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Sample records for actin-based motor protein

  1. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  2. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  3. Clamped-filament elongation model for actin-based motors.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-01-01

    Although actin-based motility drives cell crawling and intracellular locomotion of organelles and certain pathogens, the underlying mechanism of force generation remains a mystery. Recent experiments demonstrated that Listeria exhibit episodes of 5.4-nm stepwise motion corresponding to the periodicity of the actin filament subunits, and extremely small positional fluctuations during the intermittent pauses [S. C. Kuo and J. L. McGrath. 2000. Nature. 407:1026-1029]. These findings suggest that motile bacteria remain firmly bound to actin filament ends as they elongate, a behavior that appears to rule out previous models for actin-based motility. We propose and analyze a new mechanochemical model (called the "Lock, Load & Fire" mechanism) for force generation by means of affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation. During the locking step, the filament's terminal ATP-containing subunit binds tightly to a clamp situated on the surface of a motile object; in the loading step, actin.ATP monomer(s) bind to the filament end, an event that triggers the firing step, wherein ATP hydrolysis on the clamped subunit attenuates the filament's affinity for the clamp. This last step initiates translocation of the new ATP-containing terminus to the clamp, whereupon another cycle begins anew. This model explains how surface-tethered filaments can grow while exerting flexural or tensile force on the motile surface. Moreover, stochastic simulations of the model reproduce the signature motions of Listeria. This elongation motor, which we term actoclampin, exploits actin's intrinsic ATPase activity to provide a simple, high-fidelity enzymatic reaction cycle for force production that does not require elongating filaments to dissociate from the motile surface. This mechanism may operate whenever actin polymerization is called upon to generate the forces that drive cell crawling or intracellular organelle motility. PMID:11806905

  4. Defining a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins critical for actin-based motility of Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Serio, Alisa W; Jeng, Robert L; Haglund, Cat M; Reed, Shawna C; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-05-20

    Many Rickettsia species are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use actin-based motility for spread during infection. However, while other bacteria assemble actin tails consisting of branched networks, Rickettsia assemble long parallel actin bundles, suggesting the use of a distinct mechanism for exploiting actin. To identify the underlying mechanisms and host factors involved in Rickettsia parkeri actin-based motility, we performed an RNAi screen targeting 115 actin cytoskeletal genes in Drosophila cells. The screen delineated a set of four core proteins-profilin, fimbrin/T-plastin, capping protein, and cofilin--as crucial for determining actin tail length, organizing filament architecture, and enabling motility. In mammalian cells, these proteins were localized throughout R. parkeri tails, consistent with a role in motility. Profilin and fimbrin/T-plastin were critical for the motility of R. parkeri but not Listeria monocytogenes. Our results highlight key distinctions between the evolutionary strategies and molecular mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to assemble and organize actin. PMID:20478540

  5. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  6. Capping Protein Increases the Rate of Actin-based Motility by Promoting Filament Nucleation by the Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Orkun; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-01-01

    Summary Capping protein is an integral component of Arp2/3-nucleated actin networks that drive amoeboid motility. Increasing the concentration of capping protein, which caps barbed ends of actin filaments and prevents elongation, increases the rate of actin-based motility in vivo and in vitro. We studied the synergy between capping protein and Arp2/3 using an in vitro actin-based motility system reconstituted from purified proteins. We find that capping protein increases the rate of motility by promoting more frequent filament nucleation by the Arp2/3 complex, and not by increasing the rate of filament elongation as previously suggested. One consequence of this coupling between capping and nucleation is that, while the rate of motility depends strongly on the concentration of capping protein and Arp2/3, the net rate of actin assembly is insensitive to changes in either factor. By reorganizing their architecture, dendritic actin networks harness the same assembly kinetics to drive different rates of motility. PMID:18510928

  7. The Genetic Engineering of Motor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartz, Rachael M.

    Molecular motors are a remarkable feature within living organisms that are responsible for directional mechanical motion, which is driven by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Actin-binding molecular motors are of specific interest in the field of nanotechnology as filamentous actin is capable of carrying cargo, such as quantum dots, while it is translocated along a motor coated surface. The binding regions of motor proteins, which are known to interact with actin, such as Myosin, have been thoroughly examined and identified. Rapid genetic engineering of the ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, adenosine kinase, to incorporate these binding regions is possible through the use of site- directed mutagenesis. The sequences, which were mutated into the ADK wt gene, were incorporated in an unstructured loop region. During the phosphate transfer, the mutants switch between open and closed conformational states. The binding affinity of the sequences to the actin is altered during this conformational switch, thus causing the motor to move along actin filament. The ADK mutants and their interaction with filamentous actin was monitored by an in vitro motility assay. Two different mutants of ADK were found to have retained enzymatic functionality after the mutagenesis as well as function as actin-based motor proteins.

  8. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  9. Myosin V motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Ronald D.

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian myosin V motors transport cargo processively along actin filaments. Recent biophysical and structural studies have led to a detailed understanding of the mechanism of myosin V, making it perhaps the best understood cytoskeletal motor. In addition to describing the mechanism, this review will illustrate how “dynamic” single molecule measurements can synergize with “static” protein structural studies to produce amazingly clear information on the workings of a nanometer-scale machine. PMID:14610051

  10. Systematic mutational analysis of the amino-terminal domain of the Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein reveals novel functions in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lauer, P; Theriot, J A; Skoble, J; Welch, M D; Portnoy, D A

    2001-12-01

    The Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein acts as a scaffold to assemble and activate host cell actin cytoskeletal factors at the bacterial surface, resulting in directional actin polymerization and propulsion of the bacterium through the cytoplasm. We have constructed 20 clustered charged-to-alanine mutations in the NH2-terminal domain of ActA and replaced the endogenous actA gene with these molecular variants. These 20 clones were evaluated in several biological assays for phenotypes associated with particular amino acid changes. Additionally, each protein variant was purified and tested for stimulation of the Arp2/3 complex, and a subset was tested for actin monomer binding. These specific mutations refined the two regions involved in Arp2/3 activation and suggest that the actin-binding sequence of ActA spans 40 amino acids. We also identified a 'motility rate and cloud-to-tail transition' region in which nine contiguous mutations spanning amino acids 165-260 caused motility rate defects and changed the ratio of intracellular bacteria associated with actin clouds and comet tails without affecting Arp2/3 activation. Several unusual motility phenotypes were associated with amino acid changes in this region, including altered paths through the cytoplasm, discontinuous actin tails in host cells and the tendency to 'skid' or dramatically change direction while moving. These unusual phenotypes illustrate the complexity of ActA functions that control the actin-based motility of L. monocytogenes.

  11. Systematic mutational analysis of the amino-terminal domain of the Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein reveals novel functions in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lauer, P; Theriot, J A; Skoble, J; Welch, M D; Portnoy, D A

    2001-12-01

    The Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein acts as a scaffold to assemble and activate host cell actin cytoskeletal factors at the bacterial surface, resulting in directional actin polymerization and propulsion of the bacterium through the cytoplasm. We have constructed 20 clustered charged-to-alanine mutations in the NH2-terminal domain of ActA and replaced the endogenous actA gene with these molecular variants. These 20 clones were evaluated in several biological assays for phenotypes associated with particular amino acid changes. Additionally, each protein variant was purified and tested for stimulation of the Arp2/3 complex, and a subset was tested for actin monomer binding. These specific mutations refined the two regions involved in Arp2/3 activation and suggest that the actin-binding sequence of ActA spans 40 amino acids. We also identified a 'motility rate and cloud-to-tail transition' region in which nine contiguous mutations spanning amino acids 165-260 caused motility rate defects and changed the ratio of intracellular bacteria associated with actin clouds and comet tails without affecting Arp2/3 activation. Several unusual motility phenotypes were associated with amino acid changes in this region, including altered paths through the cytoplasm, discontinuous actin tails in host cells and the tendency to 'skid' or dramatically change direction while moving. These unusual phenotypes illustrate the complexity of ActA functions that control the actin-based motility of L. monocytogenes. PMID:11886549

  12. Protein phosphatase 2A, a potential regulator of actin dynamics and actin-based organelle motility in the green alga Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Menzel, D; Vugrek, O; Frank, S; Elsner-Menzel, C

    1995-06-01

    The giant, unicellular alga Acetabularia is a well known experimental model for the study of actin-dependent intracellular organelle motility. In the cyst stage, however, which is equivalent to the gametophytic stage, organelles are immobile, even though an actin cytoskeleton is present. The reason for the lack of organelle motility at this stage has not been known. To test the hypothesis that organelle motility could be under the control of posttranslational modification by protein phosphorylation, we have treated cysts with submicromolar concentrations of okadaic acid or calyculin A, both potent inhibitors of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (ser/thr-PPases). The effects were dramatic: Instead of linear actin bundles typical for control cysts, circular arrays of actin bundles formed in the cortical cyst cytoplasm. Concomitant with the formation of these action rings, the cytoplasmic layers beneath the rings began to slowly rotate in a continuous and uniform counter-clockwise fashion. This effect suggests that protein phosphorylation acts on the actin cytoskeleton at two levels: (1) It changes the assembly properties of the actin filament system to the extent that novel cytoskeletal configurations are formed and (2) it raises the activity of putative motor proteins involved in the rotational movements to levels sufficiently high to support motility at a stage when organelle motility does not normally occur. Northern blot analysis of cyst stage-mRNA using probes specific to protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) and type 2A (PP2A) reveals that PP2A is strongly expressed at this developmental stage whereas PP1 is not detectable, suggesting that PP2A is the likely target to the protein phosphatase inhibitors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  14. HAP1 helps to regulate actin-based transport of insulin-containing granules in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Ting; Wu, Hongnian; He, Jun; Li, He

    2015-07-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is enriched in neurons and binds to polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin. It consists of two alternatively spliced isoforms, HAP1A and HAP1B, which differ only in their short C-terminal sequences. Both HAP1A and HAP1B have been also detected in pancreatic β cells, where the loss of HAP1 impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we use time-lapse laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide direct evidence that HAP1A, but not HAP1B, co-localizes and co-migrates with insulin-containing vesicles and actin-based myosin Va motor protein in the INS-1 pancreatic β cell line. Knocking down HAP1 expression using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited actin-based transport of insulin vesicles following glucose stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction between HAP1A, myosin Va, and phogrin, a transmembrane protein in insulin-containing vesicles. Stimulating INS-1 cells with glucose increased the association of HAP1A with myosin Va, while silencing HAP1 expression reduced the association of myosin Va with phogrin after glucose stimulation, without affecting levels of myosin Va or actin. Our results provide real-time evidence in living cells that HAP1 may help regulate transport of insulin-containing secretory granules along cortical actin filaments. This also raises the possibility that HAP1 may play an important role in actin-based secretory vesicle trafficking in neurons. PMID:25744490

  15. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  16. Kermit Interacts with Gαo, Vang, and Motor Proteins in Drosophila Planar Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the ubiquitous apical-basal polarity, epithelial cells are often polarized within the plane of the tissue – the phenomenon known as planar cell polarity (PCP). In Drosophila, manifestations of PCP are visible in the eye, wing, and cuticle. Several components of the PCP signaling have been characterized in flies and vertebrates, including the heterotrimeric Go protein. However, Go signaling partners in PCP remain largely unknown. Using a genetic screen we uncover Kermit, previously implicated in G protein and PCP signaling, as a novel binding partner of Go. Through pull-down and genetic interaction studies, we find that Kermit interacts with Go and another PCP component Vang, known to undergo intracellular relocalization during PCP establishment. We further demonstrate that the activity of Kermit in PCP differentially relies on the motor proteins: the microtubule-based dynein and kinesin motors and the actin-based myosin VI. Our results place Kermit as a potential transducer of Go, linking Vang with motor proteins for its delivery to dedicated cellular compartments during PCP establishment. PMID:24204696

  17. Actin based processes that could determine the cytoplasmic architecture of plant cells.

    PubMed

    van der Honing, Hannie S; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2007-05-01

    Actin polymerisation can generate forces that are necessary for cell movement, such as the propulsion of a class of bacteria, including Listeria, and the protrusion of migrating animal cells. Force generation by the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells has not been studied. One process in plant cells that is likely to depend on actin-based force generation is the organisation of the cytoplasm. We compare the function of actin binding proteins of three well-studied mammalian models that depend on actin-based force generation with the function of their homologues in plants. We predict the possible role of these proteins, and thus the role of actin-based force generation, in the production of cytoplasmic organisation in plant cells.

  18. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  19. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  20. Listeria's right-handed helical rocket-tail trajectories: mechanistic implications for force generation in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Zeile, William L; Zhang, Fangliang; Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2005-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes forms right-handed helical rocket tail trajectories during actin-based motility in cell-free extracts, and this stereochemical feature is consistent with actoclampin's affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation model [Dickinson and Purich, 2002: Biophys J 82:605-617]. In that mechanism, right-handed torque is generated by an end-tracking molecular motor, each comprised of a filament barbed end and clamping protein that processively traces the right-handed helix of its filament partner. By contrast, torque is not a predicted property of those models (e.g., elastic propulsion, elastic Brownian ratchet, tethered ratchet, and insertional polymerization models) requiring filament barbed ends to depart/detach from the motile object's surface during/after each monomer-addition step. Helical trajectories also explain why Listeria undergoes longitudinal-axis rotation on a length-scale matching the helical periodicity of Listeria's rocket tails.

  1. Single-molecule studies of unconventional motor protein myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, HyeongJun

    Myosin VI is one of the myosin superfamily members that are actin-based molecular motors. It has received special attention due to its distinct features as compared to other myosins, such as its opposite directionality and a much larger step size than expected given the length of its "leg". This dissertation presents the author.s graduate work of several single-molecule studies on myosin VI. Special attention was paid to some of myosin VI.s tail domains that consist of proximal tail (PT), medial tail (MT), distal tail (DT) domains and cargo-binding domain (CBD). The functional form of myosin VI in cells is still under debate. Although full length myosin VI proteins in cytosolic extracts of cells were monomers from earlier studies, there are several reasons why it is now believed that myosin VI could exist as a dimer. If this is true and dimerization occurs, the next logical question would be which parts of myosin VI are dimerization regions? One model claimed that the CBD is the sole dimerization region. A competing model claimed that there must be another region that could be involved in dimerization, based on their observation that a construct without the CBD could still dimerize. Our single-molecule experiment with progressively truncated myosin VI constructs showed that the MT domain is a dimerization region, supporting the latter model. Additional single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation done with our collaborators suggest that electrostatic salt bridges formed between positive and negative amino acid residues are mainly responsible for the MT domain dimerization. After resolving this, we are left with another important question which is how myosin VI can take such a large step. Recent crystal structure showed that one of the tail domains preceding the MT domain, called the PT domain, is a three-helix bundle. The most easily conceivable way might be an unfolding of the three-helix bundle upon dimerization, allowing the protein to

  2. Chromatin maintenance by a molecular motor protein

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Myong-Hee; Misteli, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The kinesin motor protein KIF4 performs essential functions in mitosis. Like other mitotic kinesins, loss of KIF4 causes spindle defects, aneuploidy, genomic instability and ultimately tumor formation. However, KIF4 is unique among molecular motors in that it resides in the cell nucleus throughout interphase, suggesting a non-mitotic function as well. Here we identify a novel cellular function for a molecular motor protein by demonstrating that KIF4 acts as a modulator of large-scale chromatin architecture during interphase. KIF4 binds globally to chromatin and its absence leads to chromatin decondensation and loss of heterochromatin domains. KIF4-dependent chromatin decondensation has functional consequences by causing replication defects and global mis-regulation of gene expression programs. KIF4 exerts its function in chromatin architecture via regulation of ADP-ribosylation of core and linker histones and by physical interaction and recruitment of chromatin assembly proteins during S-phase. These observations document a novel function for a molecular motor protein in establishment and maintenance of higher order chromatin structure. PMID:22130187

  3. Observation of microtubule-based motor protein activity.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Roger D

    2015-02-01

    It is possible to detect the presence of motor proteins that have the ability to translocate particles along microtubules. The two procedures described here were developed to detect microtubule-dependent motor protein activity in cell lysates or of purified proteins. In the first procedure, latex beads bound to the putative motor protein are assayed for their ability to translocate along microtubules in an ATP-dependent fashion. If motor protein activity is present, it will bind to the beads and translocate them unidirectionally along the microtubules. In the second procedure, motor proteins induce microtubule gliding over a glass coverslip surface that is coated with active motor protein. Because the mass of a microtubule is negligible compared to that of a coverslip or slide, the microtubule glides over the glass surface when the surface is coated with active motor protein. Also included here are descriptions of assays designed to determine the directionality of movement of microtubule-based motor proteins. PMID:25646501

  4. How Linear Motor Proteins Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiwa, K.; Manstein, D. J.

    Most animals perform sophisticated forms of movement such as walking, running, flying and swimming using their skeletal muscles. Although directed movement is not generally associated with plants, cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells can reach velocities greater than 50 μm/s and thus constitutes one of the fastest forms of directed movement. Unicellular eukaryotic organisms and prokaryotes display diverse mechanisms by which they are able to actively move towards a food source, light or other sensory stimuli. On the cellular level active transport of vesicles and organelles is required, since the cytoplasm resembles a gel with a mesh size of approximately 50 nm, which makes the passive transport of organelle-sized particles impossible. For elongated cells such as neurons, even proteins and small metabolites have to be actively transported.

  5. Motor Proteins at Work in PC12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David; Holzwarth, George; Superfine, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Motor proteins such as kinesin and dynein drive vesicle transport within cells by converting the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. As vesicles are transported in PC12 neurites, they travel at constant velocity for long intervals before changing to a different constant velocity. When scaled by the minimum observed velocity of a vesicles, the changes in velocity occur in quantizes intervals of +/- 1, 2, 3 etc. These changes in velocity are caused by a change in the number of motor proteins actively transporting the vesicle. The viscoelastic modulus and viscosity appropriate for large vesicles (0.25 - 0.5 micron radius) in PC12 was determined by measuring the Brownian motion of vesicles within the distal expansions of neurites. The corresponding Stokes' drag on the vesicles was 4.2 +/- 0.6 pN per motor. Assuming that kinesin hydrolyzes 1 ATP per 8 nm step (consistent with in-vitro measurements), the motor's efficiency is 33apply forces in magnetic beeds in the hopes of mimicking vesicle motion.

  6. Actin-based motility of Listeria: Right-handed helical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes recruit cellular machinery to move in and between cells. Understanding the mechanism of motility, including force and torque generation and the resultant displacements, holds keys to numerous applications in medicine and biosensing. In this work, a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation is presented to illustrate that a biomechanical model of actin-based motility of a rigid surface through persistently attached filaments propelled by affinity-modulated molecular motors can produce a right-handed helical trajectory consistent with experimental observations. The implications of the mechanism to bacterial motility are discussed.

  7. Functions and mechanics of dynein motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Anthony J.; Kon, Takahide; Knight, Peter J.; Sutoh, Kazuo; Burgess, Stan A.

    2014-01-01

    Fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, dyneins generate force and movement on microtubules in a wealth of biological processes, including ciliary beating, cell division and intracellular transport. The large mass and complexity of dynein motors have made elucidating their mechanisms a sizable task. Yet, through a combination of approaches, including X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule assays and biochemical experiments, important progress has been made towards understanding how these giant motor proteins work. From these studies, a model for the mechanochemical cycle of dynein is emerging, in which nucleotide-driven flexing motions within the AAA+ ring of dynein alter the affinity of its microtubule-binding stalk and reshape its mechanical element to generate movement. PMID:24064538

  8. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. PMID:26715420

  9. Motor Proteins and Molecular Motors: How to Operate Machines at Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-01-01

    Several classes of biological molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical work are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. These nanometer-sized machines operate in noisy stochastic isothermal environment, strongly supporting fundamental cellular processes such as transfer of genetic information, transport, organization and functioning. In last two decades motor proteins have become a subject of intense research efforts that were aimed to uncover fundamental principles and mechanisms of molecular motors dynamics. In this review, we critically discuss a recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies on motor proteins. Our focus is on analyzing fundamental concepts and ideas that have been utilized for explaining non-equilibrium nature and mechanisms of molecular motors. PMID:24100357

  10. Engineered kinesin motor proteins amenable to small-molecule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Martin F; Winding, Michael; Yue, Yang; Shastry, Shankar; Teloni, Federico; Reddy, Sanjay; Blasius, T Lynne; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Hancock, William O; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes 45 kinesin motor proteins that drive cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Determining the cellular function of each kinesin would benefit from specific small-molecule inhibitors. However, screens have yielded only a few specific inhibitors. Here we present a novel chemical-genetic approach to engineer kinesin motors that can carry out the function of the wild-type motor yet can also be efficiently inhibited by small, cell-permeable molecules. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we develop two independent strategies to generate inhibitable motors, and characterize the resulting inhibition in single-molecule assays and in cells. We further apply these two strategies to create analogously inhibitable kinesin-3 motors. These inhibitable motors will be of great utility to study the functions of specific kinesins in a dynamic manner in cells and animals. Furthermore, these strategies can be used to generate inhibitable versions of any motor protein of interest. PMID:27045608

  11. Engineered kinesin motor proteins amenable to small-molecule inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Martin F.; Winding, Michael; Yue, Yang; Shastry, Shankar; Teloni, Federico; Reddy, Sanjay; Blasius, T. Lynne; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Hancock, William O.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Verhey, Kristen J.

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes 45 kinesin motor proteins that drive cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Determining the cellular function of each kinesin would benefit from specific small-molecule inhibitors. However, screens have yielded only a few specific inhibitors. Here we present a novel chemical-genetic approach to engineer kinesin motors that can carry out the function of the wild-type motor yet can also be efficiently inhibited by small, cell-permeable molecules. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we develop two independent strategies to generate inhibitable motors, and characterize the resulting inhibition in single-molecule assays and in cells. We further apply these two strategies to create analogously inhibitable kinesin-3 motors. These inhibitable motors will be of great utility to study the functions of specific kinesins in a dynamic manner in cells and animals. Furthermore, these strategies can be used to generate inhibitable versions of any motor protein of interest. PMID:27045608

  12. Survival motor neuron protein in motor neurons determines synaptic integrity in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Tara L; Kong, Lingling; Wang, Xueyong; Osborne, Melissa A; Crowder, Melissa E; Van Meerbeke, James P; Xu, Xixi; Davis, Crystal; Wooley, Joe; Goldhamer, David J; Lutz, Cathleen M; Rich, Mark M; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2012-06-20

    The inherited motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by deficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein and results in severe muscle weakness. In SMA mice, synaptic dysfunction of both neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and central sensorimotor synapses precedes motor neuron cell death. To address whether this synaptic dysfunction is due to SMN deficiency in motor neurons, muscle, or both, we generated three lines of conditional SMA mice with tissue-specific increases in SMN expression. All three lines of mice showed increased survival, weights, and improved motor behavior. While increased SMN expression in motor neurons prevented synaptic dysfunction at the NMJ and restored motor neuron somal synapses, increased SMN expression in muscle did not affect synaptic function although it did improve myofiber size. Together these data indicate that both peripheral and central synaptic integrity are dependent on motor neurons in SMA, but SMN may have variable roles in the maintenance of these different synapses. At the NMJ, it functions at the presynaptic terminal in a cell-autonomous fashion, but may be necessary for retrograde trophic signaling to presynaptic inputs onto motor neurons. Importantly, SMN also appears to function in muscle growth and/or maintenance independent of motor neurons. Our data suggest that SMN plays distinct roles in muscle, NMJs, and motor neuron somal synapses and that restored function of SMN at all three sites will be necessary for full recovery of muscle power.

  13. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  14. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule–motor-protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate–consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation. PMID:26764729

  15. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young's modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility.

  16. Curved trajectories of actin-based motility in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-05-01

    Recent experiments have reported fascinating geometrical trajectories for actin-based motility of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and functionalized beads. To understand the physical mechanism for these trajectories, we constructed a phenomenological model to study the motion of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions. In our model, the force and actin density on the surface of the disk are influenced by the translation and rotation of the disk, which in turn is induced by the asymmetric distributions of those densities. We show that this feedback can destabilize a straight trajectory, leading to circular, S-shape and other geometrical trajectories observed in the experiments through bifurcations in the distributions of the force and actin density. The relation between our model and the models for self-propelled deformable particles is emphasized and discussed.

  17. Transport of organelles by elastically coupled motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2016-07-01

    Motor-driven intracellular transport is a complex phenomenon where multiple motor proteins simultaneously attached on to a cargo engage in pulling activity, often leading to tug-of-war, displaying bidirectional motion. However, most mathematical and computational models ignore the details of the motor-cargo interaction. A few studies have focused on more realistic models of cargo transport by including elastic motor-cargo coupling, but either restrict the number of motors and/or use purely phenomenological forms for force-dependent hopping rates. Here, we study a generic model in which N motors are elastically coupled to a cargo, which itself is subjected to thermal noise in the cytoplasm and to an additional external applied force. The motor-hopping rates are chosen to satisfy detailed balance with respect to the energy of elastic stretching. With these assumptions, an (N + 1) -variable master equation is constructed for dynamics of the motor-cargo complex. By expanding the hopping rates to linear order in fluctuations in motor positions, we obtain a linear Fokker-Planck equation. The deterministic equations governing the average quantities are separated out and explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the mean velocity and diffusion coefficient of the cargo. We also study the statistical features of the force experienced by an individual motor and quantitatively characterize the load-sharing among the cargo-bound motors. The mean cargo velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient are found to be decreasing functions of the stiffness. While the increase in the number of motors N does not increase the velocity substantially, it decreases the effective diffusion coefficient which falls as 1/N asymptotically. We further show that the cargo-bound motors share the force exerted on the cargo equally only in the limit of vanishing elastic stiffness; as stiffness is increased, deviations from equal load sharing are observed. Numerical simulations agree with

  18. [Motor Proteins of Microtubules and Mechanisms of Synaptic Plasticity].

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, N A; Pivovarov, A S

    2016-01-01

    Motor proteins of microtubules, kinesin and dynein superfamily proteins play an important role in the intracellular transport. Inside a neuron they are involved in the transport of organelles, proteins and mRNAs along the axons and dendrites to the nerve terminals and back to the cell bodies. Disturbance of axonal transport may affect neurotransmitter release and short-term presynaptic plasticity. Disturbance of dendritic transport, in particular the recycling of synaptic receptors, affects postsynaptic plasticity. The review attempts to trace the connections between the motor proteins of microtubules and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity from the perspective of their involvement in the intracellular transport of proteins and organelles, which play role in the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:27538280

  19. A simple theory of motor protein kinetics and energetics. II.

    PubMed

    Qian, H

    2000-01-10

    A three-state stochastic model of motor protein [Qian, Biophys. Chem. 67 (1997) pp. 263-267] is further developed to illustrate the relationship between the external load on an individual motor protein in aqueous solution with various ATP concentrations and its steady-state velocity. A wide variety of dynamic motor behavior are obtained from this simple model. For the particular case of free-load translocation being the most unfavorable step within the hydrolysis cycle, the load-velocity curve is quasi-linear, V/Vmax = (cF/Fmax-c)/(1-c), in contrast to the hyperbolic relationship proposed by A.V. Hill for macroscopic muscle. Significant deviation from the linearity is expected when the velocity is less than 10% of its maximal (free-load) value--a situation under which the processivity of motor diminishes and experimental observations are less certain. We then investigate the dependence of load-velocity curve on ATP (ADP) concentration. It is shown that the free load Vmax exhibits a Michaelis-Menten like behavior, and the isometric Fmax increases linearly with ln([ATP]/[ADP]). However, the quasi-linear region is independent of the ATP concentration, yielding an apparently ATP-independent maximal force below the true isometric force. Finally, the heat production as a function of ATP concentration and external load are calculated. In simple terms and solved with elementary algebra, the present model provides an integrated picture of biochemical kinetics and mechanical energetics of motor proteins. PMID:10631478

  20. Multiscale Polar Theory of Microtubule and Motor-Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins are building blocks of self-organized subcellular biological structures such as the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. These same ingredients can form new “bioactive” liquid-crystalline fluids that are intrinsically out of equilibrium and which display complex flows and defect dynamics. It is not yet well understood how microscopic activity, which involves polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, yields such larger-scale dynamical structures. In our multiscale theory, Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubule ensembles driven by cross-linking motors allow us to study microscopic organization and stresses. Polarity sorting and cross-link relaxation emerge as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. On larger length scales, our continuum Doi-Onsager theory captures the hydrodynamic flows generated by polarity-dependent active stresses. The results connect local polar structure to flow structures and defect dynamics. PMID:25679909

  1. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  2. Prestin is the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Shen, Weixing; He, David Z. Z.; Long, Kevin B.; Madison, Laird D.; Dallos, Peter

    2000-05-01

    The outer and inner hair cells of the mammalian cochlea perform different functions. In response to changes in membrane potential, the cylindrical outer hair cell rapidly alters its length and stiffness. These mechanical changes, driven by putative molecular motors, are assumed to produce amplification of vibrations in the cochlea that are transduced by inner hair cells. Here we have identified an abundant complementary DNA from a gene, designated Prestin, which is specifically expressed in outer hair cells. Regions of the encoded protein show moderate sequence similarity to pendrin and related sulphate/anion transport proteins. Voltage-induced shape changes can be elicited in cultured human kidney cells that express prestin. The mechanical response of outer hair cells to voltage change is accompanied by a `gating current', which is manifested as nonlinear capacitance. We also demonstrate this nonlinear capacitance in transfected kidney cells. We conclude that prestin is the motor protein of the cochlear outer hair cell.

  3. Single-molecule studies of kinesin family motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordyce, Polly

    Kinesin family motor proteins drive many essential cellular processes, including cargo transport and mitotic spindle assembly and regulation. They accomplish these tasks by converting the chemical energy released from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) directly into mechanical motion along microtubules in cells. Optical traps allow us to track and apply force to individual motor proteins, and have already revealed many details of the movement of conventional kinesin, although the precise mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into mechanical motion is unclear. Other kinesin family members remain largely uncharacterized. This dissertation details the use of a novel optical-trapping assay to study Eg5, a Kinesin-5 family member involved in both spindle assembly and pole separation during mitosis. We demonstrate that individual Eg5 dimers are relatively slow and force-insensitive motors that take about 8 steps, on average, before detaching from the microtubule. Key differences in processivity and force-response between Eg5 and conventional kinesin suggest ways in which the two motors might have evolved to perform very different tasks in cells. This dissertation also details efforts to unravel how chemical energy is converted into mechanical motion by simultaneously measuring mechanical transitions (with an optical trap) and nucleotide binding and release (with single-molecule fluorescence) for individual conventional kinesin motors. We constructed a combined instrument, demonstrated its capabilities by unzipping fluorescently-labeled DNA duplexes, and used this instrument to record the motion of individual conventional kinesin motors powered by the hydrolysis of fluorescent nucleotides. Preliminary data reveal the challenges inherent in such measurements and guide proposals for future experimental approaches. Finally, this dissertation includes several chapters intended to serve as practical guides to understanding, constructing, and maintaining

  4. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S; O'Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Cook, Steven J; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J; Hall, David H; Hart, Anne C

    2016-07-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  5. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  6. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the “molecular clutch” description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. PMID:25383039

  7. Rickettsia Sca2 is a bacterial formin-like mediator of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Cat M.; Choe, Julie E.; Skau, Colleen T.; Kovar, David R.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse intracellular pathogens subvert the host actin polymerization machinery to drive movement within and between cells during infection. Rickettsia in the spotted fever group (SFG) are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that undergo actin-based motility and assemble distinctive ‘comet tails’ that consist of long, unbranched actin filaments1,2. Despite this distinct organization, it was proposed that actin in Rickettsia comet tails is nucleated by the host Arp2/3 complex and the bacterial protein RickA, which assemble branched actin networks3,4. However, a second bacterial gene, sca2, was recently implicated in actin tail formation by R. rickettsii5. Here, we demonstrate that Sca2 is a bacterial actin-assembly factor that functionally mimics eukaryotic formin proteins. Sca2 nucleates unbranched actin filaments, processively associates with growing barbed ends, requires profilin for efficient elongation, and inhibits the activity of capping protein, all properties shared with formins. Sca2 localizes to the Rickettsia surface and is sufficient to promote the assembly of actin filaments in cytoplasmic extract. These results suggest that Sca2 mimics formins to determine the unique organization of actin filaments in Rickettsia tails and drive bacterial motility, independently of host nucleators. PMID:20972427

  8. CD44 and beta3 integrin organize two functionally distinct actin-based domains in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Chabadel, Anne; Bañon-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Cluet, David; Rudkin, Brian B; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard; Genot, Elisabeth; Jurdic, Pierre; Anton, Ines M; Saltel, Frédéric

    2007-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of mature osteoclasts (OCs) adhering to nonmineralized substrates is organized in a belt of podosomes reminiscent of the sealing zone (SZ) found in bone resorbing OCs. In this study, we demonstrate that the belt is composed of two functionally different actin-based domains: podosome cores linked with CD44, which are involved in cell adhesion, and a diffuse cloud associated with beta3 integrin, which is involved in cell adhesion and contraction. Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASp) Interacting Protein (WIP)-/- OCs were devoid of podosomes, but they still exhibited actin clouds. Indeed, WIP-/- OCs show diminished expression of WASp, which is required for podosome formation. CD44 is a novel marker of OC podosome cores and the first nonintegrin receptor detected in these structures. The importance of CD44 is revealed by showing that its clustering restores podosome cores and WASp expression in WIP-/- OCs. However, although CD44 signals are sufficient to form a SZ, the presence of WIP is indispensable for the formation of a fully functional SZ.

  9. Bacterial Shape and ActA Distribution Affect Initiation of Listeria monocytogenes Actin-Based Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rafelski, Susanne M.; Theriot, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the process by which the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes initiates actin-based motility and determined the contribution of the variable surface distribution of the ActA protein to initiation and steady-state movement. To directly correlate ActA distributions to actin dynamics and motility of live bacteria, ActA was fused to a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1). Actin comet tail formation and steady-state bacterial movement rates both depended on ActA distribution, which in turn was tightly coupled to the bacterial cell cycle. Motility initiation was found to be a highly complex, multistep process for bacteria, in contrast to the simple symmetry breaking previously observed for ActA-coated spherical beads. F-actin initially accumulated along the sides of the bacterium and then slowly migrated to the bacterial pole expressing the highest density of ActA as a tail formed. Early movement was highly unstable with extreme changes in speed and frequent stops. Over time, saltatory motility and sensitivity to the immediate environment decreased as bacterial movement became robust at a constant steady-state speed. PMID:15980176

  10. Kinesin motor protein as an electrostatic ratchet machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsironis, George; Ciudad, Aleix; Sancho, Jose Maria

    2008-03-01

    Kinesin and related motor proteins utilize ATP fuel to propel themselves along the external surface of microtubules in a processive and directional fashion. We show that the observed step-like motion is possible through time varying charge distributions furnished by the ATP hydrolysis circle while the static charge configuration on the microtuble provides the guide for motion. Thus, while the chemical hydrolysis energy induces appropriate local conformational changes, the motor translational energy is fundamentally electrostatic. Numerical simulations of the mechanical equations of motion show that processivity and directionality are direct consequences of the ATP-dependent electrostatic interaction between the different charge distributions of kinesin and microtubule. Treating proterins as continuous dielectric media and using a Green's function formalism we find analytical expressions for the electrostatic energy in the vicinity of the protein surfaces. We calculate the Bjerrum length in the interior of the protein and analyze its dependence on the charge proximity to the protein interface. We apply these results to kinesin and estimate the pure electrostatic ATP-ADP interaction to be larger than 2k T.

  11. The prediction of novel multiple lipid-binding regions in protein translocation motor proteins: a possible general feature.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-03-01

    Protein translocation is an important cellular process. SecA is an essential protein component in the Sec system, as it contains the molecular motor that facilitates protein translocation. In this study, a bioinformatics approach was applied in the search for possible lipid-binding helix regions in protein translocation motor proteins. Novel lipid-binding regions in Escherichia coli SecA were identified. Remarkably, multiple lipid-binding sites were also identified in other motor proteins such as BiP, which is involved in ER protein translocation. The prokaryotic signal recognition particle receptor FtsY, though not a motor protein, is in many ways related to SecA, and was therefore included in this study. The results demonstrate a possible general feature for motor proteins involved in protein translocation. PMID:20957445

  12. Renewal-reward process formulation of motor protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arjun; Epureanu, Bogdan I

    2011-10-01

    Renewal-reward processes are used to provide a framework for the mathematical description of single-molecule bead-motor assays for processive motor proteins. The formulation provides a more powerful, general approach to the fluctuation analysis of bead-motor assays begun by Svoboda et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91(25):11782, 1994). Fluctuation analysis allows one to gain insight into the mechanochemical cycle of motor proteins purely by measuring the statistics of the displacement of the cargo (e.g., bead) the protein transports. The statistical parameters of interest are shown to be the steady-state slopes (in time) of the cumulants of the bead (the cumulant rates). The first two cumulant rates are the steady-state velocity and slope of the variance. The cumulant rates are shown to be insensitive to experimental disturbances such as the initial state of the enzyme and from the viewpoint of modeling, unaffected by substeps. Two existing models--Elston (J. Math. Biol. 41(3):189-206, 2000) and Peskin and Oster (Biophys. J. 68(4):202S-211S, 1995)--are formulated as renewal-reward processes to demonstrate the insight that the formulation affords. A key contribution of the approach is the possibility of accounting for wasted hydrolyses and backward steps in the fluctuation analysis. For example, the randomness parameter defined in the first fluctuation analysis of optical trap based bead-motor assays (Svoboda et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91(25):11782, 1994), loses its original purpose of estimating the number of rate-determining steps in the chemical cycle when backward steps and wasted hydrolyses are present. As a simple application of our formulation, we extend the randomness parameter's scope by showing how it can be used to infer the presence of wasted hydrolyses and backward steps with certainty. A more powerful fluctuation analysis using higher cumulant rate measurements is proposed: the method allows one to estimates the number of intermediate

  13. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  14. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Benanti, Erin L; Nguyen, Catherine M; Welch, Matthew D

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, whereas their close relative B. thailandensis is non-pathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion, and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate, and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection.

  15. Short actin-based mechanism for light-directed chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Akeo; Yamada, Noboru; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Hirose, Mana; Saito, Chieko; Shoda, Keiko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wada, Masamitsu

    2009-01-01

    Organelle movement is essential for proper function of living cells. In plants, these movements generally depend on actin filaments, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, in Arabidopsis, we identify associations of short actin filaments along the chloroplast periphery on the plasma membrane side associated with chloroplast photorelocation and anchoring to the plasma membrane. We have termed these chloroplast-actin filaments (cp-actin filaments). Cp-actin filaments emerge from the chloroplast edge and exhibit rapid turnover. The presence of cp-actin filaments depends on an actin-binding protein, chloroplast unusual positioning1 (CHUP1), localized on the chloroplast envelope. chup1 mutant lacked cp-actin filaments but showed normal cytoplasmic actin filaments. When irradiated with blue light to induce chloroplast movement, cp-actin filaments relocalize to the leading edge of chloroplasts before and during photorelocation and are regulated by 2 phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Our findings suggest that plants evolved a unique actin-based mechanism for organelle movement. PMID:19620714

  16. Optical trapping studies of acto-myosin motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, Rachel E.; Rosenthal, Peter B.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Holder, Anthony A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2007-09-01

    Optical tweezers have been used extensively to measure the mechanical properties of individual biological molecules. Over the past 10-15 years optical trapping studies have revealed important information about the way in which motor proteins convert chemical energy to mechanical work. This paper focuses on studies of the acto-myosin motor system that is responsible for muscle contraction and a host of other cellular motilities. Myosin works by binding to filamentous actin, pulling and then releasing. Each cycle of interaction produces a few nanometres movement and a few piconewtons force. Individual interactions can be observed directly by holding an individual actin filament between two optically trapped microspheres and positioning it in the immediate vicinity of a single myosin motor. When the chemical fuel (adenosine triphosphate or ATP) is present the myosin undergoes repeated cycles of interaction with the actin filament producing square-wave like displacements and forces. Analysis of optical trapping data sets enables the size and timing of the molecular motions to be deduced.

  17. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C; Schindler, Tony D; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears--speed up, slow down or switch directions--when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport.

  18. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C; Schindler, Tony D; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears--speed up, slow down or switch directions--when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport. PMID:25086603

  19. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C.; Schindler, Tony D.; Nogales, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells1,2. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems3,4. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears—speed up, slow down or switch directions—when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport. PMID:25086603

  20. Motor protein traffic regulation by supply-demand balance of resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciandrini, Luca; Neri, Izaak; Walter, Jean Charles; Dauloudet, Olivier; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    In cells and in in vitro assays the number of motor proteins involved in biological transport processes is far from being unlimited. The cytoskeletal binding sites are in contact with the same finite reservoir of motors (either the cytosol or the flow chamber) and hence compete for recruiting the available motors, potentially depleting the reservoir and affecting cytoskeletal transport. In this work we provide a theoretical framework in which to study, analytically and numerically, how motor density profiles and crowding along cytoskeletal filaments depend on the competition of motors for their binding sites. We propose two models in which finite processive motor proteins actively advance along cytoskeletal filaments and are continuously exchanged with the motor pool. We first look at homogeneous reservoirs and then examine the effects of free motor diffusion in the surrounding medium. We consider as a reference situation recent in vitro experimental setups of kinesin-8 motors binding and moving along microtubule filaments in a flow chamber. We investigate how the crowding of linear motor proteins moving on a filament can be regulated by the balance between supply (concentration of motor proteins in the flow chamber) and demand (total number of polymerized tubulin heterodimers). We present analytical results for the density profiles of bound motors and the reservoir depletion, and propose novel phase diagrams that present the formation of jams of motor proteins on the filament as a function of two tuneable experimental parameters: the motor protein concentration and the concentration of tubulins polymerized into cytoskeletal filaments. Extensive numerical simulations corroborate the analytical results for parameters in the experimental range and also address the effects of diffusion of motor proteins in the reservoir. We then propose experiments for validating our models and discuss how the ‘supply-demand’ effects can regulate motor traffic also in in vivo

  1. Motor protein mechanics: a stochastic model with minimal mechanochemical coupling.

    PubMed Central

    Duke, T; Leibler, S

    1996-01-01

    A stochastic model for the action of motor proteins such as kinesin is presented. The mechanical components of the enzyme are 1) two identical head domains that bind to discrete sites on a microtubule and that are capable of undergoing a conformational change; and 2) an elastic element that connects each head to the rest of the molecule. We investigate the situation in which the strain dependence of the chemical reaction rates is minimal and the heads have independent biochemical cycles. The enzyme advances stochastically along a filament when one head detaches and diffuses to a new binding site, while the other head remains bound to the microtubule. We also investigate the case in which the chemical cycles of the heads are correlated so that the molecule shifts each head alternately. The predictions of the model are found to be in agreement with experimentally measured force-velocity relationships for kinesin-both when the force is applied externally and when the enzyme is loaded by a viscous drag. For reasonable values of the parameters, this agreement is quantitative. The molecular stepping characteristics observed in recent motility assays are also reproduced. A number of experiments are suggested that would provide a more stringent test of the model and help determine whether this simple picture is an appropriate description of motor proteins or whether models that include strain-dependent reaction rates or more complicated types of cooperation of the two heads need to be considered. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8873998

  2. Myosin motor function: the ins and outs of actin-based membrane protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; McConnell, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    Cells build plasma membrane protrusions supported by parallel bundles of F-actin to enable a wide variety of biological functions, ranging from motility to host defense. Filopodia, microvilli and stereocilia are three such protrusions that have been the focus of intense biological and biophysical investigation in recent years. While it is evident that actin dynamics play a significant role in the formation of these organelles, members of the myosin superfamily have also been implicated as key players in the maintenance of protrusion architecture and function. Based on a simple analysis of the physical forces that control protrusion formation and morphology, as well as our review of available data, we propose that myosins play two general roles within these structures: (1) as cargo transporters to move critical regulatory components toward distal tips and (2) as mediators of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion. PMID:20107861

  3. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  4. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  5. CHUP1 mediates actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Usami, Hiroka; Maeda, Takuma; Fujii, Yusuke; Oikawa, Kazusato; Takahashi, Fumio; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. CHUP1 (CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING1) is indispensable for this response in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, involvement of CHUP1 in light-induced chloroplast movement is unknown in other plants. In this study, CHUP1 orthologues were isolated from a moss, Physcomitrella patens, and a fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris, by cDNA library screening and PCR cloning based on the P. patens genome sequence. Functional motifs found in CHUP1 of A. thaliana were conserved among the CHUP1 orthologues. In addition to the putative functional regions, the C-terminal regions (approximately 250 amino acids), which are unique in CHUP1s, were highly conserved. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of P. patens CHUP1s (PpCHUP1A, PpCHUP1B and PpCHUP1C) were transiently expressed in protoplast cells. All GFP fusions were localized on the chloroplasts. Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement of chup1 disruptants of P. patens was examined in the presence of cytoskeletal inhibitors because of the utilization of both microtubules and actin filaments for the movement in P. patens. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the wild type (WT) and all chup1 disruptants showed chloroplast avoidance movement. However, when microtubules were disrupted by Oryzalin, chloroplasts in ∆chup1A and ∆chup1A/B rarely moved and stayed in the strong light-irradiated area. On the other hand, WT, ∆chup1B and ∆chup1C showed chloroplast avoidance movement. These results suggest that PpCHUP1A predominantly mediates the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement. This study reveals that CHUP1 functions on the chloroplasts and is involved in the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in P. patens.

  6. Dynamics of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein interaction with the mRNA-binding protein IMP1 facilitates its trafficking into motor neuron axons

    PubMed Central

    Fallini, Claudia; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Honglai; Singer, Robert H.; Rossoll, Wilfried; Bassell, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease specifically affecting spinal motor neurons. SMA is caused by the homozygous deletion or mutation of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The SMN protein plays an essential role in the assembly of spliceosomal ribonucleoproteins. However, it is still unclear how low levels of the ubiquitously expressed SMN protein lead to the selective degeneration of motor neurons. An additional role for SMN in the regulation of the axonal transport of mRNA-binding proteins (mRBPs) and their target mRNAs has been proposed. Indeed, several mRBPs have been shown to interact with SMN, and the axonal levels of few mRNAs, such as the β-actin mRNA, are reduced in SMA motor neurons. In this study we have identified the β-actin mRNA-binding protein IMP1/ZBP1 as a novel SMN-interacting protein. Using a combination of biochemical assays and quantitative imaging techniques in primary motor neurons, we show that IMP1 associates with SMN in individual granules that are actively transported in motor neuron axons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IMP1 axonal localization depends on SMN levels, and that SMN deficiency in SMA motor neurons leads to a dramatic reduction of IMP1 protein levels. In contrast, no difference in IMP1 protein levels was detected in whole brain lysates from SMA mice, further suggesting neuron specific roles of SMN in IMP1 expression and localization. Taken together, our data support a role for SMN in the regulation of mRNA localization and axonal transport through its interaction with mRBPs such as IMP1. PMID:23897586

  7. Effect of the microtubule-associated protein tau on dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparacino, J.; Farías, M. G.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-02-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with nonmotile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al., Science 319, 1086 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152993] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduces experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  8. Motor Proteins as Nanomachines: The Roles of Thermal Fluctuations in Generating Force and Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Jonathon

    Motor proteins are enzymes that convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of a small molecule called ATP into mechanical work used to power directed movement along cytoskeletal filaments inside cells. Motor proteins have essential biological functions such as driving the contraction of muscle, the beating of sperm and cilia, and the transport of intracellular cargoes. Motor proteins are also interesting from a physical point of view because they do what no man-made engines do: they transduce chemical energy directly to mechanical work without using heat or electrical energy as an intermediate. A central issue in the mechanism of this chemomechanical transduction by motor proteins concerns the roles played by thermal fluctuations, diffusion and Brownian motion. In this lecture I discuss several molecular models for motor proteins, including so-called ratchet models, and compare predictions of these models to experimental results for the microtubule-based motor protein kinesin. I argue that kinesin, which has two motor domains or "heads," walks using a "hand-over-hand" mechanism such that at least one head is bound to the microtubule. Diffusion likely plays an essential role by facilitating the search of the unbound head for the next binding site, a distance 8 nm away. During this diffusive phase, the bound head supports the load ensuring that forward motion can still take place even against loads up to several piconewtons.

  9. Measurements of Myosin-II Motor Activity During Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Pollard, Luther W; Lord, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) represents the critical actin-based motor protein that drives actomyosin ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis. We detail three different methods to measure Myo2p motor function. Actin-activated ATPases provide a readout of actomyosin ATPase motor activity in a bulk assay; actin filament motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin-driven actin filament gliding (when motors are anchored); myosin-bead motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin ensembles traveling along actin filaments (when actin is anchored). Collectively, these methods allow us to combine the standard in vivo approaches common to fission yeast with in vitro biochemical methods to learn more about the mechanistic action of myosin-II during cytokinesis.

  10. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  11. Kinetic mechanism of the fastest motor protein, Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Kashiyama, Taku; Mogami, Toshifumi; Kon, Takahide; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2007-07-01

    Chara corallina class XI myosin is by far the fastest molecular motor. To investigate the molecular mechanism of this fast movement, we performed a kinetic analysis of a recombinant motor domain of Chara myosin. We estimated the time spent in the strongly bound state with actin by measuring rate constants of ADP dissociation from actin.motor domain complex and ATP-induced dissociation of the motor domain from actin. The rate constant of ADP dissociation from acto-motor domain was >2800 s(-1), and the rate constant of ATP-induced dissociation of the motor domain from actin at physiological ATP concentration was 2200 s(-1). From these data, the time spent in the strongly bound state with actin was estimated to be <0.82 ms. This value is the shortest among known values for various myosins and yields the duty ratio of <0.3 with a V(max) value of the actin-activated ATPase activity of 390 s(-1). The addition of the long neck domain of myosin Va to the Chara motor domain largely increased the velocity of the motility without increasing the ATP hydrolysis cycle rate, consistent with the swinging lever model. In addition, this study reveals some striking kinetic features of Chara myosin that are suited for the fast movement: a dramatic acceleration of ADP release by actin (1000-fold) and extremely fast ATP binding rate.

  12. Spiral Defects in Motility Assays: A Measure of Motor Protein Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, L.; Duke, T.; Elowitz, M. B.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Leibler, S.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-07-01

    In a commonly used motility assay, cytoskeletal filaments are observed as they glide over a surface coated with motor proteins. Defects in the motion frequently interrupt the flow of filaments. Examination of one such defect, in which a filament adopts a spiral form and rotates about a fixed point, provides a simple measure of the force exerted by the motor proteins. We demonstrate the universality of this approach by estimating the elementary forces of both myosin and kinesin.

  13. Simultaneous nano-tracking of multiple motor proteins via spectral discrimination of quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Kakizuka, Taishi; Ikezaki, Keigo; Kaneshiro, Junichi; Fujita, Hideaki; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Ichimura, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous nanometric tracking of multiple motor proteins was achieved by combining multicolor fluorescent labeling of target proteins and imaging spectroscopy, revealing dynamic behaviors of multiple motor proteins at the sub-diffraction-limit scale. Using quantum dot probes of distinct colors, we experimentally verified the localization precision to be a few nanometers at temporal resolution of 30 ms or faster. One-dimensional processive movement of two heads of a single myosin molecule and multiple myosin molecules was successfully traced. Furthermore, the system was modified for two-dimensional measurement and applied to tracking of multiple myosin molecules. Our approach is useful for investigating cooperative movement of proteins in supramolecular nanomachinery. PMID:27446684

  14. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  15. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  16. Porters versus rowers: a unified stochastic model of motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We present a general phenomenological theory for chemical to mechanical energy transduction by motor enzymes which is based on the classical "tight-coupling" mechanism. The associated minimal stochastic model takes explicitly into account both ATP hydrolysis and thermal noise effects. It provides expressions for the hydrolysis rate and the sliding velocity, as functions of the ATP concentration and the number of motor enzymes. It explains in a unified way many results of recent in vitro motility assays. More importantly, the theory provides a natural classification scheme for the motors: it correlates the biochemical and mechanical differences between "porters" such as cellular kinesins or dyneins, and "rowers" such as muscular myosins or flagellar dyneins. PMID:8509455

  17. Deficiency of the zinc finger protein ZFP106 causes motor and sensory neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Peter I.; Fratta, Pietro; Landman, Allison S.; Mcgoldrick, Philip; Wackerhage, Henning; Groves, Michael; Busam, Bharani Shiva; Galino, Jorge; Corrochano, Silvia; Beskina, Olga A.; Esapa, Christopher; Ryder, Edward; Carter, Sarah; Stewart, Michelle; Codner, Gemma; Hilton, Helen; Teboul, Lydia; Tucker, Jennifer; Lionikas, Arimantas; Estabel, Jeanne; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K.; Brandner, Sebastian; Plagnol, Vincent; Bennet, David L. H.; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger motifs are distributed amongst many eukaryotic protein families, directing nucleic acid–protein and protein–protein interactions. Zinc finger protein 106 (ZFP106) has previously been associated with roles in immune response, muscle differentiation, testes development and DNA damage, although little is known about its specific function. To further investigate the function of ZFP106, we performed an in-depth characterization of Zfp106 deficient mice (Zfp106−/−), and we report a novel role for ZFP106 in motor and sensory neuronal maintenance and survival. Zfp106−/− mice develop severe motor abnormalities, major deficits in muscle strength and histopathological changes in muscle. Intriguingly, despite being highly expressed throughout the central nervous system, Zfp106−/− mice undergo selective motor and sensory neuronal and axonal degeneration specific to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. Neurodegeneration does not occur during development of Zfp106−/− mice, suggesting that ZFP106 is likely required for the maintenance of mature peripheral motor and sensory neurons. Analysis of embryonic Zfp106−/− motor neurons revealed deficits in mitochondrial function, with an inhibition of Complex I within the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Our results highlight a vital role for ZFP106 in sensory and motor neuron maintenance and reveal a novel player in mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration. PMID:26604141

  18. Drosophila Dachsous and Fat polarize actin-based protrusions over a restricted domain of the embryonic denticle field.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Kynan T; Ly, Daniel C; DiNardo, Stephen

    2013-11-15

    Atypical cadherins Dachsous (Ds) and Fat coordinate the establishment of planar polarity, essential for the patterning of complex tissues and organs. The precise mechanisms by which this system acts, particularly in cases where Ds and Fat act independently of the 'core' frizzled system, are still the subject of investigation. Examining the deployment of the Ds-Fat system in different tissues of the model organism Drosophila, has provided insights into the general mechanisms by which polarity is established and propagated to coordinate outcomes across a field of cells. The Drosophila embryonic epidermis provides a simple model epithelia where the establishment of polarity can be observed from start to finish, and in the absence of proliferation, over a fixed number of cells. Using the asymmetric placement of f-actin during denticle assembly as a read-out of polarity, we examine the requirement for Ds and Fat in establishing polarity across the denticle field. Comparing detailed phenotypic analysis with steady state protein enrichment revealed a spatially restricted requirement for the Ds-Fat system within the posterior denticle field. Ectopic Ds signaling provides evidence for a model whereby Ds acts to asymmetrically enrich Fat in a neighboring cell, in turn polarizing the cell to specify the position of the actin-based protrusions at the cell cortex.

  19. Effects of intermediate filaments on actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Giardini, P A; Theriot, J A

    2001-12-01

    How does subcellular architecture influence the intracellular movements of large organelles and macromolecular assemblies? To investigate the effects of mechanical changes in cytoplasmic structure on intracellular motility, we have characterized the actin-based motility of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in normal mouse fibroblasts and in fibroblasts lacking intermediate filaments. The apparent diffusion coefficient of L. monocytogenes was two-fold greater in vimentin-null fibroblasts than in wild-type fibroblasts, indicating that intermediate filaments significantly restrict the Brownian motion of bacteria. However, the mean speed of L. monocytogenes actin-based motility was statistically identical in vimentin-null and wild-type cells. Thus, environmental drag is not rate limiting for bacterial motility. Analysis of the temporal variations in speed measurements indicated that bacteria in vimentin-null cells displayed larger fluctuations in speed than did trajectories in wild-type cells. Similarly, the presence of the vimentin meshwork influenced the turning behavior of the bacteria; in the vimentin-null cells, bacteria made sharper turns than they did in wild-type cells. Taken together, these results suggest that a network of intermediate filaments constrains bacterial movement and operates over distances of several microns to reduce fluctuations in motile behavior.

  20. Sub-angstrom single-molecule measurements of motor proteins using a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Derrington, Ian M; Craig, Jonathan M; Stava, Eric; Laszlo, Andrew H; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Nova, Ian C; Doering, Kenji; Tickman, Benjamin I; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Mandell, Jeffrey G; Gunderson, Kevin L; Gundlach, Jens H

    2016-01-01

    Present techniques for measuring the motion of single motor proteins, such as FRET and optical tweezers, are limited to a resolution of ~300 pm. We use ion current modulation through the protein nanopore MspA to observe translocation of helicase Hel308 on DNA with up to ~40 picometer sensitivity. This approach should be applicable to any protein that translocates on DNA or RNA, including helicases, polymerases, recombinases and DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26414351

  1. The Dynamics of Microtubule/Motor-Protein Assemblies in Biology and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Many important processes in the cell are mediated by stiff microtubule polymers and the active motor proteins moving on them. This includes the transport of subcellular structures (nuclei, chromosomes, organelles) and the self-assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle. Little is understood of these processes, but they present fascinating problems in fluid-structure interactions. Microtubules and motor proteins are also the building blocks of new biosynthetic active suspensions driven by motor-protein activity. These reduced systems can be probed—and modeled—more easily than can the fully biological ones and demonstrate their own aspects of self-assembly and complex dynamics. I review recent work modeling such systems as fluid-structure interaction problems and as multiscale complex fluids.

  2. Altered motor activity of alternative splice variants of the mammalian kinesin-3 protein KIF1B.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Ruri; Mitsui, Keiji; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Several mammalian kinesin motor proteins exist as multiple isoforms that arise from alternative splicing of a single gene. However, the roles of many motor protein splice variants remain unclear. The kinesin-3 motor protein KIF1B has alternatively spliced isoforms distinguished by the presence or absence of insertion sequences in the conserved amino-terminal region of the protein. The insertions are located in the loop region containing the lysine-rich cluster, also known as the K-loop, and in the hinge region adjacent to the motor domain. To clarify the functions of these alternative splice variants of KIF1B, we examined the biochemical properties of recombinant KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. In a microtubule-dependent ATPase assay, KIF1B variants that contained both insertions had higher activity and affinity for microtubules than KIF1B variants that contained no insertions. Mutational analysis of the K-loop insertion revealed that variants with a longer insertion sequence at this site had higher activity. However, the velocity of movement in motility assays was similar between KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. Our results indicate that splicing isoforms of KIF1B that vary in their insertion sequences have different motor activities.

  3. Single Molecule and Collective Dynamics of Motor Protein Coupled with Mechano-Sensitive Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Marcucci, Lorenzo; Togashi, Yuichi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    Motor proteins such as myosin and kinesin hydrolyze ATP into ADP and Pi to convert chemical energy into mechanical work. This resultsin various motile processes like muscle contraction, vesicle transport and cell division. Recent single molecule experiments have revealed that external load applied to these motor proteins perturb not only the mechanical motion, but the ATP hydrolysis cycle as well, making these molecules mechano-enzymes. Here, we describe our single molecule detection techniques to reveal the mechano-enzymatic properties of myosin and introduce recent progress from both experimental and theoretical approaches at the single- and multiple-molecule level.

  4. Techniques for studying protein trafficking and molecular motors in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shanxi; Arnold, Don B.

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on techniques that facilitate the visualization of protein trafficking. In the mid-1990’s the cloning of GFP allowed fluorescently tagged proteins to be expressed in cells and then visualized in real time. This advance allowed a glimpse, for the first time, of the complex system within cells for distributing proteins. It quickly became apparent, however, that time-lapse sequences of exogenously expressed GFP-labeled proteins can be difficult to interpret. Reasons for this include the relatively low signal that comes from moving proteins and high background rates from stationary proteins and other sources, as well as the difficulty of identifying the origins and destinations of specific vesicular carriers. In this review we will examine a range of techniques that have overcome these issues to varying degrees and discuss the insights into protein trafficking that they have enabled. We will concentrate on neurons, as they are highly polarized and, thus, their trafficking systems tend to be accessible for study. PMID:26800506

  5. Integration of motor proteins - towards an ATP fueled soft actuator.

    PubMed

    Kakugo, Akira; Shikinaka, Kazuhiro; Gong, Jian Ping

    2008-09-01

    We present a soft bio-machine constructed from biological motors (actin/myosin). We have found that chemically cross-linked polymer-actin complex gel filaments can move on myosin coated surfaces with a velocity as high as that of native F-actin, by coupling to ATP hydrolysis. Additionally, it is shown that the velocity of polymer-actin complex gel depends on the species of polycations binding to the F-actins. Since the design of functional actuators of well-defined size and morphology is important, the structural behavior of polymer-actin complexes has been investigated. Our results show that the morphology and growth size of polymer-actin complex can be controlled by changes in the electrostatic interactions between F-actins and polycations. Our results indicate that bio actuators with desired shapes can be created by using a polymer-actin complex. PMID:19325826

  6. Atomic-level Snapshot Catches Protein Motor in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Using a state-of-the-art protein crystallography beamline at Berkeley Labs Advanced Light Source, researchers have captured a critical action shapshot of an enzyme that is vital to the survival of all biological cells.

  7. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  8. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  9. Transport of Motor Proteins along Microtubules: A Study by Optical Trapping Method and Analysis of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Angelique

    The cellular transportation is fundamental for cell function. Under this transportation, organelles bind to motor proteins. These proteins, then move along cellular microfilaments such as microtubules. The optical trapping technique is a method that allows us to monitor the movement of molecular motors along their tracks. In this method, motor proteins are absorbed by micro-sized beads. The beads are captured by the laser and placed close to the microfilaments. Consequently, the motor proteins bind to the track and move along them. This motion can be recorded and analyzed. In this work, we have analyzed many produced trajectories resulted from the motion of a single kinesin along microtubules. We present the design of the experiment, the method of recording and extracting data, as well as the factors that need to be considered to obtain accurate results. Finally, we calculated some of the physical properties resulted from kinesin movement in our experiment. Our outcomes are compatible with previously reported results. I acknowledge the support of NJSGC 2016 during this project. This work was conducted under the supervision of Dr. Mitra Feizabadi.

  10. Active stresses and hydrodynamics of microtubule/motor-protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael

    2014-03-01

    In biologically-inspired soft active materials, chemical energy (typically from ATP) is transduced to generate active stresses arising from reconiguration or forcing of the microstructure. This can lead to novel material organization, mechanical properties, and active flows. While much focus has been on active gels and motile suspensions, another important class are suspensions of microtubules (MTs) crosslinked by motile molecular motors. These are central actors in biological phenomena such as pronuclear transport and spindle formation. Here we develop a multi-scale theory for studying such systems. At the discrete level, we use Brownian dynamics of MTs with moving crosslinks to study microscopic organization and active stress development. We observe, surprisingly, that activity generated extensile stresses arise from both polarity sorting and crosslink relaxation. These simulations estimate polarity-dependent active stress coeffcients in a Doi-Onsager kinetic theory - similar to those developed previously for motile suspensions - that captures polarity sorting and induced hydrodynamic flows. In simulating recent experiments of active flows on immersed surfaces, the model exhibits turbulent-like dynamics, and the continous generation and annihilation of disclination defects associated with coherent flow structures. We can associate the system's coherent features with instabilities of aligned linear and nonlinear states.

  11. GPR55, a G-protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidylinositol, plays a role in motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Jie; Jew, Chris P; Wager-Miller, James; Straiker, Alex; Spencer, Corinne; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance) in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior.

  12. GPR55, a G-Protein Coupled Receptor for Lysophosphatidylinositol, Plays a Role in Motor Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Jie; Jew, Chris P.; Wager-Miller, James; Straiker, Alex; Spencer, Corinne; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance) in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior. PMID:23565223

  13. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  14. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; Jensen, Grant J.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  15. From Zebrafish to Mammal: Functional Evolution of Prestin, the Motor Protein of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L.; Tang, Jie; Okoruwa, Oseremen E.; Zhang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Prestin is the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells. It belongs to a distinct anion transporter family called solute carrier protein 26A, or SLC26A. Members of this family serve two fundamentally distinct functions. Although most members transport different anion substrates across a variety of epithelia, prestin (SLC26A5) is unique, functioning as a voltage-dependent motor protein. Recent evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are electrogenic divalent/chloride anion exchangers/transporters with no motor function. These studies appear to suggest that prestin was evolved from an anion transporter. We examined the motor and transport functions of prestin and its orthologs from four different species in the vertebrate lineage, to gain insights of how these two physiological functions became distinct. Somatic motility, voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (NLC), and transporter function were measured in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells using voltage-clamp and anion uptake techniques. Zebrafish and chicken prestins both exhibited weak NLC, with peaks significantly shifted in the depolarization (right) direction. This was contrasted by robust NLC with peaks left shifted in the platypus and gerbil. The platypus and gerbil prestins retained little transporter function compared with robust anion transport capacities in the zebrafish and chicken orthologs. Somatic motility was detected only in the platypus and gerbil prestins. There appears to be an inverse relationship between NLC and anion transport functions, whereas motor function appears to have emerged only in mammalian prestin. Our results suggest that motor function is an innovation of therian prestin and is concurrent with diminished transporter capabilities. PMID:21047933

  16. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling in vertebrate motor neurons and neuromuscular communication

    PubMed Central

    Osses, Nelson; Henríquez, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    An accurate communication between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers is required for the proper assembly, growth and maintenance of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Several signaling and extracellular matrix molecules play stimulatory and inhibitory roles on the assembly of functional synapses. Studies in Drosophila have revealed crucial functions for early morphogens, such as members of the Wnt and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) signaling pathways, during the assembly and maturation of the NMJ. Here, we bring together recent findings that led us to propose that BMPs also work in vertebrate organisms as diffusible cues to communicate motor neurons and skeletal muscles. PMID:25674047

  17. Molecular shuttles based on motor proteins: active transport in synthetic environments.

    PubMed

    Hess, H; Vogel, V

    2001-11-01

    Active transport in cells, utilizing molecular motors like kinesin and myosin, provides the inspiration for the integration of active transport into synthetic devices. Hybrid devices, employing motor proteins in a synthetic environment, are the first prototypes of molecular shuttles. Here the basic characteristics of motor proteins are discussed from an engineering point of view, and the experiments aimed at incorporating motor proteins, such as myosins and kinesins, into devices are reviewed. The key problems for the construction of a molecular shuttle are: guiding the direction of motion, controlling the speed, and loading and unloading of cargo. Various techniques, relying on surface topography and chemistry as well as flow fields and electric fields, have been developed to guide the movement of molecular shuttles on surfaces. The control of ATP concentration, acting as a fuel supply, can serve as a means to control the speed of movement. The loading process requires the coupling of cargo to the shuttle, ideally by a strong and specific link. Applications of molecular shuttles can be envisioned, e.g. in the field of nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS), where scaling laws favor active transport over fluid flow, and in the bottom-up assembly of novel materials.

  18. Mapping the Geometric Evolution of Protein Folding Motor

    PubMed Central

    Hazam, Prakash Kishore; Shekhar, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide chain has an invariant main-chain and a variant side-chain sequence. How the side-chain sequence determines fold in terms of its chemical constitution has been scrutinized extensively and verified periodically. However, a focussed investigation on the directive effect of side-chain geometry may provide important insights supplementing existing algorithms in mapping the geometrical evolution of protein chains and its structural preferences. Geometrically, folding of protein structure may be envisaged as the evolution of its geometric variables: ϕ, and ψ dihedral angles of polypeptide main-chain directed by χ1, and χ2 of side chain. In this work, protein molecule is metaphorically modelled as a machine with 4 rotors ϕ, ψ, χ1 and χ2, with its evolution to the functional fold is directed by combinations of its rotor directions. We observe that differential rotor motions lead to different secondary structure formations and the combinatorial pattern is unique and consistent for particular secondary structure type. Further, we found that combination of rotor geometries of each amino acid is unique which partly explains how different amino acid sequence combinations have unique structural evolution and functional adaptation. Quantification of these amino acid rotor preferences, resulted in the generation of 3 substitution matrices, which later on plugged in the BLAST tool, for evaluating their efficiency in aligning sequences. We have employed BLOSUM62 and PAM30 as standard for primary evaluation. Generation of substitution matrices is a logical extension of the conceptual framework we attempted to build during the development of this work. Optimization of matrices following the conventional routines and possible application with biologically relevant data sets are beyond the scope of this manuscript, though it is a part of the larger project design. PMID:27716851

  19. Alterations in cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (CDK5) protein levels, activity and immunocytochemistry in canine motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Green, S L; Vulliet, P R; Pinter, M J; Cork, L C

    1998-11-01

    Hereditary canine spinal muscular atrophy (HCSMA) is a dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in Brittany spaniels that is clinically characterized by progressive muscle weakness leading to paralysis. Histopathologically, degeneration is confined to motor neurons with accumulation of phosphorylated neurofilaments in axonal internodes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a kinase related to the cell cycle kinase cdc2, phosphorylates neurofilaments and regulates neurofilament dynamics. We examined CDK5 activity, protein levels, and cellular immunoreactivity in nervous tissue from dogs with HCSMA, from closely age-matched controls and from dogs with other neurological diseases. On immunoblot analysis, CDK5 protein levels were increased in the HCSMA dogs (by approximately 1.5-fold in both the cytosolic and the particulate fractions). CDK5 activity was significantly increased (by approximately 3-fold) in the particulate fractions in the HCSMA dogs compared to all controls. The finding that CDK5 activity was increased in the young HCSMA homozygotes with the accelerated form of the disease, who do not show axonal swellings histologically, suggests that alterations in CDK5 occurs early in the pathogenesis, prior to the development of significant neurofilament pathology. Immunocytochemically, there was strong CDK5 staining of the nuclei, cytoplasm and axonal processes of the motor neurons in both control dogs and dogs with HCSMA. Further immunocytochemical studies demonstrated CDK5 staining where neurofilaments accumulated, in axonal swellings in the dogs with HCSMA. Our observations suggest phosphorylation-dependent events mediated by CDK5 occur in canine motor neuron disease.

  20. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patient iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons Have Reduced Expression of Proteins Important in Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Heidi R.; Mandefro, Berhan; Shirran, Sally L.; Gross, Andrew R.; Kaus, Anjoscha S.; Botting, Catherine H.; Morris, Glenn E.; Sareen, Dhruv

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disease primarily characterized by degeneration of spinal motor neurons, and caused by reduced levels of the SMN protein. Previous studies to understand the proteomic consequences of reduced SMN have mostly utilized patient fibroblasts and animal models. We have derived human motor neurons from type I SMA and healthy controls by creating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Quantitative mass spectrometry of these cells revealed increased expression of 63 proteins in control motor neurons compared to respective fibroblasts, whereas 30 proteins were increased in SMA motor neurons vs. their fibroblasts. Notably, UBA1 was significantly decreased in SMA motor neurons, supporting evidence for ubiquitin pathway defects. Subcellular distribution of UBA1 was predominantly cytoplasmic in SMA motor neurons in contrast to nuclear in control motor neurons; suggestive of neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Many of the proteins that were decreased in SMA motor neurons, including beta III-tubulin and UCHL1, were associated with neurodevelopment and differentiation. These neuron-specific consequences of SMN depletion were not evident in fibroblasts, highlighting the importance of iPSC technology. The proteomic profiles identified here provide a useful resource to explore the molecular consequences of reduced SMN in motor neurons, and for the identification of novel biomarker and therapeutic targets for SMA. PMID:26793058

  1. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  2. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Yochelis, A.; Ebrahim, S.; Millis, B.; Cui, R.; Kachar, B.; Naoz, M.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  3. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Yochelis, A; Ebrahim, S; Millis, B; Cui, R; Kachar, B; Naoz, M; Gov, N S

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  4. A stochastic analysis of a Brownian ratchet model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong

    2004-12-01

    In recent single-particle tracking (SPT) measurements on Listeria monocytogenes motility in cells [Kuo and McGrath (2000)], the actin-based stochastic dynamics of the bacterium movement has been analyzed statistically in terms of the mean-square displacement (MSD) of the trajectory. We present a stochastic analysis of a simplified polymerization Brownian ratchet (BR) model in which motions are limited by the bacterium movement. Analytical results are obtained and statistical data analyses are investigated. It is shown that the MSD of the stochastic bacterium movement is a monotonic quadratic function while the MSD for detrended trajectories is linear. Both the short-time relaxation and the long-time kinetics in terms the mean velocity and effective diffusion constant of the propelled bacterium are obtained from the MSD analysis. The MSD of the gap between actin tip and the bacterium exhibits an oscillatory behavior when there is a large resistant force from the bacterium. For comparison, a continuous diffusion formalism of the BR model with great analytical simplicity is also studied.

  5. Spontaneous symmetry breaking for geometrical trajectories of actin-based motility in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Actin-based motility is important for many cellular processes. In this article we extend our previous studies of an actin-propelled circular disk in two dimensions to an actin-propelled spherical bead in three dimensions. We find that for an achiral load the couplings between the motion of the load and the actin network induce a series of bifurcations, starting with a transition from rest to moving state, followed by a transition from straight to planar curves, and finally a further transition from motion in a plane to one with torsion. To address the intriguing, experimentally observed chiral motility of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we also study the motility of a spherical load with a built-in chirality. For such a chiral load, stable circular trajectories are no longer found in numerical simulations. Instead, helical trajectories with handedness that depends on the chirality of the load are found. Our results reveal the relation between the symmetry of actin network and the trajectories of actin-propelled loads.

  6. Spontaneous symmetry breaking for geometrical trajectories of actin-based motility in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-Tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Actin-based motility is important for many cellular processes. In this article we extend our previous studies of an actin-propelled circular disk in two dimensions to an actin-propelled spherical bead in three dimensions. We find that for an achiral load the couplings between the motion of the load and the actin network induce a series of bifurcations, starting with a transition from rest to moving state, followed by a transition from straight to planar curves, and finally a further transition from motion in a plane to one with torsion. To address the intriguing, experimentally observed chiral motility of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we also study the motility of a spherical load with a built-in chirality. For such a chiral load, stable circular trajectories are no longer found in numerical simulations. Instead, helical trajectories with handedness that depends on the chirality of the load are found. Our results reveal the relation between the symmetry of actin network and the trajectories of actin-propelled loads. PMID:27575158

  7. Stable Expression of the Motor Protein Prestin in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Koji; Konno, Kazuaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kumagai, Izumi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Wada, Hiroshi

    Mammalian hearing sensitivity relies on a mechanical amplification mechanism involving the outer hair cells (OHCs), which rapidly alter their longitudinal length in response to changes in their membrane potential. The molecular basis of this mechanism is thought to be a motor protein embedded in the lateral membrane of the OHCs. Recently, this motor protein was identified and termed prestin. Since then, prestin has been researched intensively to elucidate the behavior of the OHCs. However, little progress in the study of prestin at the molecular level has been made because no method of obtaining an adequate amount of prestin has been established. In this study, therefore, an attempt was made to construct a stable expression system of prestin using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The expression of prestin in the transfected CHO cells and the activity of prestin on CHO cells were confirmed by immunofluorescence and whole-cell patch-clamp measurements, respectively.

  8. Ultra-fast force-clamp laser trapping of single molecular motors and DNA binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-09-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  9. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (Crmp2) Regulates Trafficking by Linking Endocytic Regulatory Proteins to Dynein Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Rahajeng, Juliati; Giridharan, Sai S. P.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis is a conserved cellular process in which nutrients, lipids, and receptors are internalized and transported to early endosomes, where they are sorted and either channeled to degradative pathways or recycled to the plasma membrane. MICAL-L1 and EHD1 are important regulatory proteins that control key endocytic transport steps. However, the precise mechanisms by which they mediate transport, and particularly the mode by which they connect to motor proteins, have remained enigmatic. Here we have identified the collapsin response mediator protein-2 (Crmp2) as an interaction partner of MICAL-L1 in non-neuronal cells. Crmp2 interacts with tubulin dimers and kinesin and negatively regulates dynein-based transport in neuronal cells, but its expression and function in non-neuronal cells have remained poorly characterized. Upon Crmp2 depletion, we observed dramatic relocalization of internalized transferrin (Tf) from peripheral vesicles to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), similar to the effect of depleting either MICAL-L1 or EHD1. Moreover, Tf relocalization to the ERC could be inhibited by interfering with microtubule polymerization, consistent with a role for uncoupled motor protein-based transport upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. Finally, transfection of dynamitin, a component of the dynactin complex whose overexpression inhibits dynein activity, prevented the relocalization of internalized Tf to the ERC upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. These data provide the first trafficking regulatory role for Crmp2 in non-neuronal cells and support a model in which Crmp2 is an important endocytic regulatory protein that links MICAL-L1·EHD1-based vesicular transport to dynein motors. PMID:20801876

  10. Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mijalkovic, Jona; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inside the cell, vital processes such as cell division and intracellular transport are driven by the concerted action of different molecular motor proteins. In C. elegans chemosensory cilia, 2 kinesin-2 family motor proteins, kinesin-II and OSM-3, team up to drive intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the anterograde direction, from base to tip, whereas IFT dynein hitchhikes toward the tip and subsequently drives IFT in the opposite, retrograde direction, thereby recycling both kinesins. While it is evident that at least a retrograde and an anterograde motor are necessary to drive IFT, it has remained puzzling why 2 same-polarity kinesins are employed. Recently, we addressed this question by combining advanced genome-engineering tools with ultrasensitive, quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study IFT with single-molecule sensitivity.1,2 Using this combination of approaches, we uncovered a differentiation in kinesin-2 function, in which the slower kinesin-II operates as an ‘importer’, loading IFT trains into the cilium before gradually handing them over to the faster OSM-3. OSM-3 subsequently acts as a long-range ‘transporter’, driving the IFT trains toward the tip. The two kinesin-2 motors combine their unique motility properties to achieve something neither motor can achieve on its own; that is to optimize the amount of cargo inside the cilium. In this commentary, we provide detailed insight into the rationale behind our research approach and comment on our recent findings. Moreover, we discuss the role of IFT dynein and provide an outlook on future studies. PMID:27384150

  11. Spinal atypical protein kinase C activity is necessary to stabilize inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Strey, Kristi A; Nichols, Nicole L; Baertsch, Nathan A; Broytman, Oleg; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2012-11-14

    The neural network controlling breathing must establish rhythmic motor output at a level adequate to sustain life. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a novel form of plasticity in circuits driving the diaphragm known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF), a rebound increase in phrenic inspiratory output observed once respiratory neural drive is restored. The mechanisms underlying iPMF are unknown. Here, we demonstrate in anesthetized rats that spinal mechanisms give rise to iPMF and that iPMF consists of at least two mechanistically distinct phases: (1) an early, labile phase that requires atypical PKC (PKCζ and/or PKCι/λ) activity to transition to a (2) late, stable phase. Early (but not late) iPMF is associated with increased interactions between PKCζ/ι and the scaffolding protein ZIP (PKCζ-interacting protein)/p62 in spinal regions associated with the phrenic motor pool. Although PKCζ/ι activity is necessary for iPMF, spinal atypical PKC activity is not necessary for phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia, an activity-independent form of spinal respiratory plasticity. Thus, while iPMF and pLTF both manifest as prolonged increases in phrenic burst amplitude, they arise from distinct spinal cellular pathways. Our data are consistent with the hypotheses that (1) local mechanisms sense and respond to reduced respiratory-related activity in the phrenic motor pool and (2) inactivity-induced increases in phrenic inspiratory output require local PKCζ/ι activity to stabilize into a long-lasting iPMF. Although the physiological role of iPMF is unknown, we suspect that iPMF represents a compensatory mechanism, assuring adequate motor output in a physiological system in which prolonged inactivity ends life. PMID:23152633

  12. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  13. The intricate relationship between microtubules and their associated motor proteins during axon growth and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The hallmarks of neurons are their slender axons which represent the longest cellular processes of animals and which act as the cables that electrically wire the brain, and the brain to the body. Axons extend along reproducible paths during development and regeneration, and they have to be maintained for the lifetime of an organism. Both axon extension and maintenance essentially depend on the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton. For this, MTs organize into parallel bundles that are established through extension at the leading axon tips within growth cones, and these bundles then form the architectural backbones, as well as the highways for axonal transport essential for supply and intracellular communication. Axon transport over these enormous distances takes days or even weeks and is a substantial logistical challenge. It is performed by kinesins and dynein/dynactin, which are molecular motors that form close functional links to the MTs they walk along. The intricate machinery which regulates MT dynamics, axonal transport and the motors is essential for nervous system development and function, and its investigation has huge potential to bring urgently required progress in understanding the causes of many developmental and degenerative brain disorders. During the last years new explanations for the highly specific properties of axonal MTs and for their close functional links to motor proteins have emerged, and it has become increasingly clear that motors play active roles also in regulating axonal MT networks. Here, I will provide an overview of these new developments. PMID:24010872

  14. UCS protein Rng3p is essential for myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; James, Michael L; Pollard, Luther W; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors.

  15. Interaction of survival of motor neuron (SMN) and HuD proteins with mRNA cpg15 rescues motor neuron axonal deficits.

    PubMed

    Akten, Bikem; Kye, Min Jeong; Hao, Le T; Wertz, Mary H; Singh, Sasha; Nie, Duyu; Huang, Jia; Merianda, Tanuja T; Twiss, Jeffery L; Beattie, Christine E; Steen, Judith A J; Sahin, Mustafa

    2011-06-21

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), caused by the deletion of the SMN1 gene, is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. SMN protein is present at high levels in both axons and growth cones, and loss of its function disrupts axonal extension and pathfinding. SMN is known to associate with the RNA-binding protein hnRNP-R, and together they are responsible for the transport and/or local translation of β-actin mRNA in the growth cones of motor neurons. However, the full complement of SMN-interacting proteins in neurons remains unknown. Here we used mass spectrometry to identify HuD as a novel neuronal SMN-interacting partner. HuD is a neuron-specific RNA-binding protein that interacts with mRNAs, including candidate plasticity-related gene 15 (cpg15). We show that SMN and HuD form a complex in spinal motor axons, and that both interact with cpg15 mRNA in neurons. CPG15 is highly expressed in the developing ventral spinal cord and can promote motor axon branching and neuromuscular synapse formation, suggesting a crucial role in the development of motor axons and neuromuscular junctions. Cpg15 mRNA previously has been shown to localize into axonal processes. Here we show that SMN deficiency reduces cpg15 mRNA levels in neurons, and, more importantly, cpg15 overexpression partially rescues the SMN-deficiency phenotype in zebrafish. Our results provide insight into the function of SMN protein in axons and also identify potential targets for the study of mechanisms that lead to the SMA pathology and related neuromuscular diseases. PMID:21652774

  16. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika; Allingham, John S.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  17. Translocation of double-stranded DNA through membrane-adapted phi29 motor protein nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, David; Jing, Peng; Geng, Jia; Subramaniam, Varuni; Lee, Tae Jin; Montemagno, Carlo; Guo, Peixuan

    2009-11-01

    Biological pores have been used to study the transport of DNA and other molecules, but most pores have channels that allow only the movement of small molecules and single-stranded DNA and RNA. The bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging motor, which allows double-stranded DNA to enter the virus during maturation and exit during an infection, contains a connector protein with a channel that is between 3.6 and 6 nm wide. Here we show that a modified version of this connector protein, when reconstituted into liposomes and inserted into planar lipid bilayers, allows the translocation of double-stranded DNA. The measured conductance of a single connector channel was 4.8 nS in 1 M KCl. This engineered and membrane-adapted phage connector is expected to have applications in microelectromechanical sensing, microreactors, gene delivery, drug loading and DNA sequencing.

  18. Timing of inorganic phosphate release modulates the catalytic activity of ATP-driven rotary motor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    F1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein driven by ATP hydrolysis. The rotary motion of F1-ATPase is tightly coupled to catalysis, in which the catalytic sites strictly obey the reaction sequences at the resolution of elementary reaction steps. This fine coordination of the reaction scheme is thought to be important to achieve extremely high chemomechanical coupling efficiency and reversibility, which is the prominent feature of F1-ATPase among molecular motor proteins. In this study, we intentionally change the reaction scheme by using single-molecule manipulation, and we examine the resulting effect on the rotary motion of F1-ATPase. When the sequence of the products released, that is, ADP and inorganic phosphate, is switched, we find that F1 frequently stops rotating for a long time, which corresponds to inactivation of catalysis. This inactive state presents MgADP inhibition, and thus, we find that an improper reaction sequence of F1-ATPase catalysis induces MgADP inhibition.

  19. Timing of inorganic phosphate release modulates the catalytic activity of ATP-driven rotary motor protein.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    F1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein driven by ATP hydrolysis. The rotary motion of F1-ATPase is tightly coupled to catalysis, in which the catalytic sites strictly obey the reaction sequences at the resolution of elementary reaction steps. This fine coordination of the reaction scheme is thought to be important to achieve extremely high chemomechanical coupling efficiency and reversibility, which is the prominent feature of F1-ATPase among molecular motor proteins. In this study, we intentionally change the reaction scheme by using single-molecule manipulation, and we examine the resulting effect on the rotary motion of F1-ATPase. When the sequence of the products released, that is, ADP and inorganic phosphate, is switched, we find that F1 frequently stops rotating for a long time, which corresponds to inactivation of catalysis. This inactive state presents MgADP inhibition, and thus, we find that an improper reaction sequence of F1-ATPase catalysis induces MgADP inhibition.

  20. Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein is required for normal mouse liver development

    PubMed Central

    Szunyogova, Eva; Zhou, Haiyan; Maxwell, Gillian K.; Powis, Rachael A.; Francesco, Muntoni; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Parson, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Decreased levels of, cell-ubiquitous, SMN protein is associated with a range of systemic pathologies reported in severe patients. Despite high levels of SMN protein in normal liver, there is no comprehensive study of liver pathology in SMA. We describe failed liver development in response to reduced SMN levels, in a mouse model of severe SMA. The SMA liver is dark red, small and has: iron deposition; immature sinusoids congested with blood; persistent erythropoietic elements and increased immature red blood cells; increased and persistent megakaryocytes which release high levels of platelets found as clot-like accumulations in the heart. Myelopoiesis in contrast, was unaffected. Further analysis revealed significant molecular changes in SMA liver, consistent with the morphological findings. Antisense treatment from birth with PMO25, increased lifespan and ameliorated all morphological defects in liver by postnatal day 21. Defects in the liver are evident at birth, prior to motor system pathology, and impair essential liver function in SMA. Liver is a key recipient of SMA therapies, and systemically delivered antisense treatment, completely rescued liver pathology. Liver therefore, represents an important therapeutic target in SMA. PMID:27698380

  1. Interaction of brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (BIG) 1 and kinesin motor protein KIF21A

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyan; Meza-Carmen, Victor; Puxeddu, Ermanno; Wang, Guanghui; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (BIG) 1 activates human ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 and 3 by accelerating the replacement of ARF-bound GDP with GTP to initiate recruitment of coat proteins for membrane vesicle formation. Liquid chromatography MS/MS analysis of peptides from proteins that co-precipitated with BIG1 antibodies identified “kinesin family member 21A” (KIF21A), a plus-end-directed motor protein that moves cargo on microtubules away from the microtubule-organizing center. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation (IP) of endogenous proteins and microscopically apparent overlap of immunoreactive BIG1 with overexpressed GFP-KIF21A in the perinuclear region were consistent with an interaction of KIF21A–BIG1. Overexpression of full-length KIF21A and BIG1 and their fragments in HEK293 cells followed by reciprocal IP revealed that the C-terminal tail of KIF21A, with seven WD-40 repeats, may interact with structure in the C-terminal region of BIG1. Interfering with cyclic activation and inactivation of ARF1 by overexpressing constitutively active ARF1(Q71L) or dominant inactive ARF1(T31N) altered the distribution of BIG1 as well as its interaction with KIF21A. A requirement for ARF1 was confirmed by its selective depletion with siRNA. Unlike disruption of microtubules with nocodazole, selective inhibition of transport by depletion of KIF21A with specific siRNA altered BIG1 distribution without changing that of intrinsic Golgi membrane proteins. These newly recognized interactions of BIG1 and KIF21A should enable us to understand better the mechanisms through which, acting together, they may integrate local events in membrane trafficking with longer-range transport processes and to relate those processes to the diverse signaling and scaffold functions of BIG1. PMID:19020088

  2. Motor protein and microtubule mechanics: Application of a novel high-resolution optical trapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allersma, Miriam W.

    Using optical tweezers and a novel detection technique (a quadrant photodiode at the back focal plane or, BFP-QD), this thesis investigates two problems in biophysics, ncd motility and microtubule flexural rigidity. We use optically trapped microspheres to probe the samples. The technique detects the displacements of the microspheres relative to the trap center by monitoring the laser intensity shifts in the back focal plane of the microscope condenser. We use a quadrant diode to detect the shifts, which are due to far-field interference between the trapping laser and scattered laser light from the trapped object. The method yields high-resolution (nm-spatial and μsec-temporal), two-dimensional data, which is largely independent of trap position in the field of view. We first studied the motility of ncd, a kinesin-related motor protein. Motor proteins are able to harness the energy of ATP hydrolysis to perform mechanical work for the cell. Many ncd molecules were adsorbed onto silica microspheres and their motions along the microtubule surface lattice were observed with the BFP-QD method. Since the method is two-dimensional, we were able to monitor axial and lateral motions simultaneously. The average axial velocity was 230 +/- 30 nm/sec (average +/- SD). The high temporal resolution allowed us to investigate dynamical parameters. Spectral analysis showed an increase in viscous drag near the surface for ncd-driven microspheres. In addition, we found that the binding of the motors to microtubules in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable nucleotide adenylylimidodiphosphate caused an increase in the motor elastic constraint. Using a dual optical trap configuration in conjunction with the BFP-QD, we also investigated the elastic properties of taxol-stabilized microtubules. Cytoskeletal filaments are responsible for myriad structural cell functions. Our results were not readily interpreted by a standard bent strut treatment because of the finite size of the microspheres

  3. Cell to cell spreading of misfolded proteins as a therapeutic target in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Livia; Lenzi, Paola; Biagioni, Francesca; Siciliano, Gabriele; Fornai, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of genetic mutations and molecular mechanisms are recognized to participate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), such a devastating neurological disorder still lacks a substantial cure. The present manuscript rather than a general overview of potential therapeutic approaches focuses on novel research findings detailing novel molecular mechanisms which appear to be promising for developing future ALS therapeutics. A special emphasis is given to the abnormal autophagy status and to those autophagy substrates which aggregate in the form of misfolded proteins. In fact, as reviewed in the first part of the manuscript, altered autophagy pathway is present in most genetic mutations responsible for familial ALS. These mutations impair clearance of autophagy substrates, which determines accumulation of giant altered mitochondria and misfolded proteins. Therefore, a considerable piece of the review is dedicated to unconventional processing of misfolded proteins leading to unconventional protein secretions which may underlie a prionoid cellto- cell spreading of ALS neuropathology. The intimate mechanisms regulating these steps are analyzed in order to comprehend which potential therapeutic targets might be considered in future studies. At the same time, negative findings concerning recent trials are explained in light of novel disease mechanisms. In the final part of the review the replacement therapy with focal stem cells implantation is discussed in relationship with toxic mechanisms operating in the intercellular space of the spinal cord and motor-related areas. PMID:24934358

  4. Calcium dysregulation links ALS defective proteins and motor neuron selective vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Sónia S.; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 distinct gene loci have so far been implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration of motor neurons (MN) and death. Most of this distinct set of ALS-related proteins undergoes toxic deposition specifically in MN for reasons which remain unclear. Here we overview a recent body of evidence indicative that mutations in ALS-related proteins can disrupt fundamental Ca2+ signalling pathways in MN, and that Ca2+ itself impacts both directly or indirectly in many ALS critical proteins and cellular processes that result in MN neurodegeneration. We argue that the inherent vulnerability of MN to dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ is deeply associated with discriminating pathogenicity and aberrant crosstalk of most of the critical proteins involved in ALS. Overall, Ca2+ deregulation in MN is at the cornerstone of different ALS processes and is likely one of the factors contributing to the selective susceptibility of these cells to this particular neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26136661

  5. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Ryan M.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Pereira, Fred A.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- an C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity. PMID:21651892

  6. A novel nuclear structure containing the survival of motor neurons protein.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q; Dreyfuss, G

    1996-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common, often fatal, autosomal recessive disease leading to progressive muscle wasting and paralysis as a result of degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. A gene termed survival of motor neurons (SMN), at 5q13, has been identified as the determining gene of SMA (Lefebvre et al., 1995). The SMN gene is deleted in > 98% of SMA patients, but the function of the SMN protein is unknown. In searching for hnRNP-interacting proteins we found that SMN interacts with the RGG box region of hnRNP U, with itself, with fibrillarin and with several novel proteins. We have produced monoclonal antibodies to the SMN protein, and we report here on its striking cellular localization pattern. Immunolocalization studies using SMN monoclonal antibodies show several intense dots in HeLa cell nuclei. These structures are similar in number (2-6) and size (0.1-1.0 micron) to coiled bodies, and frequently are found near or associated with coiled bodies. We term these prominent nuclear structures gems, for Gemini of coiled bodies. Images PMID:8670859

  7. The kinesin related motor protein, Eg5, is essential for maintenance of pre-implantation embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, Andrew; Justice, Monica J. . E-mail: mjustice@bcm.tmc.edu

    2007-06-08

    Eg5 is a plus end directed kinesin related motor protein (KRP) previously shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. KRPs are molecular motors capable of generating forces upon microtubules (MTs) in dividing cells and driving structural rearrangements necessary in the developing spindle. In vitro experiments demonstrate that loss of Eg5 results in cell cycle arrest and defective centrosome separation resulting in the development of monopolar spindles. Here we describe mice with a genetrap insertion in Eg5. Heterozygous mutant mice appear phenotypically normal. In contrast, embryos homozygous for the Eg5 null allele recovered at embryonic days 2.5-3.5 display signs of a proliferation defect as reduced cell numbers and failure of compaction and progression to the blastocyst stage was observed. These data, in conjunction with previous in vitro data, suggest that loss of Eg5 results in abnormal spindle structure, cell cycle arrest and thereby reduced cell proliferation of early cleavage pre-implantation embryos. These observations further support the conclusion that Eg5 is essential for cell division early in mouse development, and that maternal contribution may sustain the embryo through the maternal to zygotic transition at which point supplies of functional Eg5 are exhausted, preventing further cell cleavage.

  8. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes.

  9. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes. PMID:26341555

  10. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  11. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes. PMID:26341555

  12. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science.

  13. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  14. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) "torque" helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could be

  15. Transport and self-organization across different length scales powered by motor proteins and programmed by DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Adam J. M.; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Carstairs, Helen M. J.; Cross, Robert A.; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, cargo is transported on self-organized networks of microtubule trackways by kinesin and dynein motor proteins. Synthetic microtubule networks have previously been assembled in vitro, and microtubules have been used as shuttles to carry cargoes on lithographically defined tracks consisting of surface-bound kinesin motors. Here, we show that molecular signals can be used to program both the architecture and the operation of a self-organized transport system that is based on kinesin and microtubules and spans three orders of magnitude in length scale. A single motor protein, dimeric kinesin-1, is conjugated to various DNA nanostructures to accomplish different tasks. Instructions encoded into the DNA sequences are used to direct the assembly of a polar array of microtubules and can be used to control the loading, active concentration and unloading of cargo on this track network, or to trigger the disassembly of the network.

  16. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Drew L; Bergen, Jamie M; Johnson, Russell N; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M; Horner, Philip J; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-03-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics.

  17. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Drew L.; Bergen, Jamie M.; Johnson, Russell N.; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M.; Horner, Philip J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26888285

  18. Fascin 2b Is a Component of Stereocilia that Lengthens Actin-Based Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Gustavo; Fernando, Carol A.; West, Megan C.; Pollock, Lana M.; Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Burnside, Beth; McDermott, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Stereocilia are actin-filled protrusions that permit mechanotransduction in the internal ear. To identify proteins that organize the cytoskeleton of stereocilia, we scrutinized the hair-cell transcriptome of zebrafish. One promising candidate encodes fascin 2b, a filamentous actin-bundling protein found in retinal photoreceptors. Immunolabeling of zebrafish hair cells and the use of transgenic zebrafish that expressed fascin 2b fused to green fluorescent protein demonstrated that fascin 2b localized to stereocilia specifically. When filamentous actin and recombinant fusion protein containing fascin 2b were combined in vitro to determine their dissociation constant, a Kd≈0.37 µM was observed. Electron microscopy showed that fascin 2b-actin filament complexes formed parallel actin bundles in vitro. We demonstrated that expression of fascin 2b or espin, another actin-bundling protein, in COS-7 cells induced the formation of long filopodia. Coexpression showed synergism between these proteins through the formation of extra-long protrusions. Using phosphomutant fascin 2b proteins, which mimicked either a phosphorylated or a nonphosphorylated state, in COS-7 cells and in transgenic hair cells, we showed that both formation of long filopodia and localization of fascin 2b to stereocilia were dependent on serine 38. Overexpression of wild-type fascin 2b in hair cells was correlated with increased stereociliary length relative to controls. These findings indicate that fascin 2b plays a key role in shaping stereocilia. PMID:21625653

  19. Functional Mapping of Protein Kinase A Reveals Its Importance in Adult Schistosoma mansoni Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    de Saram, Paulu S. R.; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and ‘smart’ anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology

  20. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Ryan M.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Pereira, Fred A.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Trafficking to the plasma membrane is required for prestin function. {yields} Biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) was fused to prestin through a transmembrane domain. {yields} BAP-prestin can be metabolically labeled with biotin in HEK293 cells. {yields} Biotin-BAP-prestin allows for selective imaging of fully trafficked prestin. {yields} The biotin-BAP-prestin displays voltage-sensitive activity. -- Abstract: Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity.

  1. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  2. Importance of anisotropy in detachment rates for force production and cargo transport by a team of motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Takshak, Anjneya; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-05-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by collective forces generated by a team consisting of multiple molecular motor proteins. One aspect that has received less attention is the detachment rate of molecular motors under mechanical force/load. While detachment rate of kinesin motors measured under backward force increases rapidly for forces beyond stall-force; this scenario is just reversed for non-yeast dynein motors where detachment rate from microtubule decreases, exhibiting a catch-bond type behavior. It has been shown recently that yeast dynein responds anisotropically to applied load, i.e. detachment rates are different under forward and backward pulling. Here, we use computational modeling to show that these anisotropic detachment rates might help yeast dynein motors to improve their collective force generation in the absence of catch-bond behavior. We further show that the travel distance of cargos would be longer if detachment rates are anisotropic. Our results suggest that anisotropic detachment rates could be an alternative strategy for motors to improve the transport properties and force production by the team. PMID:26890030

  3. Effects of Mutation in the Conserved GTSRH Sequence of the Motor Protein Prestin on Its Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Shun; Iida, Koji; Murakoshi, Michio; Naito, Naoyuki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kumagai, Izumi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Wada, Hiroshi

    Prestin is a motor protein responsible for the outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility which amplifies the vibration of the organ of Corti in the inner ear. Identification of the functional significance of particular amino acids is necessary to characterize prestin. In this study, an attempt was made to clarify the role of the GTSRH sequence at positions 127-131 in prestin conserved in six proteins of the solute carrier (SLC) 26 family of which prestin is a member. To elucidate what role that sequence plays in the characteristics of prestin, mutations were introduced into the sequence and the characteristics of the constructed point mutants were investigated by Western blotting, immunofluorescence experiments and the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The localization of T128A was altered, the anion transport function of H131A and that of S129T were lost and such functions of G127A, T128A, S129A and R130A declined. These results suggest that the GTSRH sequence plays an important role in the localization of prestin, as well as in its anion transport function.

  4. Two protein trafficking processes at motor nerve endings unveiled by botulinum neurotoxin E.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary; Wang, Jiafu; Chion, C K N Kwo; Aoki, K Roger; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The unique ability of a family of botulinum neurotoxins to block neuroexocytosis specifically-by selective interaction with peripheral cholinergic nerve endings, endocytotic uptake, translocation to the cytosol, and enzymic cleavage of essential proteins-underlies their increasing therapeutic applications. Although clinical use of type A is most widespread due to its prolonged inactivation of the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, botulinum neurotoxin E cleaves this same target but at a different bond and exhibits faster onset of neuromuscular paralysis. Herein, insights were gained into the different dynamics of action of types A and E toxins, which could help in designing variants with new pharmacological profiles. Natural and recombinant type E dichain forms showed similar proteolytic and neuromuscular paralytic activities. The neuroparalysis induced by type E toxin was accelerated between 21 and 35 degrees C and attenuated by bafilomycin A1. Temperature elevation also revealed an unanticipated bipartite dose response indicative of two distinct internalization processes, one being independent of temperature and the other dependent. Although elevating the temperature also hastened intoxication by type A, a second uptake mechanism was not evident. Increasing the frequency of nerve stimulation raised the uptake of type E via both processes, but the enhanced trafficking through the temperature-dependent pathway was only seen at 35 degrees C. These novel observations reveal that two membrane retrieval mechanisms are operative at motor nerve terminals which type E toxin exploits to gain entry via an acidification-dependent step, whereas A uses only one.

  5. Baseline Plasma C-Reactive Protein Concentrations and Motor Prognosis in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Atsushi; Oeda, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a blood inflammatory biomarker, is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease. In animal models of Parkinson disease (PD), systemic inflammatory stimuli can promote neuroinflammation and accelerate dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the association between long-term systemic inflammations and neurodegeneration has not been assessed in PD patients. Objective To investigate the longitudinal effects of baseline CRP concentrations on motor prognosis in PD. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective analysis of 375 patients (mean age, 69.3 years; mean PD duration, 6.6 years). Plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP were measured in the absence of infections, and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) scores were measured at five follow-up intervals (Days 1–90, 91–270, 271–450, 451–630, and 631–900). Main Outcome Measure Change of UPDRS-III scores from baseline to each of the five follow-up periods. Results Change in UPDRS-III scores was significantly greater in PD patients with CRP concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L than in those with CRP concentrations <0.7 mg/L, as determined by a generalized estimation equation model (P = 0.021) for the entire follow-up period and by a generalized regression model (P = 0.030) for the last follow-up interval (Days 631–900). The regression coefficients of baseline CRP for the two periods were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21–2.61) and 2.62 (95% CI 0.25–4.98), respectively, after adjusting for sex, age, baseline UPDRS-III score, dementia, and incremental L-dopa equivalent dose. Conclusion Baseline plasma CRP levels were associated with motor deterioration and predicted motor prognosis in patients with PD. These associations were independent of sex, age, PD severity, dementia, and anti-Parkinsonian agents, suggesting that subclinical systemic inflammations could accelerate neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:26308525

  6. Variants of the elongator protein 3 (ELP3) gene are associated with motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Claire L; Lemmens, Robin; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Broom, Wendy J; Hansen, Valerie K; van Vught, Paul W J; Landers, John E; Sapp, Peter; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Knight, Joanne; Neale, Benjamin M; Turner, Martin R; Veldink, Jan H; Ophoff, Roel A; Tripathi, Vineeta B; Beleza, Ana; Shah, Meera N; Proitsi, Petroula; Van Hoecke, Annelies; Carmeliet, Peter; Horvitz, H Robert; Leigh, P Nigel; Shaw, Christopher E; van den Berg, Leonard H; Sham, Pak C; Powell, John F; Verstreken, Patrik; Brown, Robert H; Robberecht, Wim; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2009-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a spontaneous, relentlessly progressive motor neuron disease, usually resulting in death from respiratory failure within 3 years. Variation in the genes SOD1 and TARDBP accounts for a small percentage of cases, and other genes have shown association in both candidate gene and genome-wide studies, but the genetic causes remain largely unknown. We have performed two independent parallel studies, both implicating the RNA polymerase II component, ELP3, in axonal biology and neuronal degeneration. In the first, an association study of 1884 microsatellite markers, allelic variants of ELP3 were associated with ALS in three human populations comprising 1483 people (P=1.96 x 10(-9)). In the second, an independent mutagenesis screen in Drosophila for genes important in neuronal communication and survival identified two different loss of function mutations, both in ELP3 (R475K and R456K). Furthermore, knock down of ELP3 protein levels using antisense morpholinos in zebrafish embryos resulted in dose-dependent motor axonal abnormalities [Pearson correlation: -0.49, P=1.83 x 10(-12) (start codon morpholino) and -0.46, P=4.05 x 10(-9) (splice-site morpholino), and in humans, risk-associated ELP3 genotypes correlated with reduced brain ELP3 expression (P=0.01). These findings add to the growing body of evidence implicating the RNA processing pathway in neurodegeneration and suggest a critical role for ELP3 in neuron biology and of ELP3 variants in ALS.

  7. Concentration dependent requirement for local protein synthesis in motor neuron subtype specific response to axon guidance cues

    PubMed Central

    Nedelec, Stephane; Peljto, Mirza; Shi, Peng; Amoroso, Mackenzie W.; Kam, Lance C.; Wichterle, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Formation of functional motor circuits relies on the ability of distinct spinal motor neuron subtypes to project their axons with high precision to appropriate muscle targets. While guidance cues contributing to motor axon pathfinding have been identified, the intracellular pathways underlying subtype specific responses to these cues remain poorly understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether responses to axon guidance cues depend on axonal protein synthesis. Using a growth cone collapse assay, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived spinal motor neurons (ES-MNs) respond to ephrin-A5, Sema3f and Sema3a in a concentration dependent manner. At low doses, ES-MNs exhibit segmental or subtype specific responses, while this selectivity is lost at higher concentrations. Response to high doses of semaphorins and to all doses of ephrin-A5 is protein synthesis independent. In contrast, using microfluidic devices and stripe assays, we show that growth cone collapse and guidance at low concentrations of semaphorins relies on local protein synthesis in the axonal compartment. Similar bimodal response to low and high concentrations of guidance cues is observed in human ES-MNs, pointing to a general mechanism by which neurons increase their repertoire of responses to the limited set of guidance cues involved in neural circuit formation. PMID:22279234

  8. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases. Essential molecular motor proteins for cellular machinery.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2004-05-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous molecular motor proteins which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the unwinding of energetically stable duplex DNA, and thus play important roles in nearly all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. They break the hydrogen bonds between the duplex helix and move unidirectionally along the bound strand. All helicases are also translocases and DNA-dependent ATPases. Most contain conserved helicase motifs that act as an engine to power DNA unwinding. All DNA helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP binding and hydrolysis, and unwinding of duplex DNA in the 3' to 5' or 5' to 3' direction. The minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) protein complex (Mcm4/6/7) provides a DNA-unwinding function at the origin of replication in all eukaryotes and may act as a licensing factor for DNA replication. The RecQ family of helicases is highly conserved from bacteria to humans and is required for the maintenance of genome integrity. They have also been implicated in a variety of human genetic disorders. Since the discovery of the first DNA helicase in Escherichia coli in 1976, and the first eukaryotic one in the lily in 1978, a large number of these enzymes have been isolated from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, and the number is still growing. In this review we cover the historical background of DNA helicases, helicase assays, biochemical properties, prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases including Mcm proteins and the RecQ family of helicases. The properties of most of the known DNA helicases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including viruses and bacteriophages, are summarized in tables.

  9. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  10. Mg2+ coordinating dynamics in Mg:ATP fueled motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojovschi, A.; Liu, Ming S.; Sadus, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    The coordination of Mg2+ with the triphosphate group of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins is investigated using data mining and molecular dynamics. The possible coordination structures available from crystal data for actin, myosin, RNA polymerase, DNA polymerase, DNA helicase, and F1-ATPase are verified and investigated further by molecular dynamics. Coordination states are evaluated using structural analysis and quantified by radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and pair interaction energy calculations. The results reveal a diverse range of both transitory and stable coordination arrangements between Mg2+ and ATP. The two most stable coordinating states occur when Mg2+ coordinates two or three oxygens from the triphosphate group of ATP. Evidence for five-site coordination is also reported involving water in addition to the triphosphate group. The stable states correspond to a pair interaction energy of either ˜-2750 kJ/mol or -3500 kJ/mol. The role of water molecules in the hydration shell surrounding Mg2+ is also reported.

  11. Insulin and dexamethasone stimulation of cardiac lipoprotein lipase activity involves the actin-based cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, H S; Severson, D L

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in cultured ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult rat hearts was stimulated by the combination of insulin (100 nM) and dexamethasone (100 nM) during an overnight (16 h) incubation. Wortmannin (100 nM), rapamycin (30 ng/ml) or PD98059 (50 microM) did not prevent this stimulation, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p70 S6 kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are not involved in transducing the hormonal signal. In contrast, cytochalasin D (2 microM) completely abolished the stimulatory effect of insulin and dexamethasone on both heparin-releasable LPL and total cellular LPL activities. The potential role of the actin cytoskeleton in the stimulation of LPL activity by insulin and dexamethasone appears to be distal to the initial signalling events since cytochalasin D is still effective in preventing the stimulation when added 2 h after the hormones. PMID:10333493

  12. Role of heat shock protein Hsp25 in the response of the orofacial nuclei motor system to physiological stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Talebian, S.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Although expression of the small heat shock protein family member Hsp25 has been previously observed in the central nervous system (CNS), both constitutively and upon induction, its function in the CNS remains far from clear. In the present study we have characterized the spatial pattern of expression of Hsp25 in the normal adult mouse brain as well as the changes in expression patterns induced by subjecting mice to experimental hyperthermia or hypoxia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a surprisingly restricted pattern of constitutive expression of Hsp25 in the brain, limited to the facial, trigeminal, ambiguus, hypoglossal and vagal motor nuclei of the brainstem. After hyperthermia or hypoxia treatment, significant increases in the levels of Hsp25 were observed in these same areas and also in fibers of the facial and trigeminal nerve tracts. Immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from brainstem also showed the same pattern of induction of Hsp25. Surprisingly, no other area in the brain showed expression of Hsp25, in either control or stressed animals. The highly restricted expression of Hsp25 implies that this protein may have a specific physiological role in the orofacial motor nuclei, which govern precise coordination between muscles of mastication and the pharynx, larynx, and face. Its rapid induction after stress further suggests that Hsp25 may serve as a specific molecular chaperone in the lower cholinergic motor neurons and along their fibers under conditions of stress or injury. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Reduced survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein in motor neuronal progenitors functions cell autonomously to cause spinal muscular atrophy in model mice expressing the human centromeric (SMN2) gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu-Hwan; Maeno-Hikichi, Yuka; Awano, Tomoyuki; Landmesser, Lynn T; Monani, Umrao R

    2010-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common (approximately 1:6400) autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by a paucity of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. Although widely recognized to cause selective spinal motor neuron loss when deficient, the precise cellular site of action of the SMN protein in SMA remains unclear. In this study we sought to determine the consequences of selectively depleting SMN in the motor neurons of model mice. Depleting but not abolishing the protein in motor neuronal progenitors causes an SMA-like phenotype. Neuromuscular weakness in the model mice is accompanied by peripheral as well as central synaptic defects, electrophysiological abnormalities of the neuromuscular junctions, muscle atrophy, and motor neuron degeneration. However, the disease phenotype is more modest than that observed in mice expressing ubiquitously low levels of the SMN protein, and both symptoms as well as early electrophysiological abnormalities that are readily apparent in neonates were attenuated in an age-dependent manner. We conclude that selective knock-down of SMN in motor neurons is sufficient but may not be necessary to cause a disease phenotype and that targeting these cells will be a requirement of any effective therapeutic strategy. This realization is tempered by the relatively mild SMA phenotype in our model mice, one explanation for which is the presence of normal SMN levels in non-neuronal tissue that serves to modulate disease severity.

  14. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. PMID:25681694

  15. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes.

  16. Effects of motor patterns on water-soluble and membrane proteins and cholinesterase activity in subcellular fractions of rat brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pevzner, L. Z.; Venkov, L.; Cheresharov, L.

    1980-01-01

    Albino rats were kept for a year under conditions of daily motor load or constant hypokinesia. An increase in motor activity results in a rise in the acetylcholinesterase activity determined in the synaptosomal and purified mitochondrial fractions while hypokinesia induces a pronounced decrease in this enzyme activity. The butyrylcholinesterase activity somewhat decreases in the synaptosomal fraction after hypokinesia but does not change under the motor load pattern. Motor load causes an increase in the amount of synaptosomal water-soluble proteins possessing an intermediate electrophoretic mobility and seem to correspond to the brain-specific protein 14-3-2. In the synaptosomal fraction the amount of membrane proteins with a low electrophoretic mobility and with the cholinesterase activity rises. Hypokinesia, on the contrary, decreases the amount of these membrane proteins.

  17. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  18. Migration of a Holliday junction through a nucleosome directed by the E. coli RuvAB motor protein.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, M; Hsieh, P

    1998-09-01

    Chromatin plays a critical role in regulating access to DNA by proteins that direct recombination and repair. The E. coli RuvAB protein complex promotes branch migration of the Holliday junction recombination intermediate. The ability of RuvAB to negotiate passage of the junction through nucleosomal DNA is examined. The model system involves the formation of a Holliday junction positioned upstream of a nucleosome. Unassisted, the junction is blocked by a histone octamer. In the presence of RuvAB and ATP, rapid branch migration through the nucleosome is observed. It results in disruption of the histone-DNA interactions leading to the removal of the octamer from the junction intermediate. These results suggest that eukaryotic DNA motor proteins analogous to RuvAB could function during recombination to promote branch migration through chromatin.

  19. The effect of MK-801 on motor activity and c-Fos protein expression in the brain of adolescent Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Pesić, Vesna; Popić, Jelena; Milanović, Desanka; Loncarević-Vasiljković, Natasa; Rakić, Ljubisa; Kanazir, Selma; Ruzdijić, Sabera

    2010-03-19

    The changes that occur during adolescence have a profound impact on the brain and behavior later in life. In this work we examined changes in motor activity during habituation to a novel environment and after treatment with MK-801 (0.025, 0.05, 0.1mg/kg) in peripubertal, pubertal and adult Wistar rats. The involvement of the motor cortex and striatum in motor activity was assessed by analyzing changes in c-Fos protein levels that served as an indicator of neuronal activity. During the habituation period, locomotor activity in peripubertal rats was higher during the first 10 min than in other groups. The same amount of stereotypy-like movements was detected in all three groups. MK-801 induced dose- and age-dependent changes in motor activity. Peripubertal rats were the most sensitive to treatment with MK-801. We also report a surprising finding that systemic application of MK-801 induced a similar age-related profile of changes in motor activity and c-Fos protein expression in the motor cortex but no c-Fos induction in the striatum. Our results demonstrate that, depending on the phase of adolescence the same dose of MK-801 affected behavioral functions in a different manner and that activity of the motor cortex rather than striatal activity was linked to drug-motor activity interactions.

  20. Molecular motors: nature's nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Tyreman, M J A; Molloy, J E

    2003-12-01

    Molecular motors are protein-based machines that convert chemical potential energy into mechanical work. This paper aims to introduce the non-specialist reader to molecular motors, in particular, acto-myosin, the prototype system for motor protein studies. These motors produce their driving force from changes in chemical potential arising directly from chemical reactions and are responsible for muscle contraction and a variety of other cell motilities.

  1. Effects of Protein Restriction on Perceptual-Motor Development, Habituation and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Marjorie F.

    Perceptual motor development, habituation, and learning in squirrel monkeys were studied under controlled rearing and diet history conditions to determine whether the animal's level of behavioral development was similar to well-nourished animals of his own age (agemates) or his own size (sizemates). From birth to 8 weeks of age, the animals were…

  2. NanoShuttles: Harnessing Motor Proteins to Transport Cargo in Synthetic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, V.; Hess, H.

    Motors have become a crucial commodity in our daily lives, from transportation to driving conveyor belts that enable the sequential assembly of cars and other industrial machines. For the sequential assembly of building blocks at the nanoscale that would not assemble spontaneously into larger functional systems, however, active transport systems are not yet available. In contrast, cells have evolved sophisticated molecular machinery that drives movement and active transport. Driven by the conversion of chemical into mechanical energy, namely through hydrolysis of the biological fuel ATP, molecular motors enable cells to operate far away from equilibrium by transporting organelles and molecules to designated locations within the cell, often against concentration gradients. Inspired by the biological concept of active transport, major efforts are underway to learn how to build nanoscale transport systems that are driven by molecular motors. Emerging engineering principles are discussed of how to build tracks and junctions to guide such nanoshuttles, how to load them with cargo and control their speed, how to use active transport to assemble mesoscopic structures that would otherwise not assemble spontaneously and what polymeric materials to choose to integrate motors into MEMS and other biohybrid devices. Finally, two applications that exploit the physical properties of microtubules are discussed, surface imaging by a swarm of microtubules and a self-assembled picoNewton force meter to probe receptor-ligand interactions.

  3. Purkinje Cell-Specific Knockout of the Protein Phosphatase PP2B Impairs Potentiation and Cerebellar Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schonewille, M.; Belmeguenai, A.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Houtman, S.H.; Boele, H.J.; van Beugen, B.J.; Gao, Z.; Badura, A.; Ohtsuki, G.; Amerika, W.E.; Hosy, E.; Hoebeek, F.E.; Elgersma, Y.; Hansel, C.; De Zeeuw, C.I.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Cerebellar motor learning is required to obtain procedural skills. Studies have provided supportive evidence for a potential role of kinase-mediated long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse in cerebellar learning. Recently, phosphatases have been implicated in the induction of potentiation of Purkinje cell activities in vitro, but it remains to be shown whether and how phosphatase-mediated potentiation contributes to motor learning. Here, we investigated its possible role by creating and testing a Purkinje cell-specific knockout of calcium/calmodulin-activated protein-phosphatase-2B (L7-PP2B). The selective deletion of PP2B indeed abolished postsynaptic long-term potentiation in Purkinje cells and their ability to increase their excitability, whereas LTD was unaffected. The mutants showed impaired “gain-decrease” and “gain-increase” adaptation of their vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) as well as impaired acquisition of classical delay conditioning of their eyeblink response. Thus, our data indicate that PP2B may indeed mediate potentiation in Purkinje cells and contribute prominently to cerebellar motor learning. PMID:20797538

  4. Distinctions between dynamic characteristics of the single EG5 motor protein along neural vs. cancerous microtubules.

    PubMed

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania; Jun, Yonggun; Reddy, J N Babu

    2016-09-30

    The kinesin 5 motor contributes critically to mitosis, and is often upregulated in cancer. In vitro motility studies of kinesin 5 moving along bovine brain microtubules indicate that the motors have limited processivity. Cancer cells have abnormal mitotic behavior, so one might wonder whether the functional properties of kinesin 5 change in such a background. Because there could be multiple unknown changes in cancerous vs normal cells, we chose to address this question in a controlled in vitro environment. Specifically, through a series of parallel experiments along bovine brain vs. breast cancer microtubules, we quantified the in vitro motility characteristics of single Eg5 molecular motors along these two types of microtubules, combining the utilization of an optical trapping technique with a study of motion in the unloaded regime. The obtained values indicate that Eg5 processivity is 40% less along MCF7 microtubules, compared to that measured on bovine brain MTs. Interestingly, not all single-molecule properties are altered, as the velocity of the single motor doesn't show any significant changes on either track, though the binding time along MCF7 microtubules is almost 25% shorter. The current results, in conjunction with our previously reported outcomes of the evaluation of the Eg5's characteristics under external load, show that in transition from no-load to high-load regime, the Eg5 binding time has less sensitivity on MCF7 as compared to bovine brain MTs. This finding is intriguing, as it suggests that, potentially, groups of Eg5 motors function more effectively in the cancer background of a large ensemble, possibly contributing to faster mitosis in cancer cells.

  5. Distinctions between dynamic characteristics of the single EG5 motor protein along neural vs. cancerous microtubules.

    PubMed

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania; Jun, Yonggun; Reddy, J N Babu

    2016-09-30

    The kinesin 5 motor contributes critically to mitosis, and is often upregulated in cancer. In vitro motility studies of kinesin 5 moving along bovine brain microtubules indicate that the motors have limited processivity. Cancer cells have abnormal mitotic behavior, so one might wonder whether the functional properties of kinesin 5 change in such a background. Because there could be multiple unknown changes in cancerous vs normal cells, we chose to address this question in a controlled in vitro environment. Specifically, through a series of parallel experiments along bovine brain vs. breast cancer microtubules, we quantified the in vitro motility characteristics of single Eg5 molecular motors along these two types of microtubules, combining the utilization of an optical trapping technique with a study of motion in the unloaded regime. The obtained values indicate that Eg5 processivity is 40% less along MCF7 microtubules, compared to that measured on bovine brain MTs. Interestingly, not all single-molecule properties are altered, as the velocity of the single motor doesn't show any significant changes on either track, though the binding time along MCF7 microtubules is almost 25% shorter. The current results, in conjunction with our previously reported outcomes of the evaluation of the Eg5's characteristics under external load, show that in transition from no-load to high-load regime, the Eg5 binding time has less sensitivity on MCF7 as compared to bovine brain MTs. This finding is intriguing, as it suggests that, potentially, groups of Eg5 motors function more effectively in the cancer background of a large ensemble, possibly contributing to faster mitosis in cancer cells. PMID:27590585

  6. A novel human-specific splice isoform alters the critical C-terminus of Survival Motor Neuron protein

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Lee, Brian M.; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic disease of children and infants, is caused by mutations or deletions of Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1, fails to compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to skipping of exon 7. SMN2 predominantly produces SMNΔ7, an unstable protein. Here we report exon 6B, a novel exon, generated by exonization of an intronic Alu-like sequence of SMN. We validate the expression of exon 6B-containing transcripts SMN6B and SMN6BΔ7 in human tissues and cell lines. We confirm generation of SMN6B transcripts from both SMN1 and SMN2. We detect expression of SMN6B protein using antibodies raised against a unique polypeptide encoded by exon 6B. We analyze RNA-Seq data to show that hnRNP C is a potential regulator of SMN6B expression and demonstrate that SMN6B is a substrate of nonsense-mediated decay. We show interaction of SMN6B with Gemin2, a critical SMN-interacting protein. We demonstrate that SMN6B is more stable than SMNΔ7 and localizes to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Our finding expands the diversity of transcripts generated from human SMN genes and reveals a novel protein isoform predicted to be stably expressed during conditions of stress. PMID:27481219

  7. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    mechanisms that perform plant-specific functions are yet to be discovered. Although the identification of motors in plants, especially in Arabidopsis, is progressing at a rapid pace because of the ongoing plant genome sequencing projects, only a few plant motors have been characterized in any detail. Elucidation of function and regulation of this multitude of motors in a given species is going to be a challenging and exciting area of research in plant cell biology. Structural features of some plant motors suggest calcium, through calmodulin, is likely to play a key role in regulating the function of both microtubule- and actin-based motors in plants.

  8. A structural change in the kinesin motor protein that drives motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Sarah; Lin, Abel W.; Safer, Daniel; Hart, Cynthia L.; Naber, Nariman; Carragher, Bridget O.; Cain, Shane M.; Pechatnikova, Elena; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Whittaker, Michael; Pate, Edward; Cooke, Roger; Taylor, Edwin W.; Milligan, Ronald A.; Vale, Ronald D.

    1999-12-01

    Kinesin motors power many motile processes by converting ATP energy into unidirectional motion along microtubules. The force-generating and enzymatic properties of conventional kinesin have been extensively studied; however, the structural basis of movement is unknown. Here we have detected and visualized a large conformational change of a ~15-amino-acid region (the neck linker) in kinesin using electron paramagnetic resonance, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, pre-steady state kinetics and cryo-electron microscopy. This region becomes immobilized and extended towards the microtubule `plus' end when kinesin binds microtubules and ATP, and reverts to a more mobile conformation when γ-phosphate is released after nucleotide hydrolysis. This conformational change explains both the direction of kinesin motion and processive movement by the kinesin dimer.

  9. She2p, a novel RNA-binding protein tethers ASH1 mRNA to the Myo4p myosin motor via She3p

    PubMed Central

    Böhl, Florian; Kruse, Claudia; Frank, Andrea; Ferring, Dunja; Jansen, Ralf-Peter

    2000-01-01

    RNA localization is a widespread mechanism to achieve localized protein synthesis. In budding yeast, localization of ASH1 mRNA controls daughter cell-specific accumulation of the transcriptional regulator Ash1p, which determines mating type switching. ASH1 mRNA localization depends on four independently acting sequences (‘zipcodes’) within the mRNA. In addition, the class V myosin Myo4p and a set of She proteins with as yet unknown function are essential for ASH1 localization. Here we show that She2p is a novel RNA-binding protein that binds specifically to ASH1 mRNA in vivo and to ASH1 RNA zip codes in vitro. She2p can interact with She3 protein via She3p’s C-terminus and becomes localized to the daughter cell tip upon ASH1 expression. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain of She3p is required to form an RNA-independent complex with the heavy chain of the myosin motor protein Myo4p. She2p and She3p are the first examples of adapters for tethering a localized mRNA to the motor protein and might serve as prototypes for RNA–motor protein adapters. PMID:11032818

  10. Transcriptional induction of the heat shock protein B8 mediates the clearance of misfolded proteins responsible for motor neuron diseases

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Valeria; D’Agostino, Vito G.; Cristofani, Riccardo; Rusmini, Paola; Cicardi, Maria E.; Messi, Elio; Loffredo, Rosa; Pancher, Michael; Piccolella, Margherita; Galbiati, Mariarita; Meroni, Marco; Cereda, Cristina; Carra, Serena; Provenzani, Alessandro; Poletti, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are often associated with the presence of misfolded protein inclusions. The chaperone HSPB8 is upregulated in mice, the human brain and muscle structures affected during NDs progression. HSPB8 exerts a potent pro-degradative activity on several misfolded proteins responsible for familial NDs forms. Here, we demonstrated that HSPB8 also counteracts accumulation of aberrantly localized misfolded forms of TDP-43 and its 25 KDa fragment involved in most sporadic cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (sALS) and of Fronto Lateral Temporal Dementia (FLTD). HSPB8 acts with BAG3 and the HSP70/HSC70-CHIP complex enhancing the autophagic removal of misfolded proteins. We performed a high-through put screening (HTS) to find small molecules capable of inducing HSPB8 in neurons for therapeutic purposes. We identified two compounds, colchicine and doxorubicin, that robustly up-regulated HSPB8 expression. Both colchicine and doxorubicin increased the expression of the master regulator of autophagy TFEB, the autophagy linker p62/SQSTM1 and the autophagosome component LC3. In line, both drugs counteracted the accumulation of TDP-43 and TDP-25 misfolded species responsible for motoneuronal death in sALS. Thus, analogs of colchicine and doxorubicin able to induce HSPB8 and with better safety and tolerability may result beneficial in NDs models. PMID:26961006

  11. Drosophila Torsin Protein Regulates Motor Control and Stress Sensitivity and Forms a Complex with Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Min; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    We investigated unknown in vivo functions of Torsin by using Drosophila as a model. Downregulation of Drosophila Torsin (DTor) by DTor-specific inhibitory double-stranded RNA (RNAi) induced abnormal locomotor behavior and increased susceptibility to H2O2. In addition, altered expression of DTor significantly increased the numbers of synaptic boutons. One important biochemical consequence of DTor-RNAi expression in fly brains was upregulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Altered expression of ADH has also been reported in Drosophila Fragile-X mental retardation protein (DFMRP) mutant flies. Interestingly, expression of DFMRP was altered in DTor mutant flies, and DTor and DFMRP were present in the same protein complexes. In addition, DTor and DFMRP immunoreactivities were partially colocalized in several cellular organelles in larval muscles. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between synaptic morphologies of dfmrp null mutants and dfmrp mutants expressing DTor-RNAi. Taken together, our evidences suggested that DTor and DFMRP might be present in the same signaling pathway regulating synaptic plasticity. In addition, we also found that human Torsin1A and human FMRP were present in the same protein complexes, suggesting that this phenomenon is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:27313903

  12. The presence of kinesin superfamily motor proteins KIFC1 and KIF17 in normal and pathological human placenta.

    PubMed

    Sati, L; Seval-Celik, Y; Unek, G; Korgun, E T; Demir, R

    2009-10-01

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are motor proteins that participate in chromosomal and spindle movements during mitosis and meiosis, and transport membranous organelles and macromolecules fundamental for cellular functions. Although the roles of KIFs in axonal and dendritic transports have been studied extensively, their role in intracellular transport in general is less well known. The diversity of kinesins suggests that each kinesin may have a specific function. Therefore, in this study we aimed to investigate the presence and cellular localization of KIFC1 and KIF17 in normal and pathological human placentas. First-trimester (22-56 days) and normal, preeclamptic (PE), and diabetic-term placental tissues were obtained and further studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot methods. KIFC1 was mainly localized to the syncytiotrophoblast both in early and term placental samples. However, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed both in PE and diabetic placentas compared to normal-term placentas. KIF17 was most intensively localized in developing vascular endothelium in early pregnancy. Even though KIF17 was moderately stained in the endothelium of villi from normal human-term placentas, stronger immunoreactivity was observed in all types of villi of both PE and diabetic placentas. Western blotting of tissue extracts confirmed the IHC results. Here, we demonstrate the presence of KIFC1 and KIF17 in human placenta for the first time. The intense expression of KIFC1 in syncytiotrophoblast and KIF17 in vascular endothelium suggests that both the proteins might be important in a cargo-transport system. An increased expression pattern of both KIFC1 and KIF17 in PE and diabetes might suggest that these proteins may be involved in complex trophoblast functions and placental pathologies. Further studies will clarify the physiological role of KIFs in human placental transport and development. PMID:19679349

  13. Unique charge distribution in surface loops confers high velocity on the fast motor protein Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Yanase, Kenji; Ichikawa, Yousuke; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2009-12-22

    Most myosins have a positively charged loop 2 with a cluster of lysine residues that bind to the negatively charged N-terminal segment of actin. However, the net charge of loop 2 of very fast Chara myosin is zero and there is no lysine cluster in it. In contrast, Chara myosin has a highly positively charged loop 3. To elucidate the role of these unique surface loops of Chara myosin in its high velocity and high actin-activated ATPase activity, we have undertaken mutational analysis using recombinant Chara myosin motor domain. It was found that net positive charge in loop 3 affected V(max) and K(app) of actin activated ATPase activity, while it affected the velocity only slightly. The net positive charge in loop 2 affected K(app) and the velocity, although it did not affect V(max). Our results suggested that Chara myosin has evolved to have highly positively charged loop 3 for its high ATPase activity and have less positively charged loop 2 for its high velocity. Since high positive charge in loop 3 and low positive charge in loop 2 seem to be one of the reasons for Chara myosin's high velocity, we manipulated charge contents in loops 2 and 3 of Dictyostelium myosin (class II). Removing positive charge from loop 2 and adding positive charge to loop 3 of Dictyostelium myosin made its velocity higher than that of the wild type, suggesting that the charge strategy in loops 2 and 3 is widely applicable.

  14. Stochastic kinetics of a single-headed motor protein: Dwell time distribution of KIF1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-03-01

    KIF1A, a processive single-headed kinesin superfamily motor, hydrolyzes adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to move along a filamentous track called microtubule. The stochastic movement of KIF1A on the track is characterized by an alternating sequence of pause and translocation. The sum of the durations of pause and the following translocation defines the dwell time. Using the NOSC model (Nishinari K. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 95 (2005) 118101) of individual KIF1A, we systematically derive an analytical expression for the dwell time distribution. More detailed information is contained in the probability densities of the "conditional dwell times"τ±± in between two consecutive steps each of which could be forward (+) or backward (-). We calculate the probability densities Ξ±± of these four conditional dwell times. However, for the convenience of comparison with experimental data, we also present the two distributions Ξ±* of the times of dwell before a forward (+) and a backward (-) step. In principle, our theoretical prediction can be tested by carrying out single-molecule experiments with adequate spatio-temporal resolution.

  15. Ubiquitin ligase RNF20/40 facilitates spindle assembly and promotes breast carcinogenesis through stabilizing motor protein Eg5.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yang; Huo, Dawei; Gao, Jie; Wu, Heng; Ye, Zheng; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Kai; Shan, Lin; Zhou, Xing; Wang, Yue; Su, Dongxue; Ding, Xiang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Xuan, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    Whether transcriptional regulators are functionally involved in mitosis is a fundamental question in cell biology. Here we report that the RNF20/40 complex, a major ubiquitin ligase catalysing histone H2B monoubiquitination, interacts with the motor protein Eg5 during mitosis and participates in spindle assembly. We show that the RNF20/40 complex monoubiquitinates and stabilizes Eg5. Loss of RNF20/40 results in spindle assembly defects, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Consistently, depletion of either RNF20/40 or Eg5 suppresses breast cancer in vivo. Significantly, RNF20/40 and Eg5 are concurrently upregulated in human breast carcinomas and high Eg5 expression is associated with poorer overall survival of patients with luminal A, or B, breast cancer. Our study uncovers an important spindle assembly role of the RNF20/40 complex, and implicates the RNF20/40-Eg5 axis in breast carcinogenesis, supporting the pursuit of these proteins as potential targets for breast cancer therapeutic interventions. PMID:27557628

  16. Ubiquitin ligase RNF20/40 facilitates spindle assembly and promotes breast carcinogenesis through stabilizing motor protein Eg5

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yang; Huo, Dawei; Gao, Jie; Wu, Heng; Ye, Zheng; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Kai; Shan, Lin; Zhou, Xing; Wang, Yue; Su, Dongxue; Ding, Xiang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Xuan, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    Whether transcriptional regulators are functionally involved in mitosis is a fundamental question in cell biology. Here we report that the RNF20/40 complex, a major ubiquitin ligase catalysing histone H2B monoubiquitination, interacts with the motor protein Eg5 during mitosis and participates in spindle assembly. We show that the RNF20/40 complex monoubiquitinates and stabilizes Eg5. Loss of RNF20/40 results in spindle assembly defects, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Consistently, depletion of either RNF20/40 or Eg5 suppresses breast cancer in vivo. Significantly, RNF20/40 and Eg5 are concurrently upregulated in human breast carcinomas and high Eg5 expression is associated with poorer overall survival of patients with luminal A, or B, breast cancer. Our study uncovers an important spindle assembly role of the RNF20/40 complex, and implicates the RNF20/40-Eg5 axis in breast carcinogenesis, supporting the pursuit of these proteins as potential targets for breast cancer therapeutic interventions. PMID:27557628

  17. α-Synuclein-Independent Histopathological and Motor Deficits in Mice Lacking the Endolysosomal Parkinsonism Protein Atp13a2

    PubMed Central

    Kett, Lauren R.; Stiller, Barbara; Bernath, Megan M.; Tasset, Inmaculada; Blesa, Javier; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Chan, Robin B.; Zhou, Bowen; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Przedborski, Serge; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from genetic and biochemical studies implicates dysfunction of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway as a key feature in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Most studies have focused on accumulation of neurotoxic α-synuclein secondary to defects in autophagy as the cause of neurodegeneration, but abnormalities of the autophagic-lysosomal system likely mediate toxicity through multiple mechanisms. To further explore how endolysosomal dysfunction causes PD-related neurodegeneration, we generated a murine model of Kufor–Rakeb syndrome (KRS), characterized by early-onset Parkinsonism with additional neurological features. KRS is caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2 gene encoding the endolysosomal ATPase ATP13A2. We show that loss of ATP13A2 causes a specific protein trafficking defect, and that Atp13a2 null mice develop age-related motor dysfunction that is preceded by neuropathological changes, including gliosis, accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates, lipofuscinosis, and endolysosomal abnormalities. Contrary to predictions from in vitro data, in vivo mouse genetic studies demonstrate that these phenotypes are α-synuclein independent. Our findings indicate that endolysosomal dysfunction and abnormalities of α-synuclein homeostasis are not synonymous, even in the context of an endolysosomal genetic defect linked to Parkinsonism, and highlight the presence of α-synuclein-independent neurotoxicity consequent to endolysosomal dysfunction. PMID:25855184

  18. Regulation of ER-Golgi intermediate compartment tubulation and mobility by COPI coats, motor proteins and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Mónica; Martínez-Alonso, Emma; Ballesta, José; Martínez-Menárguez, José A

    2010-05-01

    Little is known about the formation and regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi transport intermediates, although previous studies suggest that cargo is the main regulator of their morphology. In this study, we analyze the role of coat protein I (COPI) and cytoskeleton in the formation of tubular ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and also show that partial COPI detachment by means of low temperature (15 degrees C) or brefeldin A induces the formation of transient tubular ERGIC elements. Most of them moved from the cell periphery to the perinuclear area and were 2.5x slower than vesicles. Time-lapse analysis of living cells demonstrates that the ERGIC elements are able to shift very fast from tubular to vesicular forms and vice versa, suggesting that the amount of cargo is not the determining factor for ERGIC morphology. Both the partial microtubule depolymerization and the inhibition of uncoating of the membranes result in the formation of long tubules that grow from round ERGICs and form at complex network. Interestingly, both COPI detachment and microtubule depolymerization induce a redistribution of kinesin from peripheral ERGIC elements to the Golgi area, while dynein distribution is not affected. However, both kinesin and dynein downregulation by RNA interference induced ERGIC tubulation. The tubules induced by kinesin depletion were static, whereas those resulting from dynein depletion were highly mobile. Our results strongly suggest that the interaction of motor proteins with COPI-coated membranes and microtubules is a key regulator of ERGIC morphology and mobility.

  19. Intermediate filament protein accumulation in motor neurons derived from giant axonal neuropathy iPSCs rescued by restoration of gigaxonin.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Kerner, Bethany L; Ahmad, Faizzan S; Diaz, Alejandro Garcia; Greene, John Palmer; Gray, Steven J; Samulski, Richard Jude; Chung, Wendy K; Van Coster, Rudy; Maertens, Paul; Noggle, Scott A; Henderson, Christopher E; Wichterle, Hynek

    2015-03-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the GAN gene resulting in a loss of a ubiquitously expressed protein, gigaxonin. Gene replacement therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of the disease; however, the effectiveness and safety of gigaxonin reintroduction have not been tested in human GAN nerve cells. Here we report the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three GAN patients with different GAN mutations. Motor neurons differentiated from GAN iPSCs exhibit accumulation of neurofilament (NF-L) and peripherin (PRPH) protein and formation of PRPH aggregates, the key pathological phenotypes observed in patients. Introduction of gigaxonin either using a lentiviral vector or as a stable transgene resulted in normalization of NEFL and PRPH levels in GAN neurons and disappearance of PRPH aggregates. Importantly, overexpression of gigaxonin had no adverse effect on survival of GAN neurons, supporting the feasibility of gene replacement therapy. Our findings demonstrate that GAN iPSCs provide a novel model for studying human GAN neuropathologies and for the development and testing of new therapies in relevant cell types.

  20. Helicobacter pylori CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R; Ottemann, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZ(HP), localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZ(HP) localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep, and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZ(HP) for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZ(HP) determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins' activities.

  1. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior. PMID:22629462

  2. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  3. Use of the myosin motor domain as large-affinity tag for the expression and purification of proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kollmar, Martin

    2006-08-15

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is increasingly be used for the overexpression of proteins. Dictyostelium is amenable to classical and molecular genetic approaches and can easily be grown in large quantities. It contains a variety of chaperones and folding enzymes, and is able to perform all kinds of post-translational protein modifications. Here, new expression vectors are presented that have been designed for the production of proteins in large quantities for biochemical and structural studies. The expression cassettes of the most successful vectors are based on a tandem affinity purification tag consisting of an octahistidine tag followed by the myosin motor domain tag. The myosin motor domain not only strongly enhances the production of fused proteins but is also used for a fast affinity purification step through its ATP-dependent binding to actin. The applicability of the new system has been demonstrated for the expression and purification of subunits of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex from different species. PMID:16516959

  4. Helicobacter pylori CheZHP and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R.; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R.; Ottemann, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZHP, localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZHP localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZHP for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZHP determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein, and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZHP and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins’ activities. PMID:26061894

  5. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 protein aggregates cause deficits in motor learning and cerebellar plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mark, Melanie D; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-06-10

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that a CT fragment of the Cav2.1 channel, which is detected specifically in cytosolic and nuclear fractions in SCA6 patients, is associated with the SCA6 pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we expressed P/Q-type channel protein fragments from two different human CT splice variants, as predicted from SCA6 patients, in PCs of mice using viral and transgenic approaches. These splice variants represent a short (CT-short without polyQs) and a long (CT-long with 27 polyQs) CT fragment. Our results show that the different splice variants of the CTs differentially distribute within PCs, i.e., the short CTs reveal predominantly nuclear inclusions, whereas the long CTs prominently reveal both nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates. Postnatal expression of CTs in PCs in mice reveals that only CT-long causes SCA6-like symptoms, i.e., deficits in eyeblink conditioning (EBC), ataxia, and PC degeneration. The physiological phenotypes associated specifically with the long CT fragment can be explained by an impairment of LTD and LTP at the parallel fiber-to-PC synapse and alteration in spontaneous PC activity. Thus, our results suggest that the polyQ carrying the CT fragment of the P/Q-type channel is sufficient to cause SCA6 pathogenesis in mice and identifies EBC as a new diagnostic strategy to evaluate Ca(2+) channel-mediated human diseases.

  6. Function of the Histone-Like Protein H-NS in Motility of Escherichia coli: Multiple Regulatory Roles Rather than Direct Action at the Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of investigations of Escherichia coli have suggested that the DNA-binding protein H-NS, in addition to its well-known functions in chromosome organization and gene regulation, interacts directly with the flagellar motor to modulate its function. Here, in a study initially aimed at characterizing the H-NS/motor interaction further, we identify problems and limitations in the previous work that substantially weaken the case for a direct H-NS/motor interaction. Null hns mutants are immotile, largely owing to the downregulation of the flagellar master regulators FlhD and FlhC. We, and others, previously reported that an hns mutant remains poorly motile even when FlhDC are expressed constitutively. In the present work, we use better-engineered strains to show that the motility defect in a Δhns, FlhDC-constitutive strain is milder than that reported previously and does not point to a direct action of H-NS at the motor. H-NS regulates numerous genes and might influence motility via a number of regulatory molecules besides FlhDC. To examine the sources of the motility defect that persists in an FlhDC-constitutive Δhns mutant, we measured transcript levels and overexpression effects of a number of genes in candidate regulatory pathways. The results indicate that H-NS influences motility via multiple regulatory linkages that include, minimally, the messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP, the biofilm regulatory protein CsgD, and the sigma factors σS and σF. The results are in accordance with the more standard view of H-NS as a regulator of gene expression rather than a direct modulator of flagellar motor performance. IMPORTANCE Data from a number of previous studies have been taken to indicate that the nucleoid-organizing protein H-NS influences motility not only by its well-known DNA-based mechanisms but also by binding directly to the flagellar motor to alter function. In this study, H-NS is shown to influence motility through diverse regulatory pathways

  7. Interaction of motor proteins of various types at melanosome redistribution in melanocytes under action of UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Kudryashov, Alexey A.

    2004-05-01

    In the report the mathematical model of melanosome transport along filaments in intact and UV-irradiated melanocytes is submitted. Processes at three levels are considered: dynamics of the single motor, transport of melanosome by ensemble of motors, and melanosomes distribution along microtubules. A single motor is considered as <> modeling of transitions between internal states described by chemical kinetics equations allows to determine "force-velocity" dependence for motor. The ensemble of motors is described by system of equations for average motor velocities, and transported melanosome moves with average velocity, which in turn is determined by sum of force generated by each elastic-coupled motor (self-consistence problem). Distribution of melanosomes along a microtubule is described by system of equations for bidirectional motion of attached melanosome under coordinated action of "plus-end" and "minus-end" motors and free diffusion of unattached melanosomes. Influence of UV-radiation is resulted in change of number of each type motors simultaneously linked to one melanosome. It induces redistribution of melanosomes between centre and periphery of melanocyte.

  8. Spatial memory deficits and motor coordination facilitation in cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wincott, Charlotte M; Kim, Seonil; Titcombe, Roseann F; Tukey, David S; Girma, Hiwot K; Pick, Joseph E; Devito, Loren M; Hofmann, Franz; Hoeffer, Charles; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    Activity-dependent trafficking of AMPA receptors to synapses regulates synaptic strength. Activation of the NMDA receptor induces several second messenger pathways that contribute to receptor trafficking-dependent plasticity, including the NO pathway, which elevates cGMP. In turn, cGMP activates the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII), which phosphorylates the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 at serine 845, a critical step facilitating synaptic delivery in the mechanism of activity-dependent synaptic potentiation. Since cGKII is expressed in the striatum, amygdala, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, it has been proposed that mice lacking cGKII may present phenotypic differences compared to their wild-type littermates in emotion-dependent tasks, learning and memory, and drug reward salience. Previous studies have shown that cGKII KO mice ingest higher amounts of ethanol as well as exhibit elevated anxiety levels compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Here, we show that cGKII KO mice are significantly deficient in spatial learning while exhibiting facilitated motor coordination, demonstrating a clear dependence of memory-based tasks on cGKII. We also show diminished GluA1 phosphorylation in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of cGKII KO prefrontal cortex while in hippocampal PSD fractions, phosphorylation was not significantly altered. These data suggest that the role of cGKII may be more robust in particular brain regions, thereby impacting complex behaviors dependent on these regions differently.

  9. Co-aggregation of RNA binding proteins in ALS spinal motor neurons: evidence of a common pathogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian A; Volkening, Kathryn; Droppelmann, Cristian A; Ang, Lee Cyn; Rademakers, Rosa; Strong, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    While the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains to be clearly delineated, there is mounting evidence that altered RNA metabolism is a commonality amongst several of the known genetic variants of the disease. In this study, we evaluated the expression of 10 ALS-associated proteins in spinal motor neurons (MNs) in ALS patients with mutations in C9orf72 (C9orf72(GGGGCC)-ALS; n = 5), SOD1 (mtSOD1-ALS; n = 9), FUS/TLS (mtFUS/TLS-ALS; n = 2), or TARDBP (mtTDP-43-ALS; n = 2) and contrasted these to cases of sporadic ALS (sALS; n = 4) and familial ALS without known mutations (fALS; n = 2). We performed colorimetric immunohistochemistry (IHC) using antibodies against TDP-43, FUS/TLS, SOD1, C9orf72, ubiquitin, sequestosome 1 (p62), optineurin, phosphorylated high molecular weight neurofilament, peripherin, and Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RGNEF). We observed that RGNEF-immunoreactive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) can co-localize with TDP-43, FUS/TLS and p62 within spinal MNs. We confirmed their capacity to interact by co-immunoprecipitations. We also found that mtSOD1-ALS cases possess a unique IHC signature, including the presence of C9orf72-immunoreactive diffuse NCIs, which allows them to be distinguished from other variants of ALS at the level of light microscopy. These findings support the hypothesis that alterations in RNA metabolism are a core pathogenic pathway in ALS. We also conclude that routine IHC-based analysis of spinal MNs may aid in the identification of families not previously suspected to harbor SOD1 mutations. PMID:22941224

  10. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  11. A role for complexes of survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein with gemins and profilin in neurite-like cytoplasmic extensions of cultured nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aarti; Lambrechts, Anja; Le thi Hao; Le, Thanh T.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Ampe, Christophe; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Morris, Glenn E. . E-mail: glenn.morris@rjah.nhs.uk

    2005-09-10

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN (survival of motor neurons protein) and consequent loss of motor neurons. SMN is involved in snRNP transport and nuclear RNA splicing, but axonal transport of SMN has also been shown to occur in motor neurons. SMN also binds to the small actin-binding protein, profilin. We now show that SMN and profilin II co-localise in the cytoplasm of differentiating rat PC12 cells and in neurite-like extensions, especially at their growth cones. Many components of known SMN complexes were also found in these extensions, including gemin2 (SIP-1), gemin6, gemin7 and unrip (unr-interacting protein). Coilin p80 and Sm core protein immunoreactivity, however, were seen only in the nucleus. SMN is known to associate with {beta}-actin mRNA and specific hnRNPs in axons and in neurite extensions of cultured nerve cells, and SMN also stimulates neurite outgrowth in cultures. Our results are therefore consistent with SMN complexes, rather than SMN alone, being involved in the transport of actin mRNPs along the axon as in the transport of snRNPs into the nucleus by similar SMN complexes. Antisense knockdown of profilin I and II isoforms inhibited neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and caused accumulation of SMN and its associated proteins in cytoplasmic aggregates. BIAcore studies demonstrated a high affinity interaction of SMN with profilin IIa, the isoform present in developing neurons. Pathogenic missense mutations in SMN, or deletion of exons 5 and 7, prevented this interaction. The interaction is functional in that SMN can modulate actin polymerisation in vitro by reducing the inhibitory effect of profilin IIa. This suggests that reduced SMN in SMA might cause axonal pathfinding defects by disturbing the normal regulation of microfilament growth by profilins.

  12. Fusion protein Isl1-Lhx3 specifies motor neuron fate by inducing motor neuron genes and concomitantly suppressing the interneuron programs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghee; Cuvillier, James M; Lee, Bora; Shen, Rongkun; Lee, Jae W; Lee, Soo-Kyung

    2012-02-28

    Combinatorial transcription codes generate the myriad of cell types during development and thus likely provide crucial insights into directed differentiation of stem cells to a specific cell type. The LIM complex composed of Isl1 and Lhx3 directs the specification of spinal motor neurons (MNs) in embryos. Here, we report that Isl1-Lhx3, a LIM-complex mimicking fusion, induces a signature of MN transcriptome and concomitantly suppresses interneuron differentiation programs, thereby serving as a potent and specific inducer of MNs in stem cells. We show that an equimolar ratio of Isl1 and Lhx3 and the LIM domain of Lhx3 are crucial for generating MNs without up-regulating interneuron genes. These led us to design Isl1-Lhx3, which maintains the desirable 1:1 ratio of Isl1 and Lhx3 and the LIM domain of Lhx3. Isl1-Lhx3 drives MN differentiation with high specificity and efficiency in the spinal cord and embryonic stem cells, bypassing the need for sonic hedgehog (Shh). RNA-seq analysis revealed that Isl1-Lhx3 induces the expression of a battery of MN genes that control various functional aspects of MNs, while suppressing key interneuron genes. Our studies uncover a highly efficient method for directed MN generation and MN gene networks. Our results also demonstrate a general strategy of using embryonic transcription complexes for producing specific cell types from stem cells. PMID:22343290

  13. Broadening the Spectrum of Actin-Based Protrusive Activity Mediated by Arp2/3 Complex-Facilitated Polymerization: Motility of Cytoplasmic Ridges and Tubular Projections

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Gianakas, Anastasia D.; Henson, Lauren H.; Lakin, Christina L.; Voss, Meagen K.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Morris, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Arp2/3 complex-facilitated actin polymerization plays an essential role in a variety of cellular functions including motility, adherence, endocytosis and trafficking. In the present study we employ the sea urchin coelomocyte experimental model system to test the hypotheses that Arp2/3 complex-nucleated actin assembly mediates the motility of two unusual cellular protrusions; the cytoplasmic ridges present during coelomocyte spreading, and inducible, tubular-shaped, and neurite-like projections. Our investigations couple pharmacological manipulation employing inhibitors of actin polymerization and the Arp2/3 complex with a wide array of imaging methods including digitally enhanced phase contrast, DIC and polarization light microscopy of live cells; conventional, confocal and super-resolution light microscopy of fluorescently labeled cells; and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that Arp2/3 complex-facilitated actin polymerization underlies the motility of coelomocyte cytoplasmic ridges and tubular projections, that these processes are related to each other, and that they have been preliminarily identified in other cell types. The results also highlight the broad spectrum of actin-based protrusive activities dependent on the Arp2/3 complex and provide additional insights into the pervasive nature of this ubiquitous actin nucleator. Furthermore we provide the first evidence of a possible mechanistic difference between the impacts of the small molecule drugs BDM and CK666 on the Arp2/3 complex. PMID:25111797

  14. Optogenetic Control of PIP3: PIP3 Is Sufficient to Induce the Actin-Based Active Part of Growth Cones and Is Regulated via Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) is highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and plays multiple roles in individual cells. However, the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3 in developing neurons remain unclear because of a lack of techniques for manipulating PIP3 spatiotemporally. We addressed this issue by combining optogenetic control and observation of endogenous PIP3 signaling. Endogenous PIP3 was abundant in actin-rich structures such as growth cones and “waves”, and PIP3-rich plasma membranes moved actively within growth cones. To study the role of PIP3 in developing neurons, we developed a PI3K photoswitch that can induce production of PIP3 at specific locations upon blue light exposure. We succeeded in producing PIP3 locally in mouse hippocampal neurons. Local PIP3 elevation at neurite tips did not induce neurite elongation, but it was sufficient to induce the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Interestingly, ectopic PIP3 elevation alone activated membranes to form actin-based structures whose behavior was similar to that of growth-cone-like “waves”. We also found that endocytosis regulates effective PIP3 concentration at plasma membranes. These results revealed the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3, providing fundamental information about PIP3 signaling in neurons. PMID:23951027

  15. Motor protein KIFC5A interacts with Nubp1 and Nubp2, and is implicated in the regulation of centrosome duplication.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Andri; Lederer, Carsten W; Surrey, Thomas; Vernos, Isabelle; Santama, Niovi

    2006-05-15

    Inhibition of motor protein activity has been linked with defects in the formation of poles in the spindle of dividing cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional relationship between motor activity and centrosome dynamics have remained uncharacterised. Here, we characterise KIFC5A, a mouse kinesin-like protein that is highly expressed in dividing cells and tissues, and is subject to developmental and cell-type-specific regulation. KIFC5A is a minus-end-directed, microtubule-dependent motor that produces velocities of up to 1.26 microm minute(-1) in gliding assays and possesses microtubule bundling activity. It is nuclear in interphase, localises to the centre of the two microtubule asters at the beginning of mitosis, and to spindle microtubules in later mitotic phases. Overexpression of KIFC5A in mouse cells causes the formation of aberrant, non-separated microtubule asters and mitotic arrest in a prometaphase-like state. KIFC5A knockdown partly rescues the phenotype caused by inhibition of plus-end-directed motor Eg5 by monastrol on the mitotic spindle, indicating that it is involved in the balance of forces determining bipolar spindle assembly and integrity. Silencing of KIFC5A also results in centrosome amplification detectable throughout the cell cycle. Supernumerary centrosomes arise primarily as a result of reduplication and partly as a result of cytokinesis defects. They contain duplicated centrioles and have the ability to organise microtubule asters, resulting in the formation of multipolar spindles. We show that KIFC5A interacts with nucleotide-binding proteins 1 and 2 (Nubp1 and Nubp2), which have extensive sequence similarity to prokaryotic division-site-determining protein MinD. Nubp1 and Nubp2 also interact with each other. Knockdown of Nubp1 or double knockdown of Nubp1 and Nubp2 (Nubp1&Nubp2) both phenocopy the KIFC5A silencing effect. These results implicate KIFC5A and the Nubp proteins in a common regulatory pathway

  16. Widespread mRNA Association with Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins and Identification and Dynamics of Myosin-Associated mRNAs in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Casolari, Jason M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Salzman, Julia; Champion, Lowry M.; Moerner, W. E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    Programmed mRNA localization to specific subcellular compartments for localized translation is a fundamental mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation that affects many, and possibly all, mRNAs in eukaryotes. We describe her e a systematic approach to identify the RNA cargoes associated with the cytoskeletal motor proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with live-cell 3D super-localization microscopy of endogenously tagged mRNAs. Our analysis identified widespread association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins, including association of Myo3 with mRNAs encoding key regulators of actin branching and endocytosis such as WASP and WIP. Using conventional fluorescence microscopy and expression of MS2-tagged mRNAs from endogenous loci, we observed a strong bias for actin patch nucleator mRNAs to localize to the cell cortex and the actin patch in a Myo3- and F-actin dependent manner. Use of a double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF) microscope allowed super-localization measurements of single mRNPs at a spatial precision of 25 nm in x and y and 50 nm in z in live cells with 50 ms exposure times, allowing quantitative profiling of mRNP dynamics. The actin patch mRNA exhibited distinct and characteristic diffusion coefficients when compared to a control mRNA. In addition, disruption of F-actin significantly expanded the 3D confinement radius of an actin patch nucleator mRNA, providing a quantitative assessment of the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to mRNP dynamic localization. Our results provide evidence for specific association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins in yeast, suggest that different mRNPs have distinct and characteristic dynamics, and lend insight into the mechanism of actin patch nucleator mRNA localization to actin patches. PMID:22359641

  17. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor protein accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in Spinal & Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Constanza J.; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T.; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L.; Bennett, C. Frank; Shelton, G. Diane; Cleveland, Don W.; La Spada, Albert R.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked spinal & bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy, and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA, and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments. PMID:24742458

  18. Active Transport of Nanomaterials Using Motor Proteins Final report for DOE-BES grant DE-FG03-03ER46024

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Henry; Vogel, Viola

    2005-03-16

    During the two year period of funding we have focused on the following topics: Guiding of microtubule movement on kinesin-coated, structured surfaces, directed assembly of oriented microtubule networks, and the interaction between synthetic materials and biological components in hybrid devices based on microtubules and kinesin motors. Additional efforts have been made and are still on- going in controlling the motor activity, and loading and unloading of cargo. In all aspects, the collaboration with the team at Sandia has been critical. A constant intellectual and material connection has been maintained by frequent visits, videoconferences, and exchanges of parts and supplies, such as microfabricated structures and motor proteins. The scientific advances made through this collaboration have been documented in seven publications in high- impact journals and an encyclopedia, discussed in invited talks at the annual meetings of MRS and ACS, and publicized by journalists in The Scientist and Nature Materials Nanozone. One double Ph.D. degree in Bioengineering and Nanotechnology has been completed (John Clemmens).

  19. Low levels of Survival Motor Neuron protein are sufficient for normal muscle function in the SMNΔ7 mouse model of SMA

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Chitra C.; McGovern, Vicki L.; Murray, Jason D.; Gombash, Sara E.; Zaworski, Phillip G.; Foust, Kevin D.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by loss of lower motor neurons. SMA is caused by deletion or mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and retention of the SMN2 gene. The loss of SMN1 results in reduced levels of the SMN protein. SMN levels appear to be particularly important in motor neurons; however SMN levels above that produced by two copies of SMN2 have been suggested to be important in muscle. Studying the spatial requirement of SMN is important in both understanding how SMN deficiency causes SMA and in the development of effective therapies. Using Myf5-Cre, a muscle-specific Cre driver, and the Cre-loxP recombination system, we deleted mouse Smn in the muscle of mice with SMN2 and SMNΔ7 transgenes in the background, thus providing low level of SMN in the muscle. As a reciprocal experiment, we restored normal levels of SMN in the muscle with low SMN levels in all other tissues. We observed that decreasing SMN in the muscle has no phenotypic effect. This was corroborated by muscle physiology studies with twitch force, tetanic and eccentric contraction all being normal. In addition, electrocardiogram and muscle fiber size distribution were also normal. Replacement of Smn in muscle did not rescue SMA mice. Thus the muscle does not appear to require high levels of SMN above what is produced by two copies of SMN2 (and SMNΔ7). PMID:26276812

  20. The role of cyclic AMP and its protein kinase in mediating acetylcholine release and the action of adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J. K.; Silinsky, E. M.; Solsona, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    1. The importance of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and its protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) in promoting acetylcholine (ACh) release was studied at frog motor nerve endings. The effects of cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation on the action of adenosine receptor agonists were also investigated. 2. Cyclic AMP was delivered to a local region of the cytoplasm just beneath the plasma membrane of motor nerve endings using phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as a vehicle. Cyclic AMP in liposomes produced a parallel reduction in the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) and spontaneous ACh release (miniature endplate potential frequency; m.e.p.p.f) in most experiments. These inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP on quantal ACh release resemble the action of adenosine. 3. The effects of global increases in cytoplasmic cyclic AMP concentrations using lipophilic cyclic AMP analogues were generally different from those observed with cyclic AMP. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio) cyclic AMP (CPT cyclic AMP) produced approximately two fold increases in m and m.e.p.p.f. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP) also increased m and m.e.p.p.f, with the effect on m being smaller and more variable. 4. All three cyclic AMP analogues reduced the effects of adenosine receptor agonists on spontaneous and evoked ACh release. 5. The roles of protein phosphorylation in mediating ACh release and the inhibitory effects of adenosine were studied with the protein kinase inhibitor H7. H7 (30-100 microM) produced no consistent effect on evoked or spontaneous ACh release. At these concentrations, however, H7 exerted an unfortunate inhibitory action on the nicotinic ACh receptor/ion channel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2175231

  1. F-actin-based extensions of the head cyst cell adhere to the maturing spermatids to maintain them in a tight bundle and prevent their premature release in Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bela S; Shirolikar, Seema; Ray, Krishanu

    2009-01-01

    Background In Drosophila, all the 64 clonally derived spermatocytes differentiate in syncytium inside two somatic-origin cyst cells. They elongate to form slender spermatids, which are individualized and then released into the seminal vesicle. During individualization, differentiating spermatids are organized in a tight bundle inside the cyst, which is expected to play an important role in sperm selection. However, actual significance of this process and its underlying mechanism are unclear. Results We show that dynamic F-actin-based processes extend from the head cyst cell at the start of individualization, filling the interstitial space at the rostral ends of the maturing spermatid bundle. In addition to actin, these structures contained lamin, beta-catenin, dynamin, myosin VI and several other filopodial components. Further, pharmacological and genetic analyses showed that cytoskeletal stability and dynamin function are essential for their maintenance. Disruption of these F-actin based processes was associated with spermatid bundle disassembly and premature sperm release inside the testis. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggests that the head cyst cell adheres to the maturing spermatid heads through F-actin-based extensions, thus maintaining them in a tight bundle. This is likely to regulate mature sperm release into the seminal vesicle. Overall, this process bears resemblance to mammalian spermiation. PMID:19416498

  2. Disruption of neurofilament network with aggregation of light neurofilament protein: a common pathway leading to motor neuron degeneration due to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-linked mutations in NFL and HSPB1.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jinbin; Lin, Hong; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Schlaepfer, William W

    2007-12-15

    Mutations in neurofilament light (NFL) subunit and small heat-shock protein B1 (HSPB1) cause autosomal-dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2E (CMT2E) and type 2F (CMT2F). Previous studies have shown that CMT mutations in NFL and HSPB1 disrupt NF assembly and cause aggregation of NFL protein. In this study, we investigate the role of aggregation of NFL protein in the neurotoxicity of CMT mutant NFL and CMT mutant HSPB1 in motor neurons. We find that expression of CMT mutant NFL leads to progressive degeneration and loss of neuronal viability of cultured motor neurons. Degenerating motor neurons show fragmentation and loss of neuritic processes associated with disruption of NF network and aggregation of NFL protein. Co-expression of wild-type HSPB1 diminishes aggregation of CMT mutant NFL, induces reversal of CMT mutant NFL aggregates and reduces CMT mutant NFL-induced loss of motor neuron viability. Like CMT mutant NFL, expression of S135F CMT mutant HSPB1 also leads to progressive degeneration of motor neurons with disruption of NF network and aggregation of NFL protein. Further studies show that wild-type and S135F mutant HSPB1 associate with wild-type and CMT mutant NFL and that S135F mutant HSPB1 has dominant effect on disruption of NF assembly and aggregation of NFL protein. Finally, we show that deletion of NFL markedly reduces degeneration and loss of motor neuron viability induced by S135F mutant HSPB1. Together, our data support the view that disruption of NF network with aggregation of NFL is a common triggering event of motor neuron degeneration in CMT2E and CMT2F disease.

  3. The Motor Protein Myosin-X Transports VE-Cadherin along Filopodia To Allow the Formation of Early Endothelial Cell-Cell Contacts▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Sébastien; Durmort, Claire; Chervin-Pétinot, Adeline; Heyraud, Stephanie; Dubois, Mathilde; Lambert, Olivier; Maillefaud, Camille; Hewat, Elizabeth; Schaal, Jean Patrick; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelium (VE), the monolayer of endothelial cells that lines the vascular tree, undergoes damage at the basis of some vascular diseases. Its integrity is maintained by VE-cadherin, an adhesive receptor localized at cell-cell junctions. Here, we show that VE-cadherin is also located at the tip and along filopodia in sparse or subconfluent endothelial cells. We observed that VE-cadherin navigates along intrafilopodial actin filaments. We found that the actin motor protein myosin-X is colocalized and moves synchronously with filopodial VE-cadherin. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays confirmed that myosin-X is directly associated with the VE-cadherin complex. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of myosin-X revealed that myosin-X is required for VE-cadherin export to cell edges and filopodia. These features indicate that myosin-X establishes a link between the actin cytoskeleton and VE-cadherin, thereby allowing VE-cadherin transportation along intrafilopodial actin cables. In conclusion, we propose that VE-cadherin trafficking along filopodia using myosin-X motor protein is a prerequisite for cell-cell junction formation. This mechanism may have functional consequences for endothelium repair in pathological settings. PMID:20123970

  4. Characterization of Mutants of Human Small Heat Shock Protein HspB1 Carrying Replacements in the N-Terminal Domain and Associated with Hereditary Motor Neuron Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muranova, Lydia K.; Weeks, Stephen D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Gusev, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties of the mutations G34R, P39L and E41K in the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein B1 (HspB1), which have been associated with hereditary motor neuron neuropathy, were analyzed. Heat-induced aggregation of all mutants started at lower temperatures than for the wild type protein. All mutations decreased susceptibility of the N- and C-terminal parts of HspB1 to chymotrypsinolysis. All mutants formed stable homooligomers with a slightly larger apparent molecular weight compared to the wild type protein. All mutations analyzed decreased or completely prevented phosphorylation-induced dissociation of HspB1 oligomers. When mixed with HspB6 and heated, all mutants yielded heterooligomers with apparent molecular weights close to ~400 kDa. Finally, the three HspB1 mutants possessed lower chaperone-like activity towards model substrates (lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase and insulin) compared to the wild type protein, conversely the environmental probe bis-ANS yielded higher fluorescence with the mutants than with the wild type protein. Thus, in vitro the analyzed N-terminal mutations increase stability of large HspB1 homooligomers, prevent their phosphorylation-dependent dissociation, modulate their interaction with HspB6 and decrease their chaperoning capacity, preventing normal functioning of HspB1. PMID:25965061

  5. Molecular Motors: A Theorist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    2007-05-01

    Individual molecular motors, or motor proteins, are enzymatic molecules that convert chemical energy, typically obtained from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), into mechanical work and motion. Processive motor proteins, such as kinesin, dynein, and certain myosins, step unidirectionally along linear tracks, specifically microtubules and actin filaments, and play a crucial role in cellular transport processes, organization, and function. In this review some theoretical aspects of motor-protein dynamics are presented in the light of current experimental methods that enable the measurement of the biochemical and biomechanical properties on a single-molecule basis. After a brief discussion of continuum ratchet concepts, we focus on discrete kinetic and stochastic models that yield predictions for the mean velocity, V(F, [ATP], …), and other observables as a function of an imposed load force F, the ATP concentration, and other variables. The combination of appropriate theory with single-molecule observations should help uncover the mechanisms underlying motor-protein function.

  6. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice. PMID:27656663

  7. Repeated Baclofen treatment ameliorates motor dysfunction, suppresses reflex activity and decreases the expression of signaling proteins in reticular nuclei and lumbar motoneurons after spinal trauma in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Andrea; Schreiberová, Andrea; Závodská, Monika; Gedrová, Štefánia; Hricová, Ľudmila; Pavel, Jaroslav; Gálik, Ján; Maršala, Martin; Lukáčová, Nadežda

    2014-03-01

    The interruption of supraspinal input to the spinal cord leads to motor dysfunction and the development of spasticity. Clinical studies have shown that Baclofen (a GABAB agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with side-effects and the development of tolerance. The aim of the present study was to assess if discontinued Baclofen treatment and its repeated application leads antispasticity effects, and whether such changes affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brainstem, nNOS and parvalbumin (PV) in lumbar α-motoneurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to Th9 spinal cord transection. Baclofen (30mg/b.w.) diluted in drinking water, was administered for 6 days, starting at week 1 after injury and then repeated till week 4 after injury. The behavior of the animals was tested (tail-flick test, BBB locomotor score) from 1 to 8 weeks. Our results clearly indicate the role of nitric oxide, produced by nNOS in the initiation and the maintenance of spasticity states 1, 6 and 8 weeks after spinal trauma. A considerable decrease of nNOS staining after Baclofen treatment correlates with improvement of motor dysfunction. The findings also show that parvalbumin and astrocytes participate in the regulation of ion concentrations in the sub-acute phase after the injury.

  8. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  9. Motor Starters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) was invented by a NASA engineer. It matches voltage with a motor's actual need by sensing shifts in the relationship between voltage and current flow. With the device, power can be trimmed as much as 65%. Intellinet adopted this technology and designed "soft start" and "load-responsive" control modes to start engines gradually and recycle voltage without reducing motor speed. Other features are lower motor heat and faster fault identification.

  10. When a helicase is not a helicase: dsDNA tracking by the motor protein EcoR124I.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Louise K; Seidel, Ralf; van der Scheer, Carsten; Dekker, Nynke H; Szczelkun, Mark D; Dekker, Cees

    2006-05-17

    Using a combination of single molecule and bulk solution measurements, we have examined the DNA translocation activity of a helicase, the Type I restriction modification enzyme EcoR124I. We find that EcoR124I can translocate past covalent interstrand crosslinks, inconsistent with an obligatory unwinding mechanism. Instead, translocation of the intact dsDNA occurs principally via contacts to the sugar-phosphate backbone and bases of the 3'-5' strand; contacts to the 5'-3' strand are not essential for motion but do play a key role in stabilising the motor on the DNA. A model for dsDNA translocation is presented that could be applicable to a wide range of other enzyme complexes that are also labelled as helicases but which do not have actual unwinding activity.

  11. Application of molecular modeling to analysis of inhibition of kinesin motor proteins of the BimC subfamily by monastrol and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Bevan, David R; Garst, James F; Osborne, Caroline K; Sims, Angela M

    2005-11-01

    Application of molecular modeling approaches has potential to contribute to rational drug design. These approaches may be especially useful when attempting to elucidate the structural features associated with novel drug targets. In this study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics were applied to studies of inhibition of the human motor protein denoted HsEg5 and other homologues in the BimC subfamily. These proteins are essential for mitosis, so compounds that inhibit their activity may have potential as anticancer therapeutics. The discovery of a small-molecule cell-permeable inhibitor, monastrol, has stimulated research in this area. Interestingly, monastrol is reported to inhibit the human and Xenopus forms of Eg5, but not those from Drosophila and Aspergillus. In this study, homology modeling was used to generate models of the Xenopus, Drosophila, and Aspergillus homologues, using the crystal structure of the human protein in complex with monastrol as a template. A series of known inhibitors was docked into each of the homologues, and the differences in binding energies were consistent with reported experimental data. Molecular dynamics revealed significant changes in the structure of the Aspergillus homologue that may contribute to its relative insensitivity to monastrol and related compounds. PMID:17191952

  12. Inducibility of c-Fos protein in visuo-motor system and limbic structures after acute and repeated administration of nicotine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Kia, A M; Pages, C; Besson, M J

    1998-08-01

    To identify neuroanatomical substrates affected by nicotine, we have studied its effects after acute and repeated administration through the c-Fos protein inducibility in various brain structures. Ninety minutes after acute nicotine (0.35 mg/kg, s.c.) the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive nuclei was consistently increased in visuo-motor structures such as the superior colliculus, the medial terminal nucleus of accessory optic tract, and the nucleus of the optic tract. The anteroventral and lateroposterior thalamic nuclei, connected with the retina and involved in limbic processing, showed a c-Fos induction. c-Fos was preferentially induced in terminal fields of neurons of the ventral tegmental area such as the nucleus accumbens, the central amygdala, the lateral habenula, the lateral septum, as well as the cingulate, medial prefrontal, orbital and piriform cortices. In chronically treated rats (0.35 mg/kg s.c., 3 x day for 14 days), the last nicotine injection given on the 15th day was still able to induce 90 minutes later c-Fos protein in visuo-motor, retino-limbic, subcortical, and cortical limbic structures. Moreover, this chronic treatment produced an additional recruitment of c-Fos-positive nuclei in the cingulate cortex, the core and the ventral shell of the nucleus accumbens. c-Fos induction after nicotine differs from that reported after other addictive drugs in terms of pattern and chronic inducibility, indicating that different mechanisms are involved for maintaining this transcription factor. In addition to a preferential sensitivity of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to nicotine, activation of visuo-limbic and limbic regions could be relevant for understanding some context-dependent and addictive behaviors produced by nicotine.

  13. Opaque1 Encodes a Myosin XI Motor Protein That Is Required for Endoplasmic Reticulum Motility and Protein Body Formation in Maize Endosperm[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifeng; Wang, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhong, Mingyu; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Dianbin; Tang, Yuanping; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are encoded by multigene families and are involved in many basic biological processes. However, their functions in plants remain poorly understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of maize (Zea mays) opaque1 (o1), which encodes a myosin XI protein. o1 is a classic maize seed mutant with an opaque endosperm phenotype but a normal zein protein content. Compared with the wild type, o1 endosperm cells display dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structures and an increased number of smaller, misshapen protein bodies. The O1 gene was isolated by map-based cloning and was shown to encode a member of the plant myosin XI family (myosin XI-I). In endosperm cells, the O1 protein is associated with rough ER and protein bodies. Overexpression of the O1 tail domain (the C-terminal 644 amino acids) significantly inhibited ER streaming in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggested an association between O1 and the ER through a heat shock protein 70–interacting protein. In summary, this study indicated that O1 influences protein body biogenesis by affecting ER morphology and motility, ultimately affecting endosperm texture. PMID:22892319

  14. Myosin Vc Interacts with Rab32 and Rab38 Proteins and Works in the Biogenesis and Secretion of Melanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Bultema, Jarred J.; Boyle, Judith A.; Malenke, Parker B.; Martin, Faye E.; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C.; Cheney, Richard E.; Di Pietro, Santiago M.

    2014-01-01

    Class V myosins are actin-based motors with conserved functions in vesicle and organelle trafficking. Herein we report the discovery of a function for Myosin Vc in melanosome biogenesis as an effector of melanosome-associated Rab GTPases. We isolated Myosin Vc in a yeast two-hybrid screening for proteins that interact with Rab38, a Rab protein involved in the biogenesis of melanosomes and other lysosome-related organelles. Rab38 and its close homolog Rab32 bind to Myosin Vc but not to Myosin Va or Myosin Vb. Binding depends on residues in the switch II region of Rab32 and Rab38 and regions of the Myosin Vc coiled-coil tail domain. Myosin Vc also interacts with Rab7a and Rab8a but not with Rab11, Rab17, and Rab27. Although Myosin Vc is not particularly abundant on pigmented melanosomes, its knockdown in MNT-1 melanocytes caused defects in the trafficking of integral membrane proteins to melanosomes with substantially increased surface expression of Tyrp1, nearly complete loss of Tyrp2, and significant Vamp7 mislocalization. Knockdown of Myosin Vc in MNT-1 cells more than doubled the abundance of pigmented melanosomes but did not change the number of unpigmented melanosomes. Together the data demonstrate a novel role for Myosin Vc in melanosome biogenesis and secretion. PMID:25324551

  15. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; He, Qiang; Li, Ying-Ying; Li, Ce; Bai, Yu-Long; Hu, Yong-Shan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of 'learned non-use' and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model) group, a CIMT + model (CIMT) group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi.

  16. The Evolutionarily Conserved LIM Homeodomain Protein LIM-4/LHX6 Specifies the Terminal Identity of a Cholinergic and Peptidergic C. elegans Sensory/Inter/Motor Neuron-Type

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Huh, Yang Hoon; Fang, Zi; Park, Seo Jin; Kim, Myoung Ok; Ryoo, Zae Young; Kang, Kyeongjin; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Jeon, Won Bae; Li, Chris; Kim, Kyuhyung

    2015-01-01

    The expression of specific transcription factors determines the differentiated features of postmitotic neurons. However, the mechanism by which specific molecules determine neuronal cell fate and the extent to which the functions of transcription factors are conserved in evolution are not fully understood. In C. elegans, the cholinergic and peptidergic SMB sensory/inter/motor neurons innervate muscle quadrants in the head and control the amplitude of sinusoidal movement. Here we show that the LIM homeobox protein LIM-4 determines neuronal characteristics of the SMB neurons. In lim-4 mutant animals, expression of terminal differentiation genes, such as the cholinergic gene battery and the flp-12 neuropeptide gene, is completely abolished and thus the function of the SMB neurons is compromised. LIM-4 activity promotes SMB identity by directly regulating the expression of the SMB marker genes via a distinct cis-regulatory motif. Two human LIM-4 orthologs, LHX6 and LHX8, functionally substitute for LIM-4 in C. elegans. Furthermore, C. elegans LIM-4 or human LHX6 can induce cholinergic and peptidergic characteristics in the human neuronal cell lines. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved LIM-4/LHX6 homeodomain proteins function in generation of precise neuronal subtypes. PMID:26305787

  17. Chloride-driven electromechanical phase lags at acoustic frequencies are generated by SLC26a5, the outer hair cell motor protein.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Song, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) possess voltage-dependent membrane bound molecular motors, identified as the solute carrier protein SLC26a5, that drive somatic motility at acoustic frequencies. The electromotility (eM) of OHCs provides for cochlear amplification, a process that enhances auditory sensitivity by up to three orders of magnitude. In this study, using whole cell voltage clamp and mechanical measurement techniques, we identify disparities between voltage sensing and eM that result from stretched exponential electromechanical behavior of SLC26a5, also known as prestin, for its fast responsiveness. This stretched exponential behavior, which we accurately recapitulate with a new kinetic model, the meno presto model of prestin, influences the protein's responsiveness to chloride binding and provides for delays in eM relative to membrane voltage driving force. The model predicts that in the frequency domain, these delays would result in eM phase lags that we confirm by measuring OHC eM at acoustic frequencies. These lags may contribute to canceling viscous drag, a requirement for many models of cochlear amplification.

  18. Major facilitator superfamily domain-containing protein 2a (MFSD2A) has roles in body growth, motor function, and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berger, Justin H; Charron, Maureen J; Silver, David L

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic adaptations to fasting in the liver are largely controlled by the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), where PPARα upregulates genes encoding the biochemical pathway for β-oxidation of fatty acids and ketogenesis. As part of an effort to identify and characterize nutritionally regulated genes that play physiological roles in the adaptation to fasting, we identified Major facilitator superfamily domain-containing protein 2a (Mfsd2a) as a fasting-induced gene regulated by both PPARα and glucagon signaling in the liver. MFSD2A is a cell-surface protein homologous to bacterial sodium-melibiose transporters. Hepatic expression and turnover of MFSD2A is acutely regulated by fasting/refeeding, but expression in the brain is constitutive. Relative to wildtype mice, gene-targeted Mfsd2a knockout mice are smaller, leaner, and have decreased serum, liver and brown adipose triglycerides. Mfsd2a knockout mice have normal liver lipid metabolism but increased whole body energy expenditure, likely due to increased β-oxidation in brown adipose tissue and significantly increased voluntary movement, but surprisingly exhibited a form of ataxia. Together, these results indicate that MFSD2A is a nutritionally regulated gene that plays myriad roles in body growth and development, motor function, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, these data suggest that the ligand(s) that are transported by MFSD2A play important roles in these physiological processes and await future identification. PMID:23209793

  19. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; He, Qiang; Li, Ying-Ying; Li, Ce; Bai, Yu-Long; Hu, Yong-Shan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of 'learned non-use' and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model) group, a CIMT + model (CIMT) group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi. PMID:26889190

  20. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; He, Qiang; Li, Ying-ying; Li, Ce; Bai, Yu-long; Hu, Yong-shan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of ‘learned non-use’ and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model) group, a CIMT + model (CIMT) group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi. PMID:26889190

  1. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  2. Collective dynamics of processive cytoskeletal motors.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R Tyler; Diehl, Michael R; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2016-01-01

    Major cellular processes are supported by various biomolecular motors that usually operate together as teams. We present an overview of the collective dynamics of processive cytokeletal motor proteins based on recent experimental and theoretical investigations. Experimental studies show that multiple motors function with different degrees of cooperativity, ranging from negative to positive. This effect depends on the mechanical properties of individual motors, the geometry of their connections, and the surrounding cellular environment. Theoretical models based on stochastic approaches underline the importance of intermolecular interactions, the properties of single motors, and couplings with cellular medium in predicting the collective dynamics. We discuss several features that specify the cooperativity in motor proteins. Based on this approach a general picture of collective dynamics of motor proteins is formulated, and the future directions and challenges are discussed.

  3. Collective Dynamics of Processive Cytoskeletal Motors

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, R. Tyler; Diehl, Michael R.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-01-01

    Major cellular processes are supported by various biomolecular motors that usually operate together as teams. We present an overview of the collective dynamics of processive cytokeletal motor proteins based on recent experimental and theoretical investigations. Experimental studies show that multiple motors function with different degrees of cooperativity, ranging from negative to positive. This effect depends on the mechanical properties of individual motors, the geometry of their connections, and the surrounding cellular environment. Theoretical models based on stochastic approaches underline the importance of intermolecular interactions, the properties of single motors, and couplings with cellular medium in predicting the collective dynamics. We discuss several features that specify the cooperativity in motor proteins. Based on this approach a general picture of collective dynamics of motor proteins is formulated, and the future directions and challenges are discussed. PMID:26444155

  4. A Splicing Mutation in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein DNAJC11 Causes Motor Neuron Pathology Associated with Cristae Disorganization, and Lymphoid Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ioakeimidis, Fotis; Ott, Christine; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Violitzi, Foteini; Rinotas, Vagelis; Makrinou, Eleni; Eliopoulos, Elias; Fasseas, Costas; Kollias, George; Douni, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial structure and function is emerging as a major contributor to neuromuscular disease, highlighting the need for the complete elucidation of the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms. Following a forward genetics approach with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated random mutagenesis, we identified a novel mouse model of autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by a splice-site hypomorphic mutation in a novel gene of unknown function, DnaJC11. Recent findings have demonstrated that DNAJC11 protein co-immunoprecipitates with proteins of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial cristae and cristae junctions. Homozygous mutant mice developed locomotion defects, muscle weakness, spasticity, limb tremor, leucopenia, thymic and splenic hypoplasia, general wasting and early lethality. Neuropathological analysis showed severe vacuolation of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, originating from dilatations of the endoplasmic reticulum and notably from mitochondria that had lost their proper inner membrane organization. The causal role of the identified mutation in DnaJC11 was verified in rescue experiments by overexpressing the human ortholog. The full length 63 kDa isoform of human DNAJC11 was shown to localize in the periphery of the mitochondrial outer membrane whereas putative additional isoforms displayed differential submitochondrial localization. Moreover, we showed that DNAJC11 is assembled in a high molecular weight complex, similarly to mitofilin and that downregulation of mitofilin or SAM50 affected the levels of DNAJC11 in HeLa cells. Our findings provide the first mouse mutant for a putative MICOS protein and establish a link between DNAJC11 and neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25111180

  5. Phosphodiesterase type IV inhibition prevents sequestration of CREB binding protein, protects striatal parvalbumin interneurons and rescues motor deficits in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Giampà, Carmela; Middei, Silvia; Patassini, Stefano; Borreca, Antonella; Marullo, Fabrizia; Laurenti, Daunia; Bernardi, Giorgio; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Fusco, Francesca R

    2009-03-01

    The phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor rolipram increases cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and exerts neuroprotective effects in both the quinolinic acid rat model of Huntington's disease (DeMarch et al., 2007) and the R6/2 mouse including sparing of striatal neurons, prevention of neuronal intranuclear inclusion formation and attenuation of microglial reaction (DeMarch et al., 2008). In this study, we sought to determine if rolipram has a beneficial role in the altered distribution of CREB binding protein in striatal spiny neurons and in the motor impairments shown by R6/2 mutants. Moreover, we investigated whether rolipram treatment altered the degeneration of parvalbuminergic interneurons typical of Huntington's disease (Fusco et al., 1999). Transgenic mice and their wild-type controls from a stable colony maintained in our laboratory were treated with rolipram (1.5 mg/kg) or saline daily starting from 4 weeks of age. The cellular distribution of CREB binding protein in striatal spiny neurons was assessed by immunofluorescence, whereas parvalbuminergic neuron degeneration was evaluated by cell counts of immunohistochemically labeled tissue. Motor coordination and motor activity were also examined. We found that rolipram was effective in preventing CREB binding protein sequestration into striatal neuronal intranuclear inclusions, sparing parvalbuminergic interneurons of R6/2 mice, and rescuing their motor coordination and motor activity deficits. Our findings demonstrate the possibility of reversing pharmacologically the behavioral and neuropathological abnormalities of symptomatic R6/2 mice and underline the potential therapeutic value of phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitors in Huntington's disease.

  6. Multimotor Driven Cargos: From Single Motor under Load to the Role of Motor-Motor Coupling.

    PubMed

    Peker, Itay; Granek, Rony

    2016-07-01

    Motor proteins constitute an essential part of the cellular machinery. They have been the subject of intensive studies in the past two decades. Yet, when several motors simultaneously carry a single cargo, the effect of motor-motor coupling, such as mutual stalling and jamming, remains unclear. We commence by constructing a general model for single motor motion, which is a product of a derived load-dependent expression and a phenomenological motor specific function. Forming the latter according to recent single molecule measurements for a given load, the model correctly predicts the motor full step-size distribution for all other measured loads. We then use our proposed model to predict transport properties of multimotor complexes, with particular attention to 1-dimensional constructs with variable flexibility, motor density, and number of motors: (i) a chain of motors connected by springs, a recently studied construction of a pair, and (ii) an array of motors all connected by identical springs to a stiff rod, which is essentially a mirror image of standard gliding motility assays. In both systems, and for any number of carrying motors, we find that, while low flexibility results in a strongly damped velocity, increased flexibility renders an almost single motor velocity. Comparing our model based simulations to recent gliding assays we find remarkable qualitative agreement. We also demonstrate consistency with other multimotor motility assays. In all cases, the characteristic spring constant, that controls the crossover behavior between high and low velocity regimes, is found to be the stalling force divided by the mean step size. We conjecture that this characteristic spring constant can serve as a tool for engineering multimotor complexes. PMID:27044876

  7. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization.

    PubMed

    Higgins, David M; Nannas, Natalie J; Dawe, R Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  8. Chloride-driven Electromechanical Phase Lags at Acoustic Frequencies Are Generated by SLC26a5, the Outer Hair Cell Motor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Song, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) possess voltage-dependent membrane bound molecular motors, identified as the solute carrier protein SLC26a5, that drive somatic motility at acoustic frequencies. The electromotility (eM) of OHCs provides for cochlear amplification, a process that enhances auditory sensitivity by up to three orders of magnitude. In this study, using whole cell voltage clamp and mechanical measurement techniques, we identify disparities between voltage sensing and eM that result from stretched exponential electromechanical behavior of SLC26a5, also known as prestin, for its fast responsiveness. This stretched exponential behavior, which we accurately recapitulate with a new kinetic model, the meno presto model of prestin, influences the protein’s responsiveness to chloride binding and provides for delays in eM relative to membrane voltage driving force. The model predicts that in the frequency domain, these delays would result in eM phase lags that we confirm by measuring OHC eM at acoustic frequencies. These lags may contribute to canceling viscous drag, a requirement for many models of cochlear amplification. PMID:24988347

  9. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  10. Stimulus complexity dependent memory impairment and changes in motor performance after deletion of the neuronal gap junction protein connexin36 in mice.

    PubMed

    Frisch, C; De Souza-Silva, M A; Söhl, G; Güldenagel, M; Willecke, K; Huston, J P; Dere, E

    2005-02-10

    Gap junction channels, composed of connexin (Cx) proteins, are conduits for intercellular communication and metabolic exchange in the central nervous system. Connexin36 (Cx36) is expressed in distinct subpopulations of neurons throughout the mammalian brain. Deletion of the Cx36 gene in the mouse affected power and frequency of gamma and sharp wave-ripple oscillations, putative correlates of memory engram inscription. Here, we present a behavioral analysis of Cx36-deficient mice. Activity patterns, exploratory- and anxiety-related responses were largely unaffected by elimination of Cx36, while sensorimotor capacities and learning and memory processes were impaired. Repeated testing on the rotarod suggested that the Cx36-deficient mice showed slower motor-coordination learning. After a retention interval of 24 h the Cx36-deficient mice showed habituation to an open-field, but failed to habituate to a more complex spatial environment (Y-maze). A more pronounced memory impairment was found when Cx36 knockout mice had to remember recently explored objects. Cx36-deficient mice were unable to recognize objects after short delays of 15 and 45 min. These data suggest that lack of Cx36 induces memory impairments that vary in dependence of the complexity of the stimuli presented. Our results suggest that neuronal gap junctions incorporating Cx36 play a role in learning and memory.

  11. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP. PMID:25330799

  12. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP.

  13. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation.

  14. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  15. Cellular prion protein regulates the motor behaviour performance and anxiety-induced responses in genetically modified mice.

    PubMed

    Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Walz, Roger; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Calvo, Fabrício; Terzian, Ana Luiza Bernardes; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2007-10-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a sialoglycoprotein involved in neuroplasticity processes and synaptic transmission. This study investigated behavioural responses (balance in the rota-rod test at 24 rpm, motility in the open-field test, anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test) in Zurich developed wild-type adult mice (WT, controls of normal PrP(C) expression), in knockout (KO) mice (Prnp(0/0), with no PrP(C) expression), and in PrP(C) overexpressing Tg-20 mice. After 8 min in the rota-rod test, Tg-20 animals presented significantly fewer falls (1.08+/-1.56 falls) than both WT (7.27+/-4.36) and KO (7.6+/-6.15) mice (p<0.01). In the open field test, Tg-20 animals showed significantly increased motility [rearing=23.4+/-7.85, crossing=97.30+/-32.11) when compared with KO mice (rearing=5.45+/-3.69 and crossing=59.73+/-15.43) or WT mice (rearing=6.5+/-20.23 and crossing=45.18+/-20.33) (p<0.01). In the elevated plus-maze test, Tg-20 mice showed less anxiety (head projections=7.3+/-1.62) when compared with WT animals (3.38+/-0.67) (p<0.05). Moreover, KO mice spent more time in the centre of the plus maze (37.80+/-5.57 s) than did WT mice (22.57+/-3.82) (p<0.05). PrP(C) overexpressing mice evoked increased motility, less anxiety, and increased equilibrium when compared with WT control animals in the behavioural protocols used. KO animals also tended to evoke fewer anxiety-related responses in the elevated plus-maze test. These findings indicate that the levels of PrP(C) in adult life are associated with possible changes in motility, anxiety, and equilibrium.

  16. Motor neglect.

    PubMed Central

    Laplane, D; Degos, J D

    1983-01-01

    Motor neglect is characterised by an underutilisation of one side, without defects of strength, reflexes or sensibility. Twenty cases of frontal, parietal and thalamic lesions causing motor neglect, but all without sensory neglect, are reported. It is proposed that the cerebral structures involved in motor neglect are the same as those for sensory neglect and for the preparation of movement. As in sensory neglect, the multiplicity of the structures concerned suggests that this interconnection is necessary to maintain a sufficient level of activity. Predominance of left sided neglect by right sided lesions suggests that the left hemisphere is dominant for deliberate activity; hemispheric dominance could be applied to sensory neglect where conscious awareness would play the role of deliberate activity. PMID:6842219

  17. Small heat shock proteins in cellular adhesion and migration: evidence from Plasmodium genetics.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Georgina N; Matuschewski, Kai; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular locomotion and adhesion critically depend on regulated turnover of filamentous actin. Biochemical data from diverse model systems support a role for the family of small heat shock proteins (HSPBs) in microfilament regulation. The small chaperones could either act directly, through competition with the motor myosin, or indirectly, through modulation of actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin activity. However, a direct link between HSPBs and actin-based cellular motility remained to be established. In a recent experimental genetics study, we provided evidence for regulation of Plasmodium motility by HSPB6/Hsp20. The infectious forms of malaria parasites, termed sporozoites, display fast and continuous substrate-dependent motility, which is largely driven by turnover of actin microfilaments. Sporozoite gliding locomotion is essential to avoid destruction by host defense mechanisms and to ultimately reach a hepatocyte, the target cell, where to transform and replicate. Genetic ablation of Plasmodium HSP20 dramatically changed sporozoite speed and substrate adhesion, resulting in impaired natural malaria transmission. In this article, we discuss the function of Hsp20 in this fast-moving unicellular protozoan and implications for the roles of HSPBs in adhesion and migration of eukaryotic cells.

  18. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed. PMID:25688287

  19. Motor learning.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2010-06-01

    Although learning a motor skill, such as a tennis stroke, feels like a unitary experience, researchers who study motor control and learning break the processes involved into a number of interacting components. These components can be organized into four main groups. First, skilled performance requires the effective and efficient gathering of sensory information, such as deciding where and when to direct one's gaze around the court, and thus an important component of skill acquisition involves learning how best to extract task-relevant information. Second, the performer must learn key features of the task such as the geometry and mechanics of the tennis racket and ball, the properties of the court surface, and how the wind affects the ball's flight. Third, the player needs to set up different classes of control that include predictive and reactive control mechanisms that generate appropriate motor commands to achieve the task goals, as well as compliance control that specifies, for example, the stiffness with which the arm holds the racket. Finally, the successful performer can learn higher-level skills such as anticipating and countering the opponent's strategy and making effective decisions about shot selection. In this Primer we shall consider these components of motor learning using as an example how we learn to play tennis. PMID:20541489

  20. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  1. Motor learning.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2010-06-01

    Although learning a motor skill, such as a tennis stroke, feels like a unitary experience, researchers who study motor control and learning break the processes involved into a number of interacting components. These components can be organized into four main groups. First, skilled performance requires the effective and efficient gathering of sensory information, such as deciding where and when to direct one's gaze around the court, and thus an important component of skill acquisition involves learning how best to extract task-relevant information. Second, the performer must learn key features of the task such as the geometry and mechanics of the tennis racket and ball, the properties of the court surface, and how the wind affects the ball's flight. Third, the player needs to set up different classes of control that include predictive and reactive control mechanisms that generate appropriate motor commands to achieve the task goals, as well as compliance control that specifies, for example, the stiffness with which the arm holds the racket. Finally, the successful performer can learn higher-level skills such as anticipating and countering the opponent's strategy and making effective decisions about shot selection. In this Primer we shall consider these components of motor learning using as an example how we learn to play tennis.

  2. Therma motor

    DOEpatents

    Kandarian, R.

    The disclosure is directed to a thermal motor utilizing two tapered prestressed parallel adjacent cylinders lengthwise disposed about one third in a coolant. Heat is applied to contacting portions of the cylinders outside the coolant to cause them to deform and turn. Heat sources such as industrial waste heat, geothermal hot water, solar radiation, etc. can be used.

  3. Inhibition of the Motor Protein Eg5/Kinesin-5 in Amyloid β-Mediated Impairment of Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation and Dendritic Spine Loss.

    PubMed

    Freund, Ronald K; Gibson, Emily S; Potter, Huntington; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid plaques, and neurodegeneration. However, this pathology is preceded by increased soluble amyloid beta (Aβ) 1-42 oligomers that interfere with the glutamatergic synaptic plasticity required for learning and memory, includingN-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). In particular, soluble Aβ(1-42) acutely inhibits LTP and chronically causes synapse loss. Many mechanisms have been proposed for Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction, but we recently found that Aβ(1-42) inhibits the microtubule motor protein Eg5/kinesin-5. Here we compared the impacts of Aβ(1-42) and monastrol, a small-molecule Eg5 inhibitor, on LTP in hippocampal slices and synapse loss in neuronal cultures. Acute (20-minute) treatment with monastrol, like Aβ, completely inhibited LTP at doses >100 nM. In addition, 1 nM Aβ(1-42) or 50 nM monastrol inhibited LTP #x223c;50%, and when applied together caused complete LTP inhibition. At concentrations that impaired LTP, neither Aβ(1-42) nor monastrol inhibited NMDAR synaptic responses until #x223c;60 minutes, when only #x223c;25% inhibition was seen for monastrol, indicating that NMDAR inhibition was not responsible for LTP inhibition by either agent when applied for only 20 minutes. Finally, 48 hours of treatment with either 0.5-1.0μM Aβ(1-42) or 1-5μM monastrol reduced the dendritic spine/synapse density in hippocampal cultures up to a maximum of #x223c;40%, and when applied together at maximal concentrations, no additional spine loss resulted. Thus, monastrol can mimic and in some cases occlude the impact of Aβon LTP and synapse loss, suggesting that Aβinduces acute and chronic synaptic dysfunction in part through inhibiting Eg5.

  4. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  5. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  6. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  7. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  8. A focal adhesion factor directly linking intracellularly motile Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii to the actin-based cytoskeleton of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, T; Ebel, F; Domann, E; Niebuhr, K; Gerstel, B; Pistor, S; Temm-Grove, C J; Jockusch, B M; Reinhard, M; Walter, U

    1995-04-01

    The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the sole listerial factor needed for recruitment of host actin filaments by intracellularly motile bacteria. Here we report that following Listeria infection the host vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a microfilament- and focal adhesion-associated substrate of both the cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, accumulates on the surface of intracytoplasmic bacteria prior to the detection of F-actin 'clouds'. VASP remains associated with the surface of highly motile bacteria, where it is polarly located, juxtaposed between one extremity of the bacterial surface and the front of the actin comet tail. Since actin filament polymerization occurs only at the very front of the tail, VASP exhibits properties of a host protein required to promote actin polymerization. Purified VASP binds directly to the ActA polypeptide in vitro. A ligand-overlay blot using purified radiolabelled VASP enabled us to identify the ActA homologue of the related intracellular motile pathogen, Listeria ivanovii, as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. VASP also associates with actin filaments recruited by another intracellularly motile bacterial pathogen, Shigella flexneri. Hence, by the simple expedient of expressing surface-bound attractor molecules, bacterial pathogens effectively harness cytoskeletal components to achieve intracellular movement.

  9. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems—the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32–125 motors per μm2), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track. PMID:25201964

  10. Siphon motor

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    A siphon motor comprises the combination of siphon means and generating means for generating electrical energy from a water source located below the generating means and a water discharge at a lower level than the water source. Water rises by siphonic action upward from the water source to a sealed working region maintained under partial vacuum, and descends to the water discharge. The working region contains the generating means. The system has particular utility as a source of power generation in remote locations having a water table within about 30 feet of the ground.

  11. CRL2(LRR-1) targets a CDK inhibitor for cell cycle control in C. elegans and actin-based motility regulation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Natalia G; Simpliciano, Jennifer M; McGuirk, Michael A; Kipreos, Edward T

    2010-11-16

    The Cip/Kip CDK inhibitor (CKI) p21(Cip1/WAF1) has a critical role in the nucleus to limit cell proliferation by inhibiting CDK-cyclin complexes. In contrast, cytoplasmic p21 regulates cell survival and the actin cytoskeleton. These divergent functions for p21 in different cellular compartments suggest the necessity for complex regulation. In this study, we identify the CRL2(LRR-1) ubiquitin ligase as a conserved regulator of Cip/Kip CKIs that promotes the degradation of C. elegans CKI-1 and human p21. The nematode CRL2(LRR-1) complex negatively regulates nuclear CKI-1 levels to ensure G1-phase cell cycle progression in germ cells. In contrast, human CRL2(LRR1) targets cytoplasmic p21, acting as a critical regulator of cell motility that promotes a nonmotile stationary cell state by preventing p21 from inhibiting the Rho/ROCK/LIMK pathway. Inactivation of human CRL2(LRR1) leads to the activation of the actin-depolymerizing protein cofilin, dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased cell motility.

  12. Evidence implicating the 5' untranslated region of Listeria monocytogenes actA in the regulation of bacterial actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kendy K Y; Bouwer, H G Archie; Freitag, Nancy E

    2004-02-01

    The ActA protein of Listeria monocytogenes is a major virulence factor, essential for the recruitment and polymerization of host actin filaments that lead to intracellular motility and cell-to-cell spread of bacteria within the infected host. The expression of actA is tightly regulated and is strongly induced only when L. monocytogenes is within the host cytosol. Intracellular induction of actA expression is mediated through a single promoter element that directs the expression of a messenger RNA with a long (150 bp) 5' untranslated region (UTR). Deletion of the actA+3 to +130 upstream region was found to result in bacterial mutants that were no longer capable of intracellular actin recruitment or cell-to-cell spread, thus indicating that this region is important for actA expression. L. monocytogenes strains that contained smaller deletions (21-23 bp) within the actA upstream region demonstrated a range of actA expression levels that coincided with the amount of bacterial cell-to-cell spread observed within infected monolayers. A correlation appeared to exist between levels of actA expression and the ability of L. monocytogenes to transition from uniform actin accumulation surrounding individual bacteria (actin clouds) to directional assembly and the formation of actin tails. Bacterial mutants containing deletions that most significantly altered the predicted secondary structure of the actA mRNA 5' UTR had the largest reductions in actA expression. These results suggest that the actA 5' UTR is required for maximal ActA synthesis and that a threshold level of ActA synthesis must be achieved to promote the transition from bacteria-associated actin clouds to directional actin assembly and movement.

  13. Mechanics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Koen

    2001-03-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy into work by mechanisms that researchers are just starting to uncover. We have studied the coupling of chemistry to mechanics for kinesin, a motor protein that moves in a stepwise fashion along microtubules and is energized by the hydrolysis of ATP. Velocities of individual kinesin molecules at varying ATP concentrations and loads were recorded using a molecular force cl& a feedback-driven optical trap, which maintains constant loads on individual moving motor molecules. These measurements showed that kinesin requires only a single ATP molecule per mechanical step, and revealed the load-dependant biochemical transitions in the kinesin cycle where conformational changes are likely to occur. Modeling of the velocity data showed that kinesin mechanochemistry can be characterized by a mechanism that involves a thermally-activated and load-dependent isomerization directly following ATP binding. The model quantitatively accounts for velocity data over a wide range of loads and ATP concentrations, and indicates that movement may be accomplished through two sequential, non-identical, 4-nm sized substeps.

  14. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  15. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  16. Shift from extracellular signal-regulated kinase to AKT/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway increases survival-motor-neuron expression in spinal-muscular-atrophy-like mice and patient cells.

    PubMed

    Branchu, Julien; Biondi, Olivier; Chali, Farah; Collin, Thibault; Leroy, Felix; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Makoukji, Joelle; Pariset, Claude; Lopes, Philippe; Massaad, Charbel; Chanoine, Christophe; Charbonnier, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a recessive neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons. No available therapy exists for SMA, which represents one of the leading genetic causes of death in childhood. SMA is caused by a mutation of the survival-of-motor-neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to a quantitative defect in the survival-motor-neuron (SMN) protein expression. All patients retain one or more copies of the SMN2 gene, which modulates the disease severity by producing a small amount of stable SMN protein. We reported recently that NMDA receptor activation, directly in the spinal cord, significantly enhanced the transcription rate of the SMN2 genes in a mouse model of very severe SMA (referred as type 1) by a mechanism that involved AKT/CREB pathway activation. Here, we provide the first compelling evidence for a competition between the MEK/ERK/Elk-1 and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/CREB signaling pathways for SMN2 gene regulation in the spinal cord of type 1 SMA-like mice. The inhibition of the MEK/ERK/Elk-1 pathway promotes the AKT/CREB pathway activation, leading to (1) an enhanced SMN expression in the spinal cord of SMA-like mice and in human SMA myotubes and (2) a 2.8-fold lifespan extension in SMA-like mice. Furthermore, we identified a crosstalk between ERK and AKT signaling pathways that involves the calcium-dependent modulation of CaMKII activity. Together, all these data open new perspectives to the therapeutic strategy for SMA patients. PMID:23467345

  17. Kinetic mechanism of Nicotiana tabacum myosin-11 defines a new type of a processive motor.

    PubMed

    Diensthuber, Ralph P; Tominaga, Motoki; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K; Orii, Hidefumi; Chizhov, Igor; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The 175-kDa myosin-11 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt(175kDa)myosin-11) is exceptional in its mechanical activity as it is the fastest known processive actin-based motor, moving 10 times faster than the structurally related class 5 myosins. Although this ability might be essential for long-range organelle transport within larger plant cells, the kinetic features underlying the fast processive movement of Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 still remain unexplored. To address this, we generated a single-headed motor domain construct and carried out a detailed kinetic analysis. The data demonstrate that Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 is a high duty ratio motor, which remains associated with actin most of its enzymatic cycle. However, different from other processive myosins that establish a high duty ratio on the basis of a rate-limiting ADP-release step, Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 achieves a high duty ratio by a prolonged duration of the ATP-induced isomerization of the actin-bound states and ADP release kinetics, both of which in terms of the corresponding time constants approach the total ATPase cycle time. Molecular modeling predicts that variations in the charge distribution of the actin binding interface might contribute to the thermodynamic fine-tuning of the kinetics of this myosin. Our study unravels a new type of a high duty ratio motor and provides important insights into the molecular mechanism of processive movement of higher plant myosins. PMID:25326536

  18. Electrostatic origin of the unidirectionality of walking myosin V motors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Warshel, Arieh

    2013-10-22

    Understanding the basis for the action of myosin motors and related molecular machines requires a quantitative energy-based description of the overall functional cycle. Previous theoretical attempts to do so have provided interesting insights on parts of the cycle but could not generate a structure-based free energy landscape for the complete cycle of myosin. In particular, a nonphenomenological structure/energy-based understanding of the unidirectional motion is still missing. Here we use a coarse-grained model of myosin V and generate a structure-based free energy surface of the largest conformational change, namely the transition from the post- to prepowerstroke movement. We also couple the observed energetics of ligand binding/hydrolysis and product release to that of the conformational surface and reproduce the energetics of the complete mechanochemical cycle. It is found that the release in electrostatic free energy upon changing the conformation of the lever arm and the convertor domain from its post- to prepowerstroke state provides the necessary energy to bias the system towards the unidirectional movement of myosin V on the actin filament. The free energy change of 11 kcal is also in the range of ∼2-3 pN, which is consistent with the experimentally observed stalling force required to stop the motor completely on its track. The conformational-chemical coupling generating a successful powerstroke cycle is believed to be conserved among most members of the myosin family, thus highlighting the importance of the previously unknown role of electrostatics free energy in guiding the functional cycle in other actin-based myosin motors. PMID:24106304

  19. A Role for Myosin V Motor Proteins in the Selective Delivery of Kv Channel Isoforms to the Membrane Surface of Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher-Bass, Sarah M.; Vesely, Eileen D.; Zhang, Lian; Ryland, Katherine E.; McEwen, Dyke P.; Chan, Priscilla J.; Frasier, Chad R.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Shaw, Robin M.; Martens, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Kv1.5 (KCNA5) mediates the IKur current that controls atrial action potential duration. Given its atrial-specific expression and alterations in human atrial fibrillation (AF), Kv1.5 has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of AF. A necessary step in the development of novel agents that selectively modulate trafficking pathways is the identification of the cellular machinery controlling Kv1.5 surface density, of which little is yet known. Objective To investigate the role of the unconventional myosin V (MYO5A and MYO5B) motors in determining the cell surface density of Kv1.5. Methods and Results Western Blot analysis showed MYO5A and MYO5B expression in the heart, while disruption of endogenous motors selectively reduced IKur current in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Dominant negative constructs and shRNA silencing demonstrated a role for MYO5A and MYO5B in the surface trafficking of Kv1.5 and Connexin-43 (Cx43), but not hERG (KCNH2). Live-cell imaging of Kv1.5-GFP and retrospective labeling of phalloidin demonstrated motility of Kv1.5 vesicles on actin tracts. MYO5A participated in anterograde trafficking, while MYO5B regulated post-endocytic recycling. Over-expression of mutant motors revealed a selective role for Rab11 in coupling MYO5B to Kv1.5 recycling. Conclusions MYO5A and MYO5B control functionally distinct steps in the surface trafficking of Kv1.5. These isoform-specific trafficking pathways determine Kv1.5-encoded IKur in myocytes to regulate repolarizing current, and consequently, cardiac excitability. Therapeutic strategies that manipulate Kv1.5 selective trafficking pathways may prove useful in the treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:24508725

  20. A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Widdas, Wilfred F.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick’s work, energetics were revised by Joule’s experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration. PMID:19325829

  1. A microrotary motor powered by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Yuichi; Miyata, Makoto; Tada, Tetsuya; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2006-09-01

    Biological molecular motors have a number of unique advantages over artificial motors, including efficient conversion of chemical energy into mechanical work and the potential for self-assembly into larger structures, as is seen in muscle sarcomeres and bacterial and eukaryotic flagella. The development of an appropriate interface between such biological materials and synthetic devices should enable us to realize useful hybrid micromachines. Here we describe a microrotary motor composed of a 20-μm-diameter silicon dioxide rotor driven on a silicon track by the gliding bacterium Mycoplasma mobile. This motor is fueled by glucose and inherits some of the properties normally attributed to living systems. glucose | micro actuator | motor protein | nanobiotechnology | Mycoplasma gliding

  2. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons.

  3. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  4. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  5. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  6. Traffic of cytoskeletal motors with disordered attachment rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzeschik, H.; Harris, R. J.; Santen, L.

    2010-03-01

    Motivated by experimental results on the interplay between molecular motors and tau proteins, we extend lattice-based models of intracellular transport to include a second species of particle which locally influences the motor-filament attachment rate. We consider various exactly solvable limits of a stochastic multiparticle model before focusing on the low-motor-density regime. Here, an approximate treatment based on the random-walk behavior of single motors gives good quantitative agreement with simulation results for the tau dependence of the motor current. Finally, we discuss the possible physiological implications of our results.

  7. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  8. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  9. Fine motor control

    MedlinePlus

    ... out the child's developmental age. Children develop fine motor skills over time, by practicing and being taught. To have fine motor control, children need: Awareness and planning Coordination Muscle ...

  10. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Stacey L.; Morrison, Logan M.; Yorks, Rosalina M.; Hoover, Christopher M.; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16’s organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(−) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(−) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(−) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16’s organelle transport regulatory function. PMID:26354976

  11. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stacey L; Morrison, Logan M; Yorks, Rosalina M; Hoover, Christopher M; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(-) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function.

  12. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  13. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  14. Human Axonal Survival of Motor Neuron (a-SMN) Protein Stimulates Axon Growth, Cell Motility, C-C Motif Ligand 2 (CCL2), and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF1) Production*

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Denise; Terao, Mineko; Fratelli, Maddalena; Zanetti, Adriana; Kurosaki, Mami; Lupi, Monica; Barzago, Maria Monica; Uggetti, Andrea; Capra, Silvia; D'Errico, Paolo; Battaglia, Giorgio S.; Garattini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a fatal genetic disease of motoneurons due to loss of full-length survival of motor neuron protein, the main product of the disease gene SMN1. Axonal SMN (a-SMN) is an alternatively spliced isoform of SMN1, generated by retention of intron 3. To study a-SMN function, we generated cellular clones for the expression of the protein in mouse motoneuron-like NSC34 cells. The model was instrumental in providing evidence that a-SMN decreases cell growth and plays an important role in the processes of axon growth and cellular motility. In our conditions, low levels of a-SMN expression were sufficient to trigger the observed biological effects, which were not modified by further increasing the amounts of the expressed protein. Differential transcriptome analysis led to the identification of novel a-SMN-regulated factors, i.e. the transcripts coding for the two chemokines, C-C motif ligands 2 and 7 (CCL2 and CCL7), as well as the neuronal and myotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1). a-SMN-dependent induction of CCL2 and IGF1 mRNAs resulted in increased intracellular levels and secretion of the respective protein products. Induction of CCL2 contributes to the a-SMN effects, mediating part of the action on axon growth and random cell motility, as indicated by chemokine knockdown and re-addition studies. Our results shed new light on a-SMN function and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The data provide a rational framework to understand the role of a-SMN deficiency in the etiopathogenesis of spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:22669976

  15. Dopamine Promotes Motor Cortex Plasticity and Motor Skill Learning via PLC Activation.

    PubMed

    Rioult-Pedotti, Mengia-Seraina; Pekanovic, Ana; Atiemo, Clement Osei; Marshall, John; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, the major midbrain nucleus projecting to the motor cortex, play a key role in motor skill learning and motor cortex synaptic plasticity. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists exert parallel effects in the motor system: they impair motor skill learning and reduce long-term potentiation. Traditionally, D1 and D2 receptor modulate adenylyl cyclase activity and cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation in opposite directions via different G-proteins and bidirectionally modulate protein kinase A (PKA), leading to distinct physiological and behavioral effects. Here we show that D1 and D2 receptor activity influences motor skill acquisition and long term synaptic potentiation via phospholipase C (PLC) activation in rat primary motor cortex. Learning a new forelimb reaching task is severely impaired in the presence of PLC, but not PKA-inhibitor. Similarly, long term potentiation in motor cortex, a mechanism involved in motor skill learning, is reduced when PLC is inhibited but remains unaffected by the PKA inhibitor. Skill learning deficits and reduced synaptic plasticity caused by dopamine antagonists are prevented by co-administration of a PLC agonist. These results provide evidence for a role of intracellular PLC signaling in motor skill learning and associated cortical synaptic plasticity, challenging the traditional view of bidirectional modulation of PKA by D1 and D2 receptors. These findings reveal a novel and important action of dopamine in motor cortex that might be a future target for selective therapeutic interventions to support learning and recovery of movement resulting from injury and disease.

  16. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  17. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  18. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends. PMID:22431622

  19. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  20. Piezoceramic Ultrasonic Motor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.S.

    1999-02-24

    The objective of this project was to team Aerotech and AlliedSignal FM and T (AS) to develop a cost-efficient process for small-batch, high performance PZT motor production. Aerotech would acquire the basic process expertise in motor fabrication, assembly, and testing from AS. Together, Aerotech and AS were to identify appropriate process improvements, focusing on raw material quality, manufacturing processes, and durability assessment. Aerotech would then design and build a motor in consultation with AS. Aerotech engineering observed motor manufacturing in the AS piezo lab and worked side by side with AS personnel to build and test a prototype motor to facilitate learning the technology. Using information from AS and hands-on experience with the AS motor drive system enabled Aerotech to design and build its own laboratory drive system to operate motors. The team compiled information to establish a potential piezo motor users' list, and an intellectual property search was conducted to understand current patent and IP (intellectual property) status of motor design. Work was initiated to identify and develop an American source for piezo motor elements; however, due to manpower restraints created by the resignation of the AS Ph.D. ceramist responsible for these tasks, the project schedule slipped. The project was subsequently terminated before significant activities were accomplished. AS did, however, provide Aerotech with contacts in Japanese industry that are willing and capable of supplying them with special design motor elements.

  1. Motorized support jack

    DOEpatents

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2001-01-01

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  2. Motor degradation prediction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  3. Motorized support jack

    DOEpatents

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2003-05-13

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  4. Cyclic motor activity; migrating motor complex: 1985.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K

    1985-10-01

    Most of the gastrointestinal tract and the biliary tract have a cyclic motor activity. The electric counterpart of this motor activity is called cyclic myoelectric activity. A typical motor cycle in the LES, stomach, and small intestine is composed of a quiescent state, followed by progressively increasing amplitude and frequency of contractions culminating in a state of maximal contractile activity. The colonic motor cycle has only the quiescent and the contractile states. In the small intestine, these motor complexes migrate in an aborad direction, and in the colon in both orad and aborad directions. The mechanisms of initiation and migration of these complexes are best understood in the small intestine. Both the initiation and migration of these complexes seem to be controlled by enteric neural mechanisms. The functions of the enteric mechanisms may be modulated by the central nervous system and by circulating endogenous substances. The mechanisms of initiation of these complexes are not completely understood in the rest of the gastrointestinal tract and in the biliary tract. The physiologic function of these motor complexes that occur only after several hours of fast in the upper gastrointestinal tract of nonruminants may be to clean the digestive tract of residual food, secretions, and cellular debris. This function is aided by a coordinated secretion of enzymes, acid, and bicarbonate. In ruminants, phase III activity is associated with the distal propulsion of ingested food. The function of colonic motor complexes that are not coordinated with the cyclic motor activities of the rest of the gastrointestinal tract may be only to move contents back and forth for optimal absorption. PMID:3896912

  5. Motor skills training promotes motor functional recovery and induces synaptogenesis in the motor cortex and striatum after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, Keigo; Ishida, Akimasa; Takamatsu, Yasuyuki; Hamakawa, Michiru; Nakashima, Hiroki; Shimada, Haruka; Ishida, Kazuto

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the effects of motor skills training on several types of motor function and synaptic plasticity following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with collagenase into the left striatum to induce ICH, and they were randomly assigned to the ICH or sham groups. Each group was divided into the motor skills training (acrobatic training) and control (no exercise) groups. The acrobatic group performed acrobatic training from 4 to 28 days after surgery. Motor functions were assessed by motor deficit score, the horizontal ladder test and the wide or narrow beam walking test at several time points after ICH. The number of ΔFosB-positive cells was counted using immunohistochemistry to examine neuronal activation, and the PSD95 protein levels were analyzed by Western blotting to examine synaptic plasticity in the bilateral sensorimotor cortices and striata at 14 and 29 days after ICH. Motor skills training following ICH significantly improved gross motor function in the early phase after ICH and skilled motor coordinated function in the late phase. The number of ΔFosB-positive cells in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex in the acrobatic group significantly increased compared to the control group. PSD95 protein expression in the motor cortex significantly increased in the late phase, and in the striatum, the protein level significantly increased in the early phase by motor skills training after ICH compared to no training after ICH. We demonstrated that motor skills training improved motor function after ICH in rats and enhanced the neural activity and synaptic plasticity in the striatum and sensorimotor cortex. PMID:24304717

  6. The frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Burrell, James R; Halliday, Glenda M; Kril, Jillian J; Ittner, Lars M; Götz, Jürgen; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hodges, John R

    2016-08-27

    Early reports of cognitive and behavioural deficits in motor neuron disease might have been overlooked initially, but the concept of a frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum has emerged during the past decade. Frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease is now recognised as an important dementia syndrome, which presents substantial challenges for diagnosis and management. Frontotemporal dementia, motor neuron disease, and frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease are characterised by overlapping patterns of TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, while the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) repeat expansion is common across the disease spectrum. Indeed, the C9orf72 repeat expansion provides important clues to disease pathogenesis and suggests potential therapeutic targets. Variable diagnostic criteria identify motor, cognitive, and behavioural deficits, but further refinement is needed to define the clinical syndromes encountered in frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease. PMID:26987909

  7. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  8. Structural diversity of bacterial flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songye; Beeby, Morgan; Murphy, Gavin E; Leadbetter, Jared R; Hendrixson, David R; Briegel, Ariane; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Jian; Tocheva, Elitza I; Müller, Axel; Dobro, Megan J; Jensen, Grant J

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is one of nature's most amazing and well-studied nanomachines. Its cell-wall-anchored motor uses chemical energy to rotate a microns-long filament and propel the bacterium towards nutrients and away from toxins. While much is known about flagellar motors from certain model organisms, their diversity across the bacterial kingdom is less well characterized, allowing the occasional misrepresentation of the motor as an invariant, ideal machine. Here, we present an electron cryotomographical survey of flagellar motor architectures throughout the Bacteria. While a conserved structural core was observed in all 11 bacteria imaged, surprisingly novel and divergent structures as well as different symmetries were observed surrounding the core. Correlating the motor structures with the presence and absence of particular motor genes in each organism suggested the locations of five proteins involved in the export apparatus including FliI, whose position below the C-ring was confirmed by imaging a deletion strain. The combination of conserved and specially-adapted structures seen here sheds light on how this complex protein nanomachine has evolved to meet the needs of different species. PMID:21673657

  9. How molecular motors shape the flagellar beat

    PubMed Central

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Hilfinger, Andreas; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are slender cellular appendages whose regular beating propels cells and microorganisms through aqueous media. The beat is an oscillating pattern of propagating bends generated by dynein motor proteins. A key open question is how the activity of the motors is coordinated in space and time. To elucidate the nature of this coordination we inferred the mechanical properties of the motors by analyzing the shape of beating sperm: Steadily beating bull sperm were imaged and their shapes were measured with high precision using a Fourier averaging technique. Comparing our experimental data with wave forms calculated for different scenarios of motor coordination we found that only the scenario of interdoublet sliding regulating motor activity gives rise to satisfactory fits. We propose that the microscopic origin of such “sliding control” is the load dependent detachment rate of motors. Agreement between observed and calculated wave forms was obtained only if significant sliding between microtubules occurred at the base. This suggests a novel mechanism by which changes in basal compliance could reverse the direction of beat propagation. We conclude that the flagellar beat patterns are determined by an interplay of the basal properties of the axoneme and the mechanical feedback of dynein motors. PMID:19404446

  10. Motor Neurons that Multitask

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Martyn

    2013-01-01

    Animals use a form of sensory feedback termed proprioception to monitor their body position and modify the motor programs that control movement. In this issue of Neuron, Wen et al. (2012) provide evidence that a subset of motor neurons function as proprioceptors in C. elegans, where B-type motor neurons sense body curvature to control the bending movements that drive forward locomotion. PMID:23177952

  11. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  12. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  13. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, R. F.; Sommese, R. F.; Adhikari, A. S.; Taylor, R. E.; Sutton, S.; Spudich, J. A.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii myosin F, an essential motor for centrosomes positioning and apicoplast inheritance.

    PubMed

    Jacot, Damien; Daher, Wassim; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-06-12

    Members of the Apicomplexa phylum possess an organelle surrounded by four membranes, originating from the secondary endosymbiosis of a red alga. This so-called apicoplast hosts essential metabolic pathways. We report here that apicoplast inheritance is an actin-based process. Concordantly, parasites depleted in either profilin or actin depolymerizing factor, or parasites overexpressing the FH2 domain of formin 2, result in loss of the apicoplast. The class XXII myosin F (MyoF) is conserved across the phylum and localizes in the vicinity of the Toxoplasma gondii apicoplast during division. Conditional knockdown of TgMyoF severely affects apicoplast turnover, leading to parasite death. This recapitulates the phenotype observed upon perturbation of actin dynamics that led to the accumulation of the apicoplast and secretory organelles in enlarged residual bodies. To further dissect the mode of action of this motor, we conditionally stabilized the tail of MyoF, which forms an inactive heterodimer with endogenous TgMyoF. This dominant negative mutant reveals a central role of this motor in the positioning of the two centrosomes prior to daughter cell formation and in apicoplast segregation.

  15. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, R F; Sommese, R F; Adhikari, A S; Taylor, R E; Sutton, S; Spudich, J A; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes. PMID:26149240

  16. Motor efficiency management

    SciTech Connect

    Lobodovsky, K.K. , Penn Valley, CA )

    1994-01-01

    During the 102nd Congress, the Markey Bill, H.R. 2451, was introduced. The bill mandated component efficiency standards for such products as lighting, distribution transformers, and electric A.C. motors. This plan was met with opposition by NEMA and other interested groups. They called for a system approach that would recognize the complex nature of the product involved under the plan. The bill passed by the Energy Power Subcommittee on the theory that the elimination of the least efficient component from the market would ensure that consumers would purchase and use the most efficient products possible. Experience indicates that despite heightened awareness and concern with energy efficiency, the electric motor is either completely neglected or decisions are made on the basis of incomplete information. An on-going analysis of motor performance prevents major breakdown. Performance evaluation of a motor should be done as routinely as it is done on an employee. Both the motor and the employee are equally important. Applied motor maintenance will keep the building or plant running smoothly with minimal stress on the system or downtime because of failure. The Motor Performance Management Process (MPMP) is designed to be the Motor Manager's primary tool to evaluate, measure, and most importantly manage electric motors. MPMP focuses on building a stronger relationship between the Motor Manager and the electric motor employed to perform a task. Specifically, it is a logical, systematic, and structured approach to reduce energy waste. Energy waste reduction is fundamental in becoming more efficient in an increasingly competitive market. The implementation of MPMP is more than a good business practice it is an intelligent management resource.

  17. Heritability of motor control and motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Missitzi, Julia; Gentner, Reinhard; Misitzi, Angelica; Geladas, Nickos; Politis, Panagiotis; Klissouras, Vassilis; Classen, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the relative contribution of genes and environment on individual differences in motor control and acquisition of a force control task, in view of recent association studies showing that several candidate polymorphisms may have an effect on them. Forty‐four healthy female twins performed brisk isometric abductions with their right thumb. Force was recorded by a transducer and fed back to the subject on a computer screen. The task was to place the tracing of the peak force in a force window defined between 30% and 40% of the subject's maximum force, as determined beforehand. The initial level of proficiency was defined as the number of attempts reaching the force window criterion within the first 100 trials. The difference between the number of successful trials within the last and the first 100 trials was taken as a measure of motor learning. For motor control, defined by the initial level of proficiency, the intrapair differences in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins were 6.8 ± 7.8 and 13.8 ± 8.4, and the intrapair correlations 0.77 and 0.39, respectively. Heritability was estimated at 0.68. Likewise for motor learning intrapair differences in the increment of the number of successful trials in MZ and DZ twins were 5.4 ± 5.2 and 12.8 ± 7, and the intrapair correlations 0.58 and 0.19. Heritability reached 0.70. The present findings suggest that heredity accounts for a major part of existing differences in motor control and motor learning, but uncertainty remains which gene polymorphisms may be responsible. PMID:24744865

  18. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  19. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  20. Motor-Coordination-Dependent Learning, More than Others, Is Impaired in Transgenic Mice Expressing Pseudorabies Virus Immediate-Early Protein IE180

    PubMed Central

    López-Ramos, Juan C.; Tomioka, Yukiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Yamamoto, Sayo; Ozaki, Kinuyo; Ono, Etsuro; Delgado-García, José M.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum in transgenic mice expressing pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein IE180 (TgIE96) was substantially diminished in size, and its histoarchitecture was severely disorganized, resulting in severe ataxia. TgIE96 mice can therefore be used as an experimental model to study the involvement of cerebellar circuits in different learning tasks. The performance of three-month-old TgIE96 mice was studied in various behavioral tests, including associative learning (classical eyeblink conditioning), object recognition, spatial orientation (water maze), startle response and prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Wild-type and TgIE96 mice presented similar reflexively evoked eyeblinks, and acquired classical conditioned eyelid responses with similar learning curves for both trace and delay conditioning paradigms. The two groups of mice also had similar performances during the object recognition test. However, they showed significant differences for the other three tests included in this study. Although both groups of animals were capable of swimming, TgIE96 mice failed to learn the water maze task during the allowed time. The startle response to a severe tone was similar in both control and TgIE96 mice, but the latter were unable to produce a significant prepulse inhibition. TgIE96 mice also presented evident deficits for the proper accomplishment of a passive avoidance test. These results suggest that the cerebellum is not indispensable for the performance of classical eyeblink conditioning and for object recognition tasks, but seems to be necessary for the proper performance of water maze, prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance tests. PMID:20711341

  1. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly utilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilizes induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  2. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  3. Controllable 3D atomic Brownian motor in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, C. M.; Sjölund, P.; Petra, S. J. H.; Jonsell, S.; Nylén, M.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Kastberg, A.

    2008-06-01

    We study a Brownian motor, based on cold atoms in optical lattices, where atomic motion can be induced in a controlled manner in an arbitrary direction, by rectification of isotropic random fluctuations. In contrast with ratchet mechanisms, our Brownian motor operates in a potential that is spatially and temporally symmetric, in apparent contradiction to the Curie principle. Simulations, based on the Fokker-Planck equation, allow us to gain knowledge on the qualitative behaviour of our Brownian motor. Studies of Brownian motors, and in particular ones with unique control properties, are of fundamental interest because of the role they play in protein motors and their potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, our system opens the way to the study of quantum Brownian motors.

  4. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  5. Motor Priming in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Priming is a type of implicit learning wherein a stimulus prompts a change in behavior. Priming has been long studied in the field of psychology. More recently, rehabilitation researchers have studied motor priming as a possible way to facilitate motor learning. For example, priming of the motor cortex is associated with changes in neuroplasticity that are associated with improvements in motor performance. Of the numerous motor priming paradigms under investigation, only a few are practical for the current clinical environment, and the optimal priming modalities for specific clinical presentations are not known. Accordingly, developing an understanding of the various types of motor priming paradigms and their underlying neural mechanisms is an important step for therapists in neurorehabilitation. Most importantly, an understanding of the methods and their underlying mechanisms is essential for optimizing rehabilitation outcomes. The future of neurorehabilitation is likely to include these priming methods, which are delivered prior to or in conjunction with primary neurorehabilitation therapies. In this Special Interest article we discuss those priming paradigms that are supported by the greatest amount of evidence including: (i) stimulation-based priming, (ii) motor imagery and action observation, (iii) sensory priming, (iv) movement-based priming, and (v) pharmacological priming. PMID:25415551

  6. Nature's Nanomachines: The Physics of Biomolecular Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2004-10-13

    Molecular motors are tiny protein engines that use the chemical energy stored in a molecular bond to produce a variety of complex movements within biological cells. I will present an overview of these fascinating machines as well as the current technologies used to study them. One specific motor, RNA polymerase, transcribes DNA into messenger RNA, using the energy from nucleotide polymerization to move along a DNA template. Optical traps have been used to visualize these motions with ever increasing precision. I will present optical trapping data that provide evidence of a proofreading mechanism, i.e. a molecular backspace key, used by RNA polymerase to correct mistakes made in the RNA.

  7. The induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redinz, José Arnaldo

    2015-09-01

    We obtain analytical expressions for the torques and angular speed of an induction motor with a simple geometry, resembling the geometry of the first induction motor investigated by Arago in 1824. The rotor is a conducting disc rotating between the magnetic poles of two off-axis solenoids, displaced in space by 90^\\circ from each other. We apply our results to discuss a theory for the ubiquitous electromechanical watt-hour meter. For comparison of the theoretical result for the angular speed with measurements, we propose a simple experiment in which an induction motor with an aluminum disc rotor is constructed.

  8. Advanced motor and motor control development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuertz, Kenneth L.; Beauchamp, Edward D.

    1988-08-01

    The capability of operating a high speed permanent magnet brushless dc motor with electronic controller over a wide load and speed range was demonstrated. A centrifugal pump was used as the loading mechanism and hydraulic fluid was pumped in simulation of an aircraft engine fuel pump requirement. A motor speed of 45,000 rpm was reached and a maximum output of 68.5 hp was demonstrated. The response of the system to step commands for speed change was established. Reduction of size and weight of electronic control was established as a primary future goal. The program system concept with minor rotating machine improvements is viable for high speed drive applications up to 100-hp level.

  9. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  10. Molecular motors: Dynein's gearbox.

    PubMed

    Cross, R A

    2004-05-01

    A new optical trapping study shows that the stepsize of cytoplasmic dynein varies according to the applied force, suggesting that this motor can change gear. Complementary biochemical kinetic work on yeast dynein mutants hints at the allosteric mechanisms involved.

  11. MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  12. MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  13. Piezoelectric Rotary Tube Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Badescu, Mircea; Braun, David F.; Culhane, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A custom rotary SQUIGGLE(Registered TradeMark) motor has been developed that sets new benchmarks for small motor size, high position resolution, and high torque without gear reduction. Its capabilities cannot be achieved with conventional electromagnetic motors. It consists of piezoelectric plates mounted on a square flexible tube. The plates are actuated via voltage waveforms 90 out of phase at the resonant frequency of the device to create rotary motion. The motors were incorporated into a two-axis postioner that was designed for fiber-fed spectroscopy for ground-based and space-based projects. The positioner enables large-scale celestial object surveys to take place in a practical amount of time.

  14. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  15. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  16. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  17. Changes in motor unit populations in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carleton, S A; Brown, W F

    1979-01-01

    In motor neurone disease changes in the functional properties of motor units, including the surface voltage, latency, conduction velocity, and response to repetitive stimulation, were investigated. Progression was marked by motor unit loss, increase in the proportion of larger motor unit potentials, and inclusion of motor unit potentials larger than normal in the remaining motor unit population. Even late in the disease, motor unit potentials with a low surface voltage persisted. The relationship between motor unit potentials, surface voltage, and latency, present in control subjects, broke down in motor neurone disease, large motor unit potentials having abnormally long latencies and small motor unit potentials unexpectedly short latencies. Amplitude decrements were more frequent and severe in motor unit potentials at later stages in the disease, particularly in those units with lower surface voltages. In one surviving motor unit potential there was evidence suggestive of functional recovery. The observations point to complex changes in the functional properties of motor units in motor neurone disease. PMID:216781

  18. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secunde, R. R.

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  19. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  20. Cryogenic testing of stepper motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Bartko, F.; Houck, J. R.

    1982-10-01

    Stepper motors may be used in several subsystems of the planned Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility. Very high reliability is required in all considered applications. An investigation was, therefore, conducted to study the operational reliability of stepper motors, taking into account tests with a type of stepper motor which had previously performed well in uncooled spectrographic instruments. Two stepper motors were tested, in vacuum, at liquid nitrogen temperature. One motor was lubricated with a vacuum stable grease, while the other used unlubricated bearings. Both motors failed after less than 18,000 revolutions. The failure of the unlubricated motor indicated that motor modifications would have to be made to achieve operation at liquid helium temperature. The motor was modified to compensate for the magnitude of different thermal contractions. It was then found that modified stepper motors can perform reliably at LHe temperature for extended periods.

  1. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors: Cargo transport and traffic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Beeg, Janina; Dimova, Rumiana; Klumpp, Stefan; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2010-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells including those of our own body contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and make discrete mechanical steps with a step size of the order of 10 nm but are able to pull cargo particles over much larger distances, from micrometers up to meters. In vivo, the intracellular cargos include large membrane-bounded organelles, smaller vesicles, a subset of mRNAs, cytoskeletal filaments, and various protein building blocks, which are transported between different cell compartments. This cargo transport is usually performed by teams of motors. If all motors belong to the same molecular species, the cooperative action of the motors leads to uni-directional transport with a strongly increased run length and with a characteristic force dependence of the velocity distributions. If two antagonistic teams of motors pull on the same cargo particle, they perform a stochastic tug-of-war, which is characterized by a subtle force balance between the two motor teams and leads to several distinct patterns of bi-directional transport. So far, all experimental observations on bi-directional transport are consistent with such a tug-of-war. If many motors and/or cargo particles are transported along the filaments, one encounters various traffic phenomena. Depending on their mutual interactions and the compartment geometry, the motors form various spatio-temporal patterns such as traffic jams, and undergo nonequilibrium phase transitions between different patterns of transport.

  2. A New Type of Motor: Pneumatic Step Motor

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Kavoussi, Louis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of pneumatic motor, a pneumatic step motor (PneuStep). Directional rotary motion of discrete displacement is achieved by sequentially pressurizing the three ports of the motor. Pulsed pressure waves are generated by a remote pneumatic distributor. The motor assembly includes a motor, gearhead, and incremental position encoder in a compact, central bore construction. A special electronic driver is used to control the new motor with electric stepper indexers and standard motion control cards. The motor accepts open-loop step operation as well as closed-loop control with position feedback from the enclosed sensor. A special control feature is implemented to adapt classic control algorithms to the new motor, and is experimentally validated. The speed performance of the motor degrades with the length of the pneumatic hoses between the distributor and motor. Experimental results are presented to reveal this behavior and set the expectation level. Nevertheless, the stepper achieves easily controllable precise motion unlike other pneumatic motors. The motor was designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance medical imaging equipment, for actuating an image-guided intervention robot, for medical applications. For this reason, the motors were entirely made of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and rubbers. Encoding was performed with fiber optics, so that the motors are electricity free, exclusively using pressure and light. PneuStep is readily applicable to other pneumatic or hydraulic precision-motion applications. PMID:21528106

  3. A New Type of Motor: Pneumatic Step Motor.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Kavoussi, Louis

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a new type of pneumatic motor, a pneumatic step motor (PneuStep). Directional rotary motion of discrete displacement is achieved by sequentially pressurizing the three ports of the motor. Pulsed pressure waves are generated by a remote pneumatic distributor. The motor assembly includes a motor, gearhead, and incremental position encoder in a compact, central bore construction. A special electronic driver is used to control the new motor with electric stepper indexers and standard motion control cards. The motor accepts open-loop step operation as well as closed-loop control with position feedback from the enclosed sensor. A special control feature is implemented to adapt classic control algorithms to the new motor, and is experimentally validated. The speed performance of the motor degrades with the length of the pneumatic hoses between the distributor and motor. Experimental results are presented to reveal this behavior and set the expectation level. Nevertheless, the stepper achieves easily controllable precise motion unlike other pneumatic motors. The motor was designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance medical imaging equipment, for actuating an image-guided intervention robot, for medical applications. For this reason, the motors were entirely made of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and rubbers. Encoding was performed with fiber optics, so that the motors are electricity free, exclusively using pressure and light. PneuStep is readily applicable to other pneumatic or hydraulic precision-motion applications. PMID:21528106

  4. A versatile stepping motor controller for systems with many motors

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S.K.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A versatile system for controlling beamlines or complex experimental setups is described. The system as currently configured can control up to 32 motors, with all motors capable of full speed operation concurrently. There are 2 limit switch inputs for each motor, and a further input to accept a reference position marker. The motors can be controlled via a front panel keyboard with display, or by a host computer over an IEEE-488 interface. Both methods can be used together if required. There is an emergency stop'' key on the front panel keyboard to stop the motion of all motors without losing track of the motors' position. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Magnetostrictive direct drive motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Highly magnetostrictive materials such as Tb.3Dy.7Fe2, commercially known as TERFENOL-D, have been used to date in a variety of devices such as high power actuators and linear motors. The larger magnetostriction available in twinned single crystal TERFENOL-D, approx. 2000 ppm at moderate magnetic field strengths, makes possible a new generation of magnetomechanical devices. NASA researchers are studying the potential of this material as the basis for a direct microstepping rotary motor with torque densities on the order of industrial hydraulics and five times greater than that of the most efficient, high power electric motors. Such a motor would be a micro-radian stepper, capable of precision movements and self-braking in the power-off state. Innovative mechanical engineering techniques are juxtaposed on proper magnetic circuit design to reduce losses in structural flexures, inertias, thermal expansions, eddy currents, and magneto-mechanical coupling, thus optimizing motor performance and efficiency. Mathematical models are presented, including magnetic, structural, and both linear and nonlinear dynamic calculations and simulations. In addition, test results on prototypes are presented.

  6. Myosin VI as a transporter and an anchor: A model for kinetics of the motor under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Peiying; Spudich, James; Dunn, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Myosin VI is an actin-based motor that is thought to function both as a transporter and an anchor in vivo. In an earlier study (Altman et al, Cell 2004), inhibition of myosin VI stepping kinetics by load applied using an optical trap was observed at saturating ATP and low ADP concentrations (< 2.5 μM). A simple mechanism whereby the rate of ADP binding increases exponentially with load was proposed. This model predicts that myosin VI functions primarily as an anchor at loads greater than ˜0.5 pN under physiological nucleotide conditions, which is potentially inconsistent with its roles in vivo. Here we present myosin VI stepping data taken at a variety of applied loads and ADP concentrations, and show that the Altman model only holds at low ADP concentrations. At higher, physiologically relevant ADP concentrations under load we observe dwell times that are an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by the Altman model. We present a modified model in which applied load alters the equilibrium between two myosin VI states with different nucleotide affinities. This new kinetic scheme accurately describes myosin VI behavior at various nucleotide conditions under a large range of loads, and explains how the motor is able to carry out its roles in vivo, both as a force-generating transporter and as an anchor.

  7. Respiratory chain deficiency in aged spinal motor neurons☆

    PubMed Central

    Rygiel, Karolina A.; Grady, John P.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, muscle wasting, and strength decline with age, is an important cause of loss of mobility in the elderly individuals. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain but likely to involve defects of motor nerve, neuromuscular junction, and muscle. Loss of motor neurons with age and subsequent denervation of skeletal muscle has been recognized as one of the contributing factors. This study investigated aspects of mitochondrial biology in spinal motor neurons from elderly subjects. We found that protein components of complex I of mitochondrial respiratory chain were reduced or absent in a proportion of aged motor neurons–a phenomenon not observed in fetal tissue. Further investigation showed that complex I-deficient cells had reduced mitochondrial DNA content and smaller soma size. We propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in these motor neurons could lead to the cell loss and ultimately denervation of muscle fibers. PMID:24684792

  8. Energetics and efficiency of a molecular motor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Svane, Axel

    2013-12-01

    The energetics and efficiency of a linear molecular motor model proposed by Mogilner et al are analyzed from an analytical point of view. The model, which is based on protein friction with a track, is described by coupled Langevin equations for the motion in combination with coupled master equations for the ATP hydrolysis. Here the energetics and efficiency of the motor are addressed using a many body scheme with focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP). It is found that the EMP is reduced from about 10% in a heuristic description of the motor to about 1 per mille when incorporating the full motor dynamics, owing to the strong dissipation associated with the motor action.

  9. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  10. Bent shaft motor

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.

    1998-01-01

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor.

  11. Bent shaft motor

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.

    1998-05-05

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotatable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor. 11 figs.

  12. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  13. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training: a comparison between motor execution and motor imagery of sequential finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2011-03-01

    Motor imagery training, as an effective strategy, has been more and more applied to mental disorders rehabilitation and motor skill learning. Studies on the neural mechanism underlying motor imagery have suggested that such effectiveness may be related to the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery. However, as compared to the studies on motor imagery, the studies on motor imagery training are much fewer. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training and the effectiveness of motor imagery training on motor performance improvement still needs further investigation. Using fMRI, we employed a sequential finger tapping paradigm to explore the functional alterations associated with motor imagery training in both motor execution and motor imagery task. We hypothesized through 14 consecutive days motor imagery training, the motor performance could be improved and the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery would be sustained form pre-training phase to post-training phase. Our results confirmed the effectiveness of motor imagery training in improving motor performance and demonstrated in both pre and post-training phases, motor imagery and motor execution consistently sustained the congruence in functional neuroanatomy, including SMA (supplementary motor cortex), PMA (premotor area); M1( primary motor cortex) and cerebellum. Moreover, for both execution and imagery tasks, a similar functional alteration was observed in fusiform through motor imagery training. These findings provided an insight into the effectiveness of motor imagery training and suggested its potential therapeutic value in motor rehabilitation.

  14. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Eissenberg, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  15. Tuning Multiple Motor Travel Via Single Motor Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Shu, Zhanyong; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-based molecular motors often work in small groups to transport cargos in cells. A key question in understanding transport (and its regulation in vivo) is to identify the sensitivity of multiple-motor-based motion to various single molecule properties. Whereas both single-motor travel distance and microtubule binding rate have been demonstrated to contribute to cargo travel, the role of single-motor velocity is yet to be explored. Here, we recast a previous theoretical study, and make explicit a potential contribution of velocity to cargo travel. We test this possibility experimentally, and demonstrate a strong negative correlation between single-motor velocity and cargo travel for transport driven by two motors. Our study thus discovers a previously unappreciated role of single-motor velocity in regulating multiple-motor transport. PMID:22672518

  16. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors

    PubMed Central

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed three basepair steps which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and Φ29 respectively showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single stranded RNA/DNA in a directional manner, 5′ to 3′ in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA respectively. PMID:20061135

  17. A rotary motor drives Flavobacterium gliding.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Lele, Pushkar P; Berg, Howard C

    2015-02-01

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium devoid of pili or flagella, glide over glass at speeds of 2-4 μm/s [1]. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force [2], but the machinery required for this motion is not known. Usually, cells move along straight paths, but sometimes they exhibit a reciprocal motion, attach near one pole and flip end over end, or rotate. This behavior is similar to that of a Cytophaga species described earlier [3]. Development of genetic tools for F. johnsoniae led to discovery of proteins involved in gliding [4]. These include the surface adhesin SprB that forms filaments about 160 nm long by 6 nm in diameter, which, when labeled with a fluorescent antibody [2] or a latex bead [5], are seen to move longitudinally down the length of a cell, occasionally shifting positions to the right or the left. Evidently, interaction of these filaments with a surface produces gliding. To learn more about the gliding motor, we sheared cells to reduce the number and size of SprB filaments and tethered cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Cells spun about fixed points, mostly counterclockwise, rotating at speeds of 1 Hz or more. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. However, we found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than at constant torque. Now, there are three rotary motors powered by protonmotive force: the bacterial flagellar motor, the Fo ATP synthase, and the gliding motor. PMID:25619763

  18. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b)...

  19. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b)...

  20. Fluorescence imaging of single Kinesin motors on immobilized microtubules.

    PubMed

    Korten, Till; Nitzsche, Bert; Gell, Chris; Ruhnow, Felix; Leduc, Cécile; Diez, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in optical microscopy and nanometer tracking have greatly improved our understanding of cytoskeletal motor proteins. Using fluorescence microscopy, dynamic interactions are now routinely observed in vitro on the level of single molecules mainly using a geometry, where fluorescently labeled motors move on surface-immobilized filaments. In this chapter, we review recent methods related to single-molecule kinesin motility assays. In particular, we aim to provide practical advice on: how to set up the assays, how to acquire high-precision data from fluorescently labeled kinesin motors and attached quantum dots, and how to analyze data by nanometer tracking.

  1. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Motor Drives - Motor Tip Sheet #13

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Alternating current electric motors rotate at a nearly constant speed that is determined by motor design and line frequency. Energy savings of 50% or more may be available when fixed speed systems are modified to allow the motor speed to match variable load requirements of a centrifugal fan or pump.

  2. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOEpatents

    Kueck, John D.; Otaduy, Pedro J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques.

  3. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOEpatents

    Kueck, J.D.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1997-03-18

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices is disclosed. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques. 15 figs.

  4. Hybrid-fuel bacterial flagellar motors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Berry, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor rotates driven by an electrochemical ion gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, either H(+) or Na(+) ions. The motor consists of a rotor ∼50 nm in diameter surrounded by multiple torque-generating ion-conducting stator units. Stator units exchange spontaneously between the motor and a pool in the cytoplasmic membrane on a timescale of minutes, and their stability in the motor is dependent upon the ion gradient. We report a genetically engineered hybrid-fuel flagellar motor in Escherichia coli that contains both H(+)- and Na(+)-driven stator components and runs on both types of ion gradient. We controlled the number of each type of stator unit in the motor by protein expression levels and Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]), using speed changes of single motors driving 1-μm polystyrene beads to determine stator unit numbers. De-energized motors changed from locked to freely rotating on a timescale similar to that of spontaneous stator unit exchange. Hybrid motor speed is simply the sum of speeds attributable to individual stator units of each type. With Na(+) and H(+) stator components expressed at high and medium levels, respectively, Na(+) stator units dominate at high [Na(+)] and are replaced by H(+) units when Na(+) is removed. Thus, competition between stator units for spaces in a motor and sensitivity of each type to its own ion gradient combine to allow hybrid motors to adapt to the prevailing ion gradient. We speculate that a similar process may occur in species that naturally express both H(+) and Na(+) stator components sharing a common rotor. PMID:24550452

  5. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  6. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  7. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  8. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  9. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-02-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  10. The St. Louis Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock…

  11. Mechanical solar motor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    Motor is proposed to convert radiation from sun directly into mechanical energy. Motor utilizes thermal expansion of liquid, heated by sun, as driving force. Unlike most thermally powered systems, it does not require that liquid be converted into vapor.

  12. Thermal motor positions magnetometer sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.; Scott, S. G.

    1966-01-01

    Reversing, thermal, motor-driven device positions magnetometer sensors for checking zero offset. The device alternately positions two sensors at fixed positions 90 degrees apart. The thermal motor is fabricated completely of nonmagnetic materials.

  13. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  14. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  15. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  16. Motor Education: Educational Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansley, A. E.

    This booklet presents educational programs and activities focusing on motor skills for 5- to 9-year-old children and older children with learning problems. The premise of the activities is that the acquisition of motor skills is essential to basic learning. The role of language as a mediator and controller of motor development is emphasized. The…

  17. Motor Vehicle Theft. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Caroline Wolf

    Thirteen years of data from the National Crime Survey were analyzed to examine the characteristics of motor vehicle theft, to identify trends during the past 13 years, and to determine who are most likely to be victims of motor vehicle theft. All motor vehicle thefts reported to the National Crime Survey from 1973 through 1985 were examined.…

  18. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  19. Reorganization of Lipid Diffusion by Myelin Basic Protein as Revealed by STED Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Steshenko, Olena; Andrade, Débora M; Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Schneider, Falk; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W; Simons, Mikael; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Myelin is a multilayered membrane that ensheathes axonal fibers in the vertebrate nervous system, allowing fast propagation of nerve action potentials. It contains densely packed lipids, lacks an actin-based cytocortex, and requires myelin basic protein (MBP) as its major structural component. This protein is the basic constituent of the proteinaceous meshwork that is localized between adjacent cytoplasmic membranes of the myelin sheath. Yet, it is not clear how MBP influences the organization and dynamics of the lipid constituents of myelin. Here, we used optical stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the characteristics of diffusion of different fluorescent lipid analogs in myelin membrane sheets of cultured oligodendrocytes and in micrometer-sized domains that were induced by MBP in live epithelial PtK2 cells. Lipid diffusion was significantly faster and less anomalous both in oligodendrocytes and inside the MBP-rich domains of PtK2 cells compared with undisturbed live PtK2 cells. Our data show that MBP reorganizes lipid diffusion, possibly by preventing the buildup of an actin-based cytocortex and by preventing most membrane proteins from entering the myelin sheath region. Yet, in contrast to myelin sheets in oligodendrocytes, the MBP-induced domains in epithelial PtK2 cells demonstrate no change in lipid order, indicating that segregation of long-chain lipids into myelin sheets is a process specific to oligodendrocytes. PMID:27276262

  20. Reorganization of Lipid Diffusion by Myelin Basic Protein as Revealed by STED Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Steshenko, Olena; Andrade, Débora M; Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Schneider, Falk; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W; Simons, Mikael; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Myelin is a multilayered membrane that ensheathes axonal fibers in the vertebrate nervous system, allowing fast propagation of nerve action potentials. It contains densely packed lipids, lacks an actin-based cytocortex, and requires myelin basic protein (MBP) as its major structural component. This protein is the basic constituent of the proteinaceous meshwork that is localized between adjacent cytoplasmic membranes of the myelin sheath. Yet, it is not clear how MBP influences the organization and dynamics of the lipid constituents of myelin. Here, we used optical stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the characteristics of diffusion of different fluorescent lipid analogs in myelin membrane sheets of cultured oligodendrocytes and in micrometer-sized domains that were induced by MBP in live epithelial PtK2 cells. Lipid diffusion was significantly faster and less anomalous both in oligodendrocytes and inside the MBP-rich domains of PtK2 cells compared with undisturbed live PtK2 cells. Our data show that MBP reorganizes lipid diffusion, possibly by preventing the buildup of an actin-based cytocortex and by preventing most membrane proteins from entering the myelin sheath region. Yet, in contrast to myelin sheets in oligodendrocytes, the MBP-induced domains in epithelial PtK2 cells demonstrate no change in lipid order, indicating that segregation of long-chain lipids into myelin sheets is a process specific to oligodendrocytes.

  1. How Biophysics May Help Us Understand the Flagellar Motor of Bacteria Which Cause Infections.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew A B

    2016-01-01

    Motor proteins are molecules which convert chemical energy to mechanical work and are responsible for motility across all levels: for transport within a cell, for the motion of an individual cell in its surroundings, and for movement in multicellular aggregates, such as muscles. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the canonical examples of a molecular complex made from several motor proteins, which self-assembles on demand and provides the locomotive force for bacteria. This locomotion provides a key aspect of bacteria's prevalence. Here, we outline the biophysics behind the assembly, the energetics, the switching and the rotation of this remarkable nanoscale electric motor that is Nature's first wheel.

  2. How Biophysics May Help Us Understand the Flagellar Motor of Bacteria Which Cause Infections.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew A B

    2016-01-01

    Motor proteins are molecules which convert chemical energy to mechanical work and are responsible for motility across all levels: for transport within a cell, for the motion of an individual cell in its surroundings, and for movement in multicellular aggregates, such as muscles. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the canonical examples of a molecular complex made from several motor proteins, which self-assembles on demand and provides the locomotive force for bacteria. This locomotion provides a key aspect of bacteria's prevalence. Here, we outline the biophysics behind the assembly, the energetics, the switching and the rotation of this remarkable nanoscale electric motor that is Nature's first wheel. PMID:27193546

  3. Self-organization of microtubules and motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndlec, F. J.; Surrey, T.; Maggs, A. C.; Leibler, S.

    1997-09-01

    Cellular structures are established and maintained through a dynamic interplay between assembly and regulatory processes. Self-organization of molecular components provides a variety of possible spatial structures: the regulatory machinery chooses the most appropriate to express a given cellular function. Here we study the extent and the characteristics of self-organization using microtubules and molecular motors as a model system. These components are known to participate in the formation of many cellular structures, such as the dynamic asters found in mitotic and meiotic spindles. Purified motors and microtubules have previously been observed to form asters in vitro. We have reproduced this result with a simple system consisting solely of multi-headed constructs of the motor protein kinesin and stabilized microtubules. We show that dynamic asters can also be obtained from a homogeneous solution of tubulin and motors. By varying the relative concentrations of the components, we obtain a variety of self-organized structures. Further, by studying this process in a constrained geometry of micro-fabricated glass chambers, we demonstrate that the same final structure can be reached through different assembly `pathways'.

  4. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological.

  5. MotorMaster database of three-phase electric motors

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, B.L.

    1993-12-31

    Selecting the right motor for a new or replacement application used to be a daunting task. Making an intelligent choice involved a search through a stack of motor catalogs for information on efficiency, voltage, speed, horsepower, torque, service factor, power factor, frame type, and cost. The MotorMaster software package, available from the Washington State Energy Office, takes the drudgery out of motor selection by enabling rapid analysis of the most efficient and cost-effective single-speed three-phase induction motors. It has a built-in motor database, easy to use comparison and analysis features, and can calculate utility rebates and simple paybacks. By speeding the selection process and providing comprehensive economic justification for the final equipment choice, software tools like MotorMaster can become an important component of utility DSM programs. And as a bonus, wide use of such software may lead to more systematic and consistent use of energy efficient equipment.

  6. Spontaneous Formation of a Globally Connected Contractile Network in a Microtubule-Motor System.

    PubMed

    Torisawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Daisuke; Ishihara, Shuji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-26

    Microtubule (MT) networks play key roles in cell division, intracellular transport, and cell motility. These functions of MT networks occur through interactions between MTs and various associated proteins, notably motor proteins that bundle and slide MTs. Our objective in this study was to address the question of how motors determine the nature of MT networks. We conducted in vitro assays using homotetrameric kinesin Eg5, a motor protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. The mixing of Eg5 and MTs produced a range of spatiotemporal dynamics depending on the motor/filament ratio. Low motor/filament ratios produced globally connected static MT networks with sparsely distributed contractile active nodes (motor-accumulating points with radially extending MTs). Increasing the motor/filament ratio facilitated the linking of contractile active nodes and led to a global contraction of the network. When the motor/filament ratio was further increased, densely distributed active nodes formed local clusters and segmented the network into pieces with their strong contractile forces. Altering the properties of the motor through the use of chimeric Eg5, which has kinesin-1 heads, resulted in the generation of many isolated asters. These results suggest that the spatial distribution of contractile active nodes determines the dynamics of MT-motor networks. We then developed a coarse-grained model of MT-motor networks and identified two essential features for reproducing the experimentally observed patterns: an accumulation of motors that form the active nodes necessary to generate contractile forces, and a nonlinear dependency of contractile force on motor densities. Our model also enabled us to characterize the mechanical properties of the contractile network. Our study provides insight into how local motor-MT interactions generate the spatiotemporal dynamics of macroscopic network structures. PMID:27463139

  7. Motor technology for mining applications advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15

    AC motors are steadily replacing DC motors in mining and mineral processing equipment, requiring less maintenance. The permanent magnet rotor, or the synchronous motor, has enabled Blador to introduce a line of cooling tower motors. Synchronous motors are soon likely to take over from the induction motor. 1 photo.

  8. Big Savings from Smart Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Chesebrough-Pond's operates 32 plants across the nation and in those plants are more than 10,000 electric motors. In an effort to cut down on waste of electrical power used by these motors, Chesebrough organized a Corporate Advanced Technology Group to devise ways of improving productivity and cut manufacturing costs. Chesebrough used NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Power Factor Controller technology as a departure point for development of their own computerized motor controller that enables motors to operate at maximum efficiency regardless of the motor's applications or operating condition.

  9. The Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and Fe65, an APP-Binding Protein, Regulate Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, Shasta L.; Ikin, Annat F.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Greengard, Paul

    2001-01-01

    FE65 binds to the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the function of this interaction has not been identified. Here, we report that APP and FE65 are involved in regulation of cell movement. APP and FE65 colocalize with actin and Mena, an Abl-associated signaling protein thought to regulate actin dynamics, in lamellipodia. APP and FE65 specifically concentrate with β1-integrin in dynamic adhesion sites known as focal complexes, but not in more static adhesion sites known as focal adhesions. Overexpression of APP accelerates cell migration in an MDCK cell wound–healing assay. Coexpression of APP and FE65 dramatically enhances the effect of APP on cell movement, probably by regulating the amount of APP at the cell surface. These data are consistent with a role for FE65 and APP, possibly in a Mena-containing macromolecular complex, in regulation of actin-based motility. PMID:11425871

  10. Ironless armature torque motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four iron-less armature torque motors, four Hall device position sensor assemblies, and two test fixtures were fabricated. The design approach utilized samarium cobalt permanent magnets, a large airgap, and a three-phase winding in a stationary ironless armature. Hall devices were employed to sense rotor position. An ironless armature torque motor having an outer diameter of 4.25 inches was developed to produce a torque constant of 65 ounce-inches per ampere with a resistance of 20.5 ohms. The total weight, including structural elements, was 1.58 pounds. Test results indicated that all specifications were met except for generated voltage waveform. It is recommended that investigations be made concerning the generated voltage waveform to determine if it may be improved.

  11. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  12. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  13. Understanding social motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R C; Fitzpatrick, Paula; Caron, Robert; Mergeche, Joanna

    2011-10-01

    Recently there has been much interest in social coordination of motor movements, or as it is referred to by some researchers, joint action. This paper reviews the cognitive perspective's common coding/mirror neuron theory of joint action, describes some of its limitations and then presents the behavioral dynamics perspective as an alternative way of understanding social motor coordination. In particular, behavioral dynamics' ability to explain the temporal coordination of interacting individuals is detailed. Two experiments are then described that demonstrate how dynamical processes of synchronization are apparent in the coordination underlying everyday joint actions such as martial art exercises, hand-clapping games, and conversations. The import of this evidence is that emergent dynamic patterns such as synchronization are the behavioral order that any neural substrate supporting joint action (e.g., mirror systems) would have to sustain.

  14. Motor learning by observing.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Andrew A G; Gribble, Paul L

    2005-04-01

    Learning complex motor behaviors like riding a bicycle or swinging a golf club is based on acquiring neural representations of the mechanical requirements of movement (e.g., coordinating muscle forces to control the club). Here we provide evidence that mechanisms matching observation and action facilitate motor learning. Subjects who observed a video depicting another person learning to reach in a novel mechanical environment (imposed by a robot arm) performed better when later tested in the same environment than subjects who observed similar movements but no learning; moreover, subjects who observed learning of a different environment performed worse. We show that this effect is not based on conscious strategies but instead depends on the implicit engagement of neural systems for movement planning and control. PMID:15820701

  15. Prospective errors determine motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Ken; Hirashima, Masaya; Nozaki, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse features of motor learning have been reported by numerous studies, but no single theoretical framework concurrently accounts for these features. Here, we propose a model for motor learning to explain these features in a unified way by extending a motor primitive framework. The model assumes that the recruitment pattern of motor primitives is determined by the predicted movement error of an upcoming movement (prospective error). To validate this idea, we perform a behavioural experiment to examine the model’s novel prediction: after experiencing an environment in which the movement error is more easily predictable, subsequent motor learning should become faster. The experimental results support our prediction, suggesting that the prospective error might be encoded in the motor primitives. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model has a strong explanatory power to reproduce a wide variety of motor-learning-related phenomena that have been separately explained by different computational models. PMID:25635628

  16. Steps in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Thierry; Yu, Howard; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a highly efficient rotary machine used by many bacteria to propel themselves. It has recently been shown that at low speeds its rotation proceeds in steps. Here we propose a simple physical model, based on the storage of energy in protein springs, that accounts for this stepping behavior as a random walk in a tilted corrugated potential that combines torque and contact forces. We argue that the absolute angular position of the rotor is crucial for understanding step properties and show this hypothesis to be consistent with the available data, in particular the observation that backward steps are smaller on average than forward steps. We also predict a sublinear speed versus torque relationship for fixed load at low torque, and a peak in rotor diffusion as a function of torque. Our model provides a comprehensive framework for understanding and analyzing stepping behavior in the bacterial flagellar motor and proposes novel, testable predictions. More broadly, the storage of energy in protein springs by the flagellar motor may provide useful general insights into the design of highly efficient molecular machines. PMID:19851449

  17. An Electrostatic Stepper Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partington, E. C.; Wong, Edward Chun Kay; Bullough, W. A.

    This paper describes a new concept in pulse controlled motor and precision linear actuator techniques. Piezo translators [PZT] employed to provide reciprocating primary motion are connected to a load via a controllable electrorheological fluid [ERF] clutch to form a programmable speed and step-width drive. Ideal considerations are used to quantify the limiting potential of the drive and details are given of its development and progress.

  18. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

  19. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  20. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  1. Hydraulic motor for cars

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, D.C.

    1986-09-02

    A hydraulic motor for a car is described comprising, in combination, an automotive vehicle engine for travel self-propulsion, including a block, a plurality of cylinders in the block, a piston slidable in each cylinder, a crankshaft in the block, a piston rod connected between the crankshaft and each of the pistons, a power take-off gear on the crankshaft for the travel self-propulsion, and the engine including a hydraulic means for driving the pistons in the cylinders.

  2. The St. Louis Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2011-10-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock of them in the back room.

  3. Libert-E Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  4. Velocity Fluctuations in Kinesin-1 Gliding Motility Assays Originate in Motor Attachment Geometry Variations.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Henri; Idan, Ofer; Armstrong, Megan J; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Nitta, Takahiro; Hess, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Motor proteins such as myosin and kinesin play a major role in cellular cargo transport, muscle contraction, cell division, and engineered nanodevices. Quantifying the collective behavior of coupled motors is critical to our understanding of these systems. An excellent model system is the gliding motility assay, where hundreds of surface-adhered motors propel one cytoskeletal filament such as an actin filament or a microtubule. The filament motion can be observed using fluorescence microscopy, revealing fluctuations in gliding velocity. These velocity fluctuations have been previously quantified by a motional diffusion coefficient, which Sekimoto and Tawada explained as arising from the addition and removal of motors from the linear array of motors propelling the filament as it advances, assuming that different motors are not equally efficient in their force generation. A computational model of kinesin head diffusion and binding to the microtubule allowed us to quantify the heterogeneity of motor efficiency arising from the combination of anharmonic tail stiffness and varying attachment geometries assuming random motor locations on the surface and an absence of coordination between motors. Knowledge of the heterogeneity allows the calculation of the proportionality constant between the motional diffusion coefficient and the motor density. The calculated value (0.3) is within a standard error of our measurements of the motional diffusion coefficient on surfaces with varying motor densities calibrated by landing rate experiments. This allowed us to quantify the loss in efficiency of coupled molecular motors arising from heterogeneity in the attachment geometry. PMID:27414063

  5. Motor Fuel Excise Taxes

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) explores the role of alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles in motor fuel taxes. Throughout the United States, it is common practice for federal, state, and local governments to tax motor fuels on a per gallon basis to fund construction and maintenance of our transportation infrastructure. In recent years, however, expenses have outpaced revenues creating substantial funding shortfalls that have required supplemental funding sources. While rising infrastructure costs and the decreasing purchasing power of the gas tax are significant factors contributing to the shortfall, the increased use of alternative fuels and more stringent fuel economy standards are also exacerbating revenue shortfalls. The current dynamic places vehicle efficiency and petroleum use reduction polices at direct odds with policies promoting robust transportation infrastructure. Understanding the energy, transportation, and environmental tradeoffs of motor fuel tax policies can be complicated, but recent experiences at the state level are helping policymakers align their energy and environmental priorities with highway funding requirements.

  6. Dyspraxia, Motor Function and Visual-Motor Integration in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M.; Chukoskie, L.; Zinni, M.; Townsend, J.; Trauner, D.

    2014-01-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis. PMID:24742861

  7. Intra-cellular traffic: bio-molecular motors on filamentary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, D.; Basu, A.; Garai, A.; Greulich, P.; Nishinari, K.; Schadschneider, A.; Tripathi, T.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular motors are macromolecular complexes which use some form of input energy to perform mechanical work. The filamentary tracks, on which these motors move, are made of either proteins (e.g., microtubules) or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA). Often, many such motors move simultaneously on the same track and their collective properties have superficial similarities with vehicular traffic on highways. The models we have developed provide "unified" description: in the low-density limit, a model captures the transport properties of a single motor while, at higher densities the same model accounts for the collective spatio-temporal organization of interacting motors. By drawing analogy with vehicular traffic, we have introduced novel quantities for characterizing the nature of the spatio-temporal organization of molecular motors on their tracks. We show how the traffic-like intracellular collective phenomena depend on the mechano-chemistry of the corresponding individual motors.

  8. A synthetic DNA motor that transports nanoparticles along carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Chen, Haorong; Salgado, Janette; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular protein motors have evolved to perform specific tasks critical to the function of cells such as intracellular trafficking and cell division. Kinesin and dynein motors, for example, transport cargoes in living cells by walking along microtubules powered by adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis. These motors can make discrete 8 nm centre-of-mass steps and can travel over 1 µm by changing their conformations during the course of adenosine triphosphate binding, hydrolysis and product release. Inspired by such biological machines, synthetic analogues have been developed including self-assembled DNA walkers that can make stepwise movements on RNA/DNA substrates or can function as programmable assembly lines. Here, we show that motors based on RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes can transport nanoparticle cargoes--CdS nanocrystals in this case--along single-walled carbon nanotubes. Our motors extract chemical energy from RNA molecules decorated on the nanotubes and use that energy to fuel autonomous, processive walking through a series of conformational changes along the one-dimensional track. The walking is controllable and adapts to changes in the local environment, which allows us to remotely direct `go' and `stop' actions. The translocation of individual motors can be visualized in real time using the visible fluorescence of the cargo nanoparticle and the near-infared emission of the carbon-nanotube track. We observed unidirectional movements of the molecular motors over 3 µm with a translocation velocity on the order of 1 nm min-1 under our experimental conditions.

  9. Dimerization of mammalian kinesin-3 motors results in superprocessive motion.

    PubMed

    Soppina, Virupakshi; Norris, Stephen R; Dizaji, Aslan S; Kortus, Matt; Veatch, Sarah; Peckham, Michelle; Verhey, Kristen J

    2014-04-15

    The kinesin-3 family is one of the largest among the kinesin superfamily and its members play important roles in a wide range of cellular transport activities, yet the molecular mechanisms of kinesin-3 regulation and cargo transport are largely unknown. We performed a comprehensive analysis of mammalian kinesin-3 motors from three different subfamilies (KIF1, KIF13, and KIF16). Using Forster resonance energy transfer microscopy in live cells, we show for the first time to our knowledge that KIF16B motors undergo cargo-mediated dimerization. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the monomer-to-dimer transition center around the neck coil (NC) segment and its ability to undergo intramolecular interactions in the monomer state versus intermolecular interactions in the dimer state. Regulation of NC dimerization is unique to the kinesin-3 family and in the case of KIF13A and KIF13B requires the release of a proline-induced kink between the NC and subsequent coiled-coil 1 segments. We show that dimerization of kinesin-3 motors results in superprocessive motion, with average run lengths of ∼10 μm, and that this property is intrinsic to the dimeric kinesin-3 motor domain. This finding opens up studies on the mechanistic basis of motor processivity. Such high processivity has not been observed for any other motor protein and suggests that kinesin-3 motors are evolutionarily adapted to serve as the marathon runners of the cellular world.

  10. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  11. Crystal clear insights into how the dynein motor moves.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew P

    2013-02-01

    Dyneins are motor proteins that move along microtubules. They have many roles in the cell. They drive the beating of cilia and flagella, move cargos in the cytoplasm and function in the mitotic spindle. Dyneins are large and complex protein machines. Until recently, the way they move was poorly understood. In 2012, two high-resolution crystal structures of the >2500-amino-acid dynein motor domain were published. This Commentary will compare these structures and integrate the findings with other recent studies in order to suggest how dynein works. The dynein motor produces movement in a manner that is distinct from myosin and kinesin, the other cytoskeletal motors. Its powerstroke is produced by ATP-induced remodelling of a protein domain known as the linker. It binds to microtubules through a small domain at the tip of a long stalk. Dynein communicates with the microtubule-binding domain by an unconventional sliding movement of the helices in the stalk coiled-coil. Even the way the two motor domains in a dynein dimer walk processively along the microtubule is unusual.

  12. Wind motor machine

    SciTech Connect

    Goedecke, A.

    1984-12-25

    An improved wind motor machine having a wind rotor rotatable about a vertical axis. The rotor core body of the machine is provided with convexly curved wind application surfaces and coacting outer wing bodies having load supporting airplane wing-shaped cross-sections. The efficiency of the machine is improved by means of stream guiding bodies disposed in the intermediate space between the rotor core body and the wing bodies. These stream guiding bodies extend in a desired streaming direction, that is normal to the rotational axis of the wind body, which insures substantially laminar air streaming within the intermediate space.

  13. Electric motor analysis at Dofasco

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.; Morgan, V.A.; Nicholas, J.R. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Initiatives adopted by Dofasco to enhance electric motor reliability and availability include: Enhancement of the electrical repair shop testing and repair capabilities; More stringent standards for motor repair service vendors; Application of predictive technologies to motors in service within manufacturing units; Training of personnel in electrical predictive condition monitoring and analysis methods; and Periodic audit and comparison of central support and operating unit predictive technology application and integration. The basis for the initiative is discussed together with illustrative case histories.

  14. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Nemoto, Yuri L; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed "hop diffusion") for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion.

  15. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A.; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M.; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G. N.; Nemoto, Yuri L.; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed “hop diffusion”) for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion. PMID:26864625

  16. Apogee motor rocketry reliability improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behm, J.; Dowler, W.; Gin, W.

    1974-01-01

    Since 1963, solid propellant apogee motors have been placing satellites into geosynchronous orbits. Major technological breakthroughs are not required to satisfy future mission requirements; however, there is a need to improve reliability to enhance cost effectiveness. Several management test options are discussed. A summary of results and conclusions derived from review of missions, where failure of a solid motor was inferred, and correlation of system factors with failures are reported. Highlights of a solid motor diagnostic instrumentation study are presented. Finally, recommendations are provided for areas of future apogee motor upgrade, which will increase project cost effectiveness by reducing the potential for future flight failures.

  17. 27. View, looking north, of motor house; the electric motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View, looking north, of motor house; the electric motor and electric-powered winch are housed in section of building to the left. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  18. Motor power control circuit for ac induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A motor power control of the type which functions by controlling the power factor wherein one of the parameters of power factor current on time is determined by the on time of a triac through which current is supplied to the motor. By means of a positive feedback circuit, a wider range of control is effected.

  19. 76 FR 12792 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General Motors Corporation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic.... SUMMARY: This document grants in full the petition of General Motors Corporation's (GM) petition for...

  20. Motor field sensitivity for preoperative localization of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    Object In this study the role of magnetic source imaging for preoperative motor mapping was evaluated by using a single-dipole localization method to analyze motor field data in 41 patients. Methods Data from affected and unaffected hemispheres were collected in patients performing voluntary finger flexion movements. Somatosensory evoked field (SSEF) data were also obtained using tactile stimulation. Dipole localization using motor field (MF) data was successful in only 49% of patients, whereas localization with movement evoked field (MEF) data was successful in 66% of patients. When the spatial distribution of MF and MEF dipoles in relation to SSEF dipoles was analyzed, the motor dipoles were not spatially distinct from somatosensory dipoles. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that single-dipole localization for the analysis of motor data is not sufficiently sensitive and is nonspecific, and thus not clinically useful. PMID:17044563

  1. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Hallett, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that CD with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amygdala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated 2-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Eleven CD patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula, and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system, which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation.

  2. Motor Learning: The FoxP2 Puzzle Piece

    PubMed Central

    Teramitsu, Ikuko; White, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of the DNA-binding region of the FOXP2 protein causes an inherited language disorder. A recent study provides the first data on mice with this mutation, which exhibit deficits in motor-skill learning and abnormal properties of neural circuits that contribute to these skills. PMID:18430631

  3. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  4. Torque control for electric motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Method for adjusting electric-motor torque output to accomodate various loads utilizes phase-lock loop to control relay connected to starting circuit. As load is imposed, motor slows down, and phase lock is lost. Phase-lock signal triggers relay to power starting coil and generate additional torque. Once phase lock is recoverd, relay restores starting circuit to its normal operating mode.

  5. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  6. Motors and Bulbs in Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    One of Paul Hewitt's "Figuring Physics" that appeared in this journal dealt with the heating of a motor. This phenomenon can be demonstrated with a miniature motor and a bulb as part of a series of activities with "batteries and bulbs." Students examine the effect on the brightness of a single bulb when a second, identical bulb is placed in series…

  7. Conical Bearingless Motor/Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, P.; Jansen, R.; Dever, T.

    2008-01-01

    Motor/generators based on conical magnetic bearings have been invented as an improved alternative to prior such machines based, variously, on radial and/or axial magnetic bearings. Both the present and prior machines are members of the class of so-called bearingless or self bearing (in the sense of not containing mechanical bearings) rotary machines. Each motor/generator provides both a torque and force allowing it to either function as a motor and magnetic bearing or a generator and magnetic bearing concurrently. Because they are not subject to mechanical bearing wear, these machines have potentially long operational lives and can function without lubrication and over wide ranges of speed and temperature that include conditions under which lubricants would become depleted, degraded, or ineffective and mechanical bearings would fail. The figure shows three typical configurations of conical bearingless motor/generators. The main elements of each motor/generator are concentric rotor and stator portions having conically tapered surfaces facing each other across a gap. Because a conical motor/generator imposes both radial and axial magnetic forces, it acts, in effect, as a combination of an axial and a radial magnetic bearing. Therefore, only two conical motor/generators - one at each end of a rotor - are needed to effect complete magnetic leviation of the rotor, whereas previously, it was necessary to use a combination of an axial and a radial magnetic bearing at each end of the rotor to achieve complete magnetic levitation and a separate motor to provide torque.

  8. Alternative Motor Fuel Use Model

    1992-11-16

    AMFU is a tool for the analysis and prediction of motor fuel use by highway vehicles. The model advances the art of vehicle stock modeling by including a representation of the choice of motor fuel for flexible and dual fuel vehicles.

  9. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  10. Retention of Motor Skills: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, J. D.; And Others

    A summary of an extensive literature survey deals with the variables known or suspected to affect the retention of learned motor behaviors over lengthy no-practice intervals. Emphasis was given to research conducted by or for the military. The variables that may affect the retention of motor skills were dichotomized into task variables and…

  11. Power control for ac motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A motor controller employing a triac through which power is supplied to a motor is described. The open circuit voltage appearing across the triac controls the operation of a timing circuit. This timing circuit triggers on the triac at a time following turn off which varies inversely as a function of the amplitude of the open circuit voltage of the triac.

  12. Domain-swap polymerization drives the self-assembly of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew A B; Hynson, Robert M G; Ganuelas, Lorraine A; Mohammadi, Nasim Shah; Liew, Chu Wai; Rey, Anthony A; Duff, Anthony P; Whitten, Andrew E; Jeffries, Cy M; Delalez, Nicolas J; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Stock, Daniela; Armitage, Judith P; Turberfield, Andrew J; Namba, Keiichi; Berry, Richard M; Lee, Lawrence K

    2016-03-01

    Large protein complexes assemble spontaneously, yet their subunits do not prematurely form unwanted aggregates. This paradox is epitomized in the bacterial flagellar motor, a sophisticated rotary motor and sensory switch consisting of hundreds of subunits. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli FliG, one of the earliest-assembling flagellar motor proteins, forms ordered ring structures via domain-swap polymerization, which in other proteins has been associated with uncontrolled and deleterious protein aggregation. Solution structural data, in combination with in vivo biochemical cross-linking experiments and evolutionary covariance analysis, revealed that FliG exists predominantly as a monomer in solution but only as domain-swapped polymers in assembled flagellar motors. We propose a general structural and thermodynamic model for self-assembly, in which a structural template controls assembly and shapes polymer formation into rings. PMID:26854663

  13. Motor-operated gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1996-12-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, the authors compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators they tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  14. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  15. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  16. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  17. Reciprocating linear motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  18. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D.; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-04-01

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  19. Remote control of molecular motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2013-03-01

    Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in vivo and provide sophisticated components for directed nanoscale transport in vitro. We previously constructed myosin motors that respond to a change in [Ca++] by reversing their direction of motion along the polarized actin filament. To expand the potential applications of controllable molecular motors, we have now developed myosins that shift gears in response to blue light illumination. Light is a versatile control signal that can be readily modulated in time and space, and is generally orthogonal to cellular signaling. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we have incorporated LOV photoreceptor domains into the lever arms of chimeric myosins, resulting in motors that robustly speed up, slow down, or switch directions upon illumination. These genetically encoded motors should be directly deployable inside living cells. Our successful designs include constructs based on two different myosin classes, and we show that optical velocity control can be implemented in motors that move at microns/sec speeds, enabling practical biological and bioengineering applications.

  20. Multiple-motor based transport and its regulation by Tau

    PubMed Central

    Vershinin, Michael; Carter, Brian C.; Razafsky, David S.; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    Motor-based intracellular transport and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of a cell. Disruption of transport is linked to Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, many fundamental aspects of transport are poorly understood. An important issue is how cells achieve and regulate efficient long-distance transport. Mounting evidence suggests that many in vivo cargoes are transported along microtubules by more than one motor, but we do not know how multiple motors work together or can be regulated. Here we first show that multiple kinesin motors, working in conjunction, can achieve very long distance transport and apply significantly larger forces without the need of additional factors. We then demonstrate in vitro that the important microtubule-associated protein, tau, regulates the number of engaged kinesin motors per cargo via its local concentration on microtubules. This function of tau provides a previously unappreciated mechanism to regulate transport. By reducing motor reattachment rates, tau affects cargo travel distance, motive force, and cargo dispersal. We also show that different isoforms of tau, at concentrations similar to those in cells, have dramatically different potency. These results provide a well defined mechanism for how altered tau isoform levels could impair transport and thereby lead to neurodegeneration without the need of any other pathway. PMID:17190808

  1. Self-organized pattern formation in motor-microtubule mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankararaman, Sumithra; Menon, Gautam I.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2004-09-01

    We model the stable self-organized patterns obtained in the nonequilibrium steady states of mixtures of molecular motors and microtubules. In experiments [Nédélec , Nature (London) 389, 305 (1997); Surrey , Science 292, 1167 (2001)] performed in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, microtubules are oriented by complexes of motor proteins. This interaction yields a variety of patterns, including arrangements of asters, vortices, and disordered configurations. We model this system via a two-dimensional vector field describing the local coarse-grained microtubule orientation and two scalar density fields associated to molecular motors. These scalar fields describe motors which either attach to and move along microtubules or diffuse freely within the solvent. Transitions between single aster, spiral, and vortex states are obtained as a consequence of confinement, as parameters in our model are varied. For systems in which the effects of confinement can be neglected, we present a map of nonequilibrium steady states, which includes arrangements of asters and vortices separately as well as aster-vortex mixtures and fully disordered states. We calculate the steady state distribution of bound and free motors in aster and vortex configurations of microtubules and compare these to our simulation results, providing qualitative arguments for the stability of different patterns in various regimes of parameter space. We study the role of crowding or “saturation” effects on the density profiles of motors in asters, discussing the role of such effects in stabilizing single asters. We also comment on the implications of our results for experiments.

  2. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  3. Activities for a Perceptual Motor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinning, Dorothy; And Others

    Perceptual motor activities for physically handicapped children are presented in the areas of fine and gross motor skills. Also detailed are activities to develop body image, visual motor skills, and tactile and auditory perception. (JD)

  4. Resurrection of the flagellar rotary motor near zero load

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhua; Berg, Howard C.

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor, powered by a transmembrane proton flux. Torque is generated by the interaction of stator proteins, MotA and MotB, with a rotor protein FliG. The physiology of the motor has been studied extensively in the regime of relatively high load and low speed, where it appears to operate close to thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we describe an assay that allows systematic study of the motor near zero load, where proton translocation and movement of mechanical components are rate limiting. Sixty-nanometer-diameter gold spheres were attached to hooks of cells lacking flagellar filaments, and light scattered from a sphere was monitored at the image plane of a microscope through a small pinhole. Paralyzed motors of cells carrying a motA point mutation were resurrected at 23°C by expression of wild-type MotA, and speeds jumped from zero to a maximum value (≈300 Hz) in one step. Thus, near zero load, the speed of the motor is independent of the number of torque-generating units. Evidently, the units act independently (they do not interfere with one another), and there are no intervals during which a second unit can add to the speed generated by the first (the duty ratio is close to 1). PMID:18202173

  5. Multimotor transport in a system of active and inactive kinesin-1 motors.

    PubMed

    Scharrel, Lara; Ma, Rui; Schneider, René; Jülicher, Frank; Diez, Stefan

    2014-07-15

    Long-range directional transport in cells is facilitated by microtubule-based motor proteins. One example is transport in a nerve cell, where small groups of motor proteins, such as kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, work together to ensure the supply and clearance of cellular material along the axon. Defects in axonal transport have been linked to Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, it is not known in detail how multimotor-based cargo transport is impaired if a fraction of the motors are defective. To mimic impaired multimotor transport in vitro, we performed gliding motility assays with varying fractions of active kinesin-1 motors and inactive kinesin-1 motor mutants. We found that impaired transport manifests in multiple motility regimes: 1), a fast-motility regime characterized by gliding at velocities close to the single-molecule velocity of the active motors; 2), a slow-motility regime characterized by gliding at close-to zero velocity or full stopping; and 3), a regime in which fast and slow motilities coexist. Notably, the transition from the fast to the slow regime occurred sharply at a threshold fraction of active motors. Based on single-motor parameters, we developed a stochastic model and a mean-field theoretical description that explain our experimental findings. Our results demonstrate that impaired multimotor transport mostly occurs in an either/or fashion: depending on the ratio of active to inactive motors, transport is either performed at close to full speed or is out of action.

  6. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  7. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here, we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force, and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  8. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  9. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  10. Aluminum hydroxide injections lead to motor deficits and motor neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Christopher A.; Petrik, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Gulf War Syndrome is a multi-system disorder afflicting many veterans of Western armies in the 1990–1991 Gulf War. A number of those afflicted may show neurological deficits including various cognitive dysfunctions and motor neuron disease, the latter expression virtually indistinguishable from classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) except for the age of onset. This ALS “cluster” represents the second such ALS cluster described in the literature to date. Possible causes of GWS include several of the adjuvants in the anthrax vaccine and others. The most likely culprit appears to be aluminum hydroxide. In an initial series of experiments, we examined the potential toxicity of aluminum hydroxide in male, outbred CD-1 mice injected subcutaneously in two equivalent-to-human doses. After sacrifice, spinal cord and motor cortex samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. Aluminum-treated mice showed significantly increased apoptosis of motor neurons and increases in reactive astrocytes and microglial proliferation within the spinal cord and cortex. Morin stain detected the presence of aluminum in the cytoplasm of motor neurons with some neurons also testing positive for the presence of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein, a pathological hallmark of various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. A second series of experiments was conducted on mice injected with six doses of aluminum hydroxide. Behavioural analyses in these mice revealed significant impairments in a number of motor functions as well as diminished spatial memory capacity. The demonstrated neurotoxicity of aluminum hydroxide and its relative ubiquity as an adjuvant suggest that greater scrutiny by the scientific community is warranted. PMID:19740540

  11. Overexpression of survival motor neuron improves neuromuscular function and motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Bradley J.; Alfazema, Neza; Sheean, Rebecca K.; Sleigh, James N.; Davies, Kay E.; Horne, Malcolm K.; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy results from diminished levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein in spinal motor neurons. Low levels of SMN also occur in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and genetic reduction of SMN levels exacerbates the phenotype of transgenic SOD1G93A mice. Here, we demonstrate that SMN protein is significantly reduced in the spinal cords of patients with sporadic ALS. To test the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS, we overexpressed SMN in 2 different strains of SOD1G93A mice. Neuronal overexpression of SMN significantly preserved locomotor function, rescued motor neurons, and attenuated astrogliosis in spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice. Despite this, survival was not prolonged, most likely resulting from SMN mislocalization and depletion of gems in motor neurons of symptomatic mice. Our results reveal that SMN upregulation slows locomotor deficit onset and motor neuron loss in this mouse model of ALS. However, disruption of SMN nuclear complexes by high levels of mutant SOD1, even in the presence of SMN overexpression, might limit its survival promoting effects in this specific mouse model. Studies in emerging mouse models of ALS are therefore warranted to further explore the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS. PMID:24210254

  12. Biomimetic Phases of Microtubule-Motor Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    We try to determine the universal principles of organization from the molecular scale that gives rise to architecture on the cellular scale. We are specifically interested in the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, a rigid, yet versatile network in most cell types. Microtubules in the cell are organized by motor proteins and crosslinkers. This work applies the ideas of statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics to the non-equilibrium pattern formation behind intracellular organization using the microtubule cytoskeleton as the building blocks. We examine these processes in a bottom-up manner by adding increasingly complex protein actors into the system. Our systematic experiments expose nature's laws for organization and has large impacts on biology as well as illuminating new frontiers of non-equilibrium physics.

  13. A compensatory subpopulation of motor neurons in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Anneliese M; Sanes, Joshua R; Lichtman, Jeff W

    2005-09-26

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal paralytic disease that targets motor neurons, leading to motor neuron death and widespread denervation atrophy of muscle. Previous electrophysiological data have shown that some motor axon branches attempt to compensate for loss of innervation, resulting in enlarged axonal arbors. Recent histological assays have shown that during the course of the disease some axonal branches die back. We thus asked whether the two types of behavior, die-back and compensatory growth, occur in different branches of single neurons or, alternatively, whether entire motor units are of one type or the other. We used high-resolution in vivo imaging in the G93A SOD1 mouse model, bred to express transgenic yellow fluorescent protein in all or subsets of motor neurons. Time-lapse imaging showed that degenerative axon branches are easily distinguished from those undergoing compensatory reinnervation, showing fragmentation of terminal branches but sparing of the more proximal axon. Reconstruction of entire motor units showed that some were abnormally large. Surprisingly, these large motor units contained few if any degenerating synapses. Some small motor units, however, no longer possessed any neuromuscular contacts at all, giving the appearance of "winter trees." Thus, degenerative versus regenerative changes are largely confined to distinct populations of neurons within the same motor pool. Identification of factors that protect "compensatory" motor neurons from degenerative changes may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  15. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  16. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  17. Solid rocket motor witness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Witness Test was undertaken to examine the potential for using thermal infrared imagery as a tool for monitoring static tests of solid rocket motors. The project consisted of several parts: data acquisition, data analysis, and interpretation. For data acquisition, thermal infrared data were obtained of the DM-9 test of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor on December 23, 1987, at Thiokol, Inc. test facility near Brigham City, Utah. The data analysis portion consisted of processing the video tapes of the test to produce values of temperature at representative test points on the rocket motor surface as the motor cooled down following the test. Interpretation included formulation of a numerical model and evaluation of some of the conditions of the motor which could be extracted from the data. These parameters included estimates of the insulation remaining following the tests and the thickness of the charred layer of insulation at the end of the test. Also visible was a temperature signature of the star grain pattern in the forward motor segment.

  18. Physical Properties Determining Self-Organization of Motors and Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrey, Thomas; Nédélec, François; Leibler, Stanislas; Karsenti, Eric

    2001-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules and their associated motor proteins can be organized into various large-scale patterns. Using a simplified experimental system combined with computer simulations, we examined how the concentrations and kinetic parameters of the motors contribute to their collective behavior. We observed self-organization of generic steady-state structures such as asters, vortices, and a network of interconnected poles. We identified parameter combinations that determine the generation of each of these structures. In general, this approach may become useful for correlating the morphogenetic phenomena taking place in a biological system with the biophysical characteristics of its constituents.

  19. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, William T.; Cromwell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor contro ller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram packag e that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position s ensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44 -pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus , RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPI O), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier.

  20. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  1. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  2. 26. View, looking east, of motor house; the electric motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. View, looking east, of motor house; the electric motor and electric-powered winch are housed in section of building to the left. The U-bolt and concrete deadman which anchors the cable of the tramway is to the right. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  3. Understanding motor acts and motor intentions in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sparaci, Laura; Stefanini, Silvia; Marotta, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2012-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder associated with unusually hyper-social demeanor and ease with strangers. These personality traits are accompanied by difficulties in social interactions, possibly related, at least in part, to a difficulty in understanding others' mental states. Studies on mentalizing capacities in individuals with WS have often led to contrasting results, some studies revealing specific impairments, others highlighting spared mentalizing capacities. So far, however, no study investigated the performance of individuals with WS in non-inferential understanding of others' motor intentions. In the present study we investigated this capacity by using a computer-based behavioral task using pictures of hand-object interactions. We asked individuals with WS first to describe what the other was doing (i.e. a task implying no kind of intention reading), and secondly, if successful in answering the first question, to describe the motor intention underlying the observed motor acts (i.e. why an act was being done, a task requiring non-inferential motor intention understanding). Results showed that individuals with WS made more errors in understanding what the other was doing (i.e. understanding a motor act) compared to both mental-age matched controls and chronological-age matched peers with typical development, while showing mental-age appropriate performance in understanding why an individual was acting (i.e. understanding a motor intention). These findings suggest novel perspectives for understanding impairments in social behavior in WS.

  4. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use - Motor Tip Sheet #10

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors use no energy when turned off. Reducing motor operating time by just 10% usually saves more energy than replacing a standard efficiency motor with a NEMA Premium® efficiency motor. In fact, given that 97% of the life cycle cost of purchasing and operating a motor is energy-related, turning a motor off 10% of the time could reduce energy costs enough to purchase three new motors.

  5. Statistical kinetics of processive molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Mark Jacob

    1999-10-01

    We describe new theoretical and experimental tools for studying biological motor proteins at the single molecule scale. These tools enable measurements of molecular fuel economies, thereby providing insight into the pathways for conversion of biochemical energy into mechanical work. Kinesin is an ATP-dependent motor that moves processively along microtubules in discrete steps of 8 nm. How many molecules of ATP are hydrolysed per step? To determine this coupling ratio, we develop a fluctuation analysis, which relates the variance in records of mechanical displacement to the number of rate-limiting biochemical transitions in the engine cycle. Using fluctuation analysis and optical trapping interferometry, we determine that near zero load, single molecules of kinesin hydrolyse one ATP nucleotide per 8-nm step. To study kinesin behavior under load, we use a molecular force clamp, capable of maintaining constant loads on single kinesin motors moving processively. Analysis of records of motion under variable ATP concentrations and loads reveals that kinesin is a `tightly- coupled' motor, maintaining the 1:1 coupling ratio up to loads of ~ 5 pN. Moreover, a Michaelis-Menten analysis of velocity shows that the kinesin cycle contains at least two load- dependent transitions. The rate of one of these transitions affects ATP affinity, while the other does not. Therefore, the kinesin stall force must depend on the ATP concentration, as is demonstrated experimentally. These findings rule out existing theoretical models of kinesin motility. We develop a simple theoretical formalism describing a tightly-coupled mechanism for movement. This `energy-landscape' formalism quantitatively accounts for motile properties of RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme that transcribes DNA into RNA. The shapes of RNAP force-velocity curves indicate that biochemical steps limiting transcription rates at low loads do not generate movement. Modeling suggests that high loads may halt RNAP by promoting a

  6. Synthetic Motors and Nanomachines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Amar

    2006-03-01

    A bistable and palindromically-constituted [3]rotaxane incorporating two mechanically-mobile rings interlocked around a linear dumbbell component, has been designed to operate like the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle. Contraction and extension occurs when the inter-ring distance of the two rings switch, ideally, between 4.2 and 1.4 nm upon redox stimulation either chemically or electrochemically in the solution phase. When the mobile rings of these artificial molecular muscles are bound onto the tops of gold-coated, micron-scale cantilever beams, their controllable nanometer motions have a chance to be amplified along the long axis of each cantilever. It turns out that ˜6 billion of the self-assembled [3]rotaxanes can bend the cantilevers in a bistable manner concomitant with the cycled addition of redox agents. The extent of bending is commensurate with 10's of pN of force per [3]rotaxane. Recent studies on a set of ``single-shot'' control [2]rotaxanes have provided additional evidence for the origins of the force generation as it arises from a molecule-based electrostatic repulsion energy of about 10 kcal/mol at 300 K. These findings will be presented in terms of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics that have been utilized extensively to direct the design and synthesis of artificial molecular machines and which may also serve as a guide for the rational design of unidirectional molecular motors.

  7. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  8. Mechanical thermal motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for converting thermal energy such as solar energy into mechanical motion for driving fluid pumps and similar equipment. The thermal motor comprises an inner concentric cylinder carried by a stationary core member. The core member has a cylindrical disc plate fixed adjacent to a lower portion and extending radially from it. An outer concentric cylinder rotatably carried on the disc plate defining a space between the inner and outer concentric cylinders. A spiral tubular member encircles the inner concentric cylinder and is contained within the space between the inner and outer cylinders. One portion is connected to the inner concentric cylinder and a second portion connected to the outer concentric cylinder. A heated fluid is conveyed through the tubular member and is periodically cooled causing the tubular member to expand and contract. This causes the outer concentric cylinder to reciprocally rotate on the base plate accordingly. The reciprocating motion of the outer concentric cylinder is then utilized to drive a pump member in a pump chamber.

  9. Plasma motor generator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    The significant potential advantages of a plasma motor generator system over conventional systems for the generation of electrical power and propulsion for spacecraft in low Earth orbits warrants its further investigation. The two main components of such a system are a long insulated wire and the plasma generating hollow cathodes needed to maintain electrical contact with the ionosphere. Results of preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations of this system are presented. The theoretical work involved the equilibrium configurations of the wire and the nature of small oscillation about these equilibrium positions. A particularly interesting result was that two different configurations are allowed when the current is above a critical value. Experimental investigations were made of the optimal starting and running conditions for the proposed, low current hollow cathodes. Although optimal ranges of temperature, argon pressure and discharge voltage were identified, start up became progressively more difficult. This supposed depletion or contamination of the emissive surface could be countered by the addition of new emissive material.

  10. 75 FR 50797 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that its Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC)...

  11. 75 FR 72863 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that the Agency's Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee...

  12. 76 FR 12214 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice: Announcement of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting; request for comment. SUMMARY: The Federal Motor Carrier Safety...

  13. Small Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    It was three-two-one to brilliant fire as NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center tested a small solid rocket motor designed to mimic NASA's Space Launch System booster. The Mar. 14 test provides a qui...

  14. Battery powererd electric motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbacker, K.

    1984-02-28

    A battery powered vehicle is provided with a vehicle frame and an electric motor whose main shaft is connected to a differential gear by means of a gear train with a variable transmission ratio, the motor shaft and all gear shafts being parallel to the axle of the driving wheels. In order to achieve a compact design and to avoid power-consuming drive elements the electric motor and the variable transmission gear as well as a potential reducing gear mounted between the latter and the differential gear, are positioned on a subframe which is connected to the housing of the driving wheel axle on the one side whereas the other side carrying the electric motor is attached to the vehicle frame by means of a cardanic suspension.

  15. Drill-motor holding fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  16. Perceptual decoupling or motor decoupling?

    PubMed

    Head, James; Helton, William S

    2013-09-01

    The current investigation was conducted to elucidate whether errors of commission in the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) are indicators of perceptual or motor decoupling. Twenty-eight participants completed SARTs with motor and perceptual aspects of the task manipulated. The participants completed four different SART blocks whereby stimuli location uncertainty and stimuli acquisition were manipulated. In previous studies of more traditional sustained attention tasks stimuli location uncertainty reduces sustained attention performance. In the case of the SART the motor manipulation (stimuli acquisition), but not the perceptual manipulation (stimuli location uncertainty) significantly reduced commission errors. The results suggest that the majority of SART commission errors are likely to be indicators of motor decoupling not necessarily perceptual decoupling.

  17. Motor neuron disease. SMN2 splicing modifiers improve motor function and longevity in mice with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Naryshkin, Nikolai A; Weetall, Marla; Dakka, Amal; Narasimhan, Jana; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K Y; Karp, Gary M; Qi, Hongyan; Woll, Matthew G; Chen, Guangming; Zhang, Nanjing; Gabbeta, Vijayalakshmi; Vazirani, Priya; Bhattacharyya, Anuradha; Furia, Bansri; Risher, Nicole; Sheedy, Josephine; Kong, Ronald; Ma, Jiyuan; Turpoff, Anthony; Lee, Chang-Sun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Moon, Young-Choon; Trifillis, Panayiota; Welch, Ellen M; Colacino, Joseph M; Babiak, John; Almstead, Neil G; Peltz, Stuart W; Eng, Loren A; Chen, Karen S; Mull, Jesse L; Lynes, Maureen S; Rubin, Lee L; Fontoura, Paulo; Santarelli, Luca; Haehnke, Daniel; McCarthy, Kathleen D; Schmucki, Roland; Ebeling, Martin; Sivaramakrishnan, Manaswini; Ko, Chien-Ping; Paushkin, Sergey V; Ratni, Hasane; Gerlach, Irene; Ghosh, Anirvan; Metzger, Friedrich

    2014-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease caused by mutation or deletion of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. A paralogous gene in humans, SMN2, produces low, insufficient levels of functional SMN protein due to alternative splicing that truncates the transcript. The decreased levels of SMN protein lead to progressive neuromuscular degeneration and high rates of mortality. Through chemical screening and optimization, we identified orally available small molecules that shift the balance of SMN2 splicing toward the production of full-length SMN2 messenger RNA with high selectivity. Administration of these compounds to Δ7 mice, a model of severe SMA, led to an increase in SMN protein levels, improvement of motor function, and protection of the neuromuscular circuit. These compounds also extended the life span of the mice. Selective SMN2 splicing modifiers may have therapeutic potential for patients with SMA.

  18. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  19. Meissner-Effect Stepping Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed stepping motor derives torque from diamagnetic repulsion produced by Meissner effect - exclusion of magnetic field from interior of superconductor. Design of motor takes advantage of silver-doped YB2Cu3O and other compounds superconductive at temperatures as high as that of liquid nitrogen. Skin of rotor cooled below its superconducting-transition temperature by liquid nitrogen. O-rings prevent leaks of liquid nitrogen from rotor. Weight, cost, and maintenance reduced.

  20. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  1. A soft and dexterous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Tse, Tony Chun Hin; Inamura, Tokushu; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas; Gisby, Todd

    2011-03-01

    We present a soft, bearing-free artificial muscle motor that cannot only turn a shaft but also grip and reposition it through a flexible gear. The bearing-free operation provides a foundation for low complexity soft machines, with multiple degree-of-freedom actuation, that can act simultaneously as motors and manipulators. The mechanism also enables an artificial muscle controlled gear change. Future work will include self-sensing feedback for precision, multidegree-of-freedom operation.

  2. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments.

  3. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  4. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  5. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  6. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  7. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  8. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  9. Low brain histamine content affects ethanol-induced motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Raatesalmi, Kristiina; Sallmen, Tina; Anichtchik, Oleg; Karlstedt, Kaj; Kaslin, Jan; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R; Panula, Pertti

    2002-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on motor performance in humans is well established but how neural mechanisms are affected by ethanol action remains largely unknown. To investigate whether the brain histaminergic system is important in it, we used a genetic model consisting of rat lines selectively outbred for differential ethanol sensitivity. Ethanol-sensitive rats had lower levels of brain histamine and lower densities of histamine-immunoreactive fibers than ethanol-insensitive rats, although both rat lines showed no changes in histamine synthesizing neurons. Lowering the high brain histamine content of the ethanol-insensitive rats with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine before ethanol administration increased their ethanol sensitivity in a behavioral motor function test. Higher H3 receptor ligand binding and histamine-induced G-protein activation was detected in several brain regions of ethanol-naive ethanol-sensitive rats. Brain histamine levels and possibly signaling via H3 receptors may thus correlate with genetic differences in ethanol-induced motor impairment.

  10. Biochemical physics modeling of biological nano-motors

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaría-Holek, I.; López-Alamilla, N. J.

    2014-01-14

    We present a biochemical physics model accounting for the dynamics and energetics of both translational and rotational protein motors. A modified version of the hand-over-hand mechanism considering competitive inhibition by ADP is presented. Transition state-like theory is used to reconstruct the time dependent free-energy landscape of the cycle catalyst process that allows to predicting the number of steps or rotations that a single motor can perform. In addition, following the usual approach of chemical kinetics, we calculate the average translational velocity and also the stopping time of processes involving a collectivity of motors, such as exocytosis and endocytosis processes. Finally, we formulate a stochastic model reproducing very well single realizations of kinesin and rotary ATPases.

  11. Motor coordination deficits in mice lacking RGS9.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Jacqueline; Hoang, Chau V; Potts, Bryan; Gold, Stephen J; Powell, Craig M

    2008-01-23

    RGS9-2 is a striatum-enriched protein that negatively modulates dopamine and opioid receptor signaling. We examined the role of RGS9-2 in modulating complex behavior. Genetic deletion of RGS9-2 does not lead to global impairments, but results in selective abnormalities in certain behavioral domains. RGS9 knockout (KO) mice have decreased motor coordination on the accelerating rotarod and deficits in working memory as measured in the delayed-match-to-place version of the water maze. In contrast, RGS9 KO mice exhibit normal locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior, cue and contextual fear conditioning, startle threshold, and pre-pulse inhibition. These studies are the first to describe a role for RGS9-2 in motor coordination and working memory and implicate RGS9-2 as a potential therapeutic target for motor and cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOEpatents

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  13. Motor Development: From Classroom to Playground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Gerald S., Ed.; Burkhart, Ernie, Ed.

    Intended for the educator and recreator working with normal and exceptional children, the book provides an overview of perceptual motor terminology, development, and resources in addition to a state of the art paper. Presented are definitions of such terms as motor development, sensory motor development, and perceptual motor development.…

  14. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in...

  15. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in...

  16. Precision stop control for motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Montenegro, Justino (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved stop control system and method are provided for a motor having a drive mechanism in which the motor is coupled to a motor controller that controls the speed and position of the drive mechanism using a first signal indicative of a commanded position of the drive mechanism, a second signal indicative of the actual speed of the drive mechanism and a third signal indicative of the actual position of the drive mechanism. The improved system/method uses a first circuit that receives the first and third signal and generates an error signal indicative of a difference therebetween. A second circuit receives the error signal and compares same with a threshold position error. The result of this comparison is used to selectively supply the second signal (i.e., speed) to the motor controller at least whenever the error signal is less than the threshold position error so that the motor controller can use the second signal in conjunction with the third signal to stop the motor.

  17. The Bliss of Motor Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Motor control is an area of natural science exploring how the nervous system interacts with other body parts and the environment to produce purposeful, coordinated actions. A central problem of motor control – the problem of motor redundancy – was formulated by Nikolai Bernstein as the problem of elimination of redundant degrees-of-freedom. Traditionally, this problem has been addressed using optimization methods based on a variety of cost functions. This review draws attention to a body of recent findings suggesting that the problem has been formulated incorrectly. An alternative view has been suggested as the principle of abundance, which considers the apparently redundant degrees-of-freedom as useful and even vital for many aspects of motor behavior. Over the past ten years, dozens of publications have provided support for this view based on the ideas of synergic control, computational apparatus of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point (referent configuration) hypothesis. In particular, large amounts of “good variance” – variance in the space of elements that has no effect on the overall performance – have been documented across a variety of natural actions. “Good variance” helps an abundant system to deal with secondary tasks and unexpected perturbations; its amount shows adaptive modulation across a variety of conditions. These data support the view that there is no problem of motor redundancy; there is bliss of motor abundance. PMID:22246105

  18. Motoric cognitive risk syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Annweiler, Cedric; Ayers, Emmeline; Barzilai, Nir; Beauchet, Olivier; Bennett, David A.; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Camicioli, Richard; Capistrant, Benjamin; Chatterji, Somnath; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Giladi, Nir; Guralnik, Jack M.; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Holtzer, Roee; Kim, Ki Woong; Kowal, Paul; Kressig, Reto W.; Lim, Jae-Young; Lord, Susan; Meguro, Kenichi; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Muir-Hunter, Susan W.; Noone, Mohan L.; Rochester, Lynn; Srikanth, Velandai; Wang, Cuiling

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Our objective is to report prevalence of motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a newly described predementia syndrome characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints, in multiple countries, and its association with dementia risk. Methods: Pooled MCR prevalence analysis of individual data from 26,802 adults without dementia and disability aged 60 years and older from 22 cohorts from 17 countries. We also examined risk of incident cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination decline ≥4 points) and dementia associated with MCR in 4,812 individuals without dementia with baseline Mini-Mental State Examination scores ≥25 from 4 prospective cohort studies using Cox models adjusted for potential confounders. Results: At baseline, 2,808 of the 26,802 participants met MCR criteria. Pooled MCR prevalence was 9.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.2%–11.2%). MCR prevalence was higher with older age but there were no sex differences. MCR predicted risk of developing incident cognitive impairment in the pooled sample (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 2.0, 95% CI 1.7–2.4); aHRs were 1.5 to 2.7 in the individual cohorts. MCR also predicted dementia in the pooled sample (aHR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5–2.3). The results persisted even after excluding participants with possible cognitive impairment, accounting for early dementia, and diagnostic overlap with other predementia syndromes. Conclusion: MCR is common in older adults, and is a strong and early risk factor for cognitive decline. This clinical approach can be easily applied to identify high-risk seniors in a wide variety of settings. PMID:25031288

  19. A synthetic DNA motor that transports nanoparticles along carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Chen, Haorong; Salgado, Janette; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular protein motors have evolved to perform specific tasks critical to the function of cells such as intracellular trafficking and cell division. Kinesin and dynein motors, for example, transport cargoes in living cells by walking along microtubules powered by adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis. These motors can make discrete 8 nm centre-of-mass steps and can travel over 1 µm by changing their conformations during the course of adenosine triphosphate binding, hydrolysis and product release. Inspired by such biological machines, synthetic analogues have been developed including self-assembled DNA walkers that can make stepwise movements on RNA/DNA substrates or can function as programmable assembly lines. Here, we show that motors based on RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes can transport nanoparticle cargoes-CdS nanocrystals in this case-along single-walled carbon nanotubes. Our motors extract chemical energy from RNA molecules decorated on the nanotubes and use that energy to fuel autonomous, processive walking through a series of conformational changes along the one-dimensional track. The walking is controllable and adapts to changes in the local environment, which allows us to remotely direct 'go' and 'stop' actions. The translocation of individual motors can be visualized in real time using the visible fluorescence of the cargo nanoparticle and the near-infared emission of the carbon-nanotube track. We observed unidirectional movements of the molecular motors over 3 µm with a translocation velocity on the order of 1 nm min(-1) under our experimental conditions.

  20. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  1. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  2. The Infant Motor Profile: A Standardized and Qualitative Method to Assess Motor Behaviour in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and…

  3. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  4. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  5. Brush border myosin-I truncated in the motor domain impairs the distribution and the function of endocytic compartments in an hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Durrbach, A; Collins, K; Matsudaira, P; Louvard, D; Coudrier, E

    1996-01-01

    Myosins I, a ubiquitous monomeric class of myosins that exhibits actin-based motor properties, are associated with plasma and/or vesicular membranes and have been suggested as players for trafficking events between cell surface and intracellular membranous structures. To investigate the function of myosins 1, we have transfected a mouse hepatoma cell line (BWTG3) with cDNAs encoding the chicken brush border myosin-I (BBMI) and two variants truncated in the motor domain. One variant is deleted of the first 446 amino acids and thereby lacks the ATP binding site, whereas the other is deleted of the entire motor domain and lacks the ATP and actin binding sites. We have observed (i) that significant amounts of the truncated variants are recovered with membrane fractions after cell fractionation, (ii) that they codistribute with a compartment containing alpha2-macroglobulin internalized for 30 min as determined by fluorescent microscopy, (iii) that the production of BBMI-truncated variants impairs the distribution of the acidic compartment and ligands internalized for 30 min, and (iv) that the production of the truncated variant containing the actin binding site decreases the rate of alpha2-macroglobulin degradation whereas the production of the variant lacking the ATP binding site and the actin binding site increases the rate of a2-macroglobulin degradation. These observations indicate that the two truncated variants have a dominant negative effect on the distribution and the function of the endocytic compartments. We propose that an unidentified myosin-I might contribute to the distribution of endocytic compartments in a juxtanuclear position and/or to the regulation of the delivery of ligands to the degradative compartment in BWTG3 cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692943

  6. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis since the onset of spermatogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  7. Asymmetric Brownian motor driven by bubble formation in a hydrophobic channel.

    PubMed

    Arai, Noriyoshi; Yasuoka, Kenji; Koishi, Takahiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2010-10-26

    The "asymmetric brownian ratchet model" is a variation of Feynman's ratchet and pawl system proposed. In this model, a system consisting of a motor and a rail has two binding states. One is the random brownian state, and the other is the asymmetric potential state. When the system is alternatively switched between these states, the motor can be driven in one direction. This model is believed to explain nanomotor behavior in biological systems. The feasibility of the model has been demonstrated using electrical and magnetic forces; however, switching of these forces is unlikely to be found in biological systems. In this paper, we propose an original mechanism of transition between states by bubble formation in a nanosized channel surrounded by hydrophobic atoms. This amounts to a nanoscale motor system using bubble propulsion. The motor system consists of a hydrophobic motor and a rail on which hydrophobic patterns are printed. Potential asymmetry can be produced by using a left-right asymmetric pattern shape. Hydrophobic interactions are believed to play an important role in the binding of biomolecules and molecular recognition. The bubble formation is controlled by changing the width of the channel by an atomic distance (∼0.1 nm). Therefore, the motor is potentially more efficient than systems controlled by other forces, in which a much larger change in the motor position is necessary. We have simulated the bubble-powered motor using dissipative particle dynamics and found behavior in good agreement with that of motor proteins. Energy efficiency is as high as 60%.

  8. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  9. Emergence of Motor Circuit Activity

    PubMed Central

    Law, Chris; Paquet, Michel; Kania, Artur

    2014-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, ordered neuronal activity patterns can occur even in the absence of sensory input and to investigate how these arise, we have used the model system of the embryonic chicken spinal motor circuit, focusing on motor neurons of the lateral motor column (LMC). At the earliest stages of their molecular differentiation, we can detect differences between medial and lateral LMC neurons in terms of expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits, including CHRNA5, CHRNA7, GRIN2A, GRIK1, HTR1A and HTR1B, as well as the KCC2 transporter. Using patch-clamp recordings we also demonstrate that medial and lateral LMC motor neurons have subtly different activity patterns that reflect the differential expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits. Using a combination of patch-clamp recordings in single neurons and calcium-imaging of motor neuron populations, we demonstrate that inhibition of nicotinic, muscarinic or GABA-ergic activity, has profound effects of motor circuit activity during the initial stages of neuromuscular junction formation. Finally, by analysing the activity of large populations of motor neurons at different developmental stages, we show that the asynchronous, disordered neuronal activity that occurs at early stages of circuit formation develops into organised, synchronous activity evident at the stage of LMC neuron muscle innervation. In light of the considerable diversity of neurotransmitter receptor expression, activity patterns in the LMC are surprisingly similar between neuronal types, however the emergence of patterned activity, in conjunction with the differential expression of transmitter systems likely leads to the development of near-mature patterns of locomotor activity by perinatal ages. PMID:24722186

  10. Microtubules and associated molecular motors in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa Reyna; Riquelme, Meritxell; Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Galván-Mendoza, José Iván

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton provides structure, shape and movement to various cells. Microtubules (MTs) are tubular structures made of α and β-tubulin heterodimers organized in 13 protofilaments, forming a hollow cylinder. A vast group of MT-associated proteins determines the function, behavior and interaction of the MTs with other cellular components. Among these proteins, molecular motors such as the dynein-dynactin complex and kinesin superfamily play roles in MT organization and organelle transport. This article focuses on the MT cytoskeleton and associated molecular motors in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa In addition to reviewing current available information for this fungus and contrasting it with knowledge of other fungal species, we present new experimental results that support the role of dynein, dynactin and conventional kinesin in MT organization, dynamics and transport of subcellular structures (nuclei and secretory vesicles). In wild type hyphae of N. crassa, cytoplasmic MTs are arranged longitudinally along hyphae and display a helical curvature. They interlace with one another to form a network throughout the cytoplasm. N. crassa dynein and dynactin mutants have a scant and disorganized MT cytoskeleton, an erratic and reduced Spitzenkörper (Spk) and distorted hyphal morphology. In contrast, hyphae of mutants with defective conventional kinesin exhibit only minor disruptions in MT and Spk organization. Although nuclear positioning is affected in all mutants, the MT-associated motor proteins are not major contributors to nuclear movement during hyphal growth. Cytoplasmic bulk flow is the vehicle for nuclear displacement in growing hyphal regions of N. crassa Motors are involved in nuclei saltatory movements in both retrograde or anterograde direction. In the dynein and kinesin mutants, micro and macrovesicles can reach the Spk, although growth is slightly impaired and the Spk displays an erratic path. Hyphal growth requires MTs, and their associated

  11. Engineering of the fluorescent-energy-conversion arm of phi29 DNA packaging motor for single-molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Jin; Zhang, Hui; Chang, Chun-Li; Savran, Cagri; Guo, Peixuan

    2009-11-01

    The bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor contains a protein core with a central channel comprising twelve copies of re-engineered gp10 protein geared by six copies of packaging RNA (pRNA) and a DNA packaging protein gp16 with unknown copies. Incorporation of this nanomotor into a nanodevice would be beneficial for many applications. To this end, extension and modification of the motor components are necessary for the linkage of this motor to other nanomachines. Here the re-engineering of the motor DNA packaging protein gp16 by extending its length and doubling its size using a fusion protein technique is reported. The modified motor integrated with the eGFP-gp16 maintains the ability to convert the chemical energy from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to mechanical motion and package DNA. The resulting DNA-filled capsid is subsequently converted into an infectious virion. The extended part of the gp16 arm is a fluorescent protein eGFP, which serves as a marker for tracking the motor in single-molecule studies. The activity of the re-engineered motor with eGFP-gp16 is also observed directly with a bright-field microscope via its ability to transport a 2-microm-sized cargo bound to the DNA.

  12. Motor influences on judgment: Motor and cognitive integration.

    PubMed

    Mullet, Etienne; Cretenet, Joël; Dru, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Performing motor behaviours (arm flexion vs. extension) that correspond also to lateralized peripheral activations (left vs. right side) of the motivational systems of approach versus avoidance have been previously shown to impact cognitive performance and judgment. Three experiments are reported that examined the combined effect of these variables, as a kind of motor integration, on the implementation of information integration rules in various judgment tasks: judging of a person's attractiveness from personality information, judging of the severity of health risk from alcohol and tobacco intake, and attributing blame to a perpetrator from information as to intent and severity of harm done. It was found that the congruence between these motivational activations consistently influenced the use of interactive information integration rules, compared to additive ones. This set of findings showed that cognitive rules might also be embodied. Motor integration affects cognitive integration in judgment.

  13. Impacts of outboard motors on aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.J.; Woodin, B.R.; Shea, D.S.; Stegeman, J.J. |

    1995-12-31

    Outboard motor emissions often are localized in coastal and freshwater ponds, which may make their impact comparable to larger sources that discharge at greater distances from these locales. Outboard motor exhaust gases are rapidly cooled with some fractions being condensed and remaining in the water column rather than being released into the atmosphere. Here the authors compare the hydrocarbon emissions and biochemical effects of 2-cycle vs. 4-cycle engines. The engines were run for the same periods in 30-gallon containers and quantities and identities of hydrocarbons in the water were determined. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons including 2-ring to 5-ring compounds and alkylated derivatives were detected. The concentration of total polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was 5-fold less in the water from the 4 cycle than from the 2 cycle engine. However, the concentrations of 4- and 5-ring PAHs were not significantly different in water from the two engines. Exposure of killifish (Fundulus diaphanus) to diluted water containing emissions caused an induction of the content and catalytic activity of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), a sensitive biomarker for hydrocarbon exposure. CYP1A protein was induced by both, but inhibition of EROD induction occurred with greater concentrations of 4-cycle water. Relating these results to field data for CYP1A in fish from ponds that are or are not exposed to boating activity suggests that boating could account for a substantial part of the induction seen.

  14. Improve Motor Operation at Off-Design Voltages - Motor Tip Sheet #9

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors are designed to operate within +/- 10% of their nameplate rated voltages. When motors operate at conditions of over- or under-voltage, motor efficiency and other performance parameters are degraded.

  15. Three phase AC motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael; Wright, Maynard K.; Burkett, John P.

    1984-03-20

    A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

  16. Minimum Principles in Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Sascha E.

    2001-06-01

    Minimum (or minimal) principles are mathematical laws that were first used in physics: Hamilton's principle and Fermat's principle of least time are two famous example. In the past decade, a number of motor control theories have been proposed that are formally of the same kind as the minimum principles of physics, and some of these have been quite successful at predicting motor performance in a variety of tasks. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of this work. Particular attention is given to the relation between minimum theories in motor control and those used in other disciplines. Other issues around which the review is organized include: (1) the relation between minimum principles and structural models of motor planning and motor control, (2) the empirically-driven development of minimum principles and the danger of circular theorizing, and (3) the design of critical tests for minimum theories. Some perspectives for future research are discussed in the concluding section of the paper. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11401453

  17. Filament overwrapped motor case technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Joel P.

    1993-11-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) joined with the French Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) to develop and deliver to the U.S. Navy a small quantity of composite filament wound rocket motors to demonstrate a manufacturing technique that was being applied at the two companies. It was perceived that the manufacturing technique could produce motors that would be light in weight, inexpensive to produce, and that had a good chance of meeting insensitive munitions (IM) requirements that were being formulated by the Navy in the early 1980s. Under subcontract to ARC, SEP designed, tested, and delivered 2.75-inch rocket motors to the U.S. Navy for IM tests that were conducted in 1989 at China Lake, California. The program was one of the first to be founded by Nunn Amendment money. The Government-to-Government program was sponsored by the Naval Air Systems Command and was monitored by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (NSWC-IH), Maryland. The motor propellant that was employed was a new, extruded composite formulation that was under development at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. The following paper describes the highlights of the program and gives the results of structural and ballistic static tests and insensitive munitions tests that were conducted on demonstration motors.

  18. Early identification of motor delay

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (HINT), an infant neuromotor test using Canadian norms published in 2010 that could be used to screen for motor delay during the first year of life. Quality of evidence Extensive research has been published on the intrarater, interrater, and test-retest reliability and the content, concurrent, predictive, and known-groups validity of the HINT, as well as on the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of parental concerns, as assessed by the HINT. Most evidence is level II. Main message Diagnosing motor delays during the first year of life is important because these often indicate more generalized developmental delays or specific disabilities, such as cerebral palsy. Parental concerns about their children’s motor development are strongly predictive of subsequent diagnoses involving motor delay. Conclusion Only through early identification of developmental motor delays, initially with screening tools such as the HINT, is it possible to provide referrals for early intervention that could benefit both the infant and the family. PMID:27521388

  19. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to an electric motor winding and, more particularly, to a three phase motor armature winding arrangement designed to reduce motor vibration and improve efficiency. An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor.

  20. Disentangling motor execution from motor imagery with the phantom limb.

    PubMed

    Raffin, Estelle; Mattout, Jérémie; Reilly, Karen T; Giraux, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    Amputees can move their phantom limb at will. These 'movements without movements' have generally been considered as motor imagery rather than motor execution, but amputees can in fact perform both executed and imagined movements with their phantom and they report distinct perceptions during each task. Behavioural evidence for this dual ability comes from the fact that executed movements are associated with stump muscle contractions whereas imagined movements are not, and that phantom executed movements are slower than intact hand executed movements whereas the speed of imagined movements is identical for both hands. Since neither execution nor imagination produces any visible movement, we hypothesized that the perceptual difference between these two motor tasks relies on the activation of distinct cerebral networks. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and changes in functional connectivity (dynamic causal modelling), we examined the activity associated with imagined and executed movements of the intact and phantom hands of 14 upper-limb amputees. Distinct but partially overlapping cerebral networks were active during both executed and imagined phantom limb movements (both performed at the same speed). A region of interest analysis revealed a 'switch' between execution and imagination; during execution there was more activity in the primary somatosensory cortex, the primary motor cortex and the anterior lobe of the cerebellum, while during imagination there was more activity in the parietal and occipital lobes, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. In overlapping areas, task-related differences were detected in the location of activation peaks. The dynamic causal modelling analysis further confirmed the presence of a clear neurophysiological distinction between imagination and execution, as motor imagery and motor execution had opposite effects on the supplementary motor area-primary motor cortex network. This is the first imaging evidence that the