Comparison of Multi-Echo Dixon Methods with Volume Interpolated Breath-Hold Gradient Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Fat-Signal Fraction Quantification of Paravertebral Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hak-Sun; Lee, Young Han; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Paek, Mun Young; Yoo, Hanna; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Chung, Tae-Sub; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether multi-echo Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with simultaneous T2* estimation and correction yields more accurate fat-signal fraction (FF) measurement of the lumbar paravertebral muscles, in comparison with non-T2*-corrected two-echo Dixon or T2*-corrected three-echo Dixon, using the FF measurements from single-voxel MR spectroscopy as the reference standard. Materials and Methods Sixty patients with low back pain underwent MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner. FF mapping images automatically obtained using T2*-corrected Dixon technique with two (non-T2*-corrected), three, and six echoes, were compared with images from single-voxel MR spectroscopy at the paravertebral muscles on levels L4 through L5. FFs were measured directly by two radiologists, who independently drew the region of interest on the mapping images from the three sequences. Results A total of 117 spectroscopic measurements were performed either bilaterally (57 of 60 subjects) or unilaterally (3 of 60 subjects). The mean spectroscopic FF was 14.3 ± 11.7% (range, 1.9-63.7%). Interobserver agreement was excellent between the two radiologists. Lin's concordance correlation between the spectroscopic findings and all the imaging-based FFs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). FFs obtained from the T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequences showed a significantly better concordance with the spectroscopic data, with its concordance correlation coefficient being 0.99 and 0.98 (p < 0.001), as compared with two- or three-echo methods. Conclusion T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequence would be a better option than two- or three-echo methods for noninvasive quantification of lumbar muscle fat quantification. PMID:26357503

  10. The actin cytoskeleton as a sensor and mediator of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Melissa; Gunning, Peter W.; Stehn, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important biological process required for the removal of unwanted or damaged cells. Mounting evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton as both a sensor and mediator of apoptosis. Studies also suggest that actin binding proteins (ABPs) significantly contribute to apoptosis and that actin dynamics play a key role in regulating apoptosis signaling. Changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton has been attributed to the process of malignant transformation and it is hypothesized that remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton may enable tumor cells to evade normal apoptotic signaling. This review aims to illuminate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in apoptosis by systematically analyzing how actin and ABPs regulate different apoptosis pathways and to also highlight the potential for developing novel compounds that target tumor-specific actin filaments. PMID:22880146

  11. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility.

  12. Actin network architecture can determine myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Reymann, Anne-Cécile; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Guérin, Christophe; Cao, Wenxiang; Chin, Harvey F; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    The organization of actin filaments into higher-ordered structures governs eukaryotic cell shape and movement. Global actin network size and architecture are maintained in a dynamic steady state through regulated assembly and disassembly. Here, we used experimentally defined actin structures in vitro to investigate how the activity of myosin motors depends on network architecture. Direct visualization of filaments revealed myosin-induced actin network deformation. During this reorganization, myosins selectively contracted and disassembled antiparallel actin structures, while parallel actin bundles remained unaffected. The local distribution of nucleation sites and the resulting orientation of actin filaments appeared to regulate the scalability of the contraction process. This "orientation selection" mechanism for selective contraction and disassembly suggests how the dynamics of the cellular actin cytoskeleton can be spatially controlled by actomyosin contractility.

  13. Utilization of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements for structural analysis of actin-binding proteins in complex with actin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuxian; Umemoto, Ryo; Tamura, Yuki; Kofuku, Yutaka; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.; Nishida, Noritaka; Shimada, Ichio

    2016-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton dynamics are controlled by various actin binding proteins (ABPs) that modulate the polymerization of the monomeric G-actin and the depolymerization of filamentous F-actin. Although revealing the structures of the actin/ABP complexes is crucial to understand how the ABPs regulate actin dynamics, the X-ray crystallography and cryoEM methods are inadequate to apply for the ABPs that interact with G- or F-actin with lower affinity or multiple binding modes. In this study, we aimed to establish the alternative method to build a structural model of G-actin/ABP complexes, utilizing the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments. Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) was used as a test case for validation, since its structure in complex with G-actin was reported recently. Recombinantly expressed G-actin, containing a cysteine mutation, was conjugated with a nitroxyl spin label at the specific site. Based on the intensity ratio of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of Tβ4 in the complex with G-actin in the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states, the distances between the amide groups of Tβ4 and the spin label of G-actin were estimated. Using the PRE-derived distance constraints, we were able to compute a well-converged docking structure of the G-actin/Tβ4 complex that shows great accordance with the reference structure. PMID:27654858

  14. Bidirectional interactions between NOX2-type NADPH oxidase and the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Munnamalai, Vidhya; Weaver, Cory J.; Weisheit, Corinne E.; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Quinn, Mark T.; Suter, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidases are important for neuronal function but detailed subcellular localization studies have not been performed. Here, we provide the first evidence for the presence of functional NOX2-type NADPH oxidase complex in neuronal growth cones and its bidirectional relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. NADPH oxidase inhibition resulted in reduced F-actin content, retrograde F-actin flow, and neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of NADPH oxidase via protein kinase C activation increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in the growth cone periphery. The main enzymatic NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2/gp91phox localized to the growth cone plasma membrane and showed little overlap with the regulatory subunit p40phox. p40phox itself exhibited co-localization with filopodial actin bundles. Differential subcellular fractionation revealed preferential association of NOX2/gp91phox and p40phox with the membrane and the cytoskeletal fraction, respectively. When neurite growth was evoked with beads coated with the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, we observed a significant increase in co-localization of p40phox with NOX2/gp91phox at apCAM adhesion sites. Together, these findings suggest a bidirectional functional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones, which contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth. PMID:24702317

  15. Interaction of profilin with the barbed end of actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Courtemanche, Naomi; Pollard, Thomas D

    2013-09-17

    Profilin binds not only to actin monomers but also to the barbed end of the actin filament, where it inhibits association of subunits. To address open questions about the interactions of profilin with barbed ends, we measured the effects of a wide range of concentrations of Homo sapiens profilin 1 on the rate of elongation of individual skeletal muscle actin filaments by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Much higher concentrations of profilin were required to stop elongation by AMP-PNP-actin monomers than ADP-actin monomers. High concentrations of profilin depolymerized barbed ends at a rate much faster than the spontaneous dissociation rates of Mg-ATP-, Mg-AMP-PNP-, Mg-ADP-Pi-, and Mg-ADP-actin subunits. Fitting a thermodynamic model to these data allowed us to determine the affinities of profilin and profilin-actin for barbed ends and the influence of the nucleotide bound to actin on these interactions. Profilin has a much higher affinity for ADP-actin filament barbed ends (Kd = 1 μM) than AMP-PNP-actin filament barbed ends (Kd = 226 μM). ADP-actin monomers associated with profilin bind to ADP-actin filament barbed ends 10% as fast as free ADP-actin monomers, but bound profilin does not affect the rate of association of AMP-PNP-actin monomers with barbed ends. The differences in the affinities of AMP-PNP- and ADP-bound barbed ends for profilin and profilin-actin suggest that conformations of barbed end subunits differ from those of monomers and change upon nucleotide hydrolysis and phosphate release. A structural model revealed minor steric clashes between profilin and actin subunits at the barbed end that explain the biochemical results.

  16. Actin of Beta vulgaris seedlings under the clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L. Ye.

    We study the influence of altered gravity on actin expression in roots of Beta vulguris seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for three days. It is shown that the total actin quantity was not influenced. Three actin isoforms are revealed; a relative protein quantity of these isoforms was similar both in clinorotated seedlings and in ones grown in norm. This point to stable expression of actin under the altered gravity conditions.

  17. Statistical Thermodynamics for Actin-Myosin Binding: The Crucial Importance of Hydration Effects.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hiraku; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin is an important molecular motor, and the binding of actin and myosin is an essential research target in biophysics. Nevertheless, the physical factors driving or opposing the binding are still unclear. Here, we investigate the role of water in actin-myosin binding using the most reliable statistical-mechanical method currently available for assessing biomolecules immersed in water. This method is characterized as follows: water is treated not as a dielectric continuum but as an ensemble of molecules; the polyatomic structures of proteins are taken into consideration; and the binding free energy is decomposed into physically insightful entropic and energetic components by accounting for the hydration effect to its full extent. We find that the actin-myosin binding brings large gains of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones attractive interactions. However, these gains are accompanied by even larger losses of actin-water and myosin-water electrostatic and LJ attractive interactions. Although roughly half of the energy increase due to the losses is cancelled out by the energy decrease arising from structural reorganization of the water released upon binding, the remaining energy increase is still larger than the energy decrease brought by the gains mentioned above. Hence, the net change in system energy is positive, which opposes binding. Importantly, the binding is driven by a large gain of configurational entropy of water, which surpasses the positive change in system energy and the conformational entropy loss occurring for actin and myosin. The principal physical origin of the large water-entropy gain is as follows: the actin-myosin interface is closely packed with the achievement of high shape complementarity on the atomic level, leading to a large increase in the total volume available to the translational displacement of water molecules in the system and a resultant reduction of water crowding (i.e., entropic correlations among water molecules). PMID

  18. Curvature and torsion in growing actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia rickettsii move within a host cell by polymerizing a comet-tail of actin fibers that ultimately pushes the cell forward. This dense network of cross-linked actin polymers typically exhibits a striking curvature that causes bacteria to move in gently looping paths. Theoretically, tail curvature has been linked to details of motility by considering force and torque balances from a finite number of polymerizing filaments. Here we track beads coated with a prokaryotic activator of actin polymerization in three dimensions to directly quantify the curvature and torsion of bead motility paths. We find that bead paths are more likely to have low rather than high curvature at any given time. Furthermore, path curvature changes very slowly in time, with an autocorrelation decay time of 200 s. Paths with a small radius of curvature, therefore, remain so for an extended period resulting in loops when confined to two dimensions. When allowed to explore a three-dimensional (3D) space, path loops are less evident. Finally, we quantify the torsion in the bead paths and show that beads do not exhibit a significant left- or right-handed bias to their motion in 3D. These results suggest that paths of actin-propelled objects may be attributed to slow changes in curvature, possibly associated with filament debranching, rather than a fixed torque.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of actin-coated membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; Mackintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2001-02-01

    In living cells, cytoskeletal filaments interact with the plasma membrane to form structures that play a key role in cell shape and mechanical properties. To study the interaction between these basic components, we designed an in vitro self-assembled network of actin filaments attached to the outer surface of giant unilamellar vesicles. Optical tweezers and single-particle tracking experiments are used to study the rich dynamics of these actin-coated membranes (ACM). We show that microrheology studies can be carried out on such an individual microscopic object. The principle of the experiment consists in measuring the thermally excited position fluctuations of a probe bead attached biochemically to the membrane. We propose a model that relates the power spectrum of these thermal fluctuations to the viscoelastic properties of the membrane. The presence of the actin network modifies strongly the membrane dynamics with respect to a fluid, lipid bilayer one. It induces first a finite (ω=0) two-dimensional (2D) shear modulus G02D~0.5 to 5 μN/m in the membrane plane. Moreover, the frequency dependence at high frequency of the shear modulus [G'2D(f )~f0.85+/-0.07] and of the bending modulus (κACM(f)~f0.55+/-0.21) demonstrate the viscoelastic behavior of the composite membrane. These results are consistent with a common exponent of 0.75 for both moduli as expected from our model and from prior measurements on actin solutions.

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Lung Cancer at a Dose of 50 Gy Total in Five Fractions to the Periphery of the Planning Target Volume Calculated Using a Superposition Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  1. Endothelial actin-binding proteins and actin dynamics in leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael

    2015-04-15

    The endothelium is the first barrier that leukocytes have to overcome during recruitment to sites of inflamed tissues. The leukocyte extravasation cascade is a complex multistep process that requires the activation of various adhesion molecules and signaling pathways, as well as actin remodeling, in both leukocytes and endothelial cells. Endothelial adhesion molecules, such as E-selectin or ICAM-1, are connected to the actin cytoskeleton via actin-binding proteins (ABPs). Although the contribution of receptor-ligand interactions to leukocyte extravasation has been studied extensively, the contribution of endothelial ABPs to the regulation of leukocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration remains poorly understood. This review focuses on recently published evidence that endothelial ABPs, such as cortactin, myosin, or α-actinin, regulate leukocyte extravasation by controlling actin dynamics, biomechanical properties of endothelia, and signaling pathways, such as GTPase activation, during inflammation. Thus, ABPs may serve as targets for novel treatment strategies for disorders characterized by excessive leukocyte recruitment.

  2. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  3. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads. PMID:9175265

  4. Actin-organising properties of the muscular dystrophy protein myotilin.

    PubMed

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Grönholm, Mikaela; Moza, Monica; Lamberg, Arja; Savilahti, Harri; Carpén, Olli

    2005-10-15

    Myotilin is a sarcomeric Z-disc protein that binds F-actin directly and bundles actin filaments, although it does not contain a conventional actin-binding domain. Expression of mutant myotilin leads to sarcomeric alterations in the dominantly inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1A and in myofibrillar myopathy/desmin-related myopathy. Together, with previous in vitro studies, this indicates that myotilin has an important function in the assembly and maintenance of Z-discs. This study characterises further the interaction between myotilin and actin. Functionally important regions in myotilin were identified by actin pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays and with a novel strategy that combines in vitro DNA transposition-based peptide insertion mutagenesis with phenotype analysis in yeast cells. The shortest fragment to bind actin was the second Ig domain together with a short C-terminal sequence. Concerted action of the first and second Ig domain was, however, necessary for the functional activity of myotilin, as verified by analysis of transposon mutants, actin binding and phenotypic effect in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the Ig domains flanked with N- and C-terminal regions were needed for actin-bundling, indicating that the mere actin-binding sequence was insufficient for the actin-regulating activity. None of the four known disease-associated mutations altered the actin-organising ability. These results, together with previous studies in titin and kettin, identify the Ig domain as an actin-binding unit.

  5. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Kelpsch, Daniel J; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)--lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes--regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton--temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin remodeling, including actin filaments and aggregates, within the posterior nurse cells of S9 follicles; wild-type follicles exhibit similar structures at a low frequency. Hu li tai shao (Hts-RC) and Villin (Quail), an actin bundler, localize to all early actin structures, whereas Enabled (Ena), an actin elongation factor, preferentially localizes to those in pxt mutants. Reduced Ena levels strongly suppress early actin remodeling in pxt mutants. Furthermore, loss of Pxt results in reduced Ena localization to the sites of bundle formation during S10B. Together these data lead to a model in which PGs temporally regulate actin remodeling during Drosophila oogenesis by controlling Ena localization/activity, such that in S9, PG signaling inhibits, whereas at S10B, it promotes Ena-dependent actin remodeling.

  6. Shape control of lipid bilayer membranes by confined actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje Hendrika

    2015-12-01

    In living cells, lipid membranes and biopolymers determine each other's conformation in a delicate force balance. Cellular polymers such as actin filaments are strongly confined by the plasma membrane in cell protrusions such as lamellipodia and filopodia. Conversely, protrusion formation is facilitated by actin-driven membrane deformation and these protrusions are maintained by dense actin networks or bundles of actin filaments. Here we investigate the mechanical interplay between actin bundles and lipid bilayer membranes by reconstituting a minimal model system based on cell-sized liposomes with encapsulated actin filaments bundled by fascin. To address the competition between the deformability of the membrane and the enclosed actin bundles, we tune the bundle stiffness (through the fascin-to-actin molar ratio) and the membrane rigidity (through protein decoration). Using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we show that actin bundles deform the liposomes into a rich set of morphologies. For liposomes having a small membrane bending rigidity, the actin bundles tend to generate finger-like membrane protrusions that resemble cellular filopodia. Stiffer bundles formed at high crosslink density stay straight in the liposome body, whereas softer bundles formed at low crosslink density are bent and kinked. When the membrane has a large bending rigidity, membrane protrusions are suppressed. In this case, membrane enclosure forces the actin bundles to organize into cortical rings, to minimize the energy cost associated with filament bending. Our results highlight the importance of taking into account mechanical interactions between the actin cytoskeleton and the membrane to understand cell shape control.

  7. Unconventional actins and actin-binding proteins in human protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Gupta, C M; Thiyagarajan, S; Sahasrabuddhe, A A

    2015-06-01

    Actin and its regulatory proteins play a key role in several essential cellular processes such as cell movement, intracellular trafficking and cytokinesis in most eukaryotes. While these proteins are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, a number of unicellular eukaryotic organisms contain divergent forms of these proteins which have highly unusual biochemical and structural properties. Here, we review the biochemical and structural properties of these unconventional actins and their core binding proteins which are present in commonly occurring human protozoan parasites.

  8. FMNL3 FH2-actin structure gives insight into formin-mediated actin nucleation and elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Morgan E; Heimsath, Ernest G; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N; Kull, F Jon

    2012-12-09

    Formins are actin-assembly factors that act in a variety of actin-based processes. The conserved formin homology 2 (FH2) domain promotes filament nucleation and influences elongation through interaction with the barbed end. FMNL3 is a formin that induces assembly of filopodia but whose FH2 domain is a poor nucleator. The 3.4-Å structure of a mouse FMNL3 FH2 dimer in complex with tetramethylrhodamine-actin uncovers details of formin-regulated actin elongation. We observe distinct FH2 actin-binding regions; interactions in the knob and coiled-coil subdomains are necessary for actin binding, whereas those in the lasso-post interface are important for the stepping mechanism. Biochemical and cellular experiments test the importance of individual residues for function. This structure provides details for FH2-mediated filament elongation by processive capping and supports a model in which C-terminal non-FH2 residues of FMNL3 are required to stabilize the filament nucleus.

  9. Impact of Epoetin Alfa on LV Structure, Function, and Pressure-Volume Relations as Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance – The Heart Failure Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFPEF) Anemia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A.; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anemia, a common co-morbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. We quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Methods Prospective, randomized single blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa versus placebo for 24 weeks in which a sub-group (n=22) had cardiac MRI at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated Results Subjects (75±10 years, 64% female) with HFPEF (EF=63±15%) with average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dl were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared to placebo (p<0.0001). As compared to baseline, there were no significant changes in end diastolic (−7±8 vs. −3±8 ml, p=0.81) or end systolic (−0.4±2 vs. −0.7±5 ml, p= 0.96) volumes at 6 month follow-up between epoetin alfa compared with placebo. LV function as measured based on EF (−1.5±1.6% vs.−2.6±3.3%, p= 0.91) and pressure volume indices (PVa-iso-EDP at 30 mm Hg, −5071±4308 vs. −1662±4140 p=0.58) did not differ between epoetin alfa and placebo. Conclusion Administration of epoetin alfa to older adult patients with HFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR. PMID:23517485

  10. Structure of a Bud6/actin complex reveals a novel WH2-like actin monomer recruitment motif

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunyoung; Graziano, Brian R.; Zheng, Wei; Garabedian, Mikael; Goode, Bruce L.; Eck, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In budding yeast, the actin-binding protein Bud6 cooperates with formins Bni1 and Bnr1 to catalyze the assembly of actin filaments. The nucleation-enhancing activity of Bud6 requires both a “core” domain that binds to the formin and a “flank” domain that binds monomeric actin. Here we describe the structure of the Bud6 flank domain in complex with actin. Two helices in Bud6flank interact with actin; one binds in a groove at the barbed-end of the actin monomer in a manner closely resembling the helix of WH2 domains, a motif found in many actin nucleation factors. The second helix rises along the face of actin. Mutational analysis verifies the importance of these Bud6-actin contacts for nucleation-enhancing activity. The Bud6 binding site on actin overlaps with that of the formin FH2 domain and is also incompatible with inter-subunit contacts in F-actin, suggesting that Bud6 interacts only transiently with actin monomers during filament nucleation. PMID:26118535

  11. Structure of a Bud6/Actin Complex Reveals a Novel WH2-like Actin Monomer Recruitment Motif.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunyoung; Graziano, Brian R; Zheng, Wei; Garabedian, Mikael; Goode, Bruce L; Eck, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    In budding yeast, the actin-binding protein Bud6 cooperates with formins Bni1 and Bnr1 to catalyze the assembly of actin filaments. The nucleation-enhancing activity of Bud6 requires both a "core" domain that binds to the formin and a "flank" domain that binds monomeric actin. Here, we describe the structure of the Bud6 flank domain in complex with actin. Two helices in Bud6(flank) interact with actin; one binds in a groove at the barbed end of the actin monomer in a manner closely resembling the helix of WH2 domains, a motif found in many actin nucleation factors. The second helix rises along the face of actin. Mutational analysis verifies the importance of these Bud6-actin contacts for nucleation-enhancing activity. The Bud6 binding site on actin overlaps with that of the formin FH2 domain and is also incompatible with inter-subunit contacts in F-actin, suggesting that Bud6 interacts only transiently with actin monomers during filament nucleation.

  12. The origin and evolution of green algal and plant actins.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Möpps, B; Weber, K; Bhattacharya, D

    1999-02-01

    The Viridiplantae are subdivided into two groups: the Chlorophyta, which includes the Chlorophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Prasinophyceae; and the Streptophyta, which includes the Charophyceae and all land plants. Within the Streptophyta, the actin genes of the angiosperms diverge nearly simultaneously from each other before the separation of monocots and dicots. Previous evolutionary analyses have provided limited insights into the gene duplications that have produced these complex gene families. We address the origin and diversification of land plant actin genes by studying the phylogeny of actins within the green algae, ferns, and fern allies. Partial genomic sequences or cDNAs encoding actin were characterized from Cosmarium botrytis (Zygnematales), Selaginella apoda (Selaginellales), Anemia phyllitidis (Polypodiales), and Psilotum triquetrum (Psilotales). Selaginella contains at least two actin genes. One sequence (Ac2) diverges within a group of fern sequences that also includes the Psilotum Ac1 actin gene and one gymnosperm sequence (Cycas revoluta Cyc3). This clade is positioned outside of the angiosperm actin gene radiation. The second Selaginella sequence (Ac1) is the sister to all remaining land plant actin sequences, although the internal branches in this portion of the tree are very short. Use of complete actin-coding regions in phylogenetic analyses provides support for the separation of angiosperm actins into two classes. N-terminal "signature" sequence analyses support these groupings. One class (VEG) includes actin genes that are often expressed in vegetative structures. The second class (REP) includes actin genes that trace their ancestry within the vegetative actins and contains members that are largely expressed in reproductive structures. Analysis of intron positions within actin genes shows that sequences from both Selaginella and Cosmarium contain the conserved 20-3, 152-1, and 356-3 introns found in many members of the

  13. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella.

    PubMed

    Collings, D A; Zsuppan, G; Allen, N S; Blancaflor, E B

    2001-02-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling. PMID:11289604

  14. Exploring the Stability Limits of Actin and Its Suprastructures

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher; Erlkamp, Mirko; Ecken, Julian von der; Raunser, Stefan; Winter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Actin is the main component of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells and can be found in distinct morphological states. Global (G)-actin is able to assemble into highly organized, supramolecular cellular structures known as filamentous (F)-actin and bundled (B)-actin. To evaluate the structure and stability of G-, F-, and B-actin over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, laser confocal scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our analysis was designed to provide new (to our knowledge) insights into the stabilizing forces of actin self-assembly and to reveal the stability of the actin polymorphs, including in conditions encountered in extreme environments. In addition, we sought to explain the limited pressure stability of actin self-assembly observed in vivo. G-actin is not only the least temperature-stable but also the least pressure-stable actin species. Under abyssal conditions, where temperatures as low as 1–4°C and pressures up to 1 kbar are reached, G-actin is hardly stable. However, the supramolecular assemblies of actin are stable enough to withstand the extreme conditions usually encountered on Earth. Beyond ∼3–4 kbar, filamentous structures disassemble, and beyond ∼4 kbar, complete dissociation of F-actin structures is observed. Between ∼1 and 2 kbar, some disordering of actin assemblies commences, in agreement with in vivo observations. The limited pressure stability of the monomeric building block seems to be responsible for the suppression of actin assembly in the kbar pressure range. PMID:25517163

  15. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  16. Actin nucleation and elongation factors: mechanisms and interplay.

    PubMed

    Chesarone, Melissa A; Goode, Bruce L

    2009-02-01

    Cells require actin nucleators to catalyze the de novo assembly of filaments and actin elongation factors to control the rate and extent of polymerization. Nucleation and elongation factors identified to date include Arp2/3 complex, formins, Ena/VASP, and newcomers Spire, Cobl, and Lmod. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding their activities and mechanisms and new evidence for their cooperation and interaction in vivo. Earlier models had suggested that different nucleators function independently to assemble distinct actin arrays. However, more recent observations indicate that the construction of most cellular actin networks depends on the activities of multiple actin assembly-promoting factors working in concert.

  17. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  18. Distributed actin turnover in the lamellipodium and FRAP kinetics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew B; Kiuchi, Tai; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Studies of actin dynamics at the leading edge of motile cells with single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy have shown a broad distribution of EGFP-actin speckle lifetimes and indicated actin polymerization and depolymerization over an extended region. Other experiments using FRAP with the same EGFP-actin as a probe have suggested, by contrast, that polymerization occurs exclusively at the leading edge. We performed FRAP experiments on XTC cells to compare SiMS to FRAP on the same cell type. We used speckle statistics obtained by SiMS to model the steady-state distribution and kinetics of actin in the lamellipodium. We demonstrate that a model with a single diffuse actin species is in good agreement with FRAP experiments. A model including two species of diffuse actin provides an even better agreement. The second species consists of slowly diffusing oligomers that associate to the F-actin network throughout the lamellipodium or break up into monomers after a characteristic time. Our work motivates studies to test the presence and composition of slowly diffusing actin species that may contribute to local remodeling of the actin network and increase the amount of soluble actin.

  19. Bundling actin filaments from membranes: some novel players

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clément

    2012-01-01

    Progress in live-cell imaging of the cytoskeleton has significantly extended our knowledge about the organization and dynamics of actin filaments near the plasma membrane of plant cells. Noticeably, two populations of filamentous structures can be distinguished. On the one hand, fine actin filaments which exhibit an extremely dynamic behavior basically characterized by fast polymerization and prolific severing events, a process referred to as actin stochastic dynamics. On the other hand, thick actin bundles which are composed of several filaments and which are comparatively more stable although they constantly remodel as well. There is evidence that the actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in trafficking and signaling at both the cell cortex and organelle periphery but the exact contribution of actin bundles remains unclear. A common view is that actin bundles provide the long-distance tracks used by myosin motors to deliver their cargo to growing regions and accordingly play a particularly important role in cell polarization. However, several studies support that actin bundles are more than simple passive highways and display multiple and dynamic roles in the regulation of many processes, such as cell elongation, polar auxin transport, stomatal and chloroplast movement, and defense against pathogens. The list of identified plant actin-bundling proteins is ever expanding, supporting that plant cells shape structurally and functionally different actin bundles. Here I review the most recently characterized actin-bundling proteins, with a particular focus on those potentially relevant to membrane trafficking and/or signaling. PMID:22936939

  20. A second Las17 monomeric actin-binding motif functions in Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization during endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Daniel; Tolsma, Thomas O; Farrell, Kristen B; Aradi, Al; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2015-04-01

    During clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), actin assembly provides force to drive vesicle internalization. Members of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family play a fundamental role stimulating actin assembly. WASP family proteins contain a WH2 motif that binds globular actin (G-actin) and a central-acidic motif that binds the Arp2/3 complex, thus promoting the formation of branched actin filaments. Yeast WASP (Las17) is the strongest of five factors promoting Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization during CME. It was suggested that this strong activity may be caused by a putative second G-actin-binding motif in Las17. Here, we describe the in vitro and in vivo characterization of such Las17 G-actin-binding motif (LGM) and its dependence on a group of conserved arginine residues. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, GST-pulldown, fluorescence polarization and pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that LGM binds G-actin and is necessary for normal Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization in vitro. Live-cell fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrate that LGM is required for normal dynamics of actin polymerization during CME. Further, LGM is necessary for normal dynamics of endocytic machinery components that are recruited at early, intermediate and late stages of endocytosis, as well as for optimal endocytosis of native CME cargo. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that LGM has relatively lower potency compared to the previously known Las17 G-actin-binding motif, WH2. These results establish a second G-actin-binding motif in Las17 and advance our knowledge on the mechanism of actin assembly during CME.

  1. Actin-Based Transport Adapts Polarity Domain Size to Local Cellular Curvature.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Daria; Haupt, Armin; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Delacour, Delphine; Salort, Delphine; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-10-19

    Intracellular structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the centrosome, or the mitotic spindle typically scale their size to cell size [1]. Similarly, cortical polarity domains built around the active form of conserved Rho-GTPases, such as Cdc42p, exhibit widths that may range over two orders of magnitudes in cells with different sizes and shapes [2-6]. The establishment of such domains typically involves positive feedback loops based on reaction-diffusion and/or actin-mediated vesicle transport [3, 7, 8]. How these elements may adapt polarity domain size to cellular geometry is not known. Here, by tracking the width of successive oscillating Cdc42-GTP domains in fission yeast spores [9], we find that domain width scales with local cell-surface radii of curvature over an 8-fold range, independently of absolute cell volume, surface, or Cdc42-GTP concentration. This local scaling requires formin-nucleated cortical actin cables and the fusion of secretory vesicles transported along these cables with the membrane. These data suggest that reaction-diffusion may set a minimal domain size and that secretory vesicle transport along actin cables may dilute and extend polarity domains to adapt their size to local cell-surface curvature. This work reveals that actin networks may act as micrometric curvature sensors and uncovers a generic morphogenetic principle for how polarity domains define their size according to cell morphologies. PMID:26441355

  2. Actin-Based Transport Adapts Polarity Domain Size to Local Cellular Curvature.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Daria; Haupt, Armin; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Delacour, Delphine; Salort, Delphine; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-10-19

    Intracellular structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the centrosome, or the mitotic spindle typically scale their size to cell size [1]. Similarly, cortical polarity domains built around the active form of conserved Rho-GTPases, such as Cdc42p, exhibit widths that may range over two orders of magnitudes in cells with different sizes and shapes [2-6]. The establishment of such domains typically involves positive feedback loops based on reaction-diffusion and/or actin-mediated vesicle transport [3, 7, 8]. How these elements may adapt polarity domain size to cellular geometry is not known. Here, by tracking the width of successive oscillating Cdc42-GTP domains in fission yeast spores [9], we find that domain width scales with local cell-surface radii of curvature over an 8-fold range, independently of absolute cell volume, surface, or Cdc42-GTP concentration. This local scaling requires formin-nucleated cortical actin cables and the fusion of secretory vesicles transported along these cables with the membrane. These data suggest that reaction-diffusion may set a minimal domain size and that secretory vesicle transport along actin cables may dilute and extend polarity domains to adapt their size to local cell-surface curvature. This work reveals that actin networks may act as micrometric curvature sensors and uncovers a generic morphogenetic principle for how polarity domains define their size according to cell morphologies.

  3. The Potential Roles of Actin in The Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, actin’s presence in the nucleus has been demonstrated. Actin is a key protein necessary for different nuclear processes. Although actin is well known for its functional role in dynamic behavior of the cytoskeleton, emerging studies are now highlighting new roles for actin. At the present time there is no doubt about the presence of actin in the nucleus. A number of studies have uncovered the functional involvement of actin in nuclear processes. Actin as one of the nuclear components has its own structured and functional rules, such as nuclear matrix association, chromatin remodeling, transcription by RNA polymerases I, II, III and mRNA processing. In this historical review, we attempt to provide an overview of our current understanding of the functions of actin in the nucleus. PMID:25870830

  4. Regulation of cellular actin architecture by S100A10.

    PubMed

    Jung, M Juliane; Murzik, Ulrike; Wehder, Liane; Hemmerich, Peter; Melle, Christian

    2010-04-15

    Actin structures are involved in several biological processes and the disruption of actin polymerisation induces impaired motility of eukaryotic cells. Different factors are involved in regulation and maintenance of the cytoskeletal actin architecture. Here we show that S100A10 participates in the particular organisation of actin filaments. Down-regulation of S100A10 by specific siRNA triggered a disorganisation of filamentous actin structures without a reduction of the total cellular actin concentration. In contrast, the formation of cytoskeleton structures containing tubulin was unhindered in S100A10 depleted cells. Interestingly, the cellular distribution of annexin A2, an interaction partner of S100A10, was unaffected in S100A10 depleted cells. Cells lacking S100A10 showed an impaired migration activity and were unable to close a scratched wound. Our data provide first insights of S100A10 function as a regulator of the filamentous actin network. PMID:20100475

  5. Partial Depletion of Gamma-Actin Suppresses Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Po'uha, Sela T; Honore, Stephane; Braguer, Diane; Kavallaris, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Actin and microtubule interactions are important for many cellular events, however these interactions are poorly described. Alterations in γ-actin are associated with diseases such as hearing loss and cancer. Functional investigations demonstrated that partial depletion of γ-actin affects cell polarity and induces resistance to microtubule-targeted agents. To determine whether γ-actin alterations directly affect microtubule dynamics, microtubule dynamic instability was analyzed in living cells following partial siRNA depletion of γ-actin. Partial depletion of γ-actin suppresses interphase microtubule dynamics by 17.5% due to a decrease in microtubule shortening rates and an increase in microtubule attenuation. γ-Actin partial depletion also increased distance-based microtubule catastrophe and rescue frequencies. In addition, knockdown of γ-actin delayed mitotic progression, partially blocking metaphase–anaphase transition and inhibiting cell proliferation. Interestingly, in the presence of paclitaxel, interphase microtubule dynamics were further suppressed by 24.4% in the γ-actin knockdown cells, which is comparable to 28.8% suppression observed in the control siRNA treated cells. Paclitaxel blocked metaphase–anaphase transition in both the γ-actin knockdown cells and the control siRNA cells. However, the extent of mitotic arrest was much higher in the control cells (28.4%), compared to the γ-actin depleted cells (8.5%). Therefore, suppression of microtubule dynamics by partial depletion of γ-actin is associated with marked delays in metaphase-anaphase transition and not mitotic arrest. This is the first demonstration that γ-actin can modulate microtubule dynamics by reducing the microtubule shortening rate, promoting paused/attenuated microtubules, and increasing transition frequencies suggesting a mechanistic link between γ-actin and microtubules. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc PMID:23335583

  6. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  7. Caffeine relaxes smooth muscle through actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Tazzeo, Tracy; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Khasnis, Mukta D; Eto, Masumi; Janssen, Luke J

    2012-08-15

    Caffeine is sometimes used in cell physiological studies to release internally stored Ca(2+). We obtained evidence that caffeine may also act through a different mechanism that has not been previously described and sought to examine this in greater detail. We ruled out a role for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, since the effect was 1) not reversed by inhibiting PKA or adenylate cyclase; 2) not exacerbated by inhibiting PDE4; and 3) not mimicked by submillimolar caffeine nor theophylline, both of which are sufficient to inhibit PDE. Although caffeine is an agonist of bitter taste receptors, which in turn mediate bronchodilation, its relaxant effect was not mimicked by quinine. After permeabilizing the membrane using β-escin and depleting the internal Ca(2+) store using A23187, we found that 10 mM caffeine reversed tone evoked by direct application of Ca(2+), suggesting it functionally antagonizes the contractile apparatus. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we found that caffeine did not affect phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by MLC kinase, actin-filament motility catalyzed by MLC kinase, phosphorylation of CPI-17 by either protein kinase C or RhoA kinase, nor the activity of MLC-phosphatase. However, we did obtain evidence that caffeine decreased actin filament binding to phosphorylated myosin heads and increased the ratio of globular to filamentous actin in precontracted tissues. We conclude that, in addition to its other non-RyR targets, caffeine also interferes with actin function (decreased binding by myosin, possibly with depolymerization), an effect that should be borne in mind in studies using caffeine to probe excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscle.

  8. Summertime actinic lichenoid eruption (lichen planus actinicus).

    PubMed

    Isaacson, D; Turner, M L; Elgart, M L

    1981-04-01

    A patient with an unusual lichenoid photosensitive eruption is presented. The features differentiating this entity from classic lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, and polymorphous light eruption are discussed. Phototesting confirmed the provocative influence of sunlight. We prefer the name "summertime actinic lichenoid eruption" to that of "lichen planus subtropicus" or "lichen planus actinicus," since this condition is not confined to subtropical countries, and, although light appears to initiate the eruption, its exact relationship to lichen planus is unclear.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of actin-coated membranes.

    PubMed

    Helfer, E; Harlepp, S; Bourdieu, L; Robert, J; MacKintosh, F C; Chatenay, D

    2001-02-01

    In living cells, cytoskeletal filaments interact with the plasma membrane to form structures that play a key role in cell shape and mechanical properties. To study the interaction between these basic components, we designed an in vitro self-assembled network of actin filaments attached to the outer surface of giant unilamellar vesicles. Optical tweezers and single-particle tracking experiments are used to study the rich dynamics of these actin-coated membranes (ACM). We show that microrheology studies can be carried out on such an individual microscopic object. The principle of the experiment consists in measuring the thermally excited position fluctuations of a probe bead attached biochemically to the membrane. We propose a model that relates the power spectrum of these thermal fluctuations to the viscoelastic properties of the membrane. The presence of the actin network modifies strongly the membrane dynamics with respect to a fluid, lipid bilayer one. It induces first a finite (omega=0) two-dimensional (2D) shear modulus G(0)(2D) approximately 0.5 to 5 microN/m in the membrane plane. Moreover, the frequency dependence at high frequency of the shear modulus [G(')(2D)(f ) approximately f(0.85+/-0.07)] and of the bending modulus (kappa(ACM)(f) approximately f(0.55+/-0.21)) demonstrate the viscoelastic behavior of the composite membrane. These results are consistent with a common exponent of 0.75 for both moduli as expected from our model and from prior measurements on actin solutions.

  10. Aged insulin granules display reduced microtubule-dependent mobility and are disposed within actin-positive multigranular bodies

    PubMed Central

    Hoboth, Peter; Müller, Andreas; Ivanova, Anna; Mziaut, Hassan; Dehghany, Jaber; Sönmez, Anke; Lachnit, Martina; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Solimena, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion is key for glucose homeostasis. Insulin secretory granules (SGs) exist in different functional pools, with young SGs being more mobile and preferentially secreted. However, the principles governing the mobility of age-distinct SGs remain undefined. Using the time-reporter insulin-SNAP to track age-distinct SGs we now show that their dynamics can be classified into three components: highly dynamic, restricted, and nearly immobile. Young SGs display all three components, whereas old SGs are either restricted or nearly immobile. Both glucose stimulation and F-actin depolymerization recruit a fraction of nearly immobile young, but not old, SGs for highly dynamic, microtubule-dependent transport. Moreover, F-actin marks multigranular bodies/lysosomes containing aged SGs. These data demonstrate that SGs lose their responsiveness to glucose stimulation and competence for microtubule-mediated transport over time while changing their relationship with F-actin. PMID:25646459

  11. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Gurel, Pinar S.; Higgs, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER–mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals. PMID:25217628

  12. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  13. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Benanti, Erin L; Nguyen, Catherine M; Welch, Matthew D

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, whereas their close relative B. thailandensis is non-pathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion, and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate, and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection.

  14. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06585.001 PMID:26295568

  15. Dynacortin is a novel actin bundling protein that localizes to dynamic actin structures.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Douglas N; Ocon, Stephani S; Rock, Ronald S; Spudich, James A

    2002-03-15

    Dynacortin is a novel protein that was discovered in a genetic suppressor screen of a Dictyostelium discoideum cytokinesis-deficient mutant cell line devoid of the cleavage furrow actin bundling protein, cortexillin I. While dynacortin is highly enriched in the cortex, particularly in cell-surface protrusions, it is excluded from the cleavage furrow cortex during cytokinesis. Here, we describe the biochemical characterization of this new protein. Purified dynacortin is an 80-kDa dimer with a large 5.7-nm Stokes radius. Dynacortin cross-links actin filaments into parallel arrays with a mole ratio of one dimer to 1.3 actin monomers and a 3.1 microm K(d). Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, GFP-dynacortin and the actin bundling protein coronin-GFP are seen to concentrate in highly dynamic cortical structures with assembly and disassembly half-lives of about 15 s. These results indicate that cells have evolved different actin-filament cross-linking proteins with complementary cellular distributions that collaborate to orchestrate complex cell shape changes.

  16. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  17. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  18. The Intensity Of The 2.7nm Reflection As A Constraint For Models Of Myosin Docking To Actin

    SciTech Connect

    Reconditi, Massimo; Irving, Tom C.

    2009-03-16

    Previous workers have proposed high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin on the basis of combined crystallographic and electron microscopy data (Mendelson and Morris, 1997 PNAS 94:8533; Holmes et al. 2003 Nature 425:423). We have used data from small angle X-ray fiber diffraction from living muscle to check the predictions of these models. Whole sartorius muscles from Rana pipiens were mounted in a chamber containing Ringer's solution at 10 C and at rest length at the BioCAT beamline (18 ID, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL-U.S.A.). The muscles were activated by electrical stimulation and the force was recorded with a muscle lever system type 300B (Aurora Scientific). X-ray patterns were collected with 1s total exposures at rest and during isometric contraction out to 0.5 nm{sup -1} in reciprocal space, as the higher angle reflections are expected to be more sensitive to the arrangement of myosin heads on actin. We observed that during isometric contraction the meridional reflection originating from the 2.73nm repeat of the actin monomers along the actin filament increases its intensity by a factor 2.1 {+-} 0.2 relative to rest. Among the models tested, Holmes et al. fits the data when the actin filament is decorated with 30-40% the total available myosin heads, a fraction similar to that estimated with fast single fiber mechanics by Piazzesi et al. (2007, Cell 131:784). However, when the mismatch between the periodicities of actin and myosin filaments is taken into account, none of the models can reproduce the fiber diffraction data. We suggest that the fiber diffraction data should be used as a further constraint on new high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin.

  19. The effects of actin cytoskeleton perturbation on keratin intermediate filament formation in mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Ong, Wei-Kee; Fu, Yun-Ju; Lee, Oscar K; Chien, Shu; Ho, Jennifer H

    2014-04-01

    F-actin plays a crucial role in composing the three-dimensional cytoskeleton and F-actin depolymerization alters fate choice of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Here, we investigated differential gene expression and subsequent physiological changes in response to F-actin perturbation by latrunculin B in MSCs. Nineteen genes were down-regulated and 27 genes were up-regulated in the first 15 min after F-actin depolymerization. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that five genes involved in keratin (KRT) intermediate filaments clustering in the chromosome 17q21.2 region, i.e., KRT14, KRT19, KRT34, KRT-associated protein (KRTAP) 1-5, and KRTAP2-3, were strongly up-regulated. Transcription factor prediction identified NKX2.5 as the potential transcription factor to control KRT19, KRT34, KRTAP1-5, and KRTAP2-3; and indeed, the protein level of NKX2.5 was markedly increased in the nuclear fraction within 15 min of F-actin depolymerization. The peak of keratin intermediate filament formation was 1 h after actin perturbation, and the morphological changes showed by decrease in the ratio of long-axis to short-axis diameter in MSCs was observed after 4 h. Together, F-actin depolymerization rapidly triggers keratin intermediate filament formation by turning on keratin-related genes on chromosome 17q21.2. Such findings offer new insight in lineage commitment of MSCs and further scaffold design in MSC-based tissue engineering.

  20. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C; Sale, Winfield S; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Because actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor, suggesting that actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length.

  1. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition.

  2. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Excitable actin dynamics in lamellipodial protrusion and retraction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gillian L; Petroccia, Heather M; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2012-04-01

    Many animal cells initiate crawling by protruding lamellipodia, consisting of a dense network of actin filaments, at their leading edge. We imaged XTC cells that exhibit flat lamellipodia on poly-L-lysine-coated coverslips. Using active contours, we tracked the leading edge and measured the total amount of F-actin by summing the pixel intensities within a 5-μm band. We observed protrusion and retraction with period 130-200 s and local wavelike features. Positive (negative) velocities correlated with minimum (maximum) integrated actin concentration. Approximately constant retrograde flow indicated that protrusions and retractions were driven by fluctuations of the actin polymerization rate. We present a model of these actin dynamics as an excitable system in which a diffusive, autocatalytic activator causes actin polymerization; F-actin accumulation in turn inhibits further activator accumulation. Simulations of the model reproduced the pattern of actin polymerization seen in experiments. To explore the model's assumption of an autocatalytic activation mechanism, we imaged cells expressing markers for both F-actin and the p21 subunit of the Arp2/3 complex. We found that integrated Arp2/3-complex concentrations spike several seconds before spikes of F-actin concentration. This suggests that the Arp2/3 complex participates in an activation mechanism that includes additional diffuse components. Response of cells to stimulation by fetal calf serum could be reproduced by the model, further supporting the proposed dynamical picture.

  4. Effect of Tropomyosin on Formin-Bound Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ujfalusi, Zoltán; Vig, Andrea; Hild, Gábor; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Formins are conservative proteins with important roles in the regulation of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells. Previous studies showed that the binding of formins to actin made the structure of actin filaments more flexible. Here, the effects of tropomyosin on formin-induced changes in actin filaments were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The temperature dependence of the Förster-type resonance energy transfer showed that the formin-induced increase of flexibility of actin filaments was diminished by the binding of tropomyosin to actin. Fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements also revealed that the structure of flexible formin-bound actin filaments was stabilized by the binding of tropomyosin. The stabilizing effect reached its maximum when all binding sites on actin were occupied by tropomyosin. The effect of tropomyosin on actin filaments was independent of ionic strength, but became stronger as the magnesium concentration increased. Based on these observations, we propose that in cells there is a molecular mechanism in which tropomyosin binding to actin plays an important role in forming mechanically stable actin filaments, even in the case of formin-induced rapid filament assembly. PMID:18931257

  5. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26784007

  6. The Yeast Actin Cytoskeleton: from Cellular Function to Biochemical Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, James B.; Goode, Bruce L.

    2006-01-01

    All cells undergo rapid remodeling of their actin networks to regulate such critical processes as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. These events are driven by the coordinated activities of a set of 20 to 30 highly conserved actin-associated proteins, in addition to many cell-specific actin-associated proteins and numerous upstream signaling molecules. The combined activities of these factors control with exquisite precision the spatial and temporal assembly of actin structures and ensure dynamic turnover of actin structures such that cells can rapidly alter their cytoskeletons in response to internal and external cues. One of the most exciting principles to emerge from the last decade of research on actin is that the assembly of architecturally diverse actin structures is governed by highly conserved machinery and mechanisms. With this realization, it has become apparent that pioneering efforts in budding yeast have contributed substantially to defining the universal mechanisms regulating actin dynamics in eukaryotes. In this review, we first describe the filamentous actin structures found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (patches, cables, and rings) and their physiological functions, and then we discuss in detail the specific roles of actin-associated proteins and their biochemical mechanisms of action. PMID:16959963

  7. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  8. Sequence and comparative genomic analysis of actin-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of approximately 700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4.

  9. Feasibility study of stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripheral lung tumors with a maximum dose of 100 Gy in five fractions and a heterogeneous dose distribution in the planning target volume.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Aoki, Yousuke; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shuichi; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated toxicity and outcomes for patients with peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in a dose-escalation and dose-convergence study. A total of 15 patients were enrolled. SBRT was performed with 60 Gy in 5 fractions (fr.) prescribed to the 60% isodose line of maximum dose, which was 100 Gy in 5 fr., covering the planning target volume (PTV) surface (60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose)) using dynamic conformal multiple arc therapy (DCMAT). The primary endpoint was radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ Grade 2 within 6 months. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Using dose-volumetric analysis, the trial regimen of 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) was compared with our institutional conventional regimen of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose). The enrolled consecutive patients had either a solitary peripheral tumor or two ipsilateral tumors. The median follow-up duration was 22.0 (12.0-27.0) months. After 6 months post-SBRT, the respective number of RP Grade 0, 1 and 2 cases was 5, 9 and 1. In the Grade 2 RP patient, the image showed an organizing pneumonia pattern at 6.0 months post-SBRT. No other toxicity was found. At last follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence of the treated tumors. The target volumes of 60 Gy/ 5 fr. - (60%-isodose) were irradiated with a significantly higher dose than those of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose), while the former dosimetric parameters of normal lung were almost equivalent to the latter. SBRT with 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) using DCMAT allowed the delivery of very high and convergent doses to peripheral lung tumors with feasibility in the acute and subacute phases. Further follow-up is required to assess for late toxicity.

  10. Fibroblast-mediated contraction in actinically exposed and actinically protected aging skin

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.W.; Morykwas, M.J.; Wheatley, M.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The changes in skin morphology over time are a consequence of both chronologic aging and the accumulation of environmental exposure. Through observation, we know that actinic radiation intensifies the apparent aging of skin. We have investigated the effects of aging and actinic radiation on the ability of fibroblasts to contract collagen-fibroblast lattices. Preauricular and postauricular skin samples were obtained from eight patients aged 49 to 74 undergoing rhytidectomy. The samples were kept separate, and the fibroblasts were grown in culture. Lattices constructed with preauricular fibroblasts consistently contracted more than lattices containing postauricular fibroblasts. The difference in amount of contraction in 7 days between sites was greatest for the younger patients and decreased linearly as donor age increased (r = -0.96). This difference may be due to preauricular fibroblasts losing their ability to contract a lattice as aging skin is exposed to more actinic radiation.

  11. Photorhabdus luminescens toxins ADP-ribosylate actin and RhoA to force actin clustering.

    PubMed

    Lang, Alexander E; Schmidt, Gudula; Schlosser, Andreas; Hey, Timothy D; Larrinua, Ignacio M; Sheets, Joel J; Mannherz, Hans G; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-02-26

    The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is mutualistically associated with entomopathogenetic nematodes. These nematodes invade insect larvae and release the bacteria from their intestine, which kills the insects through the action of toxin complexes. We elucidated the mode of action of two of these insecticidal toxins from P. luminescens. We identified the biologically active components TccC3 and TccC5 as adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosyltransferases, which modify unusual amino acids. TccC3 ADP-ribosylated threonine-148 of actin, resulting in actin polymerization. TccC5 ADP-ribosylated Rho guanosine triphosphatase proteins at glutamine-61 and glutamine-63, inducing their activation. The concerted action of both toxins inhibited phagocytosis of target insect cells and induced extensive intracellular polymerization and clustering of actin. Several human pathogenic bacteria produce related toxins. PMID:20185726

  12. Actin foci facilitate activation of the phospholipase C-γ in primary T lymphocytes via the WASP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sudha; Depoil, David; Martinelli, Roberta; Judokusumo, Edward; Carmona, Guillaume; Gertler, Frank B; Kam, Lance C; Carman, Christopher V; Burkhardt, Janis K; Irvine, Darrell J; Dustin, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Wiscott Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) deficiency results in defects in calcium ion signaling, cytoskeletal regulation, gene transcription and overall T cell activation. The activation of WASP constitutes a key pathway for actin filament nucleation. Yet, when WASP function is eliminated there is negligible effect on actin polymerization at the immunological synapse, leading to gaps in our understanding of the events connecting WASP and calcium ion signaling. Here, we identify a fraction of total synaptic F-actin selectively generated by WASP in the form of distinct F-actin ‘foci’. These foci are polymerized de novo as a result of the T cell receptor (TCR) proximal tyrosine kinase cascade, and facilitate distal signaling events including PLCγ1 activation and subsequent cytoplasmic calcium ion elevation. We conclude that WASP generates a dynamic F-actin architecture in the context of the immunological synapse, which then amplifies the downstream signals required for an optimal immune response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04953.001 PMID:25758716

  13. The actin-related protein hArp8 accumulates on the mitotic chromosomes and functions in chromosome alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Naoki; Oka, Asako; Kitayama, Kumiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2008-02-15

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and various actin-related proteins (Arps). Some of these Arps are localized in the nucleus, and a fraction of each of these nuclear Arps is functionally involved in chromatin remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. On the other hand, in mitotic cells, the localization and function of the nuclear Arps are largely unknown. Human Arp8 (hArp8), an ortholog of yeast nuclear Arp8, was recently found to be associated with the hINO80-chromatin remodeling complex along with hArp5. Here we report that hArp8, but not hArp5, accumulates on mitotic chromosomes. This is the first example where a member of the actin family is found to be associated with mitotic chromosomes. Expression of truncated hArp8 proteins and depletion of endogenous hArp8 by RNA interference caused misalignment of mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that chromosome-associated hArp8 has a role in chromosome behavior. In contrast, depletion of hIno80 and hArp5 did not cause misalignment of chromosomes, suggesting that the role of hArp8 at mitotic chromosomes is independent of the activity of hINO80 complexes. These findings provide the first insight into a novel function of actin family members in mitosis.

  14. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  15. Interactions between actin and myosin filaments in skeletal muscle visualized in frozen-hydrated thin sections.

    PubMed

    Trus, B L; Steven, A C; McDowall, A W; Unser, M; Dubochet, J; Podolsky, R J

    1989-04-01

    For the purpose of determining net interactions between actin and myosin filaments in muscle cells, perhaps the single most informative view of the myofilament lattice is its averaged axial projection. We have studied frozen-hydrated transverse thin sections with the goal of obtaining axial projections that are not subject to the limitations of conventional thin sectioning (suspect preservation of native structure) or of equatorial x-ray diffraction analysis (lack of experimental phases). In principle, good preservation of native structure may be achieved with fast freezing, followed by low-dose electron imaging of unstained vitrified cryosections. In practice, however, cryosections undergo large-scale distortions, including irreversible compression; furthermore, phase contrast imaging results in a nonlinear relationship between the projected density of the specimen and the optical density of the micrograph. To overcome these limitations, we have devised methods of image restoration and generalized correlation averaging, and applied them to cryosections of rabbit psoas fibers in both the relaxed and rigor states. Thus visualized, myosin filaments appear thicker than actin filaments by a much smaller margin than in conventional thin sections, and particularly so for rigor muscle. This may result from a significant fraction of the myosin S1-cross-bridges averaging out in projection and thus contributing only to the baseline of projected density. Entering rigor incurs a loss of density from an annulus around the myosin filament, with a compensating accumulation of density around the actin filament. This redistribution of mass represents attachment of the fraction of cross-bridges that are visible above background. Myosin filaments in the "nonoverlap" zone appear to broaden on entering rigor, suggesting that on deprivation of ATP, cross-bridges in situ move outwards even without actin in their immediate proximity.

  16. Actin-Dynamics in Plant Cells: The Function of Actin Perturbing Substances Jasplakinolide, Chondramides, Phalloidin, Cytochalasins, and Latrunculins

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Blaas, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will give an overview of the most common F-actin perturbing substances, that are used to study actin dynamics in living plant cells in studies on morphogenesis, motility, organelle movement or when apoptosis has to be induced. These substances can be divided into two major subclasses – F-actin stabilizing and polymerizing substances like jasplakinolide, chondramides and F-actin severing compounds like chytochalasins and latrunculins. Jasplakinolide was originally isolated form a marine sponge, and can now be synthesized and has become commercially available, which is responsible for its wide distribution as membrane permeable F-actin stabilizing and polymerizing agent, which may even have anti-cancer activities. Cytochalasins, derived from fungi show an F-actin severing function and many derivatives are commercially available (A, B, C, D, E, H, J), also making it a widely used compound for F-actin disruption. The same can be stated for latrunculins (A, B), derived from red sea sponges, however the mode of action is different by binding to G-actin and inhibiting incorporation into the filament. In the case of swinholide a stable complex with actin dimers is formed resulting also in severing of F-actin. For influencing F-actin dynamics in plant cells only membrane permeable drugs are useful in a broad range. We however introduce also the phallotoxins and synthetic derivatives, as they are widely used to visualize F-actin in fixed cells. A particular uptake mechanism has been shown for hepatocytes, but has also been described in siphonal giant algae. In the present chapter the focus is set on F-actin dynamics in plant cells where alterations in cytoplasmic streaming can be particularly well studied; however methods by fluorescence applications including phalloidin- and antibody staining as well as immunofluorescence-localization of the inhibitor drugs are given. PMID:26498789

  17. Measurement and Modeling of Resistivity as a Microscale Tool to Quantify the Volume Fraction of Lenticular (alpha)' Particles in a Partially Transformed (delta)-phase Pu-Ga Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Johnson, D L; Mayhall, D J; Schwartz, A J

    2005-07-13

    We have measured and modeled the change in electrical resistivity due to partial transformation to the martensitic {alpha}{prime}-phase in a {delta}-phase Pu-Ga matrix. The primary objective is to relate the change in resistance, measured with a 4-probe technique during the transformation, to the volume fraction of the {alpha}{prime} phase created in the microstructure. Analysis by finite element methods suggests that considerable differences in the resistivity may be anticipated depending on the orientational and morphological configurations of the {alpha}{prime} particles. Finite element analysis of the computed resistance of an assembly of lenticular shaped particles indicates that series resistor or parallel resistor approximations are inaccurate and can lead to an underestimation of the predicted amount of {alpha}{prime} in the sample by 15% or more. Comparison of the resistivity of a simulated network of partially transformed grains or portions of grains suggests that a correction to the measured resistivity allows quantification of the amount of {alpha}{prime} phase in the microstructure with minimal consideration of how the {alpha}{prime} morphology may evolve. It is found that the average of the series and parallel resistor approximations provide the most accurate relationship between the measured resistivity and the amount of {alpha}{prime} phase. The methods described here are applicable to any evolving two-phase microstructure in which the resistance difference between the two phases is measurable.

  18. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Orion D.; Servant, Guy; Welch, Matthew D.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Sedat, John W.; Bourne, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients. PMID:10559877

  19. Reliable amplification of actin genes facilitates deep-level phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Voigt, K; Wöstemeyer, J

    2000-09-01

    The gene for actin as a highly conserved and functionally essential genetic element is developing into a major tool for phylogenetic analysis within a broad organismic range. We therefore propose a set of universally applicable primers that allow reliable amplification of actin genes. For primer construction the amino acid sequences of 57 actin genes comprising fungi, animals, plants and protists were analysed, aligned and used for the definition of six well-conserved regions which are suitable as priming sites in PCR amplification experiments. Ten primers were designed for specific in vitro amplification of actin gene fragments from a wide range of microorganisms. The corresponding gene fragments provide a strong basis to isolate nearly complete actin genes for further molecular characterization and for establishing phylogenies based on actin gene trees.

  20. Actin Depolymerization Drives Actomyosin Ring Contraction during Budding Yeast Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Inês Mendes; Rubinstein, Boris; Kucharavy, Andrei; Unruh, Jay R.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Actin filaments and myosin-II are evolutionarily conserved force generating components of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Here we show that in budding yeast actin filament depolymerization plays a major role in actomyosin ring constriction. Cofilin mutation or chemically stabilizing actin filaments attenuates actomyosin ring constriction. Deletion of myosin-II motor domain or the myosin regulatory light chain reduced the contraction rate and also the rate of actin depolymerization in the ring. We constructed a quantitative microscopic model of actomyosin ring constriction via filament sliding driven by both actin depolymerization and myosin-II motor activity. Model simulations based on experimental measurements supports the notion that actin depolymerization is the predominant mechanism for ring constriction. The model predicts invariability of total contraction time irrespective of the initial ring size as originally reported for C elegans embryonic cells. This prediction was validated in yeast cells of different sizes due to having different ploidies. PMID:22698284

  1. Cosolvent and Crowding Effects on the Temperature and Pressure Dependent Conformational Dynamics and Stability of Globular Actin.

    PubMed

    Schummel, Paul Hendrik; Haag, Andreas; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Winter, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Actin can be found in nearly all eukaryotic cells and is responsible for many different cellular functions. The polymerization process of actin has been found to be among the most pressure sensitive processes in vivo. In this study, we explored the effects of chaotropic and kosmotropic cosolvents, such as urea and the compatible osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), and, to mimic a more cell-like environment, crowding agents on the pressure and temperature stability of globular actin (G-actin). The temperature and pressure of unfolding as well as thermodynamic parameters upon unfolding, such as enthalpy and volume changes, have been determined by fluorescence spectroscopy over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, ranging from 10 to 80 °C and from 1 to 3000 bar, respectively. Complementary high-pressure NMR studies revealed additional information on the existence of native-like conformational substates of G-actin as well as a molten-globule-like state preceding the complete pressure denaturation. Different from the chaotropic agent urea, TMAO increases both the temperature and pressure stability for the protein most effectively. The Gibbs free energy differences of most of the native substates detected are not influenced significantly by TMAO. In mixtures of these osmolytes, urea counteracts the stabilizing effect of TMAO to some extent. Addition of the crowding agent Ficoll increases the temperature and pressure stability even further, thereby allowing sufficient stability of the protein at temperature and pressure conditions encountered under extreme environmental conditions on Earth. PMID:27314563

  2. Measuring F-actin properties in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Mikko; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, numerous studies have demonstrated that the actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in the control of dendritic spine shape. Synaptic stimulation rapidly changes the actin dynamics and many actin regulators have been shown to play roles in neuron functionality. Accordingly, defects in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons have been implicated in memory disorders. Due to the small size of spines, it is difficult to detect changes in the actin structures in dendritic spines by conventional light microscopy imaging. Instead, to know how tightly actin filaments are bundled together, and how fast the filaments turnover, we need to use advanced microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PAGFP) fluorescence decay and fluorescence anisotropy. Fluorescence anisotropy, which measures the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two GFP fluorophores, has been proposed as a method to measure the level of actin polymerization. Here, we propose a novel idea that fluorescence anisotropy could be more suitable to study the level of actin filament bundling instead of actin polymerization. We validate the method in U2OS cell line where the actin structures can be clearly distinguished and apply to analyze how actin filament organization in dendritic spines changes during neuronal maturation. In addition to fluorescence anisotropy validation, we take a critical look at the properties and limitations of FRAP and PAGFP fluorescence decay methods and offer our proposals for the analysis methods for these approaches. These three methods complement each other, each providing additional information about actin dynamics and organization in dendritic spines. PMID:25140131

  3. The architecture of actin filaments and the ultrastructural location of actin-binding protein in the periphery of lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, J H; Shevlin, P

    1986-09-01

    A highly branched filament network is the principal structure in the periphery of detergent-extracted cytoskeletons of macrophages that have been spread on a surface and either freeze or critical point dried, and then rotary shadowed with platinum-carbon. This array of filaments completely fills lamellae extended from the cell and bifurcates to form 0.2-0.5 micron thick layers on the top and bottom of the cell body. Reaction of the macrophage cytoskeletons with anti-actin IgG and with anti-IgG bound to colloidal gold produces dense staining of these filaments, and incubation with myosin subfragment 1 uniformly decorates these filaments, identifying them as actin. 45% of the total cellular actin and approximately 70% of actin-binding protein remains in the detergent-insoluble cell residue. The soluble actin is not filamentous as determined by sedimentation analysis, the DNAase I inhibition assay, and electron microscopy, indicating that the cytoskeleton is not fragmented by detergent extraction. The spacing between the ramifications of the actin network is 94 +/- 47 nm and 118 +/- 72 nm in cytoskeletons prepared for electron microscopy by freeze drying and critical point drying, respectively. Free filament ends are rare, except for a few which project upward from the body of the network or which extend down to the substrate. Filaments of the network intersect predominantly at right angles to form either T-shaped and X-shaped overlaps having striking perpendicularity or else Y-shaped intersections composed of filaments intersecting at 120-130 degrees angles. The actin filament concentration in the lamellae is high, with an average value of 12.5 mg/ml. The concentration was much more uniform in freeze-dried preparations than in critical point-dried specimens, indicating that there is less collapse associated with the freezing technique. The orthogonal actin network of the macrophage cortical cytoplasm resembles actin gels made with actin-binding protein. Reaction of

  4. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  5. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  6. Correlative nanoscale imaging of actin filaments and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huanqi; Grintsevich, Elena E.; Reisler, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Actin remodeling is an area of interest in biology in which correlative microscopy can bring a new way to analyze protein complexes at the nanoscale. Advances in EM, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and single molecule techniques have provided a wealth of information about the modulation of the F-actin structure and its regulation by actin binding proteins (ABPs). Yet, there are technological limitations of these approaches to achieving quantitative molecular level information on the structural and biophysical changes resulting from ABPs interaction with F-actin. Fundamental questions about the actin structure and dynamics and how these determine the function of ABPs remain unanswered. Specifically, how local and long-range structural and conformational changes result in ABPs induced remodeling of F-actin needs to be addressed at the single filament level. Advanced, sensitive and accurate experimental tools for detailed understanding of ABP–actin interactions are much needed. This article discusses the current understanding of nanoscale structural and mechanical modulation of F-actin by ABPs at the single filament level using several correlative microscopic techniques, focusing mainly on results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of ABP–actin complexes. PMID:23727693

  7. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  8. Solubilization of native actin monomers from human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Tilley, L; Dwyer, M; Ralston, G B

    1986-01-01

    Up to 50% of the actin in erythrocyte membranes can be solubilized at low ionic strength in a form capable of inhibiting DNAse I, in the presence of 0.4 mM ATP and 0.05 mM calcium. In the absence of calcium and ATP, actin is released but is apparently rapidly denatured. Solubilization of G-actin increases with temperature up to 37 degrees C. At higher temperatures, actin is released rapidly but quickly loses its ability to inhibit DNAse I. PMID:3789986

  9. An unconventional form of actin in protozoan hemoflagellate, Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Prabodh; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mitra, Kalyan; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2008-08-15

    Leishmania actin was cloned, overexpressed in baculovirus-insect cell system, and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein polymerized optimally in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP, but differed from conventional actins in its following properties: (i) it did not polymerize in the presence of Mg2+ alone, (ii) it polymerized in a restricted range of pH 7.0-8.5, (iii) its critical concentration for polymerization was found to be 3-4-fold lower than of muscle actin, (iv) it predominantly formed bundles rather than single filaments at pH 8.0, (v) it displayed considerably higher ATPase activity during polymerization, (vi) it did not inhibit DNase-I activity, and (vii) it did not bind the F-actin-binding toxin phalloidin or the actin polymerization disrupting agent Latrunculin B. Computational and molecular modeling studies revealed that the observed unconventional behavior of Leishmania actin is related to the diverged amino acid stretches in its sequence, which may lead to changes in the overall charge distribution on its solvent-exposed surface, ATP binding cleft, Mg2+ binding sites, and the hydrophobic loop that is involved in monomer-monomer interactions. Phylogenetically, it is related to ciliate actins, but to the best of our knowledge, no other actin with such unconventional properties has been reported to date. It is therefore suggested that actin in Leishmania may serve as a novel target for design of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:18539603

  10. Actin in dendritic spines: connecting dynamics to function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small actin-rich protrusions from neuronal dendrites that form the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses and are major sites of information processing and storage in the brain. Changes in the shape and size of dendritic spines are correlated with the strength of excitatory synaptic connections and heavily depend on remodeling of its underlying actin cytoskeleton. Emerging evidence suggests that most signaling pathways linking synaptic activity to spine morphology influence local actin dynamics. Therefore, specific mechanisms of actin regulation are integral to the formation, maturation, and plasticity of dendritic spines and to learning and memory. PMID:20457765

  11. Helical buckling of actin inside filopodia generates traction

    PubMed Central

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells can interact with their surroundings via filopodia, which are membrane protrusions that extend beyond the cell body. Filopodia are essential during dynamic cellular processes like motility, invasion, and cell–cell communication. Filopodia contain cross-linked actin filaments, attached to the surrounding cell membrane via protein linkers such as integrins. These actin filaments are thought to play a pivotal role in force transduction, bending, and rotation. We investigated whether, and how, actin within filopodia is responsible for filopodia dynamics by conducting simultaneous force spectroscopy and confocal imaging of F-actin in membrane protrusions. The actin shaft was observed to periodically undergo helical coiling and rotational motion, which occurred simultaneously with retrograde movement of actin inside the filopodium. The cells were found to retract beads attached to the filopodial tip, and retraction was found to correlate with rotation and coiling of the actin shaft. These results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism by which a cell can use rotation of the filopodial actin shaft to induce coiling and hence axial shortening of the filopodial actin bundle. PMID:25535347

  12. Force generation by endocytic actin patches in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders E; Bayly, Philip V

    2014-04-15

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value.

  13. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  14. Correlative nanoscale imaging of actin filaments and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shivani; Zhu, Huanqi; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-07-01

    Actin remodeling is an area of interest in biology in which correlative microscopy can bring a new way to analyze protein complexes at the nanoscale. Advances in EM, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and single molecule techniques have provided a wealth of information about the modulation of the F-actin structure and its regulation by actin binding proteins (ABPs). Yet, there are technological limitations of these approaches to achieving quantitative molecular level information on the structural and biophysical changes resulting from ABPs interaction with F-actin. Fundamental questions about the actin structure and dynamics and how these determine the function of ABPs remain unanswered. Specifically, how local and long-range structural and conformational changes result in ABPs induced remodeling of F-actin needs to be addressed at the single filament level. Advanced, sensitive and accurate experimental tools for detailed understanding of ABP-actin interactions are much needed. This article discusses the current understanding of nanoscale structural and mechanical modulation of F-actin by ABPs at the single filament level using several correlative microscopic techniques, focusing mainly on results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of ABP-actin complexes.

  15. Arp2/3 complex and actin dynamics are required for actin-based mitochondrial motility in yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, I R; Yang, H C; Nowakowski, W D; Karmon, S L; Hays, L G; Yates, J R; Pon, L A

    2001-03-13

    The Arp2/3 complex is implicated in actin polymerization-driven movement of Listeria monocytogenes. Here, we find that Arp2p and Arc15p, two subunits of this complex, show tight, actin-independent association with isolated yeast mitochondria. Arp2p colocalizes with mitochondria. Consistent with this result, we detect Arp2p-dependent formation of actin clouds around mitochondria in intact yeast. Cells bearing mutations in ARP2 or ARC15 genes show decreased velocities of mitochondrial movement, loss of all directed movement and defects in mitochondrial morphology. Finally, we observe a decrease in the velocity and extent of mitochondrial movement in yeast in which actin dynamics are reduced but actin cytoskeletal structure is intact. These results support the idea that the movement of mitochondria in yeast is actin polymerization driven and that this movement requires Arp2/3 complex.

  16. Visualization of Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Fixed and Live Drosophila Egg Chambers.

    PubMed

    Groen, Christopher M; Tootle, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of actin cytoskeletal dynamics is critical for understanding the spatial and temporal regulation of actin remodeling. Drosophila oogenesis provides an excellent model system for visualizing the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we present methods for imaging the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila egg chambers in both fixed samples by phalloidin staining and in live egg chambers using transgenic actin labeling tools.

  17. Hyperosmotic stress induces Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase-mediated cofilin phosphorylation in tubular cells: key role in the osmotically triggered F-actin response

    PubMed Central

    Thirone, Ana C. P.; Speight, Pam; Zulys, Matthew; Rotstein, Ori D.; Szászi, Katalin; Pedersen, Stine F.; Kapus, András

    2016-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress induces cytoskeleton reorganization and a net increase in cellular F-actin, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Whereas de novo F-actin polymerization likely contributes to the actin response, the role of F-actin severing is unknown. To address this problem, we investigated whether hyperosmolarity regulates cofilin, a key actin-severing protein, the activity of which is inhibited by phosphorylation. Since the small GTPases Rho and Rac are sensitive to cell volume changes and can regulate cofilin phosphorylation, we also asked whether they might link osmostress to cofilin. Here we show that hyperosmolarity induced rapid, sustained, and reversible phosphorylation of cofilin in kidney tubular (LLC-PK1 and Madin-Darby canine kidney) cells. Hyperosmolarity-provoked cofilin phosphorylation was mediated by the Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK)/LIM kinase (LIMK) but not the Rac/PAK/LIMK pathway, because 1) dominant negative (DN) Rho and DN-ROCK but not DN-Rac and DN-PAK inhibited cofilin phosphorylation; 2) constitutively active (CA) Rho and CA-ROCK but not CA-Rac and CA-PAK induced cofilin phosphorylation; 3) hyperosmolarity induced LIMK-2 phosphorylation, and 4) inhibition of ROCK by Y-27632 suppressed the hypertonicity-triggered LIMK-2 and cofilin phosphorylation. We then examined whether cofilin and its phosphorylation play a role in the hypertonicity-triggered F-actin changes. Downregulation of cofilin by small interfering RNA increased the resting F-actin level and eliminated any further rise upon hypertonic treatment. Inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation by Y-27632 prevented the hyperosmolarity-provoked F-actin increase. Taken together, cofilin is necessary for maintaining the osmotic responsiveness of the cytoskeleton in tubular cells, and the Rho/ROCK/LIMK-mediated cofilin phosphorylation is a key mechanism in the hyperosmotic stress-induced F-actin increase. PMID:19109524

  18. A Mechanism for Actin Filament Severing by Malaria Parasite Actin Depolymerizing Factor 1 via a Low Affinity Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Webb, Andrew I.; Olshina, Maya A.; Infusini, Giuseppe; Tan, Yan Hong; Hanssen, Eric; Catimel, Bruno; Suarez, Cristian; Condron, Melanie; Angrisano, Fiona; NebI, Thomas; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2014-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilins are essential regulators of actin turnover in eukaryotic cells. These multifunctional proteins facilitate both stabilization and severing of filamentous (F)-actin in a concentration-dependent manner. At high concentrations ADF/cofilins bind stably to F-actin longitudinally between two adjacent actin protomers forming what is called a decorative interaction. Low densities of ADF/cofilins, in contrast, result in the optimal severing of the filament. To date, how these two contrasting modalities are achieved by the same protein remains uncertain. Here, we define the proximate amino acids between the actin filament and the malaria parasite ADF/cofilin, PfADF1 from Plasmodium falciparum. PfADF1 is unique among ADF/cofilins in being able to sever F-actin but do so without stable filament binding. Using chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) combined with structure reconstruction we describe a previously overlooked binding interface on the actin filament targeted by PfADF1. This site is distinct from the known binding site that defines decoration. Furthermore, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of single actin filaments confirms that this novel low affinity site is required for F-actin severing. Exploring beyond malaria parasites, selective blocking of the decoration site with human cofilin (HsCOF1) using cytochalasin D increases its severing rate. HsCOF1 may therefore also use a decoration-independent site for filament severing. Thus our data suggest that a second, low affinity actin-binding site may be universally used by ADF/cofilins for actin filament severing. PMID:24371134

  19. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  20. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  1. Evidence That an Unconventional Actin Can Provide Essential F-Actin Function and That a Surveillance System Monitors F-Actin Integrity in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Masayuki; Pringle, John R; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-03-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved eukaryotic proteins. It is thought to have multiple essential cellular roles and to function primarily or exclusively as filaments ("F-actin"). Chlamydomonas has been an enigma, because a null mutation (ida5-1) in its single gene for conventional actin does not affect growth. A highly divergent actin gene, NAP1, is upregulated in ida5-1 cells, but it has been unclear whether NAP1 can form filaments or provide actin function. Here, we used the actin-depolymerizing drug latrunculin B (LatB), the F-actin-specific probe Lifeact-Venus, and genetic and molecular methods to resolve these issues. LatB-treated wild-type cells continue to proliferate; they initially lose Lifeact-stained structures but recover them concomitant with upregulation of NAP1. Thirty-nine LatB-sensitive mutants fell into four genes (NAP1 and LAT1-LAT3) in which we identified the causative mutations using a novel combinatorial pool-sequencing strategy. LAT1-LAT3 are required for NAP1 upregulation upon LatB treatment, and ectopic expression of NAP1 largely rescues the LatB sensitivity of the lat1-lat3 mutants, suggesting that the LAT gene products comprise a regulatory hierarchy with NAP1 expression as the major functional output. Selection of LatB-resistant revertants of a nap1 mutant yielded dominant IDA5 mutations that presumably render F-IDA5 resistant to LatB, and nap1 and lat mutations are synthetically lethal with ida5-1 in the absence of LatB. We conclude that both IDA5 and the divergent NAP1 can form filaments and redundantly provide essential F-actin functions and that a novel surveillance system, probably responding to a loss of F-actin, triggers NAP1 expression and perhaps other compensatory responses. PMID:26715672

  2. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  3. Encoding Mechano-Memories in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucard, Louis; Majumdar, Sayantan; Levine, Alex; Gardel, Margaret

    The ability of cells to sense and adapt to external mechanical stimuli is vital to many of its biological functions. A critical question is therefore to understand how mechanosensory mechanisms arise in living matter, with implications in both cell biology and smart materials design. Experimental work has demonstrated that the mechanical properties of semiflexible actin networks in Eukaryotic cells can be modulated (either transiently or irreversibly) via the application of external forces. Previous work has also shown with a combination of numerical simulations and analytic calculations shows that the broken rotational symmetry of the filament orientational distribution in semiflexible networks leads to dramatic changes in the mechanical response. Here we demonstrate with a combination of numerical and analytic calculations that the observed long-lived mechano-memory in the actin networks arise from changes in the nematic order of the constituent filaments. These stress-induced changes in network topology relax slowly under zero stress and can be observed through changes in the nonlinear mechanics. Our results provide a strategy for designing a novel class of materials and demonstrate a new putative mechanism of mechanical sensing in eukaryotic cells.

  4. Actin Foci Adhesion of D. discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Paneru, Govind

    2014-03-01

    Amoeboid migration is a fast (10 μm min-1) integrin-independent mode of migration that is important with D. discoideum, leukocytes, and breast cancer cells. It is poorly understood, but depends on the establishment of adhesive contacts to the substrate where the cell transmits traction forces. In pre-aggregative D. discoideum, a model system for learning about amoeboid migration, these adhesive contacts are discrete complexes that are known as actin-foci. They have an area of ~ 0.5 μm2 and a lifetime of ~ 20 s. This talk will present measurements of the adhesive character of actin foci that have been obtained using a submicron force transducer that was designed for this purpose. Results on the rupture stresses and lifetimes of individual acting foci under nano-newton level forces will be described in the context of a general theory for cellular adhesion. This theory depends on, essentially, three cellular properties: the membrane-medium surface tension, the number density of adhesion receptors in the membrane, and the receptor-substrate potential energy surface. Therefore, the use of the transducer to determine the surface tension will be presented, as well.

  5. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M; Wong, Elissa W P; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby arriving the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium beyond stage VIII of the epithelial cycle will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come.

  6. Force Transmission in the Actin Cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    The ability of cells to sense and generate mechanical forces is essential to numerous aspects of their physiology, including adhesion, migration, division and differentiation. To a large degree, cellular tension is regulated by the transmission of myosin II-generated forces through the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton. While transmission of myosin-generated stresses from the molecular to cellular length scale is well understood in the context of highly organized sarcomeres found in striated muscle, non-muscle and smooth muscle cells contain a wide variety of bundles and networks lacking sarcomeric organization. I will describe the in vitro and in vivo approaches we use to study force transmission in such disordered actomyosin assemblies. Our in vivo results are showing that highly organized stress fibers contribute surprisingly little to the overall extent of cellular tension as compared to disordered actomyosin meshworks. Our in vitro results are demonstrating the mechanisms of symmetry breaking in disordered actomyosin bundles that facilitate the formation of contractile bundles with well-defined ``contractile elements.'' These results provide insight into the self-organization of actomyosin cytoskeleton in non-muscle cells that regulate and maintain cellular tension.

  7. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  8. Computational Analysis of Viscoelastic Properties of Crosslinked Actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeyoon; Hwang, Wonmuk; Lee, Hyungsuk; Kamm, Roger D.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical force plays an important role in the physiology of eukaryotic cells whose dominant structural constituent is the actin cytoskeleton composed mainly of actin and actin crosslinking proteins (ACPs). Thus, knowledge of rheological properties of actin networks is crucial for understanding the mechanics and processes of cells. We used Brownian dynamics simulations to study the viscoelasticity of crosslinked actin networks. Two methods were employed, bulk rheology and segment-tracking rheology, where the former measures the stress in response to an applied shear strain, and the latter analyzes thermal fluctuations of individual actin segments of the network. It was demonstrated that the storage shear modulus (G′) increases more by the addition of ACPs that form orthogonal crosslinks than by those that form parallel bundles. In networks with orthogonal crosslinks, as crosslink density increases, the power law exponent of G′ as a function of the oscillation frequency decreases from 0.75, which reflects the transverse thermal motion of actin filaments, to near zero at low frequency. Under increasing prestrain, the network becomes more elastic, and three regimes of behavior are observed, each dominated by different mechanisms: bending of actin filaments, bending of ACPs, and at the highest prestrain tested (55%), stretching of actin filaments and ACPs. In the last case, only a small portion of actin filaments connected via highly stressed ACPs support the strain. We thus introduce the concept of a ‘supportive framework,’ as a subset of the full network, which is responsible for high elasticity. Notably, entropic effects due to thermal fluctuations appear to be important only at relatively low prestrains and when the average crosslinking distance is comparable to or greater than the persistence length of the filament. Taken together, our results suggest that viscoelasticity of the actin network is attributable to different mechanisms depending on the amount

  9. Computational analysis of viscoelastic properties of crosslinked actin networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon; Hwang, Wonmuk; Lee, Hyungsuk; Kamm, Roger D

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical force plays an important role in the physiology of eukaryotic cells whose dominant structural constituent is the actin cytoskeleton composed mainly of actin and actin crosslinking proteins (ACPs). Thus, knowledge of rheological properties of actin networks is crucial for understanding the mechanics and processes of cells. We used Brownian dynamics simulations to study the viscoelasticity of crosslinked actin networks. Two methods were employed, bulk rheology and segment-tracking rheology, where the former measures the stress in response to an applied shear strain, and the latter analyzes thermal fluctuations of individual actin segments of the network. It was demonstrated that the storage shear modulus (G') increases more by the addition of ACPs that form orthogonal crosslinks than by those that form parallel bundles. In networks with orthogonal crosslinks, as crosslink density increases, the power law exponent of G' as a function of the oscillation frequency decreases from 0.75, which reflects the transverse thermal motion of actin filaments, to near zero at low frequency. Under increasing prestrain, the network becomes more elastic, and three regimes of behavior are observed, each dominated by different mechanisms: bending of actin filaments, bending of ACPs, and at the highest prestrain tested (55%), stretching of actin filaments and ACPs. In the last case, only a small portion of actin filaments connected via highly stressed ACPs support the strain. We thus introduce the concept of a 'supportive framework,' as a subset of the full network, which is responsible for high elasticity. Notably, entropic effects due to thermal fluctuations appear to be important only at relatively low prestrains and when the average crosslinking distance is comparable to or greater than the persistence length of the filament. Taken together, our results suggest that viscoelasticity of the actin network is attributable to different mechanisms depending on the amount of