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Sample records for actin-based cytoskeletal network

  1. Defining a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins critical for actin-based motility of Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Serio, Alisa W; Jeng, Robert L; Haglund, Cat M; Reed, Shawna C; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-05-20

    Many Rickettsia species are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use actin-based motility for spread during infection. However, while other bacteria assemble actin tails consisting of branched networks, Rickettsia assemble long parallel actin bundles, suggesting the use of a distinct mechanism for exploiting actin. To identify the underlying mechanisms and host factors involved in Rickettsia parkeri actin-based motility, we performed an RNAi screen targeting 115 actin cytoskeletal genes in Drosophila cells. The screen delineated a set of four core proteins-profilin, fimbrin/T-plastin, capping protein, and cofilin--as crucial for determining actin tail length, organizing filament architecture, and enabling motility. In mammalian cells, these proteins were localized throughout R. parkeri tails, consistent with a role in motility. Profilin and fimbrin/T-plastin were critical for the motility of R. parkeri but not Listeria monocytogenes. Our results highlight key distinctions between the evolutionary strategies and molecular mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to assemble and organize actin. PMID:20478540

  2. Mechanical Response of Cytoskeletal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gardel, Margaret L.; Kasza, Karen E.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Liu, Jiayu; Weitz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is a dynamic network of filamentous proteins, consisting of filamentous actin (F-actin), microtubules, and intermediate filaments. However, these networks are not simple linear, elastic solids; they can exhibit highly nonlinear elasticity and athermal dynamics driven by ATP-dependent processes. To build quantitative mechanical models describing complex cellular behaviors, it is necessary to understand the underlying physical principles that regulate force transmission and dynamics within these networks. In this chapter, we review our current understanding of the physics of networks of cytoskeletal proteins formed in vitro. We introduce rheology, the technique used to measure mechanical response. We discuss our current understanding of the mechanical response of F-actin networks, and how the biophysical properties of F-actin and actin cross-linking proteins can dramatically impact the network mechanical response. We discuss how incorporating dynamic and rigid microtubules into F-actin networks can affect the contours of growing microtubules and composite network rigidity. Finally, we discuss the mechanical behaviors of intermediate filaments. PMID:19118688

  3. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design.

  4. Entropic forces drive contraction of cytoskeletal networks.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Hilitski, Feodor; Dogic, Zvonimir; Diez, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The cytoskeleton is a network of interconnected protein filaments, which provide a three-dimensional scaffold for cells. Remodeling of the cytoskeleton is important for key cellular processes, such as cell motility, division, or morphogenesis. This remodeling is traditionally considered to be driven exclusively by processes consuming chemical energy, such as the dynamics of the filaments or the action of molecular motors. Here, we review two mechanisms of cytoskeletal network remodeling that are independent of the consumption of chemical energy. In both cases directed motion of overlapping filaments is driven by entropic forces, which arise from harnessing thermal energy present in solution. Entropic forces are induced either by macromolecular crowding agents or by diffusible crosslinkers confined to the regions where filaments overlap. Both mechanisms increase filament overlap length and lead to the contraction of filament networks. These force-generating mechanisms, together with the chemical energy-dependent mechanisms, need to be considered for the comprehensive quantitative picture of the remodeling of cytoskeletal networks in cells. PMID:26996935

  5. Continuum modeling of forces in growing viscoelastic cytoskeletal networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seob; Sun, Sean X

    2009-02-21

    Mechanical properties of the living cell are important in cell movement, cell division, cancer development and cell signaling. There is considerable interest in measuring local mechanical properties of living materials and the living cytoskeleton using micromechanical techniques. However, living materials are constantly undergoing internal dynamics such as growth and remodeling. A modeling framework that combines mechanical deformations with cytoskeletal growth dynamics is necessary to describe cellular shape changes. The present paper develops a general finite deformation modeling approach that can treat the viscoelastic cytoskeleton. Given the growth dynamics in the cytoskeletal network and the relationship between deformation and stress, the shape of the network is computed in an incremental fashion. The growth dynamics of the cytoskeleton can be modeled as stress dependent. The result is a consistent treatment of overall cell deformation. The framework is applied to a growing 1-d bundle of actin filaments against an elastic cantilever, and a 2-d cell undergoing wave-like protrusion dynamics. In the latter example, mechanical forces on the cell adhesion are examined as a function of the protrusion dynamics. PMID:19041329

  6. Hierarchical self-organization of cytoskeletal active networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne; Keasar, Chen; Farago, Oded

    2012-04-01

    The structural reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is facilitated through the action of motor proteins that crosslink the actin filaments and transport them relative to each other. Here, we present a combined experimental-computational study that probes the dynamic evolution of mixtures of actin filaments and clusters of myosin motors. While on small spatial and temporal scales the system behaves in a very noisy manner, on larger scales it evolves into several well distinct patterns such as bundles, asters and networks. These patterns are characterized by junctions with high connectivity, whose formation is possible due to the organization of the motors in ‘oligoclusters’ (intermediate-size aggregates). The simulations reveal that the self-organization process proceeds through a series of hierarchical steps, starting from local microscopic moves and ranging up to the macroscopic large scales where the steady-state structures are formed. Our results shed light on the mechanisms involved in processes such as cytokinesis and cellular contractility, where myosin motors organized in clusters operate cooperatively to induce the structural organization of cytoskeletal networks.

  7. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  8. Computational connectionism within neurons: A model of cytoskeletal automata subserving neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Steen; Karampurwala, Hasnain; Vaidyanath, Rajesh; Jensen, Klaus S.; Hameroff, Stuart

    1990-06-01

    “Neural network” models of brain function assume neurons and their synaptic connections to be the fundamental units of information processing, somewhat like switches within computers. However, neurons and synapses are extremely complex and resemble entire computers rather than switches. The interiors of the neurons (and other eucaryotic cells) are now known to contain highly ordered parallel networks of filamentous protein polymers collectively termed the cytoskeleton. Originally assumed to provide merely structural “bone-like” support, cytoskeletal structures such as microtubules are now recognized to organize cell interiors dynamically. The cytoskeleton is the internal communication network for the eucaryotic cell, both by means of simple transport and by means of coordinating extremely complicated events like cell division, growth and differentiation. The cytoskeleton may therefore be viewed as the cell's “nervous system”. Consequently the neuronal cytoskeleton may be involved in molecular level information processing which subserves higher, collective neuronal functions ultimately relating to cognition. Numerous models of information processing within the cytoskeleton (in particular, microtubules) have been proposed. We have utilized cellular automata as a means to model and demonstrate the potential for information processing in cytoskeletal microtubules. In this paper, we extend previous work and simulate associative learning in a cytoskeletal network as well as assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We also discuss possible relevance and implications of cytoskeletal information processing to cognition.

  9. Fast Label-Free Cytoskeletal Network Imaging in Living Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Pierre; Lécart, Sandrine; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    We present a full-field technique that allows label-free cytoskeletal network imaging inside living cells. This noninvasive technique allows monitoring of the cytoskeleton dynamics as well as interactions between the latter and organelles on any timescale. It is based on high-resolution quantitative phase imaging (modified Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry) and can be directly implemented using any optical microscope without modification. We demonstrate the capability of our setup on fixed and living Chinese hamster ovary cells, showing the cytoskeleton dynamics in lamellipodia during protrusion and mitochondria displacement along the cytoskeletal network. In addition, using the quantitative function of the technique, along with simulation tools, we determined the refractive index of a single tubulin microtubule to be ntubu=2.36±0.6 at λ=527 nm. PMID:24739158

  10. Microrheology of single microtubule filaments and synthesized cytoskeletal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The ability to sense and respond to external mechanical forces is crucial for cells in many processes such as cell growth and division. Common models on mechanotransduction rely on the conversion of mechanical stimuli to chemical signals in the cell periphery and their translocation by diffusion (passive) or molecular motors (active). These processes are rather slow (~ seconds) and it has been argued that the cytoskeleton itself might be able to transport a mechanical signal within microseconds via stress waves. Microtubules are the stiffest component of the cytoskeleton and thus ideal candidates for this purpose. We study the frequency dependent response of single microtubule filaments and small networks thereof in a bottom-up approach using several (N =2-10) time-multiplexed optical tweezers together with back focal plane interferometry. Small synthesized networks with a defined geometry are constructed using trapped Neutravidin beads as anchor points for biotinylated filaments. The network is then probed by a defined oscillation of one anchor (actor). The frequency dependent response of the remaining beads (sensors) is analyzed experimentally and modeled theoretically over a wide frequency range.

  11. Active multi-point microrheology of cytoskeletal networks

    PubMed Central

    Paust, Tobias; Mertens, Lina Katinka; Martin, Ines; Beil, Michael; Walther, Paul; Schimmel, Thomas; Marti, Othmar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Active microrheology is a valuable tool to determine viscoelastic properties of polymer networks. Observing the response of the beads to the excitation of a reference leads to dynamic and morphological information of the material. In this work we present an expansion of the well-known active two-point microrheology. By measuring the response of multiple particles in a viscoelastic medium in response to the excitation of a reference particle, we are able to determine the force propagation in the polymer network. For this purpose a lock-in technique is established that allows for extraction of the periodical motion of embedded beads. To exert a sinusoidal motion onto the reference bead an optical tweezers setup in combination with a microscope is used to investigate the motion of the response beads. From the lock-in data the so called transfer tensor can be calculated, which is a direct measure for the ability of the network to transmit mechanical forces. We also take a closer look at the influence of noise on lock-in measurements and state some simple rules for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27335739

  12. Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2006-10-01

    1. Introduction and the biological basis for cell mechanics Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm; 2. Experimental measurements of intracellular mechanics Paul Janmey and Christoph Schmidt; 3. The cytoskeleton as a soft glassy material Jeffrey Fredberg and Ben Fabry; 4. Continuum elastic or viscoelastic models for the cell Mohammad R. K. Mofrad, Helene Karcher and Roger Kamm; 5. Multiphasic models of cell mechanics Farshid Guuilak, Mansoor A. Haider, Lori A. Setton, Tod A. Laursen and Frank P. T. Baaijens; 6. Models of cytoskeletal mechanics based on tensegrity Dimitrije Stamenovic; 7. Cells, gels and mechanics Gerald H. Pollack; 8. Polymer-based models of cytoskeletal networks F. C. MacKintosh; 9. Cell dynamics and the actin cytoskeleton James L. McGrath and C. Forbes Dewey, Jr; 10. Active cellular motion: continuum theories and models Marc Herant and Micah Dembo; 11. Summary Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm.

  13. Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction and the biological basis for cell mechanics Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm; 2. Experimental measurements of intracellular mechanics Paul Janmey and Christoph Schmidt; 3. The cytoskeleton as a soft glassy material Jeffrey Fredberg and Ben Fabry; 4. Continuum elastic or viscoelastic models for the cell Mohammad R. K. Mofrad, Helene Karcher and Roger Kamm; 5. Multiphasic models of cell mechanics Farshid Guuilak, Mansoor A. Haider, Lori A. Setton, Tod A. Laursen and Frank P. T. Baaijens; 6. Models of cytoskeletal mechanics based on tensegrity Dimitrije Stamenovic; 7. Cells, gels and mechanics Gerald H. Pollack; 8. Polymer-based models of cytoskeletal networks F. C. MacKintosh; 9. Cell dynamics and the actin cytoskeleton James L. McGrath and C. Forbes Dewey, Jr; 10. Active cellular motion: continuum theories and models Marc Herant and Micah Dembo; 11. Summary Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm.

  14. Mechanical models of the cellular cytoskeletal network for the analysis of intracellular mechanical properties and force distributions: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-12-01

    The cytoskeleton, which is the major mechanical component of cells, supports the cell body and regulates the cellular motility to assist the cell in performing its biological functions. Several cytoskeletal network models have been proposed to investigate the mechanical properties of cells. This review paper summarizes these models with a focus on the prestressed cable network, the semi-flexible chain network, the open-cell foam, the tensegrity, and the granular models. The components, material parameters, types of connection joints, tension conditions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated from a structural and biological point of view. The underlying mechanisms that are associated with the morphological changes of spreading cells are expected to be simulated using a cytoskeletal model; however, it is still paid less attention most likely due to the lack of a suitable cytoskeletal model that can accurately model the spreading process. In this review article, the established cytoskeletal models are hoped to provide useful information for the development of future cytoskeletal models with different degrees of cell attachment for the study of the mechanical mechanisms underlying the cellular behaviors in response to external stimulations. PMID:23062682

  15. Proteomic and Microscopic Strategies towards the Analysis of the Cytoskeletal Networks in Major Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coumans, Joëlle V. F.; Palanisamy, Suresh K. A.; McFarlane, Jim; Moens, Pierre D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health disorders have become worldwide health priorities. It is estimated that in the next 20 years they will account for a 16 trillion United State dollars (US$) loss. Up to now, the underlying pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Altered cytoskeleton proteins expression that may influence the assembly, organization and maintenance of cytoskeletal integrity has been reported in major depressive disorders, schizophrenia and to some extent bipolar disorders. The use of quantitative proteomics, dynamic microscopy and super-resolution microscopy to investigate disease-specific protein signatures holds great promise to improve our understanding of these disorders. In this review, we present the currently available quantitative proteomic approaches use in neurology, gel-based, stable isotope-labelling and label-free methodologies and evaluate their strengths and limitations. We also reported on enrichment/subfractionation methods that target the cytoskeleton associated proteins and discuss the need of alternative methods for further characterization of the neurocytoskeletal proteome. Finally, we present live cell imaging approaches and emerging dynamic microscopy technology that will provide the tools necessary to investigate protein interactions and their dynamics in the whole cells. While these areas of research are still in their infancy, they offer huge potential towards the understanding of the neuronal network stability and its modification across neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27104521

  16. Initiation of Chondrocyte Self-Assembly Requires an Intact Cytoskeletal Network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hu, Jerry C Y; Yamada, Soichiro; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembly and self-organization have recently emerged as robust scaffold-free tissue engineering methodologies that can be used to generate various tissues, including cartilage, vessel, and liver. Self-assembly, in particular, is a scaffold-free platform for tissue engineering that does not require the input of exogenous energy to the system. Although self-assembly can generate functional tissues, most notably neocartilage, the mechanisms of self-assembly remain unclear. To study the self-assembling process, we used articular chondrocytes as a model to identify parameters that can affect this process. Specifically, the roles of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules, surface-bound collagen, and the actin cytoskeletal network were investigated. Using time-lapse imaging, we analyzed the early stages of chondrocyte self-assembly. Within hours, chondrocytes rapidly coalesced into cell clusters before compacting to form tight cellular structures. Chondrocyte self-assembly was found to depend primarily on integrin function and secondarily on cadherin function. In addition, actin or myosin II inhibitors prevented chondrocyte self-assembly, suggesting that cell adhesion alone is not sufficient, but rather the active contractile actin cytoskeleton is essential for proper chondrocyte self-assembly and the formation of neocartilage. Better understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms allows for the rational modulation of this process toward generating neocartilages with improved properties. These findings are germane to understanding self-assembly, an emerging platform for tissue engineering of a plethora of tissues, especially as these neotissues are poised for translation.

  17. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  18. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young's modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility.

  19. Self-organization in cytoskeletal mixtures: from synthetic cilia to flowing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Tim

    2013-03-01

    Inspired by biological functions such as ciliary beating and cytoplasmic streaming, we have developed a highly tunable and robust model system from biological components that self-organizes to produce a broad range of far-from-equilibrium materials with remarkable emergent properties. Using only simple components - microtubules, kinesin motor clusters, and a depletion agent that bundles MTs - we reproduced several essential biological functions, including cilia-like beating, the emergence of metachronal waves in bundle arrays, and internally generated flows in active cytoskeletal gels. The occurrence of these biomimetic functions as self-organized processes provides unique insight into the mechanisms that drive these processes in biology. Beyond these biomimetic behaviors, we have also used the same components to engineer novel active materials which have no biological analogues: active streaming 2D nematics, and finally self-propelled emulsion droplets. These observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit highly sought-after collective and biomimetic properties, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties.

  20. Interplay of active processes modulates tension and drives phase transition in self-renewing, motor-driven cytoskeletal networks

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Michael; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Kamm, Roger D.; Kim, Taeyoon

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton—a complex, nonequilibrium network consisting of filaments, actin-crosslinking proteins (ACPs) and motors—confers cell structure and functionality, from migration to morphogenesis. While the core components are recognized, much less is understood about the behaviour of the integrated, disordered and internally active system with interdependent mechano-chemical component properties. Here we use a Brownian dynamics model that incorporates key and realistic features—specifically actin turnover, ACP (un)binding and motor walking—to reveal the nature and underlying regulatory mechanisms of overarching cytoskeletal states. We generate multi-dimensional maps that show the ratio in activity of these microscopic elements determines diverse global stress profiles and the induction of nonequilibrium morphological phase transition from homogeneous to aggregated networks. In particular, actin turnover dynamics plays a prominent role in tuning stress levels and stabilizing homogeneous morphologies in crosslinked, motor-driven networks. The consequence is versatile functionality, from dynamic steady-state prestress to large, pulsed constrictions. PMID:26744226

  1. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  2. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  3. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  4. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  5. Effects of intermediate filaments on actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Giardini, P A; Theriot, J A

    2001-12-01

    How does subcellular architecture influence the intracellular movements of large organelles and macromolecular assemblies? To investigate the effects of mechanical changes in cytoplasmic structure on intracellular motility, we have characterized the actin-based motility of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in normal mouse fibroblasts and in fibroblasts lacking intermediate filaments. The apparent diffusion coefficient of L. monocytogenes was two-fold greater in vimentin-null fibroblasts than in wild-type fibroblasts, indicating that intermediate filaments significantly restrict the Brownian motion of bacteria. However, the mean speed of L. monocytogenes actin-based motility was statistically identical in vimentin-null and wild-type cells. Thus, environmental drag is not rate limiting for bacterial motility. Analysis of the temporal variations in speed measurements indicated that bacteria in vimentin-null cells displayed larger fluctuations in speed than did trajectories in wild-type cells. Similarly, the presence of the vimentin meshwork influenced the turning behavior of the bacteria; in the vimentin-null cells, bacteria made sharper turns than they did in wild-type cells. Taken together, these results suggest that a network of intermediate filaments constrains bacterial movement and operates over distances of several microns to reduce fluctuations in motile behavior.

  6. Cytoskeletal social networking in the growth cone: How +TIPs mediate microtubule-actin cross-linking to drive axon outgrowth and guidance.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Garrett M; Bearce, Elizabeth A; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2016-09-01

    The growth cone is a unique structure capable of guiding axons to their proper destinations. Within the growth cone, extracellular guidance cues are interpreted and then transduced into physical changes in the actin filament (F-actin) and microtubule cytoskeletons, providing direction and movement. While both cytoskeletal networks individually possess important growth cone-specific functions, recent data over the past several years point towards a more cooperative role between the two systems. Facilitating this interaction between F-actin and microtubules, microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) have been shown to link the two cytoskeletons together. Evidence suggests that many +TIPs can couple microtubules to F-actin dynamics, supporting both microtubule advance and retraction in the growth cone periphery. In addition, growing in vitro and in vivo data support a secondary role for +TIPs in which they may participate as F-actin nucleators, thus directly influencing F-actin dynamics and organization. This review focuses on how +TIPs may link F-actin and microtubules together in the growth cone, and how these interactions may influence axon guidance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Curved trajectories of actin-based motility in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-05-01

    Recent experiments have reported fascinating geometrical trajectories for actin-based motility of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and functionalized beads. To understand the physical mechanism for these trajectories, we constructed a phenomenological model to study the motion of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions. In our model, the force and actin density on the surface of the disk are influenced by the translation and rotation of the disk, which in turn is induced by the asymmetric distributions of those densities. We show that this feedback can destabilize a straight trajectory, leading to circular, S-shape and other geometrical trajectories observed in the experiments through bifurcations in the distributions of the force and actin density. The relation between our model and the models for self-propelled deformable particles is emphasized and discussed.

  8. Clamped-filament elongation model for actin-based motors.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-01-01

    Although actin-based motility drives cell crawling and intracellular locomotion of organelles and certain pathogens, the underlying mechanism of force generation remains a mystery. Recent experiments demonstrated that Listeria exhibit episodes of 5.4-nm stepwise motion corresponding to the periodicity of the actin filament subunits, and extremely small positional fluctuations during the intermittent pauses [S. C. Kuo and J. L. McGrath. 2000. Nature. 407:1026-1029]. These findings suggest that motile bacteria remain firmly bound to actin filament ends as they elongate, a behavior that appears to rule out previous models for actin-based motility. We propose and analyze a new mechanochemical model (called the "Lock, Load & Fire" mechanism) for force generation by means of affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation. During the locking step, the filament's terminal ATP-containing subunit binds tightly to a clamp situated on the surface of a motile object; in the loading step, actin.ATP monomer(s) bind to the filament end, an event that triggers the firing step, wherein ATP hydrolysis on the clamped subunit attenuates the filament's affinity for the clamp. This last step initiates translocation of the new ATP-containing terminus to the clamp, whereupon another cycle begins anew. This model explains how surface-tethered filaments can grow while exerting flexural or tensile force on the motile surface. Moreover, stochastic simulations of the model reproduce the signature motions of Listeria. This elongation motor, which we term actoclampin, exploits actin's intrinsic ATPase activity to provide a simple, high-fidelity enzymatic reaction cycle for force production that does not require elongating filaments to dissociate from the motile surface. This mechanism may operate whenever actin polymerization is called upon to generate the forces that drive cell crawling or intracellular organelle motility. PMID:11806905

  9. CHUP1 mediates actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Usami, Hiroka; Maeda, Takuma; Fujii, Yusuke; Oikawa, Kazusato; Takahashi, Fumio; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. CHUP1 (CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING1) is indispensable for this response in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, involvement of CHUP1 in light-induced chloroplast movement is unknown in other plants. In this study, CHUP1 orthologues were isolated from a moss, Physcomitrella patens, and a fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris, by cDNA library screening and PCR cloning based on the P. patens genome sequence. Functional motifs found in CHUP1 of A. thaliana were conserved among the CHUP1 orthologues. In addition to the putative functional regions, the C-terminal regions (approximately 250 amino acids), which are unique in CHUP1s, were highly conserved. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of P. patens CHUP1s (PpCHUP1A, PpCHUP1B and PpCHUP1C) were transiently expressed in protoplast cells. All GFP fusions were localized on the chloroplasts. Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement of chup1 disruptants of P. patens was examined in the presence of cytoskeletal inhibitors because of the utilization of both microtubules and actin filaments for the movement in P. patens. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the wild type (WT) and all chup1 disruptants showed chloroplast avoidance movement. However, when microtubules were disrupted by Oryzalin, chloroplasts in ∆chup1A and ∆chup1A/B rarely moved and stayed in the strong light-irradiated area. On the other hand, WT, ∆chup1B and ∆chup1C showed chloroplast avoidance movement. These results suggest that PpCHUP1A predominantly mediates the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement. This study reveals that CHUP1 functions on the chloroplasts and is involved in the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in P. patens.

  10. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  11. Spontaneous symmetry breaking for geometrical trajectories of actin-based motility in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Actin-based motility is important for many cellular processes. In this article we extend our previous studies of an actin-propelled circular disk in two dimensions to an actin-propelled spherical bead in three dimensions. We find that for an achiral load the couplings between the motion of the load and the actin network induce a series of bifurcations, starting with a transition from rest to moving state, followed by a transition from straight to planar curves, and finally a further transition from motion in a plane to one with torsion. To address the intriguing, experimentally observed chiral motility of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we also study the motility of a spherical load with a built-in chirality. For such a chiral load, stable circular trajectories are no longer found in numerical simulations. Instead, helical trajectories with handedness that depends on the chirality of the load are found. Our results reveal the relation between the symmetry of actin network and the trajectories of actin-propelled loads.

  12. Spontaneous symmetry breaking for geometrical trajectories of actin-based motility in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-Tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Actin-based motility is important for many cellular processes. In this article we extend our previous studies of an actin-propelled circular disk in two dimensions to an actin-propelled spherical bead in three dimensions. We find that for an achiral load the couplings between the motion of the load and the actin network induce a series of bifurcations, starting with a transition from rest to moving state, followed by a transition from straight to planar curves, and finally a further transition from motion in a plane to one with torsion. To address the intriguing, experimentally observed chiral motility of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we also study the motility of a spherical load with a built-in chirality. For such a chiral load, stable circular trajectories are no longer found in numerical simulations. Instead, helical trajectories with handedness that depends on the chirality of the load are found. Our results reveal the relation between the symmetry of actin network and the trajectories of actin-propelled loads. PMID:27575158

  13. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  14. Cytoskeletal Expression and Remodeling in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boraas, Liana C.; Guidry, Julia B.; Pineda, Emma T.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Many emerging cell-based therapies are based on pluripotent stem cells, though complete understanding of the properties of these cells is lacking. In these cells, much is still unknown about the cytoskeletal network, which governs the mechanoresponse. The objective of this study was to determine the cytoskeletal state in undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells and remodeling with differentiation. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), as well as the original un-reprogrammed embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), were evaluated for expression of cytoskeletal markers. We found that pluripotent stem cells overall have a less developed cytoskeleton compared to fibroblasts. Gene and protein expression of smooth muscle cell actin, vimentin, lamin A, and nestin were markedly lower for ESCs than MEFs. Whereas, iPSC samples were heterogeneous with most cells expressing patterns of cytoskeletal proteins similar to ESCs with a small subpopulation similar to MEFs. This indicates that dedifferentiation during reprogramming is associated with cytoskeletal remodeling to a less developed state. In differentiation studies, it was found that shear stress-mediated differentiation resulted in an increase in expression of cytoskeletal intermediate filaments in ESCs, but not in iPSC samples. In the embryoid body model of spontaneous differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, however, both ESCs and iPSCs had similar gene expression for cytoskeletal proteins during early differentiation. With further differentiation, however, gene levels were significantly higher for iPSCs compared to ESCs. These results indicate that reprogrammed iPSCs more readily reacquire cytoskeletal proteins compared to the ESCs that need to form the network de novo. The strategic selection of the parental phenotype is thus critical not only in the context of reprogramming but also the ultimate functionality of the iPSC-differentiated cell population. Overall, this

  15. Rickettsia Sca2 is a bacterial formin-like mediator of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Cat M.; Choe, Julie E.; Skau, Colleen T.; Kovar, David R.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse intracellular pathogens subvert the host actin polymerization machinery to drive movement within and between cells during infection. Rickettsia in the spotted fever group (SFG) are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that undergo actin-based motility and assemble distinctive ‘comet tails’ that consist of long, unbranched actin filaments1,2. Despite this distinct organization, it was proposed that actin in Rickettsia comet tails is nucleated by the host Arp2/3 complex and the bacterial protein RickA, which assemble branched actin networks3,4. However, a second bacterial gene, sca2, was recently implicated in actin tail formation by R. rickettsii5. Here, we demonstrate that Sca2 is a bacterial actin-assembly factor that functionally mimics eukaryotic formin proteins. Sca2 nucleates unbranched actin filaments, processively associates with growing barbed ends, requires profilin for efficient elongation, and inhibits the activity of capping protein, all properties shared with formins. Sca2 localizes to the Rickettsia surface and is sufficient to promote the assembly of actin filaments in cytoplasmic extract. These results suggest that Sca2 mimics formins to determine the unique organization of actin filaments in Rickettsia tails and drive bacterial motility, independently of host nucleators. PMID:20972427

  16. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  17. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the “molecular clutch” description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. PMID:25383039

  18. F-actin-based extensions of the head cyst cell adhere to the maturing spermatids to maintain them in a tight bundle and prevent their premature release in Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bela S; Shirolikar, Seema; Ray, Krishanu

    2009-01-01

    Background In Drosophila, all the 64 clonally derived spermatocytes differentiate in syncytium inside two somatic-origin cyst cells. They elongate to form slender spermatids, which are individualized and then released into the seminal vesicle. During individualization, differentiating spermatids are organized in a tight bundle inside the cyst, which is expected to play an important role in sperm selection. However, actual significance of this process and its underlying mechanism are unclear. Results We show that dynamic F-actin-based processes extend from the head cyst cell at the start of individualization, filling the interstitial space at the rostral ends of the maturing spermatid bundle. In addition to actin, these structures contained lamin, beta-catenin, dynamin, myosin VI and several other filopodial components. Further, pharmacological and genetic analyses showed that cytoskeletal stability and dynamin function are essential for their maintenance. Disruption of these F-actin based processes was associated with spermatid bundle disassembly and premature sperm release inside the testis. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggests that the head cyst cell adheres to the maturing spermatid heads through F-actin-based extensions, thus maintaining them in a tight bundle. This is likely to regulate mature sperm release into the seminal vesicle. Overall, this process bears resemblance to mammalian spermiation. PMID:19416498

  19. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  20. Actin based processes that could determine the cytoplasmic architecture of plant cells.

    PubMed

    van der Honing, Hannie S; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2007-05-01

    Actin polymerisation can generate forces that are necessary for cell movement, such as the propulsion of a class of bacteria, including Listeria, and the protrusion of migrating animal cells. Force generation by the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells has not been studied. One process in plant cells that is likely to depend on actin-based force generation is the organisation of the cytoplasm. We compare the function of actin binding proteins of three well-studied mammalian models that depend on actin-based force generation with the function of their homologues in plants. We predict the possible role of these proteins, and thus the role of actin-based force generation, in the production of cytoplasmic organisation in plant cells.

  1. Redistribution of membrane proteins between the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum in plants is reversible and not dependent on cytoskeletal networks.

    PubMed

    Saint-Jore, Claude M; Evins, Janet; Batoko, Henri; Brandizzi, Federica; Moore, Ian; Hawes, Chris

    2002-03-01

    We have fused the signal anchor sequences of a rat sialyl transferase and a human galactosyl transferase along with the Arabidopsis homologue of the yeast HDEL receptor (AtERD2) to the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transiently expressed the chimeric genes in tobacco leaves. All constructs targeted the Golgi apparatus and co-expression with DsRed fusions along with immunolabelling of stably transformed BY2 cells indicated that the fusion proteins located all Golgi stacks. Exposure of tissue to brefeldin A (BFA) resulted in the reversible redistribution of ST-GFP into the endoplasmic reticulum. This effect occurred in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor and also in the absence of microtubules or actin filaments. Likewise, reformation of Golgi stacks on removal of BFA was not dependent on either protein synthesis or the cytoskeleton. These data suggest that ER to Golgi transport in the cell types observed does not require cytoskeletal-based mechanochemical motor systems. However, expression of an inhibitory mutant of Arabidopsis Rab 1b (AtRab1b(N121I) significantly slowed down the recovery of Golgi fluorescence in BFA treated cells indicating a role for Rab1 in regulating ER to Golgi anterograde transport.

  2. Identification of a Putative Network of Actin-Associated Cytoskeletal Proteins in Glomerular Podocytes Defined by Co-Purified mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nabet, Behnam; Tsai, Arthur; Tobias, John W.; Carstens, Russ P.

    2009-01-01

    The glomerular podocyte is a highly specialized and polarized kidney cell type that contains major processes and foot processes that extend from the cell body. Foot processes from adjacent podocytes form interdigitations with those of adjacent cells, thereby creating an essential intercellular junctional domain of the renal filtration barrier known as the slit diaphragm. Interesting parallels have been drawn between the slit diaphragm and other sites of cell-cell contact by polarized cells. Notably mutations in several genes encoding proteins localized to the foot processes can lead to proteinuria and kidney failure. Mutations in the Wilm's tumor gene (WT1) can also lead to kidney disease and one isoform of WT1, WT1(+KTS), has been proposed to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We originally sought to identify mRNAs associated with WT1(+KTS) through an RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray approach, hypothesizing that the proteins encoded by these mRNAs might be important for podocyte morphology and function. We identified a subset of mRNAs that were remarkably enriched for transcripts encoding actin-binding proteins and other cytoskeletal proteins including several that are localized at or near the slit diaphragm. Interestingly, these mRNAs included those of α-actinin-4 and non-muscle myosin IIA that are mutated in genetic forms of kidney disease. However, isolation of the mRNAs occurred independently of the expression of WT1, suggesting that the identified mRNAs were serendipitously co-purified on the basis of co-association in a common subcellular fraction. Mass spectroscopy revealed that other components of the actin cytoskeleton co-purified with these mRNAs, namely actin, tubulin, and elongation factor 1α. We propose that these mRNAs encode a number of proteins that comprise a highly specialized protein interactome underlying the slit diaphragm. Collectively, these gene products and their interactions may prove to be important for the

  3. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. PMID:26715420

  4. Robust Organizational Principles of Protrusive Biopolymer Networks in Migrating Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Käs, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration is associated with the dynamic protrusion of a thin actin-based cytoskeletal extension at the cell front, which has been shown to consist of two different substructures, the leading lamellipodium and the subsequent lamellum. While the formation of the lamellipodium is increasingly well understood, organizational principles underlying the emergence of the lamellum are just beginning to be unraveled. We report here on a 1D mathematical model which describes the reaction-diffusion processes of a polarized actin network in steady state, and reproduces essential characteristics of the lamellipodium-lamellum system. We observe a steep gradient in filament lengths at the protruding edge, a local depolymerization maximum a few microns behind the edge, as well as a differential dominance of the network destabilizer ADF/cofilin and the stabilizer tropomyosin. We identify simple and robust organizational principles giving rise to the derived network characteristics, uncoupled from the specifics of any molecular implementation, and thus plausibly valid across cell types. An analysis of network length dependence on physico-chemical system parameters implies that to limit array treadmilling to cellular dimensions, network growth has to be truncated by mechanisms other than aging-induced depolymerization, e.g., by myosin-associated network dissociation at the transition to the cell body. Our work contributes to the analytical understanding of the cytoskeletal extension's bisection into lamellipodium and lamellum and sheds light on how cells organize their molecular machinery to achieve motility. PMID:21267070

  5. Systematic mutational analysis of the amino-terminal domain of the Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein reveals novel functions in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lauer, P; Theriot, J A; Skoble, J; Welch, M D; Portnoy, D A

    2001-12-01

    The Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein acts as a scaffold to assemble and activate host cell actin cytoskeletal factors at the bacterial surface, resulting in directional actin polymerization and propulsion of the bacterium through the cytoplasm. We have constructed 20 clustered charged-to-alanine mutations in the NH2-terminal domain of ActA and replaced the endogenous actA gene with these molecular variants. These 20 clones were evaluated in several biological assays for phenotypes associated with particular amino acid changes. Additionally, each protein variant was purified and tested for stimulation of the Arp2/3 complex, and a subset was tested for actin monomer binding. These specific mutations refined the two regions involved in Arp2/3 activation and suggest that the actin-binding sequence of ActA spans 40 amino acids. We also identified a 'motility rate and cloud-to-tail transition' region in which nine contiguous mutations spanning amino acids 165-260 caused motility rate defects and changed the ratio of intracellular bacteria associated with actin clouds and comet tails without affecting Arp2/3 activation. Several unusual motility phenotypes were associated with amino acid changes in this region, including altered paths through the cytoplasm, discontinuous actin tails in host cells and the tendency to 'skid' or dramatically change direction while moving. These unusual phenotypes illustrate the complexity of ActA functions that control the actin-based motility of L. monocytogenes.

  6. Systematic mutational analysis of the amino-terminal domain of the Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein reveals novel functions in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lauer, P; Theriot, J A; Skoble, J; Welch, M D; Portnoy, D A

    2001-12-01

    The Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein acts as a scaffold to assemble and activate host cell actin cytoskeletal factors at the bacterial surface, resulting in directional actin polymerization and propulsion of the bacterium through the cytoplasm. We have constructed 20 clustered charged-to-alanine mutations in the NH2-terminal domain of ActA and replaced the endogenous actA gene with these molecular variants. These 20 clones were evaluated in several biological assays for phenotypes associated with particular amino acid changes. Additionally, each protein variant was purified and tested for stimulation of the Arp2/3 complex, and a subset was tested for actin monomer binding. These specific mutations refined the two regions involved in Arp2/3 activation and suggest that the actin-binding sequence of ActA spans 40 amino acids. We also identified a 'motility rate and cloud-to-tail transition' region in which nine contiguous mutations spanning amino acids 165-260 caused motility rate defects and changed the ratio of intracellular bacteria associated with actin clouds and comet tails without affecting Arp2/3 activation. Several unusual motility phenotypes were associated with amino acid changes in this region, including altered paths through the cytoplasm, discontinuous actin tails in host cells and the tendency to 'skid' or dramatically change direction while moving. These unusual phenotypes illustrate the complexity of ActA functions that control the actin-based motility of L. monocytogenes. PMID:11886549

  7. The interplay of nonlinearity and architecture in equilibrium cytoskeletal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenshen; Shen, Tongye; Wolynes, Peter G

    2011-01-01

    The interplay between cytoskeletal architecture and the nonlinearity of the interactions due to bucklable filaments plays a key role in modulating the cell's mechanical stability and affecting its structural rearrangements. We study a model of cytoskeletal structure treating it as an amorphous network of hard centers rigidly cross-linked by nonlinear elastic strings, neglecting the effects of motorization. Using simulations along with a self-consistent phonon method, we show that this minimal model exhibits diverse thermodynamically stable mechanical phases that depend on excluded volume, cross-link concentration, filament length, and stiffness. Within the framework set by the free energy functional formulation and making use of the random first order transition theory of structural glasses, we further estimate the characteristic densities for a kinetic glass transition to occur in this model system. Network connectivity strongly modulates the transition boundaries between various equilibrium phases, as well as the kinetic glass transition density. PMID:21219010

  8. Capping Protein Increases the Rate of Actin-based Motility by Promoting Filament Nucleation by the Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Orkun; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-01-01

    Summary Capping protein is an integral component of Arp2/3-nucleated actin networks that drive amoeboid motility. Increasing the concentration of capping protein, which caps barbed ends of actin filaments and prevents elongation, increases the rate of actin-based motility in vivo and in vitro. We studied the synergy between capping protein and Arp2/3 using an in vitro actin-based motility system reconstituted from purified proteins. We find that capping protein increases the rate of motility by promoting more frequent filament nucleation by the Arp2/3 complex, and not by increasing the rate of filament elongation as previously suggested. One consequence of this coupling between capping and nucleation is that, while the rate of motility depends strongly on the concentration of capping protein and Arp2/3, the net rate of actin assembly is insensitive to changes in either factor. By reorganizing their architecture, dendritic actin networks harness the same assembly kinetics to drive different rates of motility. PMID:18510928

  9. Alternative cytoskeletal landscapes: cytoskeletal novelty and evolution in basal excavate protists.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Paredez, Alexander R

    2013-02-01

    Microbial eukaryotes encompass the majority of eukaryotic evolutionary and cytoskeletal diversity. The cytoskeletal complexity observed in multicellular organisms appears to be an expansion of components present in genomes of diverse microbial eukaryotes such as the basal lineage of flagellates, the Excavata. Excavate protists have complex and diverse cytoskeletal architectures and life cycles-essentially alternative cytoskeletal 'landscapes'-yet still possess conserved microtubule-associated and actin-associated proteins. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed that a subset of excavates, however, lack many canonical actin-binding proteins central to actin cytoskeleton function in other eukaryotes. Overall, excavates possess numerous uncharacterized and 'hypothetical' genes, and may represent an undiscovered reservoir of novel cytoskeletal genes and cytoskeletal mechanisms. The continued development of molecular genetic tools in these complex microbial eukaryotes will undoubtedly contribute to our overall understanding of cytoskeletal diversity and evolution.

  10. Actin-based motility of Listeria: Right-handed helical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes recruit cellular machinery to move in and between cells. Understanding the mechanism of motility, including force and torque generation and the resultant displacements, holds keys to numerous applications in medicine and biosensing. In this work, a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation is presented to illustrate that a biomechanical model of actin-based motility of a rigid surface through persistently attached filaments propelled by affinity-modulated molecular motors can produce a right-handed helical trajectory consistent with experimental observations. The implications of the mechanism to bacterial motility are discussed.

  11. Implementing cell contractility in filament-based cytoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B

    2016-02-01

    Cells are known to respond over time to mechanical stimuli, even actively generating force at longer times. In this paper, a microstructural filament-based cytoskeletal network model is extended to incorporate this active response, and a computational study to assess the influence on relaxation behaviour was performed. The incorporation of an active response was achieved by including a strain energy function of contractile activity from the cross-linked actin filaments. A four-state chemical model and strain energy function was adopted, and generalisation to three dimensions and the macroscopic deformation field was performed by integration over the unit sphere. Computational results in MATLAB and ABAQUS/Explicit indicated an active cellular response over various time-scales, dependent on contractile parameters. Important features such as force generation and increasing cell stiffness due to prestress are qualitatively predicted. The work in this paper can easily be extended to encompass other filament-based cytoskeletal models as well. PMID:26899417

  12. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  13. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheeny, Sean P; Goss, Josue A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal–nuclear–chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  14. Cytoskeletal disease: a role in the etiology of adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Binderman, I; Gadban, N; Yaffe, A

    2014-01-01

    All cells and organisms across the evolutionary spectrum, from the most primitive to the most complex, are mechanosensitive. As the cytoskeleton is a key in controlling the normal basal prestress of cells and therefore is involved in virtually all physiological cellular processes, abnormalities in this essential cellular characteristic may result in diseases. Indeed, many diseases have now been associated with abnormalities in cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal proteins. We propose that adult periodontitis is, at least in part, such a cytoskeletal disease. It is well established that adult periodontitis starts by bacterial invasion at the interface between the tooth surface and marginal gingiva that induces a local inflammatory response. The inflammatory cells release metalloproteinases which degrade gingival collagenous fibrous tissue and loss of local tissue integrity that reduces the normal prestressed cell-extracellular matrix network. This is a major signaling trigger that induces a local and rapid release of ATP, which then activates P2X receptors and stimulates a calcium influx, further activating osteoclastic resorption of the alveolar bone. As periodontitis is a chronic disease, it seems reasonable to suggest that agents that maintain cytoskeletal tensegrity, for example, inhibitors of ATP receptors, may diminish the bone loss and may have a role in future periodontal therapy. PMID:23679579

  15. Shape remodeling and blebbing of active cytoskeletal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Etienne; Schneider, Jochen A M; Keber, Felix C; Pelzl, Carina; Massiera, Gladys; Salbreux, Guillaume; Bausch, Andreas R

    2016-04-01

    Morphological transformations of living cells, such as shape adaptation to external stimuli, blebbing, invagination, or tethering, result from an intricate interplay between the plasma membrane and its underlying cytoskeleton, where molecular motors generate forces. Cellular complexity defies a clear identification of the competing processes that lead to such a rich phenomenology. In a synthetic biology approach, designing a cell-like model assembled from a minimal set of purified building blocks would allow the control of all relevant parameters. We reconstruct actomyosin vesicles in which the coupling of the cytoskeleton to the membrane, the topology of the cytoskeletal network, and the contractile activity can all be precisely controlled and tuned. We demonstrate that tension generation of an encapsulated active actomyosin network suffices for global shape transformation of cell-sized lipid vesicles, which are reminiscent of morphological adaptations in living cells. The observed polymorphism of our cell-like model, such as blebbing, tether extrusion, or faceted shapes, can be qualitatively explained by the protein concentration dependencies and a force balance, taking into account the membrane tension, the density of anchoring points between the membrane and the actin network, and the forces exerted by molecular motors in the actin network. The identification of the physical mechanisms for shape transformations of active cytoskeletal vesicles sets a conceptual and quantitative benchmark for the further exploration of the adaptation mechanisms of cells. PMID:27152328

  16. Shape remodeling and blebbing of active cytoskeletal vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Etienne; Schneider, Jochen A. M.; Keber, Felix C.; Pelzl, Carina; Massiera, Gladys; Salbreux, Guillaume; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological transformations of living cells, such as shape adaptation to external stimuli, blebbing, invagination, or tethering, result from an intricate interplay between the plasma membrane and its underlying cytoskeleton, where molecular motors generate forces. Cellular complexity defies a clear identification of the competing processes that lead to such a rich phenomenology. In a synthetic biology approach, designing a cell-like model assembled from a minimal set of purified building blocks would allow the control of all relevant parameters. We reconstruct actomyosin vesicles in which the coupling of the cytoskeleton to the membrane, the topology of the cytoskeletal network, and the contractile activity can all be precisely controlled and tuned. We demonstrate that tension generation of an encapsulated active actomyosin network suffices for global shape transformation of cell-sized lipid vesicles, which are reminiscent of morphological adaptations in living cells. The observed polymorphism of our cell-like model, such as blebbing, tether extrusion, or faceted shapes, can be qualitatively explained by the protein concentration dependencies and a force balance, taking into account the membrane tension, the density of anchoring points between the membrane and the actin network, and the forces exerted by molecular motors in the actin network. The identification of the physical mechanisms for shape transformations of active cytoskeletal vesicles sets a conceptual and quantitative benchmark for the further exploration of the adaptation mechanisms of cells. PMID:27152328

  17. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants.

  18. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants. PMID:25784147

  19. VEGF-A, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the pathological vascular phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Janice A. . E-mail: jnagy@bidmc.harvard.edu; Senger, Donald R. . E-mail: dsenger@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-03-10

    Normal angiogenesis is a complex process involving the organization of proliferating and migrating endothelial cells (ECs) into a well-ordered and highly functional vascular network. In contrast, pathological angiogenesis, which is a conspicuous feature of tumor growth, ischemic diseases, and chronic inflammation, is characterized by vessels with aberrant angioarchitecture and compromised barrier function. Herein we review the subject of pathological angiogenesis, particularly that driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), from a new perspective. We propose that the serious structural and functional anomalies associated with VEGF-A-elicited neovessels, reflect, at least in part, imbalances in the internal molecular cues that govern the ordered assembly of ECs into three dimensional vascular networks and preserve vessel barrier function. Adopting such a viewpoint widens the focus from solely on specific pro-angiogenic stimuli such as VEGF-A to include a key set of cytoskeletal regulatory molecules, the Rho GTPases, which are known to direct multiple aspects of vascular morphogenesis including EC motility, alignment, multi-cellular organization, as well as intercellular junction integrity. We offer this perspective to draw attention to the importance of endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics for proper neovascularization and to suggest new therapeutic strategies with the potential to improve the pathological vascular phenotype.

  20. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  1. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Benanti, Erin L; Nguyen, Catherine M; Welch, Matthew D

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, whereas their close relative B. thailandensis is non-pathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion, and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate, and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection.

  2. CD44 and beta3 integrin organize two functionally distinct actin-based domains in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Chabadel, Anne; Bañon-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Cluet, David; Rudkin, Brian B; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard; Genot, Elisabeth; Jurdic, Pierre; Anton, Ines M; Saltel, Frédéric

    2007-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of mature osteoclasts (OCs) adhering to nonmineralized substrates is organized in a belt of podosomes reminiscent of the sealing zone (SZ) found in bone resorbing OCs. In this study, we demonstrate that the belt is composed of two functionally different actin-based domains: podosome cores linked with CD44, which are involved in cell adhesion, and a diffuse cloud associated with beta3 integrin, which is involved in cell adhesion and contraction. Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASp) Interacting Protein (WIP)-/- OCs were devoid of podosomes, but they still exhibited actin clouds. Indeed, WIP-/- OCs show diminished expression of WASp, which is required for podosome formation. CD44 is a novel marker of OC podosome cores and the first nonintegrin receptor detected in these structures. The importance of CD44 is revealed by showing that its clustering restores podosome cores and WASp expression in WIP-/- OCs. However, although CD44 signals are sufficient to form a SZ, the presence of WIP is indispensable for the formation of a fully functional SZ.

  3. A stochastic analysis of a Brownian ratchet model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong

    2004-12-01

    In recent single-particle tracking (SPT) measurements on Listeria monocytogenes motility in cells [Kuo and McGrath (2000)], the actin-based stochastic dynamics of the bacterium movement has been analyzed statistically in terms of the mean-square displacement (MSD) of the trajectory. We present a stochastic analysis of a simplified polymerization Brownian ratchet (BR) model in which motions are limited by the bacterium movement. Analytical results are obtained and statistical data analyses are investigated. It is shown that the MSD of the stochastic bacterium movement is a monotonic quadratic function while the MSD for detrended trajectories is linear. Both the short-time relaxation and the long-time kinetics in terms the mean velocity and effective diffusion constant of the propelled bacterium are obtained from the MSD analysis. The MSD of the gap between actin tip and the bacterium exhibits an oscillatory behavior when there is a large resistant force from the bacterium. For comparison, a continuous diffusion formalism of the BR model with great analytical simplicity is also studied.

  4. Short actin-based mechanism for light-directed chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Akeo; Yamada, Noboru; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Hirose, Mana; Saito, Chieko; Shoda, Keiko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wada, Masamitsu

    2009-01-01

    Organelle movement is essential for proper function of living cells. In plants, these movements generally depend on actin filaments, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, in Arabidopsis, we identify associations of short actin filaments along the chloroplast periphery on the plasma membrane side associated with chloroplast photorelocation and anchoring to the plasma membrane. We have termed these chloroplast-actin filaments (cp-actin filaments). Cp-actin filaments emerge from the chloroplast edge and exhibit rapid turnover. The presence of cp-actin filaments depends on an actin-binding protein, chloroplast unusual positioning1 (CHUP1), localized on the chloroplast envelope. chup1 mutant lacked cp-actin filaments but showed normal cytoplasmic actin filaments. When irradiated with blue light to induce chloroplast movement, cp-actin filaments relocalize to the leading edge of chloroplasts before and during photorelocation and are regulated by 2 phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Our findings suggest that plants evolved a unique actin-based mechanism for organelle movement. PMID:19620714

  5. Bacterial Shape and ActA Distribution Affect Initiation of Listeria monocytogenes Actin-Based Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rafelski, Susanne M.; Theriot, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the process by which the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes initiates actin-based motility and determined the contribution of the variable surface distribution of the ActA protein to initiation and steady-state movement. To directly correlate ActA distributions to actin dynamics and motility of live bacteria, ActA was fused to a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1). Actin comet tail formation and steady-state bacterial movement rates both depended on ActA distribution, which in turn was tightly coupled to the bacterial cell cycle. Motility initiation was found to be a highly complex, multistep process for bacteria, in contrast to the simple symmetry breaking previously observed for ActA-coated spherical beads. F-actin initially accumulated along the sides of the bacterium and then slowly migrated to the bacterial pole expressing the highest density of ActA as a tail formed. Early movement was highly unstable with extreme changes in speed and frequent stops. Over time, saltatory motility and sensitivity to the immediate environment decreased as bacterial movement became robust at a constant steady-state speed. PMID:15980176

  6. "Novel cytoskeletal proteins in protists": introductory remarks.

    PubMed

    Fleury-Aubusson, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Protists provide the opportunity to integrate analyses from a low (molecular) to a high (organism) level of complexity within a broad evolutionary framework. The perpectives they offer in the cytoskeletal field are discussed with respect to emerging concepts of cellular biology.

  7. Biophysical models of length control of cytoskeletal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Lishibanya

    Cells contain elaborate and interconnected networks of protein polymers which make up the cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton governs the internal positioning and movement of vesicles and organelles, and controls dynamic changes in cell polarity, shape and movement. Many of these processes require tight control of the size and shape of these cytoskeletal structures. A key question in cell biology is how these structures maintain a particular size and shape despite the rapid turnover of their components. In this thesis I show that the emerging mechanisms by which cells control and regulate the size of filamentous cytoskeletal structures can be classified using key parameters related to their assembly and disassembly kinetics. First, I examine quantitative models based on these specific molecular mechanisms of length control and make experimentally testable predictions that can be used to distinguish different mechanisms of length-control. Second, I study the length control of actin cables in budding yeast cells. Inspired by recent experimental observations in cells, I propose a novel antenna mechanism for cable length control which involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. My results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control. Next I consider the question of how different sized structures can co-exist in the same cytoplasm while making use of the same building blocks. Using theory, I discover limitations imposed by physics on the finite monomer pool as a mechanism of size control and conclude that additional length control mechanisms are required if a cell is to maintain multiple structures. While the primary focus of this thesis is on cytoskeletal structures, the broader principles and mechanisms discussed herein will apply to a range of

  8. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  9. On the Significance of Microtubule Flexural Behavior in Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics. In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics. One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that “every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior,” i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can exceed the axial

  10. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can exceed the axial energy

  11. HAP1 helps to regulate actin-based transport of insulin-containing granules in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Ting; Wu, Hongnian; He, Jun; Li, He

    2015-07-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is enriched in neurons and binds to polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin. It consists of two alternatively spliced isoforms, HAP1A and HAP1B, which differ only in their short C-terminal sequences. Both HAP1A and HAP1B have been also detected in pancreatic β cells, where the loss of HAP1 impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we use time-lapse laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide direct evidence that HAP1A, but not HAP1B, co-localizes and co-migrates with insulin-containing vesicles and actin-based myosin Va motor protein in the INS-1 pancreatic β cell line. Knocking down HAP1 expression using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited actin-based transport of insulin vesicles following glucose stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction between HAP1A, myosin Va, and phogrin, a transmembrane protein in insulin-containing vesicles. Stimulating INS-1 cells with glucose increased the association of HAP1A with myosin Va, while silencing HAP1 expression reduced the association of myosin Va with phogrin after glucose stimulation, without affecting levels of myosin Va or actin. Our results provide real-time evidence in living cells that HAP1 may help regulate transport of insulin-containing secretory granules along cortical actin filaments. This also raises the possibility that HAP1 may play an important role in actin-based secretory vesicle trafficking in neurons. PMID:25744490

  12. The cytoskeletal arrangements necessary to neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Piemonte, Fiorella; Sferra, Antonella; Piermarini, Emanuela; Bertini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    During the process of neurogenesis, the stem cell committed to the neuronal cell fate starts a series of molecular and morphological changes. The understanding of the physio-pathology of mechanisms controlling the molecular and morphological changes occurring during neuronal differentiation is fundamental to the development of effective therapies for many neurologic diseases. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the biological events occurring in the cell during neuronal differentiation is still poor. In this study, we focus preliminarily on the relevance of the cytoskeletal rearrangements, which earlier drive the morphology of the neuronal precursors, and later the migrating/mature neurons. In fact, neuritogenesis, neurite branching, outgrowth and retraction are seminal to the development of a fully functional nervous system. With this in mind, we highlight the importance of iPSC technology to study the processes of cytoskeletal-driven morphological changes during neuronal differentiation. PMID:26760504

  13. γ-Actin is required for cytoskeletal maintenance but not development

    PubMed Central

    Belyantseva, Inna A.; Perrin, Benjamin J.; Sonnemann, Kevin J.; Zhu, Mei; Stepanyan, Ruben; McGee, JoAnn; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Walsh, Edward J.; Friderici, Karen H.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Ervasti, James M.

    2009-01-01

    βcyto-Actin and γcyto-actin are ubiquitous proteins thought to be essential building blocks of the cytoskeleton in all non-muscle cells. Despite this widely held supposition, we show that γcyto-actin null mice (Actg1−/−) are viable. However, they suffer increased mortality and show progressive hearing loss during adulthood despite compensatory up-regulation of βcyto-actin. The surprising viability and normal hearing of young Actg1−/− mice means that βcyto-actin can likely build all essential non-muscle actin-based cytoskeletal structures including mechanosensory stereocilia of hair cells that are necessary for hearing. Although γcyto-actin–deficient stereocilia form normally, we found that they cannot maintain the integrity of the stereocilia actin core. In the wild-type, γcyto-actin localizes along the length of stereocilia but re-distributes to sites of F-actin core disruptions resulting from animal exposure to damaging noise. In Actg1−/− stereocilia similar disruptions are observed even without noise exposure. We conclude that γcyto-actin is required for reinforcement and long-term stability of F-actin–based structures but is not an essential building block of the developing cytoskeleton. PMID:19497859

  14. Supramolecular Assembly in Cytoskeletal Filaments and their Associated Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2002-03-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the emerging proteomics era, the biosciences community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the functions of a large number of interacting proteins. Cellular activity, which is usually tightly regulated, results from protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, which often lead to the formation of very large assemblies of biomolecules for distinct functions. Examples include DNA condensation states during the cell cycle, and bundle and network formation of filamentous proteins in cell attachment, motility, and cytokinesis. We present recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction and optical imaging data, in cell-free systems of cytoskeletal filaments and their associated biomolecules, which reveal novel supramolecular assemblies, spanning lengths from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Supported by NSF DMR-9972246 and NIH GM59288.

  15. Distinct cytoskeletal domains revealed in sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies against different cytoskeletal proteins were used to study the cytoskeletal organization of human spermatozoa. A positive staining with actin antibodies was seen in both the acrosomal cap region and the principal piece region of the tail. However, no staining was obtained with nitrobenzoxadiazol-phallacidin, suggesting that most of the actin was in the nonpolymerized form. Most of the myosin immunoreactivity was confirmed to a narrow band in the neck region of spermatozoa. Tubulin was located to the entire tail, whereas vimentin was only seen in a discrete band-like structure encircling the sperm head, apparently coinciding with the equatorial segment region. Surface staining of the spermatozoa with fluorochrome-coupled Helix pomatia agglutinin revealed a similar band-like structure that co-distributed with the vimentin- specific staining. Instead, other lectin conjugates used labeled either the acrosomal cap region (peanut and soybean agglutinins), both the acrosomal cap and the postacrosomal region of the head (concanavalin A), or the whole sperm cell surface membrane (wheat germ and lens culinaris agglutinins and ricinus communis agglutinin l). In lectin blotting experiments, the Helix pomatia agglutinin-binding was assigned to a 80,000-mol-wt polypeptide which, together with vimentin, also resisted treatment with Triton X-100. Only the acrosomal cap and the principal piece of the tail were decorated with rabbit and hydridoma antibodies against an immunoanalogue of erythrocyte alpha-spectrin (p230). p230 appeared to be the major calmodulin-binding polypeptide in spermatozoa, as shown by a direct overlay assay of electrophoretic blots of spermatozoa with 125I-calmodulin. The results indicate that spermatozoa have a highly specialized cytoskeletal organization and that the distribution of actin, spectrin, and vimentin can be correlated with distinct surface specializations of the sperm cells. This suggest that cytoskeleton may regulate the maintenance

  16. Measurements and models of cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamm, Roger

    2006-11-01

    Much attention has recently focused on understanding the rheology of living cells and reconstituted actin gels using a variety of experimental methods (e.g., single- and multi-particle tracking, magnetic twisting cytometry, AFM indentation) and several different models or descriptors (e.g., biopolymer models, tensegrity, cellular solids, power-law rheology), but the debate continues regarding the fundamental basis for the experimental observations. Our recent studies examine the time-dependent behavior of neutrophils as they deform to enter a narrow channel with capillary-scale dimensions. A sudden drop in the shear modulus is observed, followed by recovery to pre-deformation values in < 1 minute. These rheological changes coincide with a reduction in f-actin content and a transient increase in calcium ion concentration [Ca^++], and the change in storage modulus can be prevented by calcium chelation, suggesting that these observations are causally linked. Cells lacking the ability to increase [Ca^++] also become activated more rapidly following deformation, and the time to activation is independent of intracellular strain rates, contrary to experiments lacking the chelating agent. To better understand these processes and the nature of cytoskeletal rheology in general, we have developed a Brownian dynamics model for cytoskeletal self-assembly and subsequent rheological measurement by single particle tracking. Cross-linking proteins are included possessing a range of properties that lead to a variety of cytoskeletal structures from a fine, homogeneous mesh to a structure containing large stress fibers of varying thickness. These results are described in a multi-dimensional phase space that takes into account the geometry, dimensions and stiffness of the cross-linkers.

  17. Cytoskeletal Mechanics Regulating Amoeboid Cell Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard; Bastounis, Effie; del Álamo, Juan C.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Migrating cells exert traction forces when moving. Amoeboid cell migration is a common type of cell migration that appears in many physiological and pathological processes and is performed by a wide variety of cell types. Understanding the coupling of the biochemistry and mechanics underlying the process of migration has the potential to guide the development of pharmacological treatment or genetic manipulations to treat a wide range of diseases. The measurement of the spatiotemporal evolution of the traction forces that produce the movement is an important aspect for the characterization of the locomotion mechanics. There are several methods to calculate the traction forces exerted by the cells. Currently the most commonly used ones are traction force microscopy methods based on the measurement of the deformation induced by the cells on elastic substrate on which they are moving. Amoeboid cells migrate by implementing a motility cycle based on the sequential repetition of four phases. In this paper we review the role that specific cytoskeletal components play in the regulation of the cell migration mechanics. We investigate the role of specific cytoskeletal components regarding the ability of the cells to perform the motility cycle effectively and the generation of traction forces. The actin nucleation in the leading edge of the cell, carried by the ARP2/3 complex activated through the SCAR/WAVE complex, has shown to be fundamental to the execution of the cyclic movement and to the generation of the traction forces. The protein PIR121, a member of the SCAR/WAVE complex, is essential to the proper regulation of the periodic movement and the protein SCAR, also included in the SCAR/WAVE complex, is necessary for the generation of the traction forces during migration. The protein Myosin II, an important F-actin cross-linker and motor protein, is essential to cytoskeletal contractility and to the generation and proper organization of the traction forces during

  18. The degree of resistance of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal proteins to supra-physiologic concentrations of calcium: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Ebrahim; Nargesi, Arash Aghajani; Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Larry, Mehrdad; Farahani, Roya Horabad; Morteza, Afsaneh; Esteghamati, Alireza; Vigneron, Claude; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2014-08-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of cell dynamics. Dysregulation of its cytosolic concentration is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases. This study aimed to assess the effects of calcium on the network of membrane cytoskeletal proteins. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from eight healthy donors and incubated with 250 µM and 1.25 mM calcium solutions. Membrane cytoskeletal proteins were quantified using SDS-PAGE at baseline and after 3 and 5 days of incubation. Supra-physiologic concentrations of calcium (1.25 mM) induced a significant proteolysis in membrane cytoskeletal proteins, compared with magnesium (p < 0.001). Actin exhibited the highest sensitivity to calcium-induced proteolysis (6.8 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p < 0.001), while spectrin (39.9 ± 1.0 vs. 40.3 ± 2.0, p = 0.393) and band-6 (6.3 ± 0.3 vs. 6.8 ± 0.8, p = 0.191) were more resistant to proteolysis after incubation with calcium in the range of endoplasmic reticulum concentrations (250 µM). Aggregation of membrane cytoskeletal proteins was determined after centrifugation and was significantly higher after incubation with calcium ions compared with control, EDTA and magnesium solutions (p < 0.001). In a supra-physiologic range of 1.25-10 mM of calcium ions, there was a nearly perfect linear relationship between calcium concentration and aggregation of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal proteins (R(2) = 0.971, p < 0.001). Our observation suggests a strong interaction between calcium ions and membrane cytoskeletal network. Cumulative effects of disrupted calcium homeostasis on cytoskeletal proteins need to be further investigated at extended periods of time in disease states.

  19. The degree of resistance of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal proteins to supra-physiologic concentrations of calcium: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Ebrahim; Nargesi, Arash Aghajani; Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Larry, Mehrdad; Farahani, Roya Horabad; Morteza, Afsaneh; Esteghamati, Alireza; Vigneron, Claude; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2014-08-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of cell dynamics. Dysregulation of its cytosolic concentration is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases. This study aimed to assess the effects of calcium on the network of membrane cytoskeletal proteins. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from eight healthy donors and incubated with 250 µM and 1.25 mM calcium solutions. Membrane cytoskeletal proteins were quantified using SDS-PAGE at baseline and after 3 and 5 days of incubation. Supra-physiologic concentrations of calcium (1.25 mM) induced a significant proteolysis in membrane cytoskeletal proteins, compared with magnesium (p < 0.001). Actin exhibited the highest sensitivity to calcium-induced proteolysis (6.8 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p < 0.001), while spectrin (39.9 ± 1.0 vs. 40.3 ± 2.0, p = 0.393) and band-6 (6.3 ± 0.3 vs. 6.8 ± 0.8, p = 0.191) were more resistant to proteolysis after incubation with calcium in the range of endoplasmic reticulum concentrations (250 µM). Aggregation of membrane cytoskeletal proteins was determined after centrifugation and was significantly higher after incubation with calcium ions compared with control, EDTA and magnesium solutions (p < 0.001). In a supra-physiologic range of 1.25-10 mM of calcium ions, there was a nearly perfect linear relationship between calcium concentration and aggregation of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal proteins (R(2) = 0.971, p < 0.001). Our observation suggests a strong interaction between calcium ions and membrane cytoskeletal network. Cumulative effects of disrupted calcium homeostasis on cytoskeletal proteins need to be further investigated at extended periods of time in disease states. PMID:24930024

  20. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy Induces Rapid Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), an established enzyme-biomarker for prostate cancer, has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications. We aimed to determine the effects of PSMA-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) on cytoskeletal networks in prostate cancer cells. PSMA-targeted PDT resulted in rapid disruption of microtubules (α-/β-tubulin), microfilaments (actin), and intermediate filaments (cytokeratin 8/18) in the cytoplasm of LNCaP cells. The collapse of cytoplasmic microtubules and the later nuclear translocation of α-/β-tubulin were the most dramatic alternation. It is likely that these early changes of cytoskeletal networks are partly involved in the initiation of cell death. PMID:20452720

  1. Widespread cytoskeletal pathology characterizes corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Feany, M. B.; Dickson, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial pathology. Using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the nonamyloid cortical plaques of CBD are actually collections of abnormal tau in the distal processes of astrocytes. These glial cells express both vimentin and CD44, markers of astrocyte activation. Glial pathology also includes tau-positive cytoplasmic inclusions, here localized to Leu 7-expressing oligodendrocytes. In addition, a wide array of neuronal pathology is defined with tau-positive inclusions in multiple domains of a variety of cortical neurons. CBD thus exhibits widespread glial and neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, including a novel structure, the astrocytic plaque. CBD is a disease of generalized cytoskeletal disruption affecting several cell types and multiple domains of these cells. The further definition of CBD pathology refines the diagnosis and pathophysiological understanding of this unique disease and has important implications for other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, characterized by abnormal tau deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7778678

  2. Assembly Kinetics Determine the Architecture of α-actinin Crosslinked F-actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Falzone, Tobias T.; Lenz, Martin; Kovar, David R.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is organized into diverse meshworks and bundles that support many aspects of cell physiology. Understanding the self-assembly of these actin-based structures is essential for developing predictive models of cytoskeletal organization. Here we show that the competing kinetics of bundle formation with the onset of dynamic arrest arising from filament entanglements and cross-linking determine the architecture of reconstituted actin networks formed with α-actinin cross-links. Cross-link mediated bundle formation only occurs in dilute solutions of highly mobile actin filaments. As actin polymerization proceeds, filament mobility and bundle formation are arrested concomitantly. By controlling the onset of dynamic arrest, perturbations to actin assembly kinetics dramatically alter the architecture of biochemically identical samples. Thus, the morphology of reconstituted F-actin networks is a kinetically determined structure similar to those formed by physical gels and glasses. These results establish mechanisms controlling the structure and mechanics in diverse semi-flexible biopolymer networks. PMID:22643888

  3. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Ebbinghaus, M.; Santen, L.

    2015-09-01

    Cells are the elementary units of living organisms, which are able to carry out many vital functions. These functions rely on active processes on a microscopic scale. Therefore, they are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems, which are driven by continuous energy supply. The tasks that have to be performed in order to maintain the cell alive require transportation of various ingredients, some being small, others being large. Intracellular transport processes are able to induce concentration gradients and to carry objects to specific targets. These processes cannot be carried out only by diffusion, as cells may be crowded, and quite elongated on molecular scales. Therefore active transport has to be organized. The cytoskeleton, which is composed of three types of filaments (microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments), determines the shape of the cell, and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for a special kind of vehicles, namely the cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated. The interest for this type of question was enhanced when it was discovered that intracellular transport breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. Our review includes on the one hand an overview of biological facts, obtained from experiments, and on the other hand a presentation of some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We present some background knowledge on the original and variants of the TASEP (Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process), before turning to more application oriented models. After addressing microtubule based transport in general, with a focus on in vitro experiments, and on cooperative effects in the

  4. Listeria's right-handed helical rocket-tail trajectories: mechanistic implications for force generation in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Zeile, William L; Zhang, Fangliang; Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2005-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes forms right-handed helical rocket tail trajectories during actin-based motility in cell-free extracts, and this stereochemical feature is consistent with actoclampin's affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation model [Dickinson and Purich, 2002: Biophys J 82:605-617]. In that mechanism, right-handed torque is generated by an end-tracking molecular motor, each comprised of a filament barbed end and clamping protein that processively traces the right-handed helix of its filament partner. By contrast, torque is not a predicted property of those models (e.g., elastic propulsion, elastic Brownian ratchet, tethered ratchet, and insertional polymerization models) requiring filament barbed ends to depart/detach from the motile object's surface during/after each monomer-addition step. Helical trajectories also explain why Listeria undergoes longitudinal-axis rotation on a length-scale matching the helical periodicity of Listeria's rocket tails.

  5. Forced unfolding of protein domains determines cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John

    2005-03-01

    Cells have recently been shown to have a power-law dynamic shear modulus over wide frequency range; the value of the exponent being non-universal, varying from 0.1-0.25 depending on cell type. This observation has been interpreted as evidence for the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model, a trap-type glass model with an effective granular temperature. We propose a simple, alternative model of cytoskeletal mechanics based on the thermally activated, forced unfolding of domains in proteins cross-linking a stressed semi-flexible polymer gel. It directly relates a cell’s mechanical response to biophysical parameters of the cytoskeleton’s molecular constituents. Simulations indicate that unfolding events in a random network display a collective self-organization, giving rise to an exponential distribution of crosslink stress that can reproduce cell viscoelasticity. The model suggests natural explanations for the observed correlation between cell rheology and intracellular static stress, including those previously explained using the tensegrity concept. Moreover, our model provides insight into potential mechanisms of mechanotransduction as well as cell shape sensing and maintenance.

  6. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  7. Methods for modeling cytoskeletal and DNA filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Steven S.

    2014-02-01

    This review summarizes the models that researchers use to represent the conformations and dynamics of cytoskeletal and DNA filaments. It focuses on models that address individual filaments in continuous space. Conformation models include the freely jointed, Gaussian, angle-biased chain (ABC), and wormlike chain (WLC) models, of which the first three bend at discrete joints and the last bends continuously. Predictions from the WLC model generally agree well with experiment. Dynamics models include the Rouse, Zimm, stiff rod, dynamic WLC, and reptation models, of which the first four apply to isolated filaments and the last to entangled filaments. Experiments show that the dynamic WLC and reptation models are most accurate. They also show that biological filaments typically experience strong hydrodynamic coupling and/or constrained motion. Computer simulation methods that address filament dynamics typically compute filament segment velocities from local forces using the Langevin equation and then integrate these velocities with explicit or implicit methods; the former are more versatile and the latter are more efficient. Much remains to be discovered in biological filament modeling. In particular, filament dynamics in living cells are not well understood, and current computational methods are too slow and not sufficiently versatile. Although primarily a review, this paper also presents new statistical calculations for the ABC and WLC models. Additionally, it corrects several discrepancies in the literature about bending and torsional persistence length definitions, and their relations to flexural and torsional rigidities.

  8. [Cytoskeletal control of cell length regulation].

    PubMed

    Kharitonova, M A; Levina, C M; Rovenskii, I A

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that mouse embryo fibroblasts and human foreskin diploid fibroblasts of AGO 1523 line cultivated on specially prepared substrates with narrow (15 +/- 3 microns) linear adhesive strips were elongated and oriented along the strips, but the mean lengths of the fibroblasts of each type on the strips differed from those on the standard culture substrates. In contrast to the normal fibroblasts, the length of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with inactivated gene-suppresser Rb responsible for negative control of cell proliferation (MEF Rb-/-), ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF Rb-/-ras), or normal rat epitheliocytes of IAR2 line significantly exceeded those of the same cells on the standard culture substrates. The results of experiments with the drugs specifically affecting the cytoskeleton (colcemid and cytochalasin D) suggest that the constant mean length of normal fibroblasts is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between two forces: centripetal tension of contractile actin-myosin microfilaments and centrifugal force generated by growing microtubules. This cytoskeletal mechanism is disturbed in MEF Rb-/- or MEF Rb-/-ras, probably, because of an impaired actin cytoskeleton and also in IAR2 epitheliocytes due to the different organization of the actin-myosin system in these cells, as compared to that in the fibroblasts. PMID:11862697

  9. Simultaneous Visualization of Peroxisomes and Cytoskeletal Elements Reveals Actin and Not Microtubule-Based Peroxisome Motility in Plants1[w

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Jaideep; Mathur, Neeta; Hülskamp, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Peroxisomes were visualized in living plant cells using a yellow fluorescent protein tagged with a peroxisomal targeting signal consisting of the SKL motif. Simultaneous visualization of peroxisomes and microfilaments/microtubules was accomplished in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells transiently expressing the yellow fluorescent protein-peroxi construct, a green fluorescent protein-mTalin construct that labels filamentous-actin filaments, and a green fluorescent protein-microtubule-binding domain construct that labels microtubules. The covisualization of peroxisomes and cytoskeletal elements revealed that, contrary to the reports from animal cells, peroxisomes in plants appear to associate with actin filaments and not microtubules. That peroxisome movement is actin based was shown by pharmacological studies. For this analysis we used onion epidermal cells and various cell types of Arabidopsis including trichomes, root hairs, and root cortex cells exhibiting different modes of growth. In transient onion epidermis assay and in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, an interference with the actin cytoskeleton resulted in progressive loss of saltatory movement followed by the aggregation and a complete cessation of peroxisome motility within 30 min of drug application. Microtubule depolymerization or stabilization had no effect. PMID:11891258

  10. ZEB1 drives prometastatic actin cytoskeletal remodeling by downregulating miR-34a expression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Young-Ho; Gibbons, Don L.; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Creighton, Chad J.; Rizvi, Zain H.; Adams, Henry P.; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Gregory, Philip A.; Wright, Josephine A.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Flores, Elsa R.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer is extremely difficult to treat, and the presence of metastases greatly reduces a cancer patient’s likelihood of long-term survival. The ZEB1 transcriptional repressor promotes metastasis through downregulation of microRNAs (miRs) that are strong inducers of epithelial differentiation and inhibitors of stem cell factors. Given that each miR can target multiple genes with diverse functions, we posited that the prometastatic network controlled by ZEB1 extends beyond these processes. We tested this hypothesis using a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma metastasis driven by ZEB1, human lung carcinoma cells, and human breast carcinoma cells. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed that ZEB1 controls the expression of numerous oncogenic and tumor-suppressive miRs, including miR-34a. Ectopic expression of miR-34a decreased tumor cell invasion and metastasis, inhibited the formation of promigratory cytoskeletal structures, suppressed activation of the RHO GTPase family, and regulated a gene expression signature enriched in cytoskeletal functions and predictive of outcome in human lung adenocarcinomas. We identified several miR-34a target genes, including Arhgap1, which encodes a RHO GTPase activating protein that was required for tumor cell invasion. These findings demonstrate that ZEB1 drives prometastatic actin cytoskeletal remodeling by downregulating miR-34a expression and provide a compelling rationale to develop miR-34a as a therapeutic agent in lung cancer patients. PMID:22850877

  11. FMNL2 drives actin-based protrusion and migration downstream of Cdc42.

    PubMed

    Block, Jennifer; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Kühn, Sonja; Winterhoff, Moritz; Kage, Frieda; Geffers, Robert; Duwe, Patrick; Rohn, Jennifer L; Baum, Buzz; Brakebusch, Cord; Geyer, Matthias; Stradal, Theresia E B; Faix, Jan; Rottner, Klemens

    2012-06-01

    Cell migration entails protrusion of lamellipodia, densely packed networks of actin filaments at the cell front. Filaments are generated by nucleation, likely mediated by Arp2/3 complex and its activator Scar/WAVE. It is unclear whether formins contribute to lamellipodial actin filament nucleation or serve as elongators of filaments nucleated by Arp2/3 complex. Here we show that the Diaphanous-related formin FMNL2, also known as FRL3 or FHOD2, accumulates at lamellipodia and filopodia tips. FMNL2 is cotranslationally modified by myristoylation and regulated by interaction with the Rho-guanosine triphosphatase Cdc42. Abolition of myristoylation or Cdc42 binding interferes with proper FMNL2 activation, constituting an essential prerequisite for subcellular targeting. In vitro, C-terminal FMNL2 drives elongation rather than nucleation of actin filaments in the presence of profilin. In addition, filament ends generated by Arp2/3-mediated branching are captured and efficiently elongated by the formin. Consistent with these biochemical properties, RNAi-mediated silencing of FMNL2 expression decreases the rate of lamellipodia protrusion and, accordingly, the efficiency of cell migration. Our data establish that the FMNL subfamily member FMNL2 is a novel elongation factor of actin filaments that constitutes the first Cdc42 effector promoting cell migration and actin polymerization at the tips of lamellipodia. PMID:22608513

  12. Actin-Based Transport Adapts Polarity Domain Size to Local Cellular Curvature.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Daria; Haupt, Armin; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Delacour, Delphine; Salort, Delphine; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-10-19

    Intracellular structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the centrosome, or the mitotic spindle typically scale their size to cell size [1]. Similarly, cortical polarity domains built around the active form of conserved Rho-GTPases, such as Cdc42p, exhibit widths that may range over two orders of magnitudes in cells with different sizes and shapes [2-6]. The establishment of such domains typically involves positive feedback loops based on reaction-diffusion and/or actin-mediated vesicle transport [3, 7, 8]. How these elements may adapt polarity domain size to cellular geometry is not known. Here, by tracking the width of successive oscillating Cdc42-GTP domains in fission yeast spores [9], we find that domain width scales with local cell-surface radii of curvature over an 8-fold range, independently of absolute cell volume, surface, or Cdc42-GTP concentration. This local scaling requires formin-nucleated cortical actin cables and the fusion of secretory vesicles transported along these cables with the membrane. These data suggest that reaction-diffusion may set a minimal domain size and that secretory vesicle transport along actin cables may dilute and extend polarity domains to adapt their size to local cell-surface curvature. This work reveals that actin networks may act as micrometric curvature sensors and uncovers a generic morphogenetic principle for how polarity domains define their size according to cell morphologies. PMID:26441355

  13. Actin-Based Transport Adapts Polarity Domain Size to Local Cellular Curvature.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Daria; Haupt, Armin; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Delacour, Delphine; Salort, Delphine; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-10-19

    Intracellular structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the centrosome, or the mitotic spindle typically scale their size to cell size [1]. Similarly, cortical polarity domains built around the active form of conserved Rho-GTPases, such as Cdc42p, exhibit widths that may range over two orders of magnitudes in cells with different sizes and shapes [2-6]. The establishment of such domains typically involves positive feedback loops based on reaction-diffusion and/or actin-mediated vesicle transport [3, 7, 8]. How these elements may adapt polarity domain size to cellular geometry is not known. Here, by tracking the width of successive oscillating Cdc42-GTP domains in fission yeast spores [9], we find that domain width scales with local cell-surface radii of curvature over an 8-fold range, independently of absolute cell volume, surface, or Cdc42-GTP concentration. This local scaling requires formin-nucleated cortical actin cables and the fusion of secretory vesicles transported along these cables with the membrane. These data suggest that reaction-diffusion may set a minimal domain size and that secretory vesicle transport along actin cables may dilute and extend polarity domains to adapt their size to local cell-surface curvature. This work reveals that actin networks may act as micrometric curvature sensors and uncovers a generic morphogenetic principle for how polarity domains define their size according to cell morphologies.

  14. Drosophila Dachsous and Fat polarize actin-based protrusions over a restricted domain of the embryonic denticle field.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Kynan T; Ly, Daniel C; DiNardo, Stephen

    2013-11-15

    Atypical cadherins Dachsous (Ds) and Fat coordinate the establishment of planar polarity, essential for the patterning of complex tissues and organs. The precise mechanisms by which this system acts, particularly in cases where Ds and Fat act independently of the 'core' frizzled system, are still the subject of investigation. Examining the deployment of the Ds-Fat system in different tissues of the model organism Drosophila, has provided insights into the general mechanisms by which polarity is established and propagated to coordinate outcomes across a field of cells. The Drosophila embryonic epidermis provides a simple model epithelia where the establishment of polarity can be observed from start to finish, and in the absence of proliferation, over a fixed number of cells. Using the asymmetric placement of f-actin during denticle assembly as a read-out of polarity, we examine the requirement for Ds and Fat in establishing polarity across the denticle field. Comparing detailed phenotypic analysis with steady state protein enrichment revealed a spatially restricted requirement for the Ds-Fat system within the posterior denticle field. Ectopic Ds signaling provides evidence for a model whereby Ds acts to asymmetrically enrich Fat in a neighboring cell, in turn polarizing the cell to specify the position of the actin-based protrusions at the cell cortex.

  15. Arp2/3 complex and actin dynamics are required for actin-based mitochondrial motility in yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, I R; Yang, H C; Nowakowski, W D; Karmon, S L; Hays, L G; Yates, J R; Pon, L A

    2001-03-13

    The Arp2/3 complex is implicated in actin polymerization-driven movement of Listeria monocytogenes. Here, we find that Arp2p and Arc15p, two subunits of this complex, show tight, actin-independent association with isolated yeast mitochondria. Arp2p colocalizes with mitochondria. Consistent with this result, we detect Arp2p-dependent formation of actin clouds around mitochondria in intact yeast. Cells bearing mutations in ARP2 or ARC15 genes show decreased velocities of mitochondrial movement, loss of all directed movement and defects in mitochondrial morphology. Finally, we observe a decrease in the velocity and extent of mitochondrial movement in yeast in which actin dynamics are reduced but actin cytoskeletal structure is intact. These results support the idea that the movement of mitochondria in yeast is actin polymerization driven and that this movement requires Arp2/3 complex.

  16. Transport of cytoskeletal elements in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, M; Schmidek, A; Galbraith, J A; Gallant, P E; Reese, T S

    1995-01-01

    In order to explore how cytoskeletal proteins are moved by axonal transport, we injected fluorescent microtubules and actin filaments as well as exogenous particulates into squid giant axons and observed their movements by confocal microscopy. The squid giant axon is large enough to allow even cytoskeletal assemblies to be injected without damaging the axon or its transport mechanisms. Negatively charged, 10- to 500-nm beads and large dextrans moved down the axon, whereas small (70 kDa) dextrans diffused in all directions and 1000-nm beads did not move. Only particles with negative charge were transported. Microtubules and actin filaments, which have net negative charges, made saltatory movements down the axon, resulting in a net rate approximating that previously shown for slow transport of cytoskeletal elements. The present observations suggest that particle size and charge determine which materials are transported down the axon. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524791

  17. Transport of cytoskeletal elements in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, M; Schmidek, A; Galbraith, J A; Gallant, P E; Reese, T S

    1995-12-01

    In order to explore how cytoskeletal proteins are moved by axonal transport, we injected fluorescent microtubules and actin filaments as well as exogenous particulates into squid giant axons and observed their movements by confocal microscopy. The squid giant axon is large enough to allow even cytoskeletal assemblies to be injected without damaging the axon or its transport mechanisms. Negatively charged, 10- to 500-nm beads and large dextrans moved down the axon, whereas small (70 kDa) dextrans diffused in all directions and 1000-nm beads did not move. Only particles with negative charge were transported. Microtubules and actin filaments, which have net negative charges, made saltatory movements down the axon, resulting in a net rate approximating that previously shown for slow transport of cytoskeletal elements. The present observations suggest that particle size and charge determine which materials are transported down the axon.

  18. Remodeling of cytoskeletal architecture of nonneuronal cells induced by synapsin.

    PubMed Central

    Han, H Q; Greengard, P

    1994-01-01

    The synapsins, a family of neuron-specific phosphoproteins, have been implicated in the functional and structural maturation of synapses. The cell biological basis for these effects is unknown. In vitro, the synapsins interact with cytoskeletal elements including actin. To examine, in vivo, the possible effect of the synapsins on cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology, we have transfected each of the four known members of the synapsin family into nonneuronal cells. We report here that synapsin expression in fibroblast cells gives rise to an alteration in cell morphology that is associated with formation of highly elongated processes. This morphological change is accompanied by a reorganization of filamentous actin (F-actin) characterized by disruption of existing stress fibers and formation of bundles of actin cables in the elongated processes. These results suggest that interactions of the synapsins with actin, and possibly with other cytoskeletal elements, may play a role in the morphological differentiation of neurons. Images PMID:8078922

  19. Cytoskeletal proteins inside human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D E; Coren, L V; Kane, B P; Busch, L K; Johnson, D G; Sowder, R C; Chertova, E N; Arthur, L O; Henderson, L E

    1996-01-01

    We have identified three types of cytoskeletal proteins inside human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions by analyzing subtilisin-digested particles. HIV-1 virions were digested with protease, and the treated particles were isolated by sucrose density centrifugation. This method removes both exterior viral proteins and proteins associated with microvesicles that contaminate virion preparations. Since the proteins inside the virion are protected from digestion by the viral lipid envelope, they can be isolated and analyzed after treatment. Experiments presented here demonstrated that this procedure removed more than 95% of the protein associated with microvesicles. Proteins in digested HIV-1(MN) particles from infected H9 and CEM(ss) cell lines were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography, protein sequencing, and immunoblotting. The data revealed that three types of cytoskeletal proteins are present in virions at different concentrations relative to the molar level of Gag: actin (approximately 10 to 15%), ezrin and moesin (approximately 2%), and cofilin (approximately 2 to 10%). Our analysis of proteins within virus particles detected proteolytic fragments of alpha-smooth muscle actin and moesin that were cleaved at sites which might be recognized by HIV-1 protease. These cleavage products are not present in microvesicles from uninfected cells. Therefore, these processed proteins are most probably produced by HIV-1 protease digestion. The presence of these fragments, as well as the incorporation of a few specific cytoskeletal proteins into virions, suggests an active interaction between cytoskeletal and viral proteins. PMID:8892894

  20. Fibroblast cytoskeletal remodeling contributes to connective tissue tension.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M; Bouffard, Nicole A; Fox, James R; Palmer, Bradley M; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C; Barnes, William D; Badger, Gary J; Howe, Alan K

    2011-05-01

    The visco-elastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the visco-elastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast's processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the visco-elastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular, and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue.

  1. Morphology of the Trypanosome Bilobe, a Novel Cytoskeletal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Esson, Heather J.; Yavuz, Sevil; Vidilaseris, Keni; Dong, Gang; Warren, Graham

    2012-01-01

    The trypanosome bilobe is a cytoskeletal structure of unclear function. To date, four proteins have been shown to localize stably to it: TbMORN1, TbLRRP1, TbCentrin2, and TbCentrin4. In this study, a combination of immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy was used to explore the morphology of the bilobe and its relationship to other nearby cytoskeletal structures in the African trypanosome procyclic trypomastigote. The use of detergent/salt-extracted flagellum preparations was found to be an effective way of discerning features of the cytoskeletal ultrastructure that are normally obscured. TbMORN1 and TbCentrin4 together define a hairpin structure comprising an arm of TbCentrin4 and a fishhook of TbMORN1. The two arms flank a specialized microtubule quartet and the flagellum attachment zone filament, with TbMORN1 running alongside the former and TbCentrin4 alongside the latter. The hooked part of TbMORN1 sits atop the flagellar pocket collar marked by TbBILBO1. The TbMORN1 bilobe occasionally exhibits tendrillar extensions that seem to be connected to the basal and probasal bodies. The TbMORN1 molecules present on these tendrils undergo higher rates of turnover than those for molecules on the main bilobe structure. These observations have been integrated with previous detailed descriptions of the cytoskeletal elements in trypanosome cells. PMID:22327007

  2. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING CONTRIBUTES TO CONNECTIVE TISSUE TENSION

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M.; Bouffard, Nicole A.; Fox, James R.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C.; Barnes, William D.; Badger, Gary J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the viscoelastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast’s processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the viscoelastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue. PMID:20945345

  3. Effect of cytoskeletal elastic properties on the mechanoelectrical transduction in excitable cells.

    PubMed

    Shklyar, Tatyana F; Dinislamova, Olga A; Safronov, Alexander P; Blyakhman, Felix A

    2012-05-11

    This paper addresses the possible mechanism of stretch on cell electrochemical potential change, based on the physicochemical properties of cytoskeletal network. Synthetic polyelectrolyte gel was used as an experimental model of the cytoskeleton. Gel samples with different density of network cross linking were studied. Triangular axial deformations of samples were applied. Simultaneously, the electrochemical (Donnan) potential of the gel was measured between a micropipette electrode pinned into the swollen gel, and a reference electrode in the outer solution. We found that axial deformation shifts the gel potential toward depolarization. The extent of gel depolarization showed a close negative correlation with the Young modulus of the gel. We suggest that the underlying mechanism is likely to be a universal process of counterion adsorption on charged polymer filaments due to the decrease of distance between polymer filaments owing to gel elongation.

  4. Occluding junctions and cytoskeletal components in a cultured transporting epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meza, I; Ibarra, G; Sabanero, M; Martinez-Palomo, A; Cereijido, M

    1980-01-01

    MDCK cells form uninterrupted monolayers and make occluding junctions similar to those of natural epithelia. This aricle explores the relationship between these junctions and the cytoskeleton by combining studies on the distribution of microfilaments and microtubules with the effect of drugs, such as colchicines and cytochalasin B, on the degree of tightness of the occluding junctions. To study the degree of tightness, monolayers were prepared by plating MDCK cells on mylon disks coated with collagen. Disks were mounted as flat sheets between two Lucite chambers, and the sealing capacity of the junctions was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance across the monolayers. Equivalent monolayers on coverslips were used to study the distribution of microtubules and microfilaments by indirect immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against tubulin and actin. This was done both on complete cells and on cytoskeleton preparations in which the cell membranes had been solubilized before fixation. Staining with antiactin shows a reticular pattern of very fine filaments that spread radially toward the periphery where they form a continuous cortical ring underlying the plasma membrane. Staining with antitubulin depicts fibers that extend radially to form a network that occupies the cytoplasm up to the edges of the cell. Colchicine causes a profound disruption of microtubules but only a 27 percent decrease in the electrical resistance of the resting monolayers. Cytochalasin B, when present for prolonged periods, disrupts the cytoplasmic microfilaments and abolishes the electrical resistance. The cortical ring of filaments remains in place but appears fragmented with time. We find that removal of extracellular Ca(++), which causes the tight junctions to open, also causes the microfilaments and microtubules to retract toward the center of the cells. The process of junction opening and fiber retraction is reversed by the restoration of Ca(++). Colchicine has no effect

  5. Thermally Driven and Cytoskeletal-Assisted Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2003-05-01

    We report Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) and digital video fluorescence microscopy (DVFM) measurements of the dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living osteosarcoma cells. Mitochondrial dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, which lead to complex multi-exponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The cytoskeleton consists of an interconnected polymer network whose primary components are microfilaments (actin) and microtubules (tubulin). These filaments work with motor proteins to translate organelles through the cell. We studied the dynamics of osteosarcoma cells labeled with red fluorescent protein in the mitochondrial matrix space using DVFM and FICS. Cells were then treated with cytoskeletal destabilizing drugs. Analysis of microscopy data allows for us to determine whether dynamic processes are diffusive or driven (by the cytoskeleton or collective dynamics). In FICS experiments, the control cells exhibit a unique pattern of dynamics that are then simplified when the cytoskeleton is depolymerized. Upon depolymerization, the dynamics of the organelle appear primarily diffusive.

  6. Simulated Microgravity Induced Cytoskeletal Rearrangements are Modulated by Protooncogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melhado, C. D.; Sanford, G. L.; Bosah, F.; Harris-Hooker, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity is the environment living systems encounter during space flight and gravitational unloading is the effect of this environment on living systems. The cell, being a multiphasic chemical system, is a useful starting point to study the potential impact of gravity unloading on physiological function. In the absence of gravity, sedimentation of organelles including chromosomes, mitochondria, nuclei, the Golgi apparatus, vacuoles, and the endoplasmic reticulum may be affected. Most of these organelles, however, are somewhat held in place by cytoskeleton. Hansen and Igber suggest that intermediate filaments act to stabilize the nuleus against rotational movement, and integrate cell and nuclear structure. The tensegrity theory supports the idea that mechanical or physical forces alters the cytoskeletal structures of a cell resulting in the changes in cell: matrix interactions and receptor-signaling coupling. This type of stress to the cytoskeleton may be largely responsible regulating cell shape, growth, movement and metabolism. Mouse MC3T3 El cells under microgravity exhibited significant cytoskeletal changes and alterations in cell growth. The alterations in cytoskeleton architecture may be due to changes in the expression of actin related proteins or integrins. Philopott and coworkers reported on changes in the distribution of microtubule and cytoskeleton elements in the cells of heart tissue from space flight rats and those centrifuged at 1.7g. Other researchers have showed that microgravity reduced EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression compared to 1 g controls. Since c-fos and c-jun are known regulators of cell growth, it is likely that altered signal transduction involving protooncogenes may play a crucial role in the reduced growth and alterations in cytoskeletal arrangements found during space flight. It is clear that a microgravity environment induces a number of changes in cell shape, cell surface molecules, gene expression, and cytoskeletal

  7. Keratinocyte cytoskeletal roles in cell sheet engineering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need to understand cell-cell interactions for cell and tissue engineering purposes, such as optimizing cell sheet constructs, as well as for examining adhesion defect diseases. For cell-sheet engineering, one major obstacle to sheet function is that cell sheets in suspension are fragile and, over time, will contract. While the role of the cytoskeleton in maintaining the structure and adhesion of cells cultured on a rigid substrate is well-characterized, a systematic examination of the role played by different components of the cytoskeleton in regulating cell sheet contraction and cohesion in the absence of a substrate has been lacking. Results In this study, keratinocytes were cultured until confluent and cell sheets were generated using dispase to remove the influence of the substrate. The effects of disrupting actin, microtubules or intermediate filaments on cell-cell interactions were assessed by measuring cell sheet cohesion and contraction. Keratin intermediate filament disruption caused comparable effects on cell sheet cohesion and contraction, when compared to actin or microtubule disruption. Interfering with actomyosin contraction demonstrated that interfering with cell contraction can also diminish cell cohesion. Conclusions All components of the cytoskeleton are involved in maintaining cell sheet cohesion and contraction, although not to the same extent. These findings demonstrate that substrate-free cell sheet biomechanical properties are dependent on the integrity of the cytoskeleton network. PMID:23442760

  8. Remodeling of the fibroblast cytoskeletal architecture during the replication cycle of Ectromelia virus: A morphological in vitro study in a murine cell line.

    PubMed

    Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Gregorczyk, Karolina P; Struzik, Justyna; Boratynska-Jasinska, Anna; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Wyzewski, Zbigniew; Toka, Felix N; Gierynska, Malgorzata; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Niemialtowski, Marek G

    2016-08-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV, the causative agent of mousepox), which represents the same genus as variola virus (VARV, the agent responsible for smallpox in humans), has served for years as a model virus for studying mechanisms of poxvirus-induced disease. Despite increasing knowledge on the interaction between ECTV and its natural host-the mouse-surprisingly, still little is known about the cell biology of ECTV infection. Because pathogen interaction with the cytoskeleton is still a growing area of research in the virus-host cell interplay, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the consequences of ECTV infection on the cytoskeleton in a murine fibroblast cell line. The viral effect on the cytoskeleton was reflected by changes in migration of the cells and rearrangement of the architecture of tubulin, vimentin, and actin filaments. The virus-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements observed in these studies contributed to the efficient cell-to-cell spread of infection, which is an important feature of ECTV virulence. Additionally, during later stages of infection L929 cells produced two main types of actin-based cellular protrusions: short (actin tails and "dendrites") and long (cytoplasmic corridors). Due to diversity of filopodial extensions induced by the virus, we suggest that ECTV represents a valuable new model for studying processes and pathways that regulate the formation of cytoskeleton-based cellular structures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27169394

  9. Cytoskeletal mechanics in pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagawa, H.; Wang, N.; Narishige, T.; Ingber, D. E.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the cellular contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy results not from an abnormality intrinsic to the myofilament portion of the cardiocyte cytoskeleton but rather from an increased density of the microtubule component of the extramyofilament portion of the cardiocyte cytoskeleton. To determine how, in physical terms, this increased microtubule density mechanically overloads the contractile apparatus at the cellular level, we measured cytoskeletal stiffness and apparent viscosity in isolated cardiocytes via magnetic twisting cytometry, a technique by which magnetically induced force is applied directly to the cytoskeleton through integrin-coupled ferromagnetic beads coated with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide. Measurements were made in two groups of cardiocytes from cats with right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding: (1) those from the pressure-overloaded RV and (2) those from the normally loaded same-animal control left ventricle (LV). Cytoskeletal stiffness increased almost twofold, from 8.53 +/- 0.77 dyne/cm2 in the normally loaded LV cardiocytes to 16.46 +/- 1.32 dyne/cm2 in the hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. Cytoskeletal apparent viscosity increased almost fourfold, from 20.97 +/- 1.92 poise in the normally loaded LV cardiocytes to 87.85 +/- 6.95 poise in the hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. In addition to these baseline data showing differing stiffness and, especially, apparent viscosity in the two groups of cardiocytes, microtubule depolymerization by colchicine was found to return both the stiffness and the apparent viscosity of the pressure overload-hypertrophied RV cells fully to normal. Conversely, microtubule hyperpolymerization by taxol increased the stiffness and apparent viscosity values of normally loaded LV cardiocytes to the abnormal values given above for pressure-hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. Thus, increased microtubule density constitutes primarily a viscous load on

  10. Retraction in amoeboid cell motility powered by cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M

    2003-11-21

    Cells crawl by coupling protrusion of their leading edge with retraction of their cell body. Protrusion is generated by the polymerization and bundling of filaments, but the mechanism of retraction is less clear. We have reconstituted retraction in vitro by adding Yersinia tyrosine phosphatase to the major sperm protein-based motility apparatus assembled from Ascaris sperm extracts. Retraction in vitro parallels that observed in vivo and is generated primarily by disassembly and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. Therefore, cytoskeletal dynamics alone, unassisted by conventional motors, are able to generate both of these central components of amoeboid locomotion.

  11. Cytoskeletal regulation of calcium-permeable cation channels in the human syncytiotrophoblast: role of gelsolin

    PubMed Central

    Montalbetti, Nicolás; Li, Qiang; Timpanaro, Gustavo A; González-Perrett, Silvia; Dai, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Cantiello, Horacio F

    2005-01-01

    The human syncytiotrophoblast (hST) is the most apical epithelial barrier that covers the villous tree of the human placenta. An intricate and highly organized network of cytoskeletal structures supports the hST. Recently, polycystin-2 (PC2), a TRP-type nonselective cation channel, was functionally observed in hST, where it may be an important player to Ca2+ transport. Little is known, however, about channel regulation in hST. In this report, the regulatory role of actin dynamics on PC2 channels reconstituted from hST apical membranes was explored. Acute addition of cytochalasin D (CD, 5 μg ml−1) to reconstituted hST apical membranes transiently increased K+-permeable channel activity. The actin-binding proteins α-actinin and gelsolin, as well as PC2, were observed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses in hST vesicles. CD treatment of hST vesicles resulted in a re-distribution of actin filaments, in agreement with the effect of CD on K+ channel activity. In contrast, addition of exogenous monomeric actin, but not prepolymerized actin, induced a rapid inhibition of channel function in hST. This inhibition was obliterated by the presence of CD in the medium. The acute (<15 min) CD stimulation of K+ channel activity was mimicked by addition of the actin-severing protein gelsolin in the presence, but not in the absence, of micromolar Ca2+. Ca2+ transport through PC2 triggers a regulatory feedback mechanism, which is based on the severing and re-formation of filamentous actin near the channels. Cytoskeletal structures may thus be relevant to ion transport regulation in the human placenta. PMID:15845576

  12. The cytoskeletal system of nucleated erythrocytes. I. Composition and function of major elements

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the dogfish erythrocyte cytoskeletal system, which consists of a marginal band of microtubules (MB) and trans-marginal band material (TBM). The TBM appeared in whole mounts as a rough irregular network and in thin sections as a surface-delimiting layer completely enclosing nucleus and MB. In cells incubated at 0 degrees C for 30 min or more, the MB disappeared but the TBM remained. MB reassembly occurred with rewarming, and was inhibited by colchicine. Flattened elliptical erythrocyte morphology was retained even when MBs were absent. Total solubilization of MB and TBM at low pH, or dissolution of whole anucleate cytoskeletons, yielded components comigrating with actin, spectrin, and tubulin standards during gel electrophoresis. Mass-isolated MBs, exhibiting ribbonlike construction apparently maintained by cross-bridges, contained four polypeptides in the tubulin region of the gel. Only these four bands were noticeably increased in the soluble phase obtained from cells with 0 degrees C- disassembled MBs. The best isolated MB preparations contained tubulin but no components comigrating with high molecular weight microtubule- associated proteins, spectrin, or actin. Actin and spectrin therefore appear to be major TBM constituents, with tubulin localized in the MB. The results are interpreted in terms of an actin- and spectrin- containing subsurface cytoskeletal layer (TBM), related to that of mammalian erythrocytes, which maintains cell shape in the absence of MBs. Observations on abnormal pointed erythrocytes containing similarly pointed MBs indicate further that the MB can deform the TBM from within so as to alter cell shape. MBs may function in this manner during normal cellular morphogenesis and during blood flow in vivo. PMID:6889600

  13. Sex Hormones Regulate Cytoskeletal Proteins Involved in Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    In the brain of female mammals, including humans, a number of physiological and behavioral changes occur as a result of sex hormone exposure. Estradiol and progesterone regulate several brain functions, including learning and memory. Sex hormones contribute to shape the central nervous system by modulating the formation and turnover of the interconnections between neurons as well as controlling the function of glial cells. The dynamics of neuron and glial cells morphology depends on the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Cytoskeletal proteins are necessary to form neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines, as well as to regulate the diverse functions in astrocytes. The expression pattern of proteins, such as actin, microtubule-associated protein 2, Tau, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain, particularly when variations in sex hormone levels occur during the estrous or menstrual cycles or pregnancy. Here, we review the changes in structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity are regulated by estradiol and progesterone. PMID:26635640

  14. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  15. Cytoskeletal remodeling during growth cone-target interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Reorganization of the cytoskeleton of neuronal growth cones in response to environmental cues underlies the process of axonal guidance. Most previous studies addressing cytoskeletal changes during growth cone pathfinding have focused on the dynamics of a single cytoskeletal component. We report here an investigation of homophilic growth cone- target interactions between Aplysia bag cell neurons using digitally enhanced video microscopy, which addresses dynamic interactions between actin filaments and microtubules. After physical contact of a growth cone with a physiological target, mechanical coupling occurred after a delay; and then the growth cone exerted forces on and displaced the target object. Subsequent to coupling, F-actin accumulation was observed at the target contact zone, followed by preferential microtubule extension to the same site. After successful target interactions, growth cones typically moved off highly adhesive poly-L- lysine substrates into native target cell surfaces. These events were associated with modulation of both the direction and rate of neurite outgrowth: growth cone migration was typically reoriented to a trajectory along the target interaction axis and rates of advance increased by about one order of magnitude. Directed microtubule movements toward the contact site appeared to be F-actin dependent as target site-specific microtubule extension and bundling could be reversibly randomized by micromolar levels of cytochalasin B in a characteristic manner. Our results suggest that target contacts can induce focal F-actin assembly and reorganization which, in turn, guides target site-directed microtubule redistribution. PMID:8509456

  16. Cytoskeletal protein kinases: titin and its relations in mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Gautel, Mathias

    2011-07-01

    Titin, the giant elastic ruler protein of striated muscle sarcomeres, contains a catalytic kinase domain related to a family of intrasterically regulated protein kinases. The most extensively studied member of this branch of the human kinome is the Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-regulated myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK). However, not all kinases of the MLCK branch are functional MLCKs, and about half lack a CaM binding site in their C-terminal autoinhibitory tail (AI). A unifying feature is their association with the cytoskeleton, mostly via actin and myosin filaments. Titin kinase, similar to its invertebrate analogue twitchin kinase and likely other "MLCKs", is not Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated. Recently, local protein unfolding of the C-terminal AI has emerged as a common mechanism in the activation of CaM kinases. Single-molecule data suggested that opening of the TK active site could also be achieved by mechanical unfolding of the AI. Mechanical modulation of catalytic activity might thus allow cytoskeletal signalling proteins to act as mechanosensors, creating feedback mechanisms between cytoskeletal tension and tension generation or cellular remodelling. Similar to other MLCK-like kinases like DRAK2 and DAPK1, TK is linked to protein turnover regulation via the autophagy/lysosomal system, suggesting the MLCK-like kinases have common functions beyond contraction regulation. PMID:21416260

  17. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26237312

  18. Sex Hormones Regulate Cytoskeletal Proteins Involved in Brain Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    In the brain of female mammals, including humans, a number of physiological and behavioral changes occur as a result of sex hormone exposure. Estradiol and progesterone regulate several brain functions, including learning and memory. Sex hormones contribute to shape the central nervous system by modulating the formation and turnover of the interconnections between neurons as well as controlling the function of glial cells. The dynamics of neuron and glial cells morphology depends on the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Cytoskeletal proteins are necessary to form neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines, as well as to regulate the diverse functions in astrocytes. The expression pattern of proteins, such as actin, microtubule-associated protein 2, Tau, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain, particularly when variations in sex hormone levels occur during the estrous or menstrual cycles or pregnancy. Here, we review the changes in structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity are regulated by estradiol and progesterone. PMID:26635640

  19. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  20. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-11-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins.

  1. Segmentation and Tracking of Cytoskeletal Filaments Using Open Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew B.; Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Huang, Xiaolei; Yusuf, Eddy; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    We use open active contours to quantify cytoskeletal structures imaged by fluorescence microscopy in two and three dimensions. We developed an interactive software tool for segmentation, tracking, and visualization of individual fibers. Open active contours are parametric curves that deform to minimize the sum of an external energy derived from the image and an internal bending and stretching energy. The external energy generates (i) forces that attract the contour toward the central bright line of a filament in the image, and (ii) forces that stretch the active contour toward the ends of bright ridges. Images of simulated semiflexible polymers with known bending and torsional rigidity are analyzed to validate the method. We apply our methods to quantify the conformations and dynamics of actin in two examples: actin filaments imaged by TIRF microscopy in vitro, and actin cables in fission yeast imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:20814909

  2. Changes in cytoskeletal proteins in childhood cataract lenses

    PubMed

    Matsushima; Mukai; Obara

    2000-03-01

    Purpose: Approximately 50% of congenital and childhood cataracts seen in the clinic is of undetermined origin. Biochemical analysis of the cataracts is rare. This study analyzes lens proteins to determine the mechanism of congenital and childhood cataracts. Method: We analyzed the lens proteins from 10 young patients after cataract operations, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), densitometry analysis, and Western immunoblotting.Results: Densitometry of separated proteins showed a decrease in the high molecular protein bands of posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC). Specifically, spectrin (235 kDa), filensin (100 kDa), and vimentin (57 kDa) were absent from the SDS-PAGE of PSC. Increases in filensin and vimentin were observed in a Christmas tree cataract and lamellar cataracts. Western immunoblots confirmed the densitometry of SDS-PAGE.Conclusion: These results suggest that changes in cytoskeletal proteins may contribute to congenital and childhood cataracts.

  3. Cytoskeletal abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: beneficial or detrimental effects?

    PubMed

    Julien, J P; Beaulieu, J M

    2000-11-01

    Cytoskeletal abnormalities have been reported in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) including abnormal inclusions containing neurofilaments (NFs) and/or peripherin, reduced mRNA levels for the NF light (NF-L) protein and mutations in the NF heavy (NF-H) gene. Recently, transgenic mouse approaches have been used to address whether cytoskeletal changes may contribute to motor neuron disease. Mice lacking one of the three NF subunits are viable and do not develop motor neuron disease. Nonetheless, mice with null mutations for NF-L or for both NF-M and NF-H genes developed severe atrophy of ventral and dorsal root axons. The atrophic process is associated with hind limb paralysis during aging in mice deficient for both NF-M and NF-H proteins. The overexpression in mice of transgenes coding for wild-type or mutant NF proteins can provoke abnormal NF accumulations, axonal atrophy and sometimes motor dysfunction. However, the perikaryal NF accumulations are generally well tolerated by motor neurons and, except for expression of a mutant NF-L transgene, they did not provoke massive motor neuron death. Increasing the levels of perikaryal NF proteins may even confer protection in motor neuron disease caused by ALS-linked mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD1). In contrast, the overexpression of wild-type peripherin, a type of IF gene upregulated by inflammatory cytokines, provoked the formation of toxic IF inclusions with the high-molecular-weight NF proteins resulting in the death of motor neurons during aging. These results together with the detection of peripherin inclusions at early stage of disease in mice expressing mutant SOD1 suggest that IF inclusions containing peripherin may play a contributory role in ALS pathogenesis.

  4. Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types.

    PubMed

    Grady, Martha E; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is primarily responsible for providing structural support, localization and transport of organelles, and intracellular trafficking. The structural support is supplied by actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, which contribute to overall cell elasticity to varying degrees. We evaluate cell elasticity in five different cell types with drug-induced cytoskeletal derangements to probe how actin filaments and microtubules contribute to cell elasticity and whether it is conserved across cell type. Specifically, we measure elastic stiffness in primary chondrocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells (HUVEC), hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HUH-7), and fibrosarcoma cells (HT 1080) subjected to two cytoskeletal destabilizers: cytochalasin D and nocodazole, which disrupt actin and microtubule polymerization, respectively. Elastic stiffness is measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the disruption of the cytoskeleton is confirmed using fluorescence microscopy. The two cancer cell lines showed significantly reduced elastic moduli values (~0.5kPa) when compared to the three healthy cell lines (~2kPa). Non-cancer cells whose actin filaments were disrupted using cytochalasin D showed a decrease of 60-80% in moduli values compared to untreated cells of the same origin, whereas the nocodazole-treated cells showed no change in elasticity. Overall, we demonstrate actin filaments contribute more to elastic stiffness than microtubules but this result is cell type dependent. Cancer cells behaved differently, exhibiting increased stiffness as well as stiffness variability when subjected to nocodazole. We show that disruption of microtubule dynamics affects cancer cell elasticity, suggesting therapeutic drugs targeting microtubules be monitored for significant elastic changes. PMID:26874250

  5. Altered cytoskeletal organization characterized lethal but not surviving Brtl+/- mice: insight on phenotypic variability in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Gagliardi, Assunta; Maruelli, Silvia; Besio, Roberta; Landi, Claudia; Gioia, Roberta; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Khoury, Basma M; Coucke, Paul J; Symoens, Sofie; Marini, Joan C; Rossi, Antonio; Bini, Luca; Forlino, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone disease with dominant and recessive transmission. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from very mild to lethal in the perinatal period. The intra- and inter-familiar OI phenotypic variability in the presence of an identical molecular defect is still puzzling to the research field. We used the OI murine model Brtl(+/-) to investigate the molecular basis of OI phenotypic variability. Brtl(+/-) resembles classical dominant OI and shows either a moderately severe or a lethal outcome associated with the same Gly349Cys substitution in the α1 chain of type I collagen. A systems biology approach was used. We took advantage of proteomic pathway analysis to functionally link proteins differentially expressed in bone and skin of Brtl(+/-) mice with different outcomes to define possible phenotype modulators. The skin/bone and bone/skin hybrid networks highlighted three focal proteins: vimentin, stathmin and cofilin-1, belonging to or involved in cytoskeletal organization. Abnormal cytoskeleton was indeed demonstrated by immunohistochemistry to occur only in tissues from Brtl(+/-) lethal mice. The aberrant cytoskeleton affected osteoblast proliferation, collagen deposition, integrin and TGF-β signaling with impairment of bone structural properties. Finally, aberrant cytoskeletal assembly was detected in fibroblasts obtained from lethal, but not from non-lethal, OI patients carrying an identical glycine substitution. Our data demonstrated that compromised cytoskeletal assembly impaired both cell signaling and cellular trafficking in mutant lethal mice, altering bone properties. These results point to the cytoskeleton as a phenotypic modulator and potential novel target for OI treatment.

  6. Estradiol influences the mechanical properties of human fetal osteoblasts through cytoskeletal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, Padmalosini; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were quantified using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol causes significant decrease in the stiffness of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased stiffness was caused by decreased density of f-actin network. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stiffness changes were not associated with mineralized matrix of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol increases inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts. -- Abstract: Estrogen is known to have a direct effect on bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. The cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts and osteoblasts-like cells have been extensively studied. However, the effect of estrogen on the mechanical property of osteoblasts has not been studied yet. It is important since mechanical property of the mechanosensory osteoblasts could be pivotal to its functionality in bone remodeling. This is the first study aimed to assess the direct effect of estradiol on the apparent elastic modulus (E{sup Asterisk-Operator }) and corresponding cytoskeletal changes of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). The cells were cultured in either medium alone or medium supplemented with {beta}-estradiol and then subjected to Atomic Force Microscopy indentation (AFM) to determine E{sup Asterisk-Operator }. The underlying changes in cytoskeleton were studied by staining the cells with TRITC-Phalloidin. Following estradiol treatment, the cells were also tested for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. With estradiol treatment, E{sup Asterisk-Operator} of osteoblasts significantly decreased by 43-46%. The confocal images showed that the changes in f-actin network observed in estradiol treated cells can give rise to the changes in the stiffness of the cells. Estradiol also increases the inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. Estradiol induced stiffness

  7. Broadening the Spectrum of Actin-Based Protrusive Activity Mediated by Arp2/3 Complex-Facilitated Polymerization: Motility of Cytoplasmic Ridges and Tubular Projections

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Gianakas, Anastasia D.; Henson, Lauren H.; Lakin, Christina L.; Voss, Meagen K.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Morris, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Arp2/3 complex-facilitated actin polymerization plays an essential role in a variety of cellular functions including motility, adherence, endocytosis and trafficking. In the present study we employ the sea urchin coelomocyte experimental model system to test the hypotheses that Arp2/3 complex-nucleated actin assembly mediates the motility of two unusual cellular protrusions; the cytoplasmic ridges present during coelomocyte spreading, and inducible, tubular-shaped, and neurite-like projections. Our investigations couple pharmacological manipulation employing inhibitors of actin polymerization and the Arp2/3 complex with a wide array of imaging methods including digitally enhanced phase contrast, DIC and polarization light microscopy of live cells; conventional, confocal and super-resolution light microscopy of fluorescently labeled cells; and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that Arp2/3 complex-facilitated actin polymerization underlies the motility of coelomocyte cytoplasmic ridges and tubular projections, that these processes are related to each other, and that they have been preliminarily identified in other cell types. The results also highlight the broad spectrum of actin-based protrusive activities dependent on the Arp2/3 complex and provide additional insights into the pervasive nature of this ubiquitous actin nucleator. Furthermore we provide the first evidence of a possible mechanistic difference between the impacts of the small molecule drugs BDM and CK666 on the Arp2/3 complex. PMID:25111797

  8. Optogenetic Control of PIP3: PIP3 Is Sufficient to Induce the Actin-Based Active Part of Growth Cones and Is Regulated via Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) is highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and plays multiple roles in individual cells. However, the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3 in developing neurons remain unclear because of a lack of techniques for manipulating PIP3 spatiotemporally. We addressed this issue by combining optogenetic control and observation of endogenous PIP3 signaling. Endogenous PIP3 was abundant in actin-rich structures such as growth cones and “waves”, and PIP3-rich plasma membranes moved actively within growth cones. To study the role of PIP3 in developing neurons, we developed a PI3K photoswitch that can induce production of PIP3 at specific locations upon blue light exposure. We succeeded in producing PIP3 locally in mouse hippocampal neurons. Local PIP3 elevation at neurite tips did not induce neurite elongation, but it was sufficient to induce the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Interestingly, ectopic PIP3 elevation alone activated membranes to form actin-based structures whose behavior was similar to that of growth-cone-like “waves”. We also found that endocytosis regulates effective PIP3 concentration at plasma membranes. These results revealed the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3, providing fundamental information about PIP3 signaling in neurons. PMID:23951027

  9. Active Contraction of Microtubule Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Peter; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael; Needleman, Daniel

    Many cellular processes are driven by cytoskeletal assemblies. It remains unclear how cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins organize into cellular scale structures and how molecular properties of cytoskeletal components affect the large scale behaviors of these systems. Here we investigate the self-organization of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts and find that they can form macroscopic networks that spontaneously contract. We propose that these contractions are driven by the clustering of microtubule minus ends by dynein. Based on this idea, we construct an active fluid theory of network contractions which predicts a dependence of the timescale of contraction on initial network geometry, a development of density inhomogeneities during contraction, a constant final network density, and a strong influence of dynein inhibition on the rate of contraction, all in quantitative agreement with experiments. These results demonstrate that the motor-driven clustering of filament ends is a generic mechanism leading to contraction.

  10. Cytoskeletal proteins participate in conserved viral strategies across kingdoms of life.

    PubMed

    Erb, Marcella L; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of tubulin-like cytoskeletal proteins carried on the genomes of bacteriophages that are actively used for phage propagation during both the lytic and lysogenic cycle have revealed that there at least two ways that viruses can utilize a cytoskeleton; co-opt the host cytoskeleton or bring their own homologues. Either strategy underscores the deep evolutionary relationship between viruses and cytoskeletal proteins and points to a conservation of viral strategies that crosses the kingdoms of life. Here we review some of the most recent discoveries about tubulin cytoskeletal elements encoded by phages and compare them to some of the strategies utilized by the gammaherpesvirues of mammalian cells. PMID:24055040

  11. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  12. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  13. Reactivation of organelle movements along the cytoskeletal framework of a giant freshwater ameba

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The peripheral feeding network of the giant freshwater ameba Reticulomyxa can be easily and rapidly lysed to produce an extensive, stable, and completely exposed cytoskeletal framework of colinear microtubules and microfilaments. Most of the organelles that remain attached to this framework resume rapid saltatory movements at rates of up to 20 micron/s if ATP is added. This lysed model system is also capable of other forms of motility, namely an active splaying of microtubule bundles and bulk streaming. Reactivation does not occur with other nucleoside triphosphates, requires Mg ions, is insensitive to even high concentrations of erythro-9-(3-[2-hydroxynonyl]) adenine, is sensitive to vanadate only at concentrations of approximately 100 microM, and is inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide at concentrations greater than 100 microM. The physiology of this reactivation suggests an organelle transport motor distinct from cytoplasmic dynein and possibly the recently described kinesin. This system can serve as a model for elucidating the mechanisms of intracellular transport and, in addition, provides a unique opportunity to examine associations between microtubules and microfilaments. PMID:3733883

  14. Mechanical and spatial determinants of cytoskeletal geodesic dome formation in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia; Bien, Harold

    2009-02-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the cell cytoskeletal (CSK) network can rearrange from geodesic dome type structures to stress fibers in response to microenvironmental cues. The CSK geodesic domes are highly organized actin microarchitectures within the cell, consisting of ordered polygonal elements. We studied primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The cues used to trigger the interconversion between the two CSK architectures (geodesic domes and stress fibers) included factors affecting spatial order and the degree of CSK tension in the cells. Microfabricated three-dimensional substrates with micrometre sized grooves and peaks were used to alter the spatial order of cell growth in culture. CSK tension was modified by 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), cytochalasin D and the hyphae of Candida albicans. CSK geodesic domes occurred spontaneously in about 20% of the neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts used in this study. Microfabricated structured surfaces produced anisotropy in the cell CSK and effectively converted geodesic domes into stress fibers in a dose-dependent manner (dependence on the period of the features). Affectors of actin structure, inhibitors of CSK tension and cell motility, e.g. BDM, cytochalasin D and the hyphae of C. albicans, suppressed or eliminated the geodesic domes. Our data suggest that the geodesic domes, similar to actin stress fibers, require maintenance of CSK integrity and tension. However, microenvironments that promote structural anisotropy in tensed cells cause the transformation of the geodesic domes into stress fibers, consistent with topographic cell guidance and some previous CSK model predictions. PMID:20023805

  15. Mechanical and spatial determinants of cytoskeletal geodesic dome formation in cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Harold

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the cell cytoskeletal (CSK) network can rearrange from geodesic dome type structures to stress fibers in response to microenvironmental cues. The CSK geodesic domes are highly organized actin microarchitectures within the cell, consisting of ordered polygonal elements. We studied primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The cues used to trigger the interconversion between the two CSK architectures (geodesic domes and stress fibers) included factors affecting spatial order and the degree of CSK tension in the cells. Microfabricated three-dimensional substrates with micrometre sized grooves and peaks were used to alter the spatial order of cell growth in culture. CSK tension was modified by 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), cytochalasin D and the hyphae of Candida albicans. CSK geodesic domes occurred spontaneously in about 20% of the neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts used in this study. Microfabricated structured surfaces produced anisotropy in the cell CSK and effectively converted geodesic domes into stress fibers in a dose-dependent manner (dependence on the period of the features). Affectors of actin structure, inhibitors of CSK tension and cell motility, e.g. BDM, cytochalasin D and the hyphae of C. albicans, suppressed or eliminated the geodesic domes. Our data suggest that the geodesic domes, similar to actin stress fibers, require maintenance of CSK integrity and tension. However, microenvironments that promote structural anisotropy in tensed cells cause the transformation of the geodesic domes into stress fibers, consistent with topographic cell guidance and some previous CSK model predictions. PMID:20023805

  16. A multi-structural single cell model of force-induced interactions of cytoskeletal components.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Sara; Clausen, Casper H; Perrault, Cecile M; Fletcher, Daniel A; Lacroix, Damien

    2013-08-01

    Several computational models based on experimental techniques and theories have been proposed to describe cytoskeleton (CSK) mechanics. Tensegrity is a prominent model for force generation, but it cannot predict mechanics of individual CSK components, nor explain the discrepancies from the different single cell stimulating techniques studies combined with cytoskeleton-disruptors. A new numerical concept that defines a multi-structural 3D finite element (FE) model of a single-adherent cell is proposed to investigate the biophysical and biochemical differences of the mechanical role of each cytoskeleton component under loading. The model includes prestressed actin bundles and microtubule within cytoplasm and nucleus surrounded by the actin cortex. We performed numerical simulations of atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments by subjecting the cell model to compressive loads. The numerical role of the CSK components was corroborated with AFM force measurements on U2OS-osteosarcoma cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts exposed to different cytoskeleton-disrupting drugs. Computational simulation showed that actin cortex and microtubules are the major components targeted in resisting compression. This is a new numerical tool that explains the specific role of the cortex and overcomes the difficulty of isolating this component from other networks in vitro. This illustrates that a combination of cytoskeletal structures with their own properties is necessary for a complete description of cellular mechanics. PMID:23702149

  17. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanical models for cytoskeletal assembly: Towards understanding tensegrity in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tongye; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-10-01

    The cytoskeleton is not an equilibrium structure. To develop theoretical tools to investigate such nonequilibrium assemblies, we study a statistical physical model of motorized spherical particles. Though simple, it captures some of the key nonequilibrium features of the cytoskeletal networks. Variational solutions of the many-body master equation for a set of motorized particles accounts for their thermally induced Brownian motion as well as for the motorized kicking of the structural elements. These approximations yield stability limits for crystalline phases and for frozen amorphous structures. The methods allow one to compute the effects of nonequilibrium behavior and adhesion (effective cross-linking) on the mechanical stability of localized phases as a function of density, adhesion strength, and temperature. We find that nonequilibrium noise does not necessarily destabilize mechanically organized structures. The nonequilibrium forces strongly modulate the phase behavior and have comparable effect as the adhesion due to cross-linking. Modeling transitions such as these allows the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton to rapidly and adaptively change. The present model provides a statistical mechanical underpinning for a tensegrity picture of the cytoskeleton.

  18. β-Helical architecture of cytoskeletal bactofilin filaments revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vasa, Suresh; Lin, Lin; Shi, Chaowei; Habenstein, Birgit; Riedel, Dietmar; Kühn, Juliane; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widespread class of bacterial filament-forming proteins, which serve as cytoskeletal scaffolds in various cellular pathways. They are characterized by a conserved architecture, featuring a central conserved domain (DUF583) that is flanked by variable terminal regions. Here, we present a detailed investigation of bactofilin filaments from Caulobacter crescentus by high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. De novo sequential resonance assignments were obtained for residues Ala39 to Phe137, spanning the conserved DUF583 domain. Analysis of the secondary chemical shifts shows that this core region adopts predominantly β-sheet secondary structure. Mutational studies of conserved hydrophobic residues located in the identified β-strand segments suggest that bactofilin folding and polymerization is mediated by an extensive and redundant network of hydrophobic interactions, consistent with the high intrinsic stability of bactofilin polymers. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a propensity of bactofilin to form filament bundles as well as sheet-like, 2D crystalline assemblies, which may represent the supramolecular arrangement of bactofilin in the native context. Based on the diffraction pattern of these 2D crystalline assemblies, scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements of the mass per length of BacA filaments, and the distribution of β-strand segments identified by solid-state NMR, we propose that the DUF583 domain adopts a β-helical architecture, in which 18 β-strand segments are arranged in six consecutive windings of a β-helix. PMID:25550503

  19. Systems Genetics Implicates Cytoskeletal Genes in Oocyte Control of Cloned Embryo Quality

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yong; Gaughan, John; Midic, Uros; Han, Zhiming; Liang, Cheng-Guang; Patel, Bela G.; Latham, Keith E.

    2013-01-01

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer is an important technology, but remains limited due to poor rates of success. Identifying genes supporting clone development would enhance our understanding of basic embryology, improve applications of the technology, support greater understanding of establishing pluripotent stem cells, and provide new insight into clinically important determinants of oocyte quality. For the first time, a systems genetics approach was taken to discover genes contributing to the ability of an oocyte to support early cloned embryo development. This identified a primary locus on mouse chromosome 17 and potential loci on chromosomes 1 and 4. A combination of oocyte transcriptome profiling data, expression correlation analysis, and functional and network analyses yielded a short list of likely candidate genes in two categories. The major category—including two genes with the strongest genetic associations with the traits (Epb4.1l3 and Dlgap1)—encodes proteins associated with the subcortical cytoskeleton and other cytoskeletal elements such as the spindle. The second category encodes chromatin and transcription regulators (Runx1t1, Smchd1, and Chd7). Smchd1 promotes X chromosome inactivation, whereas Chd7 regulates expression of pluripotency genes. Runx1t1 has not been associated with these processes, but acts as a transcriptional repressor. The finding that cytoskeleton-associated proteins may be key determinants of early clone development highlights potential roles for cytoplasmic components of the oocyte in supporting nuclear reprogramming. The transcriptional regulators identified may contribute to the overall process as downstream effectors. PMID:23307892

  20. Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Fluid Flow in Drosophila Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Canio, Gabriele; Goldstein, Raymond; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The biological world includes a broad range of phenomena in which transport in a fluid plays a central role. Among these is the fundamental issue of cell polarity arising during development, studied historically using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. The polarity of the oocyte is known to be induced by the translocation of mRNAs by kinesin motor proteins along a dense microtubule cytoskeleton, a process which also induces cytoplasmic streaming. Recent experimental observations have revealed the remarkable fluid-structure interactions that occur as the streaming flows back-react on the microtubules. In this work we use a combination of theory and simulations to address the interplay between the fluid flow and the configuration of cytoskeletal filaments leading to the directed motion inside the oocyte. We show in particular that the mechanical coupling between the fluid motion and the orientation of the microtubules can lead to a transition to coherent motion within the oocyte, as observed. Supported by EPSRC and ERC Advanced Investigator Grant 247333.

  1. Synaptic Cytoskeletal Plasticity in the Prefrontal Cortex Following Psychostimulant Exposure.

    PubMed

    DePoy, Lauren M; Gourley, Shannon L

    2015-09-01

    Addiction is characterized by maladaptive decision-making, a loss of control over drug consumption and habit-like drug seeking despite adverse consequences. These cognitive changes may reflect the effects of drugs of abuse on prefrontal cortical neurobiology. Here, we review evidence that amphetamine and cocaine fundamentally remodel the structure of excitatory neurons in the prefrontal cortex. We summarize evidence in particular that these psychostimulants have opposing effects in the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices ('mPFC' and 'oPFC', respectively). For example, amphetamine and cocaine increase dendrite length and spine density in the mPFC, while dendrites are impoverished and dendritic spines are eliminated in the oPFC. We will discuss evidence that certain cytoskeletal regulatory proteins expressed in the oPFC and implicated in postnatal (adolescent) neural development also regulate behavioral sensitivity to cocaine. These findings potentially open a window of opportunity for the identification of novel pharmacotherapeutic targets in the treatment of drug abuse disorders in adults, as well as in drug-vulnerable adolescent populations. Finally, we will discuss the behavioral implications of drug-related dendritic spine elimination in the oPFC, with regard to reversal learning tasks and tasks that assess the development of reward-seeking habits, both used to model aspects of addiction in rodents.

  2. Synaptic cytoskeletal plasticity in the prefrontal cortex following psychostimulant exposure

    PubMed Central

    DePoy, Lauren M.; Gourley, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by maladaptive decision-making, a loss of control over drug consumption, and habit-like drug seeking despite adverse consequences. These cognitive changes likely reflect the effects of drugs of abuse on prefrontal cortical neurobiology. Here we review evidence that amphetamine and cocaine fundamentally remodel the structure of excitatory neurons in the prefrontal cortex. We summarize evidence in particular that these psychostimulants have opposing effects in the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices (“mPFC” and “oPFC,” respectively). For example, amphetamine and cocaine increase dendrite length and spine density in the mPFC, while dendrites are impoverished and dendritic spines are eliminated in the oPFC. We will discuss evidence that certain cytoskeletal regulatory proteins expressed in the oPFC and implicated in postnatal (adolescent) neural development also regulate behavioral sensitivity to cocaine. These findings potentially open a window of opportunity for the identification of novel pharmacotherapeutic targets in the treatment of drug abuse disorders in adults, as well as in drug-vulnerable adolescent populations. Finally, we will discuss the behavioral implications of drug-related dendritic spine elimination in the oPFC, with regards to reversal learning tasks and tasks that assess the development of reward-seeking habits, both used to model aspects of addiction in rodents. PMID:25951902

  3. Optical Interferometric Response of Living Tissue to Cytoskeletal Anticancer Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John

    2007-03-01

    Living tissue illuminated by short-coherence light can be optically sectioned in three dimensions using coherent detection such as interferometry. We have developed full-field coherence-gated imaging of tissue using digital holography. Two-dimensional image sections from a fixed depth are recorded as interference fringes with a CCD camera located at the optical Fourier plane. Fast Fourier transform of the digital hologram yields the depth-selected image. When the tissue is living, highly dynamic speckle is observed as fluctuating pixel intensities. The temporal autocorrelation functions are directly related to the degree of motility at depth. We have applied the cytoskeletal drugs nocodazole and colchicine to osteogenic sarcoma multicellular spheroids and observed the response holographically. Colchicine is an anticancer drug that inhibits microtubule polymerization and hence prevents spindle formation during mitosis. Nocodazole, on the other hand, depolymerizes microtubules. Both drugs preferentially inhibit rapidly-dividing cancer cells. We observe dose-response using motility as an effective contrast agent. This work opens the possibility for studies of three-dimensional motility as a multiplexed assay for drug discovery.

  4. Synaptic Cytoskeletal Plasticity in the Prefrontal Cortex Following Psychostimulant Exposure.

    PubMed

    DePoy, Lauren M; Gourley, Shannon L

    2015-09-01

    Addiction is characterized by maladaptive decision-making, a loss of control over drug consumption and habit-like drug seeking despite adverse consequences. These cognitive changes may reflect the effects of drugs of abuse on prefrontal cortical neurobiology. Here, we review evidence that amphetamine and cocaine fundamentally remodel the structure of excitatory neurons in the prefrontal cortex. We summarize evidence in particular that these psychostimulants have opposing effects in the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices ('mPFC' and 'oPFC', respectively). For example, amphetamine and cocaine increase dendrite length and spine density in the mPFC, while dendrites are impoverished and dendritic spines are eliminated in the oPFC. We will discuss evidence that certain cytoskeletal regulatory proteins expressed in the oPFC and implicated in postnatal (adolescent) neural development also regulate behavioral sensitivity to cocaine. These findings potentially open a window of opportunity for the identification of novel pharmacotherapeutic targets in the treatment of drug abuse disorders in adults, as well as in drug-vulnerable adolescent populations. Finally, we will discuss the behavioral implications of drug-related dendritic spine elimination in the oPFC, with regard to reversal learning tasks and tasks that assess the development of reward-seeking habits, both used to model aspects of addiction in rodents. PMID:25951902

  5. Integrin-cytoskeletal interactions in migrating fibroblasts are dynamic, asymmetric, and regulated

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have used laser optical trapping and nanometer-level motion analysis to investigate the cytoskeletal associations and surface dynamics of beta 1 integrin, a cell-substrate adhesion molecule, on the dorsal surfaces of migrating fibroblast cells. A single-beam optical gradient trap (laser tweezers) was used to restrain polystyrene beads conjugated with anti-beta 1 integrin mAbs and place them at desired locations on the cell exterior. This technique was used to demonstrate a spatial difference in integrin-cytoskeleton interactions in migrating cells. We found a distinct increase in the stable attachment of beads, and subsequent rearward flow, on the lamellipodia of locomoting cells compared with the retracting portions. Complementary to the enhanced linkage of integrin at the cell lamellipodium, the membrane was more deformable at the rear versus the front of moving cells while nonmotile cells did not exhibit this asymmetry in membrane architecture. Video microscopy and nanometer-precision tracking routines were used to study the surface dynamics of integrin on the lamellipodia of migrating cells by monitoring the displacements of colloidal gold particles coated with anti-beta 1 integrin mAbs. Small gold aggregates were rapidly transported preferentially to the leading edge of the lamellipod where they resumed diffusion restricted along the edge. This fast transport was characterized by brief periods of directed movement ("jumps") having an instantaneous velocity of 37 +/- 15 microns/min (SD), separated by periods of diffusion. In contrast, larger aggregates of gold particles and the large latex beads underwent slow, steady rearward movement (0.85 +/- 0.44 micron/min) (SD) at a rate similar to that reported for other capping events and for migration of these cells. Cell lines containing mutated beta 1 integrins were used to show that the cytoplasmic domain is essential for an asymmetry in attachment of integrin to the underlying cytoskeletal network and is also

  6. Force profiles of protein pulling with or without cytoskeletal links studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi . E-mail: aikai@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    To test the capability of the atomic force microscope for distinguishing membrane proteins with/without cytoskeletal associations, we studied the pull-out mechanics of lipid tethers from the red blood cell (RBC). When wheat germ agglutinin, a glycophorin A (GLA) specific lectin, was used to pull out tethers from RBC, characteristic force curves for tether elongation having a long plateau force were observed but without force peaks which are usually attributed to the forced unbinding of membrane components from the cytoskeleton. The result was in agreement with the reports that GLA is substantially free of cytoskeletal interactions. On the contrary, when the Band 3 specific lectin, concanavalin A, was used, the force peaks were indeed observed together with a plateau supporting its reported cytoskeletal association. Based on these observations, we postulate that the state of cytoskeletal association of particular membrane proteins can be identified from the force profiles of their pull-out mechanics.

  7. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  8. Cytoskeletal changes in podocytes associated with foot process effacement in Masugi nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Shirato, I.; Sakai, T.; Kimura, K.; Tomino, Y.; Kriz, W.

    1996-01-01

    Foot process effacement represents the most characteristic change in podocyte phenotype under a great variety of experimental as well as human glomerulopathies. It consists in simplification up to a total disappearance of an interdigitating foot process pattern. Finally, podocytes affix to the glomerular basement membrane by outspread epithelial sheets. Structural and immunocytochemical techniques were applied to analyze the cytoskeletal changes associated with foot process effacement in Masugi nephritis. Three days after injection of the anti-glomerular-basement-membrane serum an interdigitating foot process pattern was almost fully lost; more than 90 percent of the outer glomerular capillary surface were covered by expanded sheets of podocyte epithelium that contain a highly organized cytoskeleton adhering to the basal cell membrane. Structurally, this cytoskeleton consists of an interwoven network of microfilaments with regularly distributed dense bodies, which obviously serve as cross-linkers within this network. Immunocytochemically, the expression of actin, alpha-actinin, and pp44 (a specific podocyte protein normally associated with the cytoskeleton of foot processes) were increased in this structure; alpha-actinin was especially prominent in the dense bodies. The results are consistent with the view that foot process effacement represents an adaptive change in cell shape including hypertrophy of the contractile apparatus, reinforcing the supportive role of podocytes. Several factors associated with increased distending forces to podocytes may underlie this phenotype change including loss of mesangial support, elevated glomerular pressures, and impairment of GBM substructure as well as of podocyte-GBM-contacts. Twenty-eight days after serum injection a remodeling of the foot process pattern was seen. It appears that this restitution depends on a preceding repair of mesangial support function to glomerular capillaries. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure

  9. Cytoskeletal and cellular adhesion proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Costa, M L; Escaleira, R; Manasfi, M; de Souza, L F; Mermelstein, C S

    2003-08-01

    The current myogenesis and myofibrillogenesis model has been based mostly on in vitro cell culture studies, and, to a lesser extent, on in situ studies in avian and mammalian embryos. While the more isolated artificial conditions of cells in culture permitted careful structural analysis, the actual in situ cellular structures have not been described in detail because the embryos are more difficult to section and manipulate. To overcome these difficulties, we used the optically clear and easy to handle embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio. We monitored the expression of cytoskeletal and cell-adhesion proteins (actin, myosin, desmin, alpha-actinin, troponin, titin, vimentin and vinculin) using immunofluorescence microscopy and video-enhanced, background-subtracted, differential interference contrast of 24- to 48-h zebrafish embryos. In the mature myotome, the mononucleated myoblasts displayed periodic striations for all sarcomeric proteins tested. The changes in desmin distribution from aggregates to perinuclear and striated forms, although following the same sequence, occurred much faster than in other models. All desmin-positive cells were also positive for myofibrillar proteins and striated, in contrast to that which occurs in cell cultures. Vimentin appeared to be striated in mature cells, while it is developmentally down-regulated in vitro. The whole connective tissue septum between the somites was positive for adhesion proteins such as vinculin, instead of the isolated adhesion plaques observed in cell cultures. The differences in the myogenesis of zebrafish in situ and in cell culture in vitro suggest that some of the previously observed structures and protein distributions in cultures could be methodological artifacts.

  10. Integrin β1 regulates leiomyoma cytoskeletal integrity and growth

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Minnie; Segars, James; Catherino, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are characterized by an excessive extracellular matrix, increased mechanical stress, and increased active RhoA. Previously, we observed that mechanical signaling was attenuated in leiomyoma, but the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Integrins, especially integrin β1, are transmembrane adhesion receptors that couple extracellular matrix stresses to the intracellular cytoskeleton to influence cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we characterized integrin and laminin to signaling in leiomyoma cells. We observed a 2.25 ± 0.32 fold increased expression of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. Antibody-mediated inhibition of integrin β1 led to significant growth inhibition in leiomyoma cells and a loss of cytoskeletal integrity. Specifically, polymerization of actin filaments and formation of focal adhesions were reduced by inhibition of integrin p1. Inhibition of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells led to 0.81 ± 0.02 fold decrease in active RhoA, and resembled levels found in serum-starved cells. Likewise, inhibition of integrin β1 was accompanied by a decrease in phospho-ERK. Compared to myometrial cells, leiomyoma cells demonstrated increased expression of integrin α6 subunit to laminin receptor (1.91 ± 0.11 fold), and increased expression of laminin 5α (1.52±0.02), laminin 5β (3.06±0.92), and laminin 5γ (1.66 ± 0.06). Of note, leiomyoma cells grown on laminin matrix appear to realign themselves. Taken together, the findings reveal that the attenuated mechanical signaling in leiomyoma cells is accompanied by an increased expression and a dependence on integrin β1 signaling in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. PMID:23023061

  11. CONSERVED ROLES FOR CYTOSKELETAL COMPONENTS IN DETERMINING LATERALITY

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Gary S.; Lemire, Joan M.; Paré, Jean-Francois; Cammarata, Garrett; Lowery, Laura Anne; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Consistently-biased left-right (LR) patterning is required for the proper placement of organs including the heart and viscera. The LR axis is especially fascinating as an example of multi-scale pattern formation, since here chiral events at the subcellular level are integrated and amplified into asymmetric transcriptional cascades and ultimately into the anatomical patterning of the entire body. In contrast to the other two body axes, there is considerable controversy about the earliest mechanisms of embryonic laterality. Many molecular components of asymmetry have not been widely tested among phyla with diverse bodyplans, and it is unknown whether parallel (redundant) pathways may exist that could reverse abnormal asymmetry states at specific checkpoints in development. To address conservation of the early steps of LR patterning, we used the Xenopus laevis (frog) embryo to functionally test a number of protein targets known to direct asymmetry in plants, fruit fly, and rodent. Using the same reagents that randomize asymmetry in Arabidopsis, Drosophila, and mouse embryos, we show that manipulation of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton immediately post-fertilization, but not later, results in laterality defects in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, we observed organ-specific randomization effects and a striking dissociation of organ situs from effects on the expression of left side control genes, which parallel data from Drosophila and mouse. Remarkably, some early manipulations that disrupt laterality of transcriptional asymmetry determinants can be subsequently “rescued” by the embryo, resulting in normal organ situs. These data reveal the existence of novel corrective mechanisms, demonstrate that asymmetric expression of Nodal is not a definitive marker of laterality, and suggest the existence of amplification pathways that connect early cytoskeletal processes to control of organ situs bypassing Nodal. Counter to alternative models of symmetry breaking

  12. Alpha 7 nicotinic receptor coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins modulates RhoA activation, cytoskeletal motility, and structural growth.

    PubMed

    King, Justin R; Kabbani, Nadine

    2016-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) modulate the growth and structure of neurons throughout the nervous system. Ligand stimulation of the α7 nAChR has been shown to regulate the large heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G protein) signaling in various types of cells. Here, we demonstrate a role for α7 nAChR/G protein interaction in the activation of the small (monomeric) RhoA GTPase leading to cytoskeletal changes during neurite growth. Treatment of PC12 cells with the α7 nAChR agonist choline or PNU-282987 was associated with an increase in RhoA activity and an inhibition in neurite growth. Specifically, choline treatment was found to attenuate the velocity of microtubule growth at the growth cone and decrease the rate of actin polymerization throughout the cell. The effects of α7 nAChR activation were abolished by expression of a dominant negative α7 nAChR (α7345-348A ) deficient in G protein coupling. Proteomic analysis of immunoprecipitated α7 nAChR complexes from differentiating PC12 cells and synaptic fractions of the developing mouse hippocampus revealed the existence of Rho GTPase-regulating guanine nucleotide exchange factors within α7 nAChR interactomes. These findings underscore the role of α7 nAChR/G protein in cytoskeletal regulation during neurite growth. This image depicts the hypothesized interaction of the traditionally ionotropic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) and its ability to interact and signal through both large and small G proteins, leading to the regulation of cytoskeletal growth. Using differentiated PC12 cells, and the specific agonist choline, it was shown that α7 nAChR/G protein interactions mediate both short- and long-term neurite growth dynamics through increased RhoA activation. Activation of RhoA was shown to decrease actin polymerization, and lead to an overall decrease in neurite growth via regulation of the microtubule network. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13330.

  13. Corticosterone treatment results in enhanced release of peptidergic vesicles in astrocytes via cytoskeletal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreejata; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2013-12-01

    While the effect of stress on neuronal physiology is widely studied, its effect on the functionality of astrocytes is not well understood. We studied the effect of high doses of stress hormone corticosterone, on two physiological properties of astrocytes, i.e., gliotransmission and interastrocytic calcium waves. To study the release of peptidergic vesicles from astrocytes, hippocampal astrocyte cultures were transfected with a plasmid to express pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) fused with the emerald green fluorescent protein (ANP.emd). The rate of decrease in fluorescence of ANP.emd on application of ionomycin, a calcium ionophore was monitored. Significant increase in the rate of calcium-dependent exocytosis of ANP.emd was observed with the 100 nM and 1 μM corticosterone treatments for 3 h, which depended on the activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. ANP.emd tagged vesicles exhibited increased mobility in astrocyte culture upon corticosterone treatment. Increasing corticosterone concentrations also resulted in concomitant increase in the calcium wave propagation velocity, initiated by focal ATP application. Corticosterone treatment also resulted in increased GFAP expression and F-actin rearrangements. FITC-Phalloidin immunostaining revealed increased formation of cross linked F-actin networks with the 100 nM and 1 μM corticosterone treatment. Alternatively, blockade of actin polymerization and disruption of microtubules prevented the corticosterone-mediated increase in ANP.emd release kinetics. This study reports for the first time the effect of corticosterone on gliotransmission via modulation of cytoskeletal elements. As ANP acts on both neurons and blood vessels, modulation of its release could have functional implications in neurovascular coupling under pathophysiological conditions of stress. PMID:24123181

  14. Analysis of Cytoskeletal and Motility Proteins in the Sea Urchin Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    RL, Morris; MP, Hoffman; RA, Obar; SS, McCafferty; IR, Gibbons; AD, Leone; J, Cool; EL, Allgood; AM, Musante; KM, Judkins; BJ, Rossetti; AP, Rawson; DR, Burgess

    2007-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo is a classical model system for studying the role of the cytoskeleton in such events as fertilization, mitosis, cleavage, cell migration and gastrulation. We have conducted an analysis of gene models derived from the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome assembly and have gathered strong evidence for the existence of multiple gene families encoding cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators in sea urchin. While many cytoskeletal genes have been cloned from sea urchin with sequences already existing in public databases, genome analysis reveals a significantly higher degree of diversity within certain gene families. Furthermore, genes are described corresponding to homologs of cytoskeletal proteins not previously documented in sea urchins. To illustrate the varying degree of sequence diversity that exists within cytoskeletal gene families, we conducted an analysis of genes encoding actins, specific actin-binding proteins, myosins, tubulins, kinesins, dyneins, specific microtubule-associated proteins, and intermediate filaments. We conducted ontological analysis of select genes to better understand the relatedness of urchin cytoskeletal genes to those of other deuterostomes. We analyzed developmental expression (EST) data to confirm the existence of select gene models and to understand their differential expression during various stages of early development. PMID:17027957

  15. Structural Rearrangements in CHO Cells After Disruption of Individual Cytoskeletal Elements and Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jokhadar, Špela Zemljič; Derganc, Jure

    2015-04-01

    Cellular structural integrity is provided primarily by the cytoskeleton, which comprises microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments. The plasma membrane has been also recognized as a mediator of physical forces, yet its contribution to the structural integrity of the cell as a whole is less clear. In order to investigate the relationship between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton, we selectively disrupted the plasma membrane and each of the cytoskeletal elements in Chinese hamster ovary cells and assessed subsequent changes in cellular structural integrity. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize cytoskeletal rearrangements, and optical tweezers were utilized to quantify membrane tether extraction. We found that cholesterol depletion from the plasma membrane resulted in rearrangements of all cytoskeletal elements. Conversely, the state of the plasma membrane, as assessed by tether extraction, was affected by disruption of any of the cytoskeletal elements, including microtubules and intermediate filaments, which are located mainly in the cell interior. The results demonstrate that, besides the cytoskeleton, the plasma membrane is an important contributor to cellular integrity, possibly by acting as an essential framework for cytoskeletal anchoring. In agreement with the tensegrity model of cell mechanics, our results support the notion of the cell as a prestressed structure. PMID:25395197

  16. A focal adhesion factor directly linking intracellularly motile Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii to the actin-based cytoskeleton of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, T; Ebel, F; Domann, E; Niebuhr, K; Gerstel, B; Pistor, S; Temm-Grove, C J; Jockusch, B M; Reinhard, M; Walter, U

    1995-04-01

    The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the sole listerial factor needed for recruitment of host actin filaments by intracellularly motile bacteria. Here we report that following Listeria infection the host vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a microfilament- and focal adhesion-associated substrate of both the cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, accumulates on the surface of intracytoplasmic bacteria prior to the detection of F-actin 'clouds'. VASP remains associated with the surface of highly motile bacteria, where it is polarly located, juxtaposed between one extremity of the bacterial surface and the front of the actin comet tail. Since actin filament polymerization occurs only at the very front of the tail, VASP exhibits properties of a host protein required to promote actin polymerization. Purified VASP binds directly to the ActA polypeptide in vitro. A ligand-overlay blot using purified radiolabelled VASP enabled us to identify the ActA homologue of the related intracellular motile pathogen, Listeria ivanovii, as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. VASP also associates with actin filaments recruited by another intracellularly motile bacterial pathogen, Shigella flexneri. Hence, by the simple expedient of expressing surface-bound attractor molecules, bacterial pathogens effectively harness cytoskeletal components to achieve intracellular movement.

  17. The role of Nox-mediated oxidation in the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Alejandra; Duran, Charity; San Martin, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Nox generated ROS, particularly those derived from Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4, have emerged as important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-supported cell functions, such as migration and adhesion. The effects of Nox-derived ROS on cytoskeletal remodeling may be largely attributed to the ability of ROS to directly modify proteins that constitute or are associated with the cytoskeleton. Additionally, Nox-derived ROS may participate in signaling pathways governing cytoskeletal remodeling. In addition to these more extensively studied signaling pathways involving Nox-derived ROS, there also exist redox sensitive pathways for which the source of ROS is unclear. ROS from as of yet undetermined sources play a role in modifying, and thus regulating, the activity of several proteins critical for remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. In this review we discuss ROS sensitive targets that are likely to affect cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as the potential involvement of Nox proteins.

  18. Accumulation of Glucosylceramide in the Absence of the Beta-Glucosidase GBA2 Alters Cytoskeletal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Diana; Schonauer, Sophie; Hamzeh, Hussein; Flynn, Kevin C.; Bradke, Frank; vom Dorp, Katharina; Dörmann, Peter; Yildiz, Yildiz; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad; Körschen, Heinz G.; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids are key elements of cellular membranes, thereby, controlling a variety of cellular functions. Accumulation of the simple glycosphingolipid glucosylceramide results in life-threatening lipid storage-diseases or in male infertility. How glucosylceramide regulates cellular processes is ill defined. Here, we reveal that glucosylceramide accumulation in GBA2 knockout-mice alters cytoskeletal dynamics due to a more ordered lipid organization in the plasma membrane. In dermal fibroblasts, accumulation of glucosylceramide augments actin polymerization and promotes microtubules persistence, resulting in a higher number of filopodia and lamellipodia and longer microtubules. Similar cytoskeletal defects were observed in male germ and Sertoli cells from GBA2 knockout-mice. In particular, the organization of F-actin structures in the ectoplasmic specialization and microtubules in the sperm manchette is affected. Thus, glucosylceramide regulates cytoskeletal dynamics, providing mechanistic insights into how glucosylceramide controls signaling pathways not only during sperm development, but also in other cell types. PMID:25803043

  19. Accumulation of glucosylceramide in the absence of the beta-glucosidase GBA2 alters cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Raju, Diana; Schonauer, Sophie; Hamzeh, Hussein; Flynn, Kevin C; Bradke, Frank; Vom Dorp, Katharina; Dörmann, Peter; Yildiz, Yildiz; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad; Körschen, Heinz G; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-03-01

    Glycosphingolipids are key elements of cellular membranes, thereby, controlling a variety of cellular functions. Accumulation of the simple glycosphingolipid glucosylceramide results in life-threatening lipid storage-diseases or in male infertility. How glucosylceramide regulates cellular processes is ill defined. Here, we reveal that glucosylceramide accumulation in GBA2 knockout-mice alters cytoskeletal dynamics due to a more ordered lipid organization in the plasma membrane. In dermal fibroblasts, accumulation of glucosylceramide augments actin polymerization and promotes microtubules persistence, resulting in a higher number of filopodia and lamellipodia and longer microtubules. Similar cytoskeletal defects were observed in male germ and Sertoli cells from GBA2 knockout-mice. In particular, the organization of F-actin structures in the ectoplasmic specialization and microtubules in the sperm manchette is affected. Thus, glucosylceramide regulates cytoskeletal dynamics, providing mechanistic insights into how glucosylceramide controls signaling pathways not only during sperm development, but also in other cell types.

  20. Real space flight travel is associated with ultrastructural changes, cytoskeletal disruption and premature senescence of HUVEC.

    PubMed

    Kapitonova, M Y; Muid, S; Froemming, G R A; Yusoff, W N W; Othman, S; Ali, A M; Nawawi, H M

    2012-12-01

    Microgravity, hypergravity, vibration, ionizing radiation and temperature fluctuations are major factors of outer space flight affecting human organs and tissues. There are several reports on the effect of space flight on different human cell types of mesenchymal origin while information regarding changes to vascular endothelial cells is scarce. Ultrastructural and cytophysiological features of macrovascular endothelial cells in outer space flight and their persistence during subsequent culturing were demonstrated in the present investigation. At the end of the space flight, endothelial cells displayed profound changes indicating cytoskeletal lesions and increased cell membrane permeability. Readapted cells of subsequent passages exhibited persisting cytoskeletal changes, decreased metabolism and cell growth indicating cellular senescence.

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A, a potential regulator of actin dynamics and actin-based organelle motility in the green alga Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Menzel, D; Vugrek, O; Frank, S; Elsner-Menzel, C

    1995-06-01

    The giant, unicellular alga Acetabularia is a well known experimental model for the study of actin-dependent intracellular organelle motility. In the cyst stage, however, which is equivalent to the gametophytic stage, organelles are immobile, even though an actin cytoskeleton is present. The reason for the lack of organelle motility at this stage has not been known. To test the hypothesis that organelle motility could be under the control of posttranslational modification by protein phosphorylation, we have treated cysts with submicromolar concentrations of okadaic acid or calyculin A, both potent inhibitors of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (ser/thr-PPases). The effects were dramatic: Instead of linear actin bundles typical for control cysts, circular arrays of actin bundles formed in the cortical cyst cytoplasm. Concomitant with the formation of these action rings, the cytoplasmic layers beneath the rings began to slowly rotate in a continuous and uniform counter-clockwise fashion. This effect suggests that protein phosphorylation acts on the actin cytoskeleton at two levels: (1) It changes the assembly properties of the actin filament system to the extent that novel cytoskeletal configurations are formed and (2) it raises the activity of putative motor proteins involved in the rotational movements to levels sufficiently high to support motility at a stage when organelle motility does not normally occur. Northern blot analysis of cyst stage-mRNA using probes specific to protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) and type 2A (PP2A) reveals that PP2A is strongly expressed at this developmental stage whereas PP1 is not detectable, suggesting that PP2A is the likely target to the protein phosphatase inhibitors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. PTP-PEST controls EphA3 activation and ephrin-induced cytoskeletal remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mariam; Nievergall, Eva; Gegenbauer, Kristina; Llerena, Carmen; Atapattu, Lakmali; Hallé, Maxime; Tremblay, Michel L; Janes, Peter W; Lackmann, Martin

    2016-01-15

    Eph receptors and their corresponding membrane-bound ephrin ligands regulate cell positioning and establish tissue patterns during embryonic and oncogenic development. Emerging evidence suggests that assembly of polymeric Eph signalling clusters relies on cytoskeletal reorganisation and underlies regulation by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). PTP-PEST (also known as PTPN12) is a central regulator of actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal fragment of PTP-PEST, generated through an ephrinA5-triggered and spatially confined cleavage mediated by caspase-3, attenuates EphA3 receptor activation and its internalisation. Isolation of EphA3 receptor signalling clusters within intact plasma membrane fragments obtained by detergent-free cell fractionation reveals that stimulation of cells with ephrin triggers effective recruitment of this catalytically active truncated form of PTP-PEST together with key cytoskeletal and focal adhesion proteins. Importantly, modulation of actin polymerisation using pharmacological and dominant-negative approaches affects EphA3 phosphorylation in a similar manner to overexpression of PTP-PEST. We conclude that PTP-PEST regulates EphA3 activation both by affecting cytoskeletal remodelling and through its direct action as a PTP controlling EphA3 phosphorylation, indicating its multifaceted regulation of Eph signalling. PMID:26644181

  3. Visualization of Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Fixed and Live Drosophila Egg Chambers.

    PubMed

    Groen, Christopher M; Tootle, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of actin cytoskeletal dynamics is critical for understanding the spatial and temporal regulation of actin remodeling. Drosophila oogenesis provides an excellent model system for visualizing the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we present methods for imaging the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila egg chambers in both fixed samples by phalloidin staining and in live egg chambers using transgenic actin labeling tools.

  4. Stepwise cytoskeletal polarization as a series of checkpoints in innate but not adaptive cytolytic killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wülfing, Christoph; Purtic, Bozidar; Klem, Jennifer; Schatzle, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Cytolytic killing is a major effector mechanism in the elimination of virally infected and tumor cells. The innate cytolytic effectors, natural killer (NK) cells, and the adaptive effectors, cytotoxic T cells (CTL), despite differential immune recognition, both use the same lytic mechanism, cytolytic granule release. Using live cell video fluorescence microscopy in various primary cell models of NK cell and CTL killing, we show here that on tight target cell contact, a majority of the NK cells established cytoskeletal polarity required for effective lytic function slowly or incompletely. In contrast, CTLs established cytoskeletal polarity rapidly. In addition, NK cell killing was uniquely sensitive to minor interference with cytoskeletal dynamics. We propose that the stepwise NK cell cytoskeletal polarization constitutes a series of checkpoints in NK cell killing. In addition, the use of more deliberate progression to effector function to compensate for inferior immune recognition specificity provides a mechanistic explanation for how the same effector function can be used in the different functional contexts of the innate and adaptive immune response.

  5. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the physical conformation of the erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellary, S S; Anderson, K W; Arden, W A; Butterfield, D A

    1995-01-01

    Red blood cell deformability is important for effective circulation in the capillaries. It is known that red cell deformability is significantly reduced during septic shock. Surface to volume ratio, physical effects of the cytoskeletal proteins and the fluidity of lipid bilayer are some of the important intrinsic factors that regulate this mechanical function. Alterations in the physical conformation of cytoskeletal proteins in septic conditions could significantly alter their function. In this study, erythrocytes in whole blood were treated with lipopolysaccharide, the outer covering of Gram-negative bacteria released during Gram-negative sepsis. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with a protein-specific maleimide nitroxide spin label covalently bound to cytoskeletal proteins was used to investigate the resulting changes occurring in the physical state of cytoskeletal proteins in isolated membranes. Treatment of red blood cells with a lipopolysaccharide concentration as low as 40 micrograms/mL of blood solution for 90 minutes showed a significant decrease in the relevant EPR parameter (p < 0.01) of the spin label bound to subsequently isolated membranes, suggestive of a decreased segmental motion of the spin label and an increase in cytoskeletal protein-protein interactions. These results suggest a marked conformational alteration in the cytoskeletal proteins induced by the lipopolysaccharide and may explain, in part, the marked reduction in red blood cell deformability during septic shock. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide does not exert most of its effects on the host directly, but rather elicits the production of host factors that leads to complex septic shock. Leukocytes, endothelial tissue and many other cells release these mediators. Leukocytes are thought to be a particularly important source of such mediators, including cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins, etc.), oxygen free radicals, proteases, and hydrolyses. In order to

  6. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Turkel, Nezaket; Portela, Marta; Poon, Carole; Li, Jason; Brumby, Anthony M; Richardson, Helena E

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib) and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab). Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems.

  7. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Turkel, Nezaket; Portela, Marta; Poon, Carole; Li, Jason; Brumby, Anthony M.; Richardson, Helena E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib) and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab). Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems. PMID:26187947

  8. Preservation of tissue microstructure and functionality during freezing by modulation of cytoskeletal structure.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman; Seawright, Angela; Park, Sinwook; Craig Dutton, J; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-05-01

    Cryopreservation is one of the key enabling technologies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, which can provide reliable long-term storage of engineered tissues (ETs) without losing their functionality. However, it is still extremely difficult to design and develop cryopreservation protocols guaranteeing the post-thaw tissue functionality. One of the major challenges in cryopreservation is associated with the difficulty of identifying effective and less toxic cryoprotective agents (CPAs) to guarantee the post-thaw tissue functionality. In this study, thus, a hypothesis was tested that the modulation of the cytoskeletal structure of cells embedded in the extracellular matrix (ECM) can mitigate the freezing-induced changes of the functionality and can reduce the amount of CPA necessary to preserve the functionality of ETs during cryopreservation. In order to test this hypothesis, we prepared dermal equivalents by seeding fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices resulting in three different cytoskeletal structures. These ETs were exposed to various freeze/thaw (F/T) conditions with and without CPAs. The freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions and subsequent functional properties of the ETs were assessed. The results showed that the cytoskeletal structure and the use of CPA were strongly correlated to the preservation of the post-thaw functional properties. As the cytoskeletal structure became stronger via stress fiber formation, the ET's functionality was preserved better. It also reduced the necessary CPA concentration to preserve the post-thaw functionality. However, if the extent of the freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interaction was too excessive, the cytoskeletal structure was completely destroyed and the beneficial effects became minimal.

  9. Preservation of tissue microstructure and functionality during freezing by modulation of cytoskeletal structure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seungman; Seawright, Angela; Park, Sinwook; Dutton, J Craig; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is one of the key enabling technologies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, which can provide a reliable long-term storage of engineered tissues (ETs) without losing their functionality. However, it is still extremely difficult to design and develop cryopreservation protocols guaranteeing the post-thaw tissue functionality. One of the major challenges in cryopreservation is associated with the difficulty of identifying effective and less toxic cryoprotective agents (CPAs) to guarantee the post-thaw tissue functionality. In this study, thus, a hypothesis was tested that the modulation of the cytoskeletal structure of cells embedded in the extracellular matrix (ECM) can mitigate the freezing-induced changes of the functionality and can reduce the amount of CPA necessary to preserve the functionality of ETs during cryopreservation. In order to test this hypothesis, we prepared dermal equivalents by seeding fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices resulting in three different cytoskeletal structures. These ETs were exposed to various freeze/thaw (F/T) conditions with and without CPAs. The freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions and subsequent functional properties of the ETs were assessed. The results showed that the cytoskeletal structure and the use of CPA were strongly correlated to the preservation of the post-thaw functional properties. As the cytoskeletal structure became stronger via stress fiber formation, the ETs functionality was preserved better. It also reduced the necessary CPA concentration to preserve the post-thaw functionality. However, if the extent of the freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interaction was too excessive, the cytoskeletal structure was completely destroyed and the beneficial effects became minimal. PMID:25679482

  10. X-ray radiation promotes the metastatic potential of tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells via modulation of biomechanical and cytoskeletal properties.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q; Liu, Y; Zhou, H J; Du, Y T; Zhang, B P; Zhang, J; Miao, G Y; Liu, B; Zhang, H

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the metastatic potential of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) cells after X-ray irradiation as well as radiation-induced changes in the biomechanical properties and cytoskeletal structure that are relevant to metastasis. Tca-8113 TSCC cells were X-ray-irradiated at increasing doses (0, 1, 2, or 4 Gy), and 24 h later, migration was evaluated with the wound healing and transwell migration assays, while invasion was assessed with the Matrigel invasion assay. Confocal and atomic force microscopy were used to examine changes in the structure of the actin cytoskeleton and Young's modulus (cell stiffness), respectively. X-ray radiation induced dose-dependent increases in invasive and migratory potentials of cells relative to unirradiated control cells (p < 0.05). The Young's modulus of irradiated cells was decreased by radiation exposure (p < 0.05), which was accompanied by alterations in the integrity and organization of the cytoskeletal network, as evidenced by a decrease in the signal intensity of actin fibers (p < 0.05). X-ray irradiation enhanced migration and invasiveness in Tca-8113 TSCC cells by altering their biomechanical properties and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. A biomechanics-based analysis can provide an additional platform for assessing tumor response to radiation and optimization of cancer therapies.

  11. Proteomic identification of novel cytoskeletal proteins associated with TbPLK, an essential regulator of cell morphogenesis in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    McAllaster, Michael R.; Ikeda, Kyojiro N.; Lozano-Núñez, Ana; Anrather, Dorothea; Unterwurzacher, Verena; Gossenreiter, Thomas; Perry, Jenna A.; Crickley, Robbie; Mercadante, Courtney J.; Vaughan, Sue; de Graffenried, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, a devastating disease endemic to sub-Saharan Africa with few effective treatment options. The parasite is highly polarized, including a single flagellum that is nucleated at the posterior of the cell and adhered along the cell surface. These features are essential and must be transmitted to the daughter cells during division. Recently we identified the T. brucei homologue of polo-like kinase (TbPLK) as an essential morphogenic regulator. In the present work, we conduct proteomic screens to identify potential TbPLK binding partners and substrates to better understand the molecular mechanisms of kinase function. These screens identify a cohort of proteins, most of which are completely uncharacterized, which localize to key cytoskeletal organelles involved in establishing cell morphology, including the flagella connector, flagellum attachment zone, and bilobe structure. Depletion of these proteins causes substantial changes in cell division, including mispositioning of the kinetoplast, loss of flagellar connection, and prevention of cytokinesis. The proteins identified in these screens provide the foundation for establishing the molecular networks through which TbPLK directs cell morphogenesis in T. brucei. PMID:26133384

  12. Cytoskeletal reorganization of human platelets after stimulation revealed by the quick-freeze deep-etch technique

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We studied the cytoskeletal reorganization of saponized human platelets after stimulation by using the quick-freeze deep-etch technique, and examined the localization of myosin in thrombin-treated platelets by immunocytochemistry at the electron microscopic level. In unstimulated saponized platelets we observed cross-bridges between: adjoining microtubules, adjoining actin filaments, microtubules and actin filaments, and actin filaments and plasma membranes. After activation with 1 U/ml thrombin for 3 min, massive arrays of actin filaments with mixed polarity were found in the cytoplasm. Two types of cross-bridges between actin filaments were observed: short cross-bridges (11 +/- 2 nm), just like those observed in the resting platelets, and longer ones (22 +/- 3 nm). Actin filaments were linked with the plasma membrane via fine short filaments and sometimes ended on the membrane. Actin filaments and microtubules frequently ran close to the membrane organelles. We also found that actin filaments were associated by end- on attachments with some organelles. Decoration with subfragment 1 of myosin revealed that all the actin filaments associated end-on with the membrane pointed away in their polarity. Immunocytochemical study revealed that myosin was present in the saponin-extracted cytoskeleton after activation and that myosin was localized on the filamentous network. The results suggest that myosin forms a gel with actin filaments in activated platelets. Close associations between actin filaments and organelles in activated platelets suggests that contraction of this actomyosin gel could bring about the observed centralization of organelles. PMID:3667697

  13. Sorting of a nonmuscle tropomyosin to a novel cytoskeletal compartment in skeletal muscle results in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kee, Anthony J; Schevzov, Galina; Nair-Shalliker, Visalini; Robinson, C Stephen; Vrhovski, Bernadette; Ghoddusi, Majid; Qiu, Min Ru; Lin, Jim J-C; Weinberger, Ron; Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C

    2004-08-30

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a key component of the actin cytoskeleton and >40 isoforms have been described in mammals. In addition to the isoforms in the sarcomere, we now report the existence of two nonsarcomeric (NS) isoforms in skeletal muscle. These isoforms are excluded from the thin filament of the sarcomere and are localized to a novel Z-line adjacent structure. Immunostained cross sections indicate that one Tm defines a Z-line adjacent structure common to all myofibers, whereas the second Tm defines a spatially distinct structure unique to muscles that undergo chronic or repetitive contractions. When a Tm (Tm3) that is normally absent from muscle was expressed in mice it became associated with the Z-line adjacent structure. These mice display a muscular dystrophy and ragged-red fiber phenotype, suggestive of disruption of the membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Our findings raise the possibility that mutations in these tropomyosin and these structures may underpin these types of myopathies. PMID:15337777

  14. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  15. Homology Modeling Procedures for Cytoskeletal Proteins of Tetrahymena and Other Ciliated Protists.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni J; Hufnagel, Linda A; King, Roberta S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an explosive increase in the number of annotated protein sequences available through genome sequencing, as well as an accumulation of published protein structural data based on crystallographic and NMR methods. When taken together with the development of computational methods for the prediction of protein structural and functional properties through homology modeling, an opportunity exists for prediction of properties of cytoskeletal proteins in a suitable model organism, such as Tetrahymena thermophila and its ciliated protist relatives. In particular, the recently sequenced genome of T. thermophila, long a model for cytoskeletal studies, provides a good starting point for undertaking such homology modeling studies. Homology modeling can produce functional predictions, for example regarding potential molecular interactions, that are of great interest to the drug industry and Tetrahymena is an attractive model system in which to follow up computational predictions with experimental analyses. We provide here procedures that can be followed to gain entry into this promising avenue of analysis.

  16. Cytoskeletal architecture and cell motility remain unperturbed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Plk3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Daniel R; Mun, Kyu-Shik; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 3 (Plk3) is best known for its involvement in cell cycle checkpoint regulation following exposure to cytotoxicants or induction of DNA damage. Yet, Plk3 has also been implicated in roles beyond those of cellular responses to DNA damage. Here, we have investigated the proposition, suggested by the Plk literature, that Plk3 regulates cytoskeletal architecture and cell functions mediated by the cytoskeleton. To this end, we have assayed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) generated from both Plk3 knockout and wild-type mice. In particular, we asked whether Plk3 is involved in actin fiber and microtubule integrity, cell migration, cell attachment, and/or cell invasion. Our results demonstrate that functional Plk3 is not critical for the regulation of cytoskeletal integrity, cell morphology, cell adhesion, or motility in MEFs. PMID:26843517

  17. Modulation of a cytoskeletal calpain-like protein induces major transitions in trypanosome morphology.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Polly; Varga, Vladimir; Olego-Fernandez, Sofia; Sunter, Jack; Ginger, Michael L; Gull, Keith

    2014-08-01

    Individual eukaryotic microbes, such as the kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma brucei, have a defined size, shape, and form yet transition through life cycle stages, each having a distinct morphology. In questioning the structural processes involved in these transitions, we have identified a large calpain-like protein that contains numerous GM6 repeats (ClpGM6) involved in determining T. brucei cell shape, size, and form. ClpGM6 is a cytoskeletal protein located within the flagellum along the flagellar attachment zone (FAZ). Depletion of ClpGM6 in trypomastigote forms produces cells with long free flagella and a shorter FAZ, accompanied by repositioning of the basal body, the kinetoplast, Golgi, and flagellar pocket, reflecting an epimastigote-like morphology. Hence, major changes in microbial cell form can be achieved by simple modulation of one or a few proteins via coordinated association and positioning of membrane and cytoskeletal components.

  18. Heterotypic and homotypic associations between ezrin and moesin, two putative membrane-cytoskeletal linking proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gary, R; Bretscher, A

    1993-01-01

    Ezrin and moesin are components of actin-rich cell surface structures that are thought to function as membrane-cytoskeletal linking proteins. Here we show that a stable complex of ezrin and moesin can be isolated from cultured cells by immunoprecipitation with specific antibodies. The capacity of these two proteins to interact directly was confirmed with a blot-overlay procedure in which biotin-tagged proteins in solution were incubated with immobilized binding partners. In addition to the heterotypic association of ezrin and moesin, homotypic binding of ezrin to ezrin and of moesin to moesin was also demonstrated in vitro. These results suggest mechanisms by which ezrin and moesin might participate in dynamic aspects of cortical cytoskeletal structure. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8248180

  19. Tracking Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Living Neurons via Combined Atomic Force and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedden, Elise; Kaplan, David; Staii, Cristian

    2013-03-01

    Living cells are active mechanical structures which evolve within and in response to their local microenvironments. Various cell types possess different mechanical properties and respond uniquely to growth, environmental changes, and the application of chemical stimuli. Here we present a powerful approach which combines high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to systematically obtain real-time micrometer and sub-micrometer resolution elasticity maps for live neuronal cells cultured on glass substrates. Through this approach we measure the topography, the elastic properties, and the dynamics of neuronal cells, and identify changes in cytoskeletal components during axonal growth, chemical modification, and changes in ambient temperature. We will also show high resolution elasticity measurements of the cell body and of axons/dendrites during growth, as well as identification of cytoskeletal components during cell growth and environmental changes.

  20. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosynthesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field. PMID:25693826

  1. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosynthesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field.

  2. Ultrafine particles cause cytoskeletal dysfunctions in macrophages: role of intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Brown, David M; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Stone, Vicki

    2005-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution is reported to cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. Since most of these particles are derived form combustion processes, the primary composition product is carbon with a very small diameter (ultrafine, less than 100 nm in diameter). Besides the induction of reactive oxygen species and inflammation, ultrafine particles (UFP) can cause intracellular calcium transients and suppression of defense mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, such as impaired migration or phagocytosis. Methods In this study the role of intracellular calcium transients caused by UFP was studied on cytoskeleton related functions in J774A.1 macrophages. Different types of fine and ultrafine carbon black particles (CB and ufCB, respectively), such as elemental carbon (EC90), commercial carbon (Printex 90), diesel particulate matter (DEP) and urban dust (UD), were investigated. Phagosome transport mechanisms and mechanical cytoskeletal integrity were studied by cytomagnetometry and cell viability was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Macrophages were exposed in vitro with 100 and 320 μg UFP/ml/million cells for 4 hours in serum free medium. Calcium antagonists Verapamil, BAPTA-AM and W-7 were used to block calcium channels in the membrane, to chelate intracellular calcium or to inhibit the calmodulin signaling pathways, respectively. Results Impaired phagosome transport and increased cytoskeletal stiffness occurred at EC90 and P90 concentrations of 100 μg/ml/million cells and above, but not with DEP or UD. Verapamil and W-7, but not BAPTA-AM inhibited the cytoskeletal dysfunctions caused by EC90 or P90. Additionally the presence of 5% serum or 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) suppressed the cytoskeletal dysfunctions. Cell viability showed similar results, where co-culture of ufCB together with Verapamil, W-7, FCS or BSA produced less cell dead compared to the particles only. PMID:16202162

  3. Topographic regulation of cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation by multimeric complexes in the squid giant fiber system.

    PubMed

    Grant, P; Diggins, M; Pant, H C

    1999-07-01

    In mammalian and squid nervous systems, the phosphorylation of neurofilament proteins (NFs) seems to be topographically regulated. Although NFs and relevant kinases are synthesized in cell bodies, phosphorylation of NFs, particularly in the lys-ser-pro (KSP) repeats in NF-M and NF-H tail domains, seem to be restricted to axons. To explore the factors regulating the cellular compartmentalization of NF phosphorylation, we separated cell bodies (GFL) from axons in the squid stellate ganglion and compared the kinase activity in the respective lysates. Although total kinase activity was similar in each lysate, the profile of endogenous phosphorylated substrates was strikingly different. Neurofilament protein 220 (NF220), high-molecular-weight NF protein (HMW), and tubulin were the principal phosphorylated substrates in axoplasm, while tubulin was the principal GFL phosphorylated substrate, in addition to highly phosphorylated low-molecular-weight proteins. Western blot analysis showed that whereas both lysates contained similar kinases and cytoskeletal proteins, phosphorylated NF220 and HMW were completely absent from the GFL lysate. These differences were highlighted by P13(suc1) affinity chromatography, which revealed in axoplasm an active multimeric phosphorylation complex(es), enriched in cytoskeletal proteins and kinases; the equivalent P13 GFL complex exhibited six to 20 times less endogenous and exogenous phosphorylation activity, respectively, contained fewer cytoskeletal proteins and kinases, and expressed a qualitatively different cdc2-like kinase epitope, 34 kDa rather than 49 kDa. Cell bodies and axons share a similar repertoire of molecular consitutents; however, the data suggest that the cytoskeletal/kinase phosphorylation complexes extracted from each cellular compartment by P13 are fundamentally different.

  4. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    IB at the leading edge of E. histolytica. ABP-120 organizes F-actin in a network and myosin IB participates in the pseudopod formation. Similar approaches using T. vaginalis resulted in the discovery of an actin-binding protein that participate in the F-actin reorganization during adhesion of parasites to target cells. This protein is homologous to alpha-actinin from other eukaryotic cells. Finally, by using cell biology approaches, F-actin was observed in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus of Dinoflagellates. The recent developments in the molecular genetics of protozoa will provide new insights to understand the roles of actin-binding proteins during cytoskeleton activities.

  5. Cytoskeletal Configuration Modulates Mechanically Induced Changes in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis, Morphology, and Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Uzer, Gunes; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) responding to mechanical cues generated by physical activity is critical for skeletal development and remodeling. Here, we utilized low intensity vibrations (LIV) as a physiologically relevant mechanical signal and hypothesized that the confined cytoskeletal configuration imposed by 2D culture will enable human bone marrow MSCs (hBMSC) to respond more robustly when LIV is applied in-plane (horizontal-LIV) rather than out-of-plane (vertical-LIV). All LIV signals enhanced hBMSC proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and upregulated genes associated with cytoskeletal structure. The cellular response was more pronounced at higher frequencies (100 Hz vs 30 Hz) and when applied in the horizontal plane. Horizontal but not vertical LIV realigned the cell cytoskeleton, culminating in increased cell stiffness. Our results show that applying very small oscillatory motions within the primary cell attachment plane, rather than perpendicular to it, amplifies the cell’s response to LIV, ostensibly facilitating a more effective transfer of intracellular forces. Transcriptional and structural changes in particular with horizontal LIV, together with the strong frequency dependency of the signal, emphasize the importance of intracellular cytoskeletal configuration in sensing and responding to high-frequency mechanical signals at low intensities.

  6. Cytoskeletal Configuration Modulates Mechanically Induced Changes in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis, Morphology, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Uzer, Gunes; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) responding to mechanical cues generated by physical activity is critical for skeletal development and remodeling. Here, we utilized low intensity vibrations (LIV) as a physiologically relevant mechanical signal and hypothesized that the confined cytoskeletal configuration imposed by 2D culture will enable human bone marrow MSCs (hBMSC) to respond more robustly when LIV is applied in-plane (horizontal-LIV) rather than out-of-plane (vertical-LIV). All LIV signals enhanced hBMSC proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and upregulated genes associated with cytoskeletal structure. The cellular response was more pronounced at higher frequencies (100 Hz vs 30 Hz) and when applied in the horizontal plane. Horizontal but not vertical LIV realigned the cell cytoskeleton, culminating in increased cell stiffness. Our results show that applying very small oscillatory motions within the primary cell attachment plane, rather than perpendicular to it, amplifies the cell’s response to LIV, ostensibly facilitating a more effective transfer of intracellular forces. Transcriptional and structural changes in particular with horizontal LIV, together with the strong frequency dependency of the signal, emphasize the importance of intracellular cytoskeletal configuration in sensing and responding to high-frequency mechanical signals at low intensities. PMID:27708389

  7. Regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by redox signaling and oxidative stress: implications for neuronal development and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carlos; González-Billault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A proper balance between chemical reduction and oxidation (known as redox balance) is essential for normal cellular physiology. Deregulation in the production of oxidative species leads to DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and aberrant post-translational modification of proteins, which in most cases induces injury, cell death and disease. However, physiological concentrations of oxidative species are necessary to support important cell functions, such as chemotaxis, hormone synthesis, immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, Ca2+ homeostasis and others. Recent evidence suggests that redox balance regulates actin and microtubule dynamics in both physiological and pathological contexts. Microtubules and actin microfilaments contain certain amino acid residues that are susceptible to oxidation, which reduces the ability of microtubules to polymerize and causes severing of actin microfilaments in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In contrast, inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; e.g., due to NOXs) leads to aberrant actin polymerization, decreases neurite outgrowth and affects the normal development and polarization of neurons. In this review, we summarize emerging evidence suggesting that both general and specific enzymatic sources of redox species exert diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics. Considering the intimate relationship between cytoskeletal dynamics and trafficking, we also discuss the potential effects of redox balance on intracellular transport via regulation of the components of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton as well as cytoskeleton-associated proteins, which may directly impact localization of proteins and vesicles across the soma, dendrites and axon of neurons. PMID:26483635

  8. Articulins and epiplasmins: two distinct classes of cytoskeletal proteins of the membrane skeleton in protists.

    PubMed

    Huttenlauch, I; Peck, R K; Stick, R

    1998-11-01

    The cortex of ciliates, dinoflagellates and euglenoids comprises a unique structure called the epiplasm, implicated in pattern-forming processes of the cell cortex and in maintaining cell shape. Despite significant variation in the structural organization of their epiplasm and cortex, a novel type of cytoskeletal protein named articulin is the principal constituent of the epiplasm in the euglenoid Euglena and the ciliate Pseudomicrothorax. For another ciliate, Paramecium, epiplasmins, a group of polypeptides with common biochemical properties, are the major constituents of the epiplasm. Using molecular tools and affinity purification we have selected polyclonal antibodies and identified epitopes of monoclonal antibodies that identify epitopes characteristic of articulins and epiplasmins. With these antibodies we have analysed the occurrence of the two types of cytoskeletal proteins in a dinoflagellate, a euglenoid and several ciliates. Our results indicate that both articulins and epiplasmins are present in these organisms, suggesting that both contribute to the organization of the membrane skeleton in protists. Articulins and epiplasmins represent two distinct classes of cytoskeletal proteins, since different polypeptides were labeled by articulin core domain-specific or epiplasmin epitope-specific antibodies in each organism studied. In one case, a polypeptide in Pseudomicrothorax was identified that reacts with both articulin core domain-specific and with anti-epiplasmin monoclonal antibodies; however, the epiplasmin monoclonal antibody epitope was mapped to the C terminus of the polypeptide, well outside the central VPV-repeat core domain that contains the articulin monoclonal antibody epitope and that is the hallmark of the articulins.

  9. Cytoskeletal-assisted dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Capaldi, Roderick A.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2002-01-01

    Subcellular organelle dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, and lead to complex multiexponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Here we report spatio-temporal measurements of the fluctuations of the mitochondrial reticulum in osteosarcoma cells by using Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy, over time and distance scales of 10−2 to 103 s and 0.5–2.5 μm. We show that the method allows a more complete description of mitochondrial dynamics, through the time- and length-scale-dependent collective diffusion coefficient D(k,τ), than available by other means. Addition of either nocodazole to disrupt microtubules or cytochalasin D to disassemble microfilaments simplifies the intermediate scattering function. When both drugs are used, the reticulum morphology of mitochondria is retained even though the cytoskeletal elements have been de-polymerized. The dynamics of the organelle are then primarily diffusive and can be modeled as a collection of friction points interconnected by elastic springs. This study quantitatively characterizes organelle dynamics in terms of collective cytoskeletal interactions in living cells. PMID:12417764

  10. Magnetic phagosome motion in J774A.1 macrophages: influence of cytoskeletal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Möller, W; Nemoto, I; Matsuzaki, T; Hofer, T; Heyder, J

    2000-01-01

    The role of the different cytoskeletal structures like microfilaments (MF), microtubuli (MT), and intermediate filaments (IF) in phagosome motion is unclear. These cytoskeletal units play an important role in macrophage function (migration, phagocytosis, phagosome transport). We investigated ferromagnetic phagosome motions by cell magnetometry. J774A.1 macrophages were incubated with 1.3-microm spherical magnetite particles for 24 h, after which more than 90% of the particles had been phagocytized. Phagosome motions can be caused either by the cell itself (relaxation) or by applying magnetic twisting forces, yielding cell stiffness and viscoelastic properties of the cytoskeleton. Apparent viscosity of the cytoplasm was non-Newtonian and showed a shear-rate-dependent power law behavior. Elastically stored energy does not force the magnetic phagosomes back to their initial orientation: 57% of the twisting shear was not recoverable. Cytoskeletal drugs, like Cytochalasin D (CyD, 2 - 4 microM), Colchicine (CoL, 10 microM), or Acrylamide (AcL, 40 mM) were added in order to disturb the different cytoskeletal structures. AcL disintegrates IF, but affected neither stochastic (relaxation) nor directed phagosome motions. CyD disrupts MF, resulting in a retarded stochastic phagosome motion (relative decay 0.53 +/- 0.01 after 5 min versus 0.34 +/- 0.01 in control), whereas phagosome twisting shows only a small response with a 9% increase of stiffness and a small reduction of recoverable strain. CoL depolymerizes the MT, inducing a moderately accelerated relaxation (relative decay 0.28 +/- 0.01 after 5 min) and a 10% increase of cell stiffness, where the pure viscous shear is increased and the viscoelastic recoil is inhibited by 40%. Combining the two drugs conserves both effects. After disintegrating either MF or MT, phagosome motion and cytoskeletal stiffness reflect the behavior of either MT or MF, respectively. The results verify that the dominant phagosome transport

  11. Magnetic phagosome motion in J774A.1 macrophages: influence of cytoskeletal drugs.

    PubMed

    Möller, W; Nemoto, I; Matsuzaki, T; Hofer, T; Heyder, J

    2000-08-01

    The role of the different cytoskeletal structures like microfilaments (MF), microtubuli (MT), and intermediate filaments (IF) in phagosome motion is unclear. These cytoskeletal units play an important role in macrophage function (migration, phagocytosis, phagosome transport). We investigated ferromagnetic phagosome motions by cell magnetometry. J774A.1 macrophages were incubated with 1.3-microm spherical magnetite particles for 24 h, after which more than 90% of the particles had been phagocytized. Phagosome motions can be caused either by the cell itself (relaxation) or by applying magnetic twisting forces, yielding cell stiffness and viscoelastic properties of the cytoskeleton. Apparent viscosity of the cytoplasm was non-Newtonian and showed a shear-rate-dependent power law behavior. Elastically stored energy does not force the magnetic phagosomes back to their initial orientation: 57% of the twisting shear was not recoverable. Cytoskeletal drugs, like Cytochalasin D (CyD, 2 - 4 microM), Colchicine (CoL, 10 microM), or Acrylamide (AcL, 40 mM) were added in order to disturb the different cytoskeletal structures. AcL disintegrates IF, but affected neither stochastic (relaxation) nor directed phagosome motions. CyD disrupts MF, resulting in a retarded stochastic phagosome motion (relative decay 0.53 +/- 0.01 after 5 min versus 0.34 +/- 0.01 in control), whereas phagosome twisting shows only a small response with a 9% increase of stiffness and a small reduction of recoverable strain. CoL depolymerizes the MT, inducing a moderately accelerated relaxation (relative decay 0.28 +/- 0.01 after 5 min) and a 10% increase of cell stiffness, where the pure viscous shear is increased and the viscoelastic recoil is inhibited by 40%. Combining the two drugs conserves both effects. After disintegrating either MF or MT, phagosome motion and cytoskeletal stiffness reflect the behavior of either MT or MF, respectively. The results verify that the dominant phagosome transport

  12. Down-regulation of Slit-Robo pathway mediating neuronal cytoskeletal remodeling processes facilitates the antidepressive-like activity of Gastrodia elata Blume.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hang; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Pei-Ju; Hsieh, Shu-Chen; Pan, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Shui-Tein; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-10-29

    Nowadays, depression is a serious psychological disorder that causes extreme economic loss and social problems. Previously, we discovered that the water extract of Gastrodia elata Blume (WGE) improved depressive-like behavior by influencing neurotransmitters in rats subjected to the forced swimming test. To elucidate possible mechanisms, in the present study, we performed a proteomics and bioinformatics analysis to identify the related pathways. Western blot-validated results indicated that the core protein network modulated by WGE administration was closely associated with down-regulation of the Slit-Robo pathway, which modulates neuronal cytoskeletal remodeling processes. Although Slit-Robo signaling has been well investigated in neuronal development, its relationship with depression is not fully understood. We provide a potential hint on the mechanism responsible for the antidepressive-like activity of WGE. In conclusion, we suggest that the Slit-Robo pathway and neuronal cytoskeleton remodeling are possibly one of the pathways associated with the antidepressive-like effects of WGE.

  13. Coupled biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. M.; Zhang, Tao

    2015-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton provides the cell with structural integrity and allows it to change shape to crawl along a surface, for example. The actin cytoskeleton can be modeled as a semiflexible biopolymer network that modifies its morphology in response to both external and internal stimuli. Just inside the inner nuclear membrane of a cell exists a network of filamentous lamin that presumably protects the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. Lamins are intermediate filaments that can also be modeled as semiflexible biopolymers. It turns out that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins that bridge the outer and inner nuclear membranes. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the cytoskeletal network. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription, since DNA--yet another semiflexible polymer--contains lamin-binding domains, and, thus, widen the field of epigenetics.

  14. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina; Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  15. Induction of Plant Curvature by Magnetophoresis and Cytoskeletal Changes during Root Graviresponse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Blancaflor, Eilson B.

    1996-01-01

    High gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) induce curvature in roots and shoots. It is considered that this response is likely to be based on the intracellular displacement of bulk starch (amyloplasts) by the ponderomotive force generated by the HGMF. This process is called magnetophoresis. The differential elongation during the curvature along the concave and convex flanks of growing organs may be linked to the microtubular and/or microfilament cytoskeleton. The possible existence of an effect of the HGMF on the cytoskeleton was tested for, but none was found. The application of cytoskeletal stabilizers or depolymerizers showed that neither microtubules, nor microfilaments, are involved in the graviresponse.

  16. Labial Salivary Glands in Infants: Histochemical Analysis of Cytoskeletal and Antimicrobial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Loeffelbein, Denys J; Olzowy, Bernhard; Schmitz, Christoph; Koerdt, Steffen; Kesting, Marco R

    2016-08-01

    Human labial glands secrete mucous and serous substances for maintaining oral health. The normal microbial flora of the oral cavity is regulated by the acquired and innate immune systems. The localization and distribution of proteins of the innate immune system were investigated in serous acinar cells and the ductal system by the method of immunohistochemistry. Numerous antimicrobial proteins could be detected in the labial glands: β-defensin-1, -2, -3; lysozyme; lactoferrin; and cathelicidin. Cytoskeletal components such as actin, myosin II, cytokeratins 7 and 19, α- and β-tubulin were predominantly observed in apical cell regions and may be involved in secretory activities. PMID:27439958

  17. Effects of cytoskeletal disruption on transport, structure, and rheology within mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Weihs, Daphne; Mason, Thomas G.; Teitell, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Quantification of cellular responses to stimuli is challenging. Cells respond to changing external conditions through internal structural and compositional and functional modifications, thereby altering their transport and mechanical properties. By properly interpreting particle-tracking microrheology, we evaluate the response of live cells to cytoskeletal disruption mediated by the drug nocodazole. Prior to administering the drug, the particles exhibit an apparently diffusive behavior that is actually a combination of temporally heterogeneous ballistic and caged motion. Selectively depolymerizing microtubules with the drug causes actively crawling cells to halt, providing a means for assessing drug efficacy, and making the caged motion of the probes readily apparent. PMID:19816550

  18. Active contraction of microtubule networks

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Peter J; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael J; Needleman, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by cytoskeletal assemblies. It remains unclear how cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins organize into cellular scale structures and how molecular properties of cytoskeletal components affect the large-scale behaviors of these systems. Here, we investigate the self-organization of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts and find that they can form macroscopic networks that spontaneously contract. We propose that these contractions are driven by the clustering of microtubule minus ends by dynein. Based on this idea, we construct an active fluid theory of network contractions, which predicts a dependence of the timescale of contraction on initial network geometry, a development of density inhomogeneities during contraction, a constant final network density, and a strong influence of dynein inhibition on the rate of contraction, all in quantitative agreement with experiments. These results demonstrate that the motor-driven clustering of filament ends is a generic mechanism leading to contraction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10837.001 PMID:26701905

  19. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Vinton G.

    1991-01-01

    The demands placed on the networks transporting the information and knowledge generated by the increased diversity and sophistication of computational machinery are described. What is needed to support this increased flow, the structures already in place, and what must be built are topics of discussion. (KR)

  20. The cytoskeletal protein α-catenin unfurls upon binding to vinculin.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Izard, Tina

    2012-05-25

    Adherens junctions (AJs) are essential for cell-cell contacts, morphogenesis, and the development of all higher eukaryotes. AJs are formed by calcium-dependent homotypic interactions of the ectodomains of single membrane-pass cadherin family receptors. These homotypic interactions in turn promote binding of the intracellular cytoplasmic tail domains of cadherin receptors with β-catenin, a multifunctional protein that plays roles in both transcription and AJs. The cadherin receptor-β-catenin complex binds to the cytoskeletal protein α-catenin, which is essential for both the formation and the stabilization of these junctions. Precisely how α-catenin contributes to the formation and stabilization of AJs is hotly debated, although the latter is thought to involve its interactions with the cytoskeletal protein vinculin. Here we report the crystal structure of the vinculin binding domain (VBD) of α-catenin in complex with the vinculin head domain (Vh1). This structure reveals that α-catenin is in a unique unfurled mode allowing dimer formation when bound to vinculin. Finally, binding studies suggest that vinculin must be in an activated state to bind to α-catenin and that this interaction is stabilized by the formation of a ternary α-catenin-vinculin-F-actin complex, which can be formed via the F-actin binding domain of either protein. We propose a feed-forward model whereby α-catenin-vinculin interactions promote their binding to the actin cytoskeleton to stabilize AJs. PMID:22493458

  1. Gold nanoparticles induce apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum stress events and cleavage of cytoskeletal proteins in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Noël, Claudie; Simard, Jean-Christophe; Girard, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are promising candidates for developing nanomedicines, for the treatment of different disorders, including inflammatory diseases. However, how AuNPs could alter the biology of human neutrophils, key player cells in inflammation, is a poorly documented area of research. Here we found that, although AuNP of 20 nm (AuNP20) could be internalized in cytosolic vacuoles but that AuNP70 were localized at the cell membrane, both induced apoptosis similarly by a caspase-dependent mechanism. AuNPs induced degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins vimentin, lamin B1 and gelsolin, but, unexpectedly, did not increase their cell surface expression. Consequent with caspase-4 processing, AuNPs were found to activate endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress, as evidenced by activation of the three ER sensors, IRE1 (inositol-requiring protein-1), ATF-6 (activating transcription factor-6) and PERK (protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase). AuNPs are novel human neutrophil proapoptotic agents indicating that they are toxic to these cells. However, the fact that they do not induce cell surface expression of cytoskeletal proteins could decrease potential adverse effects and toxicity of AuNPs by limiting, for example, the production of autoantibody against cytoskeleton components.

  2. Phosphatidic acid regulation of PIPKI is critical for actin cytoskeletal reorganization.

    PubMed

    Roach, Akua N; Wang, Ziqing; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Feng; Chan, Robin B; Yonekubo, Yoshiya; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Du, Guangwei

    2012-12-01

    Type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIPKI) is the main enzyme generating the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], which has critical functions in many cellular processes, such as cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, and signal transduction. All three members of the PIPKI family are activated by phosphatidic acid (PA). However, how PA regulates the activity and functions of PIPKI have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify a PA-binding site on PIPKIγ. Mutation of this site inhibited the PA-stimulated activity and membrane localization of PIPKIγ as well as the formation of actin comets and foci induced by PIPKIγ. We also demonstrate that phospholipase D (PLD) generates a pool of PA involved in PIPKIγ regulation by showing that PLD inhibitors blocked the membrane localization of PIPKIγ and its ability to induce actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Targeting the PIPKIγ PA-binding-deficient mutant to membranes by a membrane localization sequence failed to restore the actin reorganization activity of PIPKIγ, suggesting that PA binding is not only involved in recruiting PIPKIγ to membranes but also may induce a conformational change. Taken together, these results reveal a new molecular mechanism through which PA regulates PIPKI and provides direct evidence that PA is important for the localization and functions of PIPKI in intact cells. PMID:22991193

  3. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR–derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra. PMID:26665178

  4. [Effect of sodium nitrite on phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and spatial learning and memory in rats].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Hong; Fan, Ling-Ling; Hu, Yong-Mei

    2015-10-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the effect of sodium nitrite on cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation and spatial learning and memory in rats. Rats were served with drinking water containing sodium nitrite (100 mg/kg) for 60 days, then, the ability of spatial learning and memory of the rats was measured by Morris water maze. Phosphorylation level of tau and neurofilament, and the expression of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit in the hippocampus were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In comparison with the rats served with normal tap water, the rats served with sodium nitrite water showed significantly longer latency to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze (P < 0.05), elevated phosphorylation level of tau and neurofilament, and decreased expression of PP2A catalytic subunit (P < 0.05). These results indicated that administration of sodium nitrite could impair the spatial learning and memory of the rats, and the hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and the down-regulation of PP2A might be underlying mechanisms for the impairment.

  5. Nuclear actin modulates cell motility via transcriptional regulation of adhesive and cytoskeletal genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharili, Amir S.; Kenny, Fiona N.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Connelly, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a classic biomechanical mediator of cell migration. While it is known that actin also shuttles in and out of the nucleus, its functions within this compartment remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how nuclear actin regulates keratinocyte gene expression and cell behavior. Gene expression profiling of normal HaCaT keratinocytes compared to HaCaTs over-expressing wild-type β-actin or β-actin tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-actin), identified multiple adhesive and cytoskeletal genes, such as MYL9, ITGB1, and VCL, which were significantly down-regulated in keratinocytes with high levels of nuclear actin. In addition, genes associated with transcriptional regulation and apoptosis were up-regulated in cells over expressing NLS-actin. Functionally, accumulation of actin in the nucleus altered cytoskeletal and focal adhesion organization and inhibited cell motility. Exclusion of endogenous actin from the nucleus by knocking down Importin 9 reversed this phenotype and enhanced cell migration. Based on these findings, we conclude that the level of actin in the nucleus is a transcriptional regulator for tuning keratinocyte migration. PMID:27650314

  6. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  7. Nuclear actin modulates cell motility via transcriptional regulation of adhesive and cytoskeletal genes.

    PubMed

    Sharili, Amir S; Kenny, Fiona N; Vartiainen, Maria K; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a classic biomechanical mediator of cell migration. While it is known that actin also shuttles in and out of the nucleus, its functions within this compartment remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how nuclear actin regulates keratinocyte gene expression and cell behavior. Gene expression profiling of normal HaCaT keratinocytes compared to HaCaTs over-expressing wild-type β-actin or β-actin tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-actin), identified multiple adhesive and cytoskeletal genes, such as MYL9, ITGB1, and VCL, which were significantly down-regulated in keratinocytes with high levels of nuclear actin. In addition, genes associated with transcriptional regulation and apoptosis were up-regulated in cells over expressing NLS-actin. Functionally, accumulation of actin in the nucleus altered cytoskeletal and focal adhesion organization and inhibited cell motility. Exclusion of endogenous actin from the nucleus by knocking down Importin 9 reversed this phenotype and enhanced cell migration. Based on these findings, we conclude that the level of actin in the nucleus is a transcriptional regulator for tuning keratinocyte migration. PMID:27650314

  8. Cytoskeletal proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Roberto; Farace, Cristiano; Tolu, Paola; Solinas, Giuliana; Asara, Yolande; Sotgiu, Maria Alessandra; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Prados, Jose Carlos; Sotgiu, Stefano; Montella, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The axonal cytoskeleton is a finely organized system, essential for maintaining the integrity of the axon. Axonal degeneration is implicated in the pathogenesis of unremitting disability of multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose of this study is to evaluate levels of cytoskeletal proteins such as neurofilament light protein (NFL), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and β-tubulin (β-Tub) isoforms II and III in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and their correlation with MS clinical indices. CSF levels of cytoskeletal proteins were determined in 51 patients: 33 with MS and 18 with other neurological diseases (OND). NFL, GFAP and β-Tub II proteins were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in MS than in OND group; no significant difference (p > 0.05) was found between MS and OND with regard to β-Tub III. Interestingly, levels of β-Tub III and NFL were higher in progressive than in remitting MS forms; on the contrary, higher levels of β-Tub II and GFAP were found in remitting MS forms. However, with the exception of β-Tub III, all proteins tend to decrease their CSF levels concomitantly with the increasing disability (EDSS) score. Overall, our results might indicate β-Tub II as a potential candidate for diagnostic and β-Tub III as a possible prognostic biomarker of MS. Therefore, further analyses are legitimated and desirable. PMID:22362332

  9. Intermediate filament-like proteins in bacteria and a cytoskeletal function in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Sonchita; Tomenius, Henrik; Belova, Lyubov M; Ausmees, Nora

    2008-01-01

    Actin and tubulin cytoskeletons are conserved and widespread in bacteria. A strikingly intermediate filament (IF)-like cytoskeleton, composed of crescentin, is also present in Caulobacter crescentus and determines its specific cell shape. However, the broader significance of this finding remained obscure, because crescentin appeared to be unique to Caulobacter. Here we demonstrate that IF-like function is probably a more widespread phenomenon in bacteria. First, we show that 21 genomes of 26 phylogenetically diverse species encoded uncharacterized proteins with a central segmented coiled coil rod domain, which we regarded as a key structural feature of IF proteins and crescentin. Experimental studies of three in silico predicted candidates from Mycobacterium and other actinomycetes revealed a common IF-like property to spontaneously assemble into filaments in vitro. Furthermore, the IF-like protein FilP formed cytoskeletal structures in the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor and was needed for normal growth and morphogenesis. Atomic force microscopy of living cells revealed that the FilP cytoskeleton contributed to mechanical fitness of the hyphae, thus closely resembling the function of metazoan IF. Together, the bioinformatic and experimental data suggest that an IF-like protein architecture is a versatile design that is generally present in bacteria and utilized to perform diverse cytoskeletal tasks. PMID:18976278

  10. The Effect of Ultrasound Stimulation on the Cytoskeletal Organization of Chondrocytes Seeded In 3D Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra; Hasanova, Gulnara; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    The impact of low intensity diffuse ultrasound (LIDUS) stimulation on the cytoskeletal organization of chondrocytes seeded in 3D scaffolds was evaluated. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D chitosan matrices were exposed to LIDUS at 5.0 MHz (~15kPa, 51-secs, 4-applications/day) in order to study the organization of actin, tubulin and vimentin. The results showed that actin presented a cytosolic punctuated distribution, tubulin presented a quasi parallel organization of microtubules whereas vimentin distribution was unaffected. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D scaffolds responded to US stimulation by the disruption of actin stress fibers and were sensitive to the presence of ROCK inhibitor (Y27632). The gene expression of ROCK-I, a key element in the formation of stress fibers and mDia1, was significantly up-regulated under the application of US. We conclude that the results of both the cytoskeletal analyses and gene expression support the argument that the presence of punctuated actin upon US stimulation was accompanied by the up-regulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:22987069

  11. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  12. Mechanical force mobilizes zyxin from focal adhesions to actin filaments and regulates cytoskeletal reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Yoshigi, Masaaki; Hoffman, Laura M; Jensen, Christopher C; Yost, H Joseph; Beckerle, Mary C

    2005-10-24

    Organs and tissues adapt to acute or chronic mechanical stress by remodeling their actin cytoskeletons. Cells that are stimulated by cyclic stretch or shear stress in vitro undergo bimodal cytoskeletal responses that include rapid reinforcement and gradual reorientation of actin stress fibers; however, the mechanism by which cells respond to mechanical cues has been obscure. We report that the application of either unidirectional cyclic stretch or shear stress to cells results in robust mobilization of zyxin from focal adhesions to actin filaments, whereas many other focal adhesion proteins and zyxin family members remain at focal adhesions. Mechanical stress also induces the rapid zyxin-dependent mobilization of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein from focal adhesions to actin filaments. Thickening of actin stress fibers reflects a cellular adaptation to mechanical stress; this cytoskeletal reinforcement coincides with zyxin mobilization and is abrogated in zyxin-null cells. Our findings identify zyxin as a mechanosensitive protein and provide mechanistic insight into how cells respond to mechanical cues. PMID:16247023

  13. Differential impact of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions involved in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is involved in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an impact on some neuronal proteins involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.

  14. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  15. Network crosstalk dynamically changes during neutrophil polarization.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chin-Jen; Wang, Yanqin; Weiner, Orion D; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F

    2012-05-25

    How complex signaling networks shape highly coordinated, multistep cellular responses is poorly understood. Here, we made use of a network-perturbation approach to investigate causal influences, or "crosstalk," among signaling modules involved in the cytoskeletal response of neutrophils to chemoattractant. We quantified the intensity and polarity of cytoskeletal marker proteins over time to characterize stereotyped cellular responses. Analyzing the effects of network disruptions revealed that, not only does crosstalk evolve rapidly during polarization, but also that intensity and polarity responses are influenced by different patterns of crosstalk. Interestingly, persistent crosstalk is arranged in a surprisingly simple circuit: a linear cascade from front to back to microtubules influences intensities, and a feed-forward network in the reverse direction influences polarity. Our approach provided a rational strategy for decomposing a complex, dynamically evolving signaling system and revealed evolving paths of causal influence that shape the neutrophil polarization response.

  16. Formation of actin networks in microfluidic concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikova, Natalja; Herren, Florian; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Pfohl, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The physical properties of cytoskeletal networks are contributors in a number of mechanical responses of cells including cellular deformation and locomotion, and are crucial for the proper action of living cells. Local chemical gradients modulate cytoskeletal functionality including the interactions of the cytoskeleton with other cellular components. Actin is a major constituent of the cytoskeleton. Introducing a microfluidic-based platform, we explored the impact of concentration gradients on the formation and structural properties of actin networks. Microfluidics-controlled flow-free steady state experimental conditions allow for the generation of chemical gradients of different profiles, such as linear or step-like. We discovered specific features of actin networks emerging in defined gradients. In particular, we analyzed the effects of spatial conditions on network properties, bending rigidities of network links, and the network elasticity.

  17. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption.

    PubMed

    Master, Alyssa M; Williams, Philise N; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M; Golovin, Yuri I; Riffle, Judy S; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact. PMID:27644858

  18. Effect of lead on cytoskeletal protein stability in crucian carp Carassius auratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia; Zhang, Dongyi; Chu, Wuying; Liu, Fang; Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Ruixue; Meng, Tao; Zhang, Jianshe

    2008-11-01

    Inorganic lead (Pb) is one of the most common environmental pollutants. Much evidence indicates that Pb exposure could directly affect fish growth and development. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of Pb on cytoskeletal protein stability at both protein and mRNA level in crucian carp Carassius auratus. Pb(NO3)2 treatment in concentration of 100 μmol/L resulted in decreased expression of both α- and β-tubulin but γ-tubulin as assayed with SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA. In vivo and in vitro analyses on protein expression of tubulins are consistent. The effect of Pb on mRNA expression varied among different tissues. Our results suggest that cytotoxicity of Pb at protein translation level is stronger than at mRNA expression level.

  19. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  20. Cytoskeletal Regulation of Inflammation and Its Impact on Skin Blistering Disease Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita.

    PubMed

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Ludwig, Ralf J; Cowin, Allison J

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation that leads to a host of diseases including autoimmune inflammation mediated epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). This review describes the role of the actin cytoskeleton and in particular the actin remodelling protein called Flightless I (Flii) in regulating cellular inflammatory responses and its subsequent effect on the autoimmune skin blistering disease EBA. It also outlines the potential of an antibody based therapy for decreasing Flii expression in vivo to ameliorate the symptoms associated with EBA. PMID:27420054

  1. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Master, Alyssa M.; Williams, Philise N.; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M.; Golovin, Yuri I.; Riffle, Judy S.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact. PMID:27644858

  2. Cytoskeletal Regulation of Inflammation and Its Impact on Skin Blistering Disease Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Ludwig, Ralf J.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation that leads to a host of diseases including autoimmune inflammation mediated epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). This review describes the role of the actin cytoskeleton and in particular the actin remodelling protein called Flightless I (Flii) in regulating cellular inflammatory responses and its subsequent effect on the autoimmune skin blistering disease EBA. It also outlines the potential of an antibody based therapy for decreasing Flii expression in vivo to ameliorate the symptoms associated with EBA. PMID:27420054

  3. Actomyosin-dependent dynamic spatial patterns of cytoskeletal components drive mesoscale podosome organization

    PubMed Central

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Pandzic, Elvis; Slotman, Johan A.; Guillet, Dominique; Joosten, Ben; Mennens, Svenja; Paardekooper, Laurent M.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van den Dries, Koen; Wiseman, Paul W.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Podosomes are cytoskeletal structures crucial for cell protrusion and matrix remodelling in osteoclasts, activated endothelial cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. In these cells, hundreds of podosomes are spatially organized in diversely shaped clusters. Although we and others established individual podosomes as micron-sized mechanosensing protrusive units, the exact scope and spatiotemporal organization of podosome clustering remain elusive. By integrating a newly developed extension of Spatiotemporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy with novel image analysis, we demonstrate that F-actin, vinculin and talin exhibit directional and correlated flow patterns throughout podosome clusters. Pattern formation and magnitude depend on the cluster actomyosin machinery. Indeed, nanoscopy reveals myosin IIA-decorated actin filaments interconnecting multiple proximal podosomes. Extending well-beyond podosome nearest neighbours, the actomyosin-dependent dynamic spatial patterns reveal a previously unappreciated mesoscale connectivity throughout the podosome clusters. This directional transport and continuous redistribution of podosome components provides a mechanistic explanation of how podosome clusters function as coordinated mechanosensory area. PMID:27721497

  4. Cytoskeletal components of Beta vulgaris root hairs in altered gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G. V.

    Root hairs of Beta vulgaris are protrusions from rhizodermal cells and are characterised by plagiotropic growth. The roles of the cytoskeleton and of gravity in this growth process are being studied with the help of a clinostat. Through the use of immunocytochemical and fluorescent staining methods which reveal microtubules (MTs) and microfilaments (MFs), it was found that these cytoskeletal components of the root hairs of 4-day-old seedlings of B. vulgaris were affected by clinorotation at 2 r.p.m. In control conditions, MTs were found to be distributed evenly throughout the root hair, and an intense fluorescence due to MFs was observed at the tip of the hairs. With clinorotation, however, MTs became distributed at random, though no redistribution of MFs was observed. The latter finding conforms to the idea that MFs are responsible for tip growth. That MTs are more sensitive to altered gravity conditions is presently being tested.

  5. Protist tubulins: new arrivals, evolutionary relationships and insights to cytoskeletal function.

    PubMed

    Gull, K

    2001-08-01

    The protists exhibit probably the most extravagant expression of microtubule-containing structures found in any organism. These structures--flagella, cilia, axostyles, spindles and a veritable constellation of microtubule bundles and cortical arrays--provide shape, form, motility, anchorage and apparatuses for feeding. The cytoskeletal structures have a precise order (i.e. size, position and number) that must be replicated and segregated with fidelity at each division, some components being inherited conservatively and others semi-conservatively. Intriguingly, it is now apparent that much of the high-order organisation, which was recognised and described by light and electron microscopy during the last century, is a reflection of molecular polarities set by assembly of constituent proteins. Tubulins and microtubules lie at the heart of this morphogenetic pattern.

  6. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth and alteration of cytoskeletal gene expression by sodium arsenite.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw Htet; Kurihara, Ryohei; Nakashima, Shizuka; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Nohara, Keiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic compounds that are often found in drinking water increase the risk of developmental brain disorders. In this study, we performed live imaging analyses of Neuro-2a cells expressing SCAT3, a caspase-3 cleavage peptide sequence linking two fluorescent proteins; enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) and Venus, to determine whether sodium arsenite (NaAsO(2); 0, 1, 5, or 10 μM) affects both neurite outgrowth and/or induces apoptosis with the same doses and in the same cell cultures. We observed that the area ratio of neurite to cell body in SCAT3-expressing cells was significantly reduced by 5 and 10 μM NaAsO(2), but not by 1 μM, although the emission ratio of ECFP to Venus, an endpoint of caspase-3 activity, was not changed. However, cytological assay using apoptotic and necrotic markers resulted in that apoptosis, but not necrosis, was significantly induced in Neuro-2a cells when NaAsO(2) exposure continued after the significant effects of NaAsO(2) on neurite outgrowth were found by live imaging. These results suggested that neurite outgrowth was suppressed by NaAsO(2) prior to NaAsO(2)-induced apoptosis. Next, we examined the effects of NaAsO(2) on cytoskeletal gene expression in Neuro-2a cells. NaAsO(2) increased the mRNA levels of the light and medium subunits of neurofilament and decreased the mRNA levels of tau and tubulin in a dose-dependent manner; no significant effect was found in the mRNA levels of the heavy subunit of neurofilament, microtubule-associated protein 2, or actin. The changes in cytoskeletal gene expression are likely responsible for the inhibitory effects of NaAsO(2) on neurite outgrowth.

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on expression of genes encoding cytoskeletal elements: Kinetics and dose effects

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Chang-Liu, C.M. )

    1990-01-01

    We examined the modulation in expression of genes encoding three cytoskeletal elements (beta-actin, gamma-actin, and alpha-tubulin) in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells following exposure to ionizing radiations. Early-passage SHE cells were irradiated in plateau phase with various low doses (12-200 cGy) of neutrons, gamma-rays, or x-rays. RNA samples were prepared from cells at different times postexposure and were analyzed for levels of specific transcripts by northern blots. The results revealed that alpha-tubulin was induced by both high-linear energy of transfer (LET) (neutrons) and low-LET (gamma-rays and x-rays) radiations with similar kinetics. The peak in alpha-tubulin mRNA accumulation occurred between 1 and 3 h postexposure; for gamma-actin mRNA, accumulation was similarly induced. For both gamma-actin and alpha-tubulin, the higher the dose during the first hour postexposure (up to 200 cGy gamma-rays), the greater the level of mRNA induction. In contrast, mRNA specific for beta-actin showed decreased accumulation during the first hour following radiation exposure, and remained low up to 3 h postexposure. These results document the differential modulation of genes specific for cytoskeletal elements following radiation exposure. In addition, they demonstrate a decrease in the ratio of beta-actin:gamma-actin mRNA within the first 3 h following gamma-ray exposure. These changes in mRNA accumulation are similar to those reported in some transformed cell lines and in cells treated with tumor promoters, which suggests a role for changes in actin- and tubulin-mRNA expression in radiation-mediated transformation.

  8. Multiple forms of tubulin in the cytoskeletal and flagellar microtubules of polytomella

    PubMed Central

    McKeithan, TW; Rosenbaum, JL

    1981-01-01

    The alga polytomella contains several organelles composed of microtubules, including four flagella and hundreds of cytoskeletal microtubules. Brown and co-workers have shown (1976. J. Cell Biol. 69:6-125; 1978, Exp. Cell Res. 117: 313-324) that the flagella could be removed and the cytoskeletans dissociated, and that both structures could partially regenerate in the absence of protein synthesis. Because of this, and because both the flagella and the cytoskeletons can be isolated intact, this organism is particularly suitable for studying tubulin heterogeneity and the incorporation of specific tubulins into different microtubule-containing organelles in the same cell. In order to define the different species of tubulin in polytonella cytoplasm, a (35)S- labeled cytoplasmic fraction was subjected to two cycles of assembly and disassembly in the presence of unlabeled brain tubulin. Comparison of the labeled polytomella cytoplasmic tubulin obtained by this procedure with the tubulin of isolated polytomella flagella by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that, whereas the β-tubulin from both cytoplasmic and flagellar tubulin samples comigrated, the two α-tubulins had distinctly different isoelectic points. As a second method of isolating tubulin from the cytoplasm, cells were gently lysed with detergent and intact cytoskeletons obtained. When these cytoskeletons were exposed to cold temperature, the proteins that were released were found to be highly enriched in tubulin; this tubulin, by itself, could be assembled into microtubules in vitro. The predominant α-tubulin of this in vitro- assembled cytoskeletal tubulin corresponded to the major cytoplasmic α-tubulin obtained by coassembly of labeled polytomella cytoplasmic extract with brain tubulin and was quite distinct from the α-tubulin of purified flagella. These results clearly show that two different microtubule-containing organelles from the same cell are composed of distinct tubulins. PMID:7309786

  9. Why is cytoskeletal contraction required for cardiac fusion before but not after looping begins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunfei; Varner, Victor D.; Taber, Larry A.

    2015-02-01

    Cytoskeletal contraction is crucial to numerous morphogenetic processes, but its role in early heart development is poorly understood. Studies in chick embryos have shown that inhibiting myosin-II-based contraction prior to Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 10 (33 h incubation) impedes fusion of the mesodermal heart fields that create the primitive heart tube (HT), as well as the ensuing process of cardiac looping. If contraction is inhibited at or after looping begins at HH10, however, fusion and looping proceed relatively normally. To explore the mechanisms behind this seemingly fundamental change in behavior, we measured spatiotemporal distributions of tissue stiffness, stress, and strain around the anterior intestinal portal (AIP), the opening to the foregut where contraction and cardiac fusion occur. The results indicate that stiffness and tangential tension decreased bilaterally along the AIP with distance from the embryonic midline. The gradients in stiffness and tension, as well as strain rate, increased to peaks at HH9 (30 h) and decreased afterward. Exposure to the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin reduced these effects, suggesting that they are mainly generated by active cytoskeletal contraction, and finite-element modeling indicates that the measured mechanical gradients are consistent with a relatively uniform contraction of the endodermal layer in conjunction with constraints imposed by the attached mesoderm. Taken together, our results suggest that, before HH10, endodermal contraction pulls the bilateral heart fields toward the midline where they fuse to create the HT. By HH10, however, the fusion process is far enough along to enable apposing cardiac progenitor cells to keep ‘zipping’ together during looping without the need for continued high contractile forces. These findings should shed new light on a perplexing question in early heart development.

  10. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, Rajendra; Kim, Seong-Bin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  11. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  12. Pathways of Ca2+ entry and cytoskeletal damage following eccentric contractions in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao-Ting; Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Gervasio, Othon L.; Reardon, Trent F.; Vale, Molly; Fatkin, Diane; Dietrich, Alexander; Yeung, Ella W.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles that are stretched during contraction (eccentric contractions) show deficits in force production and a variety of structural changes, including loss of antibody staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Extracellular Ca2+ entry and activation of calpains have been proposed as mechanisms involved in these changes. The present study used isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles subjected to 10 eccentric contractions and monitored force production, immunostaining of cytoskeletal proteins, and resting stiffness. Possible pathways for Ca2+ entry were tested with streptomycin (200 μM), a blocker of stretch-activated channels, and with muscles from mice deficient in the transient receptor potential canonical 1 gene (TRPC1 KO), a candidate gene for stretch-activated channels. At 30 min after the eccentric contractions, the isometric force was decreased to 75 ± 3% of initial control and this force loss was reduced by streptomycin but not in the TRPC1 KO. Desmin, titin, and dystrophin all showed patchy loss of immunostaining 30 min after the eccentric contractions, which was substantially reduced by streptomycin and in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Muscles showed a reduction of resting stiffness following eccentric contractions, and this reduction was eliminated by streptomycin and absent in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Calpain activation was determined by the appearance of a lower molecular weight autolysis product and μ-calpain was activated at 30 min, whereas the muscle-specific calpain-3 was not. To test whether the loss of stiffness was caused by titin cleavage, protein gels were used but no significant titin cleavage was detected. These results suggest that Ca2+ entry following eccentric contractions is through a stretch-activated channel that is blocked by streptomycin and encoded or modulated by TRPC1. PMID:22461447

  13. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    PubMed

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection.

  14. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Samantha F; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Bonin, Sawyer R; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  15. Conditioning nerve crush accelerates cytoskeletal protein transport in sprouts that form after a subsequent crush.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G; Jacob, J M

    1991-03-01

    To examine the relationship between axonal outgrowth and the delivery of cytoskeletal proteins to the growing axon tip, outgrowth was accelerated by using a conditioning nerve crush. Because slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport is the most rapid vehicle for carrying cytoskeletal proteins to the axon tip, the rate of SCb was measured in conditioned vs. sham-conditioned sprouts. In young Sprague-Dawley rats, the conditioning crush was made to sciatic nerve branches at the knee; 14 days later, the test crush was made where the L4 and L5 spinal nerves join to form the sciatic nerve in the flank. Newly synthesized proteins were labeled in motor neurons by injecting 35S-methionine into the lumbar spinal cord 7 days before the test crush. The wave of pulse-labeled SCb proteins reached the crush by the time it was made and subsequently entered sprouts. The nerve was removed and sectioned for SDS-PAGE and fluorography 4-12 days after the crush. Tubulins, neurofilament proteins, and representative "cytomatrix" proteins (actin, calmodulin, and putative microtubule-associated proteins) were removed from gels for liquid scintillation counting. Labeled SCb proteins entered sprouts without first accumulating in parent axon stumps, presumably because sprouts begin to grow within hours after axotomy. The peak of SCb moved 11% faster in conditioned than in sham-conditioned sprouts: 3.0 vs. 2.7 mm/d (p less than 0.05). To confirm that sprouts elongate more rapidly when a test crush is preceded by a conditioning crush, outgrowth distances were measured in a separate group of rats by labeling fast axonal transport with 3H-proline 24 hours before nerve retrieval.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Drosophila comes of age as a model system for understanding the function of cytoskeletal proteins in cells, tissues, and organisms.

    PubMed

    Rodal, Avital A; Del Signore, Steven J; Martin, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    For the last 100 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerhouse genetic system for understanding mechanisms of inheritance, development, and behavior in animals. In recent years, advances in imaging and genetic tools have led to Drosophila becoming one of the most effective systems for unlocking the subcellular functions of proteins (and particularly cytoskeletal proteins) in complex developmental settings. In this review, written for non-Drosophila experts, we will discuss critical technical advances that have enabled these cell biological insights, highlighting three examples of cytoskeletal discoveries that have arisen as a result: (1) regulation of Arp2/3 complex in myoblast fusion, (2) cooperation of the actin filament nucleators Spire and Cappuccino in establishment of oocyte polarity, and (3) coordination of supracellular myosin cables. These specific examples illustrate the unique power of Drosophila both to uncover new cytoskeletal structures and functions, and to place these discoveries in a broader in vivo context, providing insights that would have been impossible in a cell culture model or in vitro. Many of the cellular structures identified in Drosophila have clear counterparts in mammalian cells and tissues, and therefore elucidating cytoskeletal functions in Drosophila will be broadly applicable to other organisms.

  17. Palladin interacts with SH3 domains of SPIN90 and Src and is required for Src-induced cytoskeletal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Rönty, Mikko; Taivainen, Anu; Heiska, Leena; Otey, Carol; Ehler, Elisabeth; Song, Woo Keun; Carpen, Olli

    2007-01-01

    Palladin and SPIN90 are widely expressed proteins, which participate in modulation of actin cytoskeleton by binding to a variety of scaffold and signaling molecules. Cytoskeletal reorganization can induced by activation of signaling pathways, including the PDGF receptor and Src tyrosine kinase pathways. In this study we have analyzed the interplay between palladin, SPIN90 and Src, and characterized the role of palladin and SPIN90 in PDGF and Src-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. We show that the SH3 domains of SPIN90 and Src directly bind palladin’s poly-proline sequence and the interaction controls intracellular targeting of SPIN90. In PDGF-treated cells, palladin and SPIN90 co-localize in actin rich membrane ruffles and lamellipodia. The effect of PDGF on the cytoskeleton is at least partly mediated by the Src kinase, since PP2, a selective Src kinase family inhibitor, blocked PDGF-induced changes. Furthermore, expression of active Src kinase resulted in coordinated translocation of both palladin and SPIN90 to membrane protrusions. Knock-down of endogenous SPIN90 did not inhibit Src-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, whereas knock-down of palladin resulted in cytoskeletal disorganization and inhibition of remodeling. Further studies showed that palladin is tyrosine phosphorylated in cells expressing active Src indicating bidirectional interplay between palladin and Src. These results may have implications in understanding the invasive and metastatic phenotype of neoplastic cells induced by Src. PMID:17537434

  18. Genetic study of interactions between the cytoskeletal assembly protein sla1 and prion-forming domain of the release factor Sup35 (eRF3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, P A; Newnam, G P; Steenbergen, J N; Chernoff, Y O

    1999-01-01

    Striking similarities between cytoskeletal assembly and the "nucleated polymerization" model of prion propagation suggest that similar or overlapping sets of proteins may assist in both processes. We show that the C-terminal domain of the yeast cytoskeletal assembly protein Sla1 (Sla1C) specifically interacts with the N-terminal prion-forming domain (Sup35N) of the yeast release factor Sup35 (eRF3) in the two-hybrid system. Sla1C and several other Sup35N-interacting proteins also exhibit two-hybrid interactions with the poly-Gln-expanded N-proximal fragment of human huntingtin, which promotes Huntington disease-associated aggregation. The Sup35N-Sla1C interaction is inhibited by Sup35N alterations that make Sup35 unable to propagate the [PSI(+)] state and by the absence of the chaperone protein Hsp104, which is essential for [PSI] propagation. In a Sla1(-) background, [PSI] curing by dimethylsulfoxide or excess Hsp104 is increased, while translational readthrough and de novo [PSI] formation induced by excess Sup35 or Sup35N are decreased. These data show that, in agreement with the proposed function of Sla1 during cytoskeletal formation, Sla1 assists in [PSI] formation and propagation, but is not required for these processes. Sla1(-) strains are sensitive to some translational inhibitors, and some sup35 mutants, obtained in a Sla1(-) background, are sensitive to Sla1, suggesting that the interaction between Sla1 and Sup35 proteins may play a role in the normal function of the translational apparatus. We hypothesize that Sup35N is involved in regulatory interactions with intracellular structural networks, and [PSI] prion may be formed as a by-product of this process. PMID:10471702

  19. mTORC2 regulates mechanically induced cytoskeletal reorganization and lineage selection in marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Case, Natasha; Thompson, William R.; Uzer, Gunes; Styner, Maya; Rubin, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The cell cytoskeleton interprets and responds to physical cues from the microenvironment. Applying mechanical force to mesenchymal stem cells induces formation of a stiffer cytoskeleton, which biases against adipogenic differentiation and toward osteoblastogenesis. mTORC2, the mTOR complex defined by its binding partner rictor, is implicated in resting cytoskeletal architecture and is activated by mechanical force. We asked if mTORC2 played a role in mechanical adaptation of the cytoskeleton. We found that during bi-axial strain induced cytoskeletal restructuring, mTORC2 and Akt co-localize with newly assembled focal adhesions (FA). Disrupting the function of mTORC2, or that of its downstream substrate Akt, prevented mechanically-induced F-actin stress fiber development. mTORC2 becomes associated with vinculin during strain, and knock-down of vinculin prevents mTORC2 activation. In contrast, mTORC2 is not recruited to the FA complex during its activation by insulin, nor does insulin alter cytoskeletal structure. Further, when rictor was knocked down, the ability of MSC to enter the osteoblastic lineage was reduced, and when cultured in adipogenic medium, rictor-deficient MSC showed accelerated adipogenesis. This indicated that cytoskeletal remodeling promotes osteogenesis over adipogenesis. In sum, our data show that mTORC2 is involved in stem cell responses to biophysical stimuli, regulating both signaling and cytoskeletal reorganization. As such, mechanical activation of mTORC2 signaling participates in mesenchymal stem cell lineage selection, preventing adipogenesis by preserving β-catenin and stimulating osteogenesis by generating a stiffer cytoskeleton. PMID:23821483

  20. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  1. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  2. Effects of cryopreservation on the developmental competence, ultrastructure and cytoskeletal structure of porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Caihong; Rui, Rong; Dai, Jianjun; Zhang, Chunyan; Ju, Shiqiang; Xie, Bing; Lu, Xiao; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine ultrastructural and cytoskeletal changes that result from vitrification of porcine germinal vesicle- (GV-) and meiosis II- (MII-) stage oocytes. To investigate the effects of vitrification on developmental competence, oocytes were divided into three groups: fresh GV-oocytes (control), vitrified GV-oocytes, and vitrified MII-oocytes. In both GV- and MII-oocytes, vitrification resulted in a high proportion with normal morphology (92.4 vs. 94.2%, P > 0.05), while vitrified GV-oocytes yielded a higher survival rate than did vitrified MII-oocytes (56.8 vs. 41.9%, P < 0.05). In vitrified GV-oocytes, 12 of 154 oocytes underwent cleavage after fertilization in vitro, and 6 of these developed to the 8-cell stage, 3 developed to the 16-cell stage, and 3 developed into morulae. No cleavage was obtained from vitrified MII-oocytes. For ultrastructural analysis of oocytes, fresh and vitrified-warmed GV- and MII-oocytes were randomly selected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that vitrification caused various degrees of cryodamage in GV-oocytes. Cumulus cells of some oocytes were separated from the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC), and the zona pellucida adjacent to cumulus cells was fractured. The gap junctions between cumulus cells were ruptured, and many microvilli were disrupted or disappeared. Only homogeneous lipid droplets were observed. After vitrification, cortical granules still lined the oolemma of MII-oocytes. Only morphologically irregular, nonhomogeneous lipid droplets surrounding large vacuoles were found. To examine cytoskeletal structures, fresh and vitrified-warmed MII-oocytes were analyzed by laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM); vitrified-warmed GV-oocytes were cultured for 42-44 hr before LSCM. Of 58 control oocytes, 79.5% displayed normal spindles with chromosomes aligned along the equatorial plate. In vitrified oocytes the percentage with normal spindle organization was decreased

  3. Coordination of individual and ensemble cytoskeletal motors studied using tools from DNA nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derr, Nathan Dickson

    The cytoskeletal molecular motors kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein drive many diverse functions within eukaryotic cells. They are responsible for numerous spatially and temporally dependent intracellular processes crucial for cellular activity, including cytokinesis, maintenance of sub-cellular organization and the transport of myriad cargos along microtubule tracks. Cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-1 are processive, but opposite polarity, homodimeric motors; they each can take hundreds of thousands of consecutive steps, but do so in opposite directions along their microtubule tracks. These steps are fueled by the binding and hydrolysis of ATP within the homodimer's two identical protomers. Individual motors achieve their processivity by maintaining asynchrony between the stepping cycles of each protomer, insuring that at least one protomer always maintains contact with the track. How dynein coordinates the asynchronous stepping activity of its protomers is unknown. We developed a versatile method for assembling Saccharomyces cerevisiae dynein heterodimers, using complementary DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to dynein monomers labeled with different organic fluorophores. Using two-color, single-molecule microscopy and high-precision, two-dimensional tracking, we found that dynein has a highly variable stepping pattern that is distinct from all other processive cytoskeletal motors, which use "hand-over-hand" mechanisms. Uniquely, dynein stepping is stochastic when its two motor domains are close together. However, coordination emerges as the distance between motor domains increases, implying that a tension-based mechanism governs these steps. Many cellular cargos demonstrate bidirectional movement due to the presence of ensembles of both cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-1. To investigate the mechanisms that coordinate the interactions between motors within an ensemble, we constructed programmable synthetic cargos using three-dimensional DNA origami. This system

  4. TREK-1 Regulates Cytokine Secretion from Cultured Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Independently of Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Roan, Esra; Teng, Bin; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background TREK-1 deficient alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) secrete less IL-6, more MCP-1, and contain less F-actin. Whether these alterations in cytokine secretion and F-actin content are related remains unknown. We now hypothesized that cytokine secretion from TREK-1-deficient AECs was regulated by cytoskeletal rearrangements. Methods We determined F-actin and α-tubulin contents of control, TREK-1-deficient and TREK-1-overexpressing human A549 cells by confocal microscopy and western blotting, and measured IL-6 and MCP-1 levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results Cytochalasin D decreased the F-actin content of control cells. Jasplakinolide increased the F-actin content of TREK-1 deficient cells, similar to the effect of TREK-1 overexpression in control cells. Treatment of control and TREK-1 deficient cells with TNF-α, a strong stimulus for IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion, had no effect on F-actin structures. The combination of TNF-α+cytochalasin D or TNF-α+jasplakinolide had no additional effect on the F-actin content or architecture when compared to cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide alone. Although TREK-1 deficient AECs contained less F-actin at baseline, quantified biochemically, they contained more α-tubulin. Exposure to nocodazole disrupted α-tubulin filaments in control and TREK-1 deficient cells, but left the overall amount of α-tubulin unchanged. Although TNF-α had no effect on the F-actin or α-tubulin contents, it increased IL-6 and MCP-1 production and secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells. IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions from control and TREK-1 deficient cells after TNF-α+jasplakinolide or TNF-α+nocodazole treatment was similar to the effect of TNF-α alone. Interestingly, cytochalasin D decreased TNF-α-induced IL-6 but not MCP-1 secretion from control but not TREK-1 deficient cells. Conclusion Although cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide and nocodazole altered the F-actin and α-tubulin structures of control and TREK-1 deficient AEC, the

  5. The Drosophila TIPE family member Sigmar interacts with the Ste20-like kinase Misshapen and modulates JNK signaling, cytoskeletal remodeling and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Xu, Jing; Kuzyk, Michael; Dullat, Harpreet K.; Wilton, James; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Lebovitz, Chandra; Morin, Gregg B.; Marra, Marco A.; Gorski, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    TNFAIP8 and other mammalian TIPE family proteins have attracted increased interest due to their associations with disease-related processes including oncogenic transformation, metastasis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular functions of TIPE family proteins are still not well understood. Here we report the molecular and genetic characterization of the Drosophila TNFAIP8 homolog, CG4091/sigmar. Previous gene expression studies revealed dynamic expression of sigmar in larval salivary glands prior to histolysis. Here we demonstrate that in sigmar loss-of-function mutants, the salivary glands are morphologically abnormal with defects in the tubulin network and decreased autophagic flux. Sigmar localizes subcellularly to microtubule-containing projections in Drosophila S2 cells, and co-immunoprecipitates with the Ste20-like kinase Misshapen, a regulator of the JNK pathway. Further, the Drosophila TNF ligand Eiger can induce sigmar expression, and sigmar loss-of-function leads to altered localization of pDJNK in salivary glands. Together, these findings link Sigmar to the JNK pathway, cytoskeletal remodeling and autophagy activity during salivary gland development, and provide new insights into TIPE family member function. PMID:25836674

  6. TRPV4 regulates calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, conventional outflow and intraocular pressure in the mammalian eye

    PubMed Central

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Frye, Amber M.; Phuong, Tam T. T.; Yarishkin, Oleg; Jo, Andrew O.; Xu, Yong; Lakk, Monika; Iuso, Anthony; Redmon, Sarah N.; Ambati, Balamurali; Hageman, Gregory; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Torrejon, Karen Y.; Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An intractable challenge in glaucoma treatment has been to identify druggable targets within the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway, which is thought to be regulated/dysregulated by elusive mechanosensitive protein(s). Here, biochemical and functional analyses localized the putative mechanosensitive cation channel TRPV4 to the plasma membrane of primary and immortalized human TM (hTM) cells, and to human and mouse TM tissue. Selective TRPV4 agonists and substrate stretch evoked TRPV4-dependent cation/Ca2+ influx, thickening of F-actin stress fibers and reinforcement of focal adhesion contacts. TRPV4 inhibition enhanced the outflow facility and lowered perfusate pressure in biomimetic TM scaffolds populated with primary hTM cells. Systemic delivery, intraocular injection or topical application of putative TRPV4 antagonist prodrug analogs lowered IOP in glaucomatous mouse eyes and protected retinal neurons from IOP-induced death. Together, these findings indicate that TRPV4 channels function as a critical component of mechanosensitive, Ca2+-signaling machinery within the TM, and that TRPV4-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling regulates TM stiffness and outflow. Thus, TRPV4 is a potential IOP sensor within the conventional outflow pathway and a novel target for treating ocular hypertension. PMID:27510430

  7. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  8. Force-Induced Dynamical Properties of Multiple Cytoskeletal Filaments Are Distinct from that of Single Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    How cytoskeletal filaments collectively undergo growth and shrinkage is an intriguing question. Collective properties of multiple bio-filaments (actin or microtubules) undergoing hydrolysis have not been studied extensively earlier within simple theoretical frameworks. In this paper, we study the collective dynamical properties of multiple filaments under force, and demonstrate the distinct properties of a multi-filament system in comparison to a single filament. Comparing stochastic simulation results with recent experimental data, we show that multi-filament collective catastrophes are slower than catastrophes of single filaments. Our study also shows further distinctions as follows: (i) force-dependence of the cap-size distribution of multiple filaments are quantitatively different from that of single filaments, (ii) the diffusion constant associated with the system length fluctuations is distinct for multiple filaments, and (iii) switching dynamics of multiple filaments between capped and uncapped states and the fluctuations therein are also distinct. We build a unified picture by establishing interconnections among all these collective phenomena. Additionally, we show that the collapse times during catastrophes can be sharp indicators of collective stall forces exceeding the additive contributions of single filaments. PMID:25531397

  9. Cytoskeletal architecture and its evolutionary significance in amoeboid eukaryotes and their mode of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica R.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is the hallmark of eukaryotic evolution. The molecular and architectural aspects of the cytoskeleton have been playing a prominent role in our understanding of the origin and evolution of eukaryotes. In this study, we seek to investigate the cytoskeleton architecture and its evolutionary significance in understudied amoeboid lineages belonging to Amoebozoa. These amoebae primarily use cytoplasmic extensions supported by the cytoskeleton to perform important cellular processes such as movement and feeding. Amoeboid structure has important taxonomic significance, but, owing to techniques used, its potential significance in understanding diversity of the group has been seriously compromised, leading to an under-appreciation of its value. Here, we used immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy to study the architecture of microtubules (MTs) and F-actin in diverse groups of amoebae. Our results demonstrate that all Amoebozoa examined are characterized by a complex cytoskeletal array, unlike what has been previously thought to exist. Our results not only conclusively demonstrate that all amoebozoans possess complex cytoplasmic MTs, but also provide, for the first time, a potential synapomorphy for the molecularly defined Amoebozoa clade. Based on this evidence, the last common ancestor of amoebozoans is hypothesized to have had a complex interwoven MT architecture limited within the granular cell body. We also generate several cytoskeleton characters related to MT and F-actin, which are found to be robust for defining groups in deep and shallow nodes of Amoebozoa. PMID:27703691

  10. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A; Davidson, Michael W; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T; Mahadevan, L; Shah, Jagesh V

    2016-02-01

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues.

  11. A Silicone-Based Stretchable Micropost Array Membrane for Monitoring Live-Cell Subcellular Cytoskeletal Response

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Jennifer M.; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Weng, Shinuo; Sun, Yubing; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    External forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cellular structure and function, yet the underlying mechanism by which cells sense forces and transduce them into intracellular biochemical signals and behavioral responses (‘mechanotransduction’) is largely undetermined. To aid in the mechanistic study of mechanotransduction, herein we devised a cell stretch device that allowed for quantitative control and real-time measurements of mechanical stimuli and cellular biomechanical responses. Our strategy involved a microfabricated array of silicone elastomeric microposts integrated onto a stretchable elastomeric membrane. By using a computer-controlled vacuum, this micropost array membrane (mPAM) was activated to apply equibiaxial cell stretching forces to adherent cells attached on the microposts. Using the mPAM, we studied live-cell subcellular dynamic responses of contractile forces of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to sustained static equibiaxial cell stretches. Our data showed that in response to sustained cell stretches, VSMCs regulated their cytoskeletal (CSK) contractility in a biphasic manner: they first acutely enhanced their contraction to resist rapid cell deformation (‘stiffening’) before they allowed slow adaptive inelastic CSK reorganization to release their contractility (‘softening’). The contractile response across entire single VSMCs was spatially inhomogeneous and force-dependent. Our mPAM device and live-cell subcellular contractile measurements will help elucidate the mechanotransductive system in VSMCs and thus contribute to our understanding of pressure-induced vascular disease processes. PMID:22193351

  12. Channel-interacting PDZ protein, 'CIPP', interacts with proteins involved in cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Emanuele; Landi, Elena; Barilari, Manuela; Serresi, Michela; Salvadori, Piero; Bachi, Angela; Dente, Luciana

    2009-04-15

    Neuronal CIPP (channel-interacting PDZ protein) is a multivalent PDZ protein that interacts with specific channels and receptors highly expressed in the brain. It is composed of four PDZ domains that behave as a scaffold to clusterize functionally connected proteins. In the present study, we selected a set of potential CIPP interactors that are involved directly or indirectly in mechanisms of cytoskeletal remodelling and membrane protrusion formation. For some of these, we first proved the direct binding to specific CIPP PDZ domains considered as autonomous elements, and then confirmed the interaction with the whole protein. In particular, the small G-protein effector IRSp53 (insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate protein p53) specifically interacts with the second PDZ domain of CIPP and, when co-transfected in cultured mammalian cells with a tagged full-length CIPP, it induces a marked reorganization of CIPP cytoplasmic localization. Large punctate structures are generated as a consequence of CIPP binding to the IRSp53 C-terminus. Analysis of the puncta nature, using various endocytic markers, revealed that they are not related to cytoplasmic vesicles, but rather represent multi-protein assemblies, where CIPP can tether other potential interactors.

  13. Hes6 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Caroline M.P.; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Dunham, Ian; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H.

    2011-07-01

    Hes6 is a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors that regulate proliferating cell fate in development and is known to be expressed in developing muscle. Here we investigate its function in myogenesis in vitro. We show that Hes6 is a direct transcriptional target of the myogenic transcription factors MyoD and Myf5, indicating that it is integral to the myogenic transcriptional program. The localization of Hes6 protein changes during differentiation, becoming predominantly nuclear. Knockdown of Hes6 mRNA levels by siRNA has no effect on cell cycle exit or induction of myosin heavy chain expression in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, but F-actin filament formation is disrupted and both cell motility and myoblast fusion are reduced. The knockdown phenotype is rescued by expression of Hes6 cDNA resistant to siRNA. These results define a novel role for Hes6 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics in post mitotic myoblasts.

  14. The cytoskeletal regulator Genghis khan is required for columnar target specificity in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Gontang, Allison C.; Hwa, Jennifer J.; Mast, Joshua D.; Schwabe, Tina; Clandinin, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    A defining characteristic of neuronal cell type is the growth of axons and dendrites into specific layers and columns of the brain. Although differences in cell surface receptors and adhesion molecules are known to cause differences in synaptic specificity, differences in downstream signaling mechanisms that determine cell type-appropriate targeting patterns are unknown. Using a forward genetic screen in Drosophila, we identify the GTPase effector Genghis khan (Gek) as playing a crucial role in the ability of a subset of photoreceptor (R cell) axons to innervate appropriate target columns. In particular, single-cell mosaic analyses demonstrate that R cell growth cones lacking Gek function grow to the appropriate ganglion, but frequently fail to innervate the correct target column. Further studies reveal that R cell axons lacking the activity of the small GTPase Cdc42 display similar defects, providing evidence that these proteins regulate a common set of processes. Gek is expressed in all R cells, and a detailed structure-function analysis reveals a set of regulatory domains with activities that restrict Gek function to the growth cone. Although Gek does not normally regulate layer-specific targeting, ectopic expression of Gek is sufficient to alter the targeting choices made by another R cell type, the targeting of which is normally Gek independent. Thus, specific regulation of cytoskeletal responses to targeting cues is necessary for cell type-appropriate synaptic specificity. PMID:22007130

  15. The cytoskeletal regulator Genghis khan is required for columnar target specificity in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Gontang, Allison C; Hwa, Jennifer J; Mast, Joshua D; Schwabe, Tina; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2011-11-01

    A defining characteristic of neuronal cell type is the growth of axons and dendrites into specific layers and columns of the brain. Although differences in cell surface receptors and adhesion molecules are known to cause differences in synaptic specificity, differences in downstream signaling mechanisms that determine cell type-appropriate targeting patterns are unknown. Using a forward genetic screen in Drosophila, we identify the GTPase effector Genghis khan (Gek) as playing a crucial role in the ability of a subset of photoreceptor (R cell) axons to innervate appropriate target columns. In particular, single-cell mosaic analyses demonstrate that R cell growth cones lacking Gek function grow to the appropriate ganglion, but frequently fail to innervate the correct target column. Further studies reveal that R cell axons lacking the activity of the small GTPase Cdc42 display similar defects, providing evidence that these proteins regulate a common set of processes. Gek is expressed in all R cells, and a detailed structure-function analysis reveals a set of regulatory domains with activities that restrict Gek function to the growth cone. Although Gek does not normally regulate layer-specific targeting, ectopic expression of Gek is sufficient to alter the targeting choices made by another R cell type, the targeting of which is normally Gek independent. Thus, specific regulation of cytoskeletal responses to targeting cues is necessary for cell type-appropriate synaptic specificity.

  16. Sex hormones and expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in the rat brain throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Flores, Oscar; Galván-Rosas, Agustín; Porfirio Gómora-Arrati; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy involves diverse changes in brain function that implicate a re-organization in neuronal cytoskeleton. In this physiological state, the brain is in contact with several hormones that it has never been exposed, as well as with very high levels of hormones that the brain has been in touch throughout life. Among the latter hormones are progesterone and estradiol which regulate several brain functions, including learning, memory, neuroprotection, and the display of sexual and maternal behavior. These functions involve changes in the structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity is regulated by estradiol and progesterone. We have found that the expression pattern of Microtubule Associated Protein 2, Tau, and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain of the rat throughout gestation and the start of lactation, suggesting that these proteins participate in the plastic changes observed in the brain during pregnancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  17. Cytoskeletal proteins in cortical development and disease: actin associated proteins in periventricular heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Gewei; Sheen, Volney L.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton regulates many important cellular processes in the brain, including cell division and proliferation, migration, and cytokinesis and differentiation. These developmental processes can be regulated through actin dependent vesicle and organelle movement, cell signaling, and the establishment and maintenance of cell junctions and cell shape. Many of these processes are mediated by extensive and intimate interactions of actin with cellular membranes and proteins. Disruption in the actin cytoskeleton in the brain gives rise to periventricular heterotopia (PH), a malformation of cortical development, characterized by abnormal neurons clustered deep in the brain along the lateral ventricles. This disorder can give rise to seizures, dyslexia and psychiatric disturbances. Anatomically, PH is characterized by a smaller brain (impaired proliferation), heterotopia (impaired initial migration) and disruption along the neuroependymal lining (impaired cell-cell adhesion). Genes causal for PH have also been implicated in actin-dependent processes. The current review provides mechanistic insight into actin cytoskeletal regulation of cortical development in the context of this malformation of cortical development. PMID:25883548

  18. A Legionella effector modulates host cytoskeletal structure by inhibiting actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenhua; Stephenson, Robert; Qiu, Jiazhang; Zheng, Shijun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Successful infection by the opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila requires the collective activity of hundreds of virulence proteins delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. These virulence proteins, also called effectors modulate distinct host cellular processes to create a membrane-bound niche called the Legionella containing vacuole (LCV) supportive of bacterial growth. We found that Ceg14(Lpg0437), a Dot/Icm substrate is toxic to yeast and such toxicity can be alleviated by overexpression of profilin, a protein involved in cytoskeletal structure in eukaryotes. We further showed that mutations in profilin affect actin binding but not other functions such as interactions with poly-L-proline or phosphatidylinositol, abolish its suppressor activity. Consistent with the fact the profilin suppresses its toxicity, expression of Ceg14 but not its non-toxic mutants in yeast affects actin distribution and budding of daughter cells. Although Ceg14 does not detectably interact with profilin, it co-sediments with filamentous actin and inhibits actin polymerization, causing the accumulation of short actin filaments. These results reveal that multiple L. pneumophila effectors target components of the host cytoskeleton. PMID:24286927

  19. Form, Fabric, and Function of a Flagellum-Associated Cytoskeletal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Morriswood, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a uniflagellated protist and the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease. The single flagellum of T. brucei is essential to a number of cellular processes such as motility, and has been a longstanding focus of scientific enquiry. A number of cytoskeletal structures are associated with the flagellum in T. brucei, and one such structure—a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein TbMORN1—is the focus of this review. The TbMORN1-containing complex, which was discovered less than ten years ago, is essential for the viability of the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei. The complex has an unusual asymmetric morphology, and is coiled around the flagellum to form a hook shape. Proteomic analysis using the proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) technique has elucidated a number of its components. Recent work has uncovered a role for TbMORN1 in facilitating protein entry into the cell, thus providing a link between the cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system. This review summarises the extant data on the complex, highlights the outstanding questions for future enquiry, and provides speculation as to its possible role in a size-exclusion mechanism for regulating protein entry. The review additionally clarifies the nomenclature associated with this topic, and proposes the adoption of the term “hook complex” to replace the former name “bilobe” to describe the complex. PMID:26540076

  20. Form, Fabric, and Function of a Flagellum-Associated Cytoskeletal Structure.

    PubMed

    Morriswood, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a uniflagellated protist and the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease. The single flagellum of T. brucei is essential to a number of cellular processes such as motility, and has been a longstanding focus of scientific enquiry. A number of cytoskeletal structures are associated with the flagellum in T. brucei, and one such structure-a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein TbMORN1-is the focus of this review. The TbMORN1-containing complex, which was discovered less than ten years ago, is essential for the viability of the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei. The complex has an unusual asymmetric morphology, and is coiled around the flagellum to form a hook shape. Proteomic analysis using the proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) technique has elucidated a number of its components. Recent work has uncovered a role for TbMORN1 in facilitating protein entry into the cell, thus providing a link between the cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system. This review summarises the extant data on the complex, highlights the outstanding questions for future enquiry, and provides speculation as to its possible role in a size-exclusion mechanism for regulating protein entry. The review additionally clarifies the nomenclature associated with this topic, and proposes the adoption of the term "hook complex" to replace the former name "bilobe" to describe the complex. PMID:26540076

  1. p21-activated kinase regulates mast cell degranulation via effects on calcium mobilization and cytoskeletal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jayme D.; Jaffer, Zahara M.; Park, Su-Jung; Burgin, Sarah; Hofmann, Clemens; Sells, Mary Ann; Chen, Shi; Derr-Yellin, Ethel; Michels, Elizabeth G.; McDaniel, Andrew; Bessler, Waylan K.; Ingram, David A.; Atkinson, Simon J.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells are key participants in allergic diseases via activation of high-affinity IgE receptors (FcϵRI) resulting in release of proinflammatory mediators. The biochemical pathways linking IgE activation to calcium influx and cytoskeletal changes required for intracellular granule release are incompletely understood. We demonstrate, genetically, that Pak1 is required for this process. In a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis experiment, Wsh/Wsh mast cell–deficient mice locally reconstituted with Pak1−/− bone marrow–derived mast cells (BMMCs) experienced strikingly decreased allergen-induced vascular permeability compared with controls. Consistent with the in vivo phenotype, Pak1−/− BMMCs exhibited a reduction in FcϵRI-induced degranulation. Further, Pak1−/− BMMCs demonstrated diminished calcium mobilization and altered depolymerization of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in response to FcϵRI stimulation. These data implicate Pak1 as an essential molecular target for modulating acute mast cell responses that contribute to allergic diseases. PMID:19124833

  2. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells

    PubMed Central

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V.; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T.; Mahadevan, L.; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues. PMID:26764383

  3. Rictor Regulates Spermatogenesis by Controlling Sertoli Cell Cytoskeletal Organization and Cell Polarity in the Mouse Testis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Heling; Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Caixia; Xiong, Zhi; Zhao, Wanlu; Jia, Chunhong; Lin, Jun; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Weiping; Zhao, Allan Z; Bai, Xiaochun

    2015-11-01

    Maintenance of cell polarity is essential for Sertoli cell and blood-testis barrier (BTB) function and spermatogenesis; however, the signaling mechanisms that regulate the integrity of the cytoskeleton and polarity of Sertoli cells are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that rapamycin-insensitive component of target of rapamycin (TOR) (Rictor), a core component of mechanistic TOR complex 2 (mTORC2), was expressed in the seminiferous epithelium during testicular development, and was down-regulated in a cadmium chloride-induced BTB damage model. We then conditionally deleted the Rictor gene in Sertoli cells and mutant mice exhibited azoospermia and were sterile as early as 3 months old. Further study revealed that Rictor may regulate actin organization via both mTORC2-dependent and mTORC2-independent mechanisms, in which the small GTPase, ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, and phosphorylation of the actin filament regulatory protein, Paxillin, are involved, respectively. Loss of Rictor in Sertoli cells perturbed actin dynamics and caused microtubule disarrangement, both of which accumulatively disrupted Sertoli cell polarity and BTB integrity, accompanied by testicular developmental defects, spermiogenic arrest and excessive germ cell loss in mutant mice. Together, these findings establish the importance of Rictor/mTORC2 signaling in Sertoli cell function and spermatogenesis through the maintenance of Sertoli cell cytoskeletal dynamics, BTB integrity, and cell polarity. PMID:26360620

  4. Distinct Roles of Cytoskeletal Components in Immunological Synapse Formation and Directed Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hironori; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of CD4+ T cell activation and immunological synapse (IS) formation is the migration of the microtubule organization center and associated organelles toward the APCs. In this study, we found that when murine CD4+ T cells were treated with a microtubule-destabilizing agent (vinblastine) after the formation of IS, the microtubule organization center dispersed and all of the major cellular organelles moved away from the IS. Cytokines were no longer directed toward the synapse but were randomly secreted in quantities similar to those seen in synaptic secretion. However, if the actin cytoskeleton was disrupted at the same time with cytochalasin D, the organelles did not shift away from the IS. These findings suggest that there is a complex interplay between the microtubules and actin cytoskeleton, where microtubules are important for directing particular cytokines into the synapse, but they are not involved in the amount of cytokines that are produced for at least 1 h after IS formation. In addition, we found that they play a critical role in mobilizing organelles to reorient toward the synapse during T cell activation and in stabilizing organelles against the force that is generated through actin polymerization so that they move toward the APCs. These findings show that there is a complex interplay between these major cytoskeletal components during synapse formation and maintenance. PMID:26392461

  5. Effects of fixation protocol and gravistimulation on cytoskeletal organization in Brassica rapa roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, Andrea; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2012-07-01

    In preparation for a flight experiment we have studied the optimization of the staining protocols for microtubules and actin filaments in Brassica rapa seedlings. Microtubules (MT) were stained with monoclonal antibody (mAb) YOL 1/34. F-actin (FA) staining was achieved with C4 mAb antibody. Fixative prepared more than three weeks before use produces specimens that stained poorly. Storage in fixative for more than four weeks resulted in noticeably poorer staining. Staining was best in cortical cells but more difficult and less consistent in cap cells, especially for FA. In addition, the quality of staining of root cap cells was dependent on the age of the formaldehyde. The organization of the MTs corresponded with previously published descriptions; FA was prominent in the stele with thick and numerous parallel bundles; cortical cells showed less dense and less directional organization of mostly thinner filaments. FA organization was determined by tissue rather than by differential elongation. The organization of MTs in cortical cells of curving roots was uniformly circular and perpendicular to the long cell axis despite different cell length. The effect of clinorotation around the horizontal axis and centrifugation on the cytoskeletal organization was inconsistent. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  6. Cytoskeletal and functional changes in bioreactor assembled thyroid tissue organoids exposed to gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lora M.; Patel, Zarana; Murray, Deborah K.; Rightnar, Steven; Burell, Cheryl G.; Gridley, Daila S.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Fischer rat thyroid cells were grown under low-shear stress in a bioreactor to a stage of organization composed of integrated follicles resembling small thyroid glands prior to exposure to 3 Gray-gamma radiation. Bioreactor tissues and controls (both irradiated and non-irradiated) were harvested at 24, 48, 96 and 144 hours post-exposure. Tissue samples were fixed and fluorescently labeled for actin and microtubules. Tissues were assessed for changes in cytoskeletal components induced by radiation and quantified by laser scanning cytometry. ELISA's were used to quantify transforming growth factor-beta and thyroxin released from cells to the culture supernatant. Tissue architecture was disrupted by exposure to radiation with the structural organization of actin and loss of follicular content the most obviously affected. With time post-irradiation the actin appeared disordered and the levels of fluorescence associated with filamentous-actin and microtubules cycled in the tissue analogs, but not in the flask-grown cultures. Active transforming growth factor-beta was higher in supernatants from the irradiated bioreactor tissue. Thyroxin release paralleled cell survival in the bioreactors and control cultures. Thus, the engineered tissue responses to radiation differed from those of conventional tissue culture making it a potentially better mimic of the in vivo situation.

  7. Dynamics of Cytoskeletal Proteins during Fcγ Receptor-mediated Phagocytosis in MacrophagesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Diakonova, Maria; Bokoch, Gary; Swanson, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    Particle ingestion by phagocytosis results from sequential rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and overlying membrane. To assemble a chronology of molecular events during phagosome formation and to examine the contributions of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) to these dynamics, a method was developed for synchronizing Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis by murine macrophages. Erythrocytes opsonized with complement component C3bi were bound to macrophages at 37°C, a condition that does not favor particle phagocytosis. Addition of soluble anti-erythrocyte IgG resulted in rapid opsonization of the bound erythrocytes, followed by their immediate internalization via phagocytosis. Cellular content of F-actin, as measured by binding of rhodamine-phalloidin, increased transiently during phagocytosis, and this increase was not diminished by inhibitors of PI 3-kinase. Immunofluorescence localization of myosins in macrophages fixed at various times during phagocytosis indicated that myosins II and IXb were concentrated in early phagosomes, myosin IC increased later, and myosin V appeared after phagosome closure. Other cytoskeletal proteins showed similar variations in the timing of their appearance in phagosomes. The PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin did not change the dynamics of PI 3-kinase or ezrin localization but prevented the loss of PAK1 from phagosomes. These results suggest that PI 3-kinase deactivates PAK1, and that this may be needed for phagosome closure. PMID:11854399

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics, Inheritance, and Cytoskeletal Interactions in Budding YeastV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbacher, K. L.; Davis, D.; Wu, M.; Boldogh, I.; Pon, Liza A.

    2002-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of a reticulum underlying the plasma membrane (cortical ER) and ER associated with the nuclear envelope (nuclear ER). We used a Sec63p-green fluorescent protein fusion protein to study motility events associated with inheritance of cortical ER and nuclear ER in living yeast cells. During M phase before nuclear migration, we observed thick, apparently rigid tubular extensions emanating from the nuclear ER that elongate, undergo sweeping motions along the cell cortex, and shorten. Two findings support a role for microtubules in this process. First, extension of tubular structures from the nuclear ER is inhibited by destabilization of microtubules. Second, astral microtubules, structures that undergo similar patterns of extension, cortical surveillance and retraction, colocalize with nuclear ER extensions. During S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, we observed anchorage of the cortical ER at the site of bud emergence and apical bud growth. Thin tubules of the ER that extend from the anchored cortical ER display undulating, apparently random movement and move into the bud as it grows. Finally, we found that cortical ER morphology is sensitive to a filamentous actin–destabilizing drug, latrunculin-A, and to mutations in the actin-encoding ACT1 gene. Our observations support 1) different mechanisms and cytoskeletal mediators for the inheritance of nuclear and cortical ER elements and 2) a mechanism for cortical ER inheritance that is cytoskeleton dependent but relies on anchorage, not directed movement. PMID:11907267

  9. Depolymerization dynamics of individual filaments of bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Paez, Alfonso; Hörger, Ines; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel; Tarazona, Pedro; Vélez, Marisela

    2012-01-01

    We report observation and analysis of the depolymerization filaments of the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ (filament temperature-sensitive Z) formed on a mica surface. At low concentration, proteins adsorbed on the surface polymerize forming curved filaments that close into rings that remain stable for some time before opening irreversibly and fully depolymerizing. The distribution of ring lifetimes (T) as a function of length (N), shows that the rate of ring aperture correlates with filament length. If this ring lifetime is expressed as a bond survival time, (Tb ≡ NT), this correlation is abolished, indicating that these rupture events occur randomly and independently at each monomer interface. After rings open irreversibly, depolymerization of the remaining filaments is fast, but can be slowed down and followed using a nonhydrolyzing GTP analogue. The histogram of depolymerization velocities of individual filaments has an asymmetric distribution that can be fit with a computer model that assumes two rupture rates, a slow one similar to the one observed for ring aperture, affecting monomers in the central part of the filaments, and a faster one affecting monomers closer to the open ends. From the quantitative analysis, we conclude that the depolymerization rate is affected both by nucleotide hydrolysis rate and by its exchange along the filament, that all monomer interfaces are equally competent for hydrolysis, although depolymerization is faster at the open ends than in central filament regions, and that all monomer–monomer interactions, regardless of the nucleotide present, can adopt a curved configuration. PMID:22566654

  10. The skeleton in the closet: actin cytoskeletal remodeling in β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Arous, Caroline; Halban, Philippe A

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few decades, biomedical research has considered not only the function of single cells but also the importance of the physical environment within a whole tissue, including cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Cytoskeleton organization and focal adhesions are crucial sensors for cells that enable them to rapidly communicate with the physical extracellular environment in response to extracellular stimuli, ensuring proper function and adaptation. The involvement of the microtubular-microfilamentous cytoskeleton in secretion mechanisms was proposed almost 50 years ago, since when the evolution of ever more sensitive and sophisticated methods in microscopy and in cell and molecular biology have led us to become aware of the importance of cytoskeleton remodeling for cell shape regulation and its crucial link with signaling pathways leading to β-cell function. Emerging evidence suggests that dysfunction of cytoskeletal components or extracellular matrix modification influences a number of disorders through potential actin cytoskeleton disruption that could be involved in the initiation of multiple cellular functions. Perturbation of β-cell actin cytoskeleton remodeling could arise secondarily to islet inflammation and fibrosis, possibly accounting in part for impaired β-cell function in type 2 diabetes. This review focuses on the role of actin remodeling in insulin secretion mechanisms and its close relationship with focal adhesions and myosin II.

  11. Rod-like bacterial shape is maintained by feedback between cell curvature and cytoskeletal localization

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Tristan S.; Nguyen, Jeffrey; Monds, Russell D.; Colavin, Alexandre; Billings, Gabriel; Ouzounov, Nikolay; Gitai, Zemer; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-01-01

    Cells typically maintain characteristic shapes, but the mechanisms of self-organization for robust morphological maintenance remain unclear in most systems. Precise regulation of rod-like shape in Escherichia coli cells requires the MreB actin-like cytoskeleton, but the mechanism by which MreB maintains rod-like shape is unknown. Here, we use time-lapse and 3D imaging coupled with computational analysis to map the growth, geometry, and cytoskeletal organization of single bacterial cells at subcellular resolution. Our results demonstrate that feedback between cell geometry and MreB localization maintains rod-like cell shape by targeting cell wall growth to regions of negative cell wall curvature. Pulse-chase labeling indicates that growth is heterogeneous and correlates spatially and temporally with MreB localization, whereas MreB inhibition results in more homogeneous growth, including growth in polar regions previously thought to be inert. Biophysical simulations establish that curvature feedback on the localization of cell wall growth is an effective mechanism for cell straightening and suggest that surface deformations caused by cell wall insertion could direct circumferential motion of MreB. Our work shows that MreB orchestrates persistent, heterogeneous growth at the subcellular scale, enabling robust, uniform growth at the cellular scale without requiring global organization. PMID:24550515

  12. The Ovary of Tubifex tubifex (Clitellata, Naididae, Tubificinae) Is Composed of One, Huge Germ-Line Cyst that Is Enriched with Cytoskeletal Components

    PubMed Central

    Urbisz, Anna Z.; Chajec, Łukasz; Świątek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on the ovary organization and oogenesis in Tubificinae have revealed that their ovaries are small polarized structures that are composed of germ cells in subsequent stages of oogenesis that are associated with somatic cells. In syncytial cysts, as a rule, each germ cell is connected to the central cytoplasmic mass, the cytophore, via only one stable intercellular bridge (ring canal). In this paper we present detailed data about the composition of germ-line cysts in Tubifex tubifex with special emphasis on the occurrence and distribution of the cytoskeletal elements. Using fixed material and live cell imaging techniques, we found that the entire ovary of T. tubifex is composed of only one, huge multicellular germ-line cyst, which may contain up to 2,600 cells. Its architecture is broadly similar to the cysts that are found in other clitellate annelids, i.e. a common, anuclear cytoplasmic mass in the center of the cyst and germ cells that are connected to it via intercellular bridges. The cytophore in the T. tubifex cyst extends along the long axis of the ovary in the form of elongated and branched cytoplasmic strands. Rhodamine-coupled phalloidin staining revealed that the prominent strands of actin filaments occur inside the cytophore. Similar to the cytophore, F-actin strands are branched and they are especially well developed in the middle and outermost parts of the ovary. Microfilaments are also present in the ring canals that connect the germ cells with the cytophore in the narrow end of the ovary. Using TubulinTracker, we found that the microtubules form a prominent network of loosely and evenly distributed tubules inside the cytophore as well as in every germ cell. The well-developed cytoskeletal elements in T. tubifex ovary seem to ensure the integrity of such a huge germ-line cyst of complex (germ cells - ring canals - cytophore) organization. A comparison between the cysts that are described here and other well-known female germ-line cysts

  13. Linking TGF-beta-mediated Cdc25A inhibition and cytoskeletal regulation through RhoA/p160(ROCK) signaling.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kimberly; Bhowmick, Neil A

    2004-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) can mediate G(1)/S cell-cycle inhibition and changes in the cytoskeletal organization through multiple parallel downstream signaling pathways. Recent findings regarding TGF-beta-mediated cell-cycle checkpoint control and epithelial to mesenchymal transition have converged to the RhoA/p160(ROCK) signaling pathway. The activation of TGF-beta-mediated p160(ROCK)rapidly inhibits the Cdc25A phosphatase as a component of the G(1)/S checkpoint control at the time cytoskeletal re-organization occurs. This can be likened to the ability to preserve genomic integrity in circumstances of genotoxic stress. The inactivation of the RhoA/p160(ROCK) pathway may be a mechanism by which cancer cells bypass growth inhibition even in the presence of TGF-beta.

  14. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M.

    2013-10-15

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd{sup 2+}-associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd{sup 2+}-dependent effect, as only Cd{sup 2+} concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd{sup 2+}] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd{sup 2+} exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd{sup 2+} concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations.

  15. A cytoskeletal spring for the control of cell shape in outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Holley, M C; Ashmore, J F

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional cortical cytoskeletal lattice associated with the lateral plasma membranes of mammalian outer hair cells maintains cell shape and provides a restoring force to oppose active changes in cell length. The lattice is composed of two morphologically distinct filaments which are arranged to reinforce the cell circumferentially whilst allowing limited changes in cell length and diameter. This function can only be fulfilled if intracellular pressure is high enough to put the lattice under tension.

  16. Redistribution of activated pp60c-src to integrin-dependent cytoskeletal complexes in thrombin-stimulated platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, E A; Brugge, J S

    1993-01-01

    Thrombin stimulation of platelets induces a transient increase in the specific activity of pp60c-src followed by a redistribution of pp60c-src to the Triton X-100-insoluble, cytoskeleton-rich fraction. Concomitant with the observed increase in pp60c-src activity was a rapid dephosphorylation of tyrosine 527 in 10 to 15% of pp60c-src molecules. In addition, we found that pp60c-src from the Triton-insoluble fraction was phosphorylated on tyrosine 416, the autophosphorylation site which is phosphorylated in activated oncogenic variants of pp60src. Furthermore, in platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (which are deficient in the integrin receptor GPIIb-IIIa), pp60c-src was not translocated to the Triton-insoluble fraction, and there was a sustained increase in pp60c-src activity following thrombin treatment. These results suggest that pp60c-src is rapidly activated in thrombin-stimulated platelets, potentially by a protein tyrosine phosphatase, before it translocates to a cytoskeletal fraction, where many of its potential substrates are found. The evidence that the cytoskeletal association of pp60c-src is dependent upon engagement of the integrin receptor GPIIb-IIIa suggests that integrin-cytoskeletal complexes may serve to compartmentalize and anchor activated enzymes involved in signal transduction. Images PMID:7680100

  17. Cytoskeletal disruption activates the DLK/JNK pathway, which promotes axonal regeneration and mimics a preconditioning injury

    PubMed Central

    Valakh, Vera; Frey, Erin; Babetto, Elisabetta; Walker, Lauren J; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Nerve injury can lead to axonal regeneration, axonal degeneration, and/or neuronal cell death. Remarkably, the MAP3K dual leucine zipper kinase, DLK, promotes each of these responses, suggesting that DLK is a sensor of axon injury. In Drosophila, mutations in proteins that stabilize the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons activate the DLK pathway, suggesting that DLK may be activated by cytoskeletal disruption. Here we test this model in mammalian sensory neurons. We find that pharmacological agents designed to disrupt either the actin or microtubule cytoskeleton activate the DLK pathway, and that activation is independent of calcium influx or induction of the axon degeneration program. Moreover, activation of the DLK pathway by targeting the cytoskeleton induces a pro-regenerative state, enhancing axon regeneration in response to a subsequent injury in a process akin to preconditioning. This highlights the potential utility of activating the DLK pathway as a method to improve axon regeneration. Moreover, DLK is required for these responses to cytoskeletal perturbations, suggesting that DLK functions as a key neuronal sensor of cytoskeletal damage. PMID:25726747

  18. Hyperphosphorylated tau and neurofilament and cytoskeletal disruptions in mice overexpressing human p25, an activator of cdk5.

    PubMed

    Ahlijanian, M K; Barrezueta, N X; Williams, R D; Jakowski, A; Kowsz, K P; McCarthy, S; Coskran, T; Carlo, A; Seymour, P A; Burkhardt, J E; Nelson, R B; McNeish, J D

    2000-03-14

    Hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated proteins such as tau and neurofilament may underlie the cytoskeletal abnormalities and neuronal death seen in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. One potential mechanism of microtubule-associated protein hyperphosphorylation is augmented activity of protein kinases known to associate with microtubules, such as cdk5 or GSK3beta. Here we show that tau and neurofilament are hyperphosphorylated in transgenic mice that overexpress human p25, an activator of cdk5. The p25 transgenic mice display silver-positive neurons using the Bielschowsky stain. Disturbances in neuronal cytoskeletal organization are apparent at the ultrastructural level. These changes are localized predominantly to the amygdala, thalamus/hypothalamus, and cortex. The p25 transgenic mice display increased spontaneous locomotor activity and differences from control in the elevated plus-maze test. The overexpression of an activator of cdk5 in transgenic mice results in increased cdk5 activity that is sufficient to produce hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament as well as cytoskeletal disruptions reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Cytoskeletal remodeling of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro: relationships to culture conditions and analogies to in vivo situations.

    PubMed

    Skalli, O; Bloom, W S; Ropraz, P; Azzarone, B; Gabbiani, G

    1986-07-01

    Cytoskeletal features of arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) vary characteristically during development and during atheromatous plaque formation (Gabbiani et al., 1984; Kocher et al., 1985). We have analyzed the cytoskeletal features of rat aortic SMC placed in culture in the presence of 10% foetal calf serum (thus containing growth factors probably playing a role in SMC development and atheroma formation), as compared to SMC freshly isolated from the rat aortic media. Under these conditions, SMC show a typical cytoskeletal remodeling characterized by: 1) increased content of vimentin per cell, increased number of cells containing only vimentin, and decreased number of vimentin plus desmin containing cells; 2) decreased contents of actin, tropomyosin and myosin; 3) a switch in the pattern of actin isoforms with the appearance of a beta-type predominance. Some of these changes (e.g. increase of vimentin and decrease of alpha-type actin) are seen already in cells entering for the first time in S-phase after plating. Pulse-chase experiments with 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) indicate that vimentin containing SMC possess a higher replicative activity than vimentin plus desmin containing SMC, thus explaining the selection of vimentin containing cells during culture. Our results indicate that during culture SMC develop features similar to those observed in normal foetal SMC or in SMC present in atheromatous plaques; this model may be useful for the understanding of mechanisms leading to SMC differentiation and to atheroma formation. PMID:3528513

  20. Flat cells come full sphere: Are mutant cytoskeletal-related proteins oncoprotein-monsters or useful immunogens?

    PubMed

    Parry, Michele L; Blanck, George

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is inherited as a dominant disease because if one allele is mutated, it contributes a mutant, destructive subunit polypeptide to collagen, which requires many subunits to form normal, polymeric, collagenous structures. Recent cancer genome atlas (TCGA) data indicate that cytoskeletal-related proteins are among the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancers, in distinct mutation frequency groups, i.e., including low mutation frequency groups. Part of the explanation for this observation is likely to be the fact that many of the coding regions for these proteins are very large, and indeed, it is likely these coding regions are mutated in many cells that never become cancerous. However, it would not be surprising if mutations in cytoskeletal proteins, when combined with oncoprotein or tumor suppressor protein mutations, had significant impacts on cancer development, for a number of reasons, including results obtained almost 5 decades ago indicating that well-spread cells in tissue culture, with well-formed cytoskeletons, were less tumorigenic than spherical cells with disrupted cytoskeletons. This raises the question, are mutant cytoskeletal proteins, which would likely interfere with polymer formation, a new class of oncoproteins, in particular, dominant negative oncoproteins? If these proteins are so commonly mutant, could they be the bases for common cancer vaccines?

  1. Flat cells come full sphere: Are mutant cytoskeletal-related proteins oncoprotein-monsters or useful immunogens?

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Michele L; Blanck, George

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is inherited as a dominant disease because if one allele is mutated, it contributes a mutant, destructive subunit polypeptide to collagen, which requires many subunits to form normal, polymeric, collagenous structures. Recent cancer genome atlas (TCGA) data indicate that cytoskeletal-related proteins are among the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancers, in distinct mutation frequency groups, i.e., including low mutation frequency groups. Part of the explanation for this observation is likely to be the fact that many of the coding regions for these proteins are very large, and indeed, it is likely these coding regions are mutated in many cells that never become cancerous. However, it would not be surprising if mutations in cytoskeletal proteins, when combined with oncoprotein or tumor suppressor protein mutations, had significant impacts on cancer development, for a number of reasons, including results obtained almost 5 decades ago indicating that well-spread cells in tissue culture, with well-formed cytoskeletons, were less tumorigenic than spherical cells with disrupted cytoskeletons. This raises the question, are mutant cytoskeletal proteins, which would likely interfere with polymer formation, a new class of oncoproteins, in particular, dominant negative oncoproteins? If these proteins are so commonly mutant, could they be the bases for common cancer vaccines? PMID:26225584

  2. Heterogeneous Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulates immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Thanuja D. K.; Darveau, Richard P.; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Yu; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal (gum) disease is a highly prevalent infection and inflammation accounting for the majority of tooth loss in adult population worldwide. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen and its lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) acts as a major virulence attribute to the disease. Herein, we deciphered the overall host response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to two featured isoforms of tetra-acylated PgLPS1435/1449 and penta-acylated PgLPS1690 with reference to E. coli LPS through quantitative proteomics. This study unraveled differentially expressed novel biomarkers of immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs. PgLPS1690 greatly upregulated inflammatory proteins (e.g. cyclophilin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, annexins, galectin, cathepsins and heat shock proteins), whereas the anti-inflammatory proteins (e.g. Annexin A2 and Annexin A6) were significantly upregulated by PgLPS1435/1449. Interestingly, the antioxidants proteins such as mitochondrial manganese-containing superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 5 were only upregulated by PgLPS1690. The cytoskeletal rearrangement-related proteins like myosin were differentially regulated by these PgLPS isoforms. The present study gives new insight into the biological properties of P. gingivalis LPS lipid A moiety that could critically modulate immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs, and thereby enhances our understanding of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:27538450

  3. Myopathic lamin mutations impair nuclear stability in cells and tissue and disrupt nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, Monika; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Lombardi, Maria L.; Isermann, Philipp; Mauermann, Monika; Dialynas, George; Herrmann, Harald; Wallrath, Lori L.; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that assemble into a meshwork underneath the inner nuclear membrane, the nuclear lamina. Mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding lamins A and C, cause a variety of diseases collectively called laminopathies. The disease mechanism for these diverse conditions is not well understood. Since lamins A and C are fundamental determinants of nuclear structure and stability, we tested whether defects in nuclear mechanics could contribute to the disease development, especially in laminopathies affecting mechanically stressed tissue such as muscle. Using skin fibroblasts from laminopathy patients and lamin A/C-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts stably expressing a broad panel of laminopathic lamin A mutations, we found that several mutations associated with muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy resulted in more deformable nuclei; in contrast, lamin mutants responsible for diseases without muscular phenotypes did not alter nuclear deformability. We confirmed our results in intact muscle tissue, demonstrating that nuclei of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster muscle expressing myopathic lamin mutations deformed more under applied strain than controls. In vivo and in vitro studies indicated that the loss of nuclear stiffness resulted from impaired assembly of mutant lamins into the nuclear lamina. Although only a subset of lamin mutations associated with muscular diseases caused increased nuclear deformability, almost all mutations tested had defects in force transmission between the nucleus and cytoskeleton. In conclusion, our results indicate that although defective nuclear stability may play a role in the development of muscle diseases, other factors, such as impaired nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling, likely contribute to the muscle phenotype. PMID:23427149

  4. FtsZ Cytoskeletal Filaments as a Template for Metallic Nanowire Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, Nili; Fichman, Galit; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies can serve as templates for the fabrication of inorganic nanowires due to their morphological reproducibility and innate proclivity to form well-ordered structures. Amongst the variety of naturally occurring nano-scale assemblies, cytoskeletal fibers from diverse biological sources represent a unique family of scaffolds for biomimetics as they efficiently self-assemble in vitro in a controllable manner to form stable filaments. Here, we harness the bacterial FtsZ filament system as a scaffold for protein-based metal nanowires, and further demonstrate the control of wire alignment with the use of an external magnetic field. Due to the ease at which the bacterial FtsZ is overexpressed and purified, as well as the extensive studies of its ultrastructural properties and physiological significance, FtsZ filaments are an ideal substrate for large-scale production and chemical manipulation. Using a biologically compatible electroless metal deposition technique initiated by adsorption of platinum as a surface catalyst, we demonstrate the coating of assembled FtsZ filaments with iron, nickel, gold, and copper to fabricate continuous nanowires with diameters ranging from 10-50 nm. Organic-inorganic hybrid wires were analyzed using high-resolution field-emission-gun transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by energy-dispersive elemental analysis. We also achieved alignment of ferrofluid-coated FtsZ filaments using an external magnetic field. Overall, we provide evidence for the robustness of the FtsZ filament system as a molecular scaffold, and offer an efficient, biocompatible procedure for facile bottom-up assembly of metallic wires on biological templates. We believe that bottom-up fabrication methods as reported herein significantly contribute to the expanding toolkit available for the incorporation of biological materials in nano-scale devices for electronic and electromechanical applications.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of hypothermia on synaptic actin cytoskeletal changes induced by perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Javier; Romero, Juan; Holubiec, Mariana; Barreto, George; González, Janneth; Saint-Martin, Madeleine; Blanco, Eduardo; Carlos Cavicchia, Juan; Castilla, Rocío; Capani, Francisco

    2014-05-14

    Cerebral hypoxia-ischemia damages synaptic proteins, resulting in cytoskeletal alterations, protein aggregation and neuronal death. In the previous works, we have shown neuronal and synaptic changes in rat neostriatum subjected to hypoxia that leads to ubi-protein accumulation. Recently, we also showed that, changes in F-actin organization could be related to early alterations induced by hypoxia in the Central Nervous System. However, little is known about effective treatment to diminish the damage. The main aim of this work is to study the effects of birth hypothermia on the actin cytoskeleton of neostriatal post-synaptic densities (PSD) in 60 days olds rats by immunohistochemistry, photooxidation and western blot. We used 2 different protocols of hypothermia: (a) intrahypoxic hypothermia at 15°C and (b) post-hypoxia hypothermia at 32°C. Consistent with previous data at 30 days, staining with phalloidin-Alexa(488) followed by confocal microscopy analysis showed an increase of F-actin fluorescent staining in the neostriatum of hypoxic animals. Correlative photooxidation electron microscopy confirmed these observations showing an increment in the number of mushroom-shaped F-actin staining spines in neostriatal excitatory synapses in rats subjected to hypoxia. In addition, western blot revealed β-actin increase in PSDs in hypoxic animals. The optic relative density measurement showed a significant difference between controls and hypoxic animals. When hypoxia was induced under hypothermic conditions, the changes observed in actin cytoskeleton were blocked. Post-hypoxic hypothermia showed similar answer but actin cytoskeleton modifications were not totally reverted as we observed at 15°C. These data suggest that the decrease of the body temperature decreases the actin modifications in dendritic spines preventing the neuronal death.

  6. Deciphering the nuclear import pathway for the cytoskeletal red cell protein 4.1R.

    PubMed

    Gascard, P; Nunomura, W; Lee, G; Walensky, L D; Krauss, S W; Takakuwa, Y; Chasis, J A; Mohandas, N; Conboy, J G

    1999-06-01

    The erythroid membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1 is the prototypical member of a genetically and topologically complex family that is generated by combinatorial alternative splicing pathways and is localized at diverse intracellular sites including the nucleus. To explore the molecular determinants for nuclear localization, we transfected COS-7 cells with epitope-tagged versions of natural red cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) isoforms as well as mutagenized and truncated derivatives. Two distant topological sorting signals were required for efficient nuclear import of the 4.1R80 isoform: a basic peptide, KKKRER, encoded by alternative exon 16 and acting as a weak core nuclear localization signal (4.1R NLS), and an acidic peptide, EED, encoded by alternative exon 5. 4.1R80 isoforms lacking either of these two exons showed decreased nuclear import. Fusion of various 4.1R80 constructs to the cytoplasmic reporter protein pyruvate kinase confirmed a requirement for both motifs for full NLS function. 4.1R80 was efficiently imported in the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized COS-7 cells in the presence of recombinant Rch1 (human importin alpha2), importin beta, and GTPase Ran. Quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions using a resonant mirror detection technique showed that 4.1R80 bound to Rch1 in vitro with high affinity (KD = 30 nM). The affinity decreased at least 7- and 20-fold, respectively, if the EED motif in exon 5 or if 4.1R NLS in exon 16 was lacking or mutated, confirming that both motifs were required for efficient importin-mediated nuclear import of 4.1R80.

  7. Cytoskeletal Signaling: Is Memory Encoded in Microtubule Lattices by CaMKII Phosphorylation?

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Hameroff, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Memory is attributed to strengthened synaptic connections among particular brain neurons, yet synaptic membrane components are transient, whereas memories can endure. This suggests synaptic information is encoded and ‘hard-wired’ elsewhere, e.g. at molecular levels within the post-synaptic neuron. In long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular and molecular model for memory, post-synaptic calcium ion (Ca2+) flux activates the hexagonal Ca2+-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII), a dodacameric holoenzyme containing 2 hexagonal sets of 6 kinase domains. Each kinase domain can either phosphorylate substrate proteins, or not (i.e. encoding one bit). Thus each set of extended CaMKII kinases can potentially encode synaptic Ca2+ information via phosphorylation as ordered arrays of binary ‘bits’. Candidate sites for CaMKII phosphorylation-encoded molecular memory include microtubules (MTs), cylindrical organelles whose surfaces represent a regular lattice with a pattern of hexagonal polymers of the protein tubulin. Using molecular mechanics modeling and electrostatic profiling, we find that spatial dimensions and geometry of the extended CaMKII kinase domains precisely match those of MT hexagonal lattices. This suggests sets of six CaMKII kinase domains phosphorylate hexagonal MT lattice neighborhoods collectively, e.g. conveying synaptic information as ordered arrays of six “bits”, and thus “bytes”, with 64 to 5,281 possible bit states per CaMKII-MT byte. Signaling and encoding in MTs and other cytoskeletal structures offer rapid, robust solid-state information processing which may reflect a general code for MT-based memory and information processing within neurons and other eukaryotic cells. PMID:22412364

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of Stomatal Cytoskeletal Patterns during the Activation of Immune Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Masaki; Higaki, Takumi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically viewed as primarily functioning in the regulation of gas and water vapor exchange, it is now evident that stomata serve an important role in plant immunity. Indeed, in addition to classically defined functions related to cell architecture and movement, the actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a central component of the plant immune system, underpinning not only processes related to cell shape and movement, but also receptor activation and signaling. Using high resolution quantitative imaging techniques, the temporal and spatial changes in the actin microfilament array during diurnal cycling of stomatal guard cells has revealed a highly orchestrated transition from random arrays to ordered bundled filaments. While recent studies have demonstrated that plant stomata close in response to pathogen infection, an evaluation of stimulus-induced changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics during immune activation in the guard cell, as well as the relationship of these changes to the function of the actin cytoskeleton and stomatal aperture, remains undefined. In the current study, we employed quantitative cell imaging and hierarchical clustering analyses to define the response of the guard cell actin cytoskeleton to pathogen infection and the elicitation of immune signaling. Using this approach, we demonstrate that stomatal-localized actin filaments respond rapidly, and specifically, to both bacterial phytopathogens and purified pathogen elicitors. Notably, we demonstrate that higher order temporal and spatial changes in the filament array show distinct patterns of organization during immune activation, and that changes in the naïve diurnal oscillations of guard cell actin filaments are perturbed by pathogens, and that these changes parallel pathogen-induced stomatal gating. The data presented herein demonstrate the application of a highly tractable and quantifiable method to assign transitions in actin filament organization to the activation of immune signaling in

  9. Cytoskeletal changes induced by allosteric modulators of calcium-sensing receptor in esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen L; Rabon, Edd C; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Islam, Mohammed T; Schmieg, John J; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein-coupled receptor, plays a role in glandular and fluid secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, and regulates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells. We examined the expression of CaSR in normal and pathological conditions of human esophagus and investigated the effect of a CaSR agonist, cinacalcet (CCT), and antagonist, calhex (CHX), on cell growth and cell–cell junctional proteins in primary cultures of porcine stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. We used immunohistochemistry and Western analysis to monitor expression of CaSR and cell–cell adhesion molecules, and MTT assay to monitor cell proliferation in cultured esophageal cells. CCT treatment significantly reduced proliferation, changed the cell shape from polygonal to spindle-like, and caused redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, it reduced expression of β-catenin by 35% (P < 0.02) and increased expression of a proteolysis cleavage fragment of E-cadherin, Ecad/CFT2, by 2.3 folds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, CHX treatment enhanced cell proliferation by 27% (P < 0.01), increased the expression of p120-catenin by 24% (P < 0.04), and of Rho, a GTPase involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, by 18% (P < 0.03). In conclusion, CaSR is expressed in normal esophagus as well as in Barrett’s, esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Long-term activation of CaSR with CCT disrupted the cadherin–catenin complex, induced cytoskeletal remodeling, actin fiber formation, and redistribution of CaSR to the nuclear area. These changes indicate a significant and complex role of CaSR in epithelial remodeling and barrier function of esophageal cells. PMID:26603452

  10. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Cytoskeletal changes induced by allosteric modulators of calcium-sensing receptor in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen L; Rabon, Edd C; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Islam, Mohammed T; Schmieg, John J; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-11-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein-coupled receptor, plays a role in glandular and fluid secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, and regulates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells. We examined the expression of CaSR in normal and pathological conditions of human esophagus and investigated the effect of a CaSR agonist, cinacalcet (CCT), and antagonist, calhex (CHX), on cell growth and cell-cell junctional proteins in primary cultures of porcine stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. We used immunohistochemistry and Western analysis to monitor expression of CaSR and cell-cell adhesion molecules, and MTT assay to monitor cell proliferation in cultured esophageal cells. CCT treatment significantly reduced proliferation, changed the cell shape from polygonal to spindle-like, and caused redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, it reduced expression of β-catenin by 35% (P < 0.02) and increased expression of a proteolysis cleavage fragment of E-cadherin, Ecad/CFT2, by 2.3 folds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, CHX treatment enhanced cell proliferation by 27% (P < 0.01), increased the expression of p120-catenin by 24% (P < 0.04), and of Rho, a GTPase involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, by 18% (P < 0.03). In conclusion, CaSR is expressed in normal esophagus as well as in Barrett's, esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Long-term activation of CaSR with CCT disrupted the cadherin-catenin complex, induced cytoskeletal remodeling, actin fiber formation, and redistribution of CaSR to the nuclear area. These changes indicate a significant and complex role of CaSR in epithelial remodeling and barrier function of esophageal cells. PMID:26603452

  12. LIGHT signals directly to intestinal epithelia to cause barrier dysfunction via cytoskeletal and endocytic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Brad T.; Wang, Fengjun; Shen, Le; Clayburgh, Daniel R.; Su, Liping; Wang, Yingmin; Fu, Yang-Xin; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS LIGHT (lymphotoxin-like inducible protein that competes with glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry on T cells) is a TNF core family member that regulates T cell activation and causes experimental inflammatory bowel disease. Additional data suggest that LIGHT may be involved in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to determine if LIGHT was capable of signaling directly to intestinal epithelia and to define the mechanisms and consequences of such signaling. METHODS The effects of LIGHT and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) on barrier function, cytoskeletal regulation, and tight junction structure were assessed in mice and intestinal epithelial monolayers. RESULTS LIGHT induced barrier loss in cultured epithelia via myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation; both barrier loss and MLC phosphorylation were reversed by MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibition. IFN-γ pretreatment, which induced lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) expression, was required for these effects and neither barrier dysfunction nor intestinal epithelial MLC phosphorylation occurred in LTβR-knockout mice. In cultured monolayers, endocytosis of the tight junction protein occludin correlated with barrier loss. Internalized occludin co-localized with caveolin-1. LIGHT-induced occludin endocytosis and barrier loss were both prevented by inhibition of caveolar endocytosis. CONCLUSIONS T cell-derived LIGHT activates intestinal epithelial LTβR to disrupt barrier function. This requires MLCK activation and caveolar endocytosis. These data suggest a novel role for LIGHT in disease pathogenesis and suggest that inhibition of MLCK-dependent caveolar endocytosis may represent an approach to restoring barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17570213

  13. FtsZ Cytoskeletal Filaments as a Template for Metallic Nanowire Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, Nili; Fichman, Galit; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies can serve as templates for the fabrication of inorganic nanowires due to their morphological reproducibility and innate proclivity to form well-ordered structures. Amongst the variety of naturally occurring nano-scale assemblies, cytoskeletal fibers from diverse biological sources represent a unique family of scaffolds for biomimetics as they efficiently self-assemble in vitro in a controllable manner to form stable filaments. Here, we harness the bacterial FtsZ filament system as a scaffold for protein-based metal nanowires, and further demonstrate the control of wire alignment with the use of an external magnetic field. Due to the ease at which the bacterial FtsZ is overexpressed and purified, as well as the extensive studies of its ultrastructural properties and physiological significance, FtsZ filaments are an ideal substrate for large-scale production and chemical manipulation. Using a biologically compatible electroless metal deposition technique initiated by adsorption of platinum as a surface catalyst, we demonstrate the coating of assembled FtsZ filaments with iron, nickel, gold, and copper to fabricate continuous nanowires with diameters ranging from 10-50 nm. Organic-inorganic hybrid wires were analyzed using high-resolution field-emission-gun transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by energy-dispersive elemental analysis. We also achieved alignment of ferrofluid-coated FtsZ filaments using an external magnetic field. Overall, we provide evidence for the robustness of the FtsZ filament system as a molecular scaffold, and offer an efficient, biocompatible procedure for facile bottom-up assembly of metallic wires on biological templates. We believe that bottom-up fabrication methods as reported herein significantly contribute to the expanding toolkit available for the incorporation of biological materials in nano-scale devices for electronic and electromechanical applications. PMID:26328401

  14. Freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells: Differentiation commitment and cytoskeletal disturbances in culture.

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kipryushina, Yulia O; Maiorova, Mariia A; Boroda, Andrey V

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells. To significantly reduce the loss of physiological activity of these cells that occurs after cryopreservation and to study the effects of ultra-low temperatures on sea urchin embryonic cells, we tested the ability of the cells to differentiate into spiculogenic or pigment directions in culture, including an evaluation of the expression of some genes involved in pigment differentiation. A morphological analysis of cytoskeletal disturbances after freezing in a combination of penetrating (dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol) and non-penetrating (trehalose and polyvinylpyrrolidone) cryoprotectants revealed that the distribution pattern of filamentous actin and tubulin was similar to that in the control cultures. In contrast, very rare spreading cells and a small number of cells with filamentous actin and tubulin were detected after freezing in the presence of only non-penetrating cryoprotectants. The largest number of pigment cells was found in cultures frozen with trehalose or trehalose and dimethyl sulfoxide. The ability to induce the spicule formation was lost in the cells frozen only with non-penetrating cryoprotectants, while it was maximal in cultures frozen in a cryoprotective mixture containing both non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants (particularly, when ethylene glycol was present). Using different markers for cell state assessment, an effective cryopreservation protocol for sea urchin cells was developed: three-step freezing with a low cooling rate (1-2°C/min) and a combination of non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants made it possible to obtain a high level of cell viability (up to 65-80%).

  15. Neuroprotective effects of hypothermia on synaptic actin cytoskeletal changes induced by perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Javier; Romero, Juan; Holubiec, Mariana; Barreto, George; González, Janneth; Saint-Martin, Madeleine; Blanco, Eduardo; Carlos Cavicchia, Juan; Castilla, Rocío; Capani, Francisco

    2014-05-14

    Cerebral hypoxia-ischemia damages synaptic proteins, resulting in cytoskeletal alterations, protein aggregation and neuronal death. In the previous works, we have shown neuronal and synaptic changes in rat neostriatum subjected to hypoxia that leads to ubi-protein accumulation. Recently, we also showed that, changes in F-actin organization could be related to early alterations induced by hypoxia in the Central Nervous System. However, little is known about effective treatment to diminish the damage. The main aim of this work is to study the effects of birth hypothermia on the actin cytoskeleton of neostriatal post-synaptic densities (PSD) in 60 days olds rats by immunohistochemistry, photooxidation and western blot. We used 2 different protocols of hypothermia: (a) intrahypoxic hypothermia at 15°C and (b) post-hypoxia hypothermia at 32°C. Consistent with previous data at 30 days, staining with phalloidin-Alexa(488) followed by confocal microscopy analysis showed an increase of F-actin fluorescent staining in the neostriatum of hypoxic animals. Correlative photooxidation electron microscopy confirmed these observations showing an increment in the number of mushroom-shaped F-actin staining spines in neostriatal excitatory synapses in rats subjected to hypoxia. In addition, western blot revealed β-actin increase in PSDs in hypoxic animals. The optic relative density measurement showed a significant difference between controls and hypoxic animals. When hypoxia was induced under hypothermic conditions, the changes observed in actin cytoskeleton were blocked. Post-hypoxic hypothermia showed similar answer but actin cytoskeleton modifications were not totally reverted as we observed at 15°C. These data suggest that the decrease of the body temperature decreases the actin modifications in dendritic spines preventing the neuronal death. PMID:24685534

  16. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Stomatal Cytoskeletal Patterns during the Activation of Immune Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Masaki; Higaki, Takumi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Day, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Historically viewed as primarily functioning in the regulation of gas and water vapor exchange, it is now evident that stomata serve an important role in plant immunity. Indeed, in addition to classically defined functions related to cell architecture and movement, the actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a central component of the plant immune system, underpinning not only processes related to cell shape and movement, but also receptor activation and signaling. Using high resolution quantitative imaging techniques, the temporal and spatial changes in the actin microfilament array during diurnal cycling of stomatal guard cells has revealed a highly orchestrated transition from random arrays to ordered bundled filaments. While recent studies have demonstrated that plant stomata close in response to pathogen infection, an evaluation of stimulus-induced changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics during immune activation in the guard cell, as well as the relationship of these changes to the function of the actin cytoskeleton and stomatal aperture, remains undefined. In the current study, we employed quantitative cell imaging and hierarchical clustering analyses to define the response of the guard cell actin cytoskeleton to pathogen infection and the elicitation of immune signaling. Using this approach, we demonstrate that stomatal-localized actin filaments respond rapidly, and specifically, to both bacterial phytopathogens and purified pathogen elicitors. Notably, we demonstrate that higher order temporal and spatial changes in the filament array show distinct patterns of organization during immune activation, and that changes in the naïve diurnal oscillations of guard cell actin filaments are perturbed by pathogens, and that these changes parallel pathogen-induced stomatal gating. The data presented herein demonstrate the application of a highly tractable and quantifiable method to assign transitions in actin filament organization to the activation of immune signaling in

  18. Modeling cytoskeletal traffic: an interplay between passive diffusion and active transport.

    PubMed

    Neri, Izaak; Kern, Norbert; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    We introduce the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with Langmuir kinetics on a network as a microscopic model for active motor protein transport on the cytoskeleton, immersed in the diffusive cytoplasm. We discuss how the interplay between active transport along a network and infinite diffusion in a bulk reservoir leads to a heterogeneous matter distribution on various scales: we find three regimes for steady state transport, corresponding to the scale of the network, of individual segments, or local to sites. At low exchange rates strong density heterogeneities develop between different segments in the network. In this regime one has to consider the topological complexity of the whole network to describe transport. In contrast, at moderate exchange rates the transport through the network decouples, and the physics is determined by single segments and the local topology. At last, for very high exchange rates the homogeneous Langmuir process dominates the stationary state. We introduce effective rate diagrams for the network to identify these different regimes. Based on this method we develop an intuitive but generic picture of how the stationary state of excluded volume processes on complex networks can be understood in terms of the single-segment phase diagram.

  19. Autothixotropy of Water and its Possible Importance for the Cytoskeletal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vybíral, Bohumil

    2011-12-01

    an organization of water in cytoskeletal structures are outlined.

  20. Effects of transforming growth factor type beta on expression of cytoskeletal proteins in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lomri, A.; Marie, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many cell types in vitro. We have examined the effects of TGF beta on cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization in relation to parameters of cell proliferation and differentiation in endosteal osteoblastic cells isolated from mouse caudal vertebrae. Treatment of mouse osteoblastic cells cultured in serum free medium for 24 hours with TGF beta (1.5-30 ng/mL) slightly (-23%) inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. In parallel, TGF beta (0.5-30 ng/mL, 24 hours) greatly increased cell replication as evaluated by (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA (157% to 325% of controls). At a median dose (1.5 ng/mL) that affected both alkaline phosphatase and DNA synthesis (235% of controls) TGF beta induced rapid (six hours) cell respreading of quiescent mouse osteoblastic cells. This effect was associated with increased polymerization of actin, alpha actinin, and tubulins, as evaluated by both biochemical and immunofluorescence methods. In addition, TGF beta (1.5 ng/mL) increased the de novo biosynthesis of actin, alpha actinin, vimentin, and tubulins, as determined by {sup 35}S methionine labeling and fractionation of cytoskeletal proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These effects were rapid and transient, as they occurred at six hours and were reversed after 24 hours of TGF beta exposure. The results indicate that the stimulatory effect of TGF beta on DNA synthesis in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells is associated with a transient increase in cell spreading associated with enhanced polymerization and synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins.

  1. Cytoskeletal Regulation Dominates Temperature-Sensitive Proteomic Changes of Hibernation in Forebrain of 13-Lined Ground Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy – wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  2. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Martin, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  3. H-ras-transformed NRK-52E renal epithelial cells have altered growth, morphology, and cytoskeletal structure that correlates with renal cell carcinoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Best, C J; Tanzer, L R; Phelps, P C; Merriman, R L; Boder, G G; Trump, B F; Elliget, K A

    1999-04-01

    We studied the effect of the ras oncogene on the growth kinetics, morphology, cytoskeletal structure, and tumorigenicity of the widely used NRK-52E rat kidney epithelial cell line and two H-ras oncogene-transformed cell lines, H/1.2-NRK-52E (H/1.2) and H/6.1-NRK-52E (H/6.1). Population doubling times of NRK-52E, H/1.2, and H/6.1 cells were 28, 26, and 24 h, respectively, with the transformed cells reaching higher saturation densities than the parent cells. NRK-52E cells had typical epithelial morphology with growth in colonies. H/1.2 and H/6.1 cell colonies were more closely packed, highly condensed, and had increased plasma membrane ruffling compared to parent cell colonies. NRK-52E cells showed microfilament, microtubule, and intermediate filament networks typical of epithelial cells, while H/1.2 and H/6.1 cells showed altered cytoskeleton architecture, with decreased stress fibers and increased microtubule and intermediate filament staining at the microtubule organizing center. H/1.2 and H/6.1 cells proliferated in an in vitro soft agar transformation assay, indicating anchorage-independence, and rapidly formed tumors in vivo with characteristics of renal cell carcinoma, including mixed populations of sarcomatoid, granular, and clear cells. H/6.1 cells consistently showed more extensive alterations of growth kinetics, morphology, and cytoskeleton than H/1.2 cells, and formed tumors of a more aggressive phenotype. These data suggest that analysis of renal cell characteristics in vitro may have potential in predicting tumor behavior in vivo, and significantly contribute to the utility of these cell lines as in vitro models for examining renal epithelial cell biology and the role of the ras proto-oncogene in signal transduction involving the cytoskeleton.

  4. Antibody-based analysis reveals “filamentous vs. non-filamentous” and “cytoplasmic vs. nuclear” crosstalk of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kumeta, Masahiro; Hirai, Yuya; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-12-10

    To uncover the molecular composition and dynamics of the functional scaffold for the nucleus, three fractions of biochemically-stable nuclear protein complexes were extracted and used as immunogens to produce a variety of monoclonal antibodies. Many helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were identified as antigens, suggesting their dynamic contribution to nuclear architecture and function. Interestingly, sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform of certain cytoskeletal proteins; distinct molecular forms of keratin and actinin were found in the nucleus. Their nuclear shuttling properties were verified by the apparent nuclear accumulations under inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Nuclear keratins do not take an obvious filamentous structure, as was revealed by non-filamentous cytoplasmic keratin-specific monoclonal antibody. These results suggest the distinct roles of the helix-based cytoskeletal proteins in the nucleus. - Highlights: • A set of monoclonal antibodies were raised against nuclear scaffold proteins. • Helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were involved in nuclear scaffold. • Many cytoskeletal components shuttle into the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. • Sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform. • Nuclear keratin is soluble and does not form an obvious filamentous structure.

  5. The cytoskeletal organization of breast carcinoma and fibroblast cells inside three dimensional (3-D) isotropic silicon microstructures.

    PubMed

    Nikkhah, Mehdi; Strobl, Jeannine S; De Vita, Raffaella; Agah, Masoud

    2010-06-01

    Studying the cytoskeletal organization as cells interact in their local microenvironment is interest of biological science, tissue engineering and cancer diagnosis applications. Herein, we describe the behavior of cell lines obtained from metastatic breast tumor pleural effusions (MDA-MB-231), normal fibrocystic mammary epithelium (MCF10A), and HS68 normal fibroblasts inside three dimensional (3-D) isotropic silicon microstructures fabricated by a single-mask, single-isotropic-etch process. We report differences in adhesion, mechanism of force balance within the cytoskeleton, and deformability among these cell types inside the 3-D microenvironment. HS68 fibroblasts typically stretched and formed vinculin-rich focal adhesions at anchor sites inside the etched cavities. In contrast, MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells adopted the curved surfaces of isotropic microstructures and exhibited more diffuse vinculin cytoplasmic staining in addition to vinculin localized in focal adhesions. The measurement of cells elasticity using atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation revealed that HS68 cells are significantly stiffer (p < 0.0001) than MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells. Upon microtubule disruption with nocodazole, fibroblasts no longer stretched, but adhesion of MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 within the etched features remained unaltered. Our findings are consistent with tensegrity theory. The 3-D microstructures have the potential to probe cytoskeletal-based differences between healthy and diseased cells that can provide biomarkers for diagnostics purposes. PMID:20207413

  6. Astrocytic cytoskeletal atrophy in the medial prefrontal cortex of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Chvátal, Alexander; Syková, Eva; Rodríguez, José J

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions, reflecting pathological damage to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as well as to the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. Astrocytes maintain the internal homeostasis of the CNS and are fundamentally involved in neuropathological processes, including AD. Here, we analysed the astrocytic cytoskeletal changes within the mPFC of a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3 × Tg-AD) by measuring the surface area and volume of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive profiles in relation to the build-up and presence of amyloid-β (Aβ), and compared the results with those found in non-transgenic control animals at different ages. 3 × Tg-AD animals showed clear astroglial cytoskeletal atrophy, which appeared at an early age (3 months; 33% and 47% decrease in GFAP-positive surface area and volume, respectively) and remained throughout the disease progression at 9, 12 and 18 months old (29% and 36%; 37% and 35%; 43% and 37%, respectively). This atrophy was independent of Aβ accumulation, as only a few GFAP-positive cells were localized around Aβ aggregates, which suggests no direct relationship with Aβ toxicity. Thus, our results indicate that the progressive reduction in astrocytic branching and domain in the mPFC can account for the integrative dysfunction leading to the cognitive deficits and memory disturbances observed in AD. PMID:22738374

  7. Attenuation of LDHA expression in cancer cells leads to redox-dependent alterations in cytoskeletal structure and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Arseneault, Robert; Chien, Andrew; Newington, Jordan T; Rappon, Tim; Harris, Richard; Cumming, Robert C

    2013-09-28

    Aerobic glycolysis, the preferential use of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen to meet cellular metabolic demands, is a near universal feature of cancer. This unique type of metabolism is thought to protect cancer cells from damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondria. Using the cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 it is shown that shRNA mediated knockdown of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), a key mediator of aerobic glycolysis, results in elevated mitochondrial ROS production and a concomitant decrease in cell proliferation and motility. Redox-sensitive proteins affected by oxidative stress associated with LDHA knockdown were identified by Redox 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry. In particular, tropomyosin (Tm) isoforms Tm4, Tm5NM1 and Tm5NM5, proteins involved in cell migration and cytoskeletal dynamics, exhibited changes in disulfide bonding and co-localized with peri-nuclear actin aggregates in LDHA knockdown cells. In contrast, treatment with the thiol-based antioxidant N-acetylcysteine promoted the relocalization of Tms to cortical actin microfilaments and partially rescued the migration defects associated with attenuated LDHA expression. These results suggest that aerobic glycolysis and reduced mitochondrial ROS production create an environment conducive to cytoskeletal remodeling; key events linked to the high cell motility associated with cancer.

  8. A theoretical model of cytokinesis implicates feedback between membrane curvature and cytoskeletal organization in asymmetric cytokinetic furrowing

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Jonas F.; Zhang, Li; Phi, Tan-Trao; Lacroix, Benjamin; Maddox, Paul S.; Liu, Jian; Maddox, Amy Shaub

    2016-01-01

    During cytokinesis, the cell undergoes a dramatic shape change as it divides into two daughter cells. Cell shape changes in cytokinesis are driven by a cortical ring rich in actin filaments and nonmuscle myosin II. The ring closes via actomyosin contraction coupled with actin depolymerization. Of interest, ring closure and hence the furrow ingression are nonconcentric (asymmetric) within the division plane across Metazoa. This nonconcentricity can occur and persist even without preexisting asymmetric cues, such as spindle placement or cellular adhesions. Cell-autonomous asymmetry is not explained by current models. We combined quantitative high-resolution live-cell microscopy with theoretical modeling to explore the mechanistic basis for asymmetric cytokinesis in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, with the goal of uncovering basic principles of ring closure. Our theoretical model suggests that feedback among membrane curvature, cytoskeletal alignment, and contractility is responsible for asymmetric cytokinetic furrowing. It also accurately predicts experimental perturbations of conserved ring proteins. The model further suggests that curvature-mediated filament alignment speeds up furrow closure while promoting energy efficiency. Collectively our work underscores the importance of membrane–cytoskeletal anchoring and suggests conserved molecular mechanisms for this activity. PMID:26912796

  9. Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Drosophila Germline Ring Canals Depends on Kelch Function in a Cullin-RING E3 Ligase.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Andrew M; Mannix, Katelynn M; Cooley, Lynn

    2015-11-01

    The Drosophila Kelch protein is required to organize the ovarian ring canal cytoskeleton. Kelch binds and cross-links F-actin in vitro, and it also functions with Cullin 3 (Cul3) as a component of a ubiquitin E3 ligase. How these two activities contribute to cytoskeletal remodeling in vivo is not known. We used targeted mutagenesis to investigate the mechanism of Kelch function. We tested a model in which Cul3-dependent degradation of Kelch is required for its function, but we found no evidence to support this hypothesis. However, we found that mutant Kelch deficient in its ability to interact with Cul3 failed to rescue the kelch cytoskeletal defects, suggesting that ubiquitin ligase activity is the principal activity required in vivo. We also determined that the proteasome is required with Kelch to promote the ordered growth of the ring canal cytoskeleton. These results indicate that Kelch organizes the cytoskeleton in vivo by targeting a protein substrate for degradation by the proteasome.

  10. Astrocytic cytoskeletal atrophy in the medial prefrontal cortex of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Chvátal, Alexander; Syková, Eva; Rodríguez, José J

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions, reflecting pathological damage to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as well as to the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. Astrocytes maintain the internal homeostasis of the CNS and are fundamentally involved in neuropathological processes, including AD. Here, we analysed the astrocytic cytoskeletal changes within the mPFC of a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3 × Tg-AD) by measuring the surface area and volume of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive profiles in relation to the build-up and presence of amyloid-β (Aβ), and compared the results with those found in non-transgenic control animals at different ages. 3 × Tg-AD animals showed clear astroglial cytoskeletal atrophy, which appeared at an early age (3 months; 33% and 47% decrease in GFAP-positive surface area and volume, respectively) and remained throughout the disease progression at 9, 12 and 18 months old (29% and 36%; 37% and 35%; 43% and 37%, respectively). This atrophy was independent of Aβ accumulation, as only a few GFAP-positive cells were localized around Aβ aggregates, which suggests no direct relationship with Aβ toxicity. Thus, our results indicate that the progressive reduction in astrocytic branching and domain in the mPFC can account for the integrative dysfunction leading to the cognitive deficits and memory disturbances observed in AD.

  11. A theoretical model of cytokinesis implicates feedback between membrane curvature and cytoskeletal organization in asymmetric cytokinetic furrowing.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Jonas F; Zhang, Li; Phi, Tan-Trao; Lacroix, Benjamin; Maddox, Paul S; Liu, Jian; Maddox, Amy Shaub

    2016-04-15

    During cytokinesis, the cell undergoes a dramatic shape change as it divides into two daughter cells. Cell shape changes in cytokinesis are driven by a cortical ring rich in actin filaments and nonmuscle myosin II. The ring closes via actomyosin contraction coupled with actin depolymerization. Of interest, ring closure and hence the furrow ingression are nonconcentric (asymmetric) within the division plane across Metazoa. This nonconcentricity can occur and persist even without preexisting asymmetric cues, such as spindle placement or cellular adhesions. Cell-autonomous asymmetry is not explained by current models. We combined quantitative high-resolution live-cell microscopy with theoretical modeling to explore the mechanistic basis for asymmetric cytokinesis in theCaenorhabditis eleganszygote, with the goal of uncovering basic principles of ring closure. Our theoretical model suggests that feedback among membrane curvature, cytoskeletal alignment, and contractility is responsible for asymmetric cytokinetic furrowing. It also accurately predicts experimental perturbations of conserved ring proteins. The model further suggests that curvature-mediated filament alignment speeds up furrow closure while promoting energy efficiency. Collectively our work underscores the importance of membrane-cytoskeletal anchoring and suggests conserved molecular mechanisms for this activity. PMID:26912796

  12. Ultrastructural appearance and cytoskeletal architecture of the clear, chromophilic, and chromophobe types of human renal cell carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gerharz, C D; Moll, R; Störkel, S; Ramp, U; Thoenes, W; Gabbert, H E

    1993-03-01

    The clear, chromophilic, and chromophobe types of human renal cell carcinoma have been defined as distinct morphological entities and can be clearly separated by differences of ultrastructural appearance, cytoskeletal architecture, enzyme synthesis, and cytogenetic aberrations. In this report, the cytomorphological aspects of these tumor types are compared in vitro, showing that essential ultrastructural and cytoskeletal characteristics of each tumor type are expressed even after prolonged in vitro cultivation. The pattern of intermediate filament proteins of each tumor type was preserved in vitro, permitting the separation of exclusively cytokeratin-positive chromophobe tumor cells from clear and chromophilic tumor cells with a co-expression of vimentin and cytokeratins. In vitro, the chromophobe tumor cells continued to exhibit abundant cytoplasmatic microvesicles and sparsely distributed "studded" vesicles, which are known to be characteristic features of this tumor type in vivo. This observation confirmed the structural similarity of the chromophobe cell to the 'intercalated cell' of the cortical collecting duct and provided further evidence for the histogenetic derivation of this tumor subtype from the collecting duct system.

  13. Intermediate (skeletin) filaments in heart Purkinje fibers. A correlative morphological and biochemical identification with evidence of a cytoskeletal function

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Cow Purkinje fibers contain a population of free cytoplasmic filaments which consistently differ in ultrastructural appearance from actin and myosin filaments, irrespective of preparation technique. The fixation and staining techniques, however, influenced the filament diameter, which was found to be 7.4--9.5 nm for filaments in plastic-embedded material, and 7.0 nm in cryo-sectioned material, thus intermediate as compared to actin and myosin filaments. Cross-sectional profiles suggested that the intermediate-sized filaments are composed of four subfilaments. To provide a basis for further biochemical investigations on the filaments, extraction procedures were carried out to remove other cell organelles. Electron microscopy showed that undulating bundles of intermediate filaments converging towards desmosomes still remained, after the extractions, together with Z-disk material. In spite of the extensive extraction, the shape of the individual cells and the assemblies of cell bundles remained intact. This confirms that the intermediate filaments of cow Purkinje fibers together with desmosomes do in fact have a cytoskeletal function. On account of (a) the cytoskeletal function of the filaments, (b) the similarities to the smooth muscle "100-A filament" protein subunit skeletin, and (c) the inadequate and confusing existing terminology, we suggest that the filaments be named "skeletin filaments." PMID:572365

  14. Actin Grips: Circular Actin-Rich Cytoskeletal Structures that Mediate the Wrapping of Polymeric Microfibers by Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Desiree; Park, DoYoung; Anghelina, Mirela; Pecot, Thierry; Machiraju, Raghu; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John; Thomas, Jessica; Cole, Sara; Moldovan, Leni; Moldovan, Nicanor I.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of endothelial-lineage cells with three-dimensional substrates was much less studied than that with flat culture surfaces. We investigated the in vitro attachment of both mature endothelial cells (ECs) and of less differentiated EC colony-forming cells to poly-e-capro-lactone (PCL) fibers with diameters in 5–20 μm range (‘scaffold microfibers’, SMFs). We found that notwithstanding the poor intrinsic adhesiveness to PCL, both cell types completely wrapped the SMFs after long-term cultivation, thus attaining a cylindrical morphology. In this system, both EC types grew vigorously for more than a week and became increasingly more differentiated, as shown by multiplexed gene expression. Three-dimensional reconstructions from multiphoton confocal microscopy images using custom software showed that the filamentous (F) actin bundles took a conspicuous ring-like organization around the SMFs. Unlike the classical F-actin-containing stress fibers, these rings were not associated with either focal adhesions or intermediate filaments. We also demonstrated that plasma membrane boundaries adjacent to these circular cytoskeletal structures were tightly yet dynamically apposed to the SMFs, for which reason we suggest to call them ‘actin grips’. In conclusion, we describe a particular form of F-actin assembly with relevance for cytoskeletal organization in response to biomaterials, for endothelial-specific cell behavior in vitro and in vivo, and for tissue engineering. PMID:25818446

  15. Influence of maternal hyperthyroidism in the rat on the expression of neuronal and astrocytic cytoskeletal proteins in fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Evans, I M; Pickard, M R; Sinha, A K; Leonard, A J; Sampson, D C; Ekins, R P

    2002-12-01

    Maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy impairs brain function in human and rat offspring, but little is known regarding the influence of maternal hyperthyroidism on neurodevelopment. We have previously shown that the expression of neuronal and glial differentiation markers in fetal brain is compromised in hypothyroid rat dam pregnancies and have now therefore extended this investigation to hyperthyroid rat dams. Study groups comprised partially thyroidectomised dams, implanted with osmotic pumps infusing either vehicle (TX dams) or a supraphysiological dose of thyroxine (T4) (HYPER dams), and euthyroid dams infused with vehicle (N dams). Cytoskeletal protein abundance was determined in fetal brain at 21 days of gestation by immunoblot analysis. Relative to N dams, circulating total T4 levels were reduced to around one-third in TX dams but were doubled in HYPER dams. Fetal brain weight was increased in HYPER dams, whereas litter size and fetal body weight were reduced in TX dams. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression was similar in HYPER and TX dams, being reduced in both cases relative to N dams. alpha-Internexin (INX) abundance was reduced in HYPER dams and increased in TX dams, whereas neurofilament 68 (NF68) exhibited increased abundance in HYPER dams. Furthermore, INX was inversely related to - and NF68 directly related to - maternal serum total T4 levels, independently of fetal brain weight. In conclusion, maternal hyperthyroidism compromises the expression of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins in late fetal brain, suggestive of a pattern of accelerated neuronal differentiation.

  16. Reversible binding kinetics of a cytoskeletal protein at the erythrocyte submembrane.

    PubMed Central

    Stout, A. L.; Axelrod, D.

    1994-01-01

    removed most of the band 3. CF-4.1 binded significantly less to these trypsinized membranes and most of the decrease was a loss of the irreversibly binding sites. The third treatment simply preserved the native 4.1 and ankyrin. CF-4.1 binded less to this sample too, and the loss involved both the irreversible and reversible sites. The fourth treatment blocked the gycophorin C sites on the native 4.1-stripped membranes with an antibody. CF-4.1 again binded less to this sample than to a nonimmune serum control, and almost all of the decrease is a loss of irreversible sites. These rest suggest that 1) protein 4.1 binds to membrane or submembrane sites at least in part reversibly ; 2) the most reversible sites are probably not proteinaceous and not glycophorin C, but possibly are phospholipids (especially phosphatidylserine); and 3) TIWRFRAP can successfully examine the fast reversible dynamics of cytoskeletal components binding to biological membranes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7811947

  17. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K.; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G.; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K.; S. B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G.; Gandhi, Mayuri N.; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity. PMID:27090372

  18. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chin-Mei Chang-Liu

    1995-06-01

    Experiments examined the effects of radiation dose-rate and protein synthesis inhibition expression of cytoskeletal and matrix elements in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for neutrons when comparing expression of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin genes. Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin-mRNA following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of actin mRNA. Cycloheximide abrogated induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to radiation. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Impairment of cytoskeletal protein transport due to aging or beta,beta'-iminodipropionitrile intoxication in the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, T; Komiya, Y

    1994-01-01

    Three major age-related changes in cytoskeletal organization and metabolism in the axon were observed by comparing slow axonal transport in the sciatic nerves of rats aged 7-80 weeks: (a) a progressive decrease in the rate of slow axonal transport, (b) a tight association of cold-insoluble tubulin with the neurofilament (NF) proteins and (c) an accelerated proteolysis of the severely retarded proteins, especially NF proteins. These changes were reproduced to a large extent in the young animal by intoxication with beta,beta'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN). As IDPN is known to impair the axonal transport of NF proteins and cause segregation of NFs from microtubules, the results indicate that NF-microtubule interaction is one of the major factors regulating the axonal cytoskeleton. The importance of the balance between transport rate and degradation rate in the maintenance of the normal axonal cytoskeleton is stressed especially in the aged animal.

  20. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; S B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G; Gandhi, Mayuri N; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity. PMID:27090372

  1. Hic-5 Regulates Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Expression of Fibrogenic Markers and Myocilin in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan Paranji; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of inducible focal adhesion (FA) protein Hic-5 in actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FA formation, fibrogenic activity, and expression of myocilin in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Methods Using primary cultures of human TM (HTM) cells, the effects of various external factors on Hic-5 protein levels, as well as the effects of recombinant Hic-5 and Hic-5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on actin cytoskeleton, FAs, myocilin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and collagen-1 were determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses. Results Hic-5 distributes discretely to the FAs in HTM cells and throughout the TM and Schlemm's canal of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow pathway. Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and RhoA significantly increased Hic-5 protein levels in HTM cells in association with reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and FAs. While recombinant Hic-5 induced actin stress fibers, FAs, αv integrin redistribution to the FAs, increased levels of αSMA, collagen-1, and myocilin, Hic-5 siRNA suppressed most of these responses in HTM cells. Hic-5 siRNA also suppressed TGF-β2-induced fibrogenic activity and dexamethasone-induced myocilin expression in HTM cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results reveal that Hic-5, whose levels were increased by various external factors implicated in elevated intraocular pressure, induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FAs, expression of fibrogenic markers, and myocilin in HTM cells. These characteristics of Hic-5 in TM cells indicate its importance in regulation of AH outflow through the TM in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26313302

  2. Changes in myocardial cytoskeletal intermediate filaments and myocyte contractile dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy: an in vivo study in humans

    PubMed Central

    Di, S; Marotta, M; Salvatore, G; Cudemo, G; Cuda, G; De Vivo, F; Di, B; Ciaramella, F; Caputo, G; de Divitiis, O

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To investigate in vivo the intermediate cytoskeletal filaments desmin and vimentin in myocardial tissues from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and to determine whether alterations in these proteins are associated with impaired contractility.
METHODS—Endomyocardial biopsies were performed in 12 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in 12 controls (six women with breast cancer before anthracycline chemotherapy and six male donors for heart transplantation). Biopsy specimens were analysed by light microscopy and immunochemistry (desmin, vimentin). Myocyte contractile protein function was evaluated by the actin-myosin in vitro motility assay. Left ventricular ejection fraction was assessed by echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography.
RESULTS—Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had a greater cardiomyocyte diameter than controls (p < 0.01). The increase in cell size was associated with a reduction in contractile function, as assessed by actin-myosin motility (r = −0.643; p < 0.01). Quantitative immunochemistry showed increased desmin and vimentin contents (p < 0.01), and the desmin distribution was disturbed in cardiomyopathy. There was a linear relation between desmin distribution and actin-myosin sliding in vitro (r = 0.853; p < 0.01) and an inverse correlation between desmin content and ejection fraction (r = −0.773; p < 0.02). Negative correlations were also found between myocardial vimentin content and the actin-myosin sliding rate (r = −0.74; p < 0.02) and left ventricular ejection fraction (r = −0.68; p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Compared with normal individuals, the myocardial tissue of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy shows alterations of cytoskeletal intermediate filament distribution and content associated with reduced myocyte contraction.


Keywords: dilated cardiomyopathy; desmin; vimentin; cardiac biopsy; actin-myosin PMID:11083750

  3. Cytoskeletal Pathologies of Age-Related Diseases between Elderly Sri Lankan (Colombo) and Indian (Bangalore) Brain Samples.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Shankar, S K; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Gorrie, Catherine; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo Hun; Steinbusch, H W; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2016-01-01

    Within South Asia, Sri Lanka represents fastest aging with 13% of the population was aged over 60's in 2011, whereas in India it was 8%. Majority of the Sri Lankan population based genetic studies have confirmed their origin on Indian mainland. As there were inadequate data on aging cytoskeletal pathologies of these two nations with their close genetic affiliations, we performed a comparison on their elderly. Autopsy brain samples of 50 individuals from Colombo, Sri Lanka (mean age 72.1 yrs ± 7.8, mean ± S.D.) and 42 individuals from Bangalore, India (mean age 65.9 yrs ± 9.3) were screened for neurodegenerative pathologies using immunohistochemical techniques. A total of 79 cases with incomplete clinical history (Colombo- 47 and Bangalore- 32) were subjected to statistical analysis and 13 cases, clinically diagnosed with dementia and/or Parkinsonism disorders were excluded. As per National Institute on Aging- Alzheimer's Association guidelines, between Colombo and Bangalore samples, Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change for intermediate/ high level was 4.25% vs. 3.12% and low level was 19.15% vs. 15.62% respectively. Pathologies associated with Parkinsonism including brainstem predominant Lewy bodies- 6.4% and probable progressive supra nuclear palsy- 2.13% were found solely in Colombo samples. Alzheimer related pathologies were not different among elders, however, in Colombo males, neurofibrillary tangle grade was significantly higher in the region of hippocampus (odds ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 0.07-0.7) and at risk in midbrain substantia nigra (p = 0.075). Other age-related pathologies including spongiform changes (p < 0.05) and hippocampus cell loss in dentate gyrus region (p < 0.05) were also identified prominently in Colombo samples. Taken together, aging cytoskeletal pathologies are comparatively higher in elderly Sri Lankans and this might be due to their genetic, dietary and/ or environmental variations.

  4. Proline-rich region of non-muscle myosin light chain kinase modulates kinase activity and endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Belvitch, Patrick; Adyshev, Djanybek; Elangovan, Venkateswaran R; Brown, Mary E; Naureckas, Caitlin; Rizzo, Alicia N; Siegler, Jessica H; Garcia, Joe G N; Dudek, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Disruption of the pulmonary endothelial barrier and subsequent vascular leak is a hallmark of acute lung injury. Dynamic rearrangements in the endothelial cell (EC) peripheral membrane and underlying cytoskeleton are critical determinants of barrier function. The cytoskeletal effector protein non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) and the actin-binding regulatory protein cortactin are important regulators of the endothelial barrier. In the present study we functionally characterize a proline-rich region of nmMLCK previously identified as the possible site of interaction between nmMLCK and cortactin. A mutant nmMLCK construct deficient in proline residues at the putative sites of cortactin binding (amino acids 973, 976, 1019, 1022) was generated. Co-immunoprecipitation studies in human lung EC transfected with wild-type or mutant nmMLCK demonstrated similar levels of cortactin interaction at baseline and after stimulation with the barrier-enhancing agonist, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). In contrast, binding studies utilizing recombinant nmMLCK fragments containing the wild-type or proline-deficient sequence demonstrated a two-fold increase in cortactin binding (p<0.01) to the mutant construct. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed an increased stress fiber density in ECs expressing GFP-labeled mutant nmMLCK at baseline (p=0.02) and after thrombin (p=0.01) or S1P (p=0.02) when compared to wild-type. Mutant nmMLCK demonstrated an increase in kinase activity in response to thrombin (p<0.01). Kymographic analysis demonstrated an increased EC membrane retraction distance and velocity (p<0.01) in response to the barrier disrupting agent thrombin in cells expressing the mutant vs. the wild-type nmMLCK construct. These results provide evidence that critical prolines within nmMLCK (amino acids 973, 976, 1019, 1022) regulate cytoskeletal and membrane events associated with pulmonary endothelial barrier function. PMID:25072537

  5. Cytoskeletal remodeling of connective tissue fibroblasts in response to static stretch is dependent on matrix material properties

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Iatridis, James C; Howe, Alan K; Badger, Gary J; Langevin, Helene M

    2012-01-01

    In areolar “loose” connective tissue, fibroblasts remodel their cytoskeleton within minutes in response to static stretch resulting in increased cell body cross-sectional area that relaxes the tissue to a lower state of resting tension. It remains unknown whether the loosely arranged collagen matrix, characteristic of areolar connective tissue, is required for this cytoskeletal response to occur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytoskeletal remodeling of fibroblasts in and dissociated from areolar and dense connective tissue in response to 2 hours of static stretch in both native tissue and collagen gels of varying crosslinking. Rheometric testing indicated that the areolar connective tissue had a lower dynamic modulus and was more viscous than the dense connective tissue. In response to stretch, cells within the more compliant areolar connective tissue adopted a large “sheet-like” morphology that was in contrast to the smaller dendritic morphology in the dense connective tissue. By adjusting the in vitro collagen crosslinking, and the resulting dynamic modulus, it was demonstrated that cells dissociated from dense connective tissue are capable of responding when seeded into a compliant matrix, while cells dissociated from areolar connective tissue can lose their ability to respond when their matrix becomes stiffer. This set of experiments indicated stretch-induced fibroblast expansion was dependent on the distinct matrix material properties of areolar connective tissues as opposed to the cells’ tissue of origin. These results also suggest that disease and pathological processes with increased crosslinks, such as diabetes and fibrosis, could impair fibroblast responsiveness in connective tissues. PMID:22552950

  6. Immunocytochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and the metabolism of cytoskeletal proteins in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, M E; Somera, F P; Eng, L F

    1983-04-01

    Spinal cord sections from Lewis rats with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) showed greatly increased staining of astrocytes when stained immunocytochemically for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Fibrous processes in white matter were heavily stained early in the course of the disease when paralysis was first evident (10-12 days after injection of guinea pig spinal cord myelin), then protoplasmic astrocytes were stained in the gray matter and became more heavily stained at 20 days post-injection. The stained astrocytes were evenly distributed throughout the tissue, and did not correspond to the sites of the lesions. Spinal cord slices of control and EAE rats were incubated with [3H]amino acids, then cytoskeletal proteins were prepared in an enriched fraction, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the protein bands counted for radioactivity. In the EAE rat all cytoskeletal proteins, including the neurofilaments, vimentin, microtubules, GFAP and actin, showed increased uptake of radioactive amino acids. Immunoprecipitation of GFAP with specific antiserum showed increased radioactivity in the complex beginning at day 10 when cellular infiltration was beginning in the EAE animals. As the disease became acute, the radioactivity in the immunoprecipitated GFAP increased, in some cases to very high levels, then by day 18 when recovery was underway, the radioactivity had fallen to normal levels. Possible agents causing metabolic activation of protein synthesis in EAE animals include stimulating substances elaborated by infiltrating lymphoid cells, and the generalized edema accompanying the demyelinative condition. The activation of GFAP protein staining and metabolism in EAE might serve as a model for the activated growth of astrocyte processes which cause the severe gliosis seen in multiple sclerosis.

  7. Malformed mdx myofibers have normal cytoskeletal architecture yet altered EC coupling and stress-induced Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function is dependent on its highly regular structure. In studies of dystrophic (dy/dy) mice, the proportion of malformed myofibers decreases after prolonged whole muscle stimulation, suggesting that the malformed myofibers are more prone to injury. The aim of this study was to assess morphology and to measure excitation-contraction (EC) coupling (Ca2+ transients) and susceptibility to osmotic stress (Ca2+ sparks) of enzymatically isolated muscle fibers of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles from young (2–3 mo) and old (8–9 mo) mdx and age-matched control mice (C57BL10). In young mdx EDL, 6% of the myofibers had visible malformations (i.e., interfiber splitting, branched ends, midfiber appendages). In contrast, 65% of myofibers in old mdx EDL contained visible malformations. In the mdx FDB, malformation occurred in only 5% of young myofibers and 11% of old myofibers. Age-matched control mice did not display the altered morphology of mdx muscles. The membrane-associated and cytoplasmic cytoskeletal structures appeared normal in the malformed mdx myofibers. In mdx FDBs with significantly branched ends, an assessment of global, electrically evoked Ca2+ signals (indo-1PE-AM) revealed an EC coupling deficit in myofibers with significant branching. Interestingly, peak amplitude of electrically evoked Ca2+ release in the branch of the bifurcated mdx myofiber was significantly decreased compared with the trunk of the same myofiber. No alteration in the basal myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration (i.e., indo ratio) was seen in malformed vs. normal mdx myofibers. Finally, osmotic stress induced the occurrence of Ca2+ sparks to a greater extent in the malformed portions of myofibers, which is consistent with deficits in EC coupling control. In summary, our data show that aging mdx myofibers develop morphological malformations. These malformations are not associated with gross disruptions in cytoskeletal or t

  8. Cytoskeletal Pathologies of Age-Related Diseases between Elderly Sri Lankan (Colombo) and Indian (Bangalore) Brain Samples.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Shankar, S K; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Gorrie, Catherine; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo Hun; Steinbusch, H W; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2016-01-01

    Within South Asia, Sri Lanka represents fastest aging with 13% of the population was aged over 60's in 2011, whereas in India it was 8%. Majority of the Sri Lankan population based genetic studies have confirmed their origin on Indian mainland. As there were inadequate data on aging cytoskeletal pathologies of these two nations with their close genetic affiliations, we performed a comparison on their elderly. Autopsy brain samples of 50 individuals from Colombo, Sri Lanka (mean age 72.1 yrs ± 7.8, mean ± S.D.) and 42 individuals from Bangalore, India (mean age 65.9 yrs ± 9.3) were screened for neurodegenerative pathologies using immunohistochemical techniques. A total of 79 cases with incomplete clinical history (Colombo- 47 and Bangalore- 32) were subjected to statistical analysis and 13 cases, clinically diagnosed with dementia and/or Parkinsonism disorders were excluded. As per National Institute on Aging- Alzheimer's Association guidelines, between Colombo and Bangalore samples, Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change for intermediate/ high level was 4.25% vs. 3.12% and low level was 19.15% vs. 15.62% respectively. Pathologies associated with Parkinsonism including brainstem predominant Lewy bodies- 6.4% and probable progressive supra nuclear palsy- 2.13% were found solely in Colombo samples. Alzheimer related pathologies were not different among elders, however, in Colombo males, neurofibrillary tangle grade was significantly higher in the region of hippocampus (odds ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 0.07-0.7) and at risk in midbrain substantia nigra (p = 0.075). Other age-related pathologies including spongiform changes (p < 0.05) and hippocampus cell loss in dentate gyrus region (p < 0.05) were also identified prominently in Colombo samples. Taken together, aging cytoskeletal pathologies are comparatively higher in elderly Sri Lankans and this might be due to their genetic, dietary and/ or environmental variations. PMID:26906356

  9. The sphingolipid degradation product trans-2-hexadecenal induces cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptosis in a JNK-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Byun, Hoe-Sup; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D

    2011-07-01

    The bioactive signaling molecule D-erythro-sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is irreversibly degraded by the enzyme S1P lyase (SPL). The reaction of SPL with C18-S1P generates ethanolamine phosphate and a long-chain fatty aldehyde, trans-2-hexadecenal. Modulation of SPL expression in cells and organisms produces significant phenotypes, most of which have been attributed to corresponding changes in S1P-dependent signaling. However, the physiological functions of SPL products are not well understood. In the present study, we explored the biological activities of trans-2-hexadecenal in human and murine cells. We demonstrate that trans-2-hexadecenal causes cytoskeletal reorganization leading to cell rounding, detachment and eventual cell death by apoptosis in multiple cell types, including HEK293T, NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Trans-2-hexadecenal stimulated a signaling pathway involving MLK3 and the respective phosphorylation of MKK4/7 and JNK, whereas ERK, AKT and p38 were unaffected. Trans-2-hexadecenal-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of downstream targets of JNK including c-Jun phosphorylation, cytochrome c release, Bax activation, Bid cleavage and increased translocation of Bim into mitochondria. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented JNK activation by trans-2-hexadecenal. Further, inhibition of JNK abrogated the cytoskeletal changes and apoptosis caused by trans-2-hexadecenal, whereas Rac1 and RhoA were not involved. In conclusion, our studies provide a new paradigm of sphingolipid signaling by demonstrating for the first time that S1P metabolism generates a bioactive product that induces cellular effects through oxidant stress-dependent MAP kinase cell signaling.

  10. Changes in Ultrastructure and Cytoskeletal Aspects of Human Normal and Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes Exposed to Interleukin-1β and Cyclical Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Collodel, Giulia; Moretti, Elena; Cheleschi, Sara; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructure and cytoskeletal organization in human normal and Osteoarhritic (OA) chondrocytes, exposed to interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and cyclic hydrostatic pressure (HP). Morphological examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed differences between normal and OA chondrocytes at the nuclear and cytoplasmic level. IL-1β (5 ng/mL) induced a decrease of the number of mitochondria and Golgi bodies and a significant increase on the percentage of cells rich in vacuolization and in marginated chromatin. Cyclical HP (1–5 MPa, 0.25 Hz, for 3 h) did not change the morphology of normal chondrocytes, but had a beneficial effect on OA chondrocytes increasing the number of organelles. Normal and OA cells subjected to IL-1β and HP recovered cytoplasmic ultrastructure. Immunofluorescence (IF) examination of normal chondrocytes showed an actin signal polarized on the apical sides of the cytoplasm, tubulin and vimentin uniformly distributed throughout cytoplasm and vinculin revealed a punctuated pattern under the plasma membrane. In OA chondrocytes, these proteins partially lost their organization. Stimulation with IL-1β caused, in both type of cells, modification in the cytoskeletal organization; HP counteracted the negative effects of IL-1β. Our results showed structural differences at nuclear, cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal level between normal and OA chondrocytes. IL-1β induced ultrastructural and cytoskeletal modifications, counteracted by a cyclical low HP. PMID:26528971

  11. Changes in Ultrastructure and Cytoskeletal Aspects of Human Normal and Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes Exposed to Interleukin-1β and Cyclical Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Collodel, Giulia; Moretti, Elena; Cheleschi, Sara; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructure and cytoskeletal organization in human normal and Osteoarhritic (OA) chondrocytes, exposed to interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and cyclic hydrostatic pressure (HP). Morphological examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed differences between normal and OA chondrocytes at the nuclear and cytoplasmic level. IL-1β (5 ng/mL) induced a decrease of the number of mitochondria and Golgi bodies and a significant increase on the percentage of cells rich in vacuolization and in marginated chromatin. Cyclical HP (1-5 MPa, 0.25 Hz, for 3 h) did not change the morphology of normal chondrocytes, but had a beneficial effect on OA chondrocytes increasing the number of organelles. Normal and OA cells subjected to IL-1β and HP recovered cytoplasmic ultrastructure. Immunofluorescence (IF) examination of normal chondrocytes showed an actin signal polarized on the apical sides of the cytoplasm, tubulin and vimentin uniformly distributed throughout cytoplasm and vinculin revealed a punctuated pattern under the plasma membrane. In OA chondrocytes, these proteins partially lost their organization. Stimulation with IL-1β caused, in both type of cells, modification in the cytoskeletal organization; HP counteracted the negative effects of IL-1β. Our results showed structural differences at nuclear, cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal level between normal and OA chondrocytes. IL-1β induced ultrastructural and cytoskeletal modifications, counteracted by a cyclical low HP. PMID:26528971

  12. Shaping up to divide: coordinating actin and microtubule cytoskeletal remodelling during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Oscar M; Baum, Buzz

    2014-10-01

    Cell division requires the wholesale reorganization of cell architecture. At the same time as the microtubule network is remodelled to generate a bipolar spindle, animal cells entering mitosis replace their interphase actin cytoskeleton with a contractile mitotic actomyosin cortex that is tightly coupled to the plasma membrane--driving mitotic cell rounding. Here, we consider how these two processes are coordinated to couple chromosome segregation and cell division. In doing so we explore the relative roles of cell shape and the actin cortex in spindle morphogenesis, orientation and positioning.

  13. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton via transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes by myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs/MAL/MKLs)

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    RhoA is a crucial regulator of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation through the activation of actin nucleation and polymerization. It also regulates the nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor-A and -B (MRTF-A/B, MAL or MKL 1/2), which are co-activators of serum response factor (SRF). In dominant-negative MRTF-A (DN-MRTF-A)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the expressions of several cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes were down-regulated, and the formation of stress fiber and focal adhesion was severely diminished. MRTF-A/B-knockdown cells also exhibited such cytoskeletal defects. In reporter assays, both RhoA and MRTF-A enhanced promoter activities of these genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner, and DN-MRTF-A inhibited the RhoA-mediated activation of these promoters. In dominant-negative RhoA (RhoA-N19)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the nuclear translocation of MRTF-A/B was predominantly prevented, resulting in the reduced expression of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins. Further, constitutive-active MRTF-A/B increased the expression of endogenous cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins, and thereby rescued the defective phenotype of stress fibers and focal adhesions in RhoA-N19 expressing cells. These results indicate that MRTF-A/B act as pivotal mediators of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation via the transcriptional regulation of a subset of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes.

  14. Signal-dependent Slow Leukocyte Rolling Does Not Require Cytoskeletal Anchorage of P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) or Integrin αLβ2*

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bojing; Yago, Tadayuki; Coghill, Phillip A.; Klopocki, Arkadiusz G.; Mehta-D'souza, Padmaja; Schmidtke, David W.; Rodgers, William; McEver, Rodger P.

    2012-01-01

    In inflamed venules, neutrophils roll on P- or E-selectin, engage P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), and signal extension of integrin αLβ2 in a low affinity state to slow rolling on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Cytoskeleton-dependent receptor clustering often triggers signaling, and it has been hypothesized that the cytoplasmic domain links PSGL-1 to the cytoskeleton. Chemokines cause rolling neutrophils to fully activate αLβ2, leading to arrest on ICAM-1. Cytoskeletal anchorage of αLβ2 has been linked to chemokine-triggered extension and force-regulated conversion to the high affinity state. We asked whether PSGL-1 must interact with the cytoskeleton to initiate signaling and whether αLβ2 must interact with the cytoskeleton to extend. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of transfected cells documented cytoskeletal restraint of PSGL-1. The lateral mobility of PSGL-1 similarly increased by depolymerizing actin filaments with latrunculin B or by mutating the cytoplasmic tail to impair binding to the cytoskeleton. Converting dimeric PSGL-1 to a monomer by replacing its transmembrane domain did not alter its mobility. By transducing retroviruses expressing WT or mutant PSGL-1 into bone marrow-derived macrophages from PSGL-1-deficient mice, we show that PSGL-1 required neither dimerization nor cytoskeletal anchorage to signal β2 integrin-dependent slow rolling on P-selectin and ICAM-1. Depolymerizing actin filaments or decreasing actomyosin tension in neutrophils did not impair PSGL-1- or chemokine-mediated integrin extension. Unlike chemokines, PSGL-1 did not signal cytoskeleton-dependent swing out of the β2-hybrid domain associated with the high affinity state. The cytoskeletal independence of PSGL-1-initiated, αLβ2-mediated slow rolling differs markedly from the cytoskeletal dependence of chemokine-initiated, αLβ2-mediated arrest. PMID:22511754

  15. Energy distribution in disordered elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2010-09-01

    Disordered networks are found in many natural and artificial materials, from gels or cytoskeletal structures to metallic foams or bones. Here, the energy distribution in this type of networks is modeled, taking into account the orientation of the struts. A correlation between the orientation and the energy per unit volume is found and described as a function of the connectivity in the network and the relative bending stiffness of the struts. If one or both parameters have relatively large values, the struts aligned in the loading direction present the highest values of energy. On the contrary, if these have relatively small values, the highest values of energy can be reached in the struts oriented transversally. This result allows explaining in a simple way remodeling processes in biological materials, for example, the remodeling of trabecular bone and the reorganization in the cytoskeleton. Additionally, the correlation between the orientation, the affinity, and the bending-stretching ratio in the network is discussed.

  16. Micromechanical properties of keratin intermediate filament networks

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; DeGiulio, James V.; Lorand, Laszlo; Goldman, Robert D.; Ridge, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) form cytoskeletal KIF networks that are essential for the structural integrity of epithelial cells. However, the mechanical properties of the in situ network have not been defined. Particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) was used to obtain the micromechanical properties of the KIF network in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), independent of other cytoskeletal components, such as microtubules and microfilaments. The storage modulus (G′) at 1 Hz of the KIF network decreases from the perinuclear region (335 dyn/cm2) to the cell periphery (95 dyn/cm2), yielding a mean value of 210 dyn/cm2. These changes in G′ are inversely proportional to the mesh size of the network, which increases ≈10-fold from the perinuclear region (0.02 μm2) to the cell periphery (0.3 μm2). Shear stress (15 dyn/cm2 for 4 h) applied across the surface of AECs induces a more uniform distribution of KIF, with the mesh size of the network ranging from 0.02 μm2 near the nucleus to only 0.04 μm2 at the cell periphery. This amounts to a 40% increase in the mean G′. The storage modulus of the KIF network in the perinuclear region accurately predicts the shear-induced deflection of the cell nucleus to be 0.87 ± 0.03 μm. The high storage modulus of the KIF network, coupled with its solid-like rheological behavior, supports the role of KIF as an intracellular structural scaffold that helps epithelial cells to withstand external mechanical forces. PMID:18199836

  17. Effect of collagen I and fibronectin on the adhesion, elasticity and cytoskeletal organization of prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Docheva, Denitsa; Padula, Daniela; Schieker, Matthias; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Depending on the metastatic origin, prostate cancer cells differ in their affinity to COL1. {yields} COL1 affects specifically the F-actin and cell elasticity of bone-derived prostate cancer cells. {yields} Cell elasticity can be used as a biomarker for cancer cells from different metastases. -- Abstract: Despite of intensive research efforts, the precise mechanism of prostate cancer metastasis in bone is still not fully understood. Several studies have suggested that specific matrix production by the bone cells, such as collagen I, supports cancer cell invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of collagen I (COL1) and fibronectin (FN) on cell adhesion, cell elasticity and cytoskeletal organization of prostate cancer cells. Two cell lines, bone marrow- (PC3) and lymph node-derived (LNCaP) were cultivated on COL1 and FN (control protein). By using a quantitative adhesion assay and time-lapse analysis, it was found that PC3, but not LNCaP, adhered strongly and were more spread on COL1. Next, PC3 and LNCaP were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and flatness shape factor and cellular Young's modulus were calculated. The shape analysis revealed that PC3 were significantly flatter when grown on COL1 in comparison to LNCaP. In general, PC3 were also significantly stiffer than LNCaP and furthermore, their stiffness increased upon interaction with COL1. Since cell stiffness is strongly dependent on actin organization, phalloidin-based actin staining was performed and revealed that, of the two cell types as well as the two different matrix proteins, only PC3 grown on COL1 formed robust actin cytoskeleton. In conclusion, our study showed that PC3 cells have a strong affinity towards COL1. On this matrix protein, the cells adhered strongly and underwent a specific cell flattening. Moreover, with the establishment of PC3 contact to COL1 a significant increase of PC3 stiffness was observed due to a profound cytoskeletal

  18. Nano-ZnO leads to tubulin macrotube assembly and actin bundling, triggering cytoskeletal catastrophe and cell necrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hevia, Lorena; Valiente, Rafael; Martín-Rodríguez, Rosa; Renero-Lecuna, Carlos; González, Jesús; Rodríguez-Fernández, Lidia; Aguado, Fernando; Villegas, Juan C.; Fanarraga, Mónica L.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc is a crucial element in biology that plays chief catalytic, structural and protein regulatory roles. Excess cytoplasmic zinc is toxic to cells so there are cell-entry and intracellular buffering mechanisms that control intracellular zinc availability. Tubulin and actin are two zinc-scavenging proteins that are essential components of the cellular cytoskeleton implicated in cell division, migration and cellular architecture maintenance. Here we demonstrate how exposure to different ZnO nanostructures, namely ZnO commercial nanoparticles and custom-made ZnO nanowires, produce acute cytotoxic effects in human keratinocytes (HaCat) and epithelial cells (HeLa) triggering a dose-dependent cell retraction and collapse. We show how engulfed ZnO nanoparticles dissolve intracellularly, triggering actin filament bundling and structural changes in microtubules, transforming these highly dynamic 25 nm diameter polymers into rigid macrotubes of tubulin, severely affecting cell proliferation and survival. Our results demonstrate that nano-ZnO causes acute cytoskeletal collapse that triggers necrosis, followed by a late reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptotic process.Zinc is a crucial element in biology that plays chief catalytic, structural and protein regulatory roles. Excess cytoplasmic zinc is toxic to cells so there are cell-entry and intracellular buffering mechanisms that control intracellular zinc availability. Tubulin and actin are two zinc-scavenging proteins that are essential components of the cellular cytoskeleton implicated in cell division, migration and cellular architecture maintenance. Here we demonstrate how exposure to different ZnO nanostructures, namely ZnO commercial nanoparticles and custom-made ZnO nanowires, produce acute cytotoxic effects in human keratinocytes (HaCat) and epithelial cells (HeLa) triggering a dose-dependent cell retraction and collapse. We show how engulfed ZnO nanoparticles dissolve intracellularly, triggering actin

  19. Nanoscale assembly in biological systems: from neuronal cytoskeletal proteins to curvature stabilizing lipids.

    PubMed

    Safinya, Cyrus R; Raviv, Uri; Needleman, Daniel J; Zidovska, Alexandra; Choi, Myung Chul; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel A; Ewert, Kai K; Li, Youli; Miller, Herbert P; Quispe, Joel; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Kim, Mahn Won; Feinstein, Stuart C; Wilson, Leslie

    2011-05-24

    The review will describe experiments inspired by the rich variety of bundles and networks of interacting microtubules (MT), neurofilaments, and filamentous-actin in neurons where the nature of the interactions, structures, and structure-function correlations remain poorly understood. We describe how three-dimensional (3D) MT bundles and 2D MT bundles may assemble, in cell free systems in the presence of counter-ions, revealing structures not predicted by polyelectrolyte theories. Interestingly, experiments reveal that the neuronal protein tau, an abundant MT-associated-protein in axons, modulates the MT diameter providing insight for the control of geometric parameters in bio- nanotechnology. In another set of experiments we describe lipid-protein-nanotubes, and lipid nano-tubes and rods, resulting from membrane shape evolution processes involving protein templates and curvature stabilizing lipids. Similar membrane shape changes, occurring in cells for the purpose of specific functions, are induced by interactions between membranes and proteins. The biological materials systems described have applications in bio-nanotechnology.

  20. β-Amyloid-aluminum complex alters cytoskeletal stability and increases ROS production in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo; Lorenzetto, Erika; Valenti, Maria Teresa; Buffelli, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Several lines of evidence have supported the potential involvement of metal ions in the etiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction are still partially unknown. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) aggregation was strongly influenced by the conjugation of the peptide with few metal ions (aluminum, copper, zinc, and iron) that are found in high concentrations in the senile plaque core. The binding of aluminum (Al) to Aβ specifically stabilized the peptide in an oligomeric conformation. Here, we show that the aggregation of Aβ-Al was boosted by sodium dodecyl sulfate, a detergent that mimics some characteristics of biological membrane, suggesting a potential role for membrane components in the Aβ aggregation process. Notably, we also found that Aβ-Al caused mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production in primary cortical neurons. Aβ-Al strongly promoted also alterations in cytoskeleton network as shown by the increased F-actin expression and the occurrence of neuritic beading. Interestingly, the neurotoxic effect of this metal complex was associated with a decreased mRNA expression of ubiquitin thiolesterase, an ubiquitin-dependent protein involved in catabolic process, and by the increased expression of glutaminyl cyclase, responsible for pathological post-translational modification of Aβ. These results suggest that, in neuronal cells, Aβ-Al can induce relevant detrimental changes that resemble pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:23416043

  1. Investigating cytoskeletal function in chloroplast protrusion formation in the arctic-alpine plant Oxyria digyna.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, A; Wasteneys, G O; Lütz, C

    2007-05-01

    Arctic and alpine plants like Oxyria digyna have to face enhanced environmental stress. This study compared leaves from Oxyria digyna collected in the Arctic at Svalbard (78 degrees N) and in the Austrian Alps (47 degrees N) at cellular, subcellular, and ultrastructural levels. Oxyria digyna plants collected in Svalbard had significantly thicker leaves than the samples collected in the Austrian Alps. This difference was generated by increased thickness of the palisade and spongy mesophyll layers in the arctic plants, while epidermal cells had no significant size differences between the two habitats. A characteristic feature of arctic, alpine, and cultivated samples was the occurrence of broad stroma-filled chloroplast protrusions, 2 - 5 microm broad and up to 5 microm long. Chloroplast protrusions were in close spatial contact with other organelles including mitochondria and microbodies. Mitochondria were also present in invaginations of the chloroplasts. A dense network of cortical microtubules found in the mesophyll cells suggested a potential role for microtubules in the formation and function of chloroplast protrusions. No direct interactions between microtubules and chloroplasts, however, were observed and disruption of the microtubule arrays with the anti-microtubule agent oryzalin at 5 - 10 microM did not alter the appearance or dynamics of chloroplast protrusions. These observations suggest that, in contrast to studies on stromule formation in Nicotiana, microtubules are not involved in the formation and morphology of chloroplast protrusions in Oxyria digyna. The actin microfilament-disrupting drug latrunculin B (5 - 10 microM for 2 h) arrested cytoplasmic streaming and altered the cytoplasmic integrity of mesophyll cells. However, at the ultrastructural level, stroma-containing, thylakoid-free areas were still visible, mostly at the concave sides of the chloroplasts. As chloroplast protrusions were frequently found to be mitochondria-associated in Oxyria

  2. Cytoskeletal Regulation of CD44 Membrane Organization and Interactions with E-selectin*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yago, Tadayuki; Zhang, Nan; Abdisalaam, Salim; Alexandrakis, George; Rodgers, William; McEver, Rodger P.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of CD44 on neutrophils with E-selectin on activated endothelial cells mediate rolling under flow, a prerequisite for neutrophil arrest and migration into perivascular tissues. How CD44 functions as a rolling ligand despite its weak affinity for E-selectin is unknown. We examined the nanometer scale organization of CD44 on intact cells. CD44 on leukocytes and transfected K562 cells was cross-linked within a 1.14-nm spacer. Depolymerizing actin with latrunculin B reduced cross-linking. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed tight co-clustering between CD44 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and CD44 fused to cyan fluorescent protein on K562 cells. Latrunculin B reduced FRET-reported co-clustering. Number and brightness analysis confirmed actin-dependent CD44-YFP clusters on living cells. CD44 lacking binding sites for ankyrin and for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins on its cytoplasmic domain (ΔANKΔERM) did not cluster. Unexpectedly, CD44 lacking only the ankyrin-binding site (ΔANK) formed larger but looser clusters. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching demonstrated increased CD44 mobility by latrunculin B treatment or by deleting the cytoplasmic domain. ΔANKΔERM mobility increased only modestly, suggesting that the cytoplasmic domain engages the cytoskeleton by an additional mechanism. Ex vivo differentiated CD44-deficient neutrophils expressing exogenous CD44 rolled on E-selectin and activated Src kinases after binding anti-CD44 antibody. In contrast, differentiated neutrophils expressing ΔANK had impaired rolling and kinase activation. These data demonstrate that spectrin and actin networks regulate CD44 clustering and suggest that ankyrin enhances CD44-mediated neutrophil rolling and signaling. PMID:25359776

  3. The bacterial cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ self-organize into dynamic cytoskeletal patterns

    PubMed Central

    Loose, Martin; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cytokinesis is commonly initiated by the Z-ring, a cytoskeletal structure assembling at the site of division. Its primary component is FtsZ, a tubulin superfamily GTPase, which is recruited to the membrane by the actin-related protein FtsA. Both proteins are required for the formation of the Z-ring, but if and how they influence each other’s assembly dynamics is not known. Here, we reconstituted FtsA-dependent recruitment of FtsZ polymers to supported membranes, where both proteins self-organize into complex patterns, such as fast-moving filament bundles and chirally rotating rings. Using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical perturbations, we found that these large-scale rearrangements of FtsZ emerge from its polymerization dynamics and a dual, antagonistic role of FtsA: recruitment of FtsZ filaments to the membrane and a negative regulation on FtsZ organization. Our findings provide a model for the initial steps of bacterial cell division and illustrate how dynamic polymers can self-organize into large-scale structures. PMID:24316672

  4. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either a-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Cycloheximide, however, repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposures. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation and that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  5. The cytoskeletal system of nucleated erythrocytes. II. presence of a high molecular weight calmodulin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Calmodulin was detected in dogfish erythrocyte lysates by means of phosphodiesterase activation. Anucleate dogfish erythrocyte cytoskeletons bound calmodulin. Binding of calmodulin was calcium- dependent, concentration-dependent, and saturable. Cytoskeletons consisted of a marginal band of microtubules containing primarily tubulin, and trans-marginal band material containing actin and spectrinlike proteins. Dogfish erythrocyte ghosts and cytoskeletons were found to contain a calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding protein, CBP, by two independent techniques: (a) 125I-calmodulin binding to cytoskeletal proteins separated by SDS PAGE, and (b) in situ azidocalmodulin binding in whole anucleate ghosts and cytoskeletons. CBP, with an apparent molecular weight of 245,000, co-migrated with the upper band of human and dogfish erythrocyte spectrin. CBP was present in anucleate ghosts devoid of marginal bands and absent from isolated marginal bands. CBP therefore appears to be localized in the trans- marginal band material and not in the marginal band. Similarities between CBP and high molecular weight calmodulin-binding proteins from mammalian species are discussed. PMID:6890556

  6. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  7. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  8. The cytoskeletal binding domain of band 3 is required for multiprotein complex formation and retention during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Hawley, Bethan R; Bell, Amanda J; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Band 3 is the most abundant protein in the erythrocyte membrane and forms the core of a major multiprotein complex. The absence of band 3 in human erythrocytes has only been reported once, in the homozygous band 3 Coimbra patient. We used in vitro culture of erythroblasts derived from this patient, and separately short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of band 3, to investigate the development of a band 3-deficient erythrocyte membrane and to specifically assess the stability and retention of band 3 dependent proteins in the absence of this core protein during terminal erythroid differentiation. Further, using lentiviral transduction of N-terminally green fluorescent protein-tagged band 3, we demonstrated the ability to restore expression of band 3 to normal levels and to rescue secondary deficiencies of key proteins including glycophorin A, protein 4.2, CD47 and Rh proteins arising from the absence of band 3 in this patient. By transducing band 3-deficient erythroblasts from this patient with band 3 mutants with absent or impaired ability to associate with the cytoskeleton we also demonstrated the importance of cytoskeletal connectivity for retention both of band 3 and of its associated dependent proteins within the reticulocyte membrane during the process of erythroblast enucleation. PMID:25344524

  9. Defects in TRPM7 channel function deregulate thrombopoiesis through altered cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and cytoskeletal architecture

    PubMed Central

    Stritt, Simon; Nurden, Paquita; Favier, Remi; Favier, Marie; Ferioli, Silvia; Gotru, Sanjeev K.; van Eeuwijk, Judith M M.; Schulze, Harald; Nurden, Alan T.; Lambert, Michele P.; Turro, Ernest; Burger-Stritt, Stephanie; Matsushita, Masayuki; Mittermeier, Lorenz; Ballerini, Paola; Zierler, Susanna; Laffan, Michael A.; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Braun, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Mg2+ plays a vital role in platelet function, but despite implications for life-threatening conditions such as stroke or myocardial infarction, the mechanisms controlling [Mg2+]i in megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelets are largely unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin-like 7 channel (TRPM7) is a ubiquitous, constitutively active cation channel with a cytosolic α-kinase domain that is critical for embryonic development and cell survival. Here we report that impaired channel function of TRPM7 in MKs causes macrothrombocytopenia in mice (Trpm7fl/fl-Pf4Cre) and likely in several members of a human pedigree that, in addition, suffer from atrial fibrillation. The defect in platelet biogenesis is mainly caused by cytoskeletal alterations resulting in impaired proplatelet formation by Trpm7fl/fl-Pf4Cre MKs, which is rescued by Mg2+ supplementation or chemical inhibition of non-muscle myosin IIA heavy chain activity. Collectively, our findings reveal that TRPM7 dysfunction may cause macrothrombocytopenia in humans and mice. PMID:27020697

  10. Mitochondrial and cytoskeletal alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice.

    PubMed

    Isarangkul, Duangnate; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Reamtong, Onrapak; Ampawong, Sumate

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of congenital hydronephrosis in laboratory animals has been studied for many years, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this disease. In this study, we investigated a MS-based comparative proteomics approach to characterize the differently expressed proteins between kidney tissue samples of ICR/Mlac-hydro and wild-type mice. Interestingly, proteomic results exhibited several mitochondrial protein alterations especially the up-regulation of 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60), stress-70 protein (GRP75) dysfunction, and down-regulation of voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC-1). The results demonstrated that mitochondrial alteration may lead to inadequate energy-supply to maintain normal water reabsorption from the renal tubule, causing hydronephrosis. Moreover, the alteration of cytoskeleton proteins in the renal tubule, in particular the up-regulation of tubulin beta-4B chain (Tb4B) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 protein (Ndr-1) may also be related due to their fundamental roles in maintaining cell morphology and tissue stability. In addition, cytoskeletal alterations may consequence to the reduction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cytoplasmic enzyme, which modulates the capacity of structural proteins. Our findings highlight a number of target proteins that may play a crucial role in congenital hydronephrosis and emphasize that the disorder of mitochondria and cytoskeleton proteins may be involved.

  11. Tyrosine-Phosphorylated Caveolin-1 Blocks Bacterial Uptake by Inducing Vav2-RhoA-Mediated Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Pompaiah, Malvika; Thorn, Hans; Brinkmann, Volker; MacBeath, Gavin; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Certain bacterial adhesins appear to promote a pathogen's extracellular lifestyle rather than its entry into host cells. However, little is known about the stimuli elicited upon such pathogen host-cell interactions. Here, we report that type IV pili (Tfp)-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (P+GC) induces an immediate recruitment of caveolin-1 (Cav1) in the host cell, which subsequently prevents bacterial internalization by triggering cytoskeletal rearrangements via downstream phosphotyrosine signaling. A broad and unbiased analysis of potential interaction partners for tyrosine-phosphorylated Cav1 revealed a direct interaction with the Rho-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav2. Both Vav2 and its substrate, the small GTPase RhoA, were found to play a direct role in the Cav1-mediated prevention of bacterial uptake. Our findings, which have been extended to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, highlight how Tfp-producing bacteria avoid host cell uptake. Further, our data establish a mechanistic link between Cav1 phosphorylation and pathogen-induced cytoskeleton reorganization and advance our understanding of caveolin function. PMID:20808760

  12. miR-8 modulates cytoskeletal regulators to influence cell survival and epithelial organization in Drosophila wings.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Kelsey; Rachmaninoff, Nicholas; Moncada, Kea; Pula, Katharine; Kennell, Jennifer; Buttitta, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The miR-200 microRNA family plays important tumor suppressive roles. The sole Drosophila miR-200 ortholog, miR-8 plays conserved roles in Wingless, Notch and Insulin signaling - pathways linked to tumorigenesis, yet homozygous null animals are viable and often appear morphologically normal. We observed that wing tissues mosaic for miR-8 levels by genetic loss or gain of function exhibited patterns of cell death consistent with a role for miR-8 in modulating cell survival in vivo. Here we show that miR-8 levels impact several actin cytoskeletal regulators that can affect cell survival and epithelial organization. We show that loss of miR-8 can confer resistance to apoptosis independent of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition while the persistence of cells expressing high levels of miR-8 in the wing epithelium leads to increased JNK signaling, aberrant expression of extracellular matrix remodeling proteins and disruption of proper wing epithelial organization. Altogether our results suggest that very low as well as very high levels of miR-8 can contribute to hallmarks associated with cancer, suggesting approaches to increase miR-200 microRNAs in cancer treatment should be moderate. PMID:26902111

  13. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Matthias; Greis, Catharina; Ottis, Philipp; Silva, Christopher J; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Wrede, Arne; Koppe, Katharina; Onisko, Bruce; Requena, Jesús R; Govindarajan, Nambirajan; Korth, Carsten; Fischer, Andre; Zerr, Inga

    2014-12-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a highly conserved protein whose exact physiological role remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated age-dependent behavioral abnormalities in PrPC-knockout (Prnp0/0) mice and wild-type (WT) controls. Prnp0/0 mice showed age-dependent behavioral deficits in memory performance, associative learning, basal anxiety, and nest building behavior. Using a hypothesis-free quantitative proteomic investigation, we found that loss of PrPC affected the levels of neurofilament proteins in an age-dependent manner. In order to understand the biochemical basis of these observations, we analyzed the phosphorylation status of neurofilament heavy chain (NF-H). We found a reduction in NF-H phosphorylation in both Prnp0/0 mice and in PrPC-deficient cells. The expression of Fyn and phospho-Fyn, a potential regulator for NF phosphorylation, was associated with PrPC ablation. The number of β-tubulin III-positive neurons in the hippocampus was diminished in Prnp0/0 mice relative to WT mice. These data indicate that PrPC plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization, brain function, and age-related neuroprotection. Our work represents the first direct biochemical link between these proteins and the observed behavioral phenotypes.

  14. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  15. Mitochondrial and cytoskeletal alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice

    PubMed Central

    Isarangkul, Duangnate; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Reamtong, Onrapak; Ampawong, Sumate

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of congenital hydronephrosis in laboratory animals has been studied for many years, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this disease. In this study, we investigated a MS-based comparative proteomics approach to characterize the differently expressed proteins between kidney tissue samples of ICR/Mlac-hydro and wild-type mice. Interestingly, proteomic results exhibited several mitochondrial protein alterations especially the up-regulation of 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60), stress-70 protein (GRP75) dysfunction, and down-regulation of voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC-1). The results demonstrated that mitochondrial alteration may lead to inadequate energy-supply to maintain normal water reabsorption from the renal tubule, causing hydronephrosis. Moreover, the alteration of cytoskeleton proteins in the renal tubule, in particular the up-regulation of tubulin beta-4B chain (Tb4B) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 protein (Ndr-1) may also be related due to their fundamental roles in maintaining cell morphology and tissue stability. In addition, cytoskeletal alterations may consequence to the reduction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cytoplasmic enzyme, which modulates the capacity of structural proteins. Our findings highlight a number of target proteins that may play a crucial role in congenital hydronephrosis and emphasize that the disorder of mitochondria and cytoskeleton proteins may be involved. PMID:26309577

  16. Nano-ZnO leads to tubulin macrotube assembly and actin bundling, triggering cytoskeletal catastrophe and cell necrosis.

    PubMed

    García-Hevia, Lorena; Valiente, Rafael; Martín-Rodríguez, Rosa; Renero-Lecuna, Carlos; González, Jesús; Rodríguez-Fernández, Lidia; Aguado, Fernando; Villegas, Juan C; Fanarraga, Mónica L

    2016-06-01

    Zinc is a crucial element in biology that plays chief catalytic, structural and protein regulatory roles. Excess cytoplasmic zinc is toxic to cells so there are cell-entry and intracellular buffering mechanisms that control intracellular zinc availability. Tubulin and actin are two zinc-scavenging proteins that are essential components of the cellular cytoskeleton implicated in cell division, migration and cellular architecture maintenance. Here we demonstrate how exposure to different ZnO nanostructures, namely ZnO commercial nanoparticles and custom-made ZnO nanowires, produce acute cytotoxic effects in human keratinocytes (HaCat) and epithelial cells (HeLa) triggering a dose-dependent cell retraction and collapse. We show how engulfed ZnO nanoparticles dissolve intracellularly, triggering actin filament bundling and structural changes in microtubules, transforming these highly dynamic 25 nm diameter polymers into rigid macrotubes of tubulin, severely affecting cell proliferation and survival. Our results demonstrate that nano-ZnO causes acute cytoskeletal collapse that triggers necrosis, followed by a late reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptotic process.

  17. Mitochondrial and cytoskeletal alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice.

    PubMed

    Isarangkul, Duangnate; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Reamtong, Onrapak; Ampawong, Sumate

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of congenital hydronephrosis in laboratory animals has been studied for many years, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this disease. In this study, we investigated a MS-based comparative proteomics approach to characterize the differently expressed proteins between kidney tissue samples of ICR/Mlac-hydro and wild-type mice. Interestingly, proteomic results exhibited several mitochondrial protein alterations especially the up-regulation of 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60), stress-70 protein (GRP75) dysfunction, and down-regulation of voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC-1). The results demonstrated that mitochondrial alteration may lead to inadequate energy-supply to maintain normal water reabsorption from the renal tubule, causing hydronephrosis. Moreover, the alteration of cytoskeleton proteins in the renal tubule, in particular the up-regulation of tubulin beta-4B chain (Tb4B) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 protein (Ndr-1) may also be related due to their fundamental roles in maintaining cell morphology and tissue stability. In addition, cytoskeletal alterations may consequence to the reduction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cytoplasmic enzyme, which modulates the capacity of structural proteins. Our findings highlight a number of target proteins that may play a crucial role in congenital hydronephrosis and emphasize that the disorder of mitochondria and cytoskeleton proteins may be involved. PMID:26309577

  18. Topography design concept of a tissue engineering scaffold for controlling cell function and fate through actin cytoskeletal modulation.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Hiromi; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-12-01

    The physiological role of the actin cytoskeleton is well known: it provides mechanical support and endogenous force generation for formation of a cell shape and for migration. Furthermore, a growing number of studies have demonstrated another significant role of the actin cytoskeleton: it offers dynamic epigenetic memory for guiding cell fate, in particular, proliferation and differentiation. Because instantaneous imbalance in the mechanical homeostasis is adjusted through actin remodeling, a synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) niche as a source of topographical and mechanical cues is expected to be effective at modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. In this context, the synthetic ECM niche determines cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation, all of which have to be controlled in functional tissue engineering scaffolds to ensure proper regulation of tissue/organ formation, maintenance of tissue integrity and repair, and regeneration. Here, with an emphasis on the epigenetic role of the actin cytoskeletal system, we propose a design concept of micro/nanotopography of a tissue engineering scaffold for control of cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation in a stable and well-defined manner, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24720435

  19. Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin Regulates Cytoskeletal Tension, Cell Spreading, and Focal Adhesions by Stimulating RhoAD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Pirone, Dana M.; Tan, John L.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion and integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion coordinate to affect the physical and mechanical rearrangements of the endothelium, although the mechanisms for such cross talk remain undefined. Herein, we describe the regulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension by intercellular VE-cadherin engagement, and the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Increasing the density of endothelial cells to increase cell-cell contact decreased focal adhesions by decreasing cell spreading. This contact inhibition of cell spreading was blocked by disrupting VE-cadherin engagement with an adenovirus encoding dominant negative VE-cadherin. When changes in cell spreading were prevented by culturing cells on a micropatterned substrate, VE-cadherin–mediated cell-cell contact paradoxically increased focal adhesion formation. We show that VE-cadherin engagement mediates each of these effects by inducing both a transient and sustained activation of RhoA. Both the increase and decrease in cell-matrix adhesion were blocked by disrupting intracellular tension and signaling through the Rho-ROCK pathway. In all, these findings demonstrate that VE-cadherin signals through RhoA and the actin cytoskeleton to cross talk with cell-matrix adhesion and thereby define a novel pathway by which cell-cell contact alters the global mechanical and functional state of cells. PMID:15075376

  20. Dematin, a human erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, is a substrate for a recombinant FIKK kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gabriel S; Bailey, Scott

    2013-09-01

    P. falciparum causes the most deadly form of malaria, resulting from the adherence of infected red blood cells to blood vessels. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite secretes a large number of proteins into the host erythrocyte. The secretion of a 20-member family of protein kinases known as FIKK kinases, after a conserved Phe-Ile-Lys-Lys sequence motif, is unique to P. falciparum. Identification of physiological substrates of these kinases may provide perspective on the importance of FIKK kinase activity to P. falciparum virulence. We demonstrate, for the first time, the heterologous expression and purification of a FIKK kinase (PfFk4.1, PFD1165w). The recombinant kinase is active against general substrates and phosphorylates itself. Having demonstrated kinase activity, we incubated recombinant Fk4.1 with parasite and human erythrocyte lysates. No parasite-derived substrates were identified. However, treatment of erythrocyte ghosts shows that the FIKK kinase Fk4.1 phosphorylates dematin, a cytoskeletal protein found at the red blood cell spectrin-actin junction.

  1. Cytoskeletal rearrangements and the functional role of T-plastin during entry of Shigella flexneri into HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an enteroinvasive bacterium which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A major feature of its pathogenic potential is the capacity to invade epithelial cells. Shigella entry into epithelial cells is considered a parasite-induced internalization process requiring polymerization of actin. Here we describe the cytoskeletal rearrangements during S. flexneri invasion of HeLa cells. After an initial contact of the bacterium with the cell surface, distinct nucleation zones of heavy chain actin polymerization appear in close proximity to the contact site underneath the parasite with long filaments being polymerized. These structures then push cellular protrusions that rise beside the entering bacterium, being sustained by tightly bundled long actin filaments organized in parallel orientation with their positive ends pointing to the cytoplasmic membrane. Finally, the cellular projections coalesce above the bacterial body, leading to its internalization. In addition, we found the actin-bundling protein plastin to be concentrated in these protrusions. Since plastin is known to bundle actin filaments in parallel orientation, colocalization of parallel actin filaments and plastin in the cellular protrusions strongly suggested a functional role of this protein in the architecture of parasite-induced cellular projections. Using transfection experiments, we show the differential recruitment of the two plastin isoforms (T- and L-) into Shigella entry zones. By transient expression of a truncated T-plastin which is deprived of one of its actin-binding sites, we also demonstrate the functional role of T-plastin in Shigella entry into HeLa cells. PMID:7721941

  2. Brain-Specific Cytoskeletal Damage Markers in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Is There a Common Pattern between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Abdelhak, Ahmed; Junker, Andreas; Brettschneider, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Otto, Markus; Tumani, Hayrettin

    2015-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common pathophysiological pathway involving axonal degeneration despite different etiological triggers. Analysis of cytoskeletal markers such as neurofilaments, protein tau and tubulin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be a useful approach to detect the process of axonal damage and its severity during disease course. In this article, we review the published literature regarding brain-specific CSF markers for cytoskeletal damage in primary progressive multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to evaluate their utility as a biomarker for disease progression in conjunction with imaging and histological markers which might also be useful in other neurodegenerative diseases associated with affection of the upper motor neurons. A long-term benefit of such an approach could be facilitating early diagnostic and prognostic tools and assessment of treatment efficacy of disease modifying drugs. PMID:26263977

  3. Brain-Specific Cytoskeletal Damage Markers in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Is There a Common Pattern between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Abdelhak, Ahmed; Junker, Andreas; Brettschneider, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Otto, Markus; Tumani, Hayrettin

    2015-07-31

    Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common pathophysiological pathway involving axonal degeneration despite different etiological triggers. Analysis of cytoskeletal markers such as neurofilaments, protein tau and tubulin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be a useful approach to detect the process of axonal damage and its severity during disease course. In this article, we review the published literature regarding brain-specific CSF markers for cytoskeletal damage in primary progressive multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to evaluate their utility as a biomarker for disease progression in conjunction with imaging and histological markers which might also be useful in other neurodegenerative diseases associated with affection of the upper motor neurons. A long-term benefit of such an approach could be facilitating early diagnostic and prognostic tools and assessment of treatment efficacy of disease modifying drugs.

  4. The effects of cyclic tensile strain on the organisation and expression of cytoskeletal elements in bovine intervertebral disc cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Jia, X; Duance, V C; Blain, E J

    2011-01-01

    It is still relatively unclear how intervertebral disc (IVD) cells sense a mechanical stimulus and convert this signal into a biochemical response. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoskeletal elements are mechano-responsive in many cell types and may contribute to mechano-signalling pathways. The objective of this study was to determine the response of cells from the outer annulus fibrosus (OAF) to physiological levels of cyclic tensile strain; further, cells from the nucleus pulposus (NP) were also subjected to an identical loading regime to compare biological responses across the IVD populations. We determined whether the organisation and expression of the major cytoskeletal elements and their associated accessory proteins are responsive to mechanical stimulation in these cells, and whether these changes correlated with either a catabolic or anabolic phenotype. OAF and NP cells from immature bovine IVD were seeded onto Flexcell® type I collagen coated plates. Cells were subjected to cyclic tensile strain (10 %, 1 Hz) for 60 minutes. Post-loading, cells were processed for immunofluorescence microscopy, RNA extracted for quantitative PCR and protein extracted for Western blotting analysis. F-actin reorganisation was evident in OAF and NP cells subjected to tensile strain; strain induced β-actin at the transcriptional and translational level in OAF cells. β-tubulin mRNA and protein synthesis increased in strained OAF cells, but vimentin expression was significantly inhibited. Cytoskeletal element organisation and expression were less responsive to strain in NP cells. Tensile strain increased type I collagen and differentially regulated extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes' mRNA levels in OAF cells. Strain induced type II collagen transcription in NP cells, but had no effect on the transcription of any other genes analysed. Tensile strain induces different mechano-responses in the organisation and/or expression of cytoskeletal elements and on

  5. Cytoskeletal proteins from human skin fibroblasts, peripheral blood leukocytes, and a lymphoblastoid cell line compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Willard, K.E.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-04-01

    Differences in proteins between cells grown as suspension cultures and those grown as attached cultures were studied by comparing the proteins of detergent-resistant cytoskeletons prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes and a lymphoblastoid cell line (GM607) (both grown as suspension cultures) and those of human skin fibroblasts (grown as attached cultures) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The major cytoskeletal proteins of the leukocytes were also present in the protein pattern of GM607 cytoskeletons. In contrast, the fibroblast cytoskeletal protein pattern contained four groups of proteins that differed from the patterns of the leukocytes and GM607. In addition, surface labeling of GM607 and human fibroblasts with /sup 125/I demonstrated that substantial amounts of vimentin and actin are exposed at the surface of the attached fibroblasts, but there is little evidence of similar exposure at the surface of the suspension-grown GM607. These results demonstrate some differences in cytoskeletal protein composition between different types of cells could be related to their ability or lack of ability to grow as attached cells in tissue culture.

  6. Cytoskeletal alterations in interphase cells of the green alga Spirogyra decimina in response to heavy metals exposure: II. The effect of aluminium, nickel and copper.

    PubMed

    Pribyl, Pavel; Cepák, Vladislav; Zachleder, Vilém

    2008-08-01

    The effect of the toxic metal ions, aluminium (Al3+), nickel (Ni2+), and copper (Cu2+), on both the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton of the green alga Spirogyra decimina was studied. Batch cultured cells were grown for different time intervals at concentrations of 10, 15, 40 and 100 microM of aluminium as AlCl3, nickel as NiCl2 and copper as CuSO(4).5H2O. The impact of copper on the morphology of both MTs and AFs was much more prominent than the other two metals. A rapid irreversible depolymerization of cytoskeletal structures occurred, whereas in the presence of aluminium or nickel, changes in the cytoskeleton were slight and reversible to some extent. Nickel changed the orientation of cortical MTs, which turned from a transverse to a skewed or longitudinal direction. Aluminium caused slight depolymerization of the cytoskeleton, which reverted spontaneously to the normal cytoskeletal state (in AlCl3 free nutrient solution). Copper exerted a strong effect on both the MT and AF cytoskeleton, which fragmented and disorganized rapidly. The extent of cytoskeletal damage by copper was dosage and time dependent and AFs were slightly more sensitive than MTs. PMID:18440197

  7. Cytoskeletal alterations in interphase cells of the green alga Spirogyra decimina in response to heavy metals exposure: II. The effect of aluminium, nickel and copper.

    PubMed

    Pribyl, Pavel; Cepák, Vladislav; Zachleder, Vilém

    2008-08-01

    The effect of the toxic metal ions, aluminium (Al3+), nickel (Ni2+), and copper (Cu2+), on both the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton of the green alga Spirogyra decimina was studied. Batch cultured cells were grown for different time intervals at concentrations of 10, 15, 40 and 100 microM of aluminium as AlCl3, nickel as NiCl2 and copper as CuSO(4).5H2O. The impact of copper on the morphology of both MTs and AFs was much more prominent than the other two metals. A rapid irreversible depolymerization of cytoskeletal structures occurred, whereas in the presence of aluminium or nickel, changes in the cytoskeleton were slight and reversible to some extent. Nickel changed the orientation of cortical MTs, which turned from a transverse to a skewed or longitudinal direction. Aluminium caused slight depolymerization of the cytoskeleton, which reverted spontaneously to the normal cytoskeletal state (in AlCl3 free nutrient solution). Copper exerted a strong effect on both the MT and AF cytoskeleton, which fragmented and disorganized rapidly. The extent of cytoskeletal damage by copper was dosage and time dependent and AFs were slightly more sensitive than MTs.

  8. Use of Nanobodies to Localize Endogenous Cytoskeletal Proteins and to Determine Their Contribution to Cancer Cell Invasion by Using an ECM Degradation Assay.

    PubMed

    Van Audenhove, Isabel; Gettemans, Jan

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous ways to study actin cytoskeletal structures, and thereby identify the underlying mechanisms of organization and their regulating proteins. Traditional approaches make use of protein overexpression or siRNA. However to study or modulate resident endogenous proteins, complementary methods are required. Since the discovery of nanobodies in 1993, they have proven to represent interesting tools in a variety of applications due to their high affinity, solubility, and stability. Especially their intracellular functionality makes them ideally suited for the study of actin cytoskeletal regulation. Here we provide a protocol to clone nanobody cDNAs in frame with an EGFP or mCherry fluorescent tag. We explain how to transfect this fusion protein in eukaryotic (cancer) cells and how to perform immunofluorescence. This allows microscopic analysis of endogenous (cytoskeletal) proteins and gives insight into their endogenous localization. Moreover, we outline an extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation assay as an application of the general protocol. By seeding cells onto a fluorescently labeled gelatin matrix, degradation can be quantified by means of a matrix degradation index. This assay demonstrates the contribution of a protein during cancer cell invasiveness in vitro and the potential of a nanobody to inhibit this degradation through modulation of its target.

  9. Cytoskeletal integration in a highly ordered sensory epithelium in the organ of Corti: reponse to loss of cell partners in the Bronx waltzer mouse.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J B; Mackie, J B; Bussoli, T J; Steel, K P

    1999-12-01

    This report is concerned with control of cell shaping, positioning, and cytoskeletal integration in a highly ordered cochlear neuroepithelium. It is largely based on investigations of events that occur during abnormal morphogenesis of the organ of Corti in the Bronx waltzer (bv/bv) mutant mouse. The organ's sensory hair cells and adjacent supporting cells ordinarily construct a spatially elaborate and supracellularly integrated cytoskeletal framework. Large microtubule bundles are connected to cytoskeletal components in neighbouring cells by actin-containing meshworks that link them to substantial arrays of adherens junctions. In bv/bv mice, degeneration and loss of most inner hair cells and outer pillar cells occurs during organ development. These cells flank each side of a row of inner pillar cells that respond by upregulating assembly of their actin-containing meshworks. This only occurs in surface regions where they no longer contact cell types involved in construction of the cytoskeletal framework. The meshworks are larger and exhibit a more extensive sub-surface deployment than is normally the case. Hence, assembly of intercellular cytoskeletal connecting components can proceed without contact with appropriate cell neighbours but termination of assembly is apparently subject to a negative feedback control triggered by successful completion of intercellular connection with the correct cell neighbours. In addition, inner pillar cells compensate for loss of cell neighbours by interdigitating and overlapping each other more extensively than is usually the case to increase opportunities for generating adherens junctions. Certain adherens junctions in the organs of +/+ and bv/bv mice exhibit features that distinguish them from all previously described cell junctions. The dense plaques on their cytoplasmic faces are composed of aligned ridges. We suggest that they are called ribbed adherens junctions. Perturbations of cell shaping and positioning indicate that loss

  10. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  11. 3D Actin Network Centerline Extraction with Multiple Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and actin cables. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we propose a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the method using synthetic images shows that for images with SNR above 5.0, the average vertex error measured by the distance between our result and ground truth is 1 voxel, and the average Hausdorff distance is below 10 voxels. PMID:24316442

  12. Cytoskeletal rearrangement and Src and PI-3K-dependent Akt activation control GABA(B)R-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Barati, Michelle T; Lukenbill, Janice; Wu, Rui; Rane, Madhavi J; Klein, Jon B

    2015-06-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) type B receptors (GABA(B)R) function as chemoattractant receptors in response to GABA(B)R agonists in human neutrophils. The goal of this study was to define signaling mechanisms regulating GABA(B)R-mediated chemotaxis and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In a proteomic study we identified serine/threonine kinase Akt, tyrosine kinases Src and Pyk2, microtubule regulator kinesin and microtubule affinity-regulating kinase (MARK) co-immunoprecipitating with GABA(B)R. To define the contributions of these candidate signaling events in GABA(B)R-mediated chemotaxis, we used rat basophilic leukemic cells (RBL-2H3 cells) stably transfected with human GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) receptors. The GABA(B)R agonist baclofen induced Akt phosphorylation and chemotaxis by binding to its specific GABA(B)R since pretreatment of cells with CGP52432, a GABA(B)R antagonist, blocked such effects. Moreover, baclofen induced Akt phosphorylation was shown to be dependent upon PI-3K and Src kinases. Baclofen failed to stimulate actin polymerization in suspended RBL cells unless exposed to a baclofen gradient. However, baclofen stimulated both actin and tubulin polymerization in adherent RBL-GABA(B)R cells. Blockade of actin and tubulin polymerization by treatment of cells with cytochalasin D or nocodazole respectively, abolished baclofen-mediated chemotaxis. Furthermore, baclofen stimulated Pyk2 and STAT3 phosphorylation, both known regulators of cell migration. In conclusion, GABA(B)R stimulation promotes chemotaxis in RBL cells which is dependent on signaling via PI3-K/Akt, Src kinases and on rearrangement of both microtubules and actin cytoskeleton. These data define mechanisms of GABA(B)R-mediated chemotaxis which may potentially be used to therapeutically regulate cellular response to injury and disease.

  13. Muscular Dystrophy-Associated SUN1 and SUN2 Variants Disrupt Nuclear-Cytoskeletal Connections and Myonuclear Organization

    PubMed Central

    Antoku, Susumu; Columbaro, Marta; Straatman, Kees R.; Worman, Howard J.; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Wehnert, Manfred; Shackleton, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the nuclear envelope (NE) are associated with a range of inherited disorders, most commonly involving muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy, as exemplified by Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). EDMD is both genetically and phenotypically variable, and some evidence of modifier genes has been reported. Six genes have so far been linked to EDMD, four encoding proteins associated with the LINC complex that connects the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. However, 50% of patients have no identifiable mutations in these genes. Using a candidate approach, we have identified putative disease-causing variants in the SUN1 and SUN2 genes, also encoding LINC complex components, in patients with EDMD and related myopathies. Our data also suggest that SUN1 and SUN2 can act as disease modifier genes in individuals with co-segregating mutations in other EDMD genes. Five SUN1/SUN2 variants examined impaired rearward nuclear repositioning in fibroblasts, confirming defective LINC complex function in nuclear-cytoskeletal coupling. Furthermore, myotubes from a patient carrying compound heterozygous SUN1 mutations displayed gross defects in myonuclear organization. This was accompanied by loss of recruitment of centrosomal marker, pericentrin, to the NE and impaired microtubule nucleation at the NE, events that are required for correct myonuclear arrangement. These defects were recapitulated in C2C12 myotubes expressing exogenous SUN1 variants, demonstrating a direct link between SUN1 mutation and impairment of nuclear-microtubule coupling and myonuclear positioning. Our findings strongly support an important role for SUN1 and SUN2 in muscle disease pathogenesis and support the hypothesis that defects in the LINC complex contribute to disease pathology through disruption of nuclear-microtubule association, resulting in defective myonuclear positioning. PMID:25210889

  14. Microcystin-LR Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Cytoskeletal Disruption and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinlin; Shan, Zhengjun; Xu, Weili; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Junying; Kong, Deyang; Xu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) contains Leucine (L) and Arginine (R) in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A) activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH) was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12 - 48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity. PMID:24376844

  15. Multiple cytoskeletal pathways and PI3K signaling mediate CDC-42-induced neuronal protrusion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Alan, Jamie K; Struckhoff, Eric C; Lundquist, Erik A

    2013-01-01

    Rho GTPases are key regulators of cellular protrusion and are involved in many developmental events including axon guidance during nervous system development. Rho GTPase pathways display functional redundancy in developmental events, including axon guidance. Therefore, their roles can often be masked when using simple loss-of-function genetic approaches. As a complement to loss-of-function genetics, we constructed a constitutively activated CDC-42(G12V) expressed in C. elegans neurons. CDC-42(G12V) drove the formation of ectopic lamellipodial and filopodial protrusions in the PDE neurons, which resembled protrusions normally found on migrating growth cones of axons. We then used a candidate gene approach to identify molecules that mediate CDC-42(G12V)-induced ectopic protrusions by determining if loss of function of the genes could suppress CDC-42(G12V). Using this approach, we identified 3 cytoskeletal pathways previously implicated in axon guidance, the Arp2/3 complex, UNC-115/abLIM, and UNC-43/Ena. We also identified the Nck-interacting kinase MIG-15/NIK and p21-activated kinases (PAKs), also implicated in axon guidance. Finally, PI3K signaling was required, specifically the Rictor/mTORC2 branch but not the mTORC1 branch that has been implicated in other aspects of PI3K signaling including stress and aging. Our results indicate that multiple pathways can mediate CDC-42-induced neuronal protrusions that might be relevant to growth cone protrusions during axon pathfinding. Each of these pathways involves Rac GTPases, which might serve to integrate the pathways and coordinate the multiple CDC-42 pathways. These pathways might be relevant to developmental events such as axon pathfinding as well as disease states such as metastatic melanoma.

  16. Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Cytoskeletal Reorganization during Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescence of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2009-08-21

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are critical for tissue regeneration. How hMSC respond to genotoxic stresses and potentially contribute to aging and cancer remain underexplored. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation induced cellular senescence of hMSC over a period of 10 days, showing a critical transition between day 3 and day 6. This was confirmed by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, protein expression profiles of key cell cycle regulators (retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, p53, p21{sup waf1/Cip1}, and p16{sup INK4A}), and senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) (IL-8, IL-12, GRO, and MDC). We observed dramatic cytoskeletal reorganization of hMSC through reduction of myosin-10, redistribution of myosin-9, and secretion of profilin-1. Using a SILAC-based phosphoproteomics method, we detected significant reduction of myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, coinciding with its redistribution. Importantly, through treatment with cell permeable inhibitors (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole (TBB) and 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT)), and gene knockdown using RNA interference, we identified CK2, a kinase responsible for myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, as a key factor contributing to the radiation-induced senescence of hMSC. We showed that individual knockdown of CK2 catalytic subunits CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} induced hMSC senescence. However, only knockdown of CK2{alpha} resulted in morphological phenotypes resembling those of radiation-induced senescence. These results suggest that CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} play differential roles in hMSC senescence progression, and their relative expression might represent a novel regulatory mechanism for CK2 activity.

  17. Cytoskeletal role in the transition from compensated to decompensated hypertrophy during adult canine left ventricular pressure overloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagawa, H.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Zile, M. R.; Carabello, B. A.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    Increased microtubule density causes cardiocyte contractile dysfunction in right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy, and these linked phenotypic and contractile abnormalities persist and progress during the transition to failure. Although more severe in cells from failing than hypertrophied RVs, the mechanical defects are normalized in each case by microtubule depolymerization. To define the role of increased microtubule density in left ventricular (LV) pressure-overload hypertrophy and failure, in a given LV we examined ventricular mechanics, sarcomere mechanics, and free tubulin and microtubule levels in control dogs and in dogs with aortic stenosis both with LV hypertrophy alone and with initially compensated hypertrophy that had progressed to LV muscle failure. In comparing initial values with those at study 8 weeks later, dogs with hypertrophy alone had a very substantial increase in LV mass but preservation of a normal ejection fraction and mean systolic wall stress. Dogs with hypertrophy and associated failure had a substantial but lesser increase in LV mass and a reduction in ejection fraction, as well as a marked increase in mean systolic wall stress. Cardiocyte contractile function was equivalent, and unaffected by microtubule depolymerization, in cells from control LVs and those with compensated hypertrophy. In contrast, cardiocyte contractile function in cells from failing LVs was quite depressed but was normalized by microtubule depolymerization. Microtubules were increased only in failing LVs. These contractile and cytoskeletal changes, when assayed longitudinally in a given dog by biopsy, appeared in failing ventricles only when wall stress began to increase and function began to decrease. Thus, the microtubule-based cardiocyte contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-hypertrophied myocardium, originally described in the RV, obtains equally in the LV but is shown here to have a specific association with increased wall stress.

  18. Cell protrusions induced by hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) resemble mesothelial microvilli and share cytoskeletal features of filopodia.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, Ville; Kärnä, Riikka; Koistinen, Arto; Arjonen, Antti; Tammi, Markku; Rilla, Kirsi

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that overexpression of enzymatically active GFP-HAS induces the growth of long, slender protrusions that share many features of both filopodia and microvilli. These protrusions are dependent on continuing hyaluronan synthesis, and disrupt upon digestion of hyaluronan by hyaluronidase. However, complete understanding of their nature is still missing. This work shows that the protrusions on rat peritoneal surface are ultrastructurally indistinguishable from those induced by GFP-HAS3 in MCF-7 cells. Analysis of the actin-associated proteins villin, ezrin, espin, fascin, and Myo10 indicated that the HAS3-induced protrusions share most cytoskeletal features with filopodia, but they do not require adherence to the substratum like traditional filopodia. GFP-HAS3 overexpression was found to markedly enhance filamentous actin in the protrusions and their cortical basis. Analysis of the protrusion dynamics after enzymatic digestion of hyaluronan revealed that while GFP-HAS3 escape from the protrusions and the protrusion collapse takes place immediately, the complete retraction of the protrusions occurs more slowly. This finding also suggests that hyaluronan chain maintains HAS3 in the plasma membrane. The results of this work suggest that protrusions similar to those of HAS3 overexpressing cells in vitro exist also in cells with active hyaluronan synthesis in vivo. These protrusions are similar to common filopodia but are independent of substratum attachment due to the extracellular scaffolding by the hyaluronan coat that accounts for the growth and maintenance of these structures, previously associated to invasion, adhesion and multidrug resistance. PMID:26162854

  19. The 4.1B cytoskeletal protein regulates the domain organization and sheath thickness of myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Einheber, Steven; Meng, Xiaosong; Rubin, Marina; Lam, Isabel; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Shrager, Peter; Kissil, Joseph; Maurel, Patrice; Salzer, James L

    2013-02-01

    Myelinated axons are organized into specialized domains critical to their function in saltatory conduction, i.e., nodes, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes. Here, we describe the distribution and role of the 4.1B protein in this organization. 4.1B is expressed by neurons, and at lower levels by Schwann cells, which also robustly express 4.1G. Immunofluorescence and immuno-EM demonstrates 4.1B is expressed subjacent to the axon membrane in all domains except the nodes. Mice deficient in 4.1B have preserved paranodes, based on marker staining and EM in contrast to the juxtaparanodes, which are substantially affected in both the PNS and CNS. The juxtaparanodal defect is evident in developing and adult nerves and is neuron-autonomous based on myelinating cocultures in which wt Schwann cells were grown with 4.1B-deficient neurons. Despite the juxtaparanodal defect, nerve conduction velocity is unaffected. Preservation of paranodal markers in 4.1B deficient mice is associated with, but not dependent on an increase of 4.1R at the axonal paranodes. Loss of 4.1B in the axon is also associated with reduced levels of the internodal proteins, Necl-1 and Necl-2, and of alpha-2 spectrin. Mutant nerves are modestly hypermyelinated and have increased numbers of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, increased expression of 4.1G, and express a residual, truncated isoform of 4.1B. These results demonstrate that 4.1B is a key cytoskeletal scaffold for axonal adhesion molecules expressed in the juxtaparanodal and internodal domains that unexpectedly regulates myelin sheath thickness.

  20. Specific release of membrane-bound annexin II and cortical cytoskeletal elements by sequestration of membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, T; Kellner, R; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1997-01-01

    Annexin II is an abundant protein which is present in the cytosol and on the cytoplasmic face of plasma membrane and early endosomes. It is generally believed that this association occurs via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to lipids, a mechanism typical for the annexin protein family. Although previous studies have shown that annexin II is involved in early endosome dynamics and organization, the precise biological role of the protein is unknown. In this study, we found that approximately 50% of the total cellular annexin was associated with membranes in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This binding was extremely tight, since it resisted high salt and, to some extent, high pH treatments. We found, however, that membrane-associated annexin II could be quantitatively released by low concentrations of the cholesterol-sequestering agents filipin and digitonin. Both treatments released an identical and limited set of proteins but had no effects on other membrane-associated proteins. Among the released proteins, we identified, in addition to annexin II itself, the cortical cytoskeletal proteins alpha-actinin, ezrin and moesin, and membrane-associated actin. Our biochemical and immunological observations indicate that these proteins are part of a complex containing annexin II and that stability of the complex is sensitive to cholesterol sequestering agents. Since annexin II is tightly membrane-associated in a cholesterol-dependent manner, and since it seems to interact physically with elements of the cortical actin cytoskeleton, we propose that the protein serves as interface between membranes containing high amounts of cholesterol and the actin cytoskeleton. Images PMID:9188103

  1. Diffusible crosslinkers generate directed forces in microtubule networks.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Zdenek; Braun, Marcus; Lüdecke, Annemarie; Schlierf, Michael; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Janson, Marcel E; Diez, Stefan

    2015-03-12

    Cytoskeletal remodeling is essential to eukaryotic cell division and morphogenesis. The mechanical forces driving the restructuring are attributed to the action of molecular motors and the dynamics of cytoskeletal filaments, which both consume chemical energy. By contrast, non-enzymatic filament crosslinkers are regarded as mere friction-generating entities. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that diffusible microtubule crosslinkers of the Ase1/PRC1/Map65 family generate directed microtubule sliding when confined between partially overlapping microtubules. The Ase1-generated forces, directly measured by optical tweezers to be in the piconewton-range, were sufficient to antagonize motor-protein driven microtubule sliding. Force generation is quantitatively explained by the entropic expansion of confined Ase1 molecules diffusing within the microtubule overlaps. The thermal motion of crosslinkers is thus harnessed to generate mechanical work analogous to compressed gas propelling a piston in a cylinder. As confinement of diffusible proteins is ubiquitous in cells, the associated entropic forces are likely of importance for cellular mechanics beyond cytoskeletal networks. PMID:25748652

  2. Elasticity of F-actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret Lise

    This thesis presents a study of the elasticity and microstructure of three filamentous actin (F-actin) based materials. Using bulk rheology, microrheology, multiple particle tracking and imaging techniques, we study the microscopic origins of the mechanical properties of F-actin networks. We briefly introduce aspects of F-actin and rheology essential to provide a background for and motivate this thesis in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we describe the materials and methods used. An introduction to microrheology is given in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, we study solutions of entangled F-actin. We elucidate the microscopic origins of bulk elasticity using microrheology techniques. We also show that multiple particle tracking can also probe the dynamics of the F-actin solution microstructure. We explore the effect of rigid, incompliant chemical cross-links between actin filaments in Chapter 5. We explore changes in the network microstructure as the concentration of cross-links is varied. We find that the elastic stiffness of these networks is extremely sensitive to small changes in cross-link density. Despite this large variation, the linear viscoelasticity of all networks can be scaled onto a universal master curve; this scaling reveals that the mechanical dissipation of the networks is due to thermal fluctuations of F-actin. At large stresses, the mechanical stiffness of these networks diverges. The form of this stress stiffening response is consistent with the non-linear force extension of a single semi-flexible polymer. Thus, over a large range of conditions, the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of rigidly cross-linked networks is entropic in origin. Finally, at very low cross-link and filament densities, we observe a transition to a qualitatively different type of elasticity; this is consistent with a transition to an enthalpic network elasticity dominated by bending of F-actin. In Chapter 6, we study the elastic properties of F-actin networks assembled with a

  3. Widespread mRNA Association with Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins and Identification and Dynamics of Myosin-Associated mRNAs in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Casolari, Jason M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Salzman, Julia; Champion, Lowry M.; Moerner, W. E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    Programmed mRNA localization to specific subcellular compartments for localized translation is a fundamental mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation that affects many, and possibly all, mRNAs in eukaryotes. We describe her e a systematic approach to identify the RNA cargoes associated with the cytoskeletal motor proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with live-cell 3D super-localization microscopy of endogenously tagged mRNAs. Our analysis identified widespread association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins, including association of Myo3 with mRNAs encoding key regulators of actin branching and endocytosis such as WASP and WIP. Using conventional fluorescence microscopy and expression of MS2-tagged mRNAs from endogenous loci, we observed a strong bias for actin patch nucleator mRNAs to localize to the cell cortex and the actin patch in a Myo3- and F-actin dependent manner. Use of a double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF) microscope allowed super-localization measurements of single mRNPs at a spatial precision of 25 nm in x and y and 50 nm in z in live cells with 50 ms exposure times, allowing quantitative profiling of mRNP dynamics. The actin patch mRNA exhibited distinct and characteristic diffusion coefficients when compared to a control mRNA. In addition, disruption of F-actin significantly expanded the 3D confinement radius of an actin patch nucleator mRNA, providing a quantitative assessment of the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to mRNP dynamic localization. Our results provide evidence for specific association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins in yeast, suggest that different mRNPs have distinct and characteristic dynamics, and lend insight into the mechanism of actin patch nucleator mRNA localization to actin patches. PMID:22359641

  4. Molecular Simulations of Actomyosin Network Self-Assembly and Remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komianos, James; Popov, Konstantin; Papoian, Garegin; Papoian Lab Team

    Actomyosin networks are an integral part of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells and play an essential role in determining cellular shape and movement. Actomyosin network growth and remodeling in vivo is based on a large number of chemical and mechanical processes, which are mutually coupled and spatially and temporally resolved. To investigate the fundamental principles behind the self-organization of these networks, we have developed a detailed mechanochemical, stochastic model of actin filament growth dynamics, at a single-molecule resolution, where the nonlinear mechanical rigidity of filaments and their corresponding deformations under internally and externally generated forces are taken into account. Our work sheds light on the interplay between the chemical and mechanical processes governing the cytoskeletal dynamics, and also highlights the importance of diffusional and active transport phenomena. Our simulations reveal how different actomyosin micro-architectures emerge in response to varying the network composition. Support from NSF Grant CHE-1363081.

  5. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P; Kumar, Anil Tr; Devi, Anandavalli N; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)(+) (spermatogonia), GFRα(-)/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)(+) (meiotic), and GFRα(-)/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)(+) (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein

  6. Cdc42 and k-Ras Control Endothelial Tubulogenesis through Apical Membrane and Cytoskeletal Polarization: Novel Stimulatory Roles for GTPase Effectors, the Small GTPases, Rac2 and Rap1b, and Inhibitory Influence of Arhgap31 and Rasa1

    PubMed Central

    Norden, Pieter R.; Kim, Dae Joong; Barry, David M.; Cleaver, Ondine B.; Davis, George E.

    2016-01-01

    A critical and understudied property of endothelial cells is their ability to form lumens and tube networks. Although considerable information has been obtained concerning these issues, including the role of Cdc42 and Rac1 and their effectors such as Pak2, Pak4, Par6b, and co-regulators such as integrins, MT1-MMP and Par3; many key questions remain that are necessary to elucidate molecular and signaling requirements for this fundamental process. In this work, we identify new small GTPase regulators of EC tubulogenesis including k-Ras, Rac2 and Rap1b that act in conjunction with Cdc42 as well as the key downstream effectors, IQGAP1, MRCKβ, beta-Pix, GIT1, and Rasip1 (which can assemble into multiprotein complexes with key regulators including α2β1 integrin and MT1-MMP). In addition, we identify the negative regulators, Arhgap31 (by inactivating Cdc42 and Rac) and Rasa1 (by inactivating k-Ras) and the positive regulator, Arhgap29 (by inactivating RhoA) which play a major functional role during the EC tubulogenic process. Human EC siRNA suppression or mouse knockout of Rasip1 leads to identical phenotypes where ECs form extensive cord networks, but cannot generate lumens or tubes. Essential roles for these molecules during EC tubulogenesis include; i) establishment of asymmetric EC cytoskeletal polarization (subapical distribution of acetylated tubulin and basal membrane distribution of F-actin); and ii) directed membrane trafficking of pinocytic vacuoles or other intracellular vesicles along acetylated tubulin tracks to the developing apical membrane surface. Cdc42 co-localizes subapically with acetylated tubulin, while Rac1 and k-Ras strongly label vacuole/ vesicle membranes which accumulate and fuse together in a polarized, perinuclear manner. We observe polarized apical membrane and subapical accumulation of key GTPases and effectors regulating EC lumen formation including Cdc42, Rac1, Rac2, k-Ras, Rap1b, activated c-Raf and Rasip1 to control EC tube network

  7. Cdc42 and k-Ras Control Endothelial Tubulogenesis through Apical Membrane and Cytoskeletal Polarization: Novel Stimulatory Roles for GTPase Effectors, the Small GTPases, Rac2 and Rap1b, and Inhibitory Influence of Arhgap31 and Rasa1.

    PubMed

    Norden, Pieter R; Kim, Dae Joong; Barry, David M; Cleaver, Ondine B; Davis, George E

    2016-01-01

    A critical and understudied property of endothelial cells is their ability to form lumens and tube networks. Although considerable information has been obtained concerning these issues, including the role of Cdc42 and Rac1 and their effectors such as Pak2, Pak4, Par6b, and co-regulators such as integrins, MT1-MMP and Par3; many key questions remain that are necessary to elucidate molecular and signaling requirements for this fundamental process. In this work, we identify new small GTPase regulators of EC tubulogenesis including k-Ras, Rac2 and Rap1b that act in conjunction with Cdc42 as well as the key downstream effectors, IQGAP1, MRCKβ, beta-Pix, GIT1, and Rasip1 (which can assemble into multiprotein complexes with key regulators including α2β1 integrin and MT1-MMP). In addition, we identify the negative regulators, Arhgap31 (by inactivating Cdc42 and Rac) and Rasa1 (by inactivating k-Ras) and the positive regulator, Arhgap29 (by inactivating RhoA) which play a major functional role during the EC tubulogenic process. Human EC siRNA suppression or mouse knockout of Rasip1 leads to identical phenotypes where ECs form extensive cord networks, but cannot generate lumens or tubes. Essential roles for these molecules during EC tubulogenesis include; i) establishment of asymmetric EC cytoskeletal polarization (subapical distribution of acetylated tubulin and basal membrane distribution of F-actin); and ii) directed membrane trafficking of pinocytic vacuoles or other intracellular vesicles along acetylated tubulin tracks to the developing apical membrane surface. Cdc42 co-localizes subapically with acetylated tubulin, while Rac1 and k-Ras strongly label vacuole/ vesicle membranes which accumulate and fuse together in a polarized, perinuclear manner. We observe polarized apical membrane and subapical accumulation of key GTPases and effectors regulating EC lumen formation including Cdc42, Rac1, Rac2, k-Ras, Rap1b, activated c-Raf and Rasip1 to control EC tube network

  8. A model of low-level primary blast brain trauma results in cytoskeletal proteolysis and chronic functional impairment in the absence of lung barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Eugene; Gottlieb, James J; Cheung, Bob; Shek, Pang N; Baker, Andrew J

    2011-03-01

    Shock-wave exposure from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has been implicated as a possible contributing factor to neurological impairment reported in combat veterans. However, evidence-based substantiation of this implication, particularly for low-level exposure in the absence of external signs of trauma, remain elusive. Accordingly, we constructed an open-ended shock tube producing a short-duration, low-amplitude shockwave. Low-level (11.5 kPa static overpressure) complex shock-wave exposure in rats resulted in no histological evidence of lung injury. By contrast, delayed cytoskeletal proteolysis of αII-spectrin was detected in the cortex and hippocampus by 12 h post-injury. Cell death was minimal and localized predominantly in the corpus callosum and periventricular regions. These regions, with presumably different density interfaces, exhibit biological responses to shockwaves consistent with interface turbulence described by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Evoked compound action potential (CAP) recordings from the corpus callosum showed a significant increase in the duration of CAP responses at 14 and 30 days post-injury, and a gradual depression in the unmyelinated fiber amplitude. Shielding the head attenuated αII-spectrin cytoskeletal breakdown, thus directly implicating low-level shock-wave exposure as a cause of brain injury in the rat. Despite anatomical and scaling differences in rats compared to humans, the results suggest the potential for undiagnosed traumatic brain pathologies occurring in combat veterans following shock-wave exposure.

  9. Effect of fast pH decline during the early postmortem period on calpain activity and cytoskeletal protein degradation of broiler M. pectoralis major.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Yang, J; Huang, F; Huang, M; Chen, K J; Xu, X L; Zhou, G H

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of fast pH decline during the early postmortem period on calpain activity and the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins in broilers. Eighty broilers were randomly categorized into two groups: physical restraint (PR) and free struggle (FS). M. pectoralis major (PM) was used for determination of calpain activity, shear value, ultrastructure of myofibrils, and the degradation of desmin, titin, nebulin, and troponin-T. The pH (6.05) of FS group is significantly low than PR group (6.38) at 0.3 h postmortem. Fast pH decline during the early postmortem period led to a decrease of μ/m-calpain activities at 0.3 and 3 h postmortem (P < 0.05), but did not affect the ultimate μ/m-calpain activity. An initial fast decrease in pH increased the degradation of desmin, titin, nebulin, and increased the 30 kDa degradation fragments of troponin-T. Therefore, the fast pH decline during the early postmortem period decreased the μ/m-calpain activity and increased the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins in broiler muscle. It is possible that the fast pH decline experienced an earlier activation of calpains that resulted in earlier protein degradation and ultimately lower shear force.

  10. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  11. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways.

  12. Targeting of c-myc and beta-globin coding sequences to cytoskeletal-bound polysomes by c-myc 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, J; Campbell, G; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J M

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the 3' untranslated region on mRNA localization was investigated by measuring the distribution of myc, beta-globin and hybrid myc-globin mRNAs between free, cytoskeletal-bound and membrane-bound polysomes in cells transfected with either control or chimeric gene constructs. c-myc sequences and beta-globin-coding sequences linked to the myc 3' untranslated region were present at greatest enrichment in cytoskeletal-bound polysomes. beta-Globin mRNA and myc-coding sequences linked to the beta-globin 3' untranslated region were recovered largely in the free polysomes. In situ hybridization confirmed that replacement of the c-myc 3' untranslated region by that of globin caused a relocalization of the mRNA. The results suggest that mRNA localization in differentiated eukaryotic cells depends on a mechanism that involves directional information in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8129712

  13. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  14. Beyond β-catenin: prospects for a larger catenin network in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Pierre D; Gottardi, Cara J

    2016-01-01

    β-catenin is widely regarded as the primary transducer of canonical WNT signals to the nucleus. In most vertebrates, there are eight additional catenins that are structurally related to β-catenin, and three α-catenin genes encoding actin-binding proteins that are structurally related to vinculin. Although these catenins were initially identified in association with cadherins at cell-cell junctions, more recent evidence suggests that the majority of catenins also localize to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Moreover, the number of catenins reported to be responsive to canonical WNT signals is increasing. Here, we posit that multiple catenins form a functional network in the nucleus, possibly engaging in conserved protein-protein interactions that are currently better characterized in the context of actin-based cell junctions. PMID:26580716

  15. Modeling viscoelastic networks and cell deformation in the context of the immersed boundary method

    SciTech Connect

    Bottino, D.C.

    1998-11-20

    The author presents a straightforward numerical technique for modeling passive viscoelastic networks, such as the actin cytoskeleton of ameboid cells, in the context of the immersed boundary method. The technique involves modeling the cytoskeletal material as a network of dynamic elastic links immersed in the ambient cytosol. Linking rules of varying complexity allow the numerical network to exhibit varying degrees of viscosity, elasticity, shear thinning, and thixotropy (stress-overshoot). A series of simulated viscometer tests are used to analyze the mechanical properties of the model networks and the effects of input parameters on these properties. The numerical network is then used in the context of a full-cell model involving simulated micropipette aspiration. These micropipette aspiration tests indicate that the immersed boundary method--with the added enhancement of the viscoelastic network model presented here--can be developed into a versatile tool for studying the free-boundary deformations of passively stressed and actively moving ameboid cells.

  16. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  17. Effect of Porphyrin Sensitizer MgTPPS4 on Cytoskeletal System of HeLa Cell Line-Microscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Malohlava, Jakub; Tomankova, Katerina; Malina, Lukas; Jiravova, Jana; Hanakova, Adela; Pizova, Klara; Zapletalova, Jana; Kolarova, Hana

    2016-09-01

    Metalloporphyrins are an important group of sensitizers with a porphyrin skeleton. Their photophysical properties are significantly affected by the nature of the central ion. In this work, we focus on the mechanical properties of a cervix carcinoma cell line which underwent photodynamic treatment (PDT) with MgTPPS4 photosensitzer. Atomic force microscopy alongside confocal microscopy was used to quantify and qualify the structural characteristics before and after PDT. Cells before PDT showed a fine actin network and higher elasticity with the median of Young modulus 12.2 kPa. After PDT, the median of Young modulus was 13.4 kPa and a large redistribution in the actin network was observed.

  18. Persistent oxygen-glucose deprivation induces astrocytic death through two different pathways and calpain-mediated proteolysis of cytoskeletal proteins during astrocytic oncosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Zou, Liangyu; Xiao, Haibing; Chu, Yinghao; Chu, Xiaofan

    2010-07-26

    Astrocytes are thought to play a role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the provision of metabolic substrates for neurons as well as the coupling of cerebral blood flow to neuronal activity. Accordingly, astrocytic death due to various types of injury can critically influence neuronal survival. The exact pathway of cell death after brain ischemia is under debate. In the present study, we used astrocytes from rat primary culture treated with persistent oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) as a model of ischemia to examine the pathway of cell death and the relevant mechanisms. We observed changes in the cellular morphology, the energy metabolism of astrocytes, and the percentage of apoptosis or oncosis of the astrocytes induced by OGD. Electron microscopy revealed the co-existence of ultrastructural features in both apoptosis and oncosis in individual cells. The cellular ATP content was gradually decreased and the percentages of apoptotic and oncotic cells were increased during OGD. After 4h of OGD, ATP depletion to less than 35% of the control was observed, and oncosis became the primary pathway for astrocytic death. Increased plasma membrane permeability due to oncosis was associated with increased calpain-mediated degradation of several cytoskeletal proteins, including paxillin, vinculin, vimentin and GFAP. Pre-treatment with the calpain inhibitor 3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-mercapto-(Z)-2-propenoic acid (PD150606) could delay the OGD-induced astrocytic oncosis. These results suggest that there is a narrow range of ATP that determines astrocytic oncotic death induced by persistent OGD and that calpain-mediated hydrolysis of the cytoskeletal-associated proteins may contribute to astrocytes oncosis. PMID:20493926

  19. Modification of Experimental Protocols for a Space Shuttle Flight and Applications for the Analysis of Cytoskeletal Structures During Fertilization, Cell Division , and Development in Sea Urchin Embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Stoecker, Andrew; Schatten, Heide

    1995-01-01

    To explore the role of microgravity on cytoskeletal organization and skeletal calcium deposition during fertilization, cell division, and early development, the sea urchin was chosen as a model developmental system. Methods were developed to employ light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy on cultures being prepared for flight on the Space Shuttle. For analysis of microfilaments, microtubules, centrosomes, and calcium-requiring events, our standard laboratory protocols had to be modified substantially for experimentation on the Space Shuttle. All manipulations were carried out in a closed culture chamber containing 35 ml artificial sea water as a culture fluid. Unfertilized eggs stored for 24 hours in these chambers were fertilized with sperm diluted in sea water and fixed with concentrated fixatives for final fixation in formaldehyde, taxol, EGTA, and MgCl2(exp -6)H2O for 1 cell to 16 cell stages to preserve cytoskeletal structures for simultaneous analysis with light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, and 1.5 percent glutaraldehyde and 0.4 percent formaldehyde for blastula and plueus stages. The fixed samples wre maintained in chambers without degradation for up to two weeks after which the specimens were processed and analyzed with routine methods. Since complex manipulations are not possible in the closed chambers, the fertilization coat was removed from fixation using 0.5 percent freshly prepared sodium thioglycolate solution at pH 10.0 which provided reliable immunofluorescence staining for microtubules. Sperm/egg fusion, mitosis, cytokinesis, and calcium deposition during spicule formatin in early embryogenesis were found to be without artificial alterations when compared to cells fixed fresh and processed with conventional methods.

  20. CP beta3, a novel isoform of an actin-binding protein, is a component of the cytoskeletal calyx of the mammalian sperm head.

    PubMed

    von Bülow, M; Rackwitz, H R; Zimbelmann, R; Franke, W W

    1997-05-25

    In the mammalian sperm head, the nucleus is tightly associated with the calyx, a cell type-specific cytoskeletal structure. Previously, we have identified and characterized some basic proteins such as calicin and cylicins I and II as major calyx components of bovine and human spermatids and spermatozoa. Surprisingly we have now discovered another calyx constituent which by amino acid sequencing and cDNA cloning was recognized as a novel isoform of the widespread beta subunit of the heterodimeric actin-binding "capping protein" (CP). This polypeptide, CP beta3, of sperm calices, is identical with the beta2 subunit present in diverse somatic cell types, except that it shows an amino-terminal extension of 29 amino acids and its mRNA is detected only in testis and, albeit in trace amounts, brain. This CP beta3 mRNA contains the additional sequence, encoded by exon 1 of the gene, which is missing in beta2 mRNAs. Antibodies specific for the beta3 amino-terminal addition have been used to identify the protein by immunoblotting and to localize it to the calyx structure by immunofluorescence microscopy. We conclude that in spermiogenesis the transcription of the gene encoding the beta1, beta2, and beta3 CP subunits is regulated specifically to include exon 1 and to give rise to the testis isoform CP beta3, which is integrated into the calyx structure of the forming sperm head. This surprising finding of an actin-binding protein isoform in an insoluble cytoskeletal structure is discussed in relation to the demonstrated roles of actin and certain actin-binding proteins, such as Limulus alpha-scruin, in spermiogenesis and spermatozoa.

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates the proliferation, motility and invasiveness of lung cancer cells through its effects on cytoskeletal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Li; Gu, Run-Xia; Zhou, Xiao-Shu; Zhou, Fang-Zheng; Wu, Gang

    2015-09-01

    Determining the molecular phenotype is a key to understanding and predicting the metastatic potential and the prognosis for patients with lung cancer. Our previous study demonstrated that increased expression of cyclin‑dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in patients with non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with a poorer prognosis. The present study aimed to further investigate the underlying mechanism of CDK5 in vitro and in vivo using the A549 human NSCLC cell line. A 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to quantify the proliferation of the A549 cells; migration assay and invasiveness assays were performed using Transwell chambers and wound healing assays were used to assess cell motility, which was assessed by measuring the movement of cells. Inhibition of CDK5 by roscovitine and small interfering (si)RNA was used to investigate the mechanism of CDK5 in the process of A549 lung cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. The results demonstrated that functional inhibition of CDK5 using roscovitine and siRNA markedly suppressed the proliferation of A549 cells and resulted in a reduced tumor mass in vivo. In addition, the hinhibition of CDK5 reduced the migration and invasiveness of the A549 cells in vitro and in vivo. Notably, CDK5 inhibition also impaired tumor cell cytoskeletal remodeling and led to loss of cell polarity, which may partially explain the reduction of A549 cell mobility and invasiveness. The results of the present study revealed that CDK5 may be important in the regulation of migration and invasiveness in NSCLC through its effects on cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:26018459

  2. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking.

    PubMed

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel; Schmid, Tobias; Brauss, Thilo; Pleli, Thomas; zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Piiper, Albrecht; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC.

  3. Nek6 and Hif-1α cooperate with the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance to drive outcome in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Marta De; Fanelli, Mara; Mariani, Marisa; Raspaglio, Giuseppina; Pandya, Deep; He, Shiquan; Fiedler, Paul; Petrillo, Marco; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia selects the most aggressive and drug-resistant clones in solid malignancies. One of the pivotal transcription factors induced by hypoxia is Hif-1α. However, in serous ovarian cancer (SEOC), Hif-1α expression is not a prognostic biomarker. This study aims to assess the hypothesis that the serine-threonine kinase Nek6 functions as a downstream effector cooperating with Hif-1α in driving ovarian cancer aggressiveness. Nek6 was overexpressed and Hif-1α was silenced in A2780 cells. Nek6 was also stably silenced in Hey cells. The dependence of Nek6 expression on Hif-1α was assayed as a function of hypoxic growth conditions. Nek6 interaction with the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance was investigated with far western blot. The co-expression of NEK6, HIF1A, TUBB3 and GBP1 transcripts was quantified with qPCR in two cohorts of SEOC patients (346 locally treated patients and 344 from the TCGA dataset). Nek6 expression is induced by hypoxia in a Hif-1α dependent fashion. Nek6 directly interacts with GBP-1, thus being a component of the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance. Nek6 overexpression increases and silencing decreases the anchorage-independent growth of cultured cells. In SEOC patients, NEK6 expression is significantly correlated with HIF1A. Co-expression of NEK6, HIF1A, TUBB3 and GBP1 transcripts identifies a subset of SEOC patients characterized by poor outcome and drug resistance. This study demonstrates the functional relevance of Nek6 in the context of the adaptive response to hypoxia in SEOC. This finding may help identify a sub-population of patients at high risk of relapse to standard first-line chemotherapy. PMID:26269749

  4. Linked in: immunologic membrane nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Zaccard, C R; Rinaldo, C R; Mailliard, R B

    2016-07-01

    Membrane nanotubes, also termed tunneling nanotubes, are F-actin-based structures that can form direct cytoplasmic connections and support rapid communication between distant cells. These nanoscale conduits have been observed in diverse cell types, including immune, neuronal, stromal, cancer, and stem cells. Until recently, little was known about the mechanisms involved in membrane nanotube development in myeloid origin APCs or how membrane nanotube networks support their ability to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. New research has provided insight into the modes of induction and regulation of the immune process of "reticulation" or the development of multicellular membrane nanotube networks in dendritic cells. Preprogramming by acute type 1 inflammatory mediators at their immature stage licenses mature type 1-polarized dendritic cells to reticulate upon subsequent interaction with CD40 ligand-expressing CD4(+) Th cells. Dendritic cell reticulation can support direct antigen transfer for amplification of specific T cell responses and can be positively or negatively regulated by signals from distinct Th cell subsets. Membrane nanotubes not only enhance the ability of immature dendritic cells to sense pathogens and rapidly mobilize nearby antigen-presenting cells in the peripheral tissues but also likely support communication of pathogen-related information from mature migratory dendritic cells to resident dendritic cells in lymph nodes. Therefore, the reticulation process facilitates a coordinated multicellular response for the efficient initiation of cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. Herein, we discuss studies focused on the molecular mechanisms of membrane nanotube formation, structure, and function in the context of immunity and how pathogens, such as HIV-1, may use dendritic cell reticulation to circumvent host defenses. PMID:26931578

  5. Activation of myosin V-based motility and F-actin-dependent network formation of endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wollert, Torsten; Weiss, Dieter G; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Kuznetsov, Sergei A

    2002-11-25

    It is widely believed that microtubule- and F-actin-based transport of cytoplasmic organelles and membrane fusion is down-regulated during mitosis. Here we show that during the transition of Xenopus egg extracts from interphase to metaphase myosin V-driven movement of small globular vesicles along F-actin is strongly inhibited. In contrast, the movement of ER and ER network formation on F-actin is up-regulated in metaphase extracts. Our data demonstrate that myosin V-driven motility of distinct organelles is differently controlled during the cell cycle and suggest an active role of F-actin in partitioning, positioning, and membrane fusion of the ER during cell division. PMID:12438410

  6. Anomalous motor mediated cargo transport in microtubule networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandal, Steven; Macveigh-Fierro, Daniel; Shen, Zhiyuan; Lemoi, Kyle; Vidali, Luis; Ross, Jennifer; Tuzel, Erkan

    Cargo transport is an important biological mechanism by which cells locomote, self-organize, and actively transport organelles. This transport is mediated by the cytoskeletal network and molecular motors; however, it is not known how network self-organization and dynamics affect these transport processes. In order to develop a mechanistic understanding of cargo transport, we use a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that incorporates the dynamics of these networks, as well as experimentally determined motor properties. We will test these models with two experimental systems: (1) in vitro microtubule networks with kinesin-1 motors, and quantum dot cargos on recreated microtubule networks, and (2) an excellent model organism, the moss Physcomitrella patens, in which chloroplasts are transported via the microtubule network by means of kinesin-like proteins. Phenomenological network characterizations are made, both in vivo and in vitro, and cargo motility is characterized using Mean Squared Displacement (MSD) measurements. Our simulations shed light on the role of network density and motor properties on the observed transport behavior, and improve our understanding of cargo transport in cells.

  7. Crumbs is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-cell adhesion during dorsal closure in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Benitez, David; Knust, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Crumbs protein is required for epithelial polarity and morphogenesis. Here we identify a novel role of Crumbs as a negative regulator of actomyosin dynamics during dorsal closure in the Drosophila embryo. Embryos carrying a mutation in the FERM (protein 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain-binding motif of Crumbs die due to an overactive actomyosin network associated with disrupted adherens junctions. This phenotype is restricted to the amnioserosa and does not affect other embryonic epithelia. This function of Crumbs requires DMoesin, the Rho1-GTPase, class-I p21-activated kinases and the Arp2/3 complex. Data presented here point to a critical role of Crumbs in regulating actomyosin dynamics, cell junctions and morphogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07398.001 PMID:26544546

  8. Crumbs is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-cell adhesion during dorsal closure in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Flores-Benitez, David; Knust, Elisabeth

    2015-11-06

    The evolutionarily conserved Crumbs protein is required for epithelial polarity and morphogenesis. Here we identify a novel role of Crumbs as a negative regulator of actomyosin dynamics during dorsal closure in the Drosophila embryo. Embryos carrying a mutation in the FERM (protein 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain-binding motif of Crumbs die due to an overactive actomyosin network associated with disrupted adherens junctions. This phenotype is restricted to the amnioserosa and does not affect other embryonic epithelia. This function of Crumbs requires DMoesin, the Rho1-GTPase, class-I p21-activated kinases and the Arp2/3 complex. Data presented here point to a critical role of Crumbs in regulating actomyosin dynamics, cell junctions and morphogenesis.

  9. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. RNA Helicase DDX5 Regulates MicroRNA Expression and Contributes to Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Basal Breast Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Huang, Jing; Hu, Zhi

    2011-11-15

    RNA helicase DDX5 (also p68) is involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism and serves as a transcriptional co-regulator, but its functional role in breast cancer remains elusive. Here, we report an integrative biology study of DDX5 in breast cancer, encompassing quantitative proteomics, global MicroRNA profiling, and detailed biochemical characterization of cell lines and human tissues. We showed that protein expression of DDX5 increased progressively from the luminal to basal breast cancer cell lines, and correlated positively with that of CD44 in the basal subtypes. Through immunohistochemistry analyses of tissue microarrays containing over 200 invasive human ductal carcinomas, we observed that DDX5 was upregulated in the majority of malignant tissues, and its expression correlated strongly with those of Ki67 and EGFR in the triple-negative tumors. We demonstrated that DDX5 regulated a subset of MicroRNAs including miR-21 and miR-182 in basal breast cancer cells. Knockdown of DDX5 resulted in reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and reduction of cellular proliferation. The effects were accompanied by upregulation of tumor suppressor PDCD4 (a known miR-21 target); as well as upregulation of cofilin and profilin, two key proteins involved in actin polymerization and cytoskeleton maintenance, as a consequence of miR-182 downregulation. Treatment with miR-182 inhibitors resulted in morphologic phenotypes resembling those induced by DDX5 knockdown. Using bioinformatics tools for pathway and network analyses, we confirmed that the network for regulation of actin cytoskeleton was predominantly enriched for the predicted downstream targets of miR-182. Our results reveal a new functional role of DDX5 in breast cancer via the DDX5→miR-182→actin cytoskeleton pathway, and suggest the potential clinical utility of DDX5 and its downstream MicroRNAs in the theranostics of breast cancer.

  11. Changes in cortical cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix gene expression in prostate cancer are related to oncogenic ERG deregulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cortical cytoskeleton network connects the actin cytoskeleton to various membrane proteins, influencing cell adhesion, polarity, migration and response to extracellular signals. Previous studies have suggested changes in the expression of specific components in prostate cancer, especially of 4.1 proteins (encoded by EPB41 genes) which form nodes in this network. Methods Expression of EPB41L1, EPB41L2, EPB41L3 (protein: 4.1B), EPB41L4B (EHM2), EPB41L5, EPB49 (dematin), VIL2 (ezrin), and DLG1 (summarized as „cortical cytoskeleton" genes) as well as ERG was measured by quantitative RT-PCR in a well-characterized set of 45 M0 prostate adenocarcinoma and 13 benign tissues. Hypermethylation of EPB41L3 and GSTP1 was compared in 93 cancer tissues by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of 4.1B was further studied by immunohistochemistry. Results EPB41L1 and EPB41L3 were significantly downregulated and EPB41L4B was upregulated in cancer tissues. Low EPB41L1 or high EPB41L4B expression were associated with earlier biochemical recurrence. None of the other cortical cytoskeleton genes displayed expression changes, in particular EPB49 and VIL2, despite hints from previous studies. EPB41L3 downregulation was significantly associated with hypermethylation of its promoter and strongly correlated with GSTP1 hypermethylation. Protein 4.1B was detected most strongly in the basal cells of normal prostate epithelia. Its expression in carcinoma cells was similar to the weaker one in normal luminal cells. EPB41L3 downregulation and EPB41L4B upregulation were essentially restricted to the 22 cases with ERG overexpression. Expression changes in EPB41L3 and EPB41L4B closely paralleled those previously observed for the extracellular matrix genes FBLN1 and SPOCK1, respectively. Conclusions Specific changes in the cortical cytoskeleton were observed during prostate cancer progression. They parallel changes in the expression of extracellular matrix components and all together

  12. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladrow, J.; Fakhri, N.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks.

  13. Cytoskeletal F-actin patterns in whole-mounted larval and adult salivary glands of the fleshfly, Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, W; De Loof, A

    1991-01-01

    The patterns of filamentous actin were analysed in different larval, pupal and adult stages in the salivary glands of the fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata. Using the rhodamine labelled phalloidin staining method in combination with detergent extraction specific actin filament distribution was detected. The salivary glands which are histolysed during the process of metamorphosis show distinct cellular morphology and actin filament patterns in larvae and adults. The large third instar larval salivary gland cells contain a well developed apicolateral microvillar zone. In third instar larvae this microvillar zone invaginates and expands in the basal part of the lateral membranes. Larval salivary gland cells also contain numerous parallel basal actin bundles. The larval glands are histolysed during metamorphosis and adult glands are formed out of the imaginal cell group. At the onset of metamorphosis these basal actin bundles form a network of crossing bundles. The filamentous actin patterns of the proximal part of adult gland cells is confined to the apicolateral microvillar membranes. The cells in the distal, tubular part of the adult salivary glands show intense staining of their folded lateral membranes.

  14. Antibodies to T- and L-isoforms of the cytoskeletal protein, fimbrin, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    De Mendonca Neto, E C; Kumar, A; Shadick, N A; Michon, A M; Matsudaira, P; Eaton, R B; Kumar, P; Schur, P H

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex network of proteins that maintain cell shape, mobility, and organelle function. Its components can be divided into three distinct classes: microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. Fimbrins are microfilament proteins, a family of cytoplasmic phosphoproteins. Expression of the L-fimbrin isoform is restricted to replicating blood cells and expression of the T-fimbrin isoform to replicating cells of solid tissues. Sera from normals and from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, osteoarthritis, vasculitis, scleroderma, and mixed connective tissue disease were tested for the presence of antibodies to T- and L-fimbrin by ELISA, using purified recombinant fimbrin. The mean OD of sera from SLE patients was significantly higher than in normals (T-fimbrin, P less than 0.0001; L-fimbrin, P less than 0.001). 48 of 98 SLE sera had antibodies to T-fimbrin; 32 had antibodies to L-fimbrin; 20 had antibodies to both; 28 had only anti-T, and 12 had only anti-L-fimbrin. The mean OD for sera of the other rheumatic diseases was not significantly different from normals. The presence of either L- or T-fimbrin antibody was associated with pleuropericarditis (P = 0.015), photosensitivity (P = 0.011), and anti-Sm antibody (P = 0.010). Central nervous system SLE was associated with the presence of the L-fimbrin antibody alone (P = 0.016). There was a strong association between DR7 (but not other MHC alleles) and anti-L-fimbrin antibodies in SLE patients (chi square = 18; P less than 0.00002). No MHC association was observed with anti-T-fimbrin antibodies. Images PMID:1522211

  15. ARP2/3 localization in Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells: a diversity of intracellular pools and cytoskeletal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Mallery, Eileen L.; Szymanski, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    In plant cells the actin cytoskeleton adopts many configurations, but is best understood as an unstable, interconnected track that rearranges to define the patterns of long distance transport of organelles during growth. Actin filaments do not form spontaneously; instead filament nucleators, such as the evolutionarily conserved actin-related protein (ARP) 2/3 complex, can efficiently generate new actin filament networks when in a fully activated state. A growing number of genetic experiments have shown that ARP2/3 is necessary for morphogenesis in processes that range from tip growth during root nodule formation to the diffuse polarized growth of leaf trichomes and pavement cells. Although progress has been rapid in the identification of proteins that function in series to positively regulate ARP2/3, less has been learned about the actual function of ARP2/3 in cells. In this paper, we analyze the localization of ARP2/3 in Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells. We detect a pool of ARP2/3 in the nucleus, and also find that ARP2/3 is efficiently and specifically clustered on multiple organelle surfaces and associates with both the actin filament and microtubule cytoskeletons. Our mutant analyses and ARP2/3 and actin double labeling experiments indicate that the clustering of ARP2/3 on organelle surfaces and an association with actin bundles does not necessarily reflect an active pool of ARP2/3, and instead most of the complex appears to exist as a latent organelle-associated pool. PMID:23874346

  16. ARP2/3 localization in Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells: a diversity of intracellular pools and cytoskeletal interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Mallery, Eileen L; Szymanski, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    In plant cells the actin cytoskeleton adopts many configurations, but is best understood as an unstable, interconnected track that rearranges to define the patterns of long distance transport of organelles during growth. Actin filaments do not form spontaneously; instead filament nucleators, such as the evolutionarily conserved actin-related protein (ARP) 2/3 complex, can efficiently generate new actin filament networks when in a fully activated state. A growing number of genetic experiments have shown that ARP2/3 is necessary for morphogenesis in processes that range from tip growth during root nodule formation to the diffuse polarized growth of leaf trichomes and pavement cells. Although progress has been rapid in the identification of proteins that function in series to positively regulate ARP2/3, less has been learned about the actual function of ARP2/3 in cells. In this paper, we analyze the localization of ARP2/3 in Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells. We detect a pool of ARP2/3 in the nucleus, and also find that ARP2/3 is efficiently and specifically clustered on multiple organelle surfaces and associates with both the actin filament and microtubule cytoskeletons. Our mutant analyses and ARP2/3 and actin double labeling experiments indicate that the clustering of ARP2/3 on organelle surfaces and an association with actin bundles does not necessarily reflect an active pool of ARP2/3, and instead most of the complex appears to exist as a latent organelle-associated pool.

  17. Actin–myosin network reorganization breaks symmetry at the cell rear to spontaneously initiate polarized cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Patricia T.; Wilson, Cyrus A.; Ji, Lin; Hebert, Benedict; Barnhart, Erin L.; Dye, Natalie A.; Wiseman, Paul W.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Theriot, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed the spontaneous symmetry breaking and initiation of actin-based motility in keratocytes (fish epithelial cells). In stationary keratocytes, the actin network flow was inwards and radially symmetric. Immediately before motility initiation, the actin network flow increased at the prospective cell rear and reoriented in the perinuclear region, aligning with the prospective axis of movement. Changes in actin network flow at the cell front were detectable only after cell polarization. Inhibition of myosin II or Rho kinase disrupted actin network organization and flow in the perinuclear region and decreased the motility initiation frequency, whereas increasing myosin II activity with calyculin A increased the motility initiation frequency. Local stimulation of myosin activity in stationary cells by the local application of calyculin A induced directed motility initiation away from the site of stimulation. Together, these results indicate that large-scale actin–myosin network reorganization and contractility at the cell rear initiate spontaneous symmetry breaking and polarized motility of keratocytes. PMID:17893245

  18. Aegeline from Aegle marmelos stimulates glucose transport via Akt and Rac1 signaling, and contributes to a cytoskeletal rearrangement through PI3K/Rac1.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sudeep; Ishrat, Nayab; Singh, Rohit; Narender, Tadigoppula; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2015-09-01

    Aegeline is an alkaloidal-amide, isolated from the leaves of Aegle marmelos and have shown antihyperglycemic as well as antidyslipidemic activities in the validated animal models of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we delineate, aegeline enhanced GLUT4 translocation mediated 2-deoxy-glucose uptake in both time and concentration-dependent manner. 2-deoxy-glucose uptake was completely stymied by the transport inhibitors (wortmannin and genistein) in C2C12 myotubes. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) suggest that both Akt and Rac1 operate aegeline-stimulated glucose transport via distinct parallel pathways. Moreover, aegeline activates p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and cofilin (an actin polymerization regulator). Rac1 inhibitor (Rac1 inhib II) and PAK1 inhibitor (IPA-3) completely blocked aegeline-induced phosphorylation of cofilin and p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In summary, these findings suggest that aegeline stimulates the glucose transport through Akt and Rac1 dependent distinct parallel pathways and have cytoskeletal roles via stimulation of the PI3-kinase-Rac1-PAK1-cofilin pathway in the skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, multiple targets of aegeline in the improvement of insulin sensitivity of the skeletal muscle cells may be suggested. PMID:26102565

  19. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of nestin in the regenerating tail of lizards shows its presence during cytoskeletal modifications in the epidermis, muscles and nerves.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Nestin has been considered a neural stem cell marker, and represents an intermediate filament protein likely involved in restructuring the cytoskeleton in different cell types. The present ultrastructural study has immunodetected nestin especially in the wound epidermis, regenerating myotubes and in the growing nerves of the regenerating tail of lizards. In keratinocytes of the stratified wound epidermis nestin is present in the irregular electron-paler meshwork located along the cell perimeter and among keratin bundles converging into desmosomes. In the regenerating muscles nestin-immunoreactivity remains confined to some external regions along the myotubes and in the cytoplasmic ends of the myotubes not occupied by myofibrils. A diffuse nestin immunolabeling is also present among the neurofilaments of growing axons, in Schwann cells and in ependymal cells of the regenerating spinal cord of the tail. The localization of nestin in sites of cytoskeletal remodeling in keratinocytes, myotubes, ependymal cells and axons, suggests that this protein is associated to the reassembling of keratin tonofilaments in moving keratinocytes, assembling of contractile proteins in myotubes, and in the organization of neurofilaments during the growth and myelination of axons within the regenerating lizard tail.

  20. Aegeline from Aegle marmelos stimulates glucose transport via Akt and Rac1 signaling, and contributes to a cytoskeletal rearrangement through PI3K/Rac1.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sudeep; Ishrat, Nayab; Singh, Rohit; Narender, Tadigoppula; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2015-09-01

    Aegeline is an alkaloidal-amide, isolated from the leaves of Aegle marmelos and have shown antihyperglycemic as well as antidyslipidemic activities in the validated animal models of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we delineate, aegeline enhanced GLUT4 translocation mediated 2-deoxy-glucose uptake in both time and concentration-dependent manner. 2-deoxy-glucose uptake was completely stymied by the transport inhibitors (wortmannin and genistein) in C2C12 myotubes. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) suggest that both Akt and Rac1 operate aegeline-stimulated glucose transport via distinct parallel pathways. Moreover, aegeline activates p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and cofilin (an actin polymerization regulator). Rac1 inhibitor (Rac1 inhib II) and PAK1 inhibitor (IPA-3) completely blocked aegeline-induced phosphorylation of cofilin and p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In summary, these findings suggest that aegeline stimulates the glucose transport through Akt and Rac1 dependent distinct parallel pathways and have cytoskeletal roles via stimulation of the PI3-kinase-Rac1-PAK1-cofilin pathway in the skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, multiple targets of aegeline in the improvement of insulin sensitivity of the skeletal muscle cells may be suggested.

  1. Loss of actin cytoskeletal function and EDS1 activity, in combination, severely compromises non-host resistance in Arabidopsis against wheat powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung-Wook; Atkinson, Helen A; Gaborit, Charlotte; Greenland, Andy; Read, Nick D; Pallas, Jacqueline A; Loake, Gary J

    2003-06-01

    Plant immunity against the majority of the microbial pathogens is conveyed by a phenomenon known as non-host resistance (NHR). This defence mechanism affords durable protection to plant species against given species of phytopathogens. We investigated the genetic basis of NHR in Arabidopsis against the wheat powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt). Both primary and appressorial germ tubes were produced from individual Bgt conidia on the surface of the Arabidopsis leaves. Attempted infection occasionally resulted in successful penetration, which led to the development of an abnormal unilateral haustorium. Inoculation of a series of Arabidopsis defence-related mutants with Bgt resulted in the attenuation of reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI) production and salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defence gene expression in eds1, pad4 and nahG plants, which are known to be defective in some aspects of host resistance. Furthermore, Bgt often developed bilateral haustoria in the mutant Arabidopsis lines that closely resembled those formed in wheat. A similar decrease in NHR was observed following treatment of the wild-type Arabidopsis plants with cytochalasin E, an inhibitor of actin microfilament polymerisation. In eds1 mutants, inhibition of actin polymerisation severely compromised NHR in Arabidopsis against Bgt. This permitted completion of the Bgt infection cycle on these plants. Therefore, actin cytoskeletal function and EDS1 activity, in combination, are major contributors to NHR in Arabidopsis against wheat powdery mildew.

  2. Nano- and microscale holes modulate cell-substrate adhesion, cytoskeletal organization, and -beta1 integrin localization in SV40 human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Karuri, Nancy W; Porri, Teresa J; Albrecht, Ralph M; Murphy, Christopher J; Nealey, Paul F

    2006-12-01

    Human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) interface with a basement membrane in vivo that possesses complex nanoscale topographic features. We report that synthetic substrates patterned with nano- and microscale holes differentially modulate the proliferation, shape and adhesion of SV40 human corneal epithelial cells (SV40-HCECs) as a function of feature size: 1) Cell proliferation was inhibited on nanoscale features (features size less than 800 nm in pitch) compared to microscale features or planar substrates in identical culture conditions. 2) Cells on nanoscale holes had a stellate morphology compared to those on microscale features that were more evenly spread. 3) Cells adhered more to nanoscale features than to microscale features when exposed to shear stress in a laminar flow chamber. Transmission electron microscopy showed that cells cultured on the 400 nm pitch patterns had longer and more numerous filopodia and retraction fibers than cells cultured on the 1600 nm pitch patterns. Immunogold labeling of -beta1 integrins revealed that these receptors were localized at the cell periphery and in the aforementioned cytoskeletal elements. Our findings indicate that surface discontinuities and the activation of mechanochemical cell signaling mechanisms may contribute to the observed responses exhibited by SV40-HCECs cultured on nano- and microscale topography.

  3. The Rho-GEF Rom2p Localizes to Sites of Polarized Cell Growth and Participates in Cytoskeletal Functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Brendan D.; Padmanabha, Ramesh; Snyder, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Rom2p is a GDP/GTP exchange factor for Rho1p and Rho2p GTPases; Rho proteins have been implicated in control of actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. ROM2 and RHO2 were identified in a screen for high-copy number suppressors of cik1Δ, a mutant defective in microtubule-based processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A Rom2p::3XHA fusion protein localizes to sites of polarized cell growth, including incipient bud sites, tips of small buds, and tips of mating projections. Disruption of ROM2 results in temperature-sensitive growth defects at 11°C and 37°C. rom2Δ cells exhibit morphological defects. At permissive temperatures, rom2Δ cells often form elongated buds and fail to form normal mating projections after exposure to pheromone; at the restrictive temperature, small budded cells accumulate. High-copy number plasmids containing either ROM2 or RHO2 suppress the temperature-sensitive growth defects of cik1Δ and kar3Δ strains. KAR3 encodes a kinesin-related protein that interacts with Cik1p. Furthermore, rom2Δ strains exhibit increased sensitivity to the microtubule depolymerizing drug benomyl. These results suggest a role for Rom2p in both polarized morphogenesis and functions of the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:9348527

  4. Sub-lethal concentrations of CdCl2 disrupt cell migration and cytoskeletal proteins in cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Egbowon, Biola F; Harris, Wayne; Arnott, Gordon; Mills, Chris Lloyd; Hargreaves, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of CdCl2 on the viability, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells. Time- and concentration-dependent changes were exhibited by the cells but 1 μM CdCl2 was sub-cytotoxic at all time-points. Exposure to 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 for 4 h resulted in disruption of the leading edge, as determined by chemical staining. Cell migration was inhibited by both 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 in a scratch assay monitored by live cell imaging, although exposure to the higher concentration was associated with cell death. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining indicated that CdCl2 caused a concentration dependent reduction in actin and tubulin levels. Exposure to Cd(2+) also resulted in significant changes in the levels and/or phosphorylation status of the microtubule and microfilament destabilising proteins cofilin and stathmin, suggesting disruption of cytoskeletal dynamics. Given that 1-12 μM Cd(2+) is attainable in vivo, our findings are consistent with the possibility that Cd(2+) induced impairment of testicular development and reproductive health may involve a combination of reduced Sertoli cell migration and impaired Sertoli cell viability depending on the timing, level and duration of exposure. PMID:26724415

  5. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-2 is a distinct protein kinase enriched in a novel cytoskeletal fraction associated with adipocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Murata, Haruhiko; Mueckler, Mike

    2003-06-13

    By recombining subcellular components of 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a test tube, early insulin signaling events dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) were successfully reconstituted, up to and including the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 by the serine/threonine kinase, Akt (Murata, H., Hresko, R.C., and Mueckler, M. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21607-21614). Utilizing the advantages provided by a cell-free methodology, we characterized phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 2 (PDK2), the putative kinase responsible for phosphorylating Akt on Ser-473. Immunodepleting cytosolic PDK1 from an in vitro reaction containing plasma membrane and cytosol markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt at the PDK1 site (Thr-308) but had no effect on phosphorylation at the PDK2 site (Ser-473). In contrast, PDK2 activity was found to be highly enriched in a novel cytoskeletal subcellular fraction associated with plasma membranes. Akt isoforms 1-3 and a kinase-dead Akt1 (K179A) mutant were phosphorylated in a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent manner at Ser-473 in an in vitro reaction containing this novel adipocyte subcellular fraction. Our data indicate that this PDK2 activity is the result of a kinase distinct from PDK1 and is not due to autophosphorylation or transphosphorylation of Akt. PMID:12682057

  6. Cytoskeletal alterations in interphase cells of the green alga Spirogyra decimina in response to heavy metals exposure: I. The effect of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Pribyl, P; Cepák, V; Zachleder, V

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the effect of cadmium ions on the arrangement of the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton, as well as the relationships between cytoskeletal changes and growth processes in the green filamentous alga Spirogyra decimina. Batch cultures of algae were carried out under defined conditions in the presence of various cadmium concentrations. In control cells, the cytoskeleton appeared to be a transversely oriented pattern of both microtubules and actin filaments of various thickness in the cell cortex; colocalization of cortical microtubules and actin filaments was apparent. Microtubules were very sensitive to the presence of cadmium ions. Depending on the cadmium concentration and the time of exposure, microtubules disintegrated into short rod-shaped fragments or they completely disappeared. A steep increase in cell width and a decrease in growth rate accompanied (and probably ensued) a very rapid disintegration of microtubules. Actin filaments were more stable because they were disturbed several hours later than microtubules at any cadmium concentration used. When cadmium ions were washed out, the actin cytoskeleton was rebuilt even in cells in which actin filaments were completely disintegrated at higher cadmium concentrations (40 or 100 microM). The much more sensitive microtubules were regenerated after treatment with lower cadmium concentrations (10 or 15 microM) only.

  7. Effect of membrane stiffness and cytoskeletal element density on mechanical stimuli within cells: an analysis of the consequences of ageing in cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Lennon, Alex B; McKayed, Katey K; Campbell, Veronica A; Prendergast, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    A finite element model of a single cell was created and used to compute the biophysical stimuli generated within a cell under mechanical loading. Major cellular components were incorporated in the model: the membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, microtubules, actin filaments, intermediate filaments, nuclear lamina and chromatin. The model used multiple sets of tensegrity structures. Viscoelastic properties were assigned to the continuum components. To corroborate the model, a simulation of atomic force microscopy indentation was performed and results showed a force/indentation simulation with the range of experimental results. A parametric analysis of both increasing membrane stiffness (thereby modelling membrane peroxidation with age) and decreasing density of cytoskeletal elements (thereby modelling reduced actin density with age) was performed. Comparing normal and aged cells under indentation predicts that aged cells have a lower membrane area subjected to high strain as compared with young cells, but the difference, surprisingly, is very small and may not be measurable experimentally. Ageing is predicted to have a more significant effect on strain deep in the nucleus. These results show that computation of biophysical stimuli within cells are achievable with single-cell computational models; correspondence between computed and measured force/displacement behaviours provides a high-level validation of the model. Regarding the effect of ageing, the models suggest only small, although possibly physiologically significant, differences in internal biophysical stimuli between normal and aged cells. PMID:23947334

  8. Signaling by the Engulfment Receptor Draper: A Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Implicates Cytoskeletal Regulators, Jun N-Terminal Kinase, and Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Fullard, John F.; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Draper, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the Ced-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, is a cell-surface receptor required for the recognition and engulfment of apoptotic cells, glial clearance of axon fragments and dendritic pruning, and salivary gland autophagy. To further elucidate mechanisms of Draper signaling, we screened chromosomal deficiencies to identify loci that dominantly modify the phenotype of overexpression of Draper isoform II (suppressed differentiation of the posterior crossvein in the wing). We found evidence for 43 genetic modifiers of Draper II. Twenty-four of the 37 suppressor loci and 3 of the 6 enhancer loci were identified. An additional 5 suppressors and 2 enhancers were identified among mutations in functionally related genes. These studies reveal positive contributions to Drpr signaling for the Jun N-terminal Kinase pathway, supported by genetic interactions with hemipterous, basket, jun, and puckered, and for cytoskeleton regulation as indicated by genetic interactions with rac1, rac2, RhoA, myoblast city, Wiskcott–Aldrich syndrome protein, and the formin CG32138, and for yorkie and expanded. These findings indicate that Jun N-terminal Kinase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling collaborate in Draper signaling. Relationships between Draper signaling and Decapentaplegic signaling, insulin signaling, Salvador/Warts/Hippo signaling, apical-basal cell polarity, and cellular responses to mechanical forces are also discussed. PMID:25395664

  9. Stress-induced rearrangements of cellular networks: Consequences for protection and drug design.

    PubMed

    Szalay, Máté S; Kovács, István A; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Böde, Csaba; Csermely, Péter

    2007-07-31

    The complexity of the cells can be described and understood by a number of networks such as protein-protein interaction, cytoskeletal, organelle, signalling, gene transcription and metabolic networks. All these networks are highly dynamic producing continuous rearrangements in their links, hubs, network-skeleton and modules. Here we describe the adaptation of cellular networks after various forms of stress causing perturbations, congestions and network damage. Chronic stress decreases link-density, decouples or even quarantines modules, and induces an increased competition between network hubs and bridges. Extremely long or strong stress may induce a topological phase transition in the respective cellular networks, which switches the cell to a completely different mode of cellular function. We summarize our initial knowledge on network restoration after stress including the role of molecular chaperones in this process. Finally, we discuss the implications of stress-induced network rearrangements in diseases and ageing, and propose therapeutic approaches both to increase the robustness and help the repair of cellular networks. PMID:17433306

  10. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  11. Network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  12. Untangling the web: mechanisms underlying ER network formation.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Uma; Blackstone, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The ER is a continuous membrane system consisting of the nuclear envelope, flat sheets often studded with ribosomes, and a polygonal network of highly-curved tubules extending throughout the cell. Although protein and lipid biosynthesis, protein modification, vesicular transport, Ca(2+)dynamics, and protein quality control have been investigated in great detail, mechanisms that generate the distinctive architecture of the ER have been uncovered only recently. Several protein families including the reticulons and REEPs/DP1/Yop1p harbor hydrophobic hairpin domains that shape high-curvature ER tubules and mediate intramembrane protein interactions. Members of the atlastin/RHD3/Sey1p family of dynamin-related GTPases interact with the ER-shaping proteins and mediate the formation of three-way junctions responsible for the polygonal structure of the tubular ER network, with Lunapark proteins acting antagonistically. Additional classes of tubular ER proteins including some REEPs and the M1 spastin ATPase interact with the microtubule cytoskeleton. Flat ER sheets possess a different complement of proteins such as p180, CLIMP-63 and kinectin implicated in shaping, cisternal stacking and cytoskeletal interactions. The ER is also in constant motion, and numerous signaling pathways as well as interactions among cytoskeletal elements, the plasma membrane, and organelles cooperate to position and shape the ER dynamically. Finally, many proteins involved in shaping the ER network are mutated in the most common forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia, indicating a particular importance for proper ER morphology and distribution in large, highly-polarized cells such as neurons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Functional and structural diversity of endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:23602970

  13. Network Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietzke, Robert; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This special section explains the latest developments in networking technologies, profiles school districts benefiting from successful implementations, and reviews new products for building networks. Highlights include ATM (asynchronous transfer mode), cable modems, networking switches, Internet screening software, file servers, network management…

  14. The cytoskeletal adaptor protein band 4.1B is required for the maintenance of paranodal axoglial septate junctions in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-06-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B-null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axoglial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in the study by Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after 1 year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at ∼ 1 year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  15. The Cytoskeletal Adaptor Protein Band 4.1B is Required for the Maintenance of Paranodal Axo-Glial Septate Junctions in Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2011-01-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axo-glial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after one year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at about one year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 regulates cytoskeletal organization and chemotaxis via catalytic and microtubule-specific interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Reszka, A A; Bulinski, J C; Krebs, E G; Fischer, E H

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 are mitogen-activated protein kinases that act as key components in a signaling cascade linking growth factor receptors to the cytoskeleton and the nucleus. ERK2 mutants have been used to alter cytoskeletal regulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells without affecting cell growth or feedback signaling. Mutation of the unique loop L6 (residues 91-95), which is in a portion of the molecule that is cryptic upon the binding of ERK2 to the microtubules (MTs), generated significant morphological alterations. Most notable phenotypes were observed after expression of a combined mutant incorporating changes to both L6 and the TEY phosphorylation lip, including a 70% increase in cell spreading. Actin stress fibers in these cells, which normally formed a single broad parallel array, were arranged in three or more orientations or in fan-like arrays. MTs, which ordinarily extend longitudinally from the centrosome, spread radially, covering a larger surface area. Single, but not the double, mutations of the Thr and Tyr residues of the TEY phosphorylation lip caused a ca. 25% increase in cell spreading, accompanied by a threefold increase in chemotactic cell migration. Mutation of Lys-52 triggered a 48% increase in cell spreading but no alteration to chemotaxis. These findings suggest that wild-type ERK2 inhibits the organization of the cytoskeleton, the spreading of the cell, and chemotactic migration. This involves control of the orientation of actin and MTs and the positioning of focal adhesions via regulatory interactions that may occur on the MTs. Images PMID:9243503

  17. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide – A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, Katharina; Kahlen, Philip; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-08-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. - Graphical abstract: A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with pleiotropic anticancer effects. - Highlights: • Etacrox is a new HDACi with cytotoxic, antiangiogenic and antiinvasive activity. • Etacrox causes aberrant cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal reorganisation. • Pro-metastatic and angiogenic matrix metalloproteinases are inhibited by etacrox. • Etacrox impairs blood vessel maturation in vivo and cancer cell

  18. Micro-rheological behaviour and nonlinear rheology of networks assembled from polysaccharides from the plant cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, R. R. R.; Mansel, B. W.; Kramer, A.; Kroy, K.; Williams, M. A. K.

    2013-03-01

    The same fundamental questions that have driven enquiry into cytoskeletal mechanics can be asked of the considerably less-studied, yet arguably just as important, biopolymer matrix in the plant cell wall. In this case, it is well-known that polysaccharides, rather than filamentous and tubular protein assemblies, play a major role in satisfying the mechanical requirements of a successful cell wall, but developing a clear structure-function understanding has been exacerbated by the familiar issue of biological complexity. Herein, in the spirit of the mesoscopic approaches that have proved so illuminating in the study of cytoskeletal networks, the linear microrheological and strain-stiffening responses of biopolymeric networks reconstituted from pectin, a crucial cell wall polysaccharide, are examined. These are found to be well-captured by the glassy worm-like chain (GWLC) model of self-assembled semi-flexible filaments. Strikingly, the nonlinear mechanical response of these pectin networks is found to be much more sensitive to temperature changes than their linear response, a property that is also observed in F-actin networks, and is well reproduced by the GWLC model. Additionally, microrheological measurements suggest that over long timescales (>10 s) internal stresses continue to redistribute facilitating low frequency motions of tracer particles.

  19. The N and C Termini of ZO-1 Are Surrounded by Distinct Proteins and Functional Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Aponte, Angel; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Gucek, Marjan; Fredriksson, Karin; Anderson, James Melvin

    2013-01-01

    The proteins and functional protein networks of the tight junction remain incompletely defined. Among the currently known proteins are barrier-forming proteins like occludin and the claudin family; scaffolding proteins like ZO-1; and some cytoskeletal, signaling, and cell polarity proteins. To define a more complete list of proteins and infer their functional implications, we identified the proteins that are within molecular dimensions of ZO-1 by fusing biotin ligase to either its N or C terminus, expressing these fusion proteins in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells, and purifying and identifying the resulting biotinylated proteins by mass spectrometry. Of a predicted proteome of ∼9000, we identified more than 400 proteins tagged by biotin ligase fused to ZO-1, with both identical and distinct proteins near the N- and C-terminal ends. Those proximal to the N terminus were enriched in transmembrane tight junction proteins, and those proximal to the C terminus were enriched in cytoskeletal proteins. We also identified many unexpected but easily rationalized proteins and verified partial colocalization of three of these proteins with ZO-1 as examples. In addition, functional networks of interacting proteins were tagged, such as the basolateral but not apical polarity network. These results provide a rich inventory of proteins and potential novel insights into functions and protein networks that should catalyze further understanding of tight junction biology. Unexpectedly, the technique demonstrates high spatial resolution, which could be generally applied to defining other subcellular protein compartmentalization. PMID:23553632

  20. Semantic Networks and Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

  1. Active patterning and asymmetric transport in a model actomyosin network

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2013-12-21

    Cytoskeletal networks, which are essentially motor-filament assemblies, play a major role in many developmental processes involving structural remodeling and shape changes. These are achieved by nonequilibrium self-organization processes that generate functional patterns and drive intracellular transport. We construct a minimal physical model that incorporates the coupling between nonlinear elastic responses of individual filaments and force-dependent motor action. By performing stochastic simulations we show that the interplay of motor processes, described as driving anti-correlated motion of the network vertices, and the network connectivity, which determines the percolation character of the structure, can indeed capture the dynamical and structural cooperativity which gives rise to diverse patterns observed experimentally. The buckling instability of individual filaments is found to play a key role in localizing collapse events due to local force imbalance. Motor-driven buckling-induced node aggregation provides a dynamic mechanism that stabilizes the two-dimensional patterns below the apparent static percolation limit. Coordinated motor action is also shown to suppress random thermal noise on large time scales, the two-dimensional configuration that the system starts with thus remaining planar during the structural development. By carrying out similar simulations on a three-dimensional anchored network, we find that the myosin-driven isotropic contraction of a well-connected actin network, when combined with mechanical anchoring that confers directionality to the collective motion, may represent a novel mechanism of intracellular transport, as revealed by chromosome translocation in the starfish oocyte.

  2. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  3. Fermionic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We study the structure of fermionic networks, i.e. a model of networks based on the behavior of fermionic gases, and we analyze dynamical processes over them. In this model, particle dynamics have been mapped to the domain of networks, hence a parameter representing the temperature controls the evolution of the system. In doing so, it is possible to generate adaptive networks, i.e. networks whose structure varies over time. As shown in previous works, networks generated by quantum statistics can undergo critical phenomena as phase transitions and, moreover, they can be considered as thermodynamic systems. In this study, we analyze fermionic networks and opinion dynamics processes over them, framing this network model as a computational model useful to represent complex and adaptive systems. Results highlight that a strong relation holds between the gas temperature and the structure of the achieved networks. Notably, both the degree distribution and the assortativity vary as the temperature varies, hence we can state that fermionic networks behave as adaptive networks. On the other hand, it is worth to highlight that we did not finding relation between outcomes of opinion dynamics processes and the gas temperature. Therefore, although the latter plays a fundamental role in gas dynamics, on the network domain, its importance is related only to structural properties of fermionic networks.

  4. Cytoskeletal genes regulating brain size.

    PubMed

    Bond, Jacquelyn; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2006-02-01

    One of the most notable trends in human evolution is the dramatic increase in brain size that has occurred in the great ape clade, culminating in humans. Of particular interest is the vast expanse of the cerebral cortex, which is believed to have resulted in our ability to perform higher cognitive functions. Recent investigations of congenital microcephaly in humans have resulted in the identification of several genes that non-redundantly and specifically influence mammalian brain size. These genes appear to affect neural progenitor cell number through microtubular organisation at the centrosome. PMID:16337370

  5. Network Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    1992-01-01

    Explains how users can find and access information resources available on the Internet. Highlights include network information centers (NICs); lists, both formal and informal; computer networking protocols, including international standards; electronic mail; remote log-in; and file transfer. (LRW)

  6. The complex dynamic network of microtubule and microfilament cytasters of the leech zygote.

    PubMed

    Cantillana, V; Urrutia, M; Ubilla, A; Fernández, J

    2000-12-01

    The organization of the cytoskeleton in the early first interphase zygote and its involvement in organelle redistribution were studied in the glossiphoniid leech Theromyzon trizonare by confocal and electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and time-lapse video imaging after microinjection of labeled tubulin and/or actin and loading with a mitotracker. The cytoskeleton consists of an inner or endoplasmic and an outer or ectoplasmic domain. The inner domain consists of a monaster whose fibers retract from the zygote periphery by the end of the early first interphase. The outer domain is built upon a network of microtubules and microfilaments cytasters. Short pulses of microinjected labeled actin or tubulin and Taxol treatment demonstrate that cytasters are centers of microtubule and microfilament nucleation. Immunostaining with anti-centrophilin, anti-BX-63, and anti-AH-6 indicates that the network of cytasters includes centrosomal antigens. Cytasters move in an orderly fashion at speeds of 0.5-2 micrometer/min, in an energy-dependent process retarded and finally blocked by the ATP analogue AMP-PNP and high concentrations of Taxol. Colliding cytasters fuse and form larger cytoskeletal nucleation centers. The leech zygote is a highly compartmentalized cell whose cytasters function as articulated components of a very dynamic cytoskeletal system engaged in bulk transportation of organelles during ooplasmic segregation. PMID:11087633

  7. microRNA miR-142-3p Inhibits Breast Cancer Cell Invasiveness by Synchronous Targeting of WASL, Integrin Alpha V, and Additional Cytoskeletal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Schwickert, Alexander; Weghake, Esther; Brüggemann, Kathrin; Engbers, Annika; Brinkmann, Benjamin F.; Kemper, Björn; Seggewiß, Jochen; Stock, Christian; Ebnet, Klaus; Kiesel, Ludwig; Riethmüller, Christoph; Götte, Martin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs, micro ribonucleic acids) are pivotal post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. These endogenous small non-coding RNAs play significant roles in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. miR-142-3p expression is dysregulated in several breast cancer subtypes. We aimed at investigating the role of miR-142-3p in breast cancer cell invasiveness. Supported by transcriptomic Affymetrix array analysis and confirmatory investigations at the mRNA and protein level, we demonstrate that overexpression of miR-142-3p in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells leads to downregulation of WASL (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome-like, protein: N-WASP), Integrin-αV, RAC1, and CFL2, molecules implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and cell motility. ROCK2, IL6ST, KLF4, PGRMC2 and ADCY9 were identified as additional targets in a subset of cell lines. Decreased Matrigel invasiveness was associated with the miR-142-3p-induced expression changes. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, nanoscale atomic force microscopy and digital holographic microscopy revealed a change in cell morphology as well as a reduced cell volume and size. A more cortical actin distribution and a loss of membrane protrusions were observed in cells overexpressing miR-142-3p. Luciferase activation assays confirmed direct miR-142-3p-dependent regulation of the 3’-untranslated region of ITGAV and WASL. siRNA-mediated depletion of ITGAV and WASL resulted in a significant reduction of cellular invasiveness, highlighting the contribution of these factors to the miRNA-dependent invasion phenotype. While knockdown of WASL significantly reduced the number of membrane protrusions compared to controls, knockdown of ITGAV resulted in a decreased cell volume, indicating differential contributions of these factors to the miR-142-3p-induced phenotype. Our data identify WASL, ITGAV and several additional cytoskeleton-associated molecules as novel invasion-promoting targets of miR-142-3p in breast

  8. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flaskos, J.; Nikolaidis, E.; Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    protein are reduced Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurofilament heavy chain forms aggregates in cell bodies Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus at least two axon-associated cytoskeletal proteins are disrupted by this agent.

  9. Network science.

    PubMed

    Barabási, Albert-László

    2013-03-28

    Professor Barabási's talk described how the tools of network science can help understand the Web's structure, development and weaknesses. The Web is an information network, in which the nodes are documents (at the time of writing over one trillion of them), connected by links. Other well-known network structures include the Internet, a physical network where the nodes are routers and the links are physical connections, and organizations, where the nodes are people and the links represent communications.

  10. Classic 18.5- and 21.5-kDa myelin basic protein isoforms associate with cytoskeletal and SH3-domain proteins in the immortalized N19-oligodendroglial cell line stimulated by phorbol ester and IGF-1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham S T; Homchaudhuri, Lopamudra; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2012-06-01

    The 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is an intrinsically disordered protein arising from the Golli (Genes of Oligodendrocyte Lineage) gene complex and is responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. This MBP splice isoform also has a plethora of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, deimination, methylation, and deamidation, that reduce its overall net charge and alter its protein and lipid associations within oligodendrocytes (OLGs). It was originally thought that MBP was simply a structural component of myelin; however, additional investigations have demonstrated that MBP is multi-functional, having numerous protein-protein interactions with Ca²⁺-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and proteins with SH3-domains, and it can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. Here, we have examined cytoskeletal interactions of classic 18.5-kDa MBP, in vivo, using early developmental N19-OLGs transfected with fluorescently-tagged MBP, actin, tubulin, and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1). We show that MBP redistributes to distinct 'membrane-ruffled' regions of the plasma membrane where it co-localizes with actin and tubulin, and with the SH3-domain-containing proteins cortactin and ZO-1, when stimulated with PMA, a potent activator of the protein kinase C pathway. Moreover, using phospho-specific antibody staining, we show an increase in phosphorylated Thr98 MBP (human sequence numbering) in membrane-ruffled OLGs. Previously, Thr98 phosphorylation of MBP has been shown to affect its conformation, interactions with other proteins, and tethering of other proteins to the membrane in vitro. Here, MBP and actin were also co-localized in new focal adhesion contacts induced by IGF-1 stimulation in cells grown on laminin-2. This study supports a role for classic MBP isoforms in cytoskeletal and other protein-protein interactions during membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling in OLGs.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of an Arp2/3 Complex-independent Component of the Lamellipodial Actin Network

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Cheung, David; Fried, Christopher A.; Shuster, Charles B.; McClellan, Mary K.; Voss, Meagen K.; Sheridan, John T.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Sea urchin coelomocytes contain an unusually broad lamellipodial region and have served as a useful model experimental system for studying the process of actin-based retrograde/centripetal flow. In the current study the small molecule drug 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) was employed as a means of delocalizing the Arp2/3 complex from the cell edge in an effort to investigate the Arp2/3 complex-independent aspects of retrograde flow. Digitally-enhanced phase contrast, fluorescence and polarization light microscopy, along with rotary shadow TEM methods demonstrated that BDM treatment resulted in the centripetal displacement of the Arp2/3 complex and the associated dendritic lamellipodial (LP) actin network from the cell edge. In its wake there remained an array of elongate actin filaments organized into concave arcs that displayed retrograde flow at approximately one quarter the normal rate. Actin polymerization inhibitor experiments indicated that these arcs were generated by polymerization at the cell edge, while active myosin-based contraction in BDM treated cells was demonstrated by localization with anti-phospho-MRLC antibody, the retraction of the cytoskeleton in the presence of BDM, and the response of the BDM arcs to laser-based severing. The results suggest that BDM treatment reveals an Arp2/3 complex-independent actin structure in coelomocytes consisting of elongate filaments integrated into the LP network and that these filaments represent a potential connection between the LP network and the central cytoskeleton. PMID:19530177

  12. Superelastic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Obukhov, S.P.; Rubinstein, M.; Colby, R.H.

    1993-12-31

    This paper discusses the elastic modulus, swelling, and deswelling behavior of networks as a function of their concentration and the preparation state. Based on these results, the authors expect that networks prepared by crosslinking long chains at low concentration, followed by removal of solvent, will have superelastic properties - the deswollen networks will have low modulus and will be capable of stretching by enormous amounts without breaking. This is because deswelling introduces only temporary entanglements. These temporary entanglements change the static configuration of the network strands. The authors discuss the non-Gaussian nature of these strands and the linear viscoelastic response of the superelastic networks.

  13. Regulation of valve endothelial cell vasculogenic network architectures with ROCK and Rac inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Arevalos, C. Alexander; Walborn, Amanda T.; Rupert, Amanda A.; Berg, Jonathan M.; Godfrey, Elizabeth L.; Nguyen, Jacqueline M.V.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective The age- and disease-dependent presence of microvessels within heart valves is an understudied characteristic of these tissues. Neovascularization involves endothelial cell (EC) migration and cytoskeletal reorientation, which are heavily regulated by the Rho family of GTPases. Given that valve ECs demonstrate unique mesenchymal transdifferentiation and cytoskeletal mechanoresponsiveness, compared to vascular ECs, this study quantified the effect of inhibiting two members of the Rho family on vasculogenic network formation by valve ECs. Approach and results A tubule-like structure vasculogenesis assay (assessing lacunarity, junction density, and vessel density) was performed with porcine aortic valve ECs treated with small molecule inhibitors of Rho-associated serine-threonine protein kinase (ROCK), Y-27632, or the Rac1 inhibitor, NSC-23766. Actin coordination, cell number, and cell migration were assessed through immunocytochemistry, MTT assay, and scratch wound healing assay. ROCK inhibition reduced network lacunarity and interrupted proper cell–cell adhesion and actin coordination. Rac1 inhibition increased lacunarity and delayed actin-mediated network formation. ROCK inhibition alone significantly inhibited migration, whereas both ROCK and Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced cell number over time compared to controls. Compared to a vascular EC line, the valve ECs generated a network with larger total vessel length, but a less smooth appearance. Conclusions Both ROCK and Rac1 inhibition interfered with key processes in vascular network formation by valve ECs. This is the first report of manipulation of valve EC vasculogenic organization in response to small molecule inhibitors. Further study is warranted to comprehend this facet of valvular cell biology and pathology and how it differs from vascular biology. PMID:25660064

  14. Networking computers.

    PubMed

    McBride, D C

    1997-03-01

    This decade the role of the personal computer has shifted dramatically from a desktop device designed to increase individual productivity and efficiency to an instrument of communication linking people and machines in different places with one another. A computer in one city can communicate with another that may be thousands of miles away. Networking is how this is accomplished. Just like the voice network used by the telephone, computer networks transmit data and other information via modems over these same telephone lines. A network can be created over both short and long distances. Networks can be established within a hospital or medical building or over many hospitals or buildings covering many geographic areas. Those confined to one location are called LANs, local area networks. Those that link computers in one building to those at other locations are known as WANs, or wide area networks. The ultimate wide area network is the one we've all been hearing so much about these days--the Internet, and its World Wide Web. Setting up a network is a process that requires careful planning and commitment. To avoid potential pitfalls and to make certain the network you establish meets your needs today and several years down the road, several steps need to be followed. This article reviews the initial steps involved in getting ready to network.

  15. Vulnerability of network of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Bashan, A.; Gao, J.; Stanley, H. E.

    2014-10-01

    Our dependence on networks - be they infrastructure, economic, social or others - leaves us prone to crises caused by the vulnerabilities of these networks. There is a great need to develop new methods to protect infrastructure networks and prevent cascade of failures (especially in cases of coupled networks). Terrorist attacks on transportation networks have traumatized modern societies. With a single blast, it has become possible to paralyze airline traffic, electric power supply, ground transportation or Internet communication. How, and at which cost can one restructure the network such that it will become more robust against malicious attacks? The gradual increase in attacks on the networks society depends on - Internet, mobile phone, transportation, air travel, banking, etc. - emphasize the need to develop new strategies to protect and defend these crucial networks of communication and infrastructure networks. One example is the threat of liquid explosives a few years ago, which completely shut down air travel for days, and has created extreme changes in regulations. Such threats and dangers warrant the need for new tools and strategies to defend critical infrastructure. In this paper we review recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the vulnerabilities of interdependent networks with and without spatial embedding, attack strategies and their affect on such networks of networks as well as recently developed strategies to optimize and repair failures caused by such attacks.

  16. Systems analysis of biological networks in skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lucas R.; Meyer, Gretchen; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function depends on the efficient coordination among subcellular systems. These systems are composed of proteins encoded by a subset of genes, all of which are tightly regulated. In the cases where regulation is altered because of disease or injury, dysfunction occurs. To enable objective analysis of muscle gene expression profiles, we have defined nine biological networks whose coordination is critical to muscle function. We begin by describing the expression of proteins necessary for optimal neuromuscular junction function that results in the muscle cell action potential. That action potential is transmitted to proteins involved in excitation–contraction coupling enabling Ca2+ release. Ca2+ then activates contractile proteins supporting actin and myosin cross-bridge cycling. Force generated by cross-bridges is transmitted via cytoskeletal proteins through the sarcolemma and out to critical proteins that support the muscle extracellular matrix. Muscle contraction is fueled through many proteins that regulate energy metabolism. Inflammation is a common response to injury that can result in alteration of many pathways within muscle. Muscle also has multiple pathways that regulate size through atrophy or hypertrophy. Finally, the isoforms associated with fast muscle fibers and their corresponding isoforms in slow muscle fibers are delineated. These nine networks represent important biological systems that affect skeletal muscle function. Combining high-throughput systems analysis with advanced networking software will allow researchers to use these networks to objectively study skeletal muscle systems. PMID:23188744

  17. Computer Networks As Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, Barry

    2001-09-01

    Computer networks are inherently social networks, linking people, organizations, and knowledge. They are social institutions that should not be studied in isolation but as integrated into everyday lives. The proliferation of computer networks has facilitated a deemphasis on group solidarities at work and in the community and afforded a turn to networked societies that are loosely bounded and sparsely knit. The Internet increases people's social capital, increasing contact with friends and relatives who live nearby and far away. New tools must be developed to help people navigate and find knowledge in complex, fragmented, networked societies.

  18. Arsenic trioxide (AT) is a novel human neutrophil pro-apoptotic agent: effects of catalase on AT-induced apoptosis, degradation of cytoskeletal proteins and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Cavalli, Hélène; Moisan, Eliane; Girard, Denis

    2006-02-01

    The anti-cancer drug arsenic trioxide (AT) induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed or proliferating cells. However, little is known regarding its ability to induce apoptosis in terminally differentiated cells, such as neutrophils. Because neutropenia has been reported in some cancer patients after AT treatment, we hypothesised that AT could induce neutrophil apoptosis, an issue that has never been investigated. Herein, we found that AT-induced neutrophil apoptosis and gelsolin degradation via caspases. AT did not increase neutrophil superoxide production and did not induce mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. AT-induced apoptosis in PLB-985 and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) cells (PLB-985 cells deficient in gp91(phox) mimicking CGD) at the same potency. Addition of catalase, an inhibitor of H2O2, reversed AT-induced apoptosis and degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, alpha-tubulin and lamin B1. Unexpectedly, AT-induced de novo protein synthesis, which was reversed by catalase. Cycloheximide partially reversed AT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that AT induces neutrophil apoptosis by a caspase-dependent mechanism and via de novo protein synthesis. H2O2 is of major importance in AT-induced neutrophil apoptosis but its production does not originate from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dehydrogenase activation and mitochondria. Cytoskeletal structures other than microtubules can now be considered as novel targets of AT.

  19. Surface adsorption and hopping cause probe-size-dependent microrheology of actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Tang, Jay X.

    2011-04-01

    A network of filaments formed primarily by the abundant cytoskeletal protein actin gives animal cells their shape and elasticity. The rheological properties of reconstituted actin networks have been studied by tracking micron-sized probe beads embedded within the networks. We investigate how microrheology depends on surface properties of probe particles by varying the stickiness of their surface. For this purpose, we chose carboxylate polystyrene (PS) beads, silica beads, bovine serum albumin (BSA) -coated PS beads, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) -grafted PS beads, which show descending stickiness to actin filaments, characterized by confocal imaging and microrheology. Probe size dependence of microrheology is observed for all four types of beads. For the slippery PEG beads, particle-tracking microrheology detects weaker networks using smaller beads, which tend to diffuse through the network by hopping from one confinement “cage” to another. This trend is reversed for the other three types of beads, for which microrheology measures stiffer networks for smaller beads due to physisorption of nearby filaments to the bead surface. We explain the probe size dependence with two simple models. We also evaluate depletion effect near nonadsorption bead surface using quantitative image analysis and discuss the possible impact of depletion on microrheology. Analysis of these effects is necessary in order to accurately define the actin network rheology both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Divalent cations crosslink vimentin intermediate filament tail domains to regulate network mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Broedersz, Chase P; Rowat, Amy C; Wedig, Tatjana; Herrmann, Harald; Mackintosh, Frederick C; Weitz, David A

    2010-06-18

    Intermediate filament networks in the cytoplasm and nucleus are critical for the mechanical integrity of metazoan cells. However, the mechanism of crosslinking in these networks and the origins of their mechanical properties are not understood. Here, we study the elastic behavior of in vitro networks of the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Rheological experiments reveal that vimentin networks stiffen with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), showing that divalent cations act as crosslinkers. We quantitatively describe the elastic response of vimentin networks over five decades of applied stress using a theory that treats the divalent cations as crosslinkers: at low stress, the behavior is entropic in origin, and increasing stress pulls out thermal fluctuations from single filaments, giving rise to a nonlinear response; at high stress, enthalpic stretching of individual filaments significantly modifies the nonlinearity. We investigate the elastic properties of networks formed by a series of protein variants with stepwise tail truncations and find that the last 11 amino acids of the C-terminal tail domain mediate crosslinking by divalent ions. We determined the single-filament persistence length, l(P) approximately 0.5 mum, and Young's modulus, Y approximately 9 MPa; both are consistent with literature values. Our results provide insight into a crosslinking mechanism for vimentin networks and suggest that divalent ions may help regulate the cytoskeletal structure and mechanical properties of cells.

  1. Innovation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, Andreas; Scharnhorst, Andrea

    The idea for this book started when we organized a topical workshop entitled "Innovation Networks - New Approaches in Modeling and Analyzing" (held in Augsburg, Germany in October 2005), under the auspices of Exystence, a network of excellence funded in the European Union's Fifth Framework Program. Unlike other conferences on innovation and networks, however, this workshop brought together scientists from economics, sociology, communication science, science and technology studies, and physics. With this book we aim to build further on a bridge connecting the bodies of knowledge on networks in economics, the social sciences and, more recently, statistical physics.

  2. Network Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Jocelyn A.; Batey, Anne

    This Network Directory is part of the effort by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) School Improvement Program to promote communication among educational professionals about school improvement. Specifically, the directory is designed to provide information for networking among schools involved in systematic, long-term…

  3. Diabetes network.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes UK has launched a network of information and support for commissioning and improvement in diabetes care. The network is free to join and offers monthly updates on good practice from around the UK, a forum for sharing ideas and learning, and access to Diabetes UK resources. PMID:27369708

  4. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  5. Constructing 3D microtubule networks using holographic optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, J.; Osunbayo, O.; Vershinin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing abilities to assemble nanoscale structures is a major scientific and engineering challenge. We report a technique which allows precise positioning and manipulation of individual rigid filaments, enabling construction of custom-designed 3D filament networks. This approach uses holographic optical trapping (HOT) for nano-positioning and microtubules (MTs) as network building blocks. MTs are desirable engineering components due to their high aspect ratio, rigidity, and their ability to serve as substrate for directed nano-transport, reflecting their roles in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The 3D architecture of MT cytoskeleton is a significant component of its function, however experimental tools to study the roles of this geometric complexity in a controlled environment have been lacking. We demonstrate the broad capabilities of our system by building a self-supporting 3D MT-based nanostructure and by conducting a MT-based transport experiment on a dynamically adjustable 3D MT intersection. Our methodology not only will advance studies of cytoskeletal networks (and associated processes such as MT-based transport) but will also likely find use in engineering nanostructures and devices. PMID:26657337

  6. Technological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Bivas

    The study of networks in the form of mathematical graph theory is one of the fundamental pillars of discrete mathematics. However, recent years have witnessed a substantial new movement in network research. The focus of the research is shifting away from the analysis of small graphs and the properties of individual vertices or edges to consideration of statistical properties of large scale networks. This new approach has been driven largely by the availability of technological networks like the Internet [12], World Wide Web network [2], etc. that allow us to gather and analyze data on a scale far larger than previously possible. At the same time, technological networks have evolved as a socio-technological system, as the concepts of social systems that are based on self-organization theory have become unified in technological networks [13]. In today’s society, we have a simple and universal access to great amounts of information and services. These information services are based upon the infrastructure of the Internet and the World Wide Web. The Internet is the system composed of ‘computers’ connected by cables or some other form of physical connections. Over this physical network, it is possible to exchange e-mails, transfer files, etc. On the other hand, the World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet where nodes represent web pages and links represent hyperlinks between the pages. Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks [26] also have recently become a popular medium through which huge amounts of data can be shared. P2P file sharing systems, where files are searched and downloaded among peers without the help of central servers, have emerged as a major component of Internet traffic. An important advantage in P2P networks is that all clients provide resources, including bandwidth, storage space, and computing power. In this chapter, we discuss these technological networks in detail. The review

  7. Innovation network

    PubMed Central

    Acemoglu, Daron; Akcigit, Ufuk; Kerr, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Technological progress builds upon itself, with the expansion of invention in one domain propelling future work in linked fields. Our analysis uses 1.8 million US patents and their citation properties to map the innovation network and its strength. Past innovation network structures are calculated using citation patterns across technology classes during 1975–1994. The interaction of this preexisting network structure with patent growth in upstream technology fields has strong predictive power on future innovation after 1995. This pattern is consistent with the idea that when there is more past upstream innovation for a particular technology class to build on, then that technology class innovates more. PMID:27681628

  8. Sentinel Network

    Cancer.gov

    The Sentinel Network is an integrated, electronic, national medical product safety initiative that compiles information about the safe and effective use of medical products accessible to patients and healthcare practitioners.

  9. Developer Network

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-21

    NREL's Developer Network, developer.nrel.gov, provides data that users can access to provide data to their own analyses, mobile and web applications. Developers can retrieve the data through a Web services API (application programming interface). The Developer Network handles overhead of serving up web services such as key management, authentication, analytics, reporting, documentation standards, and throttling in a common architecture, while allowing web services and APIs to be maintained and managed independently.

  10. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    PubMed

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  11. Sentient networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1998-03-01

    The engineering problems of constructing autonomous networks of sensors and data processors that can provide alerts for dangerous situations provide a new context for debating the question whether man-made systems can emulate the cognitive capabilities of the mammalian brain. In this paper we consider the question whether a distributed network of sensors and data processors can form ``perceptions`` based on sensory data. Because sensory data can have exponentially many explanations, the use of a central data processor to analyze the outputs from a large ensemble of sensors will in general introduce unacceptable latencies for responding to dangerous situations. A better idea is to use a distributed ``Helmholtz machine`` architecture in which the sensors are connected to a network of simple processors, and the collective state of the network as a whole provides an explanation for the sensory data. In general communication within such a network will require time division multiplexing, which opens the door to the possibility that with certain refinements to the Helmholtz machine architecture it may be possible to build sensor networks that exhibit a form of artificial consciousness.

  12. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  13. Workshop on neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.; Emrich, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics covered in this report are: Learning, Memory, and Artificial Neural Systems; Emerging Neural Network Technology; Neural Networks; Digital Signal Processing and Neural Networks; Application of Neural Networks to In-Core Fuel Management; Neural Networks in Process Control; Neural Network Applications in Image Processing; Neural Networks for Multi-Sensor Information Fusion; Neural Network Research in Instruments Controls Division; Neural Networks Research in the ORNL Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division; Neural Network Applications for Linear Programming; Neural Network Applications to Signal Processing and Diagnostics; Neural Networks in Filtering and Control; Neural Network Research at Tennessee Technological University; and Global Minima within the Hopfield Hypercube.

  14. F-actin-myosin II inhibitors affect chromaffin granule plasma membrane distance and fusion kinetics by retraction of the cytoskeletal cortex.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, José; Torres, Vanesa; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina J; Garcia-Martinez, Virginia; López-Font, Inmaculada; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Chromaffin cell catecholamines are released when specialized secretory vesicles undergo exocytotic membrane fusion. Evidence indicates that vesicle supply and fusion are controlled by the activity of the cortical F-actin-myosin II network. To study in detail cell cortex and vesicle interactions, we use fluorescent labeling with GFP-lifeact and acidotropic dyes in confocal and evanescent wave microscopy. These techniques provide structural details and dynamic images of chromaffin granules caged in a complex cortical structure. Both the movement of cortical structures and granule motion appear to be linked, and this motion can be restricted by the myosin II-specific inhibitor, blebbistatin, and the F-actin stabilizer, jasplakinolide. These treatments also affect the position of the vesicles in relation to the plasma membrane, increasing the distance between them and the fusion sites. Consequently, we observed slower single vesicle fusion kinetics in treated cells after neutralization of acridine orange-loaded granules during exocytosis. Increasing the distance between the granules and the fusion sites appears to be linked to the retraction of the F-actin cytoskeleton when treated with jasplakinolide. Thus, F-actin-myosin II inhibitors appear to slow granule fusion kinetics by altering the position of vesicles after relaxation of the cortical network.

  15. Organization of the cytokeratin network in an epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Portet, Stéphanie; Arino, Ovide; Vassy, Jany; Schoëvaërt, Damien

    2003-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic three-dimensional structure mainly located in the cytoplasm. It is involved in many cell functions such as mechanical signal transduction and maintenance of cell integrity. Among the three cytoskeletal components, intermediate filaments (the cytokeratin in epithelial cells) are the best candidates for this mechanical role. A model of the establishment of the cytokeratin network of an epithelial cell is proposed to study the dependence of its structural organization on extracellular mechanical environment. To implicitly describe the latter and its effects on the intracellular domain, we use mechanically regulated protein synthesis. Our model is a hybrid of a partial differential equation of parabolic type, governing the evolution of the concentration of cytokeratin, and a set of stochastic differential equations describing the dynamics of filaments. Each filament is described by a stochastic differential equation that reflects both the local interactions with the environment and the non-local interactions via the past history of the filament. A three-dimensional simulation model is derived from this mathematical model. This simulation model is then used to obtain examples of cytokeratin network architectures under given mechanical conditions, and to study the influence of several parameters.

  16. Mitotic redistribution of the mitochondrial network by Miro and Cenp-F

    PubMed Central

    Kanfer, Gil; Courthéoux, Thibault; Peterka, Martin; Meier, Sonja; Soste, Martin; Melnik, Andre; Reis, Katarina; Aspenström, Pontus; Peter, Matthias; Picotti, Paola; Kornmann, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Although chromosome partitioning during mitosis is well studied, the molecular mechanisms that allow proper segregation of cytoplasmic organelles in human cells are poorly understood. Here we show that mitochondria interact with growing m