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Sample records for actin-related protein arp

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-related protein Arp2 is involved in the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Arp2p is an essential yeast actin-related protein. Disruption of the corresponding ARP2 gene leads to a terminal phenotype characterized by the presence of a single large bud. Thus, Arp2p may be important for a late stage of the cell cycle (Schwob, E., and R.P. Martin, 1992. Nature (Lond.). 355:179-182). We have localized Arp2p by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific peptide antibodies revealed punctate staining under the plasma membrane, which partially colocalizes with actin. Temperature-sensitive arp2 mutations were created by PCR mutagenesis and selected by an ade2/SUP11 sectoring screen. One temperature-sensitive mutant that was characterized, arp2-H330L, was osmosensitive and had an altered actin cytoskeleton at a nonpermissive temperature, suggesting a role of Arp2p in the actin cytoskeleton. Random budding patterns were observed in both haploid and diploid arp2- H330L mutant cells. Endocytosis, as judged by Lucifer yellow uptake, was severely reduced in the mutant, at all temperatures. In addition, genetic interaction was observed between temperature-sensitive alleles arp2-H330L and cdc10-1. CDC10 is a gene encoding a neck filament- associated protein that is necessary for polarized growth and cytokinesis. Overall, the immunolocalization, mutant phenotypes, and genetic interaction suggest that the Arp2 protein is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton that is involved in membrane growth and polarity, as well as in endocytosis. PMID:8698808

  2. The human actin-related protein hArp5: nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and involvement in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Kumiko; Kamo, Mariko; Oma, Yukako; Matsuda, Ryo; Uchida, Takafumi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Winsor, Barbara; Harata, Masahiko

    2009-01-15

    Certain actin-related proteins (Arps) of budding yeast are localized in the nucleus, and have essential roles as stoichiometric components of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and chromatin remodeling complexes. On the other hand, identification of vertebrate nuclear Arps and their functional analyses are just beginning. We show that human Arp5 (hArp5) proteins are localized in the nucleus, and that arp5Delta yeast cells are partially complemented by hArp5. Thus, hArp5 is a novel member of the nuclear Arps of vertebrates, which possess evolutionarily conserved functions from yeast to humans. We show here that hArp5 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, after the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), cell growth and the accumulation of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) are impaired by hArp5 depletion. Association of hArp5 with the hIno80 chromatin remodeling enzyme and decrease of chromatin-bound hIno80 by hArp5-depletion indicate that hArp5 may have a role in the recruitment of the hINO80 complex to chromatin. Overexpression of hArp5 and hIno80 enhanced gamma-H2AX accumulation. These observations suggest that hArp5 is involved in the process of DSB repair through the regulation of the chromatin remodelling machinery.

  3. The actin-related protein hArp8 accumulates on the mitotic chromosomes and functions in chromosome alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Naoki; Oka, Asako; Kitayama, Kumiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2008-02-15

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and various actin-related proteins (Arps). Some of these Arps are localized in the nucleus, and a fraction of each of these nuclear Arps is functionally involved in chromatin remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. On the other hand, in mitotic cells, the localization and function of the nuclear Arps are largely unknown. Human Arp8 (hArp8), an ortholog of yeast nuclear Arp8, was recently found to be associated with the hINO80-chromatin remodeling complex along with hArp5. Here we report that hArp8, but not hArp5, accumulates on mitotic chromosomes. This is the first example where a member of the actin family is found to be associated with mitotic chromosomes. Expression of truncated hArp8 proteins and depletion of endogenous hArp8 by RNA interference caused misalignment of mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that chromosome-associated hArp8 has a role in chromosome behavior. In contrast, depletion of hIno80 and hArp5 did not cause misalignment of chromosomes, suggesting that the role of hArp8 at mitotic chromosomes is independent of the activity of hINO80 complexes. These findings provide the first insight into a novel function of actin family members in mitosis.

  4. DNA binding properties of the actin-related protein Arp8 and its role in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Otawa, Kenji; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ich; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), which are members of the actin family, are essential components of many of these remodeling complexes. Actin, Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8 are found to be evolutionarily conserved components of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is involved in transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, and DNA repair. A recent report showed that Arp8 forms a module in the INO80 complex and this module can directly capture a nucleosome. In the present study, we showed that recombinant human Arp8 binds to DNAs, and preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the binding of adenine nucleotides to Arp8 mutants suggested that the ATP-binding pocket, located in the evolutionarily conserved actin fold, plays a regulatory role in the binding of Arp8 to DNA. To determine the cellular function of Arp8, we derived tetracycline-inducible Arp8 knockout cells from a cultured human cell line. Analysis of results obtained after treating these cells with aphidicolin and camptothecin revealed that Arp8 is involved in DNA repair. Together with the previous observation that Arp8, but not γ-H2AX, is indispensable for recruiting INO80 complex to DSB in human, results of our study suggest an individual role for Arp8 in DNA repair.

  5. Actin-Related Protein 2 (ARP2) and Virus-Induced Filopodia Facilitate Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Spread

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas; Martin, Scott E.; Le Nouën, Cyril; Buehler, Eugen; Chen, Yu-Chi; Smelkinson, Margery; Ganesan, Sundar; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Brock, Linda G.; Liang, Bo; Munir, Shirin; Collins, Peter L.; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an enveloped RNA virus that is the most important viral cause of acute pediatric lower respiratory tract illness worldwide, and lacks a vaccine or effective antiviral drug. The involvement of host factors in the RSV replicative cycle remains poorly characterized. A genome-wide siRNA screen in human lung epithelial A549 cells identified actin-related protein 2 (ARP2) as a host factor involved in RSV infection. ARP2 knockdown did not reduce RSV entry, and did not markedly reduce gene expression during the first 24 hr of infection, but decreased viral gene expression thereafter, an effect that appeared to be due to inhibition of viral spread to neighboring cells. Consistent with reduced spread, there was a 10-fold reduction in the release of infectious progeny virions in ARP2-depleted cells at 72 hr post-infection. In addition, we found that RSV infection induced filopodia formation and increased cell motility in A549 cells and that this phenotype was ARP2 dependent. Filopodia appeared to shuttle RSV to nearby uninfected cells, facilitating virus spread. Expression of the RSV F protein alone from a plasmid or heterologous viral vector in A549 cells induced filopodia, indicating a new role for the RSV F protein, driving filopodia induction and virus spread. Thus, this study identified roles for ARP2 and filopodia in RSV-induced cell motility, RSV production, and RSV cell-to-cell spread. PMID:27926942

  6. The brain-specific actin-related protein ArpN alpha interacts with the transcriptional co-repressor CtBP.

    PubMed

    Oma, Yukako; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2003-02-07

    Actin-related protein (Arp) is found in many chromatin remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. We previously identified ArpN alpha as an isoform of ArpN beta/BAF53, which is included in mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, and showed that ArpN alpha is a potential component of the complex. Although it has a structure highly similar to ArpN beta/BAF53, ArpN alpha is expressed exclusively in brain and in neural differentiated embryonal carcinoma cells. Since ArpN alpha possesses a region that shows low similarity to ArpN beta/BAF53, we hypothesized that proteins interacting with this region contribute to the ArpN alpha-specific function in brain. Here we showed that ArpN alpha, but not ArpN beta/BAF53, interacts with the transcriptional co-repressor CtBP (C-terminal binding protein). Transactivation by the SWI/SNF complex and glucocorticoid receptor was repressed by the CtBP in the presence of ArpN alpha. These findings suggest that SWI/SNF complex containing ArpN alpha might regulate certain genes involved in brain development and/or its function differently from SWI/SNF complex containing ArpN beta/BAF53.

  7. Actin-related protein Arp6 influences H2A.Z-dependent and -independent gene expression and links ribosomal protein genes to nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takahito; Shimada, Kenji; Oma, Yukako; Kalck, Véronique; Akimura, Kazumi; Taddei, Angela; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Kugou, Kazuto; Ohta, Kunihiro; Gasser, Susan M; Harata, Masahiko

    2010-04-15

    Actin-related proteins are ubiquitous components of chromatin remodelers and are conserved from yeast to man. We have examined the role of the budding yeast actin-related protein Arp6 in gene expression, both as a component of the SWR1 complex (SWR-C) and in its absence. We mapped Arp6 binding sites along four yeast chromosomes using chromatin immunoprecipitation from wild-type and swr1 deleted (swr1Delta) cells. We find that a majority of Arp6 binding sites coincide with binding sites of Swr1, the catalytic subunit of SWR-C, and with the histone H2A variant Htz1 (H2A.Z) deposited by SWR-C. However, Arp6 binding detected at centromeres, the promoters of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and some telomeres is independent of Swr1 and Htz1 deposition. Given that RP genes and telomeres both show association with the nuclear periphery, we monitored the ability of Arp6 to mediate the localization of chromatin to nuclear pores. Arp6 binding is sufficient to shift a randomly positioned locus to nuclear periphery, even in a swr1Delta strain. Arp6 is also necessary for the pore association of its targeted RP promoters possibly through cell cycle-dependent factors. Loss of Arp6, but not Htz1, leads to an up-regulation of these RP genes. In contrast, the pore-association of GAL1 correlates with Htz1 deposition, and loss of Arp6 reduces both GAL1 activation and peripheral localization. We conclude that Arp6 functions both together with the nucleosome remodeler Swr1 and also without it, to mediate Htz1-dependent and Htz1-independent binding of chromatin domains to nuclear pores. This association is shown to have modulating effects on gene expression.

  8. The nuclear actin-related protein ARP6 is a pleiotropic developmental regulator required for the maintenance of FLOWERING LOCUS C expression and repression of flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Deal, Roger B; Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-10-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are found in the nuclei of all eukaryotic cells, but their functions are generally understood only in the context of their presence in various yeast and animal chromatin-modifying complexes. Arabidopsis thaliana ARP6 is a clear homolog of other eukaryotic ARP6s, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARP6, which was identified as a component of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex. We examined the subcellular localization, expression patterns, and loss-of-function phenotypes for this protein and found that Arabidopsis ARP6 is localized to the nucleus during interphase but dispersed away from the chromosomes during cell division. ARP6 expression was observed in all vegetative tissues as well as in a subset of reproductive tissues. Null mutations in ARP6 caused numerous defects, including altered development of the leaf, inflorescence, and flower as well as reduced female fertility and early flowering in both long- and short-day photoperiods. The early flowering of arp6 mutants was associated with reduced expression of the central floral repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) as well as MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 4 (MAF4) and MAF5. In addition, arp6 mutations suppress the FLC-mediated late flowering of a FRIGIDA-expressing line, indicating that ARP6 is required for the activation of FLC expression to levels that inhibit flowering. These results indicate that ARP6 acts in the nucleus to regulate plant development, and we propose that it does so through modulation of chromatin structure and the control of gene expression.

  9. A mutation in the Cc.arp9 gene encoding a putative actin-related protein causes defects in fruiting initiation and asexual development in the agaricomycete Coprinopsis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Ando, Yuki; Hata, Takeshi; Nakahori, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Agaricomycetes exhibit a remarkable morphological differentiation from vegetative mycelia to huge fruiting bodies. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the fruiting body development, we have isolated and characterized many Coprinopsis cinerea mutant strains defective in fruiting initiation to date. Dikaryon formation in agaricomycetes, which is followed by fruiting development, is governed by the mating type loci, A and B. Recently, mutations in the Cc.snf5 gene, which encodes a putative component of the chromatin remodeling complex switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), were shown to cause defects in A-regulated clamp cell morphogenesis, as well as in fruiting initiation. Here, we demonstrate that Cc.arp9, which encodes a putative actin-related protein associated with two chromatin remodeling complexes, SWI/SNF and remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC), is also essential for fruiting initiation. In contrast to Cc.snf5 mutants, Cc.arp9 mutants were not defective in clamp cell formation. The effects of mutations in Cc.arp9 and Cc.snf5 on oidia production and the transcriptional expression levels of clp1 and pcc1, which are under the control of the A gene, were also examined. These indicated that Cc.Snf5 is involved in A-regulated pathways, whereas Cc.Arp9 is not apparently. Cc.arp9/Cc.snf5 double-gene disruptants were generated and their phenotypes were analyzed, which suggested a complicated developmental regulation mechanism mediated by chromatin remodeling.

  10. Sequence and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Actin-related ProteinsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of ∼700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4. PMID:16195354

  11. Identification of another actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex binding site in neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) that complements actin polymerization induced by the Arp2/3 complex activating (VCA) domain of N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, S; Miki, H; Takenawa, T

    2001-08-31

    Neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) is an essential regulator of actin cytoskeleton formation via its association with the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. It is believed that the C-terminal Arp2/3 complex-activating domain (verprolin homology, cofilin homology, and acidic (VCA) or C-terminal region of WASP family proteins domain) of N-WASP is usually kept masked (autoinhibition) but is opened upon cooperative binding of upstream regulators such as Cdc42 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). However, the mechanisms of autoinhibition and association with Arp2/3 complex are still unclear. We focused on the acidic region of N-WASP because it is thought to interact with Arp2/3 complex and may be involved in autoinhibition. Partial deletion of acidic residues from the VCA portion alone greatly reduced actin polymerization activity, demonstrating that the acidic region contributes to Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. Surprisingly, the same partial deletion of the acidic region in full-length N-WASP led to constitutive activity comparable with the activity seen with the VCA portion. Therefore, the acidic region in full-length N-WASP plays an indispensable role in the formation of the autoinhibited structure. This mutant contains WASP-homology (WH) 1 domain with weak affinity to the Arp2/3 complex, leading to activity in the absence of part of the acidic region. Furthermore, the actin comet formed by the DeltaWH1 mutant of N-WASP was much smaller than that of wild-type N-WASP. Partial deletion of acidic residues did not affect actin comet size, indicating the importance of the WH1 domain in actin structure formation. Collectively, the acidic region of N-WASP plays an essential role in Arp2/3 complex activation as well as in the formation of the autoinhibited structure, whereas the WH1 domain complements the activation of the Arp2/3 complex achieved through the VCA portion.

  12. Actin, actin-related proteins and profilin in diatoms: a comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Aumeier, Charlotte; Polinski, Ellen; Menzel, Diedrik

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are heterokont unicellular algae with a widespread distribution throughout all aquatic habitats. Research on diatoms has advanced significantly over the last decade due to available genetic transformation methods and publicly available genome databases. Yet up to now, proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton in diatoms are largely unknown. Consequently, this work focuses on actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs) encoded in the diatom genomes of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Thalassiosira oceanica, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Our comparative genomic study revealed that most diatoms possess only a single conventional actin and a small set of ARPs. Among these are the highly conserved cytoplasmic Arp1 protein and the nuclear Arp4 as well as Arp6. Diatom genomes contain genes coding for two structurally different homologues of Arp4 that might serve specific functions. All diatom species examined here lack ARP2 and ARP3 proteins, suggesting that diatoms are not capable of forming the Arp2/3 complex, which is essential in most eukaryotes for actin filament branching and plus-end dynamics. Interestingly, none of the sequenced representatives of the Bacillariophyta phylum code for profilin. Profilin is an essential actin-binding protein regulating the monomer actin pool and is involved in filament plus-end dynamics. This is the first report of organisms not containing profilin.

  13. Actin-related proteins localized in the nucleus: from discovery to novel roles in nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Oma, Yukako; Harata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), and the members show moderate similarity and share the same basal structure. Following the finding of various ARPs in the cytoplasm in the 1990s, multiple subfamilies that are localized predominantly in the nucleus were identified. Consistent with these cytological observations, subsequent biochemical analyses revealed the involvement of the nuclear ARPs in ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. In addition to their contribution to chromatin remodeling, recent studies have shown that nuclear ARPs have roles in the organization of the nucleus that are independent of the activity of the above-mentioned complexes. Therefore, nuclear ARPs are recognized as novel key regulators of genome function, and affect not only the remodeling of chromatin but also the spatial arrangement and dynamics of chromatin within the nucleus.

  14. Plasma IgG autoantibody against actin-related protein 3 in liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini infection.

    PubMed

    Rucksaken, R; Haonon, O; Pinlaor, P; Pairojkul, C; Roytrakul, S; Yongvanit, P; Selmi, C; Pinlaor, S

    2015-07-01

    Opisthorchiasis secondary to Opisthorchis viverrini infection leads to cholangiocellular carcinoma through chronic inflammation of the bile ducts and possibly inducing autoimmunity. It was hypothesized that plasma autoantibodies directed against self-proteins are biomarkers for opisthorchiasis. Plasma from patients with opisthorchiasis was tested using proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell lines, and spots reacting with plasma were excised and subjected to LC-MS/MS. Seven protein spots were recognized by IgG autoantibodies, and the highest matching scored protein was actin-related protein 3 (ARP3). The antibody against ARP3 was tested in plasma from 55 O. viverrini-infected patients, 24 patients with others endemic parasitic infections and 17 healthy controls using Western blot and ELISA. Immunoreactivity against recombinant ARP3 was significantly more prevalent in opisthorchiasis compared to healthy controls at Western blotting and ELISA (P < 0.05). Plasma ARP3 autoantibody titres were also higher in opisthorchiasis compared to healthy individuals (P < 0.01) and other parasitic infections including Strongyloides stercoralis (P < 0.001), echinostome (P < 0.05), hookworms (P < 0.001) and Taenia spp. (P < 0.05). It was further characterized in that the ARP3 autoantibody titre had a sensitivity of 78.18% and specificity of 100% for opisthorchiasis. In conclusion, it may be suggested that plasma anti-ARP3 might represent a new diagnostic antibody for opisthorchiasis.

  15. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  16. The Actinome of Dictyostelium discoideum in Comparison to Actins and Actin-Related Proteins from Other Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jayabalan M.; Fey, Petra; Ramalingam, Nagendran; Liu, Xiao I.; Rohlfs, Meino; Noegel, Angelika A.; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Glöckner, Gernot; Schleicher, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Actin belongs to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotic cells which harbor usually many conventional actin isoforms as well as actin-related proteins (Arps). To get an overview over the sometimes confusing multitude of actins and Arps, we analyzed the Dictyostelium discoideum actinome in detail and compared it with the genomes from other model organisms. The D. discoideum actinome comprises 41 actins and actin-related proteins. The genome contains 17 actin genes which most likely arose from consecutive gene duplications, are all active, in some cases developmentally regulated and coding for identical proteins (Act8-group). According to published data, the actin fraction in a D. discoideum cell consists of more than 95% of these Act8-type proteins. The other 16 actin isoforms contain a conventional actin motif profile as well but differ in their protein sequences. Seven actin genes are potential pseudogenes. A homology search of the human genome using the most typical D. discoideum actin (Act8) as query sequence finds the major actin isoforms such as cytoplasmic beta-actin as best hit. This suggests that the Act8-group represents a nearly perfect actin throughout evolution. Interestingly, limited data from D. fasciculatum, a more ancient member among the social amoebae, show different relationships between conventional actins. The Act8-type isoform is most conserved throughout evolution. Modeling of the putative structures suggests that the majority of the actin-related proteins is functionally unrelated to canonical actin. The data suggest that the other actin variants are not necessary for the cytoskeleton itself but rather regulators of its dynamical features or subunits in larger protein complexes. PMID:18612387

  17. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Ac34 Protein Retains Cellular Actin-Related Protein 2/3 Complex in the Nucleus by Subversion of CRM1-Dependent Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jingfang; Zhang, Yongli; Hu, Yangyang; Hu, Xue; Zhou, Yuan; Pei, Rongjuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Jizheng; van Oers, Monique M.; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Actin, nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs), and the actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) are key elements of the cellular actin polymerization machinery. With nuclear actin polymerization implicated in ever-expanding biological processes and the discovery of the nuclear import mechanisms of actin and NPFs, determining Arp2/3 nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling mechanism is important for understanding the function of nuclear actin. A unique feature of alphabaculovirus infection of insect cells is the robust nuclear accumulation of Arp2/3, which induces actin polymerization in the nucleus to assist in virus replication. We found that Ac34, a viral late gene product encoded by the alphabaculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), is involved in Arp2/3 nuclear accumulation during virus infection. Further assays revealed that the subcellular distribution of Arp2/3 under steady-state conditions is controlled by chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent nuclear export. Upon AcMNPV infection, Ac34 inhibits CRM1 pathway and leads to Arp2/3 retention in the nucleus. PMID:27802336

  18. The role of Arabidopsis Actin-Related Protein 3 in amyloplast sedimentation and polar auxin transport in root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Zhong-Yu; Xue, Shan; Li, Han-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ren; Le, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Gravitropism is vital for shaping directional plant growth in response to the forces of gravity. Signals perceived in the gravity-sensing cells can be converted into biochemical signals and transmitted. Sedimentation of amyloplasts in the columella cells triggers asymmetric auxin redistribution in root tips, leading to downward root growth. The actin cytoskeleton is thought to play an important role in root gravitropism, although the molecular mechanism has not been resolved. DISTORTED1 (DIS1) encodes the ARP3 subunit of the Arabidopsis Actin-Related Protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, and the ARP3/DIS1 mutant dis1-1 showed delayed root curvature after gravity stimulation. Microrheological analysis revealed that the high apparent viscosity within dis1-1 central columella cells is closely associated with abnormal movement trajectories of amyloplasts. Analysis using a sensitive auxin input reporter DII-VENUS showed that asymmetric auxin redistribution was reduced in the root tips of dis1-1, and the actin-disrupting drug Latrunculin B increased the asymmetric auxin redistribution. An uptake assay using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 indicated that endocytosis was decelerated in dis1-1 root epidermal cells. Treatment and wash-out with Brefeldin A, which inhibits protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, showed that cycling of the auxin-transporter PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins to the plasma membrane was also suppressed in dis1-1 roots. The results reveal that ARP3/DIS1 acts in root gravitropism by affecting amyloplast sedimentation and PIN-mediated polar auxin transport through regulation of PIN protein trafficking.

  19. The role of Arabidopsis Actin-Related Protein 3 in amyloplast sedimentation and polar auxin transport in root gravitropism

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Zhong-Yu; Xue, Shan; Li, Han-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ren; Le, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Gravitropism is vital for shaping directional plant growth in response to the forces of gravity. Signals perceived in the gravity-sensing cells can be converted into biochemical signals and transmitted. Sedimentation of amyloplasts in the columella cells triggers asymmetric auxin redistribution in root tips, leading to downward root growth. The actin cytoskeleton is thought to play an important role in root gravitropism, although the molecular mechanism has not been resolved. DISTORTED1 (DIS1) encodes the ARP3 subunit of the Arabidopsis Actin-Related Protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, and the ARP3/DIS1 mutant dis1-1 showed delayed root curvature after gravity stimulation. Microrheological analysis revealed that the high apparent viscosity within dis1-1 central columella cells is closely associated with abnormal movement trajectories of amyloplasts. Analysis using a sensitive auxin input reporter DII-VENUS showed that asymmetric auxin redistribution was reduced in the root tips of dis1-1, and the actin-disrupting drug Latrunculin B increased the asymmetric auxin redistribution. An uptake assay using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 indicated that endocytosis was decelerated in dis1-1 root epidermal cells. Treatment and wash-out with Brefeldin A, which inhibits protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, showed that cycling of the auxin-transporter PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins to the plasma membrane was also suppressed in dis1-1 roots. The results reveal that ARP3/DIS1 acts in root gravitropism by affecting amyloplast sedimentation and PIN-mediated polar auxin transport through regulation of PIN protein trafficking. PMID:27473572

  20. SUPPRESSOR OF FRIGIDA3 Encodes a Nuclear ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 Required for Floral Repression in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuha; Kim, Sanghee; Kim, Sang Yeol; Kim, Minsoo; Hyun, Youbong; Lee, Horim; Choe, Sunghwa; Kim, Sang-Gu; Michaels, Scott; Lee, Ilha

    2005-01-01

    Flowering traits in winter annual Arabidopsis thaliana are conferred mainly by two genes, FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). FLC acts as a flowering repressor and is regulated by multiple flowering pathways. We isolated an early-flowering mutant, suppressor of FRIGIDA3 (suf3), which also shows leaf serration, weak apical dominance, and infrequent conversion of the inflorescence shoot to a terminal flower. The suf3 mutation caused a decrease in the transcript level of FLC in both a FRI-containing line and autonomous pathway mutants. However, suf3 showed only a partial reduction of FLC transcript level, although it largely suppressed the late-flowering phenotype. In addition, the suf3 mutation caused acceleration of flowering in both 35S-FLC and a flc null mutant, indicating that SUF3 regulates additional factor(s) for the repression of flowering. SUF3 is highly expressed in the shoot apex, but the expression is not regulated by FRI, autonomous pathway genes, or vernalization. SUF3 encodes the nuclear ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), the homolog of which in yeast is a component of an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling SWR1 complex. Our analyses showed that SUF3 regulates FLC expression independent of vernalization, FRI, and an autonomous pathway gene, all of which affect the histone modification of FLC chromatin. Subcellular localization using a green fluorescent protein fusion showed that Arabidopsis ARP6 is located at distinct regions of the nuclear periphery. PMID:16155178

  1. Structure and Biochemical Properties of Fission Yeast Arp2/3 Complex Lacking the Arp2 Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, B.; Pollard, T

    2008-01-01

    Arp2/3 (actin-related protein 2/3) complex is a seven-subunit complex that nucleates branched actin filaments in response to cellular signals. Nucleation-promoting factors such as WASp/Scar family proteins activate the complex by facilitating the activating conformational change and recruiting the first actin monomer for the daughter branch. Here we address the role of the Arp2 subunit in the function of Arp2/3 complex by isolating a version of the complex lacking Arp2 (Arp2? Arp2/3 complex) from fission yeast. An x-ray crystal structure of the ?Arp2 Arp2/3 complex showed that the rest of the complex is unperturbed by the loss of Arp2. However, the Arp2? Arp2/3 complex was inactive in actin nucleation assays, indicating that Arp2 is essential to form a branch. A fluorescence anisotropy assay showed that Arp2 does not contribute to the affinity of the complex for Wsp1-VCA, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe nucleation-promoting factor protein. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments showed that the loss of Arp2 does not prevent VCA from recruiting an actin monomer to the complex. Truncation of the N terminus of ARPC5, the smallest subunit in the complex, increased the yield of Arp2? Arp2/3 complex during purification but did not compromise nucleation activity of the full Arp2/3 complex.

  2. Visualizing Arp2/3 Complex Activation Mediated by Binding of ATP and WASp using Structural Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselar,J.; Mahaffy, R.; Pollard, T.; Almo, S.; Chance, M.

    2007-01-01

    Actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex nucleates new branches in actin filaments playing a key role in controlling eukaryotic cell motility. This process is tightly regulated by activating factors: ATP and WASp-family proteins. However, the mechanism of activation remains largely hypothetical. We used radiolytic protein footprinting with mass spectrometry in solution to probe the effects of nucleotide- and WASp-binding on Arp2/3. These results represent two significant advances in such footprinting approaches. First, Arp2/3 is the most complex macromolecular assembly yet examined; second, only a few picomoles of Arp2/3 was required for individual experiments. In terms of structural biology of Arp 2/3, we find that ATP binding induces conformational changes within Arp2/3 complex in Arp3 (localized in peptide segments 5-18, 212-225, and 318-327) and Arp2 (within peptide segment 300-316). These data are consistent with nucleotide docking within the nucleotide clefts of the actin-related proteins promoting closure of the cleft of the Arp3 subunit. However, ATP binding does not induce conformational changes in the other Arp subunits. Arp2/3 complex binds to WASp within the C subdomain at residue Met 474 and within the A subdomain to Trp 500. Our data suggest a bivalent attachment of WASp to Arp3 (within peptides 162-191 and 318-329) and Arp2 (within peptides 66-80 and 87-97). WASp-dependent protections from oxidation within peptides 54-65 and 80-91 of Arp3 and in peptides 300-316 of Arp2 suggest domain rearrangements of Arp2 and Arp3 resulting in a closed conformational state consistent with an 'actin-dimer' model for the active state.

  3. New insights into the regulation and cellular functions of the ARP2/3 complex.

    PubMed

    Rotty, Jeremy D; Wu, Congying; Bear, James E

    2013-01-01

    The actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex nucleates branched actin filament networks, but requires nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) to stimulate this activity. NPFs include proteins such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP), neural WASP (NWASP), WASP family verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE; also known as SCAR) and the recently identified WASP and SCAR homologue (WASH) complex. The mechanisms underlying NPF-dependent regulation and the cellular functions of ARP2/3 are being unravelled using new chemical and genetic approaches. Of particular interest is the role of the ARP2/3 complex in vesicular trafficking and directional cell motility.

  4. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-1 Regulates Arp2/3-dependent Actin Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Kemp, Hui-Chia; Brieher, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial parasite that uses host proteins to assemble an Arp2/3-dependent actin comet tail to power its movement through the host cell. Initiation of comet tail assembly is more efficient in cytosol than it is under defined conditions, indicating that unknown factors contribute to the reaction. We therefore fractionated cytosol and identified CRMP-1 as a factor that facilitates Arp2/3-dependent Listeria actin cloud formation in the presence of Arp2/3 and actin alone. It also scored as an important factor for Listeria actin comet tail formation in brain cytosol. CRMP-1 does not nucleate actin assembly on its own, nor does it directly activate the Arp2/3 complex. Rather, CRMP-1 scored as an auxiliary factor that promoted the ability of Listeria ActA protein to activate the Arp2/3 complex to trigger actin assembly. CRMP-1 is one member of a family of five related proteins that modulate cell motility in response to extracellular signals. Our results demonstrate an important role for CRMP-1 in Listeria actin comet tail formation and open the possibility that CRMP-1 controls cell motility by modulating Arp2/3 activation. PMID:26598519

  5. The actin-related protein Sac1 is required for morphogenesis and cell wall integrity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Yu, Qilin; Jia, Chang; Wang, Yuzhou; Xiao, Chenpeng; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Wang, Lei; Li, Mingchun

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a common pathogenic fungus and has aroused widespread attention recently. Actin cytoskeleton, an important player in polarized growth, protein secretion and organization of cell shape, displays irreplaceable role in hyphal development and cell integrity. In this study, we demonstrated a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sac1, in C. albicans. It is a potential PIP phosphatase with Sac domain which is related to actin organization, hyphal development, biofilm formation and cell wall integrity. Deletion of SAC1 did not lead to insitiol-auxotroph phenotype in C. albicans, but this gene rescued the growth defect of S. cerevisiae sac1Δ in the insitiol-free medium. Hyphal induction further revealed the deficiency of sac1Δ/Δ in hyphal development and biofilm formation. Fluorescence observation and real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis suggested both actin and the hyphal cell wall protein Hwp1 were overexpressed and mislocated in this mutant. Furthermore, cell wall integrity (CWI) was largely affected by deletion of SAC1, due to the hypersensitivity to cell wall stress, changed content and distribution of chitin in the mutant. As a result, the virulence of sac1Δ/Δ was seriously attenuated. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Sac1, as a potential PIP phosphatase, is essential for actin organization, hyphal development, CWI and pathogenicity in C. albicans.

  6. Characterization of Two Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, B.; Tomasevic, N; Russell, A; Pierce, D; Jia, Z; McCormick, C; Hartman, J; Sakowicz, R; Pollard, T

    2009-01-01

    Polymerization of actin filaments directed by the actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex supports many types of cellular movements. However, questions remain regarding the relative contributions of Arp2/3 complex versus other mechanisms of actin filament nucleation to processes such as path finding by neuronal growth cones; this is because of the lack of simple methods to inhibit Arp2/3 complex reversibly in living cells. Here we describe two classes of small molecules that bind to different sites on the Arp2/3 complex and inhibit its ability to nucleate actin filaments. CK-0944636 binds between Arp2 and Arp3, where it appears to block movement of Arp2 and Arp3 into their active conformation. CK-0993548 inserts into the hydrophobic core of Arp3 and alters its conformation. Both classes of compounds inhibit formation of actin filament comet tails by Listeria and podosomes by monocytes. Two inhibitors with different mechanisms of action provide a powerful approach for studying the Arp2/3 complex in living cells.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Two Binding Sites for Nucleation-promoting Factor WASp-VCA on Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    S Ti; C Jurgenson; B Nolen; T Pollard

    2011-12-31

    Actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex mediates the formation of actin filament branches during endocytosis and at the leading edge of motile cells. The pathway of branch formation is ambiguous owing to uncertainty regarding the stoichiometry and location of VCA binding sites on Arp2/3 complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the CA motif from the C terminus of fission yeast WASP (Wsp1p) bound to fission yeast and bovine Arp2/3 complex with a stoichiometry of 2 to 1 and very different affinities for the two sites (K{sub d}s of 0.13 and 1.6 {micro}M for fission yeast Arp2/3 complex). Equilibrium binding, kinetic, and cross-linking experiments showed that (i) CA at high-affinity site 1 inhibited Arp2/3 complex binding to actin filaments, (ii) low-affinity site 2 had a higher affinity for CA when Arp2/3 complex was bound to actin filaments, and (iii) Arp2/3 complex had a much higher affinity for free CA than VCA cross-linked to an actin monomer. Crystal structures showed the C terminus of CA bound to the low-affinity site 2 on Arp3 of bovine Arp2/3 complex. The C helix is likely to bind to the barbed end groove of Arp3 in a position for VCA to deliver the first actin subunit to the daughter filament.

  8. Breaking good resolutions with ARP/wARP.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard J; Zwart, Petrus H; Cohen, Serge; Fernandez, Francisco J; Kakaris, Mattheos; Kirillova, Olga; Vonrhein, Clemens; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S

    2004-01-01

    New procedures are outlined that enable ARP/wARP to automatically build protein models with diffraction data extending to about 2.5 A. An overview of ongoing research is given and possible future advances are discussed.

  9. Direct observation of dendritic actin filament networks nucleated by Arp2/3 complex and WASP/Scar proteins.

    PubMed

    Blanchoin, L; Amann, K J; Higgs, H N; Marchand, J B; Kaiser, D A; Pollard, T D

    2000-04-27

    Most nucleated cells crawl about by extending a pseudopod that is driven by the polymerization of actin filaments in the cytoplasm behind the leading edge of the plasma membrane. These actin filaments are linked into a network by Y-branches, with the pointed end of each filament attached to the side of another filament and the rapidly growing barbed end facing forward. Because Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin polymerization and links the pointed end to the side of another filament in vitro, a dendritic nucleation model has been proposed in which Arp2/3 complex initiates filaments from the sides of older filaments. Here we report, by using a light microscopy assay, many new features of the mechanism. Branching occurs during, rather than after, nucleation by Arp2/3 complex activated by the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) or Scar protein; capping protein and profilin act synergistically with Arp2/3 complex to favour branched nucleation; phosphate release from aged actin filaments favours dissociation of Arp2/3 complex from the pointed ends of filaments; and branches created by Arp2/3 complex are relatively rigid. These properties result in the automatic assembly of the branched actin network after activation by proteins of the WASP/Scar family and favour the selective disassembly of proximal regions of the network.

  10. Arp2/3 promotes junction formation and maintenance in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine by regulating membrane association of apical proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernadskaya, Yelena Y.; Patel, Falshruti B.; Hsu, Hsiao-Ting; Soto, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that Arp2/3, which promotes nucleation of branched actin, is needed for epithelial junction initiation but is less important as junctions mature. We focus here on how Arp2/3 contributes to the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium and find important roles for Arp2/3 in the maturation and maintenance of junctions in embryos and adults. Electron microscope studies show that embryos depleted of Arp2/3 form apical actin-rich microvilli and electron-dense apical junctions. However, whereas apical/basal polarity initiates, apical maturation is defective, including decreased apical F-actin enrichment, aberrant lumen morphology, and reduced accumulation of some apical junctional proteins, including DLG-1. Depletion of Arp2/3 in adult animals leads to similar intestinal defects. The DLG-1/AJM-1 apical junction proteins, and the ezrin–radixin–moesin homologue ERM-1, a protein that connects F-actin to membranes, are required along with Arp2/3 for apical F-actin enrichment in embryos, whereas cadherin junction proteins are not. Arp2/3 affects the subcellular distribution of DLG-1 and ERM-1. Loss of Arp2/3 shifts both ERM-1 and DLG-1 from pellet fractions to supernatant fractions, suggesting a role for Arp2/3 in the distribution of membrane-associated proteins. Thus, Arp2/3 is required as junctions mature to maintain apical proteins associated with the correct membranes. PMID:21697505

  11. Arp5 is a key regulator of myocardin in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ken’ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Myocardin (Myocd) and Myocd-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are robust coactivators of serum response factor (SRF). RPEL motifs are monomeric globular actin (G-actin) binding elements that regulate MRTF localization and activity. However, the function of the RPEL motif in Myocd is largely unknown because of its low affinity for G-actin. Here, we demonstrated that the Myocd RPEL motif bound to actin-related protein 5 (Arp5) instead of conventional actin, resulting in a significant suppression of Myocd activity. In addition, Arp5 bound to a DNA binding domain of SRF via its C-terminal sequence and prevented the association of the Myocd–SRF complex with the promoter regions of smooth muscle genes. Well-differentiated smooth muscle cells mainly expressed a specific splicing variant of arp5; therefore, the protein level of Arp5 was markedly reduced by partial messenger RNA decay and translational suppression. In dedifferentiated smooth muscle cells, Arp5 knockdown restored the differentiated phenotype via Myocd activation. Thus, Arp5 is a key regulator of Myocd activity. PMID:24567363

  12. ARP/wARP and molecular replacement.

    PubMed

    Perrakis, A; Harkiolaki, M; Wilson, K S; Lamzin, V S

    2001-10-01

    The aim of ARP/wARP is improved automation of model building and refinement in macromolecular crystallography. Once a molecular-replacement solution has been obtained, it is often tedious to refine and rebuild the initial (search) model. ARP/wARP offers three options to automate that task to varying extents: (i) autobuilding of a completely new model based on phases calculated from the molecular-replacement solution, (ii) updating of the initial model by atom addition and deletion to obtain an improved map and (iii) docking of a structure onto a new (or mutated) sequence, followed by rebuilding and refining the side chains in real space. A few examples are presented where ARP/wARP made a considerable difference in the speed of structure solution and/or made possible refinement of otherwise difficult or uninterpretable maps. The resolution range allowing complete autobuilding of protein structures is currently 2.0 A, but for map improvement considerable advances over more conventional refinement techniques are evident even at 3.2 A spacing.

  13. Signalling to actin assembly via the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)-family proteins and the Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Thomas H; Sharp, Stewart J; Machesky, Laura M

    2004-01-01

    The assembly of a branched network of actin filaments provides the mechanical propulsion that drives a range of dynamic cellular processes, including cell motility. The Arp2/3 complex is a crucial component of such filament networks. Arp2/3 nucleates new actin filaments while bound to existing filaments, thus creating a branched network. In recent years, a number of proteins that activate the filament nucleation activity of Arp2/3 have been identified, most notably the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) family. WASP-family proteins activate the Arp2/3 complex, and consequently stimulate actin assembly, in response to extracellular signals. Structural studies have provided a significant refinement in our understanding of the molecular detail of how the Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments. There has also been much progress towards an understanding of the complicated signalling processes that regulate WASP-family proteins. In addition, the use of gene disruption in a number of organisms has led to new insights into the specific functions of individual WASP-family members. The present review will discuss the Arp2/3 complex and its regulators, in particular the WASP-family proteins. Emphasis will be placed on recent developments in the field that have furthered our understanding of actin dynamics and cell motility. PMID:15040784

  14. The Interaction of Arp2/3 Complex with Actin: Nucleation, High Affinity Pointed End Capping, and Formation of Branching Networks of Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyche Mullins, R.; Heuser, John A.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1998-05-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is a stable assembly of seven protein subunits including two actin-related proteins (Arp2 and Arp3) and five novel proteins. Previous work showed that this complex binds to the sides of actin filaments and is concentrated at the leading edges of motile cells. Here, we show that Arp2/3 complex purified from Acanthamoeba caps the pointed ends of actin filaments with high affinity. Arp2/3 complex inhibits both monomer addition and dissociation at the pointed ends of actin filaments with apparent nanomolar affinity and increases the critical concentration for polymerization at the pointed end from 0.6 to 1.0 μ M. The high affinity of Arp2/3 complex for pointed ends and its abundance in amoebae suggest that in vivo all actin filament pointed ends are capped by Arp2/3 complex. Arp2/3 complex also nucleates formation of actin filaments that elongate only from their barbed ends. From kinetic analysis, the nucleation mechanism appears to involve stabilization of polymerization intermediates (probably actin dimers). In electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep-etched samples, we see Arp2/3 bound to sides and pointed ends of actin filaments and examples of Arp2/3 complex attaching pointed ends of filaments to sides of other filaments. In these cases, the angle of attachment is a remarkably constant 70 ± 7 degrees. From these in vitro biochemical properties, we propose a model for how Arp2/3 complex controls the assembly of a branching network of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells.

  15. Pathway of actin filament branch formation by Arp2/3 complex revealed by single-molecule imaging

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin A.; Daugherty-Clarke, Karen; Goode, Bruce L.; Gelles, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament nucleation by actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex is a critical process in cell motility and endocytosis, yet key aspects of its mechanism are unknown due to a lack of real-time observations of Arp2/3 complex through the nucleation process. Triggered by the verprolin homology, central, and acidic (VCA) region of proteins in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family, Arp2/3 complex produces new (daughter) filaments as branches from the sides of preexisting (mother) filaments. We visualized individual fluorescently labeled Arp2/3 complexes dynamically interacting with and producing branches on growing actin filaments in vitro. Branch formation was strikingly inefficient, even in the presence of VCA: only ∼1% of filament-bound Arp2/3 complexes yielded a daughter filament. VCA acted at multiple steps, increasing both the association rate of Arp2/3 complexes with mother filament and the fraction of filament-bound complexes that nucleated a daughter. The results lead to a quantitative kinetic mechanism for branched actin assembly, revealing the steps that can be stimulated by additional cellular factors. PMID:23292935

  16. Novel identification of Dermacentor variabilis Arp2/3 complex and its role in rickettsial infection of the arthropod vector.

    PubMed

    Petchampai, Natthida; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Guillotte, Mark L; Verhoeve, Victoria I; Banajee, Kaikhushroo H; Kearney, Michael T; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species must be able to infect both vertebrate and arthropod host cells. The host actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex is important in the invasion process and actin-based motility for several intracellular bacteria, including SFG Rickettsia in Drosophila and mammalian cells. To investigate the role of the tick Arp2/3 complex in tick-Rickettsia interactions, open reading frames of all subunits of the protein including Arp2, Arp3, ARPC1, ARPC2, ARPC3, ARPC4, and ARPC5 were identified from Dermacentor variabilis. Amino acid sequence analysis showed variation (ranging from 25-88%) in percent identity compared to the corresponding subunits of the complex from Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Potential ATP binding sites were identified in D. variabilis (Dv) Arp2 and Arp3 subunits as well as five putative WD (Trp-Asp) motifs which were observed in DvARPC1. Transcriptional profiles of all subunits of the DvArp2/3 complex revealed greater mRNA expression in both Rickettsia-infected and -uninfected ovary compared to midgut and salivary glands. In response to R. montanensis infection of the tick ovary, the mRNA level of only DvARPC4 was significantly upregulated compared to uninfected tissues. Arp2/3 complex inhibition bioassays resulted in a decrease in the ability of R. montanensis to invade tick tissues with a significant difference in the tick ovary, indicating a role for the Arp2/3 complex in rickettsial invasion of tick cells. Characterization of tick-derived molecules associated with rickettsial infection is imperative in order to better comprehend the ecology of tick-borne rickettsial diseases.

  17. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-Ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

  18. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex. PMID:28270832

  19. Model of Capping Protein and Arp2/3 Complex Turnover in the Lamellipodium Based on Single Molecule Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Laura; Smith, Matthew; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-03-01

    Capping protein (CP) and Arp2/3 protein complex regulate actin polymerization near the leading edge of motile cells. Actin and regulatory proteins assemble near the leading edge of the cell, undergo retrograde flow, and dissociate into the cytoplasm as single subunits (monomers) or as part of multiple actin subunits (oligomers.) To better understand this cycle, we modeled the kinetics of actin CP and Arp2/3 complex near the leading edge using data from prior experiments [Miyoshi et al. JCB, 2006, 175:948]. We used the measured dissociation rates of Arp2/3 complex and CP in a Monte Carlo simulation that includes particles in association with filamentous and diffuse actin in the cytoplasm. A slowly diffusing cytoplasmic pool may account for a big fraction of CP, with diffusion coefficients as slow as 0.5 μm2 / s [Smith et al. Biophys. J., 2011,101:1799]. Such slow diffusion coefficients are consistent with prior experiments by Kapustina et al. [Cytoskeleton, 2010, 67:525]. We also show that the single molecule data are consistent with experiments by Lai et al. [EMBO J., 2008, 28:986]. We discuss the implication of disassembly with actin oligomers and suggest experiments to distinguish among mechanisms that influence long range transport.

  20. The Human Arp2/3 Complex Is Composed of Evolutionarily Conserved Subunits and Is Localized to Cellular Regions of Dynamic Actin Filament Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Matthew D.; DePace, Angela H.; Verma, Suzie; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    The Arp2/3 protein complex has been implicated in the control of actin polymerization in cells. The human complex consists of seven subunits which include the actin related proteins Arp2 and Arp3, and five others referred to as p41-Arc, p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc (Arp complex). We have determined the predicted amino acid sequence of all seven subunits. Each has homologues in diverse eukaryotes, implying that the structure and function of the complex has been conserved through evolution. Human Arp2 and Arp3 are very similar to family members from other species. p41-Arc is a new member of the Sop2 family of WD (tryptophan and aspartate) repeat–containing proteins and may be posttranslationally modified, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating the activity and/or localization of the complex. p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc define novel protein families. We sought to evaluate the function of the Arp2/3 complex in cells by determining its intracellular distribution. Arp3, p34-Arc, and p21-Arc were localized to the lamellipodia of stationary and locomoting fibroblasts, as well to Listeria monocytogenes assembled actin tails. They were not detected in cellular bundles of actin filaments. Taken together with the ability of the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin polymerization, these observations suggest that the complex promotes actin assembly in lamellipodia and may participate in lamellipodial protrusion. PMID:9230079

  1. The human Arp2/3 complex is composed of evolutionarily conserved subunits and is localized to cellular regions of dynamic actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Welch, M D; DePace, A H; Verma, S; Iwamatsu, A; Mitchison, T J

    1997-07-28

    The Arp2/3 protein complex has been implicated in the control of actin polymerization in cells. The human complex consists of seven subunits which include the actin related proteins Arp2 and Arp3, and five others referred to as p41-Arc, p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc (p omplex). We have determined the predicted amino acid sequence of all seven subunits. Each has homologues in diverse eukaryotes, implying that the structure and function of the complex has been conserved through evolution. Human Arp2 and Arp3 are very similar to family members from other species. p41-Arc is a new member of the Sop2 family of WD (tryptophan and aspartate) repeat-containing proteins and may be posttranslationally modified, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating the activity and/or localization of the complex. p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc define novel protein families. We sought to evaluate the function of the Arp2/3 complex in cells by determining its intracellular distribution. Arp3, p34-Arc, and p21-Arc were localized to the lamellipodia of stationary and locomoting fibroblasts, as well to Listeria monocytogenes assembled actin tails. They were not detected in cellular bundles of actin filaments. Taken together with the ability of the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin polymerization, these observations suggest that the complex promotes actin assembly in lamellipodia and may participate in lamellipodial protrusion.

  2. Involvement of the Arp2/3 complex and WASP proteins in the effect of glutoxim and molixan on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Krutetskaya, Z I; Milenina, L S; Naumova, A A; Butov, S N; Antonov, V G; Nozdrachev, A D

    2015-01-01

    The Fura-2AM fluorescent Ca(2+) probe was used to study the possibility that the Arp2/3 complex and WASP proteins are involved in the effects of glutoxim and molixan on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that preincubation of macrophages with inhibitors of the Arp2/3 complex or WASP proteins (CK-0944666 or wiskostatin, respectively) results in a significant suppression of Ca(2+)-responses induced by glutoxim or molixan. This suggests that polymerization of actin filaments is a process involved in the effect of glutoxim or molixan on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in macrophages.

  3. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Guillaume X; Langer, Gerrit G; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein-ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  4. Model of turnover kinetics in the lamellipodium: implications of slow- and fast- diffusing capping protein and Arp2/3 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Laura M.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Cell protrusion through polymerization of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells may be influenced by spatial gradients of diffuse actin and regulators. Here we study the distribution of two of the most important regulators, capping protein and Arp2/3 complex, which regulate actin polymerization in the lamellipodium through capping and nucleation of free barbed ends. We modeled their kinetics using data from prior single molecule microscopy experiments on XTC cells. These experiments have provided evidence for a broad distribution of diffusion coefficients of both capping protein and Arp2/3 complex. The slowly diffusing proteins appear as extended ‘clouds’ while proteins bound to the actin filament network appear as speckles that undergo retrograde flow. Speckle appearance and disappearance events correspond to assembly and dissociation from the actin filament network and speckle lifetimes correspond to the dissociation rate. The slowly diffusing capping protein could represent severed capped actin filament fragments or membrane-bound capping protein. Prior evidence suggests that slowly diffusing Apr2/3 complex associates with the membrane. We use the measured rates and estimates of diffusion coefficients of capping protein and Arp2/3 complex in a Monte Carlo simulation that includes particles in association with a filament network and diffuse in the cytoplasm. We consider two separate pools of diffuse proteins, representing fast and slowly diffusing species. We find a steady state with concentration gradients involving a balance of diffusive flow of fast and slow species with retrograde flow. We show that simulations of FRAP are consistent with prior experiments performed on different cell types. We provide estimates for the ratio of bound to diffuse complexes and calculate conditions where Arp2/3 complex recycling by diffusion may become limiting. We discuss the implications of slowly diffusing populations and suggest experiments to distinguish

  5. Automated macromolecular model building for X-ray crystallography using ARP/wARP version 7.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gerrit; Cohen, Serge X; Lamzin, Victor S; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2008-01-01

    ARP/wARP is a software suite to build macromolecular models in X-ray crystallography electron density maps. Structural genomics initiatives and the study of complex macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins all rely on advanced methods for 3D structure determination. ARP/wARP meets these needs by providing the tools to obtain a macromolecular model automatically, with a reproducible computational procedure. ARP/wARP 7.0 tackles several tasks: iterative protein model building including a high-level decision-making control module; fast construction of the secondary structure of a protein; building flexible loops in alternate conformations; fully automated placement of ligands, including a choice of the best-fitting ligand from a 'cocktail'; and finding ordered water molecules. All protocols are easy to handle by a nonexpert user through a graphical user interface or a command line. The time required is typically a few minutes although iterative model building may take a few hours.

  6. LC-MS/MS Based Quantitation of ABC and SLC Transporter Proteins in Plasma Membranes of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells and Immortalized ARPE19 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Laura; Sato, Kazuki; Reinisalo, Mika; Kidron, Heidi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Uchida, Yasuo; Urtti, Arto; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2017-02-14

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) forms the outer blood-retinal barrier between neural retina and choroid. The RPE has several important vision supporting functions, such as transport mechanisms that may also modify pharmacokinetics in the posterior eye segment. Expression of plasma membrane transporters in the RPE cells has not been quantitated. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare transporter protein expression in the ARPE19 cell line and hfRPE (human fetal RPE) cells by using quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP). Among 41 studied transporters, 16 proteins were expressed in hfRPE and 13 in ARPE19 cells. MRP1, MRP5, GLUT1, 4F2hc, TAUT, CAT1, LAT1, and MATE1 proteins were detected in both cell lines within 4-fold differences. MPR7, OAT2 and RFC1 were detected in the hfRPE cells, but their expression levels were below the limit of quantification in ARPE19 cells. PCFT was detected in both studied cell lines, but the expression was over 4-fold higher in hfRPE cells. MCT1, MCT4, MRP4, and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase were upregulated in the ARPE19 cell line showing over 4-fold differences in the quantitative expression values. Expression levels of 25 transporters were below the limit of quantification in both cell models. In conclusion, we present the first systematic and quantitative study on transporter protein expression in the plasma membranes of ARPE19 and hfRPE cells. Overall, transporter expression in the ARPE19 and hfRPE cells correlated well and the absolute expression levels were similar, but not identical. The presented quantitative expression levels could be a useful basis for further studies on drug permeation in the outer blood-retinal barrier.

  7. Ubl4A is required for insulin-induced Akt plasma membrane translocation through promotion of Arp2/3-dependent actin branching.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Lin, Yuting; Zhang, Honghong; Mañas, Adriana; Tang, Wenwen; Zhang, Yuzhu; Wu, Dianqing; Lin, Anning; Xiang, Jialing

    2015-08-04

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt is a key regulator of cell proliferation and survival, glucose metabolism, cell mobility, and tumorigenesis. Activation of Akt by extracellular stimuli such as insulin centers on the interaction of Akt with PIP3 on the plasma membrane, where it is subsequently phosphorylated and activated by upstream protein kinases. However, it is not known how Akt is recruited to the plasma membrane upon stimulation. Here we report that ubiquitin-like protein 4A (Ubl4A) plays a crucial role in insulin-induced Akt plasma membrane translocation. Ubl4A knockout newborn mice have defective Akt-dependent glycogen synthesis and increased neonatal mortality. Loss of Ubl4A results in the impairment of insulin-induced Akt translocation to the plasma membrane and activation. Akt binds actin-filaments and colocalizes with actin-related protein 2 and 3 (Arp2/3) complex in the membrane ruffles and lamellipodia. Ubl4A directly interacts with Arp2/3 to accelerate actin branching and networking, allowing Akt to be in close proximity to the plasma membrane for activation upon insulin stimulation. Our finding reveals a new mechanism by which Akt is recruited to the plasma membrane for activation, thereby providing a missing link in Akt signaling.

  8. Platelet actin nodules are podosome-like structures dependent on Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein and ARP2/3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, Natalie S.; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Davies, Amy; Malinova, Dessislava; Nash, Gerard B.; Hannon, Mike J.; Pikramenou, Zoe; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Hartwig, John H.; Owen, Dylan M.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Watson, Stephen P.; Thomas, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    The actin nodule is a novel F-actin structure present in platelets during early spreading. However, only limited detail is known regarding nodule organization and function. Here we use electron microscopy, SIM and dSTORM super-resolution, and live-cell TIRF microscopy to characterize the structural organization and signalling pathways associated with nodule formation. Nodules are composed of up to four actin-rich structures linked together by actin bundles. They are enriched in the adhesion-related proteins talin and vinculin, have a central core of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and are depleted of integrins at the plasma membrane. Nodule formation is dependent on Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and the ARP2/3 complex. WASp−/− mouse blood displays impaired platelet aggregate formation at arteriolar shear rates. We propose actin nodules are platelet podosome-related structures required for platelet–platelet interaction and their absence contributes to the bleeding diathesis of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome. PMID:26028144

  9. Nuclear role of WASp in gene transcription is uncoupled from its ARP2/3-dependent cytoplasmic role in actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Sarkar, Koustav; Taylor, Matthew; Candotti, Fabio; Vyas, Yatin M

    2014-07-01

    Defects in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) underlie development of WAS, an X-linked immunodeficiency and autoimmunity disorder of childhood. Nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) of the WASp family generate F-actin in the cytosol via the VCA (verprolin-homology, cofilin-homology, and acidic) domain and support RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription in the nucleus. Whether nuclear-WASp requires the integration of its actin-related protein (ARP)2/3-dependent cytoplasmic function to reprogram gene transcription, however, remains unresolved. Using the model of human TH cell differentiation, we find that WASp has a functional nuclear localizing and nuclear exit sequences, and accordingly, its effects on transcription are controlled mainly at the level of its nuclear entry and exit via the nuclear pore. Human WASp does not use its VCA-dependent, ARP2/3-driven, cytoplasmic effector mechanisms to support histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity in the nucleus of TH1-skewed cells. Accordingly, an isolated deficiency of nuclear-WASp is sufficient to impair the transcriptional reprogramming of TBX21 and IFNG promoters in TH1-skewed cells, whereas an isolated deficiency of cytosolic-WASp does not impair this process. In contrast, nuclear presence of WASp in TH2-skewed cells is small, and its loss does not impair transcriptional reprogramming of GATA3 and IL4 promoters. Our study unveils an ARP2/3:VCA-independent function of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene activation that is uncoupled from its cytoplasmic role in actin polymerization.

  10. ARP/wARP and molecular replacement: the next generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Serge X. Ben Jelloul, Marouane; Long, Fei; Vagin, Alexei; Knipscheer, Puck; Lebbink, Joyce; Sixma, Titia K.; Lamzin, Victor S.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2008-01-01

    A systematic test shows how ARP/wARP deals with automated model building for structures that have been solved by molecular replacement. A description of protocols in the flex-wARP control system and studies of two specific cases are also presented. Automatic iterative model (re-)building, as implemented in ARP/wARP and its new control system flex-wARP, is particularly well suited to follow structure solution by molecular replacement. More than 100 molecular-replacement solutions automatically solved by the BALBES software were submitted to three standard protocols in flex-wARP and the results were compared with final models from the PDB. Standard metrics were gathered in a systematic way and enabled the drawing of statistical conclusions on the advantages of each protocol. Based on this analysis, an empirical estimator was proposed that predicts how good the final model produced by flex-wARP is likely to be based on the experimental data and the quality of the molecular-replacement solution. To introduce the differences between the three flex-wARP protocols (keeping the complete search model, converting it to atomic coordinates but ignoring atom identities or using the electron-density map calculated from the molecular-replacement solution), two examples are also discussed in detail, focusing on the evolution of the models during iterative rebuilding. This highlights the diversity of paths that the flex-wARP control system can employ to reach a nearly complete and accurate model while actually starting from the same initial information.

  11. ARP/wARP and molecular replacement: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Serge X; Ben Jelloul, Marouane; Long, Fei; Vagin, Alexei; Knipscheer, Puck; Lebbink, Joyce; Sixma, Titia K; Lamzin, Victor S; Murshudov, Garib N; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2008-01-01

    Automatic iterative model (re-)building, as implemented in ARP/wARP and its new control system flex-wARP, is particularly well suited to follow structure solution by molecular replacement. More than 100 molecular-replacement solutions automatically solved by the BALBES software were submitted to three standard protocols in flex-wARP and the results were compared with final models from the PDB. Standard metrics were gathered in a systematic way and enabled the drawing of statistical conclusions on the advantages of each protocol. Based on this analysis, an empirical estimator was proposed that predicts how good the final model produced by flex-wARP is likely to be based on the experimental data and the quality of the molecular-replacement solution. To introduce the differences between the three flex-wARP protocols (keeping the complete search model, converting it to atomic coordinates but ignoring atom identities or using the electron-density map calculated from the molecular-replacement solution), two examples are also discussed in detail, focusing on the evolution of the models during iterative rebuilding. This highlights the diversity of paths that the flex-wARP control system can employ to reach a nearly complete and accurate model while actually starting from the same initial information.

  12. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Guillaume X.; Langer, Gerrit G.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement. PMID:17164533

  13. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    SciTech Connect

    Evrard, Guillaume X. Langer, Gerrit G.; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the ligand-building module of the ARP/wARP software suite is assessed through a large-scale test on known protein–ligand complexes. The results provide a detailed benchmark and guidelines for future improvements. The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  14. "Conditional Restraints": Restraining the Free Atoms in ARP/wARP.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Wijnand T M; Cohen, Serge X; Joosten, Krista; Murshudov, Garib N; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2009-02-13

    The automated building of a protein model into an electron density map remains a challenging problem. In the ARP/wARP approach, model building is facilitated by initially interpreting a density map with free atoms of unknown chemical identity; all structural information for such chemically unassigned atoms is discarded. Here, this is remedied by applying restraints between free atoms, and between free atoms and a partial protein model. These are based on geometric considerations of protein structure and tentative (conditional) assignments for the free atoms. Restraints are applied in the REFMAC5 refinement program and are generated on an ad hoc basis, allowing them to fluctuate from step to step. A large set of experimentally phased and molecular replacement structures showcases individual structures where automated building is improved drastically by the conditional restraints. The concept and implementation we present can also find application in restraining geometries, such as hydrogen bonds, in low-resolution refinement.

  15. Sigma Factor RpoS Controls Alkylresorcinol Synthesis through ArpR, a LysR-Type Regulatory Protein, during Encystment of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Yanet; Moreno, Soledad; Guzmán, Josefina; Espín, Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a bacterium which undergoes a differentiation process leading to the formation of metabolically dormant cysts. During the encystment process, A. vinelandii produces alkylresorcinol lipids (ARs) that replace the membrane phospholipids and are also components of the layers covering the cyst. The synthesis of ARs in A. vinelandii has been shown to occur by the activity of enzymes encoded by the arsABCD operon, which is expressed only during the differentiation process. Also, the production of ARs has been shown to be dependent on the stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS, which is also implicated in the control of the synthesis of other cyst components (i.e., alginate and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate). In this study, we identified ArpR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator expressed only during encystment that positively regulates arsABCD transcription. We show that this activation is dependent on acetoacetyl-coenzyme A (acetoacetyl-CoA), which might provide a metabolic signal for encystment. We also show that RpoS regulates arsABCD expression through the control of arpR transcription. PMID:23378510

  16. Deficiency in ubiquitin-like protein Ubl4A impairs migration of fibroblasts and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Affonso, Carlos; Bonomo, Raiza; Mañas, Adriana; Xiang, Jialing

    2017-01-29

    Ubiquitin-like protein Ubl4A is a small, multi-functional protein with no ubiquitination activity. We have previously demonstrated that Ubl4A directly interacts with actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) and promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin branching, thereby accelerating plasma membrane translocation of protein kinase Akt upon insulin stimulation. Here, we show that Ubl4A is critical for plasma membrane protrusion and cell migration. Ubl4A, F-actin and Arp2/3 are co-localized at the cell leading edges during wound closure. Knockout of Ubl4A significantly reduces actin-mediated membrane protrusion and delays wound healing by primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Consistently, the ability of fibroblasts to migrate out of corneal tissue ex vivo is also impaired in Ubl4A-deficient mice. Furthermore, cell motility, but not phagocytosis, is significantly decreased in Ubl4A-deficient macrophages compared with wild-type controls. These results imply an important role for Ubl4A in cell migration-associated pathophysiological processes.

  17. Laboratory-scale integrated ARP filter test

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Burket, P.

    2016-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. There is a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. This task attempted to simulate the entire ARP process, including multiple batches (5), washing, chemical cleaning, and blending the feed with heels and recycle streams. The objective of the tests was to determine whether one of these processes is causing excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter. The authors conducted the tests with feed solutions containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 simulant supernate with no MST.

  18. The knock-out of ARP3a gene affects F-actin cytoskeleton organization altering cellular tip growth, morphology and development in moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Finka, Andrija; Saidi, Younousse; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Zrÿd, Jean-Pierre; Schaefer, Didier G

    2008-10-01

    The seven subunit Arp2/3 complex is a highly conserved nucleation factor of actin microfilaments. We have isolated the genomic sequence encoding a putative Arp3a protein of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The disruption of this ARP3A gene by allele replacement has generated loss-of-function mutants displaying a complex developmental phenotype. The loss-of function of ARP3A gene results in shortened, almost cubic chloronemal cells displaying affected tip growth and lacking differentiation to caulonemal cells. In moss arp3a mutants, buds differentiate directly from chloronemata to form stunted leafy shoots having differentiated leaves similar to wild type. Yet, rhizoids never differentiate from stem epidermal cells. To characterize the F-actin organization in the arp3a-mutated cells, we disrupted ARP3A gene in the previously described HGT1 strain expressing conditionally the GFP-talin marker. In vivo observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton during P. patens development demonstrated that loss-of-function of Arp3a is associated with the disappearance of specific F-actin cortical structures associated with the establishment of localized cellular growth domains. Finally, we show that constitutive expression of the P. patens Arp3a and its Arabidopsis thaliana orthologs efficiently complement the mutated phenotype indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservation of the Arp3 function in land plants.

  19. Apigenin Attenuates Oxidative Injury in ARPE-19 Cells thorough Activation of Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Haitao; Yang, Yan; Hang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The current study was aimed at evaluating the therapeutic implication of apigenin and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. The tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) at 200 μM was used to induce oxidative stress-associated injury in ARPE-19 cells. Apigenin at concentrations less than 800 μM did not cause cytotoxic effects on ARPE-19 cells. Cell viability assay showed that apigenin at 200 μM significantly promoted cell survival in t-BHP-treated ARPE-19 cells. Additionally, apigenin at 100 μM significantly protected ARPE-19 cells from t-BHP-induced apoptosis. Molecular examinations demonstrated that apigenin at 400 μM significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 and stimulated its nuclear translocation in ARPE-19 cells treated with or without t-BHP. Apigenin 400 μM also significantly elevated the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and GCLM at both mRNA and protein levels in the presence or absence of t-BHP. Furthermore, apigenin at 400 μM significantly increased the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-PX, and T-AOC and reduced the levels of ROS and MDA in t-BHP-treated ARPE-19 cells. However, these effects of apigenin were all abolished by being transfected with Nrf2 siRNA. Collectively, our current data indicated that apigenin exerted potent antioxidant properties in ARPE-19 cells challenged with t-BHP, which were dependent on activation of Nrf2 signaling. PMID:27656262

  20. Apigenin Attenuates Oxidative Injury in ARPE-19 Cells thorough Activation of Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinrong; Li, Min; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Haitao; Yang, Yan; Hang, Li

    The current study was aimed at evaluating the therapeutic implication of apigenin and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. The tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) at 200 μM was used to induce oxidative stress-associated injury in ARPE-19 cells. Apigenin at concentrations less than 800 μM did not cause cytotoxic effects on ARPE-19 cells. Cell viability assay showed that apigenin at 200 μM significantly promoted cell survival in t-BHP-treated ARPE-19 cells. Additionally, apigenin at 100 μM significantly protected ARPE-19 cells from t-BHP-induced apoptosis. Molecular examinations demonstrated that apigenin at 400 μM significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 and stimulated its nuclear translocation in ARPE-19 cells treated with or without t-BHP. Apigenin 400 μM also significantly elevated the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and GCLM at both mRNA and protein levels in the presence or absence of t-BHP. Furthermore, apigenin at 400 μM significantly increased the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-PX, and T-AOC and reduced the levels of ROS and MDA in t-BHP-treated ARPE-19 cells. However, these effects of apigenin were all abolished by being transfected with Nrf2 siRNA. Collectively, our current data indicated that apigenin exerted potent antioxidant properties in ARPE-19 cells challenged with t-BHP, which were dependent on activation of Nrf2 signaling.

  1. Towards complete validated models in the next generation of ARP/wARP.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Serge X; Morris, Richard J; Fernandez, Francisco J; Ben Jelloul, Marouane; Kakaris, Mattheos; Parthasarathy, Venkataraman; Lamzin, Victor S; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2004-12-01

    The design of a new versatile control system that will underlie future releases of the automated model-building package ARP/wARP is presented. A sophisticated expert system is under development that will transform ARP/wARP from a very useful model-building aid to a truly automated package capable of delivering complete, well refined and validated models comparable in quality to the result of intensive manual checking, rebuilding, hypothesis testing, refinement and validation cycles of an experienced crystallographer. In addition to the presentation of this control system, recent advances, ideas and future plans for improving the current model-building algorithms, especially for completing partially built models, are presented. Furthermore, a concept for integrating validation routines into the iterative model-building process is also presented.

  2. Genetic dissection of the budding yeast Arp2/3 complex: A comparison of the in vivo and structural roles of individual subunits

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Dirk C.; Choe, Elizabeth Y.; Li, Rong

    1999-01-01

    In previous work, we identified the yeast Arp2/3 complex, which localizes to cortical actin patches and is required for their motility and integrity in vivo. This complex contains proteins homologous to each subunit of the Acanthamoeba and human Arp2/3 complex except for a 40-kDa subunit (p40), which was missing from the purified yeast complex. Here, we demonstrate by using immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration analysis that Arc40p, the homolog of p40 identified from the yeast genome database, associates with the yeast Arp2/3 complex. We have carried out gene disruptions of each subunit of the yeast Arp2/3 complex to study each subunit’s role in the function of the complex. Surprisingly, we find that only ARC40 is fully essential for cell viability. Strains lacking each of the other subunits exhibit varying degrees of defects in cell growth and viability and in assembly and polarization of cortical actin patches. We have also examined each subunit’s role in maintaining the structural integrity of the Arp2/3 complex. Arp2p, Arp3p, and Arc40p fall into the monomer pool in Δarc19 and Δarc35 cells, suggesting that Arc19p and Arc35p are the central scaffolding components of the complex. Arp2p and Arp3p do not have major roles in maintaining complex integrity, and Arc15p is required for association of Arp2p and Arc40p, but not other subunits, with the complex. These results provide evidence that each subunit contributes differently to the assembly and function of the Arp2/3 complex. PMID:10377407

  3. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  4. Inhibition of cytokinesis by wiskostatin does not rely on N-WASP/Arp2/3 complex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bompard, Guillaume; Rabeharivelo, Gabriel; Morin, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Background Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division taking place at the end of mitosis during which the cytoplasmic content and replicated chromosomes of a cell are equally partitioned between the two daughter cells. This process is achieved by the formation and the ingression of an actomyosin contractile ring under the control of equatorial microtubules. The mechanisms of contractile ring formation are not fully understood but involve recruitment of preexisting actin filaments and de novo actin polymerisation. Results In this study, we evaluated the role of the actin nucleation factor, Arp2/3 complex, during cytokinesis. We found that the Arp2/3 complex is recruited late to the cleavage furrow suggesting a potential involvement of Arp2/3 complex during this process. Furthermore, wiskostatin a potent inhibitor of N-WASP activity towards the Arp2/3 complex blocked cytokinesis without affecting mitosis. Nonetheless, this inhibition could not be reproduced using alternative approaches targeting the N-WASP/Arp2/3 complex pathway. Conclusion We conclude that the wiskostatin induced defective cytokinesis does not occur through the inhibition of the N-WASP/Arp2/3 pathway. Wiskostatin is likely to either directly target other proteins required for cytokinesis progression or alternately wiskostatin bound to N-WASP could affect the activity of other factors involved in cytokinesis. PMID:18667055

  5. WAVE binds Ena/VASP for enhanced Arp2/3 complex–based actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Noguera, Philippe; Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Manzi, John; Faqir, Fahima; Lamora, Audrey; Guérin, Christophe; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WAVE complex is the main activator of the Arp2/3 complex for actin filament nucleation and assembly in the lamellipodia of moving cells. Other important players in lamellipodial protrusion are Ena/VASP proteins, which enhance actin filament elongation. Here we examine the molecular coordination between the nucleating activity of the Arp2/3 complex and the elongating activity of Ena/VASP proteins for the formation of actin networks. Using an in vitro bead motility assay, we show that WAVE directly binds VASP, resulting in an increase in Arp2/3 complex–based actin assembly. We show that this interaction is important in vivo as well, for the formation of lamellipodia during the ventral enclosure event of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. Ena/VASP's ability to bind F-actin and profilin-complexed G-actin are important for its effect, whereas Ena/VASP tetramerization is not necessary. Our data are consistent with the idea that binding of Ena/VASP to WAVE potentiates Arp2/3 complex activity and lamellipodial actin assembly. PMID:25355952

  6. Genomic analysis of the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp with evidence of T3SS and T6SS gene expression on plant roots.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Muriel; Boutin, Morgane; Gazengel, Kévin; Rispe, Claude; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Lebreton, Lionel; Barret, Matthieu; Daval, Stéphanie; Sarniguet, Alain

    2013-06-01

    Several bacterial strains of the Pseudomonas genus provide plant growth stimulation, plant protection against pests or bioremediation. Among these bacteria, P. fluorescens Pf29Arp reduces the severity of take-all, a disease caused by the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In this study, we obtained a draft genome of Pf29Arp and subsequent comparative genomic analyses have revealed that this bacterial strain is closely related to strains of the 'P. brassicacearum-like' subgroup including P. brassicacearum ssp. brassicacearum NFM421 and P. fluorescens F113. Despite an overall chromosomal organization similar to these strains, a number of features including antibiotic synthesis gene clusters from secondary metabolism are not found in the Pf29Arp genome. But Pf29Arp possesses different protein secretion systems including type III (T3SS) and type VI (T6SS) secretion systems. Pf29Arp is the first Pseudomonas sp. strain described with four T6SS clusters (cluster I, II, III and IV). In addition, some protein-coding genes involved in the assembly of these secretion systems are basally expressed during Pf29Arp colonization of healthy wheat roots and display different expression patterns on necrotized roots caused by Ggt. These data suggest a role of T3SS and T6SS in the Pf29Arp adaptation to different root environments.

  7. Robotic Reverberation Mapping of Arp 151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, S.; Sand, D. J.; Barth, A. J.; Horne, K.; Treu, T.; Raganit, L.; Boroson, T.; Crawford, S.; Pancoast, A.; Pei, L.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Villforth, C.; Winkler, H.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network's Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) Key Project, a large program devoted to using the robotic resources of LCOGT to perform time domain studies of active galaxies. We monitored the Seyfert 1 galaxy Arp 151 (Mrk 40) for ∼200 days with robotic imagers and with the FLOYDS robotic spectrograph at Faulkes Telescope North. Arp 151 was highly variable during this campaign, with V-band light curve variations of ∼0.3 mag and Hβ flux changing by a factor of ∼3. We measure robust time lags between the V-band continuum and the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ emission lines, with {τ }{cen}={13.89}-1.41+1.39, {7.52}-1.06+1.43, and {7.40}-1.32+1.50 days, respectively. The lag for the He iiλ4686 emission line is unresolved. We measure a velocity-resolved lag for the Hβ line, which is clearly asymmetric with higher lags on the blue wing of the line that decline to the red, possibly indicative of radial inflow, and is similar in morphology to past observations of the Hβ transfer function shape. Assuming a virialization factor of f = 5.5, we estimate a black hole mass of {M}{BH}={6.2}-1.2+1.4 × 106 M⊙, also consistent with past measurements for this object. These results represent the first step to demonstrate the powerful robotic capabilities of LCOGT for long-term AGN time domain campaigns that human intensive programs cannot easily accomplish. Arp 151 is now one of just a few AGNs where the virial product is known to remain constant against substantial changes in Hβ lag and luminosity.

  8. Protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos grown in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Gabriella; Pagliato, Lara; Negroni, Manuela; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola; Nonnis, Simona; Negri, Armando; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies indicate that microgravity affects cell growth and differentiation in many living organisms, and various processes are modified when cells are placed under conditions of weightlessness. However, until now, there is no coherent explanation for these observations, and little information is available concerning the biomolecules involved. Our aim has been to investigate the protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to simulated microgravity during the first 6 days of development. A proteomic approach was applied to compare the protein profiles of Xenopus embryos developed in simulated microgravity and in normal conditions. Attention was focused on embryos that do not present visible malformations in order to investigate if weightlessness has effects at protein level in the absence of macroscopic alterations. The data presented strongly suggest that some of the major components of the cytoskeleton vary in such conditions. Three major findings are described for the first time: (i) the expression of important factors involved in the organization and stabilization of the cytoskeleton, such as Arp (actin-related protein) 3 and stathmin, is heavily affected by microgravity; (ii) the amount of the two major cytoskeletal proteins, actin and tubulin, do not change in such conditions; however, (iii) an increase in the tyrosine nitration of these two proteins can be detected. The data suggest that, in the absence of morphological alterations, simulated microgravity affects the intracellular movement system of cells by altering cytoskeletal proteins heavily involved in the regulation of cytoskeleton remodelling.

  9. [Cloning and functional research of Arp2/3-P40/ARPC1 subunit of Sf9 cells].

    PubMed

    Han, Shi-Li; Mu, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Yong-Li; Chen, Xin-Wen; Wang, Yun; Li, Lu-Lin

    2012-11-01

    The baculovirus-induced actin polymerization is mainly associated with the virus nucleocapsid protein P78/83, which is homologous with WASP proteins that can activate Arp2/3 complex and induce the actin polymerization. In order to explore the role of Arp2/3 complex in the baculovirus replication, the P40 subunit of Arp2/3 complex from Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda 9) cell line was cloned and characterized. Immunofluorescent microscopy assay indicated that P40 was recruited to the inner-side of nuclear membrane during virus infection, which was in accordance with nuclear F-actin distribution in virus-infected cells as documented in our previous research, suggesting P40 could be used to track Arp2/3 complex subcellular distribution changes during virus infection. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that P40 interacted with P78/83 only in virus-infected cells, suggesting that actin polymerization induced by P78/83-Arp2/3 complex during baculovirus infection was regulated by some unidentified virus factors.

  10. Appropriately differentiated ARPE-19 cells regain phenotype and gene expression profiles similar to those of native RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Cynthia; Postnikova, Olga. A.; Kutty, R. Krishnan; Duncan, Todd; Tan, Li Xuan; Poliakov, Eugenia; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Redmond, T. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The RPE cell line ARPE-19 provides a dependable and widely used alternative to native RPE. However, replication of the native RPE phenotype becomes more difficult because these cells lose their specialized phenotype after multiple passages. Compounding this problem is the widespread use of ARPE-19 cells in an undifferentiated state to attempt to model RPE functions. We wished to determine whether suitable culture conditions and differentiation could restore the RPE-appropriate expression of genes and proteins to ARPE-19, along with a functional and morphological phenotype resembling native RPE. We compared the transcriptome of ARPE-19 cells kept in long-term culture with those of primary and other human RPE cells to assess the former’s inherent plasticity relative to the latter. Methods ARPE-19 cells at passages 9 to 12 grown in DMEM containing high glucose and pyruvate with 1% fetal bovine serum were differentiated for up to 4 months. Immunocytochemistry was performed on ARPE-19 cells grown on filters. Total RNA extracted from ARPE-19 cells cultured for either 4 days or 4 months was used for RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis using a 2 × 50 bp paired end protocol. The RNA-Seq data were analyzed to identify the affected pathways and recognize shared ontological classification among differentially expressed genes. RPE-specific mRNAs and miRNAs were assessed with quantitative real-time (RT)–PCR, and proteins with western blotting. Results ARPE-19 cells grown for 4 months developed the classic native RPE phenotype with heavy pigmentation. RPE-expressed genes, including RPE65, RDH5, and RDH10, as well as miR-204/211, were greatly increased in the ARPE-19 cells maintained at confluence for 4 months. The RNA-Seq analysis provided a comprehensive view of the relative abundance and differential expression of the genes in the differentiated ARPE-19 cells. Of the 16,757 genes with detectable signals, nearly 1,681 genes were upregulated, and 1,629 genes were

  11. DS-ARP: a new detection scheme for ARP spoofing attacks based on routing trace for ubiquitous environments.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Su; Lee, Jae Dong; Jeong, Young-Sik; Jeong, Hwa-Young; Park, Jong Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Despite the convenience, ubiquitous computing suffers from many threats and security risks. Security considerations in the ubiquitous network are required to create enriched and more secure ubiquitous environments. The address resolution protocol (ARP) is a protocol used to identify the IP address and the physical address of the associated network card. ARP is designed to work without problems in general environments. However, since it does not include security measures against malicious attacks, in its design, an attacker can impersonate another host using ARP spoofing or access important information. In this paper, we propose a new detection scheme for ARP spoofing attacks using a routing trace, which can be used to protect the internal network. Tracing routing can find the change of network movement path. The proposed scheme provides high constancy and compatibility because it does not alter the ARP protocol. In addition, it is simple and stable, as it does not use a complex algorithm or impose extra load on the computer system.

  12. Arp2/3 and VASP Are Essential for Fear Memory Formation in Lateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Kustanovich, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The actin cytoskeleton is involved in key neuronal functions such as synaptic transmission and morphogenesis. However, the roles and regulation of actin cytoskeleton in memory formation remain to be clarified. In this study, we unveil the mechanism whereby actin cytoskeleton is regulated to form memory by exploring the roles of the major actin-regulatory proteins Arp2/3, VASP, and formins in long-term memory formation. Inhibition of Arp2/3, involved in actin filament branching and neuronal morphogenesis, in lateral amygdala (LA) with the specific inhibitor CK-666 during fear conditioning impaired long-term, but not short-term, fear memory. The inactive isomer CK-689 had no effect on memory formation. We observed that Arp2/3 is colocalized with the actin-regulatory protein profilin in LA neurons of fear-conditioned rats. VASP binding to profilin is needed for profilin-mediated stabilization of actin cytoskeleton and dendritic spine morphology. Microinjection of poly-proline peptide [G(GP5)3] into LA, to interfere with VASP binding to profilin, impaired long-term but not short-term fear memory formation. Control peptide [G(GA5)3] had no effect. Inhibiting formins, which regulate linear actin elongation, in LA during fear conditioning by microinjecting the formin-specific inhibitor SMIFH2 into LA had no effect on long-term fear memory formation. We conclude that Arp2/3 and VASP, through the profilin binding site, are essential for the formation of long-term fear memory in LA and propose a model whereby these proteins subserve cellular events, leading to memory consolidation. PMID:27957528

  13. The unbearable opaqueness of Arp220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, S.; Aalto, S.; Sakamoto, K.; González-Alfonso, E.; Muller, S.; Henkel, C.; García-Burillo, S.; Aladro, R.; Costagliola, F.; Harada, N.; Krips, M.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mühle, S.; van der Werf, P.; Viti, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the enormous luminosities of the two opaque nuclei of Arp 220, the prototypical ultra-luminous infrared galaxy, remains a mystery because we lack observational tools to explore the innermost regions around the nuclei. Aims: We explore the potential of imaging vibrationally excited molecular emission at high angular resolution to better understand the morphology and physical structure of the dense gas in Arp 220 and to gain insight into the nature of the nuclear powering sources. Methods: The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) provided simultaneous observations of HCN, HCO+, and vibrationally excited HCN v2 = 1f emission. Their J = 4-3 and 3-2 transitions were observed at a matching resolution of ~0.5'', which allows us to isolate the emission from the two nuclei. Results: The HCN and HCO+ lines within the ground-vibrational state poorly describe the central ~100 pc region around the nuclei because there are strong effects of cool absorbing gas in the foreground and severe line blending that is due to the prolific molecular emission of Arp 220. Vibrationally excited emission of HCN is detected in both nuclei with a very high ratio relative to the total LFIR, higher than in any other observed galaxy and well above what is observed in Galactic hot cores. HCN v2 = 1f is observed to be marginally resolved in ~60 × 50 pc regions inside the dusty ~100 pc sized nuclear cores. Its emission is centered on our derived individual nuclear velocities based on HCO+ emission (VWN = 5342 ± 4 and VEN = 5454 ± 8 km s-1, for the western and eastern nucleus, respectively). With virial masses within r ~ 25-30 pc based on the HCN v2 = 1f line widths, we estimate gas surface densities (gas fraction fg = 0.1) of 3 ± 0.3 × 104 M⊙ pc-2 (WN) and 1.1 ± 0.1 × 104 M⊙ pc-2 (EN). The 4-3/3-2 flux density ratio could be consistent with optically thick emission, which would further constrain the size of the emitting region to >15 pc (EN) and >22 pc

  14. Elucidating Key Motifs Required for Arp2/3-Dependent and Independent Actin Nucleation by Las17/WASP

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Agnieszka N.; Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I.

    2016-01-01

    Actin nucleation is the key rate limiting step in the process of actin polymerization, and tight regulation of this process is critical to ensure actin filaments form only at specific times and at defined regions of the cell. Arp2/3 is a well-characterised protein complex that can promote nucleation of new filaments, though its activity requires additional nucleation promotion factors (NPFs). The best recognized of these factors are the WASP family of proteins that contain binding motifs for both monomeric actin and for Arp2/3. Previously we demonstrated that the yeast WASP homologue, Las17, in addition to activating Arp2/3 can also nucleate actin filaments de novo, independently of Arp2/3. This activity is dependent on its polyproline rich region. Through biochemical and in vivo analysis we have now identified key motifs within the polyproline region that are required for nucleation and elongation of actin filaments, and have addressed the role of the WH2 domain in the context of actin nucleation without Arp2/3. We have also demonstrated that full length Las17 is able to bind liposomes giving rise to the possibility of direct linkage of nascent actin filaments to specific membrane sites to which Las17 has been recruited. Overall, we propose that Las17 functions as the key initiator of de novo actin filament formation at endocytic sites by nucleating, elongating and tethering nascent filaments which then serve as a platform for Arp2/3 recruitment and function. PMID:27637067

  15. The Far-Infrared Spectrum of ARP 220

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-27

    the fine struc- ture lines from ionic species are, to the contrary, extremely weak. Luhman et al. (1998, 2003) found that in Arp, like in other ULIRGs...resolution. GONZÁLEZ-ALFONSO ET AL.250 Vol. 613 as observed in Arp 220 and other ULIRGs, have been dis- cussed elsewhere (Fischer et al. 1997, 1999; Luhman ...Lyman continuum from nuclear starbursts or AGN is absorbed by dust rather than by gas, may explain these properties of Arp 220, as was proposed by Luhman

  16. The Arp2/3 complex mediates multigeneration dendritic protrusions for efficient 3-dimensional cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Giri, Anjil; Bajpai, Saumendra; Trenton, Nicholaus; Jayatilaka, Hasini; Longmore, Gregory D; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Arp2/3 is a protein complex that nucleates actin filament assembly in the lamellipodium in adherent cells crawling on planar 2-dimensional (2D) substrates. However, in physiopathological situations, cell migration typically occurs within a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, and little is known about the role of Arp2/3 and associated proteins in 3D cell migration. Using time resolved live-cell imaging and HT1080, a fibrosarcoma cell line commonly used to study cell migration, we find that the Arp2/3 complex and associated proteins N-WASP, WAVE1, cortactin, and Cdc42 regulate 3D cell migration. We report that this regulation is caused by formation of multigeneration dendritic protrusions, which mediate traction forces on the surrounding matrix and effective cell migration. The primary protrusions emanating directly from the cell body and prolonging the nucleus forms independent of Arp2/3 and dependent on focal adhesion proteins FAK, talin, and p130Cas. The Arp2/3 complex, N-WASP, WAVE1, cortactin, and Cdc42 regulate the secondary protrusions branching off from the primary protrusions. In 3D matrices, fibrosarcoma cells as well as migrating breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer cells do not display lamellipodial structures. This study characterizes the unique topology of protrusions made by cells in a 3D matrix and show that these dendritic protrusions play a critical role in 3D cell motility and matrix deformation. The relative contribution of these proteins to 3D migration is significantly different from their role in 2D migration.

  17. Application of SAE ARP4754A to Flight Critical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents applications of ARP4754A to the development of modern computer-based (i.e., digital electronics, software and network-based) aircraft systems. This study is to offer insight and provide educational value relative to the guidelines in ARP4754A and provide an assessment of the current state-of-the- practice within industry and regulatory bodies relative to development assurance for complex and safety-critical computer-based aircraft systems.

  18. The Arp2/3 Complex Is Essential for Distinct Stages of Spine Synapse Maturation, Including Synapse Unsilencing

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Erin F.; Kanak, Daniel J.; Carlson, Benjamin R.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic filopodia are actin-rich structures that are thought to contribute to early spine synapse formation; however, the actin regulatory proteins important for early synaptogenesis are poorly defined. Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and primary neuron hippocampal cultures from Arp2/3 conditional knock-out mice, we analyze the roles of the Arp2/3 complex, an actin regulator that creates branched actin networks, and demonstrate it is essential for distinct stages of both structural and functional maturation of excitatory spine synapses. Our data show that initially the Arp2/3 complex inhibits the formation of dendritic filopodia but that later during development, the Arp2/3 complex drives the morphological maturation from filopodia to typical spine morphology. Furthermore, we demonstrate that although the Arp2/3 complex is not required for key spine maturation steps, such as presynaptic contact and recruitment of MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) scaffolding proteins or NMDA receptors, it is necessary for the recruitment of AMPA receptors. This latter process, also known as synapse unsilencing, is a final and essential step in the neurodevelopment of excitatory postsynaptic synaptogenesis, setting the stage for neuronal interconnectivity. These findings provide the first evidence that the Arp2/3 complex is directly involved in functional maturation of dendritic spines during the developmental period of spinogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Excitatory spine synapse formation (spinogenesis) is a poorly understood yet pivotal period of neurodevelopment that occurs within 2–3 weeks after birth. Neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism are characterized by abnormal spine structure, which may arise from abnormal excitatory synaptogenesis. The initial stage of spinogenesis is thought to begin with the emergence of actin-rich dendritic filopodia that initiate contact with presynaptic axonal boutons. However, it

  19. Accelerated X-ray structure elucidation of a 36 kDa muramidase/transglycosylase using wARP.

    PubMed

    Van Asselt, E J; Perrakis, A; Kalk, K H; Lamzin, V S; Dijkstra, B W

    1998-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the 36 kDa soluble lytic transglycosylase from Escherichia coli has been determined starting with the multiple isomorphous replacement method with inclusion of anomalous scattering at 2.7 A resolution. Subsequently, before any model building was carried out, phases were extended to 1.7 A resolution with the weighted automated refinement procedure wARP, which gave a dramatic improvement in the phases. The electron-density maps from wARP were of outstanding quality for both the main chain and the side chains of the protein, which allowed the time spent on the tracing, interpretation and building of the X-ray structure to be substantially shortened. The structure of the soluble lytic transglycosylase was refined at 1.7 A resolution with X-PLOR to a final crystallographic R factor of 18.9%. Analysis of the wARP procedure revealed that the use of the maximum-likelihood refinement in wARP gave much better phases than least-squares refinement, provided that the ratio of reflections to protein atom parameters was approximately 1.8 or higher. Furthermore, setting aside 5% of the data for an Rfree test set had a negative effect on the phase improvement. The mean WwARP, a weight determined at the end of the wARP procedure and based on the variance of structure factors from six individually refined wARP models, proved to be a better indicator than the Rfree factor to judge different phase improvement protocols. The elongated Slt35 structure has three domains named the alpha, beta and core domains. The alpha domain contains mainly alpha-helices, while the beta domain consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet flanked by a short alpha-helix. Sandwiched between the alpha and beta domains is the core domain, which bears some resemblance to the fold of the catalytic domain of the previously elucidated 70 kDa soluble lytic transglycosylase from E. coli. The putative active site is at the bottom of a large deep groove in the core domain.

  20. Structural basis of Arp2/3 complex inhibition by GMF, Coronin, and Arpin

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Olga S.; Chemeris, Angelina; Guo, Siyang; Alioto, Salvatore L.; Gandhi, Meghal; Padrick, Shae; Pechnikova, Evgeniya; David, Violaine; Gautreau, Alexis; Goode, Bruce L.

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Arp2/3 complex plays a central role in nucleating the branched actin filament arrays that drive cell migration, endocytosis, and other processes. To better understand Arp2/3 complex regulation, we used single particle electron microscopy to compare the structures of Arp2/3 complex bound to three different inhibitory ligands: GMF, Coronin, and Arpin. Although the three inhibitors have distinct binding sites on Arp2/3 complex, they each induced an ‘open’ nucleation-inactive conformation. Coronin promoted a standard (previously described) open conformation of Arp2/3 complex, with the N-terminal β-propeller domain of Coronin positioned near the p35/ARPC2 subunit of Arp2/3 complex. GMF induced two distinct open conformations of Arp2/3 complex, which correlated with two suggested binding sites for GMF. Further, GMF synergized with Coronin in inhibiting actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex. Arpin, which uses VCA-related acidic (A) motifs to interact with the Arp2/3 complex, induced the standard open conformation, and two new masses appeared at positions near Arp2 and Arp3. Further, Arpin showed additive inhibitory effects on Arp2/3 complex with Coronin and GMF. Together, these data suggest that Arp2/3 complex conformation is highly polymorphic and that its activities can be controlled combinatorially by different inhibitory ligands. PMID:27939292

  1. Breast cancer resistance protein regulates apical ectoplasmic specialization dynamics stage specifically in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Elissa W P; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-04-01

    Drug transporters determine the bioavailability of drugs in the testis behind the blood-testis barrier (BTB). Thus, they are crucial for male contraceptive development if these drugs (e.g., adjudin) exert their effects behind the BTB. Herein breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), an efflux drug transporter, was found to be expressed by both Sertoli and germ cells. Interestingly, Bcrp was not a component of the Sertoli cell BTB. Instead, it was highly expressed by peritubular myoid cells at the tunica propria and also endothelial cells of the microvessels in the interstitium at all stages of the epithelial cycle. Unexpectedly, Bcrp was found to be expressed at the Sertoli-step 18-19 spermatid interface but limited to stage VI-early VIII tubules, and an integrated component of the apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES). Apparently, Bcrp is being used by late-stage spermatids to safeguard their completion of spermiogenesis by preventing harmful drugs to enter these cells while they transform to spermatozoa. Also, the association of Bcrp with actin, Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8, an actin barbed end capping and bundling protein), and Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex known to induce branched actin polymerization) at the apical ES suggest that Bcrp may be involved in regulating the organization of actin filament bundles at the site. Indeed, a knockdown of Bcrp by RNAi in the testis perturbed the apical ES function, disrupting spermatid polarity and adhesion. In summary, Bcrp is a regulator of the F-actin-rich apical ES in the testis.

  2. The remarkable infrared galaxy Arp 220 = IC 4553

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Helou, G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P.; Rice, W.; Houck, J. R.; Low, F. J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1984-01-01

    IRAS observations of the peculiar galaxy Arp 220 = IC 4553 show that it is extremely luminous in the far-infrared, with a total luminosity of 2 x 10 to the 12th solar luminosities. The infrared-to-blue luminosity ratio of this galaxy is about 80, which is the largest value of the ratio for galaxies in the UGC catalog, and places it in the range of the 'unidentified' infrared sources recently reported by Houck et al. in the IRAS all-sky survey. Other observations of Arp 220, combined with the luminosity in the infrared, allow either a Seyfert-like or starburst origin for this luminosity.

  3. Proton Calorimetry and Gamma-Rays in Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova; Gallagher, John S.; Zweibel, Ellen Gould

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, it was thought that starburst galaxies were both electron and proton calorimeters, making them especially bright in gamma-rays. However, with detections of starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 by Fermi, HESS, and VERITAS, we find that such galaxies are only partial proton calorimeters due to significant advection by galactic winds. Thus, to find cosmic-ray proton calorimeters, we must look for much denser systems. Previous models of the cosmic ray interactions in Arp 220 (e.g. Torres 2004) suggest it is a proton calorimeter and that it should already be detectable by Fermi. The Torres model suggests that if Arp 220 is a calorimeter, then it should have been detected in gamma-rays by Fermi at levels above current upper limits. We therefore must question. whether Arp 220 is a true proton calorimeter, and if so what other properties could be responsible for its low gamma ray flux. Here, we further explore the observed ranges on environmental properties and model the central nuclei to predict both the radio and gamma-ray spectra. We test the proton calorimetry hypothesis and estimate the observation time needed for a detection by Fermi for a range of assumptions about conditions in Arp 220.

  4. MOX Cross-Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2003-07-01

    The use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial nuclear power reactors operated in Europe has expanded rapidly over the past decade. The predicted characteristics of MOX fuel such as the nuclide inventories, thermal power from decay heat, and radiation sources are required for design and safety evaluations, and can provide valuable information for non-destructive safeguards verification activities. This report describes the development of computational methods and cross-section libraries suitable for the analysis of irradiated MOX fuel with the widely-used and recognized ORIGEN-ARP isotope generation and depletion code of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system. The MOX libraries are designed to be used with the Automatic Rapid Processing (ARP) module of SCALE that interpolates appropriate values of the cross sections from a database of parameterized cross-section libraries to create a problem-dependent library for the burnup analysis. The methods in ORIGEN-ARP, originally designed for uranium-based fuels only, have been significantly upgraded to handle the larger number of interpolation parameters associated with MOX fuels. The new methods have been incorporated in a new version of the ARP code that can generate libraries for low-enriched uranium (LEU) and MOX fuel types. The MOX data libraries and interpolation algorithms in ORIGEN-ARP have been verified using a database of declared isotopic concentrations for 1042 European MOX fuel assemblies. The methods and data are validated using a numerical MOX fuel benchmark established by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Working Group on burnup credit and nuclide assay measurements for irradiated MOX fuel performed as part of the Belgonucleaire ARIANE International Program.

  5. Nutraceutical with Resveratrol and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Induces Autophagy in ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Ali; Reinisalo, Mika; Petrovski, Goran; Sinha, Debasish; Olmiere, Céline; Karjalainen, Reijo; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Impaired autophagic and proteasomal cleansing have been documented in aged retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Omega-3 fatty acids and resveratrol have many positive homeostatic effects in RPE cells. In this work, ARPE-19 cells were treated with 288 ng of Resvega, containing 30 mg of trans resveratrol and 665 mg of omega-3 fatty acids, among other nutrients, with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 up to 48 h. Autophagy markers p62/SQSTM1 (p62) and LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) were analyzed by Western blotting. Fluorescence microscopy with mCherry-GFP-LC3 plasmid was applied to study the autophagy flux, and cytoprotective effects were investigated with colorimetric MTT and LDH assays. Resvega induced autophagy by showing increased autolysosome formation and autophagy flux, and the change in the p62 and LC3 protein levels further confirmed the fluorescent microscopy results. Moreover, Resvega provided a clear cytoprotection under proteasome inhibition. These findings highlight the potential of the nutraceuticals containing resveratrol, omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients in the prevention of ARPE-19 cell damage. PMID:27187449

  6. Nutraceutical with Resveratrol and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Induces Autophagy in ARPE-19 Cells.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Ali; Reinisalo, Mika; Petrovski, Goran; Sinha, Debasish; Olmiere, Céline; Karjalainen, Reijo; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-11

    Impaired autophagic and proteasomal cleansing have been documented in aged retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Omega-3 fatty acids and resveratrol have many positive homeostatic effects in RPE cells. In this work, ARPE-19 cells were treated with 288 ng of Resvega, containing 30 mg of trans resveratrol and 665 mg of omega-3 fatty acids, among other nutrients, with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 up to 48 h. Autophagy markers p62/SQSTM1 (p62) and LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) were analyzed by Western blotting. Fluorescence microscopy with mCherry-GFP-LC3 plasmid was applied to study the autophagy flux, and cytoprotective effects were investigated with colorimetric MTT and LDH assays. Resvega induced autophagy by showing increased autolysosome formation and autophagy flux, and the change in the p62 and LC3 protein levels further confirmed the fluorescent microscopy results. Moreover, Resvega provided a clear cytoprotection under proteasome inhibition. These findings highlight the potential of the nutraceuticals containing resveratrol, omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients in the prevention of ARPE-19 cell damage.

  7. ARP101 inhibits α-MSH-stimulated melanogenesis by regulation of autophagy in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Jung; Chang, Huikyoung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Choi, Eun Sun; Kim, Jun Bum; Seok, Su Hyeon; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2013-12-11

    Autophagy is a cooperative process between autophagosomes and lysosomes that degrades cellular organelles. Although autophagy regulates the turnover of cellular components, its role in melanogenesis is not clearly established. Previously, we reported that ARP101 induces autophagy in various cancer cells. Here, we show that ARP101 inhibits melanogenesis by regulation of autophagy. ARP101 inhibited α-MSH-stimulated melanin synthesis and suppressed the expression of tyrosinase and TRP1 in immortalized mouse melanocytes. ARP101 also induced autophagy in melanocytes. Knockdown of ATG5 reduced both anti-melanogenic activity and autophagy mediated by ARP101 in α-MSH treated melanocytes. Electron microscopy analysis further revealed that autophagosomes engulf melanin or melanosome in α-MSH and ARP101-treated cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ARP101 inhibits α-MSH-stimulated melanogenesis through the activation of autophagy in melanocytes.

  8. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 suppresses invasion and anchorage-independent growth of astrocytic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cockbill, Louisa M. R.; Murk, Kai; Love, Seth; Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors are the most common form of primary brain tumor. Astrocytic tumor cells infiltrate the surrounding CNS tissue, allowing them to evade removal upon surgical resection of the primary tumor. Dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton are crucial to cancer cell invasion, but the specific mechanisms that underlie the particularly invasive phenotype of astrocytic tumor cells are unclear. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) is a PDZ and BAR domain–containing protein that inhibits actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3)-dependent actin polymerization and is involved in regulating the trafficking of a number of cell-surface receptors. Here we report that, in contrast to other cancers, PICK1 expression is down-regulated in grade IV astrocytic tumor cell lines and also in clinical cases of the disease in which grade IV tumors have progressed from lower-grade tumors. Exogenous expression of PICK1 in the grade IV astrocytic cell line U251 reduces their capacity for anchorage-independent growth, two-dimensional migration, and invasion through a three-dimensional matrix, strongly suggesting that low PICK1 expression plays an important role in astrocytic tumorigenesis. We propose that PICK1 negatively regulates neoplastic infiltration of astrocytic tumors and that manipulation of PICK1 is an attractive possibility for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26466675

  9. The putative pocket protein binding site of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus BV/ODV-C42 is required for virus-induced nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Yun; Bai, Huimin; Wang, Qian; Song, Jianhua; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for nucleocapsid morphogenesis of lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses. Previously, we had demonstrated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-C42 (C42) is involved in nuclear actin polymerization by recruiting P78/83, an AcMNPV orf9-encoded N-WASP homology protein that is capable of activating an actin-related-protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex to initiate actin polymerization, to the nucleus. To further investigate the role of C42 in virus-induced actin polymerization, the recombinant bacmid vAc(p78/83nls-gfp), with a c42 knockout, p78/83 tagged with a nuclear localization signal coding sequence, and egfp as a reporter gene under the control of the Pp10 promoter, was constructed and transfected to Sf9 cells. In the nuclei of vAc(p78/83nls-gfp)-transfected cells, polymerized F-actin filaments were absent, whereas other actin polymerization elements (i.e., P78/83, G-actin, and Arp2/3 complex) were present. This in vivo evidence indicated that C42 actively participates in the nuclear actin polymerization process as a key element, besides its role in recruiting P78/83 to the nucleus. In order to collect in vitro evidence for the participation of C42 in actin polymerization, an anti-C42 antibody was used to neutralize the viral nucleocapsid, which is capable of initiating actin polymerization in vitro. Both the kinetics of pyrene-actin polymerization and F-actin-specific staining by phalloidin indicated that anti-C42 can significantly attenuate the efficiency of F-actin formation compared to that with control antibodies. Furthermore, we have identified the putative pocket protein binding sequence (PPBS) on C42 that is essential for C42 to exert its function in nuclear actin polymerization.

  10. Forgetting is regulated via Musashi-mediated translational control of the Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed

    Hadziselimovic, Nils; Vukojevic, Vanja; Peter, Fabian; Milnik, Annette; Fastenrath, Matthias; Fenyves, Bank Gabor; Hieber, Petra; Demougin, Philippe; Vogler, Christian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stetak, Attila

    2014-03-13

    A plastic nervous system requires the ability not only to acquire and store but also to forget. Here, we report that musashi (msi-1) is necessary for time-dependent memory loss in C. elegans. Tissue-specific rescue demonstrates that MSI-1 function is necessary in the AVA interneuron. Using RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation (IP), we found that MSI-1 binds to mRNAs of three subunits of the Arp2/3 actin branching regulator complex in vivo and downregulates ARX-1, ARX-2, and ARX-3 translation upon associative learning. The role of msi-1 in forgetting is also reflected by the persistence of learning-induced GLR-1 synaptic size increase in msi-1 mutants. We demonstrate that memory length is regulated cooperatively through the activation of adducin (add-1) and by the inhibitory effect of msi-1. Thus, a GLR-1/MSI-1/Arp2/3 pathway induces forgetting and represents a novel mechanism of memory decay by linking translational control to the structure of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons.

  11. Arabidopsis ARP endonuclease functions in a branched base excision DNA repair pathway completed by LIG1.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2011-11-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential cellular defence mechanism against DNA damage, but it is poorly understood in plants. We used an assay that monitors repair of damaged bases and abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic, AP) sites in Arabidopsis to characterize post-excision events during plant BER. We found that Apurinic endonuclease-redox protein (ARP) is the major AP endonuclease activity in Arabidopsis cell extracts, and is required for AP incision during uracil BER in vitro. Mutant plants that are deficient in ARP grow normally but are hypersensitive to 5-fluorouracil, a compound that favours mis-incorporation of uracil into DNA. We also found that, after AP incision, the choice between single-nucleotide or long-patch DNA synthesis (SN- or LP-BER) is influenced by the 5' end of the repair gap. When the 5' end is blocked and not amenable to β-elimination, the SN sub-pathway is abrogated, and repair is accomplished through LP-BER only. Finally, we provide evidence that Arabidopsis DNA ligase I (LIG1) is required for both SN- and LP-BER. lig1 RNAi-silenced lines show very reduced uracil BER, and anti-LIG1 antibody abolishes repair in wild-type cell extracts. In contrast, knockout lig4(-/-) mutants exhibit normal BER and nick ligation levels. Our results suggest that a branched BER pathway completed by a member of the DNA ligase I family may be an ancient feature in eukaryotic species.

  12. Mid-infrared imaging of Markarian 231 and Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, E.; Ball, R.; Arens, J.; Jernigan, G.; Meixner, M. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA California University, Berkeley )

    1992-03-01

    High angular resolution observations of Arp 220 and Mrk 231 provide images of the nuclei and show that the source of the strong mid-IR emission is confined to regions less than about 0.5 arcsec or 400 pc in diameter in Mrk 231 and less than 1.5 arcsec x 0.9 arcsec or 320 x 530 pc in Arp 220. If much of the far-IR emission also derives from such a small region, the implied radiation densities are quite high, equivalent to one O star per cu pc. Although in normal galaxies the near-IR traces an older population of evolved, cool stars, such high radiation densities in the IR bright galaxies suggest the possibility that the spatial correlation observed between the near-IR, mid-IR, and radio may hold because emission in all three bands is associated with hot interstellar gas and dust. 23 refs.

  13. EVLA Imaging of Methanimine and Hydrogen Cyanide in Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Momjian, E.; Sarma, A.; AO Arp 220 Team

    2011-01-01

    We used the EVLA in A configuration to image the C-band transitions of the pre-biotic molecule methanimine (H2CNH) and the J=5 direct l-type transition of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the nearest and the prototypical ultra-luminous IR galaxy, Arp 220. The observations were carried out as a result of the first definitive extragalactic detection of these transitions with Arecibo (Salter et al. 2008). These EVLA A-configuration observations spatially resolve the two nuclei of Arp 220, which are separated by about 1 arcsec. The results show that the emission line of the H2CNH and the absorption line of the HCN (J=5) are solely detected toward the western nucleus of Arp 220. The H2CNH emission is very likely due to a maser, because its brightness temperature is several times the decomposition temperature of the molecule. This is similar to the formaldehyde (H2CO) transition, which also shows a weak maser emission in Arp 220 and mostly toward the western nucleus. The confinement of the HCN (J=5) absorption line to the western nucleus is in contrast to previous detections of rotationally excited HCN transitions, which have been observed in emission from both nuclei. These EVLA observations, along with Arecibo's original detections, demonstrate that a new range of molecular transitions can now be detected and imaged at cm wavelengths, thus opening up new opportunities for the study of the physical and chemical characteristics of luminous IR galaxies. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  14. Quercetin phospholipid complex significantly protects against oxidative injury in ARPE-19 cells associated with activation of Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Rong; Yu, Hai-Tao; Yang, Yan; Hang, Li; Yang, Xue-Wen; Ding, Shu-Hua

    2016-01-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness worldwide. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of dry AMD. Quercetin has potent anti-oxidative activities, but poor bioavailability limits its therapeutic application. Herein, we prepared the phospholipid complex of quercetin (quercetin-PC), characterized its structure by differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectrum and x-ray diffraction. Quercetin-PC had equilibrium solubility of 38.36 and 1351.27μg/ml in water and chloroform, respectively, which was remarkably higher than those of quercetin alone. Then we established hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative injury model in human ARPE-19 cells to examine the effects of quercetin-PC. Quercetin-PC, stronger than quercetin, promoted cell proliferation, and the proliferation rate was increased to be 78.89% when treated with Quercetin-PC at 400μM. Moreover, quercetin-PC effectively prevented ARPE-19 cells from apoptosis, and the apoptotic rate was reduced to be 3.1% when treated with Quercetin-PC at 200μM. In addition, quercetin-PC at 200μM significantly increased the activities of SOD, CAT and GSH-PX, and reduced the levels of reactive oxygen species and MDA in H2O2-treated ARPE-19 cells, but quercetin at 200μM failed to do so. Molecular examinations revealed that quercetin-PC at 200μM significantly activated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and significantly enhanced the expression of target genes HO-1, NQO-1 and GCL by different folds at both mRNA and protein levels. Our current data collectively indicated that quercetin-PC had stronger protective effects against oxidative-induced damages in ARPE-19 cells, which was associated with activation of Nrf2 pathway and its target genes implicated in antioxidant defense.

  15. Kv3.3 Channels Bind Hax-1 and Arp2/3 to Assemble a Stable Local Actin Network that Regulates Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Fleming, Matthew R; Amiri, Anahita; El-Hassar, Lynda; Surguchev, Alexei A; Hyland, Callen; Jenkins, David P; Desai, Rooma; Brown, Maile R; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Waters, Michael F; Large, Charles H; Horvath, Tamas L; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Vaccarino, Flora M; Forscher, Paul; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-04-07

    Mutations in the Kv3.3 potassium channel (KCNC3) cause cerebellar neurodegeneration and impair auditory processing. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 contains a proline-rich domain conserved in proteins that activate actin nucleation through Arp2/3. We found that Kv3.3 recruits Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in formation of a relatively stable cortical actin filament network resistant to cytochalasin D that inhibits fast barbed end actin assembly. These Kv3.3-associated actin structures are required to prevent very rapid N-type channel inactivation during short depolarizations of the plasma membrane. The effects of Kv3.3 on the actin cytoskeleton are mediated by the binding of the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 to Hax-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates actin nucleation through Arp2/3. A human Kv3.3 mutation within a conserved proline-rich domain produces channels that bind Hax-1 but are impaired in recruiting Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in growth cones with deficient actin veils in stem cell-derived neurons.

  16. Fusion of the mouse IgG1 Fc domain to the VHH fragment (ARP1) enhances protection in a mouse model of rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Yu, Shengze; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2016-01-01

    A variable fragment of a heavy chain antibody (VHH) directed against rotavirus, also referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 (ARP1), was shown to confer protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea in infant mouse model of rotavirus induced diarrhea. In this study, we have fused the mouse IgG1 Fc to ARP1 to improve the protective capacity of ARP1 by inducing an Fc-mediated effector function. We have shown that the Fc-ARP1 fusion protein confers significantly increased protection against rotavirus in a neonatal mouse model of rotavirus-induced diarrhea by reducing the prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and the viral load in the small intestines, suggesting that the Fc part of immunoglobulins may be engaged in Fc-mediated neutralization of rotavirus. Engineered conventional-like antibodies, by fusion of the Fc part of immunoglobulins to antigen-specific heavy-chain only VHH fragments, might be applied to novel antibody-based therapeutic approaches to enhance elimination of pathogens by activation of distinct effector signaling pathways. PMID:27439689

  17. ORIGEN-ARP, A Fast and Easy-to-Use Source Term Generation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Hermann, O.W.; Leal, L.C.; Parks, C.V.

    1999-10-17

    ORIGEN-ARP is a new SCALE analytical sequence for spent fuel characterization and source term generation that serves as a faster alternative to the SAS2H sequence by using the Automatic Rapid Processing (ARP) methodology for generating problem-dependent ORIGEN-S cross-section libraries. ORIGEN-ARP provides an easy-to-use menu-driven input processor. This new sequence is two orders of magnitude faster than SAS2H while conserving the rigor and accuracy of the SAS2H methodology. ORIGEN-ARP has been validated against pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel chemical assay data.

  18. Following the Viterbi Path to Deduce Flagellar Actin-Interacting Proteins of Leishmania spp.: Report on Cofilins and Twinfilins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Ana Carolina L.; Araújo, Fabiana F.; Kamimura, Michel T.; Medeiros, Sarah R.; Viana, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Fátima de Cássia E.; Filho, Raimundo Araújo; Costa, Marcília P.; Oliveira, Diana M.

    2007-11-01

    For performing vital cellular processes, such as motility, eukaryotic cells rely on the actin cytoskeleton, whose structure and dynamics are tightly controlled by a large number of actin-interacting (AIP) or actin-related/regulating (ARP) proteins. Trypanosomatid protozoa, such as Leishmania, rely on their flagellum for motility and sensory reception, which are believed to allow parasite migration, adhesion, invasion and even persistence on mammalian host tissues to cause disease. Actin can determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes, while the identification and analyses of AIPs can help to improve understanding of their mechanical properties on physiological architectures, such as the present case regarding Leishmania flagellar apparatus. This work conveniently apply bioinformatics tools in some refined pattern recognition techniques (such as hidden Markov models (HMMs) through the Viterbi algorithm/path) in order to improve the recognition of actin-binding/interacting activity through identification of AIPs in genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of Leishmania species. We here report cofilin and twinfilin as putative components of the flagellar apparatus, a direct bioinformatics contribution in the secondary annotation of Leishmania and trypanosomatid genomes.

  19. The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp strain affects the pathogenesis-related gene expression of the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gazengel, Kévin; Boutin, Morgane; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2011-12-01

    The main effects of antagonistic rhizobacteria on plant pathogenic fungi are antibiosis, fungistasis or an indirect constraint through the induction of a plant defence response. To explore different biocontrol mechanisms, an in vitro confrontation assay was conducted with the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp as a biocontrol agent of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In parallel with the assessment of disease extension, together with the bacterial and fungal root colonization rates, the transcript levels of candidate fungal pathogenicity and plant-induced genes were monitored during the 10-day infection process. The bacterial inoculation of wheat roots with the Pf29Arp strain reduced the development of Ggt-induced disease expressed as attack frequency and necrosis length. The growth rates of Ggt and Pf29Arp, monitored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction of DNA amounts with a part of the Ggt 18S rDNA gene and a specific Pf29Arp strain detection probe, respectively, increased throughout the interactions. Bacterial antagonism and colonization had no significant effect on root colonization by Ggt. The expression of fungal and plant genes was quantified in planta by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the interactions thanks to the design of specific primers and an innovative universal reference system. During the early stages of the tripartite interaction, several of the fungal genes assayed were down-regulated by Pf29Arp, including two laccases, a β-1,3-exoglucanase and a mitogen-activated protein kinase. The plant host glutathione-S-transferase gene was induced by Ggt alone and up-regulated by Pf29Arp bacteria in interaction with the pathogen. We conclude that Pf29Arp antagonism acts through the alteration of fungal pathogenesis and probably through the activation of host defences.

  20. Filter-cultured ARPE-19 cells as outer blood-retinal barrier model.

    PubMed

    Mannermaa, Eliisa; Reinisalo, Mika; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Kokki, Heidi; Saarikko, Anni; Kaarniranta, Kai; Urtti, Arto

    2010-07-11

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) regulates drug transfer between posterior eye segment and blood circulation, but there is no established RPE cell model for drug delivery studies. We evaluated ARPE-19 filter culture model for this purpose. Passive permeability of 6-carboxyfluorescein, betaxolol and FITC-dextran (40kDa) and active transport of 6-carboxyfluorescein, sodium fluorescein, rhodamine 123, cyclosporine A and digoxin in ARPE-19 model were investigated and compared with isolated bovine RPE-choroid tissue. In addition, barrier properties, and mRNA expression of RPE-specific and melanogenesis-related genes (RPE65, VMD2, CRALBP, OTX-2, MITF-A, TRP-1, tyrosinase) were measured in various culture conditions. The filter grown ARPE-19 cell model showed reasonable barrier properties (TER close to 100Omegacm(2)), but its permeability was slightly higher than that of isolated bovine RPE/choroid specimens. In active transport studies the ARPE-19 model mimics qualitatively the permeability profile of bovine RPE-choroid, but ARPE-19 model underestimates the importance of active transport relative to passive diffusion. Long-term filter-cultured ARPE-19 cells expressed various RPE-specific and melanogenesis-related genes at higher levels than the ARPE-19 cells cultured short-term in flasks. ARPE-19 model can be used to study drug permeation processes in the RPE.

  1. PWR Cross Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, Carolyn; Ilas, Germina

    2012-01-01

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% 235U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time.

  2. A Deep Arecibo Spectral Scan of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Michelle; Ghosh, T.; Salter, C. J.; Minchin, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    A deep spectral scan of the prototype Ultra Luminous Infra-Red Galaxy (ULIRG), Arp 220, has been made over the frequency range 1.1 to 10.0 GHz using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new observations supersede a previous shallow scan of Arp 220 (Salter et al., 2008, Astron. J., 136, 389). The spectral lines seen in the previous scan were all re-detected with greatly improved signal-to-noise ratio. These lines include hydrogen cyanide (HCN v2=1) in absorption, formaldehyde (H2CO) in emission at 4.83 GHz, and hydroxyl (OH) in emission at 1.6 GHz and absorption at 4.7, 6.0 and 7.8 GHz. In addition, a large number of hydrogen recombination lines were detected, as was the H2CO line at 4.955 GHz, and two lines that are identified with excited transitions of methylidyne (CH) at 4.848 and 4.870 GHz. The identification of other possible detections is on-going.

  3. The far-infrared and optical structure of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, M.; Lester, D. F.; Harvey, P. M.; Frueh, M.

    1986-01-01

    The spatial structure of the luminous peculiar galaxy Arp 220 has been investigated in the far infrared. The results reveal that most of the luminosity is from a source less than 3 kpc in extent, located in the nuclear region of the galaxy. The size constraints yield a lower limit of 0.05 for the 100 micron optical depth, implying a hydrogen column density over 5 x 10 to the 22nd/sq cm. New optical images confirm that the double-lobed optical appearance results from strong absorption across the true nucleus. Arp 220 exhibits three primary features which provide strong evidence for an external source of energy: (1) a chaotic and highly asymmetric galactic halo; (2) a large internal velocity dispersion in CO and H I; and (3) extreme compression of gas and dust. These features are natural consequences of previously proposed models which invoke a direct galactic collision and merger, and are unlikely to result from a long-range tidal interaction with the neighboring galaxy IC 4554.

  4. SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liping; Lin, Jie-shun; Xu, Ji; Sato, Shusei; Parniske, Martin; Wang, Trevor L.; Downie, J. Allan; Xie, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobial infection of legume root hairs requires a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton to enable the establishment of plant-made infection structures called infection threads. In the SCAR/WAVE (Suppressor of cAMP receptor defect/WASP family verpolin homologous protein) actin regulatory complex, the conserved N-terminal domains of SCAR proteins interact with other components of the SCAR/WAVE complex. The conserved C-terminal domains of SCAR proteins bind to and activate the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, which can bind to actin filaments catalyzing new actin filament formation by nucleating actin branching. We have identified, SCARN (SCAR-Nodulation), a gene required for root hair infection of Lotus japonicus by Mesorhizobium loti. Although the SCARN protein is related to Arabidopsis thaliana SCAR2 and SCAR4, it belongs to a distinct legume-sub clade. We identified other SCARN-like proteins in legumes and phylogeny analyses suggested that SCARN may have arisen from a gene duplication and acquired specialized functions in root nodule symbiosis. Mutation of SCARN reduced formation of infection-threads and their extension into the root cortex and slightly reduced root-hair length. Surprisingly two of the scarn mutants showed constitutive branching of root hairs in uninoculated plants. However we observed no effect of scarn mutations on trichome development or on the early actin cytoskeletal accumulation that is normally seen in root hair tips shortly after M. loti inoculation, distinguishing them from other symbiosis mutations affecting actin nucleation. The C-terminal domain of SCARN binds to ARPC3 and ectopic expression of the N-terminal SCAR-homology domain (but not the full length protein) inhibited nodulation. In addition, we found that SCARN expression is enhanced by M. loti in epidermal cells and that this is directly regulated by the NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) transcription factor. PMID:26517270

  5. Discovery of an Obscured Supernova in Arp 299

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, Susan; Ulvstad, James; Teng, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    The galaxy merger Arp 299, at a distance of 40 Mpc, is one of the most extensively studied interacting starburst galaxies known. It has been the site of 4 known supernovae (SNe) since 1990. Arp 299 contains a number of strong radio and infrared condensations, with the strongest starburst occurring in 'Source A,' in the nuclear region of the eastern galaxy. Source A has an inferred supernova rate of 0.5-0.7/yr, and its star formation peaked 6-8 Myr ago. Our recent observations identify a new radio-loud SN in Source A, which occurred sometime between April 2002 and February 2003. We imaged Arp 299 at milliarcsecond resolution at two epochs, in April 2002 and February 2003, using the Very Long Baseline Array and (at the first epoch) the Green Bank Telescope. In 2002, four compact radio sources were found in Source A at 2.3 GHz, with flux densities ranging from 0.3 to 1.7 mJy. In 2003, 8.4 GEz images revealed a new 3 mJy source, as well as the four objects detected a year earlier. The new radio SN is more than 1000 times more powerful than the galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A and is located located only 12 milliarcseconds (2.5 pc projected) from the strongest source seen in 2002. Milliarcsecond radio imaging is the only technique that could have detected this supernova, since it is embedded within an 80 mJy VLA source and buried in gas and dust (Av 15-25 mag). We suggest that both the new supernova and its nearest neighbor are occurring within a super star cluster, perhaps a newly formed globular cluster akin to those seen in a number of nearby galaxies and particularly galaxy mergers. If so, we are observing this cluster just as its massive stars have begun to explode into a very dense surrounding medium. The likelihood that most supernovae in such a medium will be radio-loud implies that future VLBI imaging over a number of years could lead to a direct measurement of the supernova rate in the Source A starburst, placing powerful constraints on models of

  6. LGR4 Is a Direct Target of MicroRNA-34a and Modulates the Proliferation and Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qiang; Zhou, Linglin; Tang, Jiajia; Ma, Nan; Xu, Ancong; Tang, Jiang; Zheng, Dandan; Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Feng; Dong, Xiang Da; Tu, LiLi

    2016-01-01

    The pathology of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy is linked to proliferation, migration, and adhesion of the retinal pigment epithelium. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) expression modulates changes in proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19. In this study, we determined that miR-34a interacts with LGR4, identified by bioinformatics using TargetScan Human 5.0, to affect these changes. Double luciferase gene reporter assay confirmed miR-34a involvement in mediating control. miR-34a mimic transfection decreased LGR4 expression. Western blot analysis documented corresponding protein expression inhibition. MTS, Ki67 immunostaining, scratch and transwell testing, along with attachment assay showed that miR-34a upregulation inhibited ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and attachment partly through downregulation of LGR4 protein expression. Western blot analysis revealed that both miR-34a upregulation and LGR4 downregulation induced declines in E2F1, p-CDC2, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 protein expression. Taken together, miR-34a gene expression upregulation inhibits ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and adhesion partly by suppressing LGR4 expression. These results substantiate earlier indications that both miR-34a and LGR4 are potential drug targets to prevent fibrosis in a clinical setting. PMID:27977785

  7. The Extreme Nuclear Environments of Sgr A^* and Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N. Z.

    2009-10-01

    The dense ISM which is the fuel for both nuclear starbursts is believed to be accreted to the nucleus by stellar bars and galactic interactions. In this contribution, I summarize the observational results for two galactic nuclei at the extreme ends of starburst/AGN activity - our own Galactic nucleus with SgrA^* and the ULIRG Arp 220. I discuss theoretical considerations for the properties of the ISM - it's density and scale height, whether it is likely to clump into gravitational bound GMCs - and the self-regulation of SB and AGN fueling due to radiation pressure support of the ISM. The latter yields an Eddington-like limit on the activity for both SB and AGN, corresponding to approximately 500 lsun/msun for optically thick regions in which the radiation has been degraded to the NIR.

  8. ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN ARP 147

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Steinhorn, B.; Levine, A.; Pooley, D. E-mail: aml@space.mit.ed

    2010-10-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory was used to image the collisional ring galaxy Arp 147 for 42 ks. We detect nine X-ray sources with luminosities in the range of (1.4-7) x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} (assuming that the sources emit isotropically) in or near the blue knots of star formation associated with the ring. A source with an X-ray luminosity of 1.4 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} is detected in the nuclear region of the intruder galaxy. X-ray sources associated with a foreground star and a background quasar are used to improve the registration of the X-ray image with respect to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) high-resolution optical images. The intruder galaxy, which apparently contained little gas before the collision, shows no X-ray sources other than the one in the nuclear bulge which may be a poorly fed supermassive black hole. These observations confirm the conventional wisdom that collisions of gas-rich galaxies trigger large rates of star formation which, in turn, generate substantial numbers of X-ray sources, some of which have luminosities above the Eddington limit for accreting stellar-mass black holes (i.e., ultraluminous X-ray sources, 'ULXs'). We also utilize archival Spitzer and Galex data to help constrain the current star formation rate in Arp 147 to {approx}7 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. All of these results, coupled with binary evolution models for ULXs, allow us to tentatively conclude that the most intense star formation may have ended some 15 Myr in the past.

  9. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    PubMed

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact.

  10. Effect of bevacizumab on the expression of fibrosis-related inflammatory mediators in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, San-Jun; Zhang, Zhao-Hua; Wang, Min; Xu, Hai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of anti-vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) agents on the expression of fibrosis-related inflammatory mediators under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and to further clarify the mechanism underlying fibrosis after anti-VEGF therapy. METHODS Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were incubated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. For hypoxia treatment, CoCl2 at 200 µmol/L was added to the media. ARPE-19 cells were treated as following: 1) control group: no treatment; 2) bevacizumab group: bevacizumab at 0.25 mg/mL was added to the media; 3) hypoxia group: CoCl2 at 200 µmol/L was added to the media; 4) hypoxia+bevacizumab group: CoCl2 at 200 µmol/L and bevacizumab at 0.25 mg/mL were added to the media. The expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 6, 12, 24 and 48h. RESULTS Both mRNA and protein levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were statistically significantly higher in the bevacizumab group than in the control group at each time point, and TNF-α gene and protein expression was only significantly higher only at 24 and 48h (P<0.05). Under hypoxic conditions, bevacizumab significantly increased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α at 6, 12, 24 and 48h (P<0.05). IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α peaked at 24h and IL-6 peaked at 12h after the bevacizumab treatment under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSION Treatment of ARPE-19 cells with bevacizumab can significantly increase the expression of fibrosis-related inflammatory mediators under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Inflammatory factors might be involved in the process of fibrosis after anti-VEGF therapy, and the up-regulation of inflammatory factors induced by anti-VEGF drugs might promote the fibrosis process.

  11. Initial SVE Well Testing for the A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) Trenches Area

    SciTech Connect

    RIHA, BRIAN

    2004-04-01

    The A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) is a 5.9 acre unit located at the southern end of A/M Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Disposal activities at ARP began in the early 1950s. The exact dates of operation and material disposed in the unit remain unknown. Within the ARP exists a smaller, approximately 2 acre, sub unit identified as the Trenches Area. The Trenches Area is dominated by a T-shaped trench (approximately 50 feet wide) containing 8 to 12 feet of ash material. This T-shaped trench will be referred to as the ARP Trench. Vegetation has been removed from the Trenches Area and a lower permeability earthen cover now covers the ARP Trench. The ARP active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) remediation system consists of seven extraction wells and twelve monitoring wells that were pushed into the vadose zone of the ARP Trench. The remediation system was designed based on the pre-design study conducted in 2002. The purpose of the initial soil vapor extraction (SVE) well testing was to verify the integrity and functionality of the nineteen wells installed in the ARP Trench. The well integrity was evaluated based on the flow rate, vacuum, and indication that soil gas and not surface air was pulled from the well. Soil gas was defined as gas with levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) above ambient concentrations (400-700 ppmv). Volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured at each well to determine the initial distribution of the contamination. In addition, the subsurface vacuum distribution was measured around each extraction well as a relative measure of the influence of each well.

  12. Implications of the ISO LWS spectrum of the prototypical ultraluminous galaxy: ARP 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J.; Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M. L.; Melnick, G.; Cox, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Stacey, G. J.; Smith, H. A.; Lord, S. D.; Greenhouse, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    The low resolution far infrared spectrum of the galaxy Arp 220, obtained with the low wavelength spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), is presented. The spectrum is dominated by the OH, H2O, CH, NH3 and O I absorption lines. The upper limits on the far infrared fine structure lines indicate a softer radiation in Arp 220 than in starburst galaxies.

  13. ARPES Studies of Cuprate Fermiology: Superconductivity, Pseudogap and Quasiparticle Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, Inna

    2011-06-23

    We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors which elucidate the relation between superconductivity and the pseudogap and highlight low-energy quasiparticle dynamics in the superconducting state. Our experiments suggest that the pseudogap and superconducting gap represent distinct states, which coexist below T{sub c}. Studies on Bi-2212 demonstrate that the near-nodal and near-antinodal regions behave differently as a function of temperature and doping, implying that different orders dominate in different momentum-space regions. However, the ubiquity of sharp quasiparticles all around the Fermi surface in Bi-2212 indicates that superconductivity extends into the momentum-space region dominated by the pseudogap, revealing subtlety in this dichotomy. In Bi-2201, the temperature dependence of antinodal spectra reveals particle-hole asymmetry and anomalous spectral broadening, which may constrain the explanation for the pseudogap. Recognizing that electron-boson coupling is an important aspect of cuprate physics, we close with a discussion of the multiple 'kinks' in the nodal dispersion. Understanding these may be important to establishing which excitations are important to superconductivity.

  14. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus nucleocapsid protein BV/ODV-C42 mediates the nuclear entry of P78/83.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Qian; Liang, Changyong; Song, Jianhua; Li, Ni; Shi, Hui; Chen, Xinwen

    2008-05-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-c42 (orf101; c42), which encodes a 41.5-kDa viral nucleocapsid protein with a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at the C terminus, is a highly conserved gene among members of the Baculoviridae family. C42 is demonstrated to be essential for AcMNPV propagation and can bind to nucleocapsid protein P78/83, a viral activator for the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex to initiate nuclear actin polymerization, which is essential for viral nucleocapsid morphogenesis during AcMNPV infection. Here, we report the identification of a novel pathway through which c42 functions in nucleocapsid assembly. Cotransfection of Sf9 cells with c42 and p78/83 plasmids demonstrated that C42 was capable of recruiting P78/83 to the nuclei of uninfected cells and that the NLS motif of C42 was essential for this process. To validate this nuclear relocation mode in bacmid-transfected cells, a c42-disrupted bacmid (vAc(c42ko-gfp)) and rescued bacmids with wild-type c42 (vAc(c42res-gfp)) or with NLS coding sequence-mutated c42 (vAc(c42nls-gfp)) were prepared. By immuno-staining, P78/83 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm of either vAc(c42ko-gfp)- or vAc(c42nls-gfp)-transfected cells, whereas P78/83 was relocated to the nuclei of vAc(c42res-gfp)-transfected cells. Furthermore, F-actin-specific staining confirmed that there was no actin polymerization activity in the nuclei of either vAc(c42ko-gfp)- or vAc(c42nls-gfp)-transfected cells, which might be attributed to the absence of nuclear P78/83, an activator of the ARP2/3 complex to initiate nuclear actin polymerization. We therefore hypothesize a mode of action where C42 binds to P78/83 in the cytoplasm to form a protein complex and cotransports to the nucleus under the direction of the NLS motif in C42 during AcMNPV infection.

  15. Arp2/3 complex and actin dynamics are required for actin-based mitochondrial motility in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Boldogh, Istvan R.; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Nowakowski, W. Dan; Karmon, Sharon L.; Hays, Lara G.; Yates, John R.; Pon, Liza A.

    2001-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is implicated in actin polymerization-driven movement of Listeria monocytogenes. Here, we find that Arp2p and Arc15p, two subunits of this complex, show tight, actin-independent association with isolated yeast mitochondria. Arp2p colocalizes with mitochondria. Consistent with this result, we detect Arp2p-dependent formation of actin clouds around mitochondria in intact yeast. Cells bearing mutations in ARP2 or ARC15 genes show decreased velocities of mitochondrial movement, loss of all directed movement and defects in mitochondrial morphology. Finally, we observe a decrease in the velocity and extent of mitochondrial movement in yeast in which actin dynamics are reduced but actin cytoskeletal structure is intact. These results support the idea that the movement of mitochondria in yeast is actin polymerization driven and that this movement requires Arp2/3 complex. PMID:11248049

  16. Zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol reduce the inhibitory effects of photodynamic stress on phagocytosis by ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Olchawa, Magdalena M.; Herrnreiter, Anja M.; Pilat, Anna K.; Skumatz, Christine M. B.; Niziolek-Kierecka, Magdalena; Burke, Janice M.; Sarna, Tadeusz J.

    2016-01-01

    Zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol have been previously shown to efficiently protect liposomal membrane lipids against photosensitized peroxidation, and to protect cultured RPE cells against photodynamic killing. Here the protective action of combined zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol was analyzed in ARPE-19 cells subjected to photodynamic (PD) stress mediated by rose Bengal (RB) or merocyanine-540 (MC-540) at sub-lethal levels. Stress-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed by the MTT assay. The peroxidation of membrane lipids was determined by HPLC-EC(Hg) measurements of cholesterol hydroperoxides using cholesterol as a mechanistic reporter molecule. The specific phagocytosis of FITC-labeled photoreceptor outer segments (POS) isolated from bovine retinas was measured by flow cytometry, and the levels of phagocytosis receptor proteins αv integrin subunit, β5 integrin subunit and MerTK were quantified by Western blot analysis. Cytotoxicity measures confirmed that PD stress levels used for phagocytosis analysis were sub-lethal and that antioxidant supplementation protected against higher, lethal PD doses. Sub-lethal PD stress mediated by both photosensitizers induced the accumulation of 5α-OOH and 7α/β-OOH cholesterol hydroperoxides and the addition of the antioxidants substantially inhibited their accumulation. Antioxidant delivery prior to PD stress also reduced the inhibitory effect of stress on POS phagocytosis and partially reduced the stress-induced diminution of phagocytosis receptor proteins. The use of a novel model system where oxidative stress was induced at sub-lethal levels enable observations that would not be detectable using lethal stress models. Moreover, novel observations about the protective effects of zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol on photodynamic damage to ARPE-19 cell membranes and against reductions in the abundance of receptor proteins involved in POS phagocytosis, a process essential for photoreceptor survival, supports the importance of the antioxidants

  17. Zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol reduce the inhibitory effects of photodynamic stress on phagocytosis by ARPE-19 cells.

    PubMed

    Olchawa, Magdalena M; Herrnreiter, Anja M; Pilat, Anna K; Skumatz, Christine M B; Niziolek-Kierecka, Magdalena; Burke, Janice M; Sarna, Tadeusz J

    2015-12-01

    Zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol have been previously shown to efficiently protect liposomal membrane lipids against photosensitized peroxidation, and to protect cultured RPE cells against photodynamic killing. Here the protective action of combined zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol was analyzed in ARPE-19 cells subjected to photodynamic (PD) stress mediated by rose Bengal (RB) or merocyanine-540 (MC-540) at sub-lethal levels. Stress-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed by the MTT assay. The peroxidation of membrane lipids was determined by HPLC-EC (Hg) measurements of cholesterol hydroperoxides using cholesterol as a mechanistic reporter molecule. The specific phagocytosis of FITC-labeled photoreceptor outer segments (POS) isolated from bovine retinas was measured by flow cytometry, and the levels of phagocytosis receptor proteins αv integrin subunit, β5 integrin subunit and MerTK were quantified by Western blot analysis. Cytotoxicity measures confirmed that PD stress levels used for phagocytosis analysis were sub-lethal and that antioxidant supplementation protected against higher, lethal PD doses. Sub-lethal PD stress mediated by both photosensitizers induced the accumulation of 5α-OOH and 7α/β-OOH cholesterol hydroperoxides and the addition of the antioxidants substantially inhibited their accumulation. Antioxidant delivery prior to PD stress also reduced the inhibitory effect of stress on POS phagocytosis and partially reduced the stress-induced diminution of phagocytosis receptor proteins. The use of a novel model system where oxidative stress was induced at sub-lethal levels enable observations that would not be detectable using lethal stress models. Moreover, novel observations about the protective effects of zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol on photodynamic damage to ARPE-19 cell membranes and against reductions in the abundance of receptor proteins involved in POS phagocytosis, a process essential for photoreceptor survival, supports the importance of the

  18. ALMA Resolves the Nuclear Disks of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, Nick; Murchikova, Lena; Walter, Fabian; Vlahakis, Catherine; Koda, Jin; Vanden Bout, Paul; Barnes, Joshua; Hernquist, Lars; Sheth, Kartik; Yun, Min; Sanders, David; Armus, Lee; Cox, Pierre; Thompson, Todd; Robertson, Brant; Zschaechner, Laura; Tacconi, Linda; Torrey, Paul; Hayward, Christopher C.; Genzel, Reinhard; Hopkins, Phil; van der Werf, Paul; Decarli, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    We present 90 mas (37 pc) resolution ALMA imaging of Arp 220 in the CO (1-0) line and continuum at λ =2.6 {mm}. The internal gas distribution and kinematics of both galactic nuclei are well resolved for the first time. In the west nucleus, the major gas and dust emission extends out to 0.″2 radius (74 pc); the central resolution element shows a strong peak in the dust emission but a factor of 3 dip in the CO line emission. In this nucleus, the dust is apparently optically thick ({τ }2.6{mm}∼ 1) at λ =2.6 {mm} with a dust brightness temperature of ∼147 K. The column of interstellar matter at this nucleus is {N}{{H}2}≥slant 2× {10}26 cm‑2, corresponding to ∼900 gr cm‑2. The east nucleus is more elongated with radial extent 0.″3 or ∼111 pc. The derived kinematics of the nuclear disks provide a good fit to the line profiles, yielding the emissivity distributions, the rotation curves, and velocity dispersions. In the west nucleus, there is evidence of a central Keplerian component requiring a central mass of 8 × 108 {M}ȯ . The intrinsic widths of the emission lines are {{Δ }}v({FWHM})=250 (west) and 120 (east) km s‑1. Given the very short dissipation timescales for turbulence (≲105 years), we suggest that the line widths may be due to semicoherent motions within the nuclear disks. The symmetry of the nuclear disk structures is impressive, implying the merger timescale is significantly longer than the rotation period of the disks.

  19. Arabidopsis ZDP DNA 3'-phosphatase and ARP endonuclease function in 8-oxoG repair initiated by FPG and OGG1 DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2014-09-01

    Oxidation of guanine in DNA generates 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), an ubiquitous lesion with mutagenic properties. 8-oxoG is primarily removed by DNA glycosylases distributed in two families, typified by bacterial Fpg proteins and eukaryotic Ogg1 proteins. Interestingly, plants possess both Fpg and Ogg1 homologs but their relative contributions to 8-oxoG repair remain uncertain. In this work we used Arabidopsis cell-free extracts to monitor 8-oxoG repair in wild-type and mutant plants. We found that both FPG and OGG1 catalyze excision of 8-oxoG in Arabidopsis cell extracts by a DNA glycosylase/lyase mechanism, and generate repair intermediates with blocked 3'-termini. An increase in oxidative damage is detected in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from double fpg ogg1 mutants, but not in single mutants, which suggests that a single deficiency in one of these DNA glycosylases may be compensated by the other. We also found that the DNA 3'-phosphatase ZDP (zinc finger DNA 3'-phosphoesterase) and the AP(apurinic/apyirmidinic) endonuclease ARP(apurinic endonuclease redox protein) are required in the 8-oxoG repair pathway to process the 3'-blocking ends generated by FPG and OGG1. Furthermore, deficiencies in ZDP and/or ARP decrease germination ability after seed deteriorating conditions. Altogether, our results suggest that Arabidopsis cells use both FPG and OGG1 to repair 8-oxoG in a pathway that requires ZDP and ARP in downstream steps.

  20. Identification of early salt stress responsive proteins in seedling roots of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) employing iTRAQ-based proteomic technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Zhao, Fu'an; Fang, Weiping; Xie, Deyi; Hou, Jianan; Yang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Yuanming; Tang, Zhongjie; Nie, Lihong; Lv, Shuping

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress that limits plant growth and agricultural productivity. Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is highly tolerant to salinity; however, large-scale proteomic data of cotton in response to salt stress are still scant. Here, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic technique was employed to identify the early differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) from salt-treated cotton roots. One hundred and twenty-eight DEPs were identified, 76 of which displayed increased abundance and 52 decreased under salt stress conditions. The majority of the proteins have functions related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, transcription, protein metabolism, cell wall and cytoskeleton metabolism, membrane and transport, signal transduction, in addition to stress and defense. It is worth emphasizing that some novel salt-responsive proteins were identified, which are involved in cell cytoskeleton metabolism (actin-related protein2, ARP2, and fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins, FLAs), membrane transport (tonoplast intrinsic proteins, TIPs, and plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, PIPs), signal transduction (leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase encoding genes, LRR-RLKs) and stress responses (thaumatin-like protein, TLP, universal stress protein, USP, dirigent-like protein, DIR, desiccation-related protein PCC13-62). High positive correlation between the abundance of some altered proteins (superoxide dismutase, SOD, peroxidase, POD, glutathione S-transferase, GST, monodehydroascorbate reductase, MDAR, and malate dehydrogenase, MDH) and their enzyme activity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that the iTRAQ-based proteomic technique is reliable for identifying and quantifying a large number of cotton root proteins. qRT-PCR was used to study the gene expression levels of the five above-mentioned proteins; four patterns are consistent with those of induced protein. These results showed that the proteome

  1. Chiral Orbital Angular Momentum and Circular Dichroism ARPES in p- and d-orbital Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Hong; Han, Jung Hoon

    2012-02-01

    We derive explicit formulas relating the circular dichroism angle-resolved photoemission (CD-ARPES) signal to the existence of nonzero chiral orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the band structure. The existence of nonzero chiral OAM is a generic feature of surface states that break inversion symmetry, as pointed out in several recent articles [1-3]. We propose that CD-ARPES setup is an effective probe of the OAM of quasi-particles occupying the surface states. Explicit formulas for the p- and d-orbital bands are derived to show that the CD-ARPES signal is proportional to the OAM in the momentum space.[4pt] [1] S. R. Park, C. H. Kim, J. Yu, J. H. Han and C. Kim, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 156803 (2011).[0pt] [2] S. R. Park et al., arXiv:1103.0805 (2011).[0pt] [3] Choong H. Kim et al., arXiv:1107.3285 (2011).

  2. An infrared study of starbursts in the interacting galaxy pair Arp 299 (NGC 3690+IC 694)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Takao; Nagata, Tetsuya; Geballe, T.R.; Okuda, Haruyuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Tokyo Univ.; Kyoto Univ.; Joint Astronomy Center, Hilo, HI; Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara )

    1989-05-01

    Extensive infrared observations have been obtained of the three active regions in Arp 299. Multiaperture JHK photometry reveals that the colors of the three regions are totally different from each other, and that there are very red nuclei smaller than 4 arcsec in two of them. Multiaperture spectroscopy of the Br-gamma and the shock-excited H2 lines shows that both the atomic and molecular lines are spatially extended, indicating that Arp 299 is undergoing an active episode of star formation not only in its nuclei but also well outside of them. Although there is some evidence that suggests the presence of a compact, active galactic nucleus, a simple starburst model can explain the bolometric luminosities, production rates of ionizing photons, and H24 line luminosities of each active region in Arp 299. However, each starburst cannot last longer than 10 to the 8th yr. 56 refs.

  3. The Far-Infrared Spectrum of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Smith, Howard A.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Cernicharo, Jose

    2005-01-01

    ISO/LWS grating observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 shows absorption in molecular lines of OH, H(sub 2)O, CH, NH, and NH(sub 3), as well as in the [O I] 63 micron line and emission in the [C II] 158 micron line. We have modeled the continuum and the emission/absorption of all observed features by means of a non-local radiative transfer code. The continuum from 25 to 1300 microns is modeled as a warm (106 K) nuclear region that is optically thick in the far-infrared, attenuated by an extended region (size 2") that is heated mainly through absorption of nuclear infrared radiation. The molecular absorption in the nuclear region is characterized by high excitation due to the high infrared radiation density. The OH column densities are high toward the nucleus (2 - 6 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -2)) and the extended region (approximately 2 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -2)). The H(sub 2)O column density is also high toward the nucleus (2 - 10 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -2)) and lower in the extended region. The column densities in a halo that accounts for the absorption by the lowest lying levels are similar to what are found in the diffuse clouds toward the star forming regions in the Sgr B2 molecular cloud complex near the Galactic Center. Most notable are the high column densities found for NH and NH(sub 3) toward the nucleus, with values of approximately 1.5 x 10(exp 16) cm(exp -2) and approximately 3 x 10(exp 16) cm(exp -2), respectively, whereas the NH(sub 2) column density is lower than approximately 2 x 10(exp 15) cm(exp -2). A combination of PDRs in the extended region and hot cores with enhanced H(sub 2)O photodissociation and a possible shock contribution in the nuclei may explain the relative column densities of OH and H(sub 2)O, whereas the nitrogen chemistry may be strongly affected by cosmic ray ionization. The [C II] 158 micron line is well reproduced by our models and its deficit relative to the CII/FIR ratio in normal and starburst galaxies is suggested to

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera observations of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaya, Edward J.; Dowling, Daniel M.; Currie, Douglas G.; Faber, S. M.; Groth, Edward J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary Camera images of peculiar galaxy Arp 220 taken with V, R, and I band filters reveal a very luminous object near the position of the western radio continuum source, assumed to be the major nucleus, ans seven lesser objects within 2 sec of this position. The most luminous object is formally coincident with the radio source to within the errors of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy, but we have found an alternate, more compelling alignment of maps in which the eastern radio source coincides with one of the lesser objects and the OH radio sources reside near the surfaces of other optical objects. The proposed centering places the most luminous object 150 pc (0.4 sec) away from the western radio source. We explore the possibilities that the objects are either holes in the dense dust distribution, dusty clouds reflecting a hidden bright nucleus, or associations of bright young stars. We favor the interpretation that at least the brightest two objects are massive young star associations with luminosities 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 11) solar luminosity, but highly extinguished by intervening dust. These massive associations should fall into the nucleus on a time scale of 10(exp 8) yr. About 10% of the enigmatic far-IR flux arises from the observed objects. In addition, if the diffuse starlight out to a radius of 8 sec is dominated by stars with typical ages of order 10(exp 8) yr (the time since the alleged merger of two galaxies), as indicated by the blue colors at larger radius, then the lower limit to the reradiation of diffuse starlight contributes 3 x 10(exp 11) solar luminosity to the far-infrared flux, or greater than or equal to 25% of the total far-IR flux. Three additional bright objects (M(sub V) approximately equals -13) located about 6 sec from the core are likely young globular clusters, but any of these could be recently exploded supernovae instead. The expected supernovae rate, if the dominant energy source is young stars, is about one per

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent

  6. The Far-Infrared Spectrum of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Smith, Howard A.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Cernicharo, Jose

    2004-01-01

    ISO/LWS grating observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 shows absorption in molecular lines of OH, H 2 0 , CH, NH, and "3, well as in the [0 I] 63 pm line and emission in the [C 111 158 pm line. We have modeled the continuum and the emission/absorption of all observed features by means of a non-local radiative transfer code. The continuum from 25 to 1300 pm is modeled AS A WARM (106 K) NUCLEAR REGION THAT IS OPTICALLY THICK IN THE FAR-INFRARED, attenuated by an extended region (size 2") that is heated mainly through absorption of nuclear infrared radiation. The molecular absorption in the nuclear region is characterized by high excitation due to the high infrared radiation density. The OH column densities are high toward the nucleus and the extended region (about 2 x 10 sup 17 cm sup-2). The H2O column density is also high toward the nucleus (2 - 10 x 1017 cm-2) and lower in the extended region. The column densities in a halo that accounts for the absorption by the lowest lying levels are similar to what are found in the diffuse clouds toward the star forming regions in the Sgr B2 molecular cloud complex near the Galactic Center. Most notable are the high column densities found for NH and NH3 toward the nucleus, with values of about 1.5 x 10supl6 cmsup-2 and about 3 x 10supl6 cmsup-2, respectively, whereas the NH2 column density is lower than about 2 x 10sup15 cmsup-2. A combination of PDRs in the extended region and hot cores with enhanced H20 photodissociation and a possible shock contribution in the nuclei may explain the relative column densities of OH and H20, whereas the nitrogen chemistry may be strongly affected by cosmic ray ionization. The [C II] 158 pm line is well reproduced by our models and its "deficit" relative to the CII/FIR ratio in normal and starburst galaxies is suggested to be mainly a consequence of the dominant non-PDR component of far- infrared radiation, ALTHOUGH OUR MODELS ALONE CANNOT RULE OUT EXTINCTION EFFECTS IN THE

  7. The Far-IR Spectrum of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Alfonso, E.; Smith, H. A.; Fischer, J.; Cernicharo, J.

    2004-05-01

    ISO/LWS observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 show absorption in molecular lines of OH, H2O, CH, NH, and NH3, as well as in the [O I] 63 μ m line and emission in the [C II] 158 μ m line. We have modeled the continuum and the emission/absorption of all observed features by means of a non-local radiative transfer code. The continuum from 25 to 1300 μ m is modeled as a warm (106 K) nuclear region that is optically thick in the far-infrared, attenuated by an extended region (size 2'') that is heated mainly through absorption of nuclear infrared radiation. The molecular absorption in the nuclear region is characterized by high excitation due to the high infrared radiation density. The OH column densities are high toward the nucleus and the extended region ( ˜ 2-6 × 1017 cm-2). The H2O column density is also high toward the nucleus (2-10 × 1017 cm-2). The column densities in a halo that accounts for the absorption by the lowest lying levels are similar to those in the diffuse clouds in the Sgr B2 molecular cloud complex near the Galactic Center. Most notable are the high column densities found for NH and NH3 toward the nucleus ˜ 1.5 - 3 × 1016 cm-2, whereas the NH2 column density is ≤ 2 × 1015 cm-2. A combination of PDRs in the extended region and hot cores with enhanced H2O photodissociation and a possible shock contribution in the nuclei may explain the relative column densities of OH and H2O, whereas the nitrogen chemistry may be strongly affected by cosmic ray ionization. The [C II] 158 μ m line is well reproduced by our models and its ``deficit'' relative to the CII/FIR ratio in normal and starburst galaxies is suggested to be mainly a consequence of the dominant non-PDR component of far-infrared radiation, although our models alone cannot rule out extinction effects in the nuclei. E. G-A thanks Spanish SEEU for funding support under project PR2003-0057, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics for its hospitality. This

  8. OrigenArp Primer: How to Perform Isotopic Depletion and Decay Calculations with SCALE/ORIGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M; Gauld, Ian C

    2010-08-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for nuclear analyses. ORIGEN-ARP is a SCALE isotopic depletion and decay analysis sequence used to perform point-depletion calculations with the well-known ORIGEN-S code using problem-dependent cross sections. Problem-dependent cross-section libraries are generated using the ARP (Automatic Rapid Processing) module using an interpolation algorithm that operates on pre-generated libraries created for a range of fuel properties and operating conditions. Methods are provided in SCALE to generate these libraries using one-, two-, and three-dimensional transport codes. The interpolation of cross sections for uranium-based fuels may be performed for the variables burnup, enrichment, and water density. An option is also available to interpolate cross sections for mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels using the variables burnup, plutonium content, plutonium isotopic vector, and water moderator density. This primer is designed to help a new user understand and use ORIGEN-ARP with the OrigenArp Windows graphical user interface in SCALE. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with nuclear depletion codes in general or with SCALE/ORIGEN-ARP in particular. The primer is based on SCALE 6 but should be applicable to earlier or later versions of SCALE. Information is included to help new users, along with several sample problems that walk the user through the different input forms and menus and illustrate the basic features. References to related documentation are provided. The primer provides a starting point for the nuclear analyst who uses SCALE/ORIGEN-ARP. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE documentation. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE documentation. The SCALE Manual is

  9. A Role for Myosin-I in Actin Assembly through Interactions with Vrp1p, Bee1p, and the Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Marie; Klebl, Bert M.; Tong, Amy H.Y.; Webb, Bradley A.; Leeuw, Thomas; Leberer, Ekkehard; Whiteway, Malcolm; Thomas, David Y.; Boone, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Type I myosins are highly conserved actin-based molecular motors that localize to the actin-rich cortex and participate in motility functions such as endocytosis, polarized morphogenesis, and cell migration. The COOH-terminal tail of yeast myosin-I proteins, Myo3p and Myo5p, contains an Src homology domain 3 (SH3) followed by an acidic domain. The myosin-I SH3 domain interacted with both Bee1p and Vrp1p, yeast homologues of human WASP and WIP, adapter proteins that link actin assembly and signaling molecules. The myosin-I acidic domain interacted with Arp2/3 complex subunits, Arc40p and Arc19p, and showed both sequence similarity and genetic redundancy with the COOH-terminal acidic domain of Bee1p (Las17p), which controls Arp2/3-mediated actin nucleation. These findings suggest that myosin-I proteins may participate in a diverse set of motility functions through a role in actin assembly. PMID:10648568

  10. Impact of axial velocity and transmembrane pressure (TMP) on ARP filter performance

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Burket, P.

    2016-02-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. One potential method for increasing filter flux is to adjust the axial velocity and transmembrane pressure (TMP). SRR requested SRNL to conduct bench-scale filter tests to evaluate the effects of axial velocity and transmembrane pressure on crossflow filter flux. The objective of the testing was to determine whether increasing the axial velocity at the ARP could produce a significant increase in filter flux. The authors conducted the tests by preparing slurries containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 supernate and 2.5 g MST/L, processing the slurry through a bench-scale crossflow filter unit at varying axial velocity and TMP, and measuring filter flux as a function of time.

  11. Research and application of ARP protocol vulnerability attack and defense technology based on trusted network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Huixing

    2017-03-01

    With the continuous development of network technology and the rapid spread of the Internet, computer networks have been around the world every corner. However, the network attacks frequently occur. The ARP protocol vulnerability is one of the most common vulnerabilities in the TCP / IP four-layer architecture. The network protocol vulnerabilities can lead to the intrusion and attack of the information system, and disable or disable the normal defense function of the system [1]. At present, ARP spoofing Trojans spread widely in the LAN, the network security to run a huge hidden danger, is the primary threat to LAN security. In this paper, the author summarizes the research status and the key technologies involved in ARP protocol, analyzes the formation mechanism of ARP protocol vulnerability, and analyzes the feasibility of the attack technique. Based on the summary of the common defensive methods, the advantages and disadvantages of each defense method. At the same time, the current defense method is improved, and the advantage of the improved defense algorithm is given. At the end of this paper, the appropriate test method is selected and the test environment is set up. Experiment and test are carried out for each proposed improved defense algorithm.

  12. Impact Of Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Aluminosilicate, and Gibbsite/Boehmite on ARP Filter Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Burket, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. SRR requested SRNL to conduct bench-scale filter tests to evaluate whether sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, or aluminum solids (i.e., gibbsite and boehmite) could be the cause of excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter at ARP. The authors conducted the tests by preparing slurries containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 supernate, 2.5 g MST/L slurry, and varying concentrations of sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, and aluminum solids, processing the slurry through a bench-scale filter unit that contains a crossflow primary filter and a dead-end secondary filter, and measuring filter flux and transmembrane pressure as a function of time. Among the conclusions drwn from this work are the following: (1) All of the tests showed some evidence of fouling the secondary filter. This fouling could be from fine particles passing through the crossflow filter. (2) The sodium oxalate-containing feeds behaved differently from the sodium aluminosilicate- and gibbsite/boehmite-containing feeds.

  13. Differential analyses of major allergen proteins in wild-type rice and rice producing a fragment of anti-rotavirus antibody.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Mejima, Mio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Teshima, Reiko; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    To develop oral antibody therapy against rotavirus infection, we previously produced a recombinant fragment of llama heavy-chain antibody to rotavirus (ARP1) in rice seeds (MucoRice-ARP1). We intend to use a purification-free rice powder for clinical application but needed to check whether MucoRice-ARP1 had increased levels of known allergen proteins. For this purpose, we used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis to compare the allergen protein levels in MucoRice-ARP1 and wild-type rice. We detected no notable differences, except in the levels of α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like family proteins. Because by this approach we could not completely separate ARP1 from the proteins of this family, we confirmed the absence of changes in the levels of these allergens by using shotgun mass spectrometry as well as immunoblot. By using immunoelectron microscopy, we also showed that RAG2, a member of the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family, was relocated from protein bodies II to the plasma membrane or cell wall in MucoRice-ARP1 seed. The relocation did not affect the level of RAG2. We demonstrated that most of the known rice allergens were not considerably upregulated by the genetic modification in MucoRice-ARP1. Our data suggest that MucoRice-ARP1 is a potentially safe oral antibody for clinical application.

  14. Genetically encoded photoswitching of actin assembly through the Cdc42-WASP-Arp2/3 complex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Otomo, Chinatsu; Chory, Joanne; Rosen, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    General methods to engineer genetically encoded, reversible, light-mediated control over protein function would be useful in many areas of biomedical research and technology. We describe a system that yields such photo-control over actin assembly. We fused the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 in its GDP-bound form to the photosensory domain of phytochrome B (PhyB) and fused the Cdc42 effector, the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP), to the light-dependent PhyB-binding domain of phytochrome interacting factor 3 (Pif3). Upon red light illumination, the fusion proteins bind each other, activating WASP, and consequently stimulating actin assembly by the WASP target, the Arp2/3 complex. Binding and WASP activation are reversed by far-red illumination. Our approach, in which the biochemical specificity of the nucleotide switch in Cdc42 is overridden by the light-dependent PhyB-Pif3 interaction, should be generally applicable to other GTPase-effector pairs. PMID:18728185

  15. OSSE observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies ARP 220 and MRK 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Shier, L. M.; Sturner, S. J.; McNaron-Brown, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1997-01-01

    The results of oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies Arp 220 and Mrk 273 are reported. The pointings of Arp 220 and Mrk 273 concentrated on their upper limits. The gamma ray luminosities from these sources were found to be between one and two orders of magnitude smaller than the infrared luminosities. Multiwavelength luminosity spectra are produced from the radio to the gamma ray regime, and are compared with the typical multiwavelength spectra of active galactic nuclei. The lack of measured gamma ray emission provides no evidence for the existence of buried active galactic nuclei in these ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but is consistent with an origin of the infrared luminosity from starburst activity.

  16. Recent advance in ARPES data analysis of dispersive features in Fe-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Richard, Pierre; Qian, Tian; Dai, Xi; Ding, Hong; Xu, Yiming

    2012-02-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful tool to image the electronic band dispersion of materials, especially in multi-band systems such as the Fe-based superconductors. Here we present a new method to visualize ARPES data based on the mathematical concept of curvature, which improves the advantages and the reliability of the second derivative method in tracking the positions of extrema from the experimental data. We apply it to the Fe-based superconductors. We reveal clear kink features and FS contours, making it easier to capture the essential physics from the data. [4pt] [1] P. Zhang, P. Richard, T. Qian, Y.-M. Xu, X. Dai and H. Ding, A precise method for visualizing dispersive features in image plots, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 043712 (2011).

  17. The evolutionary history of the interacting Galaxy system NGC 7714/7715 (Arp 284)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Wallin, John F.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen in an interacting galaxy pair are studied to develop a model of its formation and assess its implications. H I gas peaks, bridges, and tails for NGC 7714/7715 (Arp 284) are identified with the VLA observations, and the velocity field appears to indicate that of an inclined rotating disk. A parabolic off-center collision is modeled for two disk galaxies with different masses, and formation scenario leads to results consistent with the observations. The point of closest approach occurred 1.1 x 10 exp 8 years ago, and the inclination angle for NGC 7714 is given at around 30 deg. This ring galaxy's lack of star formation is attributed to the large impact parameter associated with the parabolic off-center collision considered for Arp 284. Star formation and the initial mass function of the interacting galaxy pair are studied to assess the age and composition of the objects.

  18. Doping-Dependent Nodal Fermi Velocity in Bi-2212 Revealed by High-Resolution ARPES

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, I. M.

    2011-08-19

    The improved resolution of laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) allows reliable access to fine structures in the spectrum. We present a systematic, doping-dependent study of a recently discovered low-energy kink in the nodal dispersion of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi-2212), which demonstrates the ubiquity and robustness of this kink in underdoped Bi-2212. The renormalization of the nodal velocity due to this kink becomes stronger with underdoping, revealing that the nodal Fermi velocity is non-universal, in contrast to assumed phenomenology. This is used together with laser-ARPES measurements of the gap velocity, v{sub 2}, to resolve discrepancies with thermal conductivity measurements.

  19. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda; Evans, Neal J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Blanc, Guillermo; Davis, Timothy; Papovich, Casey; van den Bosch, Remco; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.

    2015-08-01

    We highlight first results from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from VIXENS. By comparing Hα, Paα, and 24μm images to CO(2→1), CO(3→2), HCN(1→0), HCO+(1→0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find that the SFR-gas relations for Arp 299 are discrepant from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  20. Sludge Batch 4 Simulant Flowsheet Studies with ARP and MCU: Impact of MCU Organics

    SciTech Connect

    Baich, M. A.; Herman, C. C.; Eibling, R. E.; Williams, M. F.; Smith, F. G.

    2005-07-01

    Two facilities for treating the salt currently being stored in the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks are currently planned to begin operations during the processing of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The Immobilization Technology Section (ITS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 (Washburn, 2004) to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing for streams from the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Side Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). In particular, the TTR requests SRNL to validate the existing process flowsheet and establish a coupled operations flowsheet for use with SB4. The flowsheet runs are required so an evaluation of potential chemical processing issues, quantification of the potential hydrogen generation rates, and estimation of the required acid stoichiometry can be made. Previous testing (Baich et. al., 2003) was performed for incorporating ARP/MST in Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and recommendations were made to DWPF on possible flowsheet options. However, since that time, some changes have occurred to the ARP facility processing strategy, and material balances have been revised (Subosits, 2004). Thus, testing with updated compositions was necessary. Since the MCU is a new design and project, no CPC flowsheet studies have been performed for this stream. This testing will validate the previously recommended ARP stream addition methods based on the new information and based on the need to also incorporate the MCU stream. The basic principle of solvent extraction is to use a sparingly soluble diluent material that carries an extractant that will complex with the cesium ions in the caustic HLW solution. The decontaminated aqueous stream (raffinate) is then sent to Saltstone for disposal. The cesium contained in the organic phase (solvent) can then be stripped into an aqueous phase ready for transfer to the DWPF. The solvent is

  1. ALMA IMAGING OF HCN, CS, AND DUST IN ARP 220 AND NGC 6240

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, Nick; Manohar, Swarnima; Murchikova, Lena; Sheth, Kartik; Walter, Fabian; Zschaechner, Laura; Yun, Min; Koda, Jin; Sanders, David; Barnes, Joshua; Thompson, Todd; Robertson, Brant; Tacconi, Linda; Narayanan, Desika; Genzel, Reinhard; Davies, Richard; Hernquist, Lars; Brown, Robert; Hayward, Christopher C.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; and others

    2015-02-10

    We report ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz) imaging at 0.''4-0.''6 resolution and Band 9 (696 GHz) at ∼0.''25 resolution of the luminous IR galaxies Arp 220 and NGC 6240. The long wavelength dust continuum is used to estimate interstellar medium masses for Arp 220 east and west and NGC 6240 of 1.9, 4.2, and 1.6 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}within radii of 69, 65, and 190 pc. The HCN emission was modeled to derive the emissivity distribution as a function of radius and the kinematics of each nuclear disk, yielding dynamical masses consistent with the masses and sizes derived from the dust emission. In Arp 220, the major dust and gas concentrations are at radii less than 50 pc in both counter-rotating nuclear disks. The thickness of the disks in Arp 220 estimated from the velocity dispersion and rotation velocities are 10-20 pc and the mean gas densities are n{sub H{sub 2}}∼10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} at R <50 pc. We develop an analytic treatment for the molecular excitation (including photon trapping), yielding volume densities for both the HCN and CS emission with n {sub H2} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}. The agreement of the mean density from the total mass and size with that required for excitation suggests that the volume is essentially filled with dense gas, i.e., it is not cloudy or like swiss cheese.

  2. Enhanced Positioning Algorithm of ARPS for Improving Accuracy and Expanding Service Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Baek, Hoki; Lim, Jaesung

    2016-01-01

    The airborne relay-based positioning system (ARPS), which employs the relaying of navigation signals, was proposed as an alternative positioning system. However, the ARPS has limitations, such as relatively large vertical error and service restrictions, because firstly, the user position is estimated based on airborne relays that are located in one direction, and secondly, the positioning is processed using only relayed navigation signals. In this paper, we propose an enhanced positioning algorithm to improve the performance of the ARPS. The main idea of the enhanced algorithm is the adaptable use of either virtual or direct measurements of reference stations in the calculation process based on the structural features of the ARPS. Unlike the existing two-step algorithm for airborne relay and user positioning, the enhanced algorithm is divided into two cases based on whether the required number of navigation signals for user positioning is met. In the first case, where the number of signals is greater than four, the user first estimates the positions of the airborne relays and its own initial position. Then, the user position is re-estimated by integrating a virtual measurement of a reference station that is calculated using the initial estimated user position and known reference positions. To prevent performance degradation, the re-estimation is performed after determining its requirement through comparing the expected position errors. If the navigation signals are insufficient, such as when the user is outside of airborne relay coverage, the user position is estimated by additionally using direct signal measurements of the reference stations in place of absent relayed signals. The simulation results demonstrate that a higher accuracy level can be achieved because the user position is estimated based on the measurements of airborne relays and a ground station. Furthermore, the service coverage is expanded by using direct measurements of reference stations for user

  3. The Isolated Interacting Galaxy Pair NGC 5426/27 (Arp 271)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Carrera, I.; Rosado, M.; Amram, P.; Dultzin-Hacyan, D.; Bernal, A.; Salo, H.; Laurikainen, E.; Cruz-González, I.; Le Coarer, E.

    2001-03-01

    The isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5426/27 (Arp 271) was observed using the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer PUMA. The velocity field, various kinematical parameters and rotation curve for each galaxy were derived. We found a small bar-like structure in NGC 5426 and a severely distorted velocity field for NGC 5427. A range of possible masses was computed for each galaxy.

  4. A deep Chandra observation of the interacting star-forming galaxy Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, K.; Zezas, A.; Ballo, L.; Della Ceca, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present results from a 90 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the X-ray luminous interacting galaxy system Arp 299 (NGC 3690/IC 694). We detect 25 discrete X-ray sources with luminosities above ˜4.0 × 1038 erg s-1 covering the entire Ultra Luminous X-ray source (ULX) regime. Based on the hard X-ray spectra of the non-nuclear discrete sources identified in Arp 299, and their association with young, actively star-forming region of Arp 299 we identify them as HMXBs. We find in total 20 off-nuclear sources with luminosities above the ULX limit, 14 of which are point-like sources. Furthermore we observe a marginally significant deficit in the number of ULXs, with respect to the number expected from scaling relations of X-ray binaries with the star formation rate (SFR). Although the high metallicity of the galaxy could result in lower ULX numbers, the good agreement between the observed total X-ray luminosity of ULXs, and that expected from the relevant scaling relation indicates that this deficit could be the result of confusion effects. The integrated spectrum of the galaxy shows the presence of a hot gaseous component with kT = 0.72 ± 0.03 keV, contributing ˜20 per cent of the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) unabsorbed luminosity of the galaxy. A plume of soft X-ray emission in the west of the galaxy indicates a large scale outflow. We find that the AGN in NGC 3690 contributes only 22 per cent of the observed broad-band X-ray luminosity of Arp 299.

  5. ARPES study on the kink structure in σ-bands of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has served as a prototypical model system for the study of electron-phonon interactions in low dimensions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful technique, which can not only visualize electron chirality, but also identify a signature of electron-boson interaction as a kink in dispersion. While ARPES spectra of graphene π-bands are known to show such kinked dispersion near the Fermi level, recently the similar kink features were also observed in σ-bands with binding energy greater than 4 eV [F. Mazzola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 216806 (2013)]. This kink feature was attributed to a signature of electron-phonon interaction, but its microscopic origin remains unclear. In this work, we performed systematic ARPES measurements for graphene σ-bands with various photon energies and polarization conditions. Our results demonstrate a strong matrix-element effect that can explain the kink-like features in σ-bands, regardless of manybody interactions. This work was supported by Institute for Basic Science (IBS, Grant No. IBS-R014-D1).

  6. Chemical and electronic structure imaging of graphene on Cu: A NanoARPES study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria

    2017-03-06

    Electronic structure, which describes the distribution of electronic states in reciprocal space, is one of the most fundamental concepts in condensed matter physics, since it determines the electrical, optical and magnetic behaviours of materials. Graphene has great promise for both fundamental physics and future applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the dominant technology for its scaled growth on metal foils. The polycrystalline nature of metal foil makes NanoARPES, one energy-momentum dispersion probe with spatial resolution down to few tens of nanometers, an unique tool to study the intrinsic electronic structure of polycrystalline graphene films. In this Topical Review, we present the latest NanoARPES studies on graphene grains and films grown on copper foil by CVD. The comprehensive chemical and electronic images probed by NanoARPES provide deep insight about graphene and point out potential ways to functionalize graphene's property. These knowledge may stimulate us to look into the future of this field from both the material synthesis and instrumental characterisation.

  7. System design impacts on optimization of the advanced radioisotope power system (ARPS) AMTEC cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T.J.; Huang, C.

    1998-07-01

    Several NASA deep space missions require Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS) to supply spacecraft power for various internal functions and mission instruments and experiments. AMTEC (Alkali-Metal Thermal-Electric Conversion) power conversion is the DOE-selected technology for an advanced, next- generation RPS to power these spacecraft. Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc. (AMPS) has begun investigating the design of an AMTEC-based ARPS using the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and the latest PX-5 AMTEC cell technology with refractory materials in critical components. This paper presents and discusses the system design methodology, and results of important system design tradeoffs and system design impacts on the ARPS AMTEC cell design. This work investigated dual 2-GPHS system configurations and 4-GPHS system configurations with 16 side-mounted AMTEC cells operating at beginning-of-mission (BOM) and end-of-mission (EOM) GPHS heat dissipation conditions. Current design studies indicate using a refractory material AMTEC cell with 8-BASE tubes, 5.0 inches long, and 1.75 inches diameter in the 4-GPHS system configuration is the strongest design candidate to satisfy system performance requirements.

  8. CANDIDATE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN Arp 305: LESSONS ON DWARF DETACHMENT AND GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, Mark; Smith, Beverly J.; Giroux, Mark L.; Hurlock, Sabrina; Struck, Curtis E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu E-mail: zshh7@goldmail.etsu.edu

    2009-06-15

    To search for Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) and to study star formation (SF) in tidal features, we are conducting a large UV imaging survey of interacting galaxies selected from the Arp (1996) Atlas using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) telescope. As part of that study, we present a GALEX UV and Sloan Digital Sky Survey and SARA optical study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy pair Arp 305 (NGC 4016/7). The GALEX UV data reveal much extended diffuse UV emission and SF outside the disks. This includes a luminous star-forming region between the two galaxies, and a number of such regions in tidal tails. We have identified 45 young star-forming clumps in Arp 305, including several TDG candidates. By comparing the UV and optical colors to population synthesis models, we determined that the clumps are very young, with several having ages {approx}6 Myr. We do not find many intermediate age clumps in spite of the fact that the last closest encounter was about 300 Myr ago. We have used a smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model the interaction and determine the fate of the star clusters and candidate TDGs.

  9. The Quasiparticle Puzzle: Reconciling ARPES and FTSTS Studies of Bi2212

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, I.M.; Nowadnick, E.A.; Lee, W.S.; Shen, Z.X.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T.P.; Tanaka, K.; Sasagawa, T.; Fujii, T.; /Tokyo U.

    2009-12-17

    Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) probes the momentum-space electronic structure of materials, and provides invaluable information about the high-temperature superconducting cuprates. Likewise, cuprates real-space, inhomogeneous electronic structure is elucidated by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). Recently, STS has exploited quasiparticle interference (QPI) - wave-like electrons scattering off impurities to produce periodic interference patterns - to infer properties of the QP in momentum-space. Surprisingly, some interference peaks in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi-2212) are absent beyond the antiferromagnetic (AF) zone boundary, implying the dominance of particular scattering process. Here, we show that ARPES sees no evidence of quasiparticle (QP) extinction: QP-like peaks are measured everywhere on the Fermi surface, evolving smoothly across the AF zone boundary. This apparent contradiction stems from different natures of single-particle (ARPES) and two-particle (STS) processes underlying these probes. Using a simple model, we demonstrate extinction of QPI without implying the loss of QP beyond the AF zone boundary.

  10. LMO2 Enhances Lamellipodia/Filopodia Formation in Basal-Type Breast Cancer Cells by Mediating ARP3-Profilin1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Wu, Chao; Zhu, Tianhui; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background The human LMO2 gene was first cloned from an acute T lymphocytic leukemia patient; it is primarily expressed in hematopoietic and vascular endothelial systems, and functions as a pivotal transcriptional regulator during embryonic hematopoiesis and angiogenesis. However, some recent reports indicated that LMO2 is widely expressed in many tissues and tumors, predominantly in cytoplasm, and revealed complicated functions on tumor behaviors in a variety of cancer types. As an adaptor molecule, binding partners and function details of LMO2 in these solid tumors need to be further investigated. Material/Methods In this study, we used yeast two-hybrid method to screen potential LMO2 interacting partners, MBP-pulldown, and co-immunoprecipitation assay to confirm protein-protein interactions, and confocal microscopy to reveal the subcellular localization of relevant proteins and actin cytoskeleton changes in relevant cells. Results We found that ARP3 and profilin1 were 2 binding partners of LMO2, primarily in cytoplasm. LMO2. Functionally, LMO2 mediated the assembly of a complex including ARP3, profilin1, and actin monomer, increased actin monomer binding to profilin1, and promoted lamellipodia/filopodia formation in basal-type breast cancer cells. Conclusions Our data indicate a novel functional mechanism of LMO2 in facilitating the delivery of actin monomers to the branched microfilament and increasing lamellipodia/filopodia formation in basal-type breast cancer cells, suggesting a cancer-promoting role of LMO2 in a subtype-dependent manner and its potential as a subtype-specific biomarker for clinical treatment of breast cancers. PMID:28170369

  11. Dynamic maintenance of asymmetric meiotic spindle position through Arp2/3-complex-driven cytoplasmic streaming in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Kexi; Unruh, Jay R; Deng, Manqi; Slaughter, Brian D; Rubinstein, Boris; Li, Rong

    2011-08-28

    Mature mammalian oocytes are poised for completing meiosis II (MII) on fertilization by positioning the spindle close to an actomyosin-rich cortical cap. Here, we show that the Arp2/3 complex localizes to the cortical cap in a Ran-GTPase-dependent manner and nucleates actin filaments in the cortical cap and a cytoplasmic actin network. Inhibition of Arp2/3 activity leads to rapid dissociation of the spindle from the cortex. Live-cell imaging and spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy analysis reveal that actin filaments flow continuously away from the Arp2/3-rich cortex, driving a cytoplasmic streaming expected to exert a net pushing force on the spindle towards the cortex. Arp2/3 inhibition not only diminishes this actin flow and cytoplasmic streaming but also enables a reverse streaming driven by myosin-II-based cortical contraction, moving the spindle away from the cortex. Thus, the asymmetric MII spindle position is dynamically maintained as a result of balanced forces governed by the Arp2/3 complex.

  12. ChAInGeS: THE CHANDRA ARP INTERACTING GALAXIES SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Beverly J.; Miller, Olivia; Swartz, Douglas A.; Burleson, Jacob A.; Nowak, Michael A.; Struck, Curtis E-mail: millero@goldmail.etsu.edu E-mail: jab0039@uah.edu E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2012-06-15

    We have conducted a statistical analysis of the ultra-luminous X-ray point sources (ULXs; L{sub X} {>=} 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}) in a sample of galaxies selected from the Arp Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. We find a possible enhancement of a factor of {approx}2-4 in the number of ULXs per blue luminosity for the strongly interacting subset. Such an enhancement would be expected if ULX production is related to star formation, as interacting galaxies tend to have enhanced star formation rates on average. For most of the Arp galaxies in our sample, the total number of ULXs compared to the far-infrared luminosity is consistent with values found earlier for spiral galaxies. This suggests that for these galaxies, ULXs trace recent star formation. However, for the most infrared-luminous galaxies, we find a deficiency of ULXs compared to the infrared luminosity. For these very infrared-luminous galaxies, active galactic nuclei may contribute to powering the far-infrared; alternatively, ULXs may be highly obscured in the X-ray in these galaxies and therefore not detected by these Chandra observations. We determined local UV/optical colors within the galaxies in the vicinity of the candidate ULXs using Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV and Sloan Digitized Sky Survey optical images. In most cases, the distributions of colors are similar to the global colors of interacting galaxies. However, the u - g and r - i colors at the ULX locations tend to be bluer on average than these global colors, suggesting that ULXs are preferentially found in regions with young stellar populations. In the Arp sample there is a possible enhancement of a factor of {approx}2-5 in the fraction of galactic nuclei that are X-ray-bright compared to more normal spirals.

  13. EXTREME DUST DISKS IN Arp 220 AS REVEALED BY ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C. D.; Rangwala, N.; Glenn, J.; Maloney, P. R.; Spinoglio, L.; Pereira-Santaella, M.

    2014-07-10

    We present new images of Arp 220 from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array with the highest combination of frequency (691 GHz) and resolution (0.''36 × 0.''20) ever obtained for this prototypical ultraluminous infrared galaxy. The western nucleus is revealed to contain warm (200 K) dust that is optically thick (τ{sub 434} {sub μm} = 5.3), while the eastern nucleus is cooler (80 K) and somewhat less opaque (τ{sub 434} {sub μm} = 1.7). We derive full width at half-maximum diameters of 76 × ≤ 70 pc and 123 × 79 pc for the western and eastern nucleus, respectively. The two nuclei combined account for (83{sub −38}{sup +65} (calibration) {sub −34}{sup +0} (systematic))% of the total infrared luminosity of Arp 220. The luminosity surface density of the western nucleus (log (σT{sup 4})=14.3±0.2{sub −0.7}{sup +0} in units of L {sub ☉} kpc{sup –2}) appears sufficiently high to require the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or a ''hot starburst'', although the exact value depends sensitively on the brightness distribution adopted for the source. Although the role of any central AGN remains open, the inferred mean gas column densities of (0.6-1.8) × 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2} mean that any AGN in Arp 220 must be Compton-thick.

  14. Computational Model of Ca2+ Wave Propagation in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, Iina; Abu Khamidakh, Amna; Paci, Michelangelo; Skottman, Heli; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Hyttinen, Jari; Nymark, Soile

    2015-01-01

    Objective Computational models of calcium (Ca2+) signaling have been constructed for several cell types. There are, however, no such models for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Our aim was to construct a Ca2+ signaling model for RPE based on our experimental data of mechanically induced Ca2+ wave in the in vitro model of RPE, the ARPE-19 monolayer. Methods We combined six essential Ca2+ signaling components into a model: stretch-sensitive Ca2+ channels (SSCCs), P2Y2 receptors, IP3 receptors, ryanodine receptors, Ca2+ pumps, and gap junctions. The cells in our epithelial model are connected to each other to enable transport of signaling molecules. Parameterization was done by tuning the above model components so that the simulated Ca2+ waves reproduced our control experimental data and data where gap junctions were blocked. Results Our model was able to explain Ca2+ signaling in ARPE-19 cells, and the basic mechanism was found to be as follows: 1) Cells near the stimulus site are likely to conduct Ca2+ through plasma membrane SSCCs and gap junctions conduct the Ca2+ and IP3 between cells further away. 2) Most likely the stimulated cell secretes ligand to the extracellular space where the ligand diffusion mediates the Ca2+ signal so that the ligand concentration decreases with distance. 3) The phosphorylation of the IP3 receptor defines the cell’s sensitivity to the extracellular ligand attenuating the Ca2+ signal in the distance. Conclusions The developed model was able to simulate an array of experimental data including drug effects. Furthermore, our simulations predict that suramin may interfere ligand binding on P2Y2 receptors or accelerate P2Y2 receptor phosphorylation, which may partially be the reason for Ca2+ wave attenuation by suramin. Being the first RPE Ca2+ signaling model created based on experimental data on ARPE-19 cell line, the model offers a platform for further modeling of native RPE functions. PMID:26070134

  15. Near-infrared (Fe II) and Pa Beta imaging and spectroscopy of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armus, L.; Shupe, D. L.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have imaged the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 in light of the near-infrared (Fe II) 1.257 micron and Pa-beta lines, and have obtained spectra in the J- and H-band atmospheric windows. Arp 220 is a strong source of (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission, with luminosities of 1.3 x 10(exp 41) and 9.2 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s, respectively. The (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission are both extended over the central 2 sec-3 sec, but with different morphologies. We suggest that the extended (Fe II) emission is produced through the interaction of fast shocks with ambient gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) at the base of the outflowing, supernovae-driven superwind mapped by Heckman et al. (1987). The bolometric luminosity of the starburst required to power this wind is estimated to be at least 2 x 10(exp 11) solar luminosity. If the spatially unresolved (Fe II) emission is produced via a large number of supernova remnants, the implied rate is approximately 0.6/yr. The overall luminosity of such a starburst could account for a large fraction (1/2-1/3) of the Arp 220 energy budget, but the large deficit of ionizing photons (as counted by the Pa-beta luminosity) requires that the starburst be rapidly declining and/or have a low upper mass cutoff. Alternatively, dust may effectively compete with the gas for ionizing photons, or much of the ionizing radiation may escape through 'holes' in the ISM. It is also possible that a buried active galactic nuclei (AGN) produces a large fraction of the unresolved (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission. We briefly discuss these possibilities in light of these new imaging and spectroscopic data.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kinematics of Arp 270 (NGC 3395) (Zaragoza-Cardiel+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Font-Serra, J.; Beckman, J. E.; Blasco-Herrera, J.; Garcia-Lorenzo, B.; Camps, A.; Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Loiseau, N.; Gutierrez, L.

    2013-03-01

    We have observed the Arp 270 system (NGC 3395 and NGC 3396) in Hα emission using the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot spectrometer on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (La Palma). In NGC 3396, which is edge-on to us, we detect gas inflow towards the centre, and also axially confined opposed outflows, characteristic of galactic superwinds, and we go on to examine the possibility that there is a shrouded AGN in the nucleus. The combination of surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion information enabled us to measure the radii, FWHM, and the masses of 108 HII regions in both galaxies. (3 data files).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arp 102B spectral optical monitoring (Shapovalova+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalova, A. I.; Popovic, L. C.; Burenkov, A. N.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Ilic, D.; Kollatschny, W.; Kovacevic, A.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Valdes, J. R.; Torrealba, J.; Patino-Alvarez, V.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Benitez, E.; Carrasco, L.; Dultzin, D.; Mercado, A.; Zhdanova, V. E.

    2013-10-01

    Spectra of Arp 102B (during 142 nights) were taken with the 6-m and 1-m telescopes of the SAO RAS (Russia, 1998-2010), the INAOE 2.1-m telescope of the Guillermo Haro Observatory (GHO) at Cananea, Sonora, Mexico (1998-2007), the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional at San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM), Baja California, Mexico (2005-2007), and the 3.5-m and 2.2-m telescopes of Calar Alto observatory, Spain (1987-1994). (4 data files).

  18. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; Evans, N. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Davis, T.; Papovich, C. J.; van den Bosch, R.; Iono, D.; Yun, M.; VIXENS Team

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. By comparing H-alpha, Pa-alpha and 24um data to CO(1-0), CO(2-1), HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find discrepancies from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  19. wARP: improvement and extension of crystallographic phases by weighted averaging of multiple-refined dummy atomic models.

    PubMed

    Perrakis, A; Sixma, T K; Wilson, K S; Lamzin, V S

    1997-07-01

    wARP is a procedure that substantially improves crystallographic phases (and subsequently electron-density maps) as an additional step after density-modification methods such as solvent flattening and averaging. The initial phase set is used to create a number of dummy atom models which are subjected to least-squares or maximum-likelihood refinement and iterative model updating in an automated refinement procedure (ARP). Averaging of the phase sets calculated from the refined output models and weighting of structure factors by their similarity to an average vector results in a phase set that improves and extends the initial phases substantially. An important requirement is that the native data have a maximum resolution beyond approximately 2.4 A. The wARP procedure shortens the time-consuming step of model building in crystallographic structure determination and helps to prevent the introduction of errors.

  20. A mutation at proline-115 in the A-factor receptor protein of Streptomyces griseus abolishes DNA-binding ability but not ligand-binding ability.

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, H; Sugiyama, M; Horinouchi, S

    1997-01-01

    A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone) and its specific receptor protein (ArpA) are required for streptomycin production and aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces griseus. A mutant strain HO1 that produced streptomycin and formed aerial mycelium and spores was derived from an A-factor-deficient mutant, S. griseus HH1. The phenotypes of mutant HO1 were found to result from a single amino acid replacement of ArpA; the proline residue at position 115 in the wild-type ArpA was replaced by serine, yielding mutant ArpA (P115S). The mutant ArpA (P115S) was still able to form a homodimer and possessed A-factor-binding ability but lost the ability to bind DNA. The properties of P115S suggest that ArpA consists of two independently functional domains, one for A-factor binding and one for DNA binding, and that proline-115 plays an important role in DNA binding. This is in agreement with the idea that A-factor binding to the COOH-terminal domain of ArpA causes a subtle conformational change of the distal NH2-terminal DNA-binding domain, resulting in dissociation of ArpA from DNA. PMID:9098075

  1. PWR ENDF/B-VII cross-section libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, C.; Ilas, G.

    2012-07-01

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% {sup 235}U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time. (authors)

  2. ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL/INFRARED COLOR SEQUENCES ALONG THE TIDAL RING/ARM OF Arp 107

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, Ryen C.; Smith, Beverly J.; Struck, Curtis E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu

    2013-05-15

    We construct UV/optical/IR spectral energy distributions for 29 star forming regions in the interacting galaxy Arp 107, using GALEX UV, Sloan Digitized Sky Survey optical, and Spitzer infrared images. In an earlier study utilizing only the Spitzer data, we found a sequence in the mid-infrared colors of star-forming knots along the strong tidal arm in this system. In the current study, we find sequences in the UV/optical colors along the tidal arm that mirror those in the mid-infrared, with blue UV/optical colors found for regions that are red in the mid-infrared, and vice versa. With single-burst stellar population synthesis models, we find a sequence in the average stellar age along this arm, with younger stars preferentially located further out in the arm. Models that allow two populations of different ages and dust attenuations suggest that there may be both a young component and an older population present in these regions. Thus the observed color sequences may be better interpreted as a sequence in the relative proportion of young and old stars along the arm, with a larger fraction of young stars near the end. Comparison with star forming regions in other interacting galaxies shows that the Arp 107 regions are relatively quiescent, with less intense star formation than in many other systems.

  3. Chandra Observations of Extended X-Ray Emission in ARP 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, J. C.; Clements, D. L.; Lamb, S. A.; Shaked, S.; Hearn, N. C.; Colina, L.; Mundell, C.; Borne, K.; Baker, A. C.; Arribas, S.

    2003-01-01

    We resolve the extended X-ray emission from the prototypical ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. Extended, faint, edge-brightened, soft X-ray lobes outside the optical galaxy are observed to a distance of 1CL 15 kpc on each side of the nuclear region. Bright plumes inside the optical isophotes coincide with the optical line emission and extend 1 1 kpc from end to end across the nucleus. The data for the plumes cannot be fitted by a single-temperature plasma and display a range of temperatures from 0.2 to 1 keV. The plumes emerge from bright, diffuse circumnuclear emission in the inner 3 kpc centered on the Ha peak, which is displaced from the radio nuclei. There is a close morphological correspondence between the Ha and soft X-ray emission on all spatial scales. We interpret the plumes as a starburst-driven superwind and discuss two interpretations of the emission from the lobes in the context of simulations of the merger dynamics of Arp 220.

  4. Electron-Phonon Coupling in Alkali Doped Bilayer Graphene Studied by ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeman, James; Sugawara, Katsuaki; Sato, Takafumi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Graphene intercalation compounds are a class of materials consisting of stacked graphene sheets, with dopant adatoms ordered in-between them. These materials exhibit an unusual superconducting state, for which characteristic electron-phonon coupling has been suggested. Recent advances in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have enabled high precision measurement of electron-phonon coupling in GICs. Coupling at the graphite-derived π bands was found to be highly anisotropic in the GIC KC8, being much stronger in the K-M than K- Γ directions. This unusual anisotropy is not predicted by previous superconducting theories. A much smaller anisotropy has also been seen in recent studies of K-doped graphene monolayers. In order to examine the presence of anisotropic coupling in the graphene-metal system, we have performed ARPES on the bilayer graphene GIC. We have found that C8RbC8 exhibits strong, anisotropic coupling, similar to that in GICs. The origin of this coupling, as well as its relation to possible superconductivity in ultrathin GICs is discussed.

  5. Wnt signaling induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition with proliferation in ARPE-19 cells upon loss of contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Chi; Zhu, Ying-Ting; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2012-05-01

    Proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are hallmarks of proliferative vitreoretinopathy. This study aims at clarifying the role of growth factors, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), in controlling how RPE proliferates while undergoing EMT. When contact inhibition of post-confluent ARPE-19 cells was disrupted by EGTA, an increase of BrdU labeling was noted only in the presence of EGF and/or FGF-2, and was accompanied by EMT as evidenced by the loss of a normal RPE phenotype (altered cytolocalization of RPE65, N-cadherin, ZO-1, and Na,K-ATPase) and the gain of a mesenchymal phenotype (increased expression of vimentin, S100A4, and α-smooth muscle actin). EMT with proliferation by EGTA+EGF+FGF-2 was accompanied by activation of canonical Wnt signaling (judged by the TCF/LEF promoter activity, increased nuclear levels of and interaction between β-catenin and LEF1 proteins, and the replication by overexpression of β-catenin), abolished by concomitant addition of XAV939, a Wnt inhibitor, but not associated with suppression of Hippo signaling (negative expression of nuclear TAZ or YAP and cytoplasmic p-TAZ or p-YAP). The causative role of Wnt signaling on EMT with proliferation was confirmed by overexpression of stable S33Y β-catenin with EGTA treatment. In addition, contact inhibition disrupted by EGTA in the presence of TGF-β1 also led to EMT, but suppressed proliferation and Wnt signaling. The Wnt signaling triggered by EGF+FGF-2 was sufficient and synergized with TGF-β1 in activating the Smad/ZEB1/2 signaling responsible for EMT. These findings establish a framework for further dissecting how RPE might partake in a number of proliferative vitreoretinopathies characterized by EMT.

  6. KEY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE MIXES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-10-05

    At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), decontaminated salt solution (DSS) is combined with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) Saltstone. After transfer to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) the hydration reactions initiated during the contact of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period to produce the hardened waste form product. The amount of heat generated from hydration and the resultant temperature increase in the vaults depend on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned as well as the grout formulation (mix design). This report details the results from Task 3 of the Saltstone Variability Study for FY09 which was performed to identify, and quantify when possible, those factors that drive the performance properties of the projected ARP/MCU Batches. A baseline ARP/MCU mix (at 0.60 water to cementitious materials (w/cm) ratio) was established and consisted of the normal premix composition and a salt solution that was an average of the projected compositions of the last three ARP/MCU batches developed by T. A. Le. This task introduced significant variation in (1) wt % slag, w/cm ratio, and wt % portland cement about the baseline mix and (2) the temperature of curing in order to better assess the dependence of the performance properties on these factors. Two separate campaigns, designated Phase 10 and Phase 11, were carried out under Task 3. Experimental designs and statistical analyses were used to search for correlation among properties and to develop linear models to predict property values based on factors such as w/cm ratio, slag concentration, and portland cement concentration. It turns out that the projected salt compositions contained relatively high amounts of aluminate (0.22 M) even though no aluminate was introduced due to caustic aluminate removal from High Level Waste. Previous

  7. Distinct roles for the actin nucleators Arp2/3 and hDia1 during NK-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Boyd; Cooper, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several actin nucleators, including Arp2/3 and various formins, control numerous cytoskeletal-based functions in vivo. Results We investigated the relative roles of these nucleators. As a model system, we used natural killer (NK) lymphocytes, which display a wide range of cytoskeletal-based functions that culminate in the lysis of target cells. NK cells lacking either Arp2/3 or the formin hDia1 were ineffective in target cell lysis, but for distinct reasons. Loss of Arp2/3 function led to defects in cells adhesion and actin assembly at the junction with the target cell (the lytic synapse). In contrast, loss of hDia1 did not disrupt actin assembly at the lytic synapse. Instead, loss of hDia1 led to perturbations in the microtubule cytoskeleton, including the targeting of microtubules to the lytic synapse. Conclusions These studies reveal novel distinctions and relationships among the functions of Arp2/3, formins and microtubules in cells. Notably, a formin mediates the capture of microtubules at the cell periphery. PMID:19913427

  8. Arp2/3 complex inhibition radically alters lamellipodial actin architecture, suspended cell shape, and the cell spreading process

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Yeterian, Mesrob; Weeks, Richard M.; Medrano, Angela E.; Brown, Briana L.; Geist, Heather L.; Pais, Mollyann D.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Shuster, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have investigated the dendritic actin cytoskeleton of the cell edge's lamellipodial (LP) region by experimentally decreasing the activity of the actin filament nucleator and branch former, the Arp2/3 complex. Here we extend these studies via pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex in sea urchin coelomocytes, cells that possess an unusually broad LP region and display correspondingly exaggerated centripetal flow. Using light and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that Arp2/3 complex inhibition via the drug CK666 dramatically altered LP actin architecture, slowed centripetal flow, drove a lamellipodial-to-filopodial shape change in suspended cells, and induced a novel actin structural organization during cell spreading. A general feature of the CK666 phenotype in coelomocytes was transverse actin arcs, and arc generation was arrested by a formin inhibitor. We also demonstrate that CK666 treatment produces actin arcs in other cells with broad LP regions, namely fish keratocytes and Drosophila S2 cells. We hypothesize that the actin arcs made visible by Arp2/3 complex inhibition in coelomocytes may represent an exaggerated manifestation of the elongate mother filaments that could possibly serve as the scaffold for the production of the dendritic actin network. PMID:25568343

  9. Differential autophagic effects of vital dyes in retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 and photoreceptor 661W cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan; Chen, Jiunn-Liang; Bee, Youn-Shen; Chen, Yi-An; Lin, Shi-Han; Shu, Chih-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) and brilliant blue G (BBG) are commonly used vital dyes to remove internal limiting membrane (ILM) in vitreoretinal surgery. The vital dyes have shown cytotoxic effects in ocular cells. Autophagy is a stress responsive pathway for either protecting cells or promoting cell death. However, the role of autophagy in ocular cells in response to the vital dyes remains unknown. In this study, we found that ICG and BBG reduced cell viability in both human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 and mouse photoreceptor 661W cells. ICG and BBG induced lipidated GFP-LC3-II and LC3-II in ARPE-19 and 661W cells. Combination treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine indicated that ICG and BBG reduced autophagic flux in ARPE-19 cells, whereas the vital dyes induced autophagic flux in 661W cells. Moreover, genetic and pharmacological ablation of autophagy enhanced vital dyes-induced cytotoxicity in ocular cells. Dietary supplements, including resveratrol, lutein, and CoQ10, induced autophagy and diminished the cytotoxic effects of ICG and BBG in ocular cells. These results suggest that autophagy may protect ARPE-19 and 661W cells from vital dyes-induced damage. PMID:28358857

  10. Ground-based 1- to 32-microns observations of ARP 220: Evidence for a dust-embedded AGN?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Wynn-Williams, C. G.

    1987-01-01

    New observations of the 10 and 20 micron size of the emission region in Arp 220 are presented. Also given are ground based photometry from 1 to 32 micron including measurements of the strength of the silicate feature at 10 micron. The results show that the 20 micron size of Arp is smaller than 1.5 arcsec (500 pc); comparison of IRAS and ground based observations show that IRAS 12 micron flux measured with a large arcmin beam is the same as that seen from the ground with a 3 arcsec aperture. At 10 micron a deep silicate absorption feature is seen that corresponds to a visual extinction of about 50 mag. These results suggest that a very significant portion of the 10 to the 12th power L sub 0 infrared luminosity from Arp 220 comes from a region less than or of the order of 500 pc in diameter. When these results are combined with recent measurement of a broad Brackett alpha line by DePoy and an unresolved 2.2 micron source by Neugebauer, Matthews and Scoville, a very attractive possibility for the primary luminosity source Arp 220 is a dust embedded compact Seyfert type nucleus.

  11. Methylglyoxal, a reactive glucose metabolite, enhances autophagy flux and suppresses proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yo-Chen; Hsieh, Ming-Chu; Wu, Horng-Jiun; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Kao, Ying-Hsien

    2015-10-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO), a glycolytic metabolite, induces oxidative injury and apoptotic cell death that play a pathogenetic role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study examined the impact of MGO on cell proliferation and autophagy flux in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) ARPE-19 cells and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Short-term MGO exposure suppressed cell proliferation without induction of apoptotic cell death, increased production of reactive oxygen species, and potentiated H2O2-exhibited cytotoxicity in ARPE-19 cells. Conversely, pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger, and aminoguanidine, an MGO blocker, prevented MGO-induced growth retardation. MGO significantly enhanced autophagy flux and increased intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes, which was functionally confirmed by addition of autophagy enhancer or inhibitors. Signaling kinetic observation indicated that MGO remarkably triggered phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK1/2. Blockade of kinase activity demonstrated that the hyperphosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK were all involved in the MGO-enhanced autophagy and growth-arresting effect in ARPE-19 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with autophagic flux inhibitors including 3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A, and chloroquine effectively ameliorated MGO- but not H2O2-mediated ARPE-19 cytotoxicity. In conclusion, modulation of autophagy flux activity by using autophagic or kinase inhibitors may be an applicable modality to treat AMD.

  12. Tissue factor induces VEGF expression via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Sang, Aimin; Zhu, Manhui; Zhang, Guowei; Guan, Huaijin; Ji, Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential signal mechanism of tissue factor (TF) in the regulation of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Methods An in vitro RPE cell chemical hypoxia model was established by adding cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the culture medium. The irritative concentration of CoCl2 was determined with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay kit. VEGF production in ARPE-19 cells was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. The Wnt signaling pathway–associated molecules, including phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β), GSK3β, p-β-catenin and β-catenin, were detected with western blotting. pEGFP-N3-hTF was constructed and verified with digestion of the restriction enzyme and sequencing analysis. Human TF overexpression and silencing plasmids were transfected into the ARPE-19 cells to clarify the causal relationship between TF and VEGF expression. The Transwell coculture system of ARPE-19 cells and RF/6A rhesus macaque choroid–retinal endothelial cells was performed to evaluate cell invasion and tube formation ability. Results Our anoxic model of ARPE-19 cells showed that TF expression was upregulated in accordance with variations in hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) and VEGF levels. Silencing and overexpression of TF decreased and increased VEGF expression, respectively. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played an important role in this effect. Results from the ARPE-19 cell and RF/6A cell coculture system showed that the enhancement of TF expression in the ARPE-19 cells led to significantly faster invasion and stronger tube-forming ability of the RF/6A cells, while siRNA-mediated TF silencing caused the opposite effects. Pharmacological disruption of Wnt signaling IWR-1-endo inhibited the effects compared to the TF-overexpressing group

  13. Fermi surface and band structure of BiPd from ARPES studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohani, H.; Mishra, P.; Gupta, Anurag; Awana, V. P. S.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a detailed electronic structure study of the non-centrosymmetric superconductor BiPd based on our angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations. We observe a high intensity distribution on the Fermi surface (FS) of this compound resulting from various electron and hole like bands which are present in the vicinity of the Fermi energy (Ef). The near Ef states are primarily composed of Bi-6p with a little admixture of Pd-4dx2-y2/zy orbitals. There are various spin-orbit split bands involved in the crossing of Ef making a complex FS. The FS mainly consists of multi sheets of three dimensions which disfavor the nesting between different sheets of the FS. Our comprehensive study elucidates that BiPd could be a s-wave multiband superconductor.

  14. the effect of electron doping in TiO2 assessed by ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreschini, Luca; Moser, Simon; Jacimovic, Jacim; Barisic, Osor; Berger, Helmut; Magrez, Arnaud; Chang, Young Jun; Kim, Keun Su; Bostwick, Aaron; Forro, Laszlo; Rotenberg, Eli; Grioni, Marco

    2013-03-01

    The titanium oxide TiO2 has been object of extensive studies because of its suitability in many practical fields, ranging from photovoltaic applications, to catalysis, memristors, and others. As for many other transition metal oxides, great attention has been devoted to the impact on the electronic structure of different doping mechanisms, either extrinsic or due to the creation of oxygen vacancies. Here we report an angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) work on TiO2 single crystals and epitaxial films grown wIth the in situ pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) system available on beamline 7.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source. We show the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of the amount of oxygen vacancies induced by the photon beam.

  15. HST/WFC3 OBSERVATIONS OF AN OFF-NUCLEAR SUPERBUBBLE IN ARP 220

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, Kelly E.; Lu, Jessica R.; Sanders, David B.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Allen, Mark G.; Rupke, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Davies, Richard I.; Engel, Hauke; Heckman, Timothy M.; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-09-10

    We present a high spatial resolution optical and infrared study of the circumnuclear region in Arp 220, a late-stage galaxy merger. Narrowband imaging using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 has resolved the previously observed peak in Hα+[N ii] emission into a bubble-shaped feature. This feature measures 1.″6 in diameter, or 600 pc, and is only 1″ northwest of the western nucleus. The bubble is aligned with the western nucleus and the large-scale outflow axis seen in X-rays. We explore several possibilities for the bubble origin, including a jet or outflow from a hidden active galactic nucleus (AGN), outflows from high levels of star formation within the few hundred pc nuclear gas disk, or an ultraluminous X-ray source. An obscured AGN or high levels of star formation within the inner ∼100 pc of the nuclei are favored based on the alignment of the bubble and energetics arguments.

  16. Detecting the minimum gap locus in ARPES spectra of Bi2201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; He, Ruihua; Moore, Rob; Lu, Donghui; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Hussain, Zahid; Devereaux, Tom; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-02-01

    Recent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies have reported a direct evidence for the competing nature of the pseudogap by showing that the pseudogap dispersion is not tied to Fermi momentum (kF)[1,2]. In this study, to get more detailed information on how the competing pseudogap evolves across the pseudogap temperature (T*), we introduce a new analysis method for spectral weight. We found a clear indication that the pseudogap opens at T* with the minimum gap locus deviating from kF, which is completely different manner from the gap opening by simple superconductivity, and strongly supports that the pseudogap is another distinct order. [1] M. Hashimoto and R.-H. He et al., Nature Phys. 6, 14-418 (2010). [2] R.-H. He and M. Hashimoto et al., Science 331, 1579-1583 (2011).

  17. Far-infrared spectroscopy of NGC 6946, IC 342, and Arp 299

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Steven D.; Hollenbach, David J.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Haas, Michael R.; Rubin, Robert H.; Erickson, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers investigated the physical conditions in the infrared bright galaxies NGC 6946, IC 342, and Arp 299 through measurements of far-infrared emission lines from Si II, O I, C II, and O III using the facility Cooled Grating Spectrometer on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. These data are interpreted using our theoretical models for photodissociation regions and H II regions. For the central 45 inches of these galaxies, researchers determined that the dominant excitation mechanism for the far infrared radiation (FIR) lines is far ultraviolet radiation (FUR) radiation from young stars, and the authors derived the total mass, density, and temperature of the warm atomic gas and the typical sizes, number densities, and filling factors for the interstellar clouds.

  18. The WASP-WAVE protein network: connecting the membrane to the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Takenawa, Tadaomi; Suetsugu, Shiro

    2007-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and WASP-family verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE) family proteins are scaffolds that link upstream signals to the activation of the ARP2/3 complex, leading to a burst of actin polymerization. ARP2/3-complex-mediated actin polymerization is crucial for the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton at the cell cortex for processes such as cell movement, vesicular trafficking and pathogen infection. Large families of membrane-binding proteins were recently found to interact with WASP and WAVE family proteins, therefore providing a new layer of membrane-dependent regulation of actin polymerization.

  19. ARPES Study of Nodal Quasiparticles Using Low-Energy Tunable Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, Akihiro

    2006-03-01

    Low-energy quasiparticle excitations govern the thermodynamic properties of a superconductor both in the zero-field and vortex-mixed states. For a d-wave superconductor, nodal quasiparticles are crucial excitations starting from zero energy. So far, however, the nodal quasiparticle dynamics of high-Tc cuprates has been controversial. For example, it has been reported by an angle-resolved-photoemission (ARPES) experiment that the marginal-Fermi-liquid behavior persists into the superconducting state without appreciable change in the scattering rate, while microwave conductivity increases upon the superconducting transition. Here, we show a new ARPES result that solves the controversies with unprecedented momentum-resolution. Low-energy tunable photons have enabled us to resolve a small nodal bilayer splitting clearly, and to reveal the detailed temperature- and energy-dependence of the scattering rate, indicating the behaviors unique to the nodal quasiparticles. Due to the opening of the d-wave gap, the nodal scattering rate is remarkably suppressed, and shows a linear energy dependence. The difference in the energy-linear term between the bilayer-resolved scattering rates hints the nature of impurities involved. This work was done in collaboration with T. Yamasaki, T. Kamo, K. Yamazaki, H. Anzai, M. Arita, H. Namatame, M. Taniguchi, Grad. Sch. of Science and Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima Univ., A. Fujimori, Dept. of Complexity Science and Engineering, Univ. of Tokyo, Z.-X. Shen, Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and SSRL, Stanford Univ., M. Ishikado, K. Fujita, and S. Uchida, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Tokyo.

  20. Multiple A2E treatments lead to melanization of rod outer segment–challenged ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, Eugenia; Strunnikova, Natalya V.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Martinez, Bianca; Parikh, Toral; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Thomas, Craig; Brooks, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Daily phagocytosis of outer segments (OSs) and retinoid recycling by the RPE lead to the accumulation of storage bodies in the RPE containing autofluorescent lipofuscin, which consists of lipids and bisretinoids such as A2E and its oxidation products. Accumulation of A2E and its oxidation products is implicated in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerative diseases. However, A2E accumulates in the RPE during normal aging. In this study, we used a cell model to determine the homeostatic mechanisms of RPE cells in response to A2E accumulation. Methods To distinguish between pathologic and normal responses of the RPE to A2E accumulation, we treated established ARPE-19 cells (cultured for 3 weeks after reaching confluence) with low micromolar amounts of A2E for several weeks. We compared the lysosomal function, lysosomal pH, degree of OS digestion, and melanization of the treated cells to untreated control cells in response to a challenge of purified rod OSs (ROSs). A2E was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); and A2E and melanin were identified with mass spectrometry. Results We found that post-confluent ARPE-19 cells took up and accumulated A2E under dim light conditions. Spectral analysis of the HPLC separations and mass spectrometry showed that A2E-fed cells contained A2E and oxidized A2E (furan-A2E). A2E accumulation led to a modest increase (up to 0.25 unit) in lysosomal pH in these cells. The specific activity of cathepsin D and lysosomal acid phosphatase was reduced in the A2E-treated cells, but ROS degradation was not impaired. We found that, upon challenge with ROSs, melanin pigment was induced in the lysosomal fraction of the A2E-treated ARPE-19 cells. Thus, the ARPE-19 cells responded to the A2E treatment and ROS challenge by producing a melanin-containing lysosome fraction. We speculate that this prevents them from becoming impaired in OS processing. Conclusions We used a modified ARPE-19 cell model in which

  1. Strategies of ARP application (Automatic Resistivity Profiling) for viticultural precision farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Andrenelli, M. C.; Bucelli, P.; Magini, S.; Natarelli, L.; Pellegrini, S.; Perria, R.; Storchi, P.; Vignozzi, N.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction Viticultural precision farming needs detailed soil information, which can be obtained by means of remote as well as proximal sensors, besides traditional invasive soil survey. Nevertheless, the use of the new technologies is still in its infancy, because of their costs and the lack of knowledge about the detail actually needed for the viticultural husbandry. The main aim of this work was to test the sensitivity of the ARP methodology (Automatic Resistivity Profiling) in supporting soil survey for viticultural precision farming. In addition, we tried to optimize the detail of geoelectrical measurements and soil sampling to reduce the cost of the integrated survey, maintaining a significant information accuracy for viticulture. Materials and methods Two vineyards in coastal Tuscany (central Italy), about 3.5 ha each, were selected. Vineyard 1 was cultivated with Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, while vineyard 2 only had Cabernet Sauvignon. Soil survey and geoelectrical investigation were conducted in may 2007. The ARP methodology consists in the injection in soil of electric current through one pair of electrodes mounted on teeth wheels and measuring the resulting potential with other three pairs of electrodes, placed of the same mobile equipment. The electrical resistance of the soil (ER) is expressed as ohm per m. The depth of investigation is a function of the geometry of the electrodes and the soil being probed. Increasing the distance between electrodes will increase the depth while decreasing the measured potential. The innovative character of the ARP technique is represented by the passage of a mobile machinery, able to perform 30,000 measurements per hectare, with a measurement every 0.2 m. The ARP system, equipped with a digital encoder and DGPS system, is transported by a four-wheeled vehicle. It is fitted with three sensors that contemporaneously analyse three distinct levels of the soil, the values of which are represented by maps of

  2. Mechanism of Twist1-Induced Invasion in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    actin regulatory proteins, such as cortactin, Wiscott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp), and the actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3 complex...with beta integrins; and 3) had a cytoplasmic truncation to remove the cytoplasmic tail ( Jacobsen et al., 2008). These mutants allowed us to...cell migration by distinct ADAM family members. Mol Biol Cell 16, 4982–4991. Jacobsen , J., Visse, R., Sørensen, H. P., Enghild, J. J., Brew, K

  3. OPERATIONAL AND COMPOSITIONAL FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Edwards, T.; Pickenheim, B.

    2012-02-15

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives low level waste (LLW) salt solution from Tank 50H for treatment and disposal. Tank 50H receives transfers from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, and the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). At the SPF, the LLW is mixed with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) saltstone that is transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The saltstone formulation (mix design) must produce a grout waste form that meets both placement and performance properties. In previous simulated saltstone studies, multiple compositional factors were identified that drive the performance properties of saltstone made from the projected ARP/MCU salt solution. This composition was selected as salt solution simulant since ARP/MCU is the primary influent into Tank 50H. The primary performance property investigated was hydraulic conductivity since it is a variable input property to the saltstone Performance Assessment (PA) transport model. In addition, the porosity, also referred to as void structure, is another variable that impacts the PA response. In addition, Young's modulus and cured density are other performance properties analyzed in this report; however they are indicators of the performance of saltstone and not direct inputs into the PA. The data from previous studies showed that the largest impact on the performance properties of saltstone was due to curing temperature, followed by aluminate concentration in the salt solution, water to premix ratio and premix composition. However, due to the scope of the previous studies, only a few mixes were cured and analyzed at higher temperatures. The samples cured at 60 C had an increased hydraulic conductivity of approximately 600 times

  4. Ammonia as a Temperature Tracer in the Ultraluminous Galaxy Merger Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Jürgen; Henkel, Christian; Braatz, James A.; Weiß, Axel

    2011-12-01

    We present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of ammonia (NH3) and the 1.2 cm radio continuum toward the ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Arp 220. We detect the NH3(1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), (5,5), and (6,6) inversion lines in absorption against the unresolved, (62 ± 9) mJy continuum source at 1.2 cm. The peak apparent optical depths of the ammonia lines range from ~0.05 to 0.18. The absorption lines are well described by single-component Gaussians with central velocities in between the velocities of the eastern and western cores of Arp 220. Therefore, the ammonia likely traces gas that encompasses both cores. The absorption depth of the NH3(1,1) line is significantly shallower than expected based on the depths of the other transitions. The shallow (1,1) profile may be caused by contamination from emission by a hypothetical, cold (lsim 20 K) gas layer with an estimated column density of <~ 2 × 1014 cm-2. This layer would have to be located behind or away from the radio continuum sources to produce the contaminating emission. The widths of the ammonia absorption lines are ~120-430 km s-1, in agreement with those of other molecular tracers. We cannot confirm the extremely large line widths of up to ~1800 km s-1 previously reported for this galaxy. Using all of the ATCA detections except for the shallow (1,1) line, we determine a rotational temperature of (124 ± 19) K, corresponding to a kinetic temperature of T kin = (186 ± 55) K. Ammonia column densities depend on the excitation temperature. For excitation temperatures of 10 K and 50 K, we estimate N(NH3) = (1.7 ± 0.1) × 1016 cm-2 and (8.4 ± 0.5) × 1016 cm-2, respectively. The relation scales linearly for possible higher excitation temperatures. Our observations are consistent with an ortho-to-para-ammonia ratio of unity, implying that the ammonia formation temperature exceeds ~30 K. In the context of a model with a molecular ring that

  5. AMMONIA AS A TEMPERATURE TRACER IN THE ULTRALUMINOUS GALAXY MERGER Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Juergen; Henkel, Christian; Weiss, Axel; Braatz, James A. E-mail: chenkel@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: jbraatz@nrao.edu

    2011-12-01

    We present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and the 1.2 cm radio continuum toward the ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Arp 220. We detect the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), (5,5), and (6,6) inversion lines in absorption against the unresolved, (62 {+-} 9) mJy continuum source at 1.2 cm. The peak apparent optical depths of the ammonia lines range from {approx}0.05 to 0.18. The absorption lines are well described by single-component Gaussians with central velocities in between the velocities of the eastern and western cores of Arp 220. Therefore, the ammonia likely traces gas that encompasses both cores. The absorption depth of the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line is significantly shallower than expected based on the depths of the other transitions. The shallow (1,1) profile may be caused by contamination from emission by a hypothetical, cold ({approx}< 20 K) gas layer with an estimated column density of {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. This layer would have to be located behind or away from the radio continuum sources to produce the contaminating emission. The widths of the ammonia absorption lines are {approx}120-430 km s{sup -1}, in agreement with those of other molecular tracers. We cannot confirm the extremely large line widths of up to {approx}1800 km s{sup -1} previously reported for this galaxy. Using all of the ATCA detections except for the shallow (1,1) line, we determine a rotational temperature of (124 {+-} 19) K, corresponding to a kinetic temperature of T{sub kin} = (186 {+-} 55) K. Ammonia column densities depend on the excitation temperature. For excitation temperatures of 10 K and 50 K, we estimate N(NH{sub 3}) = (1.7 {+-} 0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and (8.4 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The relation scales linearly for possible higher excitation temperatures. Our observations are

  6. The antagonistic modulation of Arp2/3 activity by N-WASP, WAVE2 and PICK1 defines dynamic changes in astrocyte morphology.

    PubMed

    Murk, Kai; Blanco Suarez, Elena M; Cockbill, Louisa M R; Banks, Paul; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2013-09-01

    Astrocytes exhibit a complex, branched morphology, allowing them to functionally interact with numerous blood vessels, neighboring glial processes and neuronal elements, including synapses. They also respond to central nervous system (CNS) injury by a process known as astrogliosis, which involves morphological changes, including cell body hypertrophy and thickening of major processes. Following severe injury, astrocytes exhibit drastically reduced morphological complexity and collectively form a glial scar. The mechanistic details behind these morphological changes are unknown. Here, we investigate the regulation of the actin-nucleating Arp2/3 complex in controlling dynamic changes in astrocyte morphology. In contrast to other cell types, Arp2/3 inhibition drives the rapid expansion of astrocyte cell bodies and major processes. This intervention results in a reduced morphological complexity of astrocytes in both dissociated culture and in brain slices. We show that this expansion requires functional myosin II downstream of ROCK and RhoA. Knockdown of the Arp2/3 subunit Arp3 or the Arp2/3 activator N-WASP by siRNA also results in cell body expansion and reduced morphological complexity, whereas depleting WAVE2 specifically reduces the branching complexity of astrocyte processes. By contrast, knockdown of the Arp2/3 inhibitor PICK1 increases astrocyte branching complexity. Furthermore, astrocyte expansion induced by ischemic conditions is delayed by PICK1 knockdown or N-WASP overexpression. Our findings identify a new morphological outcome for Arp2/3 activation in restricting rather than promoting outwards movement of the plasma membrane in astrocytes. The Arp2/3 regulators PICK1, and N-WASP and WAVE2 function antagonistically to control the complexity of astrocyte branched morphology, and this mechanism underlies the morphological changes seen in astrocytes during their response to pathological insult.

  7. ORIGEN-ARP Cross-Section Libraries for Magnox, Advanced Gas-Cooled, and VVER Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, BD

    2004-03-10

    Cross-section libraries for the ORIGEN-ARP system were extended to include four non-U.S. reactor types: the Magnox reactor, the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor, the VVER-440, and the VVER-1000. Typical design and operational parameters for these four reactor types were determined by an examination of a variety of published information sources. Burnup simulation models of the reactors were then developed using the SAS2H sequence from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory SCALE code system. In turn, these models were used to prepare the burnup-dependent cross-section libraries suitable for use with ORIGEN-ARP. The reactor designs together with the development of the SAS2H models are described, and a small number of validation results using spent-fuel assay data are reported.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp cooperates with the Arp2/3 complex to increase the rate of actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Ohr, Ryan J; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Hackstadt, Ted; Alvarado, Stephenie; Romero, Adriana; Jewett, Travis J

    2012-04-20

    Actin polymerization is required for Chlamydia trachomatis entry into nonphagocytic host cells. Host and chlamydial actin nucleators are essential for internalization of chlamydiae by eukaryotic cells. The host cell Arp2/3 complex and the chlamydial translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) are both required for entry. Tarp and the Arp2/3 complex exhibit unique actin polymerization kinetics individually, but the molecular details of how these two actin nucleators cooperate to promote bacterial entry is not understood. In this study we provide biochemical evidence that the two actin nucleators act synergistically by co-opting the unique attributes of each to enhance the dynamics of actin filament formation. This process is independent of Tarp phosphorylation. We further demonstrate that Tarp colocalization with actin filaments is independent of the Tarp phosphorylation domain. The results are consistent with a model in which chlamydial and host cell actin nucleators cooperate to increase the rate of actin filament formation.

  9. Topological Kondo Insulator (TKI) and related candidate materials: High-resolution ARPES studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. Zahid

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I plan to present ARPES (synchrotron and laser-based) studies of several mix valence and Kondo insulator phenomena in some of the rare earth heavy fermion compounds in connection to their non-trivial topology of band structures. Focus will be on SmB6 which has been predicted to be a TKI recently. By combining low-temperature and high energy-momentum resolution of the laser-based ARPES technique, for the first time, we accessed the surface electronic structure of the anomalous conductivity regime. At low T, we observe in-gap states within a 4 meV energy window of the Fermi level, which lie clearly within the bulk insulating gap. The in-gap states are found to be suppressed and eventually disappear, as the temperature is raised in approaching the coherent Kondo lattice hybridization (30 K), which proves that the in-gap states strongly depend on the existence of Kondo lattice hybridization and the effective Kondo gap, in agreement with their theoretical predicted origin of topological surface states within the Kondo insulating gap . Our Fermi mapping at the energy corresponding to these in-gap states shows distinct Fermi pockets that enclose the three Kramers' points the surface Brillouin zone, which are remarkably consistent with the theoretically predicted topological surface Fermi surface in the topological Kondo insulating phase within the level of energy resolution. The observed Fermi surface topology of the in-gap states, their temperature dependence across the transport anomaly and Kondo lattice hybridization temperatures, as well as their robustness against repeated thermal recycling, collectively not only provide a unique insight illuminating the nature of the residual conductivity anomaly but also serve as a strong experimental evidence to the predicted topological Kondo insulator phase. I also plan to present results on YbB6 and YbB12 both of which are mix valence compounds. This work is in collaboration with Madhab Neupane, N. Alidoust, S

  10. Luminous Infrared Galaxies with the Submillimeter Array. III. The Dense Kiloparsec Molecular Concentrations of Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, Kazimierz; Wilson, Christine D.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Armus, Lee; Juvela, Mika; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Yun, Min S.

    2012-07-01

    We have used high-resolution (~2farcs3) observations of the local (D L = 46 Mpc) luminous infrared galaxy Arp 299 to map out the physical properties of the molecular gas that provides the fuel for its extreme star formation activity. The 12CO J = 3-2, 12CO J = 2-1, and 13CO J = 2-1 lines were observed with the Submillimeter Array, and the short spacings of the 12CO J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 observations have been recovered using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope single dish observations. We use the radiative transfer code RADEX to estimate the physical properties (density, column density, and temperature) of the different regions in this system. The RADEX solutions of the two galaxy nuclei, IC 694 and NGC 3690, are consistent with a wide range of gas components, from warm moderately dense gas with T kin > 30 K and n(H2) ~ 0.3-3 × 103 cm-3 to cold dense gas with T kin ~ 10-30 K and n(H2) > 3 × 103 cm-3. The overlap region is shown to have a better constrained solution with T kin ~ 10-50 K and n(H2) ~ 1-30 × 103 cm-3. We estimate the gas masses and star formation rates of each region in order to derive molecular gas depletion times. The depletion times of all regions (20-50 Myr) are found to be about two orders of magnitude lower than those of normal spiral galaxies. This rapid depletion time can probably be explained by a high fraction of dense gas on kiloparsec scales in Arp 299. We estimate the CO-to-H2 factor, αco to be 0.4 ± 0.3(3 × 10-4/x CO) M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1 for the overlap region. This value agrees well with values determined previously for more advanced merger systems.

  11. LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES WITH THE SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY. III. THE DENSE KILOPARSEC MOLECULAR CONCENTRATIONS OF Arp 299

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, Kazimierz; Wilson, Christine D.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Armus, Lee; Juvela, Mika; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Yun, Min S. E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.ca E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: satoki@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw E-mail: myun@astro.umass.edu

    2012-07-01

    We have used high-resolution ({approx}2.''3) observations of the local (D{sub L} = 46 Mpc) luminous infrared galaxy Arp 299 to map out the physical properties of the molecular gas that provides the fuel for its extreme star formation activity. The {sup 12}CO J = 3-2, {sup 12}CO J = 2-1, and {sup 13}CO J = 2-1 lines were observed with the Submillimeter Array, and the short spacings of the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 observations have been recovered using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope single dish observations. We use the radiative transfer code RADEX to estimate the physical properties (density, column density, and temperature) of the different regions in this system. The RADEX solutions of the two galaxy nuclei, IC 694 and NGC 3690, are consistent with a wide range of gas components, from warm moderately dense gas with T{sub kin} > 30 K and n(H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} to cold dense gas with T{sub kin} {approx} 10-30 K and n(H{sub 2}) > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}. The overlap region is shown to have a better constrained solution with T{sub kin} {approx} 10-50 K and n(H{sub 2}) {approx} 1-30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}. We estimate the gas masses and star formation rates of each region in order to derive molecular gas depletion times. The depletion times of all regions (20-50 Myr) are found to be about two orders of magnitude lower than those of normal spiral galaxies. This rapid depletion time can probably be explained by a high fraction of dense gas on kiloparsec scales in Arp 299. We estimate the CO-to-H{sub 2} factor, {alpha}{sub co} to be 0.4 {+-} 0.3(3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}/x{sub CO}) M{sub Sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1} for the overlap region. This value agrees well with values determined previously for more advanced merger systems.

  12. CHEMICALLY DISTINCT NUCLEI AND OUTFLOWING SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS IN Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnard, R.; Greve, T. R.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Fuente, A.; Usero, A.; Planesas, P.; Carpio, J. Graciá; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Sturm, E.; Fischer, J.; González-Alfonso, E.; Neri, R.

    2015-02-10

    We present the results of interferometric spectral line observations of Arp 220 at 3.5 mm and 1.2 mm from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, imaging the two nuclear disks in H{sup 13}CN(1-0) and (3-2), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(1-0) and (3-2), and HN{sup 13}C(3-2) as well as SiO(2-1) and (6-5), HC{sup 15}N(3-2), and SO(6{sub 6}-5{sub 5}). The gas traced by SiO(6-5) has a complex and extended kinematic signature including a prominent P Cygni profile, almost identical to previous observations of HCO{sup +}(3-2). Spatial offsets 0.''1 north and south of the continuum center in the emission and absorption of the SiO(6-5) P Cygni profile in the western nucleus (WN) imply a bipolar outflow, delineating the northern and southern edges of its disk and suggesting a disk radius of ∼40 pc, consistent with that found by ALMA observations of Arp 220. We address the blending of SiO(6-5) and H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(3-2) by considering two limiting cases with regards to the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} emission throughout our analysis. Large velocity gradient modeling is used to constrain the physical conditions of the gas and to infer abundance ratios in the two nuclei. Our most conservative lower limit on the [H{sup 13}CN]/[H{sup 13}CO{sup +}] abundance ratio is 11 in the WN, compared with 0.10 in the eastern nucleus (EN). Comparing these ratios to the literature we argue on chemical grounds for an energetically significant active galactic nucleus in the WN driving either X-ray or shock chemistry, and a dominant starburst in the EN.

  13. UNCOVERING THE DEEPLY EMBEDDED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY Arp 299

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Roche, P. F.; Esquej, P.; Colina, L.; González-Martín, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Alvarez, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Mason, R. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Perlman, E.; Telesco, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13 μm spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp 299 (IC 694+NGC 3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (∼0.''3-0.''6) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120 pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC 3690/Arp 299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC 3690 is 3.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC 694/Arp 299-A shows 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission stemming from a deeply embedded (A{sub V} ∼ 24 mag) region of less than 120 pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with the putative AGN in IC 694, we estimate that it would be approximately five times less luminous than the AGN in NGC 3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp 299 a good example to study such phenomena in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.

  14. Local Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly modulates applied traction force during apCAM adhesion site maturation

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Kenneth B.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Schoonderwoert, Vincent T.; Creamer, Matthew S.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Forscher, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Homophilic binding of immunoglobulin superfamily molecules such as the Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM) leads to actin filament assembly near nascent adhesion sites. Such actin assembly can generate significant localized forces that have not been characterized in the larger context of axon growth and guidance. We used apCAM-coated bead substrates applied to the surface of neuronal growth cones to characterize the development of forces evoked by varying stiffness of mechanical restraint. Unrestrained bead propulsion matched or exceeded rates of retrograde network flow and was dependent on Arp2/3 complex activity. Analysis of growth cone forces applied to beads at low stiffness of restraint revealed switching between two states: frictional coupling to retrograde flow and Arp2/3-dependent propulsion. Stiff mechanical restraint led to formation of an extensive actin cup matching the geometric profile of the bead target and forward growth cone translocation; pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex or Rac attenuated F-actin assembly near bead binding sites, decreased the efficacy of growth responses, and blocked accumulation of signaling molecules associated with nascent adhesions. These studies introduce a new model for regulation of traction force in which local actin assembly forces buffer nascent adhesion sites from the mechanical effects of retrograde flow. PMID:27852899

  15. Visualization and force measurement of branching by Arp2/3 complex and N-WASP in actin filament.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Suetsugu, Shiro; Uemura, Sotaro; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2002-05-24

    To determine whether the Arp2/3 complex activated by N-WASP (VCA) branches actin filaments at the side (side branching), or at the barbed (B-)end (end branching) of the mother filaments, we have directly observed the branching process of actin filaments and examined single-molecule unbinding under optical microscope. We found that side branching was predominant, though not exclusive. At the initial stage of polymerization, the branching at the B-end occurred and subsequently the side branching started to occur. In either type of branching, the mother and daughter filaments elongated at nearly the same rate (growing type). Independently of the stage of polymerization, branching due to the direct coupling of filaments with an acute angle to the mother filaments (a coupling type) occurred. Phalloidin suppressed the growing type of branching but not the coupling type, implying that actin monomers are required for the former but not the latter. We found, by single molecule measurements using optical tweezers, that the Arp2/3 complex attaches to the side of actin filaments and the N-WASP appears to detach from the actin-Arp2/3 complex at 6-7 pN.

  16. Perinuclear Arp2/3-driven actin polymerization enables nuclear deformation to facilitate cell migration through complex environments

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Vargas, Pablo; Carpi, Nicolas; Crespo, Carolina Lage; Raab, Matthew; Terriac, Emmanuel; King, Megan C.; Jacobelli, Jordan; Alberts, Arthur S.; Stradal, Theresia; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration has two opposite faces: although necessary for physiological processes such as immune responses, it can also have detrimental effects by enabling metastatic cells to invade new organs. In vivo, migration occurs in complex environments and often requires a high cellular deformability, a property limited by the cell nucleus. Here we show that dendritic cells, the sentinels of the immune system, possess a mechanism to pass through micrometric constrictions. This mechanism is based on a rapid Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation around the nucleus that disrupts the nuclear lamina, the main structure limiting nuclear deformability. The cells' requirement for Arp2/3 to pass through constrictions can be relieved when nuclear stiffness is decreased by suppressing lamin A/C expression. We propose a new role for Arp2/3 in three-dimensional cell migration, allowing fast-moving cells such as leukocytes to rapidly and efficiently migrate through narrow gaps, a process probably important for their function. PMID:26975831

  17. Evaluation of an ARPS-based canopy flow modeling system for use in future operational smoke prediction efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, M. T.; Zhong, S.; Heilman, W. E.; Charney, J. J.; Bian, X.

    2013-06-01

    Efforts to develop a canopy flow modeling system based on the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model are discussed. The standard version of ARPS is modified to account for the effect of drag forces on mean and turbulent flow through a vegetation canopy, via production and sink terms in the momentum and subgrid-scale turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equations. Additionally, a downward decaying net radiation profile inside the canopy is used to account for the attenuation of net radiation by vegetation elements. As a critical step in the model development process, simulations performed with the new canopy model, termed ARPS-CANOPY, are examined and compared to observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) experiment. Comparisons of mean and turbulent flow properties in a statistically homogeneous atmosphere are presented for two cases, one when the trees are dormant without leaves and another when the trees are full of mature leaves. The model is shown to reproduce the shape of the vertical profiles of mean wind, temperature, and TKE observed during the CHATS experiment, with errors generally smaller in the afternoon and in the case with stronger mean flow. Sensitivity experiments with relatively coarse (90 m) horizontal grid spacing retain the overall mean profile shapes and diurnal trends seen in the finer-resolution simulations. The work described herein is part of a larger effort to develop predictive tools for close-range (on the order of 1 km from the source) smoke dispersion from low-intensity fires within forested areas.

  18. Tolerance of ARPE 19 cells to organophosphorus pesticide chlorpyrifos is limited to concentration and time of exposure.

    PubMed

    Gomathy, Narayanan; Sumantran, Venil N; Shabna, A; Sulochana, K N

    2015-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration is a blinding disease common in elder adults. The prevalence of age related macular degeneration has been found to be 1.8% in the Indian population. Organophosphates are widely used insecticides with well documented neurological effects, and the persistent nature of these compounds in the body results in long term health effects. Farmers exposed to organophosphorus pesticides in USA had an earlier onset of age related macular degeneration when compared to unexposed controls. A recent study found significant levels of an organophosphate, termed chlorpyrifos, in the blood samples of Indian farmers. Therefore, in understanding the link between age related macular degeneration and chlorpyrifos, the need for investigation is important. Our data show that ARPE-19 (retinal pigment epithelial cells) exhibit a cytoprotective response to chlorpyrifos as measured by viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, superoxide dismutase activity, and increased levels of glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione, after 24 h exposure to chlorpyrifos. However, this cytoprotective response was absent in ARPE-19 cells exposed to the same range of concentrations of chlorpyrifos for 48 h. These results have physiological significance, since HPLC analysis showed that effects of chlorpyrifos were mediated through its entry into ARPE-19 cells. HPLC analysis also showed that chlorpyrifos remained stable, as we recovered up to 80% of the chlorpyrifos added to 6 different ocular tissues.

  19. Perinuclear Arp2/3-driven actin polymerization enables nuclear deformation to facilitate cell migration through complex environments.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Vargas, Pablo; Carpi, Nicolas; Crespo, Carolina Lage; Raab, Matthew; Terriac, Emmanuel; King, Megan C; Jacobelli, Jordan; Alberts, Arthur S; Stradal, Theresia; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2016-03-15

    Cell migration has two opposite faces: although necessary for physiological processes such as immune responses, it can also have detrimental effects by enabling metastatic cells to invade new organs. In vivo, migration occurs in complex environments and often requires a high cellular deformability, a property limited by the cell nucleus. Here we show that dendritic cells, the sentinels of the immune system, possess a mechanism to pass through micrometric constrictions. This mechanism is based on a rapid Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation around the nucleus that disrupts the nuclear lamina, the main structure limiting nuclear deformability. The cells' requirement for Arp2/3 to pass through constrictions can be relieved when nuclear stiffness is decreased by suppressing lamin A/C expression. We propose a new role for Arp2/3 in three-dimensional cell migration, allowing fast-moving cells such as leukocytes to rapidly and efficiently migrate through narrow gaps, a process probably important for their function.

  20. The INO80 Complex Requires the Arp5-Ies6 Subcomplex for Chromatin Remodeling and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; King, Devin A.; Beckwith, Sean L.; Gowans, Graeme J.; Yen, Kuangyu; Zhou, Coral

    2016-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are essential for transcription regulation, and yet it is unclear how these multisubunit complexes coordinate their activities to facilitate diverse transcriptional responses. In this study, we found that the conserved Arp5 and Ies6 subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae INO80 chromatin-remodeler form an abundant and distinct subcomplex in vivo and stimulate INO80-mediated activity in vitro. Moreover, our genomic studies reveal that the relative occupancy of Arp5-Ies6 correlates with nucleosome positioning at transcriptional start sites and expression levels of >1,000 INO80-regulated genes. Notably, these genes are significantly enriched in energy metabolism pathways. Specifically, arp5Δ, ies6Δ, and ino80Δ mutants demonstrate decreased expression of genes involved in glycolysis and increased expression of genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Deregulation of these metabolic pathways results in constitutively elevated mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of the INO80 complex assembly and demonstrate for the first time that a chromatin remodeler regulates glycolytic and respiratory capacity, thereby maintaining metabolic stability. PMID:26755556

  1. Cholesterol Crystals Induce Inflammatory Cytokines Expression in nARPE-19 Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yijun; Lin, Haijiang; Dib, Bernard; Atik, Alp; Bouzika, Peggy; Lin, Christopher; Yan, Yueran; Tang, Shibo; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the expression of inflammatory cytokines in ARPE-19 cells after stimulation with cholesterol crystals. Methods APRE-19 cells were cultured, primed with IL-1α, and treated with cholesterol crystals under different concentrations. Inflammatory cytokines (mature-IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) in supernatant and inflammatory cytokines (pro-IL-1β, IL-18) in cell lysate were detected by western blot. The NF-κB pathway inhibitor BAY 11-7082 was used to determine the pathway of cytokine expression. Results Cholesterol crystals did not induce the nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, but did increase pro-IL-1β expression in ARPE-19 cells. Cholesterol crystals increased pro-IL-1β expression by activating the NF-κB pathway. Cholesterol crystal activation of the NF-κB pathway also leads to increased IL-6 and IL-8 expression. Conclusion Cholesterol crystals can induce inflammatory cytokine expression in ARPE-19 cells by activating the NF-κB pathway. PMID:25091484

  2. Chitin-binding proteins of Artemia diapause cysts participate in formation of the embryonic cuticle layer of cyst shells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Ming; Li, Hua-Wei; Dai, Zhong-Min; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia reproduces either ovoviviparously, producing free-swimming nauplii, or oviparously, producing encysted embryos (diapause cysts) able to cope with harsh and complex habitats. When the cysts enter diapause they are encased in a complex external shell that protects them from certain extreme environments. The genomic comparison of oviparous and ovoviviparous ovisacs has been described previously. We isolated three significantly up-regulated genes in oviparous oocytes and identified them as Arp-CBP (Artemia parthenogenetica chitin-binding protein) genes. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the expression of Arp-CBP genes gradually increases during diapause cyst formation and significant mRNA accumulation occurs during the ovisac stage of oviparous development. Moreover, in situ hybridization results demonstrated that Arp-CBP mRNAs are expressed in the embryo. Interestingly, the results of immune electron microscopy showed that all three Arp-CBPs are distributed throughout the cellular ECL (embryonic cuticle layer) of the cyst shell. Furthermore, knockdown of Arp-CBP by RNA interference resulted in marked changes in the composition of the embryonic cuticular layer. The fibrous layer of the cyst shell adopted a loose conformation and the inner and outer cuticular membranes exhibited marked irregularities when Arp-CBP expression was suppressed. Finally, an in vitro recombinant protein-binding assay showed that all three Arp-CBPs have carbohydrate-binding activities. These findings provide significant insight into the mechanisms by which the ECL of Artemia cyst shell is formed, and demonstrate that Arp-CBPs are involved in construction of the fibrous lattice and are required for formation of the ECL of the cyst shell.

  3. DECONTAMINATION FACTORS AND FILTRATION FLUX IMPACT TO ARP AT REDUCED MST CONCENTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2012-06-27

    Tank Farm and Closure Engineering is evaluating changes to the Actinide Removal Process facility operations to decrease the MST concentration from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L and the contact time from 12 hours to between 6 and 8 hours. For this evaluation, SRNL reviewed previous datasets investigating the performance of MST at 0.2 g/L in salt solutions ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration. In general, reducing the MST concentration from 0.4 to 0.2 g/L and increasing the ionic strength from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration will decrease the measured decontamination factors for plutonium, neptunium, uranium and strontium. The decontamination factors as well as single standard deviation values for each sorbate are reported. These values are applicable within the sorbate and sodium concentrations used in the experimental measurements. Decreasing the MST concentration in the ARP from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L will produce an increase in the filter flux, and could lead to longer operating times between filter cleaning. The increase in flux is a function of a number of operating parameters, and is difficult to quantify. However, it is estimated that the reduction in MST could result in a reduction of filtration time of up to 20%.

  4. Improvements in simulation of atmospheric boundary layer parameters through data assimilation in ARPS mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahamanyam, D. Bala; Ramachandran, Radhika; Kunhikrishnan, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    In a broad sense, 'Data Assimilation' refers to a technique, whereby the realistic observational datasets are injected to a model simulation for bringing accurate forecasts. There are several schemes available for insertion of observational datasets in the model. In this piece of research, we present one of the simplest, yet powerful data assimilation techniques - known as nudging through optimal interpolation in the ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System) model. Through this technique, we firstly identify the assimilation window in space and time over which the observational datasets need to be inserted and the model products require to be adjusted. Appropriate model variables are then adjusted for the realistic observational datasets with a proper weightage being given to the observations. Incorporation of such a subroutine in the model that takes care of the assimilation in the model provides a powerful tool for improving the forecast parameters. Such a technique can be very useful in cases, where observational datasets are available at regular intervals. In this article, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for simulation of profiles of Atmospheric Boundary Layer parameters for a tiny island of Kaashidhoo in the Republic of Maldives, where regular GPS Loran Atmospheric Soundings were carried out during the Intensive Field Phase of Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX, IFP-99).

  5. ARPES study of the YBCO phase diagram by in-situ K evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, D.; Levy, G.; McCheyney, J. L.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, R. X.; Bonn, D. A.; Elfimov, I. S.; Damascelli, A.

    2010-03-01

    The study of the YBCO phase diagram by ARPES has become of central interest since the observation of quantum oscillations in high-magnetic field [1]. However, until recently accessing the various electronic phases by photoemission has been hampered by the so-called polar catastrophe [2]. In this work, the overdoped metal (OD, p=0.37, Tc=0), the superconducting phase (OP, T

  6. Local Data Integration in East Central Florida Using the ARPS Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan; Manobianco, John

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) efforts to configure, implement, and test a version of the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS; Brewster 1996) that assimilates all available data within 250 km of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Eastern Range at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The objective for running a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) such as ADAS is to generate products which may enhance weather nowcasts and short-range (less than 6 h) forecasts issued in support of ground and aerospace operations at KSC/CCAS. A LDIS such as ADAS has the potential to provide added value because it combines observational data to produce gridded analyses of temperature, wind, and moisture (including clouds) and diagnostic quantities such as vorticity, divergence, etc. at specified temporal and spatial resolutions. In this regard, a LDTS along with suitable visualization tools may provide users with a ignore complete and comprehensive understanding of evolving weather than could be developed by individually examining the disparate data sets over the same area and time. The AMU implemented a working prototype of the ADAS which does not run in real-time. Instead, the AMU is evaluating ADAS through post-analyses of weather events for a warm and cool season case. The case studies were chosen to investigate the capabilities and limitations of a LDIS such as ADAS including the impact of non-incorporation of specific data sources on the utility of the subsequent analyses.

  7. THE MASS OF THE BLACK HOLE IN Arp 151 FROM BAYESIAN MODELING OF REVERBERATION MAPPING DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Pancoast, Anna; Bennert, Vardha N.; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2011-06-01

    Supermassive black holes are believed to be ubiquitous at the centers of galaxies. Measuring their masses is extremely challenging yet essential for understanding their role in the formation and evolution of cosmic structure. We present a direct measurement of the mass of a black hole in an active galactic nucleus (Arp 151) based on the motion of the gas responsible for the broad emission lines. By analyzing and modeling spectroscopic and photometric time series, we find that the gas is well described by a disk or torus with an average radius of 3.99 {+-} 1.25 light days and an opening angle of 68.9{sup +21.4}{sub -17.2} deg, viewed at an inclination angle of 67.8 {+-} 7.8 deg (that is, closer to face-on than edge-on). The black hole mass is inferred to be 10{sup 6.51{+-}0.28} M{sub sun}. The method is fully general and can be used to determine the masses of black holes at arbitrary distances, enabling studies of their evolution over cosmic time.

  8. cAMP signaling by anthrax edema toxin induces transendothelial cell tunnels, which are resealed by MIM via Arp2/3-driven actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Maddugoda, Madhavi P; Stefani, Caroline; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Saarikangas, Juha; Torrino, Stéphanie; Janel, Sebastien; Munro, Patrick; Doye, Anne; Prodon, François; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Goossens, Pierre L; Lafont, Frank; Bassereau, Patricia; Lappalainen, Pekka; Brochard, Françoise; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2011-11-17

    RhoA-inhibitory bacterial toxins, such as Staphylococcus aureus EDIN toxin, induce large transendothelial cell macroaperture (TEM) tunnels that rupture the host endothelium barrier and promote bacterial dissemination. Host cells repair these tunnels by extending actin-rich membrane waves from the TEM edges. We reveal that cyclic-AMP signaling produced by Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (ET) also induces TEM formation, which correlates with increased vascular permeability. We show that ET-induced TEM formation resembles liquid dewetting, a physical process of nucleation and growth of holes within a thin liquid film. We also identify the cellular mechanisms of tunnel closure and reveal that the I-BAR domain protein Missing in Metastasis (MIM) senses de novo membrane curvature generated by the TEM, accumulates at the TEM edge, and triggers Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization, which induces actin-rich membrane waves that close the TEM. Thus, the balance between ET-induced TEM formation and resealing likely determines the integrity of the host endothelium barrier.

  9. HIV-1 Triggers WAVE2 Phosphorylation in Primary CD4 T Cells and Macrophages, Mediating Arp2/3-dependent Nuclear Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Turner, Amy; Yu, Dongyang; Wang, Weifeng; Meltzer, Beatrix; He, Sijia; Hu, Xiaohua; Shang, Hong; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) initiates receptor signaling and early actin dynamics during viral entry. This process is required for viral infection of primary targets such as resting CD4 T cells. WAVE2 is a component of a multiprotein complex linking receptor signaling to dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. WAVE2 directly activates Arp2/3, leading to actin nucleation and filament branching. Although several bacterial and viral pathogens target Arp2/3 for intracellular mobility, it remains unknown whether HIV-1 actively modulates the Arp2/3 complex through virus-mediated receptor signal transduction. Here we report that HIV-1 triggers WAVE2 phosphorylation at serine 351 through gp120 binding to the chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5 during entry. This phosphorylation event involves both Gαi-dependent and -independent pathways, and is conserved both in X4 and R5 viral infection of resting CD4 T cells and primary macrophages. We further demonstrate that inhibition of WAVE2-mediated Arp2/3 activity through stable shRNA knockdown of Arp3 dramatically diminished HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells, preventing viral nuclear migration. Inhibition of Arp2/3 through a specific inhibitor, CK548, also drastically inhibited HIV-1 nuclear migration and infection of CD4 T cells. Our results suggest that Arp2/3 and the upstream regulator, WAVE2, are essential co-factors hijacked by HIV for intracellular migration, and may serve as novel targets to prevent HIV transmission. PMID:24415754

  10. Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is essential for early porcine embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zi Li; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is a regulator of both transcription and actin filament assembly. JMY is a critical nucleation-promoting factor (NPF); however, its role in the development of mammalian embryos is poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the functional roles of the NPF JMY in porcine embryos. Porcine embryos expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and JMY protein moved from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at later embryonic developmental stages. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference markedly decreased the rate of blastocyst development, validating its role in the development of porcine embryos. Furthermore, injection of JMY dsRNA also impaired actin and Arp2 expression, and co-injection of actin and Arp2 mRNA partially rescued blastocyst development. Taken together, our results show that the NPF JMY is involved in the development of porcine embryos by regulating the NPF-Arp2-actin pathway.

  11. Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is essential for early porcine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Zi Li; CUI, Xiang-Shun; NAMGOONG, Suk; KIM, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is a regulator of both transcription and actin filament assembly. JMY is a critical nucleation-promoting factor (NPF); however, its role in the development of mammalian embryos is poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the functional roles of the NPF JMY in porcine embryos. Porcine embryos expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and JMY protein moved from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at later embryonic developmental stages. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference markedly decreased the rate of blastocyst development, validating its role in the development of porcine embryos. Furthermore, injection of JMY dsRNA also impaired actin and Arp2 expression, and co-injection of actin and Arp2 mRNA partially rescued blastocyst development. Taken together, our results show that the NPF JMY is involved in the development of porcine embryos by regulating the NPF-Arp2-actin pathway. PMID:26052154

  12. Protein Kinase D Controls Actin Polymerization and Cell Motility through Phosphorylation of Cortactin*

    PubMed Central

    Eiseler, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; De Kimpe, Line; Van Lint, Johan; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We here identify protein kinase D (PKD) as an upstream regulator of the F-actin-binding protein cortactin and the Arp actin polymerization machinery. PKD phosphorylates cortactin in vitro and in vivo at serine 298 thereby generating a 14-3-3 binding motif. In vitro, a phosphorylation-deficient cortactin-S298A protein accelerated VCA-Arp-cortactin-mediated synergistic actin polymerization and showed reduced F-actin binding, indicative of enhanced turnover of nucleation complexes. In vivo, cortactin co-localized with the nucleation promoting factor WAVE2, essential for lamellipodia extension, in the actin polymerization zone in Heregulin-treated MCF-7 cells. Using a 3-dye FRET-based approach we further demonstrate that WAVE2-Arp and cortactin prominently interact at these structures. Accordingly, cortactin-S298A significantly enhanced lamellipodia extension and directed cell migration. Our data thus unravel a previously unrecognized mechanism by which PKD controls cancer cell motility. PMID:20363754

  13. The unphosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) protein represses the synthesis of alkylresorcinols in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Muriel-Millán, Luis Felipe; Moreno, Soledad; Romero, Yanet; Bedoya-Pérez, Leidy Patricia; Castañeda, Miguel; Segura, Daniel; Espín, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Upon encystment induction, Azotobacter vinelandii produces the phenolic lipids alkylresorcinols (ARs) that are structural components of the cysts. The enzymes responsible for the ARs synthesis are encoded in the arsABCD operon, whose expression is activated by ArpR. The transcription of arpR is initiated from an RpoS dependent promoter. The nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)) is a global regulatory system present in Gram negative bacteria. It comprises the EI(Ntr), NPr and EIIA(Ntr) proteins encoded by ptsP, ptsO and ptsN genes respectively. These proteins participate in a phosphoryl-group transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate to protein EIIA(Ntr) via the phosphotransferases EI(Ntr) and NPr. In A. vinelandii, the non-phosphorylated form of EIIA(Ntr) was previously shown to repress the synthesis of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate. In this work, we show that PTS(Ntr) also regulates the synthesis of ARs. In a strain that carries unphosphorylated EIIA(Ntr), the expression of arpR was reduced, while synthesis of ARs and transcription of arsA were almost abrogated. The expression of arpR from an RpoS-independent promoter in this strain restored the ARs synthesis. Taken together these results indicate that unphosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) negatively affects activation of arpR transcription by RpoS.

  14. ARPS: an Advanced Radio Isotope Power Subsystem for ExoMars Geophysical Package (GEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoun, D.; Biele, J.; Lenoir, B.; Dauscher, A.; Müller, E.

    2005-12-01

    Within the framework of the ESA Aurora initiative , IPGP, DLR and an international consortium of laboratories launched an initiative aiming at adding on board the ExoMars mission a long life geophysical observatory, called "GEP" (Geophysical package) or "Mars Long Lived Surface Package". The feasibility study of this "geophysical package", carried out with the CNES support, showed the need for studying an alternative source of power to solar panels. Developments related to RTG technologies have been restricted for a long time to the United States and Russian industries. However, the exploration of the remote solar system (in the frame of the ESA Cosmic Vision) as well as long duration planetary missions (such as ExoMars Geophysical Package GEP ) exclude de facto the use of solar panels. A possible solution would be to associate to a radioisotope heat source of Russian origin (of Angel type) a thermo-electrical conversion system of European design. A European consortium of laboratories, including LPM, IPG and DLR (WF and RS) was thus constituted, in order to validate by a study the assumptions on the electric subsystem for the preliminary sizing of the geophysical package. The power of this Advanced radio-isotopic power system (ARPS) should be between 3 and 4 W, and the proposed mass limited to about 3 to 4 kg. This study will be undertaken in collaboration between the LPM, IPGP, DLR-WF and DLR-RS. A preliminary iteration of the GEP power subsystem will be presented, and main trade-off will be considered.

  15. Tidal bridge and tidal dwarf candidates in the interacting system Arp194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasov, Anatoly V.; Saburova, Anna S.; Egorov, Oleg V.; Afanasiev, Viktor L.

    2016-11-01

    Arp194 is a system of recently collided galaxies, where the southern galaxy (S) passed through the gaseous disc of the northern galaxy (N) which in turn consists of two close components. This system is of special interest due to the presence of regions of active star formation in the bridge between galaxies, the brightest of which (the region A) has a size of at least 4 kpc. We obtained three spectral slices of the system for different slit positions at the 6-m telescope of SAO RAS. We estimated the radial distribution of line-of-sight velocity and velocity dispersion as well as the intensities of emission lines and oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H). The gas in the bridge is only partially mixed chemically and spatially: we observe the O/H gradient with the galactocentric distances both from S and N galaxies and a high dispersion of O/H in the outskirts of N-galaxy. Velocity dispersion of the emission-line gas is the lowest in the star-forming sites of the bridge and exceeds 50-70 km s-1 in the disturbed region of N-galaxy. Based on the SDSS photometrical data and our kinematical profiles we measured the masses of stellar population and the dynamical masses of individual objects. We confirm that the region A is the gravitationally bound tidal dwarf with the age of 107-108 yr, which is falling on to the parent S-galaxy. There is no evidence of the significant amount of dark matter in this dwarf galaxy.

  16. CO J = 6-5 IN Arp 220: STRONG EFFECTS OF DUST ON HIGH-J CO LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padeli P.; Isaak, Kate; Van der Werf, Paul E-mail: Kate.Isaak@astro.cf.ac.u

    2010-03-10

    We report new single dish CO J = 6-5 line observations for the archetypal Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The J = 6-5 line is found to be faint, with brightness temperature ratios (6-5)/(1-0), (6-5)/(3-2) of R{sub 65/10} = 0.080 +- 0.017 and R{sub 65/32} = 0.082 +- 0.019, suggesting very low excitation conditions that cannot be reconciled with the warm and very dense molecular gas present in one of the most extreme starbursts in the local universe. We find that an optically thick dust continuum, with tau(nu {approx}> 350 GHz) {approx}> 1 for the bulk of the warm dust and gas in Arp 220, submerges this line to an almost black body curve, reducing its flux, and affecting its CO spectral line energy distribution at high frequencies. This also resolves the C{sup +} line deficiency in this object, first observed by Infrared Space Observatory: the near absence of that line is a dust optical depth effect, not a dense photodissociation region phenomenon. Finally, we briefly comment on the possibility of such extreme interstellar medium (ISM) states in other ULIRGs in the distant universe, and their consequences for the diagnostic utility of high frequency molecular and atomic ISM lines in such systems. In the case of Arp 220, we anticipate that the now spaceborne Herschel Space Observatory will find faint high-J CO lines at nu {approx}> 690 GHz that would appear as sub-thermally excited with respect to the low-J ones as a result of the effects of dust absorption.

  17. Fission Yeast Myosin-I, Myo1p, Stimulates Actin Assembly by Arp2/3 Complex and Shares Functions with Wasp

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Lih; Bezanilla, Magdalena; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2000-01-01

    Fission yeast myo1+ encodes a myosin-I with all three tail homology domains (TH1, 2, 3) found in typical long-tailed myosin-Is. Myo1p tail also contains a COOH-terminal acidic region similar to the A-domain of WASp/Scar proteins and other fungal myosin-Is. Our analysis shows that Myo1p and Wsp1p, the fission yeast WASp-like protein, share functions and cooperate in controlling actin assembly. First, Myo1p localizes to cortical patches enriched at tips of growing cells and at sites of cell division. Myo1p patches partially colocalize with actin patches and are dependent on an intact actin cytoskeleton. Second, although deletion of myo1+ is not lethal, Δmyo1 cells have actin cytoskeletal defects, including loss of polarized cell growth, delocalized actin patches, and mating defects. Third, additional disruption of wsp1+ is synthetically lethal, suggesting that these genes may share functions. In mapping the domains of Myo1p tail that share function with Wsp1p, we discovered that a Myo1p construct with just the head and TH1 domains is sufficient for cortical localization and to rescue all Δmyo1 defects. However, it fails to rescue the Δmyo1 Δwsp1 lethality. Additional tail domains, TH2 and TH3, are required to complement the double mutant. Fourth, we show that a recombinant Myo1p tail binds to Arp2/3 complex and activates its actin nucleation activity. PMID:11076964

  18. ARPES lineshapes, coherent to incoherent ratios, and the waterfall self-energy of Bi2212 cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Sun, Zhe; Das, Tanmoy; Balatsky, Alexander; Rotenberg, Eli; Berger, Helmuth; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Aiura, Yoshihiro; Dessau, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    We report a detailed lineshape analysis of ARPES data on Bi2212 in which we separate out the sharp coherent peaks from the higher energy incoherent ``background'' portions, which includes and makes up the famous waterfall regions. We find that the ratio of the incoherent to coherent weights scales quadratically with the peak energy of the coherent portion of the spectra over a very wide energy range. We show that this behavior, including the waterfalls, can be understood with a simple model electron self-energy, giving a new and powerful experimental tool for determining self-energy effects in correlated electron systems.

  19. Investigation of the gravitational interaction between the components of the galaxy pairs Arp 242, CPG 165, and CPG 410

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Gamal B.; Tawfeek, Amira A.; Amin, Magdy Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the effect of interaction between the components of the galaxy pairs Arp 242, CPG 165, and CPG 410 on the symmetry of their morphologies and structures is studied by applying the technique of surface photometry. For each component of each pair we present the isophotal contours, profiles of surface brightness (SB), major-axis position angle (PA), and isophotal center-shift. The present analysis is done using the r- and i-band images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observation. It is found that the position angle and the isophotal center shift are strongly affected by the state of interaction between the components of the pairs.

  20. ARP: Automatic rapid processing for the generation of problem dependent SAS2H/ORIGEN-s cross section libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Hermann, O.W.; Bowman, S.M.; Parks, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, a methodology is described which serves as an alternative to the SAS2H path of the SCALE system to generate cross sections for point-depletion calculations with the ORIGEN-S code. ARP, Automatic Rapid Processing, is an algorithm that allows the generation of cross-section libraries suitable to the ORIGEN-S code by interpolation over pregenerated SAS2H libraries. The interpolations are carried out on the following variables: burnup, enrichment, and water density. The adequacy of the methodology is evaluated by comparing measured and computed spent fuel isotopic compositions for PWR and BWR systems.

  1. Structural and electronic changes in the growth of mercury overlayers on Cu(001) - A helium beam scattering, LEED and ARPES study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidali, G.; Li, W.; Dowben, P. A.; Karimi, M.; Hutchings, C. W.; Lin, J.; Moses, C.; Ila, D.; Dalins, I.

    1990-01-01

    We used ABS, LEED and angle-resolved photo-electron spectroscopy (ARPES) to study bilayer films of Hg on Cu(001). In the surface temperature range of 180 to 330 K, the first Hg layer forms two ordered phases, a c(2x2) (with coverage-0.5 of Cu(001)) and a high density (partially commensurate) c(4x4) (coverage-0.62). ARPES data show that there is little or no dispersion of the 5d band of Hg. ABS data show that this layer is not flat, with in-registry Hg atoms lying about 0.15 below the not-in-registry Hg atoms. From ABS we find that the second layer forms a completely registered c(4x4) phase. From ARPES we obtain that the second layer has an electronic structure, particularly the 5d levels, characteristic of bulk mercury. Preliminary results of calculations of the structure of the bilayer are given.

  2. Panax ginseng Fraction F3 Extracted by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Protects against Oxidative Stress in ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Chi; Koo, Malcolm; Yu, Zer-Ran; Wang, Be-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work, the ethanolic extract of Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer was successively partitioned using supercritical carbon dioxide at pressures in series to yield residue (R), F1, F2, and F3 fractions. Among them, F3 contained the highest deglycosylated ginsenosides and exerted the strongest antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of P. ginseng fractions against cellular oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Viability of adult retinal pigment epithelium-19 (ARPE-19) cells was examined after treatments of different concentrations of fractions followed by exposure to H2O2. Oxidative levels (malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and reactive oxygen species (ROS)) and levels of activity of antioxidant enzymes were assessed. Results showed that F3 could dose-dependently protected ARPE-19 cells against oxidative injury induced by H2O2. F3 at a level of 1 mg/mL could restore the cell death induced by H2O2 of up to 60% and could alleviate the increase in cellular oxidation (MDA, 8-OHdG, and ROS) induced by H2O2. Moreover, F3 could restore the activities of antioxidant enzymes suppressed by H2O2. In conclusion, F3 obtained using supercritical carbon dioxide fractionation could significantly increase the antioxidant capacity of P. ginseng extract. The antioxidant capacity was highly correlated with the concentration of F3. PMID:27754362

  3. DETERMINATION OF THE IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON ARP AND MCU OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Peters, T.; Shehee, T.

    2012-06-04

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). Sorption testing was performed using both MST and modified MST (mMST) in the presence of 5,000 and 10,000 ppm (mass basis) glycolate. 10,000 ppm is the estimated bounding concentration expected in the DWPF recycle stream based on DWPF melter flammable gas model results. The presence of glycolate was found to slow the removal of Sr and Pu by MST, while increasing the removal rate of Np. Results indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. There was no measurable effect on U removal at either glycolate concentration. The slower removal rates for Sr and Pu at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm glycolate could result in lower DF values for these sorbates in ARP based on the current (12 hours) and proposed (8 hours) contact times. For the highest glycolate concentration used in this study, the percentage of Sr removed at 6 hours of contact decreased by 1% and the percentage of Pu removed decreased by nearly 7%. The impact may prove insignificant if the concentration of glycolate that is returned to the tank farm is well below the concentrations tested in this study. The presence of glycolate also decreased the removal rates for all three sorbates (Sr, Pu, and Np) by mMST. Similarly to MST, the results for mMST indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. The presence of glycolate did not change the lack

  4. Effects of resveratrol on ARPE-19 cell proliferation and migration via regulating the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, P21, P27 and p38MAPK/MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Qu, Yi-Xin; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore whether resveratrol (Res) can inhibit human retinal pigment epithelial cell (ARPE-19 cell) proliferation and migration, and to research the molecular mechanisms. METHODS ARPE-19 cells were pretreated with various concentrations at 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 300 µmol/L of Res, and with 0 µmol/L Res as the control for 24, 48 and 72h. The cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration were measured with cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry, and wound-healing and Transwell assays, respectively. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), P21 and P27, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) was identified by Western blot. RESULTS Cell proliferation was effectively inhibited by Res (P<0.05). When pretreated with Res, cells arrested in S-phase increased remarkably (P<0.05), but the apoptosis ratios showed no significant difference between the treatment and control groups (P>0.05). Cell migration was suppressed by Res both in wound-healing assay and Transwell migration assay (P<0.05). Decreases of PCNA, MMP-9 and p38MAPK, as well as increases of P21 and P27 were detected by Western blot (P<0.05). CONCLUSION Res can inhibit APRE-19 cell proliferation and migration in a concentration-dependent manner with up-regulation of the expression of P21 and P27, and down-regulation of PCNA, MMP-9 and p38MAPK. PMID:28003970

  5. Using surface-bound rubidium ions for protein phasing.

    PubMed

    Korolev, S; Dementieva, I; Sanishvili, R; Minor, W; Otwinowski, Z; Joachimiak, A

    2001-07-01

    Rubidium is a monovalent metal that can be used as a counterion in protein solutions. X-ray anomalous scattering from rubidium ions bound to the protein surface was used for phasing of the crystal structure of the hsp60 apical domain from Thermus thermophilus. Multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data were collected from a crystal obtained from a solution containing 0.2 M rubidium salt. One molecule of protein (147 amino acids) binds one well ordered and one poorly ordered Rb atom. Phases calculated with the program SHARP were sufficient for automatic tracing and side-chain assignment using the program ARP/wARP. The data show that bound rubidium ions can be used to determine protein structures and to study the interaction of monovalent metal ions with proteins and other macromolecules.

  6. Spin-Label CW Microwave Power Saturation and Rapid Passage with Triangular Non-Adiabatic Rapid Sweep (NARS) and Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell, A.W., Camenisch, T.G., Ratke, J.J. Sidabras, J.W., Hyde, J.S., 2011 as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions, and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra. In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10−3 to 10−7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  7. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  8. Determination of the Impact of Glycolate on ARP and MCU Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.; Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Shehee, T. C.; Washington, A. L.

    2012-12-13

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal, phase separation, or coalescer performance at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). Sorption testing was performed using both MST and modified MST (mMST) in the presence of 5000 and 10,000 ppm (mass basis) glycolate. 10,000 ppm is the estimated bounding concentration expected in the DWPF recycle stream based on DWPF melter flammable gas model results. The presence of glycolate was found to slow the removal of Sr and Pu by MST, while increasing the removal rate of Np. Results indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. There was no measurable effect on U removal at either glycolate concentration. The slower removal rates for Sr and Pu at 5000 and 10,000 ppm glycolate could result in lower DF values for these sorbates in ARP based on the current (12 hours) and proposed (8 hours) contact times. For the highest glycolate concentration used in this study, the percentage of Sr removed at 6 hours of contact decreased by 1% and the percentage of Pu removed decreased by nearly 7%. The impact may prove insignificant if the concentration of glycolate that is returned to the tank farm is well below the concentrations tested in this study. The presence of glycolate also decreased the removal rates for all three sorbates (Sr, Pu, and Np) by mMST. Similar to MST, the results for mMST indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. The

  9. An evaluation of automated model-building procedures for protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Badger, John

    2003-05-01

    The computer programs ARP/wARP, MAID and RESOLVE are designed to build protein structures into experimentally phased electron-density maps without any user intervention, requiring only diffraction data and sequence information. However, the MAID and RESOLVE systems, which seek to extend the range of automated model-building to approximately 3 A resolution, have yet to receive significant testing outside the small numbers of data sets used in their development. Since these two systems employ a large number of scoring functions and decision-making heuristics, additional tests are required to establish their usefulness to the crystallographic community. To independently evaluate these programs, their performance was tested using a database containing 41 experimentally phased maps between 1.3 and 2.9 A resolution from a diverse set of protein structures. At resolutions higher than 2.3 A the most successful program was ARP/wARP 6.0, which accurately built an average of 90% of the main chain. This system builds somewhat larger fractions of the model than the previous version ARP/wARP 5.1, which accurately built an average of 87% of the main chain. Although not specifically designed for model building into high-resolution maps, MAID and RESOLVE were also quite successful in this resolution regime, typically building approximately 80% of the main chain. At 2.3-2.7 A resolution the MAID and RESOLVE programs automatically built approximately 75% of the main-chain atoms in the protein structures used in these tests, which would significantly accelerate the model-building process. Data sets at lower resolution proved more problematic for these programs, although many of the secondary-structure elements were correctly identified and fitted.

  10. Constraining Gamma-Ray Emission from Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Fermi-LAT; Tentative Detection of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-05-01

    Star-forming galaxies produce gamma-rays primarily via pion production, resulting from inelastic collisions between cosmic-ray protons and the interstellar medium (ISM). The dense ISM and high star formation rates of luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) imply that they should be strong gamma-ray emitters, but so far only two LIRGs have been detected. Theoretical models for their emission depend on the unknown fraction of cosmic-ray protons that escape these galaxies before interacting. We analyze Fermi-LAT data for 82 of the brightest Infrared Astronomical Satellite LIRGs and ULIRGs. We examine each system individually and carry out a stacking analysis to constrain their gamma-ray fluxes. We report the detection of the nearest ULIRG Arp 220 (˜4.6σ). We observe a gamma-ray flux (0.8-100 GeV) of 2.4 × 10-10 phot cm-2 s-1 with a photon index of 2.23 (8.2 × 1041 erg s-1 at 77 Mpc). We also derive upper limits (ULs) for the stacked LIRGs and ULIRGs. The gamma-ray luminosity of Arp 220 and the stacked ULs agree with calorimetric predictions for dense star-forming galaxies. With the detection of Arp 220, we extend the gamma-ray-IR luminosity correlation to the high-luminosity regime with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.25× {log}{L}8-1000μ {{m}}+26.7 as well as the gamma-ray-radio continuum luminosity correlation with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.22× {log}{L}1.4{GHz}+13.3. The current survey of Fermi-LAT is on the verge of detecting more LIRGs/ULIRGs in the local universe, and we expect even more detections with deeper Fermi-LAT observations or the next generation of gamma-ray detectors.

  11. Differential toxic effect of dissolved triamcinolone and its crystalline deposits on cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE19) cells.

    PubMed

    Szurman, Peter; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Spitzer, Martin S; Jaissle, Gesine B; Decker, Patrice; Grisanti, Salvatore; Henke-Fahle, Sigrid; Aisenbrey, Sabine; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and cytotoxic properties of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) on human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE19) and the role of epicellular crystalline deposits. Monolayer cultures of ARPE19 cells were used. Purified or unpurified crystalline TA suspension (0.01-1.0 mg/ml) or the vehicle alone (benzyl alcohol, 0.025%-0.00025%), diluted in culture medium, were added to the cells that were either grown on cell culture dishes covered by a protecting membrane filter insert or without a filter. After 1, 3, 5 and 7 days mitochondrial activity was measured using the MTT assay and the morphology assessed microscopically. Cellular proliferative activity was monitored by BrdU-incorporation into cellular DNA. For cytotoxicity assays ARPE19 cells were grown to confluence and then cultured in a serum-deficient medium to ensure a static milieu. Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide co-staining was performed and analyzed by flow cytometry. Exposure to TA without direct cellular contact showed a moderate antiproliferative activity resulting in a dose-dependent suppression of DNA synthesis (maximum 42.7%), but not a cytotoxic effect. In contrast, adherent deposits of crystalline TA particles on top of the cell layer caused a rapid-progressive and dose-dependent cell death preceded by an early phosphatidylserine externalization to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. Within a healthy, confluent cell layer the number of viable cells decreased by 14.2, 20.8 and 68.8%, respectively, after one day of direct exposure. Exposure to the vehicle alone caused only a slight growth inhibitory effect in a proliferating cell layer, but early signs of cell death were detected even at the lowest concentration tested. In conclusion, the effect of the vehicle is less pronounced than formerly assumed, but not negligible, thus indicating a beneficial effect of purification. While non-adherent TA, if purified, appears to be safe in clinically

  12. THE FIRST DETECTION OF GeV EMISSION FROM AN ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY: Arp 220 AS SEEN WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang-Kun; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2016-04-20

    Cosmic rays (CRs) in starburst galaxies produce high-energy gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. Arp 220 is the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxy that has star formation at extreme levels, so it has long been predicted to emit high-energy gamma-rays. However, no evidence of gamma-ray emission was found despite intense search efforts. Here we report the discovery of high-energy gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from Arp 220 at a confidence level of ∼6.3σ using 7.5 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. The gamma-ray emission shows no significant variability over the observation period and it is consistent with the quasi-linear scaling relation between the gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, suggesting that these gamma-rays arise from CR interactions. As the high-density medium of Arp 220 makes it an ideal CR calorimeter, the gamma-ray luminosity can be used to measure the efficiency of powering CRs by supernova (SN) remnants given a known supernova rate in Arp 220. We find that this efficiency is about 4.2 ± 2.6% for CRs above 1 GeV.

  13. Soft-X-ray ARPES facility at the ADRESS beamline of the SLS: concepts, technical realisation and scientific applications.

    PubMed

    Strocov, V N; Wang, X; Shi, M; Kobayashi, M; Krempasky, J; Hess, C; Schmitt, T; Patthey, L

    2014-01-01

    Soft-X-ray angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) with photon energies around 1 keV combines the momentum space resolution with increasing probing depth. The concepts and technical realisation of the new soft-X-ray ARPES endstation at the ADRESS beamline of SLS are described. The experimental geometry of the endstation is characterized by grazing X-ray incidence on the sample to increase the photoyield and vertical orientation of the measurement plane. The vacuum chambers adopt a radial layout allowing most efficient sample transfer. High accuracy of the angular resolution is ensured by alignment strategies focused on precise matching of the X-ray beam and optical axis of the analyzer. The high photon flux of up to 10(13) photons s(-1) (0.01% bandwidth)(-1) delivered by the beamline combined with the optimized experimental geometry break through the dramatic loss of the valence band photoexcitation cross section at soft-X-ray energies. ARPES images with energy resolution up to a few tens of meV are typically acquired on the time scale of minutes. A few application examples illustrate the power of our advanced soft-X-ray ARPES instrumentation to explore the electronic structure of bulk crystals with resolution in three-dimensional momentum, access buried heterostructures and study elemental composition of the valence states using resonant excitation.

  14. ARPES investigation on the surface vs bulk electronic structures of correlated topological insulators YbB6 and other rare earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Matt, C. E.; Pomjakushina, E.; Dil, J. H.; Landolt, G.; Ma, J. Z.; Shi, X.; Dhaka, R. S.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Rogalev, V.; Strocov, V.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; Conder, K.; Mesot, J.; Ding, H.; Shi, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Using ARPES performed in wide photon energy range we systematically studied the bulk and surface electronic structures of a topological mixed- valence insulator candidate, YbB6. The bulk B-2p states are probed with bulk-sensitive soft X-ray ARPES, exhibiting strong three-dimensionality with the band top locating 80 meV below the EF at the X point. The measured bulk Yb-4f states are located at 1 and 2.3 eV below EF, which hybridize with the dispersive B-2p states. The bulk band structures obtained by experiments are substantially different from the first principle calculations, but it can be better described by adding a correlation parameter U = 7 eV, indicating YbB6 is a correlated system. Using surface-sensitive VUV ARPES, we revealed two-dimensional surface states which form three electron-like FSs with Dirac-cone-like dispersions. The odd number of surface FSs gives the first indication that the surface states are topological non-trivial. The spin-resolved ARPES measurements provide further evidence that these surface states are spin polarized with spin locked to the crystal momentum. Recent results on the TI phase in other rare earth hexaborides will also be shown.

  15. Mechanism of riboflavin uptake by cultured human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells: possible regulation by an intracellular Ca2+-calmodulin-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Said, Hamid M; Wang, Shuling; Ma, Thomas Y

    2005-07-15

    In mammalian cells (including those of the ocular system), the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) assumes an essential role in a variety of metabolic reactions and is critical for normal cellular functions, growth and development. Cells of the human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) play an important role in providing a sufficient supply of RF to the retina, but nothing is known about the mechanism of the vitamin uptake by these cells and its regulation. Our aim in the present study was to address this issue using the hRPE ARPE-19 cells as the retinal epithelial model. Our results show RF uptake in the hRPE to be: (1) energy and temperature dependent and occurring without metabolic alteration in the transported substrate, (2) pH but not Na+ dependent, (3) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 80 +/- 14 nM, (4) trans-stimulated by unlabelled RF and its structural analogue lumiflavine, (5) cis-inhibited by the RF structural analogues lumiflavine and lumichrome but not by unrelated compounds, and (6) inhibited by the anion transport inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS) as well as by the Na+ -H+ exchange inhibitor amiloride and the sulfhydryl group inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (p-CMPS). Maintaining the hRPE cells in a RF-deficient medium led to a specific and significant up-regulation in RF uptake which was mediated via changes in the number and affinity of the RF uptake carriers. While modulating the activities of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)-, protein kinase C (PKC)-, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK)-, and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pathways were found to have no role in regulating RF uptake, a role for the Ca2+ -calmodulin-mediated pathway was observed. These studies demonstrate for the first time the involvement of a specialized carrier-mediated mechanism for RF uptake by hRPE cells and show that the process is

  16. VI CCD Photometry Of The Old Open Clusters Arp-madore 2, Tombaugh 2 And Saurer 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Randy L.

    2007-05-01

    Faint-magnitude VI CCD photometry has been obtained for the clusters Arp-Madore 2, Tombaugh 2 and Saurer 1 with the DuPont 2.5-meter telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. These three clusters are among a handful that have been proposed to be associated with the so-called “Galactic Anticenter Stellar Structure” (GASS). Using the Padova isochrones (Girardi et al. 2000, 2002), we have self-consistently determined the ages, distances and Galactocentric positions of these clusters. In this contribution the newly determined parameters will be discussed, as will the potential association of the clusters with the “GASS”. This work is supported, in part, by a Research and Creative Activities award from the California State University, Sacramento and a grant (AST-0652742) from the National Science Foundation.

  17. Electronic structure of transferred graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures with nonzero stacking angles by nano-ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Eryin; Chen, Guorui; Wan, Guoliang; Lu, Xiaobo; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Guangyu; Asensio, Maria C.; Zhang, Yuanbo; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-11-01

    In van der Waals heterostructures, the periodic potential from the Moiré superlattice can be used as a control knob to modulate the electronic structure of the constituent materials. Here we present a nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of transferred graphene/h-BN heterostructures with two different stacking angles of 2.4° and 4.3° respectively. Our measurements reveal six replicas of graphene Dirac cones at the superlattice Brillouin zone (SBZ) centers. The size of the SBZ and its relative rotation angle to the graphene BZ are in good agreement with Moiré superlattice period extracted from atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Comparison to the epitaxial graphene/h-BN with 0° stacking angles suggests that the interaction between graphene and h-BN decreases with increasing stacking angle.

  18. Azimuthal and Kinematic Segregation of Neutral and Molecular Gas in Arp 118: The Yin-Yang Galaxy NGC 1144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Charmandaris, V.; Gao, Yu; Jarrett, Tom; Bransford, M. A.

    2003-03-01

    We present new high-resolution H I observations of the disk of the collisional infrared luminous (LIR=2.2×1011Lsolar) galaxy NGC 1144, which reveal an apparent large-scale azimuthal and kinematic segregation of neutral hydrogen relative to the molecular gas distribution. Even among violently collisional galaxies, the CO/H I asymmetry in NGC 1144 is unusual, both in the inner regions and in the outer disk. We suggest that we are observing Arp 118 at a special moment, shortly after a high-speed collision between NGC 1144 and its elliptical companion NGC 1143. H I emission with an average molecular fraction fmol<0.5 is observed on one side (northwest) of the rotating disk of NGC 1144, while the other side (southeast) is dominated by dense molecular complexes in which fmol is almost unity. The interface region between the warm- and cool-cloud dominated regions lies on a deep spiral-like dust lane that we identify as a shock wave responsible for the relative shift in the dominance of H I and H2 gas. A strong shock being fed by diffuse H I clouds with unusually large (>400 km s-1) rotational velocities can explain (1) the CO/H I asymmetries, (2) a large velocity jump (185 km s-1) across the arm as measured by H I absorption against a radio bright continuum source that straddles the arm, and (3) the asymmetric distribution of star formation and off-nuclear molecular gas resulting from likely streaming motions associated with the strong shock. The new results provide for the first time a coherent picture of Arp 118's many peculiarities and underline the potentially complex changes in the gas phase that can accompany large gravitational perturbations of gas-rich galaxies.

  19. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: VELOCITY-DELAY MAPS FROM THE MAXIMUM-ENTROPY METHOD FOR Arp 151

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Horne, Keith; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Treu, Tommaso; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Minezaki, Takeo; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2010-09-01

    We present velocity-delay maps for optical H I, He I, and He II recombination lines in Arp 151, recovered by fitting a reverberation model to spectrophotometric monitoring data using the maximum-entropy method. H I response is detected over the range 0-15 days, with the response confined within the virial envelope. The Balmer-line maps have similar morphologies but exhibit radial stratification, with progressively longer delays for H{gamma} to H{beta} to H{alpha}. The He I and He II response is confined within 1-2 days. There is a deficit of prompt response in the Balmer-line cores but strong prompt response in the red wings. Comparison with simple models identifies two classes that reproduce these features: free-falling gas and a half-illuminated disk with a hot spot at small radius on the receding lune. Symmetrically illuminated models with gas orbiting in an inclined disk or an isotropic distribution of randomly inclined circular orbits can reproduce the virial structure but not the observed asymmetry. Radial outflows are also largely ruled out by the observed asymmetry. A warped-disk geometry provides a physically plausible mechanism for the asymmetric illumination and hot spot features. Simple estimates show that a disk in the broad-line region of Arp 151 could be unstable to warping induced by radiation pressure. Our results demonstrate the potential power of detailed modeling combined with monitoring campaigns at higher cadence to characterize the gas kinematics and physical processes that give rise to the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of derivatization reagents for different types of protein-bound carbonyl groups.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2013-09-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) of 'carbonylated proteins' often involves derivatization of reactive carbonyl groups to facilitate their enrichment, identification and quantification. Among the many reported reagents, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), biotin hydrazide (BHZ) and O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl) hydroxylamine (ARP) are the most frequently used. Despite their common use in carbonylation research, their reactivity towards protein-bound carbonyls has not been quantitatively evaluated in detail, to the best of our knowledge. Thus we studied the reactivity and specificity of these reagents towards different classes of reactive carbonyl groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones and lactams), each being represented by a synthetic peptide carrying an accordingly modified residue. All three tagging reagents were selective for aliphatic aldehydes and ketones. Lactams and carbonyl-containing tryptophan oxidation products, however, were labelled only at low levels or not at all. Whereas DNPH derivatization was efficient under the published standard conditions, the derivatization conditions for BHZ and ARP had to be altered. Acidic conditions provided quantitative labelling yields for ARP. Peptides derivatized with DNPH, BHZ and ARP fragmented efficiently in tandem mass spectrometry, when the experimental conditions were chosen carefully for each reagent. Importantly, the tested carbonylated peptides did not cross-react with amino groups in other proteins present during sample preparations or enzymatic digestion. Thus, it appears favourable to digest proteins first and then derivatise the reactive carbonyl groups more efficiently at the peptide level under acidic conditions. The carbonylated model peptides used in this study might be valid internal standards for carbonylation proteomics.

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-14

    The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective in

  2. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  3. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  4. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  5. Inflowing gas onto a compact obscured nucleus in Arp 299A. Herschel spectroscopic studies of H2O and OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falstad, N.; González-Alfonso, E.; Aalto, S.; Fischer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We probe the physical conditions in the core of Arp 299A and try to put constraints on the nature of its nuclear power source. Methods: We used Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared and submillimeter observations of H2O and OH rotational lines in Arp 299A to create a multi-component model of the galaxy. In doing this, we employed a spherically symmetric radiative transfer code. Results: Nine H2O lines in absorption and eight in emission, as well as four OH doublets in absorption and one in emission, are detected in Arp 299A. No lines of the 18O isotopologues, which have been seen in compact obscured nuclei of other galaxies, are detected. The absorption in the ground state OH 2Π3/2-2Π3/2(5/2)+-(3/2)- doublet at 119 μm is found redshifted by 175 km s-1 compared with other OH and H2O lines, suggesting a low excitation inflow. We find that at least two components are required in order to account for the excited molecular line spectrum. The inner component has a radius of 20-25 pc, a very high infrared surface brightness (≳3 × 1013L⊙kpc-2), warm dust (Td > 90 K), and a large H2 column density (NH2 > 1024 cm-2). The modeling also indicates high nuclear H2O (1-5 × 10-6) and OH (0.5-5 × 10-5) abundances relative to H nuclei. The outer component is larger (50-100 pc) with slightly cooler dust (70-90 K) and molecular abundances that are approximately one order of magnitude lower. In addition to the two components that account for the excited OH and H2O lines, we require a much more extended inflowing component to account for the OH 2Π3/2-2Π3/2(5/2)+-(3/2)- doublet at 119 μm. Conclusions: The Compton-thick nature of the core makes it difficult to determine the nature of the buried power source, but the high surface brightness indicates that it is an active galactic nucleus and/or a dense nuclear starburst. Our results are consistent with a composite source. The high OH/H2O ratio in the nucleus indicates that ion-neutral chemistry induced by X-rays or

  6. COMMIX-1AR/P: A three-dimensional transient single-phase computer program for thermal hydraulic analysis of single and multicomponent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, P.L.; Blomquist, R.N.; Gelbard, E.M.

    1992-09-01

    The COMMIX-1AR/P computer program is designed for analyzing the steady-state and transient aspects of single-phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three spatial dimensions. This version is an extension of the modeling in COMMIX-1A to include multiple fluids in physically separate regions of the computational domain, modeling descriptions for pumps, radiation heat transfer between surfaces of the solids which are embedded in or surround the fluid, a k-[var epsilon] model for fluid turbulence, and improved numerical techniques. The porous-medium formulation in COMMIX allows the program to be applied to a wide range of problems involving both simple and complex geometrical arrangements. The input preparation and execution procedures are presented for the COMMIX-1AR/P program and several postprocessor programs which produce graphical displays of the calculated results.

  7. Temperature-Induced Electronic Structure Evolution of ZrTe5 Revealed by High resolution & Laser Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chenlu; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Genfu; Yu, Li; He, Shaolong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    The transition metal pentatellurides ZrTe5 have attracted consideration attention since the 70s, due to the unusual transport properties like resistivity peak at ~140K and the sign change of the Hall coefficient and thermopower. The origin of the most peculiar resistivity peak remains controversial. In this talk we will present high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) study on the Fermi surface and band structure of ZrTe5, by using our high resolution ARPES system equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer. Upon cooling down, we found a gradual transition from hole-like band into electron-like band around the Brillouin zone center. Such an electron state transition forms the underlying physics for the abnormal transport properties. We will also comment on the possibility of a Dirac semimetal in ZrTe5.

  8. ARPES study of YBa2Cu3O7-δ from the over to the underdoped regime by in situ K evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, G.; Fournier, David; Hossain, M. A.; Mottershead, J. D. F.; McCheyney, J. L.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, R.; Sawatzky, G. A.; Elfimov, I. S.; Bonn, D. A.; Damascelli, A.

    2009-03-01

    Unravelling the nature of the electronic excitations in the underdoped regime of the Cuprates is a key element for understanding the fundamental mechanism behind HTSC. The YBCO phase diagram has been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) using a new in situ electron doping approach based on controlled potassium deposition [1] onto as-cleaved samples. All of the compounds studied (δ=0,0.5,0.66) exhibit heavily over-doped nature with well defined LDA-like Fermi surfaces and evolve toward disconnected Fermi arcs in the underdoped regime. These results are consistent with previous ARPES measurement on the HTSCs and in contrast with the quantum oscillations observations [2]. [4pt] [1] M. A. Hossain et al., Nat. Phys., 4:527, 2008[0pt] [2] N. Doiron et al., Nature, 447:565, 2007

  9. What lurks in ULIRGs?—Probing the chemistry and excitation of molecular gas in the nuclei of Arp 220 and NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, Nick

    2017-02-01

    We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 in the 3 mm band transitions of CO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, and CS at 0.″5–0.″8 resolution using CARMA. Our data set images all these lines at similar resolutions and high sensitivity, and can be used to derive line ratios of faint high excitation lines. In both the nuclei of Arp 220, the HCN/HNC ratios suggest chemistry of X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs)—a likely signature of an active galactic nucleus. In NGC 6240, there is no evidence of XDR type chemistry, but there the bulk of the molecular gas is concentrated between the nuclei rather than on them. We calculated molecular H2 densities from excitation analysis of each of the molecular species. It appears that the abundances of HNC and HCO+ in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies may be significantly different from those in galactic molecular clouds. The derived H2 volume densities are ∼5 × 104 cm‑3 in the Arp 220 nuclei and ∼104 cm‑3 in NGC 6240.

  10. Squamosamide derivative FLZ inhibits TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression via down-regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting-Ting; Liang, Ze-Yu; Chen, Song

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) resulting from chronic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It has been reported that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) could induce intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in RPE cells. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, Annona glabra, has displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity. However, the effects of FLZ on TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPE cells remain unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of FLZ on TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPE cells. We found that FLZ prevented TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and the ability of monocytes to adhere to ARPE-19 cells induced by TNF-α. Furthermore, FLZ inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB p65 expression, as well as phosphorylation of IκBα in ARPE-19 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that FLZ inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression through blocking NF-κB signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells. Thus, FLZ could be used for designing novel therapeutic agents against AMD. PMID:26464656

  11. Squamosamide derivative FLZ inhibits TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression via down-regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ting-Ting; Liang, Ze-Yu; Chen, Song

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) resulting from chronic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It has been reported that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) could induce intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in RPE cells. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, Annona glabra, has displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity. However, the effects of FLZ on TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPE cells remain unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of FLZ on TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPE cells. We found that FLZ prevented TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and the ability of monocytes to adhere to ARPE-19 cells induced by TNF-α. Furthermore, FLZ inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB p65 expression, as well as phosphorylation of IκBα in ARPE-19 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that FLZ inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression through blocking NF-κB signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells. Thus, FLZ could be used for designing novel therapeutic agents against AMD.

  12. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Arc3 is a conserved subunit of the Arp2/3 complex required for polarity, actin organization, and endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Rodrigo; Suo, Jinfeng; Young, Evelin; Chang, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the Schizosaccharomyces pombe arc3 gene, whose product shares sequence homology with that of the budding yeast ARC18 and human ARPC3/p21 subunits of the Arp2/3 complex. Our data showed that Arc3p co-localizes with F-actin patches at the cell ends, but not with F-actin cables or the equatorial actin ring, and binds other subunits of the Arp2/3 complex. Gene deletion analysis showed that arc3 is essential for viability. When arc3 expression was repressed, F-actin patches became dispersed throughout the cell with greatly reduced mobility. Furthermore in arc3-repressed cells, endocytosis was also inhibited. Human ARPC3 rescued the viability of the S. pombe arc3 null mutant; in addition, ARPC3 also localizes to F-actin patches in human cells. These data suggest that Arc3p is an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the Arp2/3 complex required for proper F-actin organization and efficient endocytosis. PMID:21449051

  13. High harmonic generation based time resolved ARPES at 30 eV with 50 meV energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Timm; Sie, Edbert J.; Mahmood, Fahad; Gedik, Nuh

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a leading technique in identifying equilibrium properties of complex electronic systems as well as their correlated dynamics. By using femtosecond high harmonic generation (HHG) pulses, this technique can be extended to monitor ultrafast changes in the electronic structure in response to an optical excitation. However, the broad bandwidth of the HHG pulses has been a major experimental limitation. In this contribution, we combine the HHG source with an off-axis Czerny-Turner XUV monochromator and a three-dimensional ``ARTOF'' photoelectron detector to achieve an unrivaled overall energy resolution of 50 meV in multiple harmonic energies. Moreover, the use of a stack of different gratings enables us to fine control both the photon energy and time vs. energy resolution to its particular needs. The performance of our setup is demonstrated by studies on the transition metal dichalcogenide IrTe2 which undergoes a first-order structural transition and accompanied reconstruction of the band structure upon cooling without the characteristic opening of an energy gap.

  14. Quantifying electronic correlation strength in a complex oxide: A combined DMFT and ARPES study of LaNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowadnick, E. A.; Ruf, J. P.; Park, H.; King, P. D. C.; Schlom, D. G.; Shen, K. M.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The electronic correlation strength is a basic quantity that characterizes the physical properties of materials such as transition metal oxides. Determining correlation strengths requires both precise definitions and a careful comparison between experiment and theory. In this paper, we define the correlation strength via the magnitude of the electron self-energy near the Fermi level. For the case of LaNiO3, we obtain both the experimental and theoretical mass enhancements m⊙/m by considering high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and density functional + dynamical mean field theory (DFT + DMFT) calculations. We use valence-band photoemission data to constrain the free parameters in the theory and demonstrate a quantitative agreement between the experiment and theory when both the realistic crystal structure and strong electronic correlations are taken into account. In addition, by considering DFT + DMFT calculations on epitaxially strained LaNiO3, we find a strain-induced evolution of m⊙/m in qualitative agreement with trends derived from optics experiments. These results provide a benchmark for the accuracy of the DFT + DMFT theoretical approach, and can serve as a test case when considering other complex materials. By establishing the level of accuracy of the theory, this work also will enable better quantitative predictions when engineering new emergent properties in nickelate heterostructures.

  15. ARPES view on surface and bulk hybridization phenomena in the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice CeRh2Si2

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S.; Generalov, A.; Güttler, M.; Kushwaha, P.; Chikina, A.; Kummer, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Caroca-Canales, N.; Geibel, C.; Danzenbächer, S.; Kucherenko, Yu.; Laubschat, C.; Allen, J. W.; Vyalikh, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The hybridization between localized 4f electrons and itinerant electrons in rare-earth-based materials gives rise to their exotic properties like valence fluctuations, Kondo behaviour, heavy-fermions, or unconventional superconductivity. Here we present an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of the Kondo lattice antiferromagnet CeRh2Si2, where the surface and bulk Ce-4f spectral responses were clearly resolved. The pronounced 4f 0 peak seen for the Ce terminated surface gets strongly suppressed in the bulk Ce-4f spectra taken from a Si-terminated crystal due to much larger f-d hybridization. Most interestingly, the bulk Ce-4f spectra reveal a fine structure near the Fermi edge reflecting the crystal electric field splitting of the bulk magnetic 4f 15/2 state. This structure presents a clear dispersion upon crossing valence states, providing direct evidence of f-d hybridization. Our findings give precise insight into f-d hybridization penomena and highlight their importance in the antiferromagnetic phases of Kondo lattices. PMID:26987899

  16. Subarcsecond international LOFAR radio images of Arp 220 at 150 MHz. A kpc-scale star forming disk surrounding nuclei with shocked outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenius, E.; Conway, J. E.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Aalto, S.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.; König, S.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Deller, A. T.; Moldón, J.; Gallagher, J. S.; Yoast-Hull, T. M.; Horellou, C.; Morabito, L. K.; Alberdi, A.; Jackson, N.; Beswick, R.; Carozzi, T. D.; Wucknitz, O.; Ramírez-Olivencia, N.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Arp 220 is the prototypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG). Despite extensive studies, the structure at MHz-frequencies has remained unknown because of limits in spatial resolution. Aims: This work aims to constrain the flux and shape of radio emission from Arp 220 at MHz frequencies. Methods: We analyse new observations with the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope, and archival data from the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We model the spatially resolved radio spectrum of Arp 220 from 150 MHz to 33 GHz. Results: We present an image of Arp 220 at 150 MHz with resolution 0.̋65 × 0.̋35, sensitivity 0.15 mJy beam-1, and integrated flux density 394 ± 59 mJy. More than 80% of the detected flux comes from extended (6''≈ 2.2 kpc) steep spectrum (α = -0.7) emission, likely from star formation in the molecular disk surrounding the two nuclei. We find elongated features extending 0.3'' (110 pc) and 0.9'' (330 pc) from the eastern and western nucleus respectively, which we interpret as evidence for outflows. The extent of radio emission requires acceleration of cosmic rays far outside the nuclei. We find that a simple three component model can explain most of the observed radio spectrum of the galaxy. When accounting for absorption at 1.4 GHz, Arp 220 follows the FIR/radio correlation with q = 2.36, and we estimate a star formation rate of 220 M⊙ yr-1. We derive thermal fractions at 1 GHz of less than 1% for the nuclei, which indicates that a major part of the UV-photons are absorbed by dust. Conclusions: International LOFAR observations shows great promise to detect steep spectrum outflows and probe regions of thermal absorption. However, in LIRGs the emission detected at 150 MHz does not necessarily come from the main regions of star formation. This implies that high spatial resolution is crucial for accurate estimates of star formation rates for such galaxies

  17. An Operational Configuration of the ARPS Data Analysis System to Initialize WRF in the NM'S Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan; Blottman, Pete; Hoeth, Brian; Oram, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is the next generation community mesoscale model designed to enhance collaboration between the research and operational sectors. The NM'S as a whole has begun a transition toward WRF as the mesoscale model of choice to use as a tool in making local forecasts. Currently, both the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) are running the Advanced Regional Prediction System (AIRPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) every 15 minutes over the Florida peninsula to produce high-resolution diagnostics supporting their daily operations. In addition, the NWS MLB and SMG have used ADAS to provide initial conditions for short-range forecasts from the ARPS numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. Both NM'S MLB and SMG have derived great benefit from the maturity of ADAS, and would like to use ADAS for providing initial conditions to WRF. In order to assist in this WRF transition effort, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to configure and implement an operational version of WRF that uses output from ADAS for the model initial conditions. Both agencies asked the AMU to develop a framework that allows the ADAS initial conditions to be incorporated into the WRF Environmental Modeling System (EMS) software. Developed by the NM'S Science Operations Officer (S00) Science and Training Resource Center (STRC), the EMS is a complete, full physics, NWP package that incorporates dynamical cores from both the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction's Non-Hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) into a single end-to-end forecasting system. The EMS performs nearly all pre- and postprocessing and can be run automatically to obtain external grid data for WRF boundary conditions, run the model, and convert the data into a format that can be readily viewed within the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

  18. Morphology and Kinematics of Warm Molecular Gas in the Nuclear Region of Arp 220 as Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Wilson, Christine D.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Spinoglio, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle-0 observations of the CO J = 6-5 line in the advanced galaxy merger Arp 220. This line traces warm molecular gas, which dominates the total CO luminosity. The CO emission from the two nuclei is well resolved by the 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 39× 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 22 beam and the exceptional sensitivity and spatial/spectral resolution reveal new complex features in the morphology and kinematics of the warm gas. The line profiles are asymmetric between the red and blue sides of the nuclear disks and the peak of the line emission is offset from the peak of the continuum emission in both nuclei by about 100 pc in the same direction. CO self-absorption is detected at the centers of both nuclei but it is much deeper in the eastern nucleus. We also clearly detect strong, highly redshifted CO absorption located near the southwest side of each nucleus. For the eastern nucleus, we reproduce the major line profile features with a simple kinematic model of a highly turbulent, rotating disk with a substantial line center optical depth and a large gradient in the excitation temperature. The red/blue asymmetries and line-to-continuum offset are likely produced by absorption of the blue (SW) sides of the two nuclei by blueshifted, foreground molecular gas; the mass of the absorber is comparable to the nuclear warm gas mass (˜{{10}8} {{M}⊙ }). We measure an unusually high {{L}CO}/{{L}FIR} ratio in the eastern nucleus, suggesting there is an additional energy source, such as mechanical energy from shocks, present in this nucleus.

  19. Secretory proteins characteristic of environmental changes in cellular signal transduction: Expression in oral fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Burke, J. C.; Sivakumar, T. P.; Hand, A. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Past studies have shown that both hypo- and hyper-gravity have significant consequences on a variety of tissues and organ systems. It is not known if the effects of environmental stimuli such as altered gravity are beneficial or detrimental, and if the effects can be prevented or reversed. Animal experiments from the Space Lab and Cosmos missions indicate that events that are mediated by cyclic AMP, such as cellular responses to catecholamine and peptide hormone action, are significantly altered in a number of tissues as a consequence of space flight. A secretory cyclic AMP-receptor protein (cARP), is present in saliva, and can serve as an indicator of individual responses to physiologic and environmental stress. Animal experiments have shown that the hypergravity component of space flight is a significant stress factor. In humans, cARP levels in each individual are constant under normal conditions, but elevated after acute stress. Additionally, the levels of cARP in secreted saliva can be compared to those in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), which reflects the protein composition of serum. The ratio of cARP in saliva to that in GCF can be used as a measure of basal compared to hyper-or hypo-gravity values. An ultimate goal is to test hyper and zero G responses in human saliva to determine if cARP is a suitable index of acute and chronic stress. A miniaturized test kit for saliva collection has been designed. Samples can be collected and stored till analyses are carried out that will distinguish the effects of increased gravity from those of one and zero G. Such tests can serve as an individualized monitoring system for physiologic responses either in space or on earth. .

  20. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  1. ARPES study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 ( R=Y , La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, and Dy)

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Brouet, Veronique; Yang, Wanli; Zhou, Xingjiang; Hussain, Zahid; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, R.

    2008-01-16

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe3 family, which sets this system as an ideal"textbook" example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDWinstabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe3 is that theband structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tinorbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDWinteraction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n (EF), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  2. Development and Deployment of an Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) Compliant Measurement System for nvPM Certification Measurements of Aircraft Engines - Current Status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitefield, P. D.; Hagen, D. E.; Lobo, P.; Miake-Lye, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Aircraft Exhaust Emissions Measurement Committee (E-31) has published an Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 6241 detailing the sampling system for the measurement of non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) from aircraft engines (SAE 2013). The system is designed to operate in parallel with existing International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annex 16 compliant combustion gas sampling systems used for emissions certification from aircraft engines captured by conventional (Annex 16) gas sampling rakes (ICAO, 2008). The SAE E-31 committee is also working to ballot an Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) that will provide the methodology and system specification to measure nvPM from aircraft engines. The ARP is currently in preparation and is expected to be ready for ballot in 2015. A prototype AIR-compliant nvPM measurement system - The North American Reference System (NARS) has been built and evaluated at the MSTCOE under the joint sponsorship of the FAA, EPA and Transport Canada. It has been used to validate the performance characteristics of OEM AIR-compliant systems and is being used in engine certification type testing at OEM facilities to obtain data from a set of representative engines in the fleet. The data collected during these tests will be used by ICAO/CAEP/WG3/PMTG to develop a metric on which on the regulation for nvPM emissions will be based. This paper will review the salient features of the NARS including: (1) emissions sample transport from probe tip to the key diagnostic tools, (2) the mass and number-based diagnostic tools for nvPM mass and number concentration measurement and (3) methods employed to assess the extent of nvPM loss throughout the sampling system. This paper will conclude with a discussion of the recent results from inter-comparison studies conducted with other US - based systems that gives credence to the ARP's readiness for ballot.

  3. Electronic structure of (In,Mn)As quantum dots buried in GaAs investigated by soft-x-ray ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouravleuv, A. D.; Lev, L. L.; Piamonteze, C.; Wang, X.; Schmitt, T.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Samsonenko, Yu B.; Kanski, J.; Cirlin, G. E.; Strocov, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure of a molecular beam epitaxy-grown system of (In,Mn)As quantum dots (QDs) buried in GaAs is explored with soft-x-ray angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) using photon energies around 1 keV. This technique, ideally suited for buried systems, extends the momentum-resolving capabilities of conventional ARPES with enhanced probing depth as well as elemental and chemical state specificity achieved with resonant photoexcitation. The experimental results resolve the dispersive energy bands of the GaAs substrate buried in ∼2 nm below the surface, and the impurity states (ISs) derived from the substitutional Mn atoms in the (In,Mn)As QDs and oxidized Mn atoms distributed near the surface. An energy shift of the Mn ISs in the QDs compared to (In,Mn)As DMS is attributed to the band offset and proximity effect at the interface with the surrounding GaAs. The absence of any ISs in the vicinity of the VBM relates the electron transport in (In,Mn)As QDs to the prototype (In,Mn)As diluted magnetic semiconductor. The SX-ARPES results are supported by measurements of the shallow core levels under variation of probing depth through photon energy. X-ray absorption measurements identify significant diffusion of interstitial Mn atoms out of the QDs towards the surface, and the role of magnetic circular dichroism is to block the ferromagnetic response of the (In,Mn)As QDs. Possible routes are drawn to tune the growth procedure aiming at practical applications of the (In,Mn)As based systems.

  4. Electronic structure of (In,Mn)As quantum dots buried in GaAs investigated by soft-x-ray ARPES.

    PubMed

    Bouravleuv, A D; Lev, L L; Piamonteze, C; Wang, X; Schmitt, T; Khrebtov, A I; Samsonenko, Yu B; Kanski, J; Cirlin, G E; Strocov, V N

    2016-10-21

    Electronic structure of a molecular beam epitaxy-grown system of (In,Mn)As quantum dots (QDs) buried in GaAs is explored with soft-x-ray angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) using photon energies around 1 keV. This technique, ideally suited for buried systems, extends the momentum-resolving capabilities of conventional ARPES with enhanced probing depth as well as elemental and chemical state specificity achieved with resonant photoexcitation. The experimental results resolve the dispersive energy bands of the GaAs substrate buried in ∼2 nm below the surface, and the impurity states (ISs) derived from the substitutional Mn atoms in the (In,Mn)As QDs and oxidized Mn atoms distributed near the surface. An energy shift of the Mn ISs in the QDs compared to (In,Mn)As DMS is attributed to the band offset and proximity effect at the interface with the surrounding GaAs. The absence of any ISs in the vicinity of the VBM relates the electron transport in (In,Mn)As QDs to the prototype (In,Mn)As diluted magnetic semiconductor. The SX-ARPES results are supported by measurements of the shallow core levels under variation of probing depth through photon energy. X-ray absorption measurements identify significant diffusion of interstitial Mn atoms out of the QDs towards the surface, and the role of magnetic circular dichroism is to block the ferromagnetic response of the (In,Mn)As QDs. Possible routes are drawn to tune the growth procedure aiming at practical applications of the (In,Mn)As based systems.

  5. Functional Genomic Analysis of Candida albicans Adherence Reveals a Key Role for the Arp2/3 Complex in Cell Wall Remodelling and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ketela, Troy; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal biofilms are complex, structured communities that can form on surfaces such as catheters and other indwelling medical devices. Biofilms are of particular concern with Candida albicans, one of the leading opportunistic fungal pathogens of humans. C. albicans biofilms include yeast and filamentous cells that are surrounded by an extracellular matrix, and they are intrinsically resistant to antifungal drugs such that resolving biofilm infections often requires surgery to remove the contaminated device. C. albicans biofilms form through a regulated process of adhesion to surfaces, filamentation, maturation, and ultimately dispersion. To uncover new strategies to block the initial stages of biofilm formation, we utilized a functional genomic approach to identify genes that modulate C. albicans adherence. We screened a library of 1,481 double barcoded doxycycline-repressible conditional gene expression strains covering ~25% of the C. albicans genome. We identified five genes for which transcriptional repression impaired adherence, including: ARC18, PMT1, MNN9, SPT7, and orf19.831. The most severe adherence defect was observed upon transcriptional repression of ARC18, which encodes a member of the Arp2/3 complex that is involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. Depletion of components of the Arp2/3 complex not only impaired adherence, but also caused reduced biofilm formation, increased cell surface hydrophobicity, and increased exposure of cell wall chitin and β-glucans. Reduced function of the Arp2/3 complex led to impaired cell wall integrity and activation of Rho1-mediated cell wall stress responses, thereby causing cell wall remodelling and reduced adherence. Thus, we identify important functional relationships between cell wall stress responses and a novel mechanism that controls adherence and biofilm formation, thereby illuminating novel strategies to cripple a leading fungal pathogen of humans. PMID:27870871

  6. Ankyrin-repeat proteins from sponge symbionts modulate amoebal phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mary T H D; Liu, Michael; Thomas, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria-eukaryote symbiosis occurs in all stages of evolution, from simple amoebae to mammals, and from facultative to obligate associations. Sponges are ancient metazoans that form intimate symbiotic interactions with complex communities of bacteria. The basic nutritional requirements of the sponge are in part satisfied by the phagocytosis of bacterial food particles from the surrounding water. How bacterial symbionts, which are permanently associated with the sponge, survive in the presence of phagocytic cells is largely unknown. Here, we present the discovery of a genomic fragment from an uncultured gamma-proteobacterial sponge symbiont that encodes for four proteins, whose closest known relatives are found in a sponge genome. Through recombinant approaches, we show that these four eukaryotic-like, ankyrin-repeat proteins (ARP) when expressed in Eschericha coli can modulate phagocytosis of amoebal cells and lead to accumulation of bacteria in the phagosome. Mechanistically, two ARPs appear to interfere with phagosome development in a similar way to reduced vacuole acidification, by blocking the fusion of the early phagosome with the lysosome and its digestive enzymes. Our results show that ARP from sponge symbionts can function to interfere with phagocytosis, and we postulate that this might be one mechanism by which symbionts can escape digestion in a sponge host.

  7. Water, methanol and dense gas tracers in the local ULIRG Arp 220: results from the new SEPIA Band 5 Science Verification campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galametz, M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Immer, K.; Humphreys, E.; Aladro, R.; De Breuck, C.; Ginsburg, A.; Madden, S. C.; Møller, P.; Arumugam, V.

    2016-10-01

    We present a line survey of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220, taken with the newly installed SEPIA (Swedish-European Southern Observatory PI receiver for APEX) Band 5 instrument on APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment). We illustrate the capacity of SEPIA to detect the 183.3 GHz H2O 31,3-22,0 line against the atmospheric H2O absorption feature. We confirm the previous detection of the HCN(2-1) line, and detect new transitions of standard dense gas tracers such as HNC(2-1), HCO+(2-1), CS(4-3), C34S(4-3) and HC3N(20-19). We also detect HCN(2-1) v2 = 1 and the 193.5 GHz methanol (4-3) group for the first time. The absence of time variations in the megamaser water line compared to previous observations seems to rule out an AGN nuclear origin for the line. It could, on the contrary, favour a thermal origin instead, but also possibly be a sign that the megamaser emission is associated with star-forming cores washed out in the beam. We finally discuss how the new transitions of HCN, HNC and HCO+ refine our knowledge of the interstellar medium physical conditions in Arp 220.

  8. Tuning the electronic structure of bulk FeSe with chemical pressure using quantum oscillations and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, Amalia

    FeSe is a unique and intriguing superconductor which can be tuned into a high temperature superconducting state using applied pressure, chemical intercalation and surface doping. In the absence of magnetism, the structural transition in FeSe is believed to be electronically driven, with the orbital degrees of freedom playing an important part. This scenario supports the stabilization of a nematic state in FeSe, which manifests as a Fermi surface deformation in the presence of strong interactions, as detected by ARPES. Another manifestation of the nematicity is the enhanced nematic susceptibility determined from elastoresistance measurements under applied strain. Isovalent Sulphur substitution onto the Selenium site constitutes a chemical pressure, which subtly modifies the electronic structure of FeSe, suppressing the structural transition without inducing high temperature superconductivity. I will present the evolution of the electronic structure with chemical pressure in FeSe, as determined from quantum oscillations and ARPES studies and I will discuss the suppression of the nematic electronic state and the role of electronic correlations. Experiments were performed at high magnetic field facilities in Tallahassee, Nijmegen and Toulouse and Diamond Light Source, UK. This work is mainly supported by EPSRC, UK (EP/I004475/1, EP/I017836/1) and I acknowledge my collaborators from Refs. .

  9. The WASP-Arp2/3 complex signal cascade is involved in actin-dependent sperm nuclei migration during double fertilization in tobacco and maize

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiongbo; Yan, Tingting; Sun, Mengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Sperm nuclear migration during fertilization in Arabidopsis and rice has recently been found to be actin-dependent, but the driving force behind this actin cytoskeleton-dependent motion is unclear. Here, we confirmed that the actin-dependent sperm nuclei migration during fertilization is a conserved mechanism in plants. Using in vitro fertilization systems, we showed that a functional actin is also essential in maize and tobacco for sperm nuclei migration after gamete membrane fusion. Cytoskeleton depolymerization inhibitor treatments supported the view that sperm nuclei migration is actin-dependent but microtubule-independent in both egg cell and central cell during double fertilization. We further revealed that the actin-based motor myosin is not the driving force for sperm nuclear migration in maize and tobacco. The WASP-Arp2/3 complex signal cascade is shown here to be involved in the regulation of sperm nuclear migration in maize and tobacco. It is interesting that sperm nuclei migration within somatic cell also need WASP-Arp2/3 complex signal cascade and actin, suggesting that the mechanism of sperm nuclear migration is not gamete specific. PMID:28225074

  10. High-resolution Observations of Molecular Lines in Arp 220: Kinematics, Morphology, and Limits on the Applicability of the Ammonia Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschaechner, Laura K.; Ott, Jürgen; Walter, Fabian; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Scoville, Nick

    2016-12-01

    We observe Arp 220, the nearest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy, over 4 GHz in the K and Ka bands, providing constraints for the kinematics and morphology, and identifying molecular species on scales resolving both nuclei (0.″6 or 230 pc). We detect multiple molecular species, including hydroxyl (OH {}2{{{\\Pi }}}3/2J=9/2F=4-4;5-5) in both cores, and tentatively detect H2O(615-523) at ˜21.84 GHz in both nuclei, indicating the likely presence of maser emission. The observed frequency range also contains metastable ammonia transitions from (J, K) = (1, 1)-(5, 5), as well as the (9, 9) inversion line; together, they are a well-known thermometer of dense molecular gas. Furthermore, the non-metastable (4, 2) and (10, 9), and possibly the (3, 1), lines are also detected. We apply a standard temperature analysis to Arp 220; however, the analysis is complicated in that standard local thermal equilibrium (LTE) assumptions do not hold. There are indications that a substantial fraction of ammonia could be in the non-metastable transitions, as opposed to only the metastable ones. Thus, the non-metastable transitions could be essential to constraining the temperature. We compare all of these data to ALMA observations of this source, confirming the outflow previously observed by other tracers in both nuclei.

  11. Dynactin 3D structure: implications for assembly and dynein binding.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hiroshi; Narita, Akihiro; Maéda, Yuichiro; Schroer, Trina A

    2014-09-23

    The multisubunit protein complex, dynactin, is an essential component of the cytoplasmic dynein motor. High-resolution structural work on dynactin and the dynein/dynactin supercomplex has been limited to small subunits and recombinant fragments that do not report fully on either ≈1MDa assembly. In the present study, we used negative-stain electron microscopy and image analysis based on random conical tilt reconstruction to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) structure of native vertebrate dynactin. The 35-nm-long dynactin molecule has a V-shaped shoulder at one end and a flattened tip at the other end, both offset relative to the long axis of the actin-related protein (Arp) backbone. The shoulder projects dramatically away from the Arp filament core in a way that cannot be appreciated in two-dimensional images, which has implications for the mechanism of dynein binding. The 3D structure allows the helical parameters of the entire Arp filament core, which includes the actin capping protein, CP, to be determined for the first time. This structure exhibits near identity to F-actin and can be well fitted into the dynactin envelope. Molecular fitting of modeled CP-Arp polymers into the envelope shows that the filament contains between 7 and 9 Arp protomers and is capped at both ends. In the 7 Arp model, which agrees best with measured Arp stoichiometry and other structural information, actin capping protein (CP) is not present at the distal tip of the structure, unlike what is seen in the other models. The 3D structure suggests a mechanism for dynactin assembly and length specification.

  12. Agonistic and antagonistic effects of C5a-chimera bearing S19 ribosomal protein tail portion on the C5a receptor of monocytes and neutrophils, respectively.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yuuichiro; Tokita, Kazutaka; Ota, Yoshihiko; Li, Ying; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Nishino, Norikazu; Takagi, Katsumasa; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    C-terminus of S19 ribosomal protein (RP S19) endows the cross-linked homodimer with a dual effect on the C5a receptor in leucocyte chemoattraction; agonistic effect on the monocyte receptor, and antagonistic effect on the neutrophil receptor. C5a exhibits the uniform agonistic effect on this receptor of both cell types. We have currently prepared a recombinant C5a-chimeric protein bearing the C-terminus of RP S19 (C5a/RP S19 chimera) to be used as a substitute of the RP S19 dimer. In vitro, this chimera similarly inhibited the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization of neutrophils induced by C5a to the RP S19 dimer did. In the guinea pig skin, 10(-7) M C5a/RP S19 chimera exhibited an inhibitory capacity to the neutrophil infiltration induced by 3 x 10(-7) M C5a without enhancing monocyte infiltration. In reverse passive Arthus reaction, the neutrophil infiltration associated with plasma extravasation was significantly reduced by the simultaneous administration of 10(-7) M C5a/RP S19 chimera with antibodies. The C5a/RP S19 chimera is a useful tool not only to examine the molecular mechanism that underlies the functional difference of the C5a receptor between monocytes and neutrophils, but also to prevent C5a-mediated hyper-response of neutrophils in acute inflammation.

  13. A conserved family of enzymes that phosphorylate inositol hexakisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Mulugu, Sashidhar; Bai, Wenli; Fridy, Peter C; Bastidas, Robert J; Otto, James C; Dollins, D Eric; Haystead, Timothy A; Ribeiro, Anthony A; York, John D

    2007-04-06

    Inositol pyrophosphates are a diverse group of high-energy signaling molecules whose cellular roles remain an active area of study. We report a previously uncharacterized class of inositol pyrophosphate synthase and find it is identical to yeast Vip1 and Asp1 proteins, regulators of actin-related protein-2/3 (ARP 2/3) complexes. Vip1 and Asp1 acted as enzymes that encode inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) and inositol heptakisphosphate (IP7) kinase activities. Alterations in kinase activity led to defects in cell growth, morphology, and interactions with ARP complex members. The functionality of Asp1 and Vip1 may provide cells with increased signaling capacity through metabolism of IP6.

  14. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Modulates DNA Damage Response and the Expression of the VEGF-A and MKI67 Genes in ARPE-19 Cells Subjected to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Paulina; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka Wanda; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-06-14

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by the progressive degradation of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 is an RPE cell line established as an in vitro model for the study of AMD pathogenesis. Oxidative stress is an AMD pathogenesis factor that induces DNA damage. Thus, the oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) of ARPE-19 cells can be important in AMD pathogenesis. The metabolism of retinoids-which regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and the visual cycle in the retina-was reported to be disturbed in AMD patients. In the present work, we studied the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, a retinoid) on DDR in ARPE-19 cells subjected to oxidative stress. We observed that ATRA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), alkali-labile sites in DNA, DNA single-strand breaks, and cell death evoked by oxidative stress. ATRA did not modulate DNA repair or the distribution of cells in cell cycle in the response of ARPE-19 cells to oxidative stress. ATRA induced autophagy in the absence of oxidative stress, but had no effect on this process in the stress. ATRA induced over-expression of proliferation marker MKI67 and neovascularization marker VEGF-A. In conclusion, ATRA increased oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells, resulting in more lesions to their DNA and cell death. Moreover, ATRA can modulate some properties of these cells, including neovascularization, which is associated with the exudative form of AMD. Therefore, ATRA can be important in the prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of AMD.

  15. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Modulates DNA Damage Response and the Expression of the VEGF-A and MKI67 Genes in ARPE-19 Cells Subjected to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tokarz, Paulina; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka Wanda; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by the progressive degradation of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 is an RPE cell line established as an in vitro model for the study of AMD pathogenesis. Oxidative stress is an AMD pathogenesis factor that induces DNA damage. Thus, the oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) of ARPE-19 cells can be important in AMD pathogenesis. The metabolism of retinoids—which regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and the visual cycle in the retina—was reported to be disturbed in AMD patients. In the present work, we studied the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, a retinoid) on DDR in ARPE-19 cells subjected to oxidative stress. We observed that ATRA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), alkali-labile sites in DNA, DNA single-strand breaks, and cell death evoked by oxidative stress. ATRA did not modulate DNA repair or the distribution of cells in cell cycle in the response of ARPE-19 cells to oxidative stress. ATRA induced autophagy in the absence of oxidative stress, but had no effect on this process in the stress. ATRA induced over-expression of proliferation marker MKI67 and neovascularization marker VEGF-A. In conclusion, ATRA increased oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells, resulting in more lesions to their DNA and cell death. Moreover, ATRA can modulate some properties of these cells, including neovascularization, which is associated with the exudative form of AMD. Therefore, ATRA can be important in the prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of AMD. PMID:27314326

  16. Common Origin of the Circular-dichroism Pattern in ARPES of SrTiO3 and CuxBi2Se3

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Christopher

    2011-08-19

    We investigate circular dichroism in the angular distribution (CDAD) of photoelectrons from SrTiO{sub 3}:Nb and Cu{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} recorded by 7-eV laser ARPES. In addition to the well-known node that occurs in CDAD when the incidence plane matches the mirror plane of the crystal, we show that another type of node occurs when the mirror plane of the crystal is vertical to the incidence plane and the electronic state is two dimensional. The flower-shaped CDAD's occurring around the Fermi level of SrTiO{sub 3}:Nb and around the Dirac point of Cu{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are explained on equal footings. A surface-state-to-surface-resonance transition is indicated for the topological state of Cu{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}.

  17. Observations of Arp 220 Using Herschel-SPIRE: An Unprecedented View of the Molecular Gas in an Extreme Star Formation Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Wilson, Christine D.; Rykala, Adam; Isaak, Kate; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Bradford, Charles M.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, Asantha; Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter; Kamenetzky, Julia; Madden, Suzanne C.; Mentuch, Erin; Sacchi, Nicola; Sauvage, Marc; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, Luigi; Wolfire, Mark

    2011-12-01

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 μm, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity ~2 × 108 L ⊙ very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH+, H2O+, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with τdust ~ 5 at 100 μm. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L FIR ~ 2 × 1012 L ⊙. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T ~ 50 K and warm molecular gas at T ~ 1350+280 - 100 K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L CO/L FIR ~ 10-4 (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L CO, J = 6-5/L FIR ~ 10-5). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H2 rotational lines. At 1350 K, H2 dominates the cooling (~20 L ⊙ M -1 ⊙) in the interstellar medium compared to CO (~0.4 L ⊙ M -1 ⊙). We have ruled out photodissociation regions, X-ray-dominated regions, and cosmic rays as likely sources of excitation of this warm molecular gas

  18. Analysis and implementation of PM sampling methodology protocols to aid in the development of an ARP (aerospace recommended practice) for aircraft non-volatile PM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catron, Brian Lowell

    Due to the growing concerns that particulate matter (PM) have on health and the environment, there is a need to include mass and number non-volatile PM measurements to current jet engine certification. This thesis looks at the necessary work required to help produce recommendations and perform background research to aid in the creation of an improved Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) (by the SAE E-31 Committee). This work addressed the following issues. The investigation began in the Missouri S&T Center of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research (COE) laboratory with an examination of the jet engine surrogate used, the miniCAST, as well as integrating it into the COE's PM measurement system. A clean PM sample line was aged by running a PM source through it until a steady state signal was measured by the instruments in order to make a recommended procedure for line conditioning as well as reconditioning. Several eductors were studied for their performance characteristics and compared against desired characteristics, which suggested a need to include a pressure relief valve to cap the sample pressure at the eductor entrance. A volatile particle remover (VPR) was studied for penetration and ability to remove volatile material. A prototype E-31 system was setup at the second alternative aviation fuel experiment (AAFEX II), which provided a direct comparison of probe tip dilution and downstream dilution and found comparable results when line loss was taken into account. Also performed at AAFEX II was a study that compared measured sample line penetration with theoretical calculations finding that theoretical calculations were an accurate alternative of measuring line loss. Two PM sampling systems were setup at an ARP demonstration and both system had similar results for both number and mass measurement. An instrument comparison was also performed that included an examination of condensation particle counter (CPC) cutoff size. It was also

  19. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (P<0.0001). MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (P<0.0001). However, no difference was observed in the expression of Arp2, Arp3 or other WASPs. A neutralizing anti-MRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (P<0.0001), and reversed the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  1. COMMIX-1AR/P: A three-dimensional transient single-phase computer program for thermal hydraulic analysis of single and multicomponent systems. Volume 2, User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, P.L.; Blomquist, R.N.; Gelbard, E.M.

    1992-09-01

    The COMMIX-1AR/P computer program is designed for analyzing the steady-state and transient aspects of single-phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three spatial dimensions. This version is an extension of the modeling in COMMIX-1A to include multiple fluids in physically separate regions of the computational domain, modeling descriptions for pumps, radiation heat transfer between surfaces of the solids which are embedded in or surround the fluid, a k-{var_epsilon} model for fluid turbulence, and improved numerical techniques. The porous-medium formulation in COMMIX allows the program to be applied to a wide range of problems involving both simple and complex geometrical arrangements. The input preparation and execution procedures are presented for the COMMIX-1AR/P program and several postprocessor programs which produce graphical displays of the calculated results.

  2. Temperature Evolution of the Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 Superconductor Studied by High Resolution Time-of-Flight Laser-ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhou, Xingjiang

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between the pseudogap and superconducting gap in high temperature cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. In this talk, we will present our high resolution laser-ARPES measurement on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 superconductor. We will use the latest generation of ARPES system equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer. This enables us to have super-high energy resolution, high momentum resolution, simultaneous coverage of two-dimensional momentum space, high data acquisition efficiency and much reduced nonlinearity effect. From detailed temperature dependence near the nodal and antinodal regions, we will discuss on the relationship between the pseudogap and superconducting gap in the cuprate superconductors.

  3. V-1 regulates capping protein activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Goeh; Alexander, Christopher J; Wu, Xufeng S; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2016-10-25

    Capping Protein (CP) plays a central role in the creation of the Arp2/3-generated branched actin networks comprising lamellipodia and pseudopodia by virtue of its ability to cap the actin filament barbed end, which promotes Arp2/3-dependent filament nucleation and optimal branching. The highly conserved protein V-1/Myotrophin binds CP tightly in vitro to render it incapable of binding the barbed end. Here we addressed the physiological significance of this CP antagonist in Dictyostelium, which expresses a V-1 homolog that we show is very similar biochemically to mouse V-1. Consistent with previous studies of CP knockdown, overexpression of V-1 in Dictyostelium reduced the size of pseudopodia and the cortical content of Arp2/3 and induced the formation of filopodia. Importantly, these effects scaled positively with the degree of V-1 overexpression and were not seen with a V-1 mutant that cannot bind CP. V-1 is present in molar excess over CP, suggesting that it suppresses CP activity in the cytoplasm at steady state. Consistently, cells devoid of V-1, like cells overexpressing CP described previously, exhibited a significant decrease in cellular F-actin content. Moreover, V-1-null cells exhibited pronounced defects in macropinocytosis and chemotactic aggregation that were rescued by V-1, but not by the V-1 mutant. Together, these observations demonstrate that V-1 exerts significant influence in vivo on major actin-based processes via its ability to sequester CP. Finally, we present evidence that V-1's ability to sequester CP is regulated by phosphorylation, suggesting that cells may manipulate the level of active CP to tune their "actin phenotype."

  4. Quantifying electronic correlation strength in a complex oxide: a combined DMFT and ARPES study of LaNiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Nowadnick, E. A.; Ruf, J. P.; Park, H.; King, P. D. C.; Schlom, D. G.; Shen, K. M.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-12-07

    The electronic correlation strength is a basic quantity that characterizes the physical properties of materials such as transition metal oxides. Determining correlation strengths requires both precise definitions and a careful comparison between experiment and theory. In this paper, we define the correlation strength via the magnitude of the electron self-energy near the Fermi level. For the case of LaNiO3, we obtain both the experimental and theoretical mass enhancements m/m by considering high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and density functional+dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) calculations.We use valence-band photoemission data to constrain the free parameters in the theory and demonstrate a quantitative agreement between the experiment and theory when both the realistic crystal structure and strong electronic correlations are taken into account. In addition, by considering DFT+DMFT calculations on epitaxially strained LaNiO3, we find a strain-induced evolution of m/m in qualitative agreement with trends derived from optics experiments. These results provide a benchmark for the accuracy of the DFT+DMFT theoretical approach, and can serve as a test case when considering other complex materials. By establishing the level of accuracy of the theory, this work also will enable better quantitative predictions when engineering new emergent properties in nickelate heterostructures.

  5. Downregulating p22phox ameliorates inflammatory response in Angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress by regulating MAPK and NF-κB pathways in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiguo; Tao, Lifei; Lei, Chunyan; Wang, Jiaming; Yang, Peizeng; Li, Qiuhong; Lei, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are two interrelated biological events implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced under oxidative stress play a key role in pathological conditions. Inhibition of p22phox, an indispensable component of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex comprising the main source of ROS, plays a protective role in many ocular conditions by inhibiting the activation of NOXs and the generation of ROS. However, little is understood regarding the role of p22phox in oxidative stress-related inflammation in the eye. We used a p22phox small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transfect the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell line ARPE-19, and human primary RPE (hRPE) cells, then stimulated with Ang II. We observed a potent anti-inflammatory effect and studied the underlying mechanism. Downregulating p22phox resulted in decreased ROS generation, a reduction of NOXs (NOX1, 2, 4) and a decrease in inflammatory cytokine. In addition, p22phox downregulation reduced the activation of the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. We conclude that inhibition of p22phox has an anti-inflammatory effect in Ang II-induced oxidative stress. Suppressing the MAPK and NF-κB pathways is involved in this protective effect. These results suggest that p22phox may provide a promising therapeutic target for oxidative stress-induced ocular inflammation PMID:26415877

  6. Configuration of human dendritic cell cytoskeleton by Rho GTPases, the WAS protein, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burns, S; Thrasher, A J; Blundell, M P; Machesky, L; Jones, G E

    2001-08-15

    The cellular mechanisms that configure the cytoskeleton during migration of dendritic cells (DCs) are poorly understood. Immature DCs assemble specialized adhesion structures known as podosomes at their leading edge; these are associated with the localized recruitment of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) and the actin organizing actin-related protein 2/3 complex. In immature DCs lacking WASp, podosomes are absent, residual dysmorphic lamellipodia and filopodia are nonpolarized, and migration is severely compromised. Microinjection studies indicate that podosome assembly and polarization require concerted action of Cdc42, Rac, and Rho, thereby providing a link between sequential protrusive and adhesive activity. Formation of podosomes is restricted to cells with an immature phenotype, indicating a specific role for these structures during the early migratory phase. (Blood. 2001;98:1142-1149)

  7. THE CARMA PAIRED ANTENNA CALIBRATION SYSTEM: ATMOSPHERIC PHASE CORRECTION FOR MILLIMETER WAVE INTERFEROMETRY AND ITS APPLICATION TO MAPPING THE ULTRALUMINOUS GALAXY ARP 193

    SciTech Connect

    Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Curley, Roger; Pound, Marc W.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Teuben, Peter J.; Carpenter, John M.; Peréz, Laura M.; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Leitch, Erik M.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Bock, Douglas C.-J.; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Marrone, Daniel P.; and others

    2016-01-15

    Phase fluctuations introduced by the atmosphere are the main limiting factor in attaining diffraction limited performance in extended interferometric arrays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We report the results of C-PACS, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy Paired Antenna Calibration System. We present a systematic study of several hundred test observations taken during the 2009–2010 winter observing season where we utilize CARMA's eight 3.5 m antennas to monitor an atmospheric calibrator while simultaneously acquiring science observations with 6.1 and 10.4 m antennas on baselines ranging from a few hundred meters to ∼2 km. We find that C-PACS is systematically successful at improving coherence on long baselines under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We find that the angular separation between the atmospheric calibrator and target source is the most important consideration, with consistently successful phase correction at CARMA requiring a suitable calibrator located ≲6° away from the science target. We show that cloud cover does not affect the success of C-PACS. We demonstrate C-PACS in typical use by applying it to the observations of the nearby very luminous infrared galaxy Arp 193 in {sup 12}CO(2-1) at a linear resolution of ≈70 pc (0.″12 × 0.″18), 3 times better than previously published molecular maps of this galaxy. We resolve the molecular disk rotation kinematics and the molecular gas distribution and measure the gas surface densities and masses on 90 pc scales. We find that molecular gas constitutes ∼30% of the dynamical mass in the inner 700 pc of this object with a surface density ∼10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2}; we compare these properties to those of the starburst region of NGC 253.

  8. Theoretical Modelling of the Diffuse Emission of (gamma)-rays From Extreme Regions of Star Formation: The Case of Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D F

    2004-07-09

    Our current understanding of ultraluminous infrared galaxies suggest that they are recent galaxy mergers in which much of the gas in the former spiral disks, particularly that located at distances less than 5 kpc from each of the pre-merger nuclei, has fallen into a common center, triggering a huge starburst phenomenon. This large nuclear concentration of molecular gas has been detected by many groups, and estimates of molecular mass and density have been made. Not surprisingly, these estimates were found to be orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding values found in our Galaxy. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the high energy emission of the super-starburst galaxy Arp 220 is presented. The model also provides an estimate of the radio emission from each of the components of the central region of the galaxy (western and eastern extreme starbursts, and molecular disk). The predicted radio spectrum is found as a result of the synchrotron and free-free emission, and absorption, of the primary and secondary steady population of electrons and positrons. The latter is output of charged pion decay and knock-on leptonic production, subject to a full set of losses in the interstellar medium. The resulting radio spectrum is in agreement with sub-arcsec radio observations, what allows to estimate the magnetic field. In addition, the FIR emission is modeled with dust emissivity, and the computed FIR photon density is used as a target for inverse Compton process as well as to give account of losses in the {gamma}-ray scape. Bremsstrahlung emission and neutral pion decay are also computed, and the {gamma}-ray spectrum is finally predicted. Future possible observations with GLAST, and the ground based Cherenkov telescopes are discussed.

  9. The CARMA Paired Antenna Calibration System: Atmospheric Phase Correction for Millimeter Wave Interferometry and Its Application to Mapping the Ultraluminous Galaxy Arp 193

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Carpenter, John M.; Peréz, Laura M.; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Bock, Douglas C.-J.; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Curley, Roger; Leitch, Erik M.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Pound, Marc W.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Teuben, Peter J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Wu, Dalton

    2016-01-01

    Phase fluctuations introduced by the atmosphere are the main limiting factor in attaining diffraction limited performance in extended interferometric arrays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We report the results of C-PACS, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy Paired Antenna Calibration System. We present a systematic study of several hundred test observations taken during the 2009-2010 winter observing season where we utilize CARMA's eight 3.5 m antennas to monitor an atmospheric calibrator while simultaneously acquiring science observations with 6.1 and 10.4 m antennas on baselines ranging from a few hundred meters to ˜2 km. We find that C-PACS is systematically successful at improving coherence on long baselines under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We find that the angular separation between the atmospheric calibrator and target source is the most important consideration, with consistently successful phase correction at CARMA requiring a suitable calibrator located ≲6° away from the science target. We show that cloud cover does not affect the success of C-PACS. We demonstrate C-PACS in typical use by applying it to the observations of the nearby very luminous infrared galaxy Arp 193 in 12CO(2-1) at a linear resolution of ≈70 pc (0.″12 × 0.″18), 3 times better than previously published molecular maps of this galaxy. We resolve the molecular disk rotation kinematics and the molecular gas distribution and measure the gas surface densities and masses on 90 pc scales. We find that molecular gas constitutes ˜30% of the dynamical mass in the inner 700 pc of this object with a surface density ˜104 M⊙ pc-2 we compare these properties to those of the starburst region of NGC 253.

  10. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins in the nucleus: aWASH with possibilities.

    PubMed

    Verboon, Jeffrey M; Sugumar, Bina; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Actin and proteins that regulate its dynamics or interactions have well-established roles in the cytoplasm where they function as key components of the cytoskeleton to control diverse processes, including cellular infrastructure, cellular motility, cell signaling, and vesicle transport. Recent work has also uncovered roles for actin and its regulatory proteins in the nucleus, primarily in mechanisms governing gene expression. The Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) family of proteins, comprising the WASP/N-WASP, SCAR/WAVE, WHAMM/JMY/WHAMY, and WASH subfamilies, function in the cytoplasm where they activate the Arp2/3 complex to form branched actin filaments. WAS proteins are present in the nucleus and have been implicated as transcriptional regulators. We found that Drosophila Wash, in addition to transcriptional effects, is involved in global nuclear architecture. Here we summarize the regulation and function of nuclear WAS proteins, and highlight how our work with Wash expands the possibilities for the functions of these proteins in the nucleus.

  11. Niosomes based on synthetic cationic lipids for gene delivery: the influence of polar head-groups on the transfection efficiency in HEK-293, ARPE-19 and MSC-D1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, E; Puras, G; Agirre, M; Zárate, J; Grijalvo, S; Pons, R; Eritja, R; Martinez-Navarrete, G; Soto-Sanchez, C; Fernández, E; Pedraz, J L

    2015-01-28

    We designed niosomes based on three lipids that differed only in the polar-head group to analyze their influence on the transfection efficiency. These lipids were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering before being incorporated into the niosomes which were characterized in terms of pKa, size, zeta potential, morphology and physical stability. Nioplexes were obtained upon the addition of a plasmid. Different ratios (w/w) were selected to analyze the influence of this parameter on size, charge and the ability to condense, release and protect the DNA. In vitro transfection experiments were performed in HEK-293, ARPE-19 and MSC-D1 cells. Our results show that the chemical composition of the cationic head-group clearly affects the physicochemical parameters of the niosomes and especially the transfection efficiency. Only niosomes based on cationic lipids with a dimethyl amino head group (lipid 3) showed a transfection capacity when compared with their counterparts amino (lipid 1) and tripeptide head-groups (lipid 2). Regarding cell viability, we clearly observed that nioplexes based on the cationic lipid 3 had a more deleterious effect than their counterparts, especially in ARPE-19 cells at 20/1 and 30/1 ratios. Similar studies could be extended to other series of cationic lipids in order to progress in the research on safe and efficient non-viral vectors for gene delivery purposes.

  12. High energy resolution ARPES measurements of the normal and superconducting states of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Dessau, D.S.; King, D.M.; Shen, Z.X.

    1993-08-01

    The near-E{sub F} electronic structure and Fermi surface of Bi2212 has been mapped out with ARPES. A key feature of our measured bandstructure is the existence of an extended region of flat CuO{sub 2}-derived bands at E{sub F}. Comparative analysis of this data with that from NdCeCuO and YBCO{sub 7} suggests that many of the anomalous (normal) physical properties of Bi2212 and YBCO{sub 7} (NdCeCuO) may be related to the existence (absence) of such bands at E{sub F}. Superconducting gap anisotropy at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the conventional superconductors has been observed in the a-b plane of Bi2212 in ARPES. For samples with {Tc} of 88K, the gap size reaches a maximum of approximately 20 MeV along the Cu-O bond direction, and a minimum of much smaller or vanishing magnitude 450 away. The experimental data is discussed within the context of various theoretical models. In particular, a detailed comparison with what is expected from a superconductor with a d{sub x2-y2} order parameter is carried out, yielding a consistent picture.

  13. Exploration of the Dynamic Properties of Protein Complexes Predicted from Spatially Constrained Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Eric A.; Tsay, Aaron; Waldispuhl, Jerome; Vogel, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Protein complexes are not static, but rather highly dynamic with subunits that undergo 1-dimensional diffusion with respect to each other. Interactions within protein complexes are modulated through regulatory inputs that alter interactions and introduce new components and deplete existing components through exchange. While it is clear that the structure and function of any given protein complex is coupled to its dynamical properties, it remains a challenge to predict the possible conformations that complexes can adopt. Protein-fragment Complementation Assays detect physical interactions between protein pairs constrained to ≤8 nm from each other in living cells. This method has been used to build networks composed of 1000s of pair-wise interactions. Significantly, these networks contain a wealth of dynamic information, as the assay is fully reversible and the proteins are expressed in their natural context. In this study, we describe a method that extracts this valuable information in the form of predicted conformations, allowing the user to explore the conformational landscape, to search for structures that correlate with an activity state, and estimate the abundance of conformations in the living cell. The generator is based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation that uses the interaction dataset as input and is constrained by the physical resolution of the assay. We applied this method to an 18-member protein complex composed of the seven core proteins of the budding yeast Arp2/3 complex and 11 associated regulators and effector proteins. We generated 20,480 output structures and identified conformational states using principle component analysis. We interrogated the conformation landscape and found evidence of symmetry breaking, a mixture of likely active and inactive conformational states and dynamic exchange of the core protein Arc15 between core and regulatory components. Our method provides a novel tool for prediction and visualization of the hidden

  14. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  15. An optimized optogenetic clustering tool for probing protein interaction and function.

    PubMed

    Taslimi, Amir; Vrana, Justin D; Chen, Daniel; Borinskaya, Sofya; Mayer, Bruce J; Kennedy, Matthew J; Tucker, Chandra L

    2014-09-18

    The Arabidopsis photoreceptor cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) was previously used as an optogenetic module, allowing spatiotemporal control of cellular processes with light. Here we report the development of a new CRY2-derived optogenetic module, 'CRY2olig', which induces rapid, robust, and reversible protein oligomerization in response to light. Using this module, we developed a novel protein interaction assay, Light-Induced Co-clustering, that can be used to interrogate protein interaction dynamics in live cells. In addition to use probing protein interactions, CRY2olig can also be used to induce and reversibly control diverse cellular processes with spatial and temporal resolution. Here we demonstrate disrupting clathrin-mediated endocytosis and promoting Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization with light. These new CRY2-based approaches expand the growing arsenal of optogenetic strategies to probe cellular function.

  16. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-13

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large pool of freely diffusing, inactive CP (CP:V-1) feeds, via CARMIL-driven complex exchange, the formation of weak-capping complexes (CP:CARMIL) at the plasma membrane of protruding edges. In vivo, therefore, CARMIL should promote Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly at the leading edge by promoting barbed-end capping there.

  17. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large pool of freely diffusing, inactive CP (CP:V-1) feeds, via CARMIL-driven complex exchange, the formation of weak-capping complexes (CP:CARMIL) at the plasma membrane of protruding edges. In vivo, therefore, CARMIL should promote Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly at the leading edge by promoting barbed-end capping there. PMID:24778263

  18. Impact of genetic variation on synaptic protein levels in genetically diverse mice.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Li, Ka Wan; van der Schors, Roel; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; van der Loo, Rolinka; Williams, Robert W; Smit, August B; Spijker, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    The relative abundance of synaptic proteins shapes protein complex formation and is essential for synapse function and behavioral fitness. Here, we have used a panel of highly diverse inbred strains of mice-NOD/LtJ, A/J, 129S1/SvImJ, FVB/NJ, C57BL/6J, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ, and CAST/EiJ-to quantify the effects of genetic variation on the synaptic proteome between strains. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteome analyses, we detected significant differences in ∼20% of 400 core synaptic proteins. Surprisingly, the differentially abundant proteins showed a modest range of variation across strains, averaging about 1.3-fold. Analysis of protein abundance covariation across the eight strains identified known protein-protein relations (proteins of Arp2/3 complex), as well as novel relations (e.g. Dlg family, Fscn1). Moreover, covariation of synaptic proteins was substantially tighter (∼fourfold more dense than chance level) than corresponding networks of synaptic transcripts (∼twofold more dense than chance). The tight stoichiometry and coherent synaptic protein covariation networks suggest more intense evolutionary selection at this level of molecular organization. In conclusion, genetic diversity in the mouse genome differentially affects the transcriptome and proteome, and only partially penetrates the synaptic proteome. Protein abundance correlation analyses in genetically divergent strains can complement protein-protein interaction network analyses, to provide insight into protein interactomes.

  19. New Insights into Mechanism and Regulation of Actin Capping Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, John A.; Sept, David

    2008-01-01

    The heterodimeric actin capping protein, referred to here as “CP,” is an essential element of the actin cytoskeleton, binding to the barbed ends of actin filaments and regulating their polymerization. In vitro, CP has a critical role in the dendritic nucleation process of actin assembly mediated by Arp2/3 complex, and in vivo, CP is important for actin assembly and actin-based process of morphogenesis and differentiation. Recent studies have provided new insight into the mechanism of CP binding the barbed end, which raises new possibilities for the dynamics of CP and actin in cells. In addition, a number of molecules that bind and regulate CP have been discovered, suggesting new ideas for how CP may integrate into diverse processes of cell physiology. PMID:18544499

  20. Molecular Characterization of Neurally Expressing Genes in the Para Sodium Channel Gene Cluster of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hong, C. S.; Ganetzky, B.

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms regulating expression of para, which encodes the major class of sodium channels in the Drosophila nervous system, we have tried to locate upstream cis-acting regulatory elements by mapping the transcriptional start site and analyzing the region immediately upstream of para in region 14D of the polytene chromosomes. From these studies, we have discovered that the region contains a cluster of neurally expressing genes. Here we report the molecular characterization of the genomic organization of the 14D region and the genes within this region, which are: calnexin (Cnx), actin related protein 14D (Arp14D), calcineurin A 14D (CnnA14D), and chromosome associated protein (Cap). The tight clustering of these genes, their neuronal expression patterns, and their potential functions related to expression, modulation, or regulation of sodium channels raise the possibility that these genes represent a functionally related group sharing some coordinate regulatory mechanism. PMID:8849894

  1. Retinal proteins associated with redox regulation and protein folding play central roles in response to high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ssu-Han; Lee, Wen-Chi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy typically causes poor vision and blindness. A previous study revealed that a high blood glucose concentration induces glycoxidation and weakens the retinal capillaries. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose induced diabetic retinopathy remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we cultured the retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 in mannitol-balanced 5.5, 25, and 100 mM glucose media and investigated protein level alterations. Proteomic analysis revealed significant changes in 137 protein features, of which 124 demonstrated changes in a glucose concentration dependent manner. Several proteins functionally associated with redox regulation, protein folding, or the cytoskeleton are affected by increased glucose concentrations. Additional analyses also revealed that cellular oxidative stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, was significantly increased after treatment with high glucose concentrations. However, the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell survival remained unchanged during treatment with high glucose concentrations. To summarize, in this study, we used a comprehensive retinal pigmented epithelial cell based proteomic approach for identifying changes in protein expression associated retinal markers induced by high glucose concentrations. Our results revealed that a high glucose condition can induce cellular oxidative stress and modulate the levels of proteins with functions in redox regulation, protein folding, and cytoskeleton regulation; however, cell viability and mitochondrial integrity are not significantly disturbed under these high glucose conditions.

  2. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  3. CARMIL is a bona fide capping protein interactant.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Kirsten; Olszewski, Thomas E; Bowers, M Blair; Dimitrova, Mariana; Ginsburg, Ann; Hammer, John A

    2004-01-23

    CARMIL, also known as Acan 125, is a multidomain protein that was originally identified on the basis of its interaction with the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of type I myosins from Acanthamoeba. In a subsequent study of CARMIL from Dictyostelium, pull-down assays indicated that the protein also bound capping protein and the Arp2/3 complex. Here we present biochemical evidence that Acanthamoeba CARMIL interacts tightly with capping protein. In biochemical preparations, CARMIL copurified extensively with two polypeptides that were shown by microsequencing to be the alpha- and beta-subunits of Acanthamoeba capping protein. The complex between CARMIL and capping protein, which is readily demonstratable by chemical cross-linking, can be completely dissociated by size exclusion chromatography at pH 5.4. Analytical ultracentrifugation, surface plasmon resonance and SH3 domain pull-down assays indicate that the dissociation constant of capping protein for CARMIL is approximately 0.4 microm or lower. Using CARMIL fusion proteins, the binding site for capping protein was shown to reside within the carboxyl-terminal, approximately 200 residue, proline-rich domain of CARMIL. Finally, chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and rotary shadowed electron microscopy revealed that CARMIL is asymmetric and that it exists in a monomer <--> dimer equilibrium with an association constant of 1.0 x 10(6) m(-1). Together, these results indicate that CARMIL self-associates and interacts with capping protein with affinities that, given the cellular concentrations of the proteins ( approximately 1 and 2 microm for capping protein and CARMIL, respectively), indicate that both activities should be physiologically relevant.

  4. Mycolactone activation of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins underpins Buruli ulcer formation

    PubMed Central

    Guenin-Macé, Laure; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume; Hong, Hui; Leadlay, Peter F.; Danckaert, Anne; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Mostowy, Serge; Zurzolo, Chiara; Bousso, Philippe; Chrétien, Fabrice; Carlier, Marie-France; Demangel, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Mycolactone is a diffusible lipid secreted by the human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, which induces the formation of open skin lesions referred to as Buruli ulcers. Here, we show that mycolactone operates by hijacking the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family of actin-nucleating factors. By disrupting WASP autoinhibition, mycolactone leads to uncontrolled activation of ARP2/3-mediated assembly of actin in the cytoplasm. In epithelial cells, mycolactone-induced stimulation of ARP2/3 concentrated in the perinuclear region, resulting in defective cell adhesion and directional migration. In vivo injection of mycolactone into mouse ears consistently altered the junctional organization and stratification of keratinocytes, leading to epidermal thinning, followed by rupture. This degradation process was efficiently suppressed by coadministration of the N-WASP inhibitor wiskostatin. These results elucidate the molecular basis of mycolactone activity and provide a mechanism for Buruli ulcer pathogenesis. Our findings should allow for the rationale design of competitive inhibitors of mycolactone binding to N-WASP, with anti–Buruli ulcer therapeutic potential. PMID:23549080

  5. Curcumin analog 1, 5-bis (2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1, 4-pentadien-3-one exhibits enhanced ability on Nrf2 activation and protection against acrolein-induced ARPE-19 cell toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Zou, Xuan; Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Yue, Tingting; Dai, Fang; Zhou, Bo; Lu, Wuyuan; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang

    2013-11-01

    Curcumin, a phytochemical agent in the spice turmeric, has received increasing attention for its anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, application of curcumin has been limited due to its insolubility in water and poor bioavailability both clinically and experimentally. In addition, the protective effects and mechanisms of curcumin in eye diseases have been poorly studied. In the present study, we synthesized a curcumin analog, 1, 5-bis (2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1, 4-pentadien-3-one (C3), which displayed improved protective effect against acrolein-induced toxicity in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19). At 5 μM, curcumin completely protected against acrolein-induced cell oxidative damage and preserved GSH levels and mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, C3 displayed a complete protective effect at 0.5 μM, which was much more efficient than curcumin. Both 0.5 μM C3 and 5 μM curcumin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and Nrf2 target genes transcription similarly. Experiments using Nrf2 siRNA showed that the protective effects of curcumin and C3 were eliminated by Nrf2 knockdown. Additionally, both curcumin and C3 activated the PI3/Akt pathway, however, Nrf2 activation was independent of this pathway, and therefore, we hypothesized that both curcumin and C3 activated phase II enzymes via directly disrupting the Nrf2/Keap1 complex and promoting Nrf2's nuclear translocation. Since acrolein challenge of ARPE-19 cells has been used as a model of smoking and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we concluded that the curcumin analog, C3, may be a more promising drug candidate for its potential application for the prevention and treatment of eye diseases, such as AMD. - Highlights: • We examine toxicity effects of cigarette smoking component acrolein in retina cells. • We report a more efficient curcumin analog (C3) protecting cellular function. • Mitochondrial function and phase II enzyme activation are the major

  6. Phosphoinositides and membrane curvature switch the mode of actin polymerization via selective recruitment of toca-1 and Snx9.

    PubMed

    Gallop, Jennifer L; Walrant, Astrid; Cantley, Lewis C; Kirschner, Marc W

    2013-04-30

    The membrane-cytosol interface is the major locus of control of actin polymerization. At this interface, phosphoinositides act as second messengers to recruit membrane-binding proteins. We show that curved membranes, but not flat ones, can use phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] along with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] to stimulate actin polymerization. In this case, actin polymerization requires the small GTPase cell cycle division 42 (Cdc42), the nucleation-promoting factor neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the actin nucleator the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. In liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 as the sole phosphoinositide, actin polymerization requires transducer of Cdc42 activation-1 (toca-1). In the presence of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, polymerization is both more efficient and independent of toca-1. Under these conditions, sorting nexin 9 (Snx9) can be implicated as a specific adaptor that replaces toca-1 to mobilize neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and the Arp2/3 complex. This switch in phosphoinositide and adaptor specificity for actin polymerization from membranes has implications for how different types of actin structures are generated at precise times and locations in the cell.

  7. The long journey: actin on the road to pro- and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Jockusch, Brigitte M; Graumann, Peter L

    2011-01-01

    Actin-like proteins comprise a large group of polymorphic proteins that readily form filaments engaged in cytoskeletal functions. Various members have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, e.g. MreB, ParM and Ta0583, and actin and the actin-related proteins, ARPs, respectively. Therefore, it is assumed that an ancestor of actin/MreB/ParM already existed in the last common progenitor of all cells. In eubacteria and archaea, actin-like proteins are either membrane-associated or freely soluble, and their activities are related to motility, cell shape maintenance, subcellular organization and cell cycle progression. In eukaryotes, all these functions are executed by actin in various isoforms. Additional functions have been described for actin and ARPs in the nucleus of the eukaryotic cell, and some of those were also discovered in prokaryotes. In the current essay, we compare structures and selected functions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic actins and discuss various aspects on how actins may have found their way into bacteria, into the eukaryotic cytoplasm and into the nuclear compartment.

  8. Under lock and key: Spatiotemporal regulation of WASP family proteins coordinates separate dynamic cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Burianek, Lauren E.; Soderling, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    WASP family proteins are nucleation promoting factors that bind to and activate the Arp2/3 complex in order to stimulate nucleation of branched actin filaments. The WASP family consists of WASP, N-WASP, WAVE1-3, WASH, and the novel family members WHAMM and JMY. Each of the family members contains a C-terminus responsible for their nucleation promoting activity and unique N-termini that allow for them to be regulated in a spatiotemporal manner. Upon activation they reorganize the cytoskeleton for different cellular functions depending on their subcellular localization and regulatory protein interactions. Emerging evidence indicates that WASH, WHAMM, and JMY have functions that require the coordination of both actin polymerization and microtubule dynamics. Here, we review the mechanisms of regulation for each family member and their associated in vivo functions including cell migration, vesicle trafficking, and neuronal development. PMID:23291261

  9. The WASH complex, an endosomal Arp2/3 activator, interacts with the Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome complex BLOC-1 and its cargo phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase type IIα

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, P. V.; Vistein, R.; Gokhale, A.; Seaman, M. N.; Puthenveedu, M. A.; Faundez, V.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle biogenesis machinery components such as coat proteins can interact with the actin cytoskeleton for cargo sorting into multiple pathways. It is unknown, however, whether these interactions are a general requirement for the diverse endosome traffic routes. In this study, we identify actin cytoskeleton regulators as previously unrecognized interactors of complexes associated with the Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome. Two complexes mutated in the Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome, adaptor protein complex-3 and biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), interact with and are regulated by the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase type IIα (PI4KIIα). We therefore hypothesized that PI4KIIα interacts with novel regulators of these complexes. To test this hypothesis, we immunoaffinity purified PI4KIIα from isotope-labeled cell lysates to quantitatively identify interactors. Strikingly, PI4KIIα isolation preferentially coenriched proteins that regulate the actin cytoskeleton, including guanine exchange factors for Rho family GTPases such as RhoGEF1 and several subunits of the WASH complex. We biochemically confirmed several of these PI4KIIα interactions. Of importance, BLOC-1 complex, WASH complex, RhoGEF1, or PI4KIIα depletions altered the content and/or subcellular distribution of the BLOC-1–sensitive cargoes PI4KIIα, ATP7A, and VAMP7. We conclude that the Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome complex BLOC-1 and its cargo PI4KIIα interact with regulators of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23676666

  10. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  11. Mammalian CARMIL Inhibits Actin Filament Capping by Capping Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changsong; Pring, Martin; Wear, Martin A.; Huang, Minzhou; Cooper, John A.; Svitkina, Tatyana M.; Zigmond, Sally H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Actin polymerization in cells occurs via filament elongation at the barbed end. Proteins that cap the barbed end terminate this elongation. Heterodimeric capping protein (CP) is an abundant and ubiquitous protein that caps the barbed end. We find that the mouse homolog of the adaptor protein CARMIL (mCARMIL) binds CP with high affinity and decreases its affinity for the barbed end. Addition of mCARMIL to cell extracts increases the rate and extent of Arp2/3 or spectrin-actin seed-induced polymerization. In cells, GFP-mCARMIL concentrates in lamellipodia and increases the fraction of cells with large lamellipodia. Decreasing mCARMIL levels by siRNA transfection lowers theF-actin level and slows cell migration through a mechanism that includes decreased lamellipodia protrusion. This phenotype is reversed by full-length mCARMIL but not mCARMIL lacking the domain that binds CP. Thus, mCARMIL is a key regulator of CP and has profound effects on cell behavior. PMID:16054028

  12. Lotus japonicus ARPC1 is required for rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Shakhawat; Liao, Jinqiu; James, Euan K; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Jurkiewicz, Anna; Madsen, Lene H; Stougaard, Jens; Ross, Loretta; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Remodeling of the plant cell cytoskeleton precedes symbiotic entry of nitrogen-fixing bacteria within the host plant roots. Here we identify a Lotus japonicus gene encoding a predicted ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN COMPONENT1 (ARPC1) as essential for rhizobial infection but not for arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis. In other organisms ARPC1 constitutes a subunit of the ARP2/3 complex, the major nucleator of Y-branched actin filaments. The L. japonicus arpc1 mutant showed a distorted trichome phenotype and was defective in epidermal infection thread formation, producing mostly empty nodules. A few partially colonized nodules that did form in arpc1 contained abnormal infections. Together with previously described L. japonicus Nck-associated protein1 and 121F-specific p53 inducible RNA mutants, which are also impaired in the accommodation of rhizobia, our data indicate that ARPC1 and, by inference a suppressor of cAMP receptor/WASP-family verpolin homologous protein-ARP2/3 pathway, must have been coopted during evolution of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis to specifically mediate bacterial entry.

  13. Expression of early and late cellular damage markers by ARPE-19 cells following prolonged treatment with UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Giuseppe; Sampaolese, Beatrice; Clementi, Maria Elisabetta

    2016-10-01

    Pathological alterations to the retinal pigment epithelium underlie several eye diseases, which lead to visual impairment and even blindness. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is associated with some skin and ocular pathologies; UV radiation may induce DNA breakdown and cause cellular damage through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus leading to programmed cell death. The present study aimed to investigate the production of ROS and the gene expression levels of anti‑ and proapoptotic proteins [B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and caspase‑3] in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE‑19) treated with UV‑A for 5 h consecutively. The results demonstrated that prolonged exposure to UV‑A induced: i) Cell death, the decrease in cell viability was time‑dependent and reached statistical significance after 3 h; ii) a significant and substantial increase in ROS levels that remained constant for the duration of the experiment, the levels were significantly increased after 1 h of exposure; iii) an activation of apoptotic genes (Bax and caspase‑3) after 1 h of treatment, which was accompanied by a decrease in the anti‑apoptotic gene Bcl‑2; and iv) a loss of apoptotic signals and a rapid decrease in cellular viability after 3 h of consecutive treatment. These processes may trigger necrosis, which was observed in the cells following treatment with UV‑A for 5 consecutive hours. In conclusion, the present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to provide in vitro evidence regarding the sequence of events that underlie the cellular damage induced by prolonged UV‑A radiation, starting from the first 30 min of treatment. UV‑A radiation resulted in the activation of apoptotic events, and subsequently led to irreversible cell necrosis.

  14. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  15. Fucoidan protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via normalization of reactive oxygen species generation through the Ca²⁺-dependent ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Qingfa; Liang, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) and it is the main cause of loss of vision. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of marine organisms has intensified. The effect of fucoidan from the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus on the molecular mechanisms of numerous diseases has been studied, while to date, its effect on DR was yet to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of fucoidan in DR. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE‑19 was exposed to high D‑glucose in the presence or absence of fucoidan. Cell viability was monitored using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Ca2+ influx was measured with a calcium imaging system and the activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) protein was evaluated using western blot analysis. The non‑toxic fucoidan protected ARPE‑19 cells from high glucose‑induced cell death and normalized high glucose‑induced generation of ROS. Fucoidan also inhibited high glucose‑induced cell apoptosis, as well as the Ca2+ influx and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in ARPE‑19 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that fucoidan protects ARPE‑19 cells against high glucose‑induced oxidative damage via normalization of ROS generation through the Ca2+‑dependent ERK signaling pathway.

  16. Site-specific protein adducts of 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal in human THP-1 monocytic cells: Protein carbonylation is diminished by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan; Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Singhal, Mudita; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2010-01-01

    The protein targets and sites of modification by 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE) in human monocytic THP-1 cells after exogenous exposure to HNE were examined using a multi-pronged proteomic approach involving electrophoretic, immunoblotting and mass spectrometric methods. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal anti-HNE antibodies showed several proteins as targets of HNE adduction. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with ascorbic acid resulted in reduced levels of HNE-protein adducts. Biotinylation of Michael-type HNE adducts using an aldehyde-reactive hydroxylamine-functionalized probe (aldehyde-reactive probe, ARP) and subsequent enrichment facilitated the identification and site-specific assignment of the modifications by LC-MS/MS analysis. Sixteen proteins were unequivocally identified as targets of HNE adduction and eighteen sites of HNE modification at Cys and His residues were assigned. HNE exposure of THP-1 cells resulted in the modification of proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization and regulation, proteins associated with stress responses and enzymes of the glycolytic and other metabolic pathways. This study yielded the first evidence of site-specific adduction of HNE to Cys-295 in tubulin α-1B chain, Cys-351 and Cys-499 in α-actinin-4, Cys-328 in vimentin, Cys-369 in D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and His-246 in aldolase A. PMID:20043646

  17. Secondary Reactions and Strategies to Improve Quantitative Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Kiselar, J.; He, Q.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting permits detailed examination of structure and dynamic processes of proteins and large biological assemblies, as changes in the rate of reaction of radicals with target peptides are governed by changes in the solvent accessibility of the side-chain probe residues. The precise and accurate determination of peptide reaction rates is essential to successfully probing protein structure using footprinting. In this study, we specifically examine the magnitude and mechanisms of secondary oxidation occurring after radiolytic exposure and prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Secondary oxidation results from hydrogen peroxide and other oxidative species generated during radiolysis, significantly impacting the oxidation of Met and Cys but not aromatic or other reactive residues. Secondary oxidation of Met with formation of sulfoxide degrades data reproducibility and inflates the perceived solvent accessibility of Met-containing peptides. It can be suppressed by adding trace amounts of catalase or millimolar Met-NH{sub 2} (or Met-OH) buffer immediately after irradiation; this leads to greatly improved adherence to first-order kinetics and more precise observed oxidation rates. The strategy is shown to suppress secondary oxidation in model peptides and improve data quality in examining the reactivity of peptides within the Arp2/3 protein complex. Cysteine is also subject to secondary oxidation generating disulfide as the principal product. The disulfides can be reduced before mass spectrometric analysis by reducing agents such as TCEP, while methionine sulfoxide is refractory to reduction by this reagent under typical reducing conditions.

  18. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V.; King, David S.; Banani, Salman F.; Russo, Paul S.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B. Tracy; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-04-08

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from angstrom to micrometers. However, the mechanisms by which angstrom-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometer-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometer-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin1, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology.

  19. The bacterial cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ self-organize into dynamic cytoskeletal patterns.

    PubMed

    Loose, Martin; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cytokinesis is commonly initiated by the Z-ring, a cytoskeletal structure that assembles at the site of division. Its primary component is FtsZ, a tubulin superfamily GTPase, which is recruited to the membrane by the actin-related protein FtsA. Both proteins are required for the formation of the Z-ring, but if and how they influence each other's assembly dynamics is not known. Here, we reconstituted FtsA-dependent recruitment of FtsZ polymers to supported membranes, where both proteins self-organize into complex patterns, such as fast-moving filament bundles and chirally rotating rings. Using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical perturbations, we found that these large-scale rearrangements of FtsZ emerge from its polymerization dynamics and a dual, antagonistic role of FtsA: recruitment of FtsZ filaments to the membrane and negative regulation of FtsZ organization. Our findings provide a model for the initial steps of bacterial cell division and illustrate how dynamic polymers can self-organize into large-scale structures.

  20. Actin filaments align into hollow comets for rapid VASP-mediated propulsion.

    PubMed

    Plastino, Julie; Olivier, Stéphane; Sykes, Cécile

    2004-10-05

    For cells, the growth of a dense array of branched actin filaments organized by the actin-related proteins 2 and 3 (Arp2/3) complex at the plasma membrane offers an explanation as to how movement is produced, and this arrangement is considered to be optimal for motility. Here, we challenged this assumption by using an in vitro system of polystyrene beads in cell extracts that contained a complex mix of actin polymerization proteins as in vivo. We employed the surface of the bead as a reactor where we mixed two different actin polymerization-activating factors, the Arp2/3 complex and the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), to examine their contribution to actin-based movement and filament organization. We varied the coating of the bead surface but left the extracts identical for all assays. We found that the degree of filament alignment in the actin comet tails depended on the surface ratio of VASP to Arp2/3. Alignment of actin filaments parallel to the direction of bead movement in the presence of VASP was accompanied by an abrupt 7-fold increase in velocity that was independent of bead size and by hollowing out of the comets. The actin filament-bundling proteins fimbrin and fascin did not appear to play a role in this transformation. Together with the idea that VASP enhances filament detachment and with the presence of pulling forces at the rear of the bead, a mesoscopic analysis of movement provides a possible explanation for our results.

  1. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  2. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  3. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-08-09

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus.

  4. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-01-01

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT–associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus. PMID:27457955

  5. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  6. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-11-05

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24-37 °C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an "active actin-membrane composite" cell surface.

  7. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T.; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24–37°C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an “active actin-membrane composite” cell surface. PMID:26378258

  8. Ginsenoside Rg1 Protects against Oxidative Stress-induced Neuronal Apoptosis through Myosin IIA-actin Related Cytoskeletal Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Qian; Xu, Yingqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Yanni; Tan, Yisha; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Guosheng; Ma, Xiaonan; Wang, Jingrong; Cao, Zhengyu; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cytoskeletal dysfunction of neurons has been implicated as a crucial cause of cell apoptosis or death in the central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. The application of neuroprotectants rescuing the neurons from cytoskeletal damage and apoptosis can be a potential treatment for these CNS diseases. Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), one of the major active components of ginseng, has been reported possessing notable neuroprotective activities. However, there is rare report about its effect on cytoskeleton and its undergoing mechanism. The current study is to reveal the regulatory effects of Rg1 on cytoskeletal and morphological lesion in oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. The results demonstrated that pre-treatment with Rg1 (0.1-10 μM) attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress through reducing the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level. The Rg1 treatment also abolished H2O2-induced morphological changes, including cell rounding, membrane blebbing, neurite retraction and nuclei condensation, which were generated by myosin IIA-actin interaction. These effects were mediated via the down-regulation of caspase-3, ROCK1 (Rho-associated kinase1) activation and myosin light chain (MLC, Ser-19) phosphorylation. Furthermore, inhibiting myosin II activity with blebbistatin partly blocked the neuroprotective effects of Rg1. The computer-aided homology modelling revealed that Rg1 preferentially positioned in the actin binding cleft of myosin IIA and might block the binding of myosin IIA to actin filaments. Accordingly, the neuroprotective mechanism of Rg1 is related to the activity that inhibits myosin IIA-actin interaction and the caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC signaling pathway. These findings put some insights into the unique neuroprotective properties of Rg1 associated with the regulation of myosin IIA-actin cytoskeletal structure under oxidative stress and provide experimental evidence for Rg1 in CNS diseases. PMID:27877086

  9. The roles of a ribosomal protein S19 polymer in a mouse model of carrageenan-induced acute pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Yamanegi, Koji; Kawakami, Toru; Yamada, Naoko; Kumanishi, Shunsuke; Futani, Hiroyuki; Nakasho, Keiji; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2017-02-07

    C5-deficient mice usually present moderate neutrophil activation during the initiation phase of acute inflammation. Conversely, C5a receptor (C5aR)-deficient mice show unusually excessive activation of neutrophils. We identified the ribosomal protein S19 (RP S19) polymer, which is cross-linked at Lys122 and Gln137 by transglutaminases in apoptotic neutrophils, as a second C5aR ligand during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. The RP S19 polymer promotes apoptosis via the neutrophil C5aR and phagocytosis via the macrophage C5aR. To confirm the roles of the RP S19 polymer, we employed a carrageenan-induced acute pleurisy mouse model using C57BL/6J mice with a knock-in of the Gln137Glu mutant RP S19 gene and replaced the RP S19 polymer with either an S-tagged C5a/RP S19 recombinant protein or the RP S19(122-145) peptide monomer and dimer (as functional C5aR agonists/antagonists) and the RP S19(122-145) peptide trimer (as a functional C5aR antagonist). Neutrophils and macrophages were still present in the thoracic cavities of the knock-in mice at 24h and 7days after carrageenan injection, respectively. Knock-in mice showed structural organization and severe hemorrhaging from the surrounding small vessels of the alveolar walls in the lung parenchyma. In contrast to the RP S19(122-145) peptide monomer and trimer, the simultaneous presence of S-tagged C5a/RP S19 and the RP S19(122-145) peptide dimer completely improved the physiological and pathological acute inflammatory cues. The RP S19 polymer, especially the dimer, appears to play a role at the resolution phase of carrageenan-induced acute pleurisy in C57BL/6J model mice.

  10. NDR proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alan M

    2010-01-01

    N-myc downregulated (NDR) genes were discovered more than fifteen years ago. Indirect evidence support a role in tumor progression and cellular differentiation, but their biochemical function is still unknown. Our detailed analyses on Arabidopsis NDR proteins (deisgnated NDR-like, NDL) show their involvement in altering auxin transport, local auxin gradients and expression level of auxin transport proteins. Animal NDL proteins may be involved in membrane recycling of E-cadherin and effector for the small GTPase. In light of these findings, we hypothesize that NDL proteins regulate vesicular trafficking of auxin transport facilitator PIN proteins by biochemically alterating the local lipid environment of PIN proteins. PMID:20724844

  11. Proteins (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an important nutrient that builds muscles and bones and provides energy. Protein can help with weight control because it helps you feel full and satisfied from your meals. The healthiest proteins are the leanest. This means ...

  12. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  13. Large scale systematic proteomic quantification from non-metastatic to metastatic colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuefei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Shaowen; Jin, Hong; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-07-01

    A systematic proteomic quantification of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues from stage I to stage IIIC was performed in large scale. 1017 proteins were identified with 338 proteins in quantitative changes by label free method, while 341 proteins were quantified with significant expression changes among 6294 proteins by iTRAQ method. We found that proteins related to migration expression increased and those for binding and adherent decreased during the colorectal cancer development according to the gene ontology (GO) annotation and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The integrin alpha 5 (ITA5) in integrin family was focused, which was consistent with the metastasis related pathway. The expression level of ITA5 decreased in metastasis tissues and the result has been further verified by Western blotting. Another two cell migration related proteins vitronectin (VTN) and actin-related protein (ARP3) were also proved to be up-regulated by both mass spectrometry (MS) based quantification results and Western blotting. Up to now, our result shows one of the largest dataset in colorectal cancer proteomics research. Our strategy reveals a disease driven omics-pattern for the metastasis colorectal cancer.

  14. An experimentally based computer search identifies unstructured membrane-binding sites in proteins: application to class I myosins, PAKS, and CARMIL.

    PubMed

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D

    2010-02-19

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro.

  15. Therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-01-01

    Protein-based therapeutics are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential. More than 100 genuine and similar number of modified therapeutic proteins are approved for clinical use in the European Union and the USA with 2010 sales of US$108 bln; monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) accounted for almost half (48%) of the sales. Based on their pharmacological activity, they can be divided into five groups: (a) replacing a protein that is deficient or abnormal; (b) augmenting an existing pathway; (c) providing a novel function or activity; (d) interfering with a molecule or organism; and (e) delivering other compounds or proteins, such as a radionuclide, cytotoxic drug, or effector proteins. Therapeutic proteins can also be grouped based on their molecular types that include antibody-based drugs, Fc fusion proteins, anticoagulants, blood factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, engineered protein scaffolds, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, interferons, interleukins, and thrombolytics. They can also be classified based on their molecular mechanism of activity as (a) binding non-covalently to target, e.g., mAbs; (b) affecting covalent bonds, e.g., enzymes; and (c) exerting activity without specific interactions, e.g., serum albumin. Most protein therapeutics currently on the market are recombinant and hundreds of them are in clinical trials for therapy of cancers, immune disorders, infections, and other diseases. New engineered proteins, including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs, and proteins with optimized pharmacokinetics, are currently under development. However, in the last several decades, there are no conceptually new methodological developments comparable, e.g., to genetic engineering leading to the development of recombinant therapeutic proteins. It appears that a paradigm change in methodologies and understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major

  16. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.

  17. Nervous Wreck and Cdc42 cooperate to regulate endocytic actin assembly during synaptic growth

    PubMed Central

    Rodal, Avital A.; Motola-Barnes, Rebecca N.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic morphology depends on endocytosis of activated growth signal receptors, but the mechanisms regulating this membrane trafficking event are unclear. Actin polymerization mediated by WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein) and the Arp2/3 (Actin related protein 2/3) complex generates forces at multiple stages of endocytosis. F-BAR/SH3 domain proteins play key roles in this process by coordinating membrane deformation with WASp-dependent actin polymerization. However, it is not known how other WASp ligands, such as the small GTPase Cdc42, coordinate with F-BAR/SH3 proteins to regulate actin polymerization at membranes. Nervous Wreck (Nwk) is a conserved neuronal F-BAR/SH3 protein that localizes to periactive zones at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and is required for regulation of synaptic growth via BMP signaling. Here we show that Nwk interacts with the endocytic proteins dynamin and Dap160 and functions together with Cdc42 to promote WASp-mediated actin polymerization in vitro and to regulate synaptic growth in vivo. Cdc42 function is associated with Rab11-dependent recycling endosomes, and we show that Rab11 co-localizes with Nwk at the NMJ. Taken together, our results suggest that synaptic growth activated by growth factor signaling is controlled at an endosomal compartment via coordinated Nwk and Cdc42-dependent actin assembly. PMID:18701694

  18. Tropomodulin 1 Regulation of Actin Is Required for the Formation of Large Paddle Protrusions Between Mature Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Catherine; Nowak, Roberta B.; Biswas, Sondip K.; Lo, Woo-Kuen; FitzGerald, Paul G.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the proteins required for specialized small interlocking protrusions and large paddle domains at lens fiber cell tricellular junctions (vertices), we developed a novel method to immunostain single lens fibers and studied changes in cell morphology due to loss of tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1), an F-actin pointed end–capping protein. Methods We investigated F-actin and F-actin–binding protein localization in interdigitations of Tmod1+/+ and Tmod1−/− single mature lens fibers. Results F-actin–rich small protrusions and large paddles were present along cell vertices of Tmod1+/+ mature fibers. In contrast, Tmod1−/− mature fiber cells lack normal paddle domains, while small protrusions were unaffected. In Tmod1+/+ mature fibers, Tmod1, β2-spectrin, and α-actinin are localized in large puncta in valleys between paddles; but in Tmod1−/− mature fibers, β2-spectrin was dispersed while α-actinin was redistributed at the base of small protrusions and rudimentary paddles. Fimbrin and Arp3 (actin-related protein 3) were located in puncta at the base of small protrusions, while N-cadherin and ezrin outlined the cell membrane in both Tmod1+/+ and Tmod1−/− mature fibers. Conclusions These results suggest that distinct F-actin organizations are present in small protrusions versus large paddles. Formation and/or maintenance of large paddle domains depends on a β2-spectrin–actin network stabilized by Tmod1. α-Actinin–crosslinked F-actin bundles are enhanced in absence of Tmod1, indicating altered cytoskeleton organization. Formation of small protrusions is likely facilitated by Arp3-branched and fimbrin-bundled F-actin networks, which do not depend on Tmod1. This is the first work to reveal the F-actin–associated proteins required for the formation of paddles between lens fibers. PMID:27537257

  19. Mammalian verprolin CR16 acts as a modulator of ITSN scaffold proteins association with actin.

    PubMed

    Kropyvko, Sergii; Gryaznova, Tetyana; Morderer, Dmytro; Rynditch, Alla

    2017-03-18

    Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements are required for normal cell functioning, and their deregulation leads to various pathologies. Members of two mammalian protein families - ITSNs (ITSN1 and ITSN2) and verprolins (WIP, CR16 and WIRE) are involved in Cdc42/N-WASP/Arp2/3 signaling pathway-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Recently we demonstrated that ITSNs interact with the actin-regulating protein WIP. Here, we show that other member of verprolin family, CR16, also forms complexes with ITSN1 and ITSN2 in human cell lines. The actin-binding protein CR16 modulates ITSN/β-actin association. Moreover, overexpressed CR16 promoted co-localization of ITSN1 with F-actin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our data demonstrated that CR16 mRNA is expressed in glioblastoma and breast tumors. These findings provide the basis for further functional investigations of the ITSN/CR16 complex that may play an important role in actin remodeling and cellular invasion.

  20. 4-Hydroxy-7-oxo-5-heptenoic Acid (HOHA) Lactone is a Biologically Active Precursor for the Generation of 2-(ω-Carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) Derivatives of Proteins and Ethanolamine Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Linetsky, Mikhail; Guo, Junhong; Choi, Jaewoo; Hong, Li; Chamberlain, Amanda S.; Howell, Scott J.; Howes, Andrew M.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    2-(ω-Carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) derivatives of proteins were previously shown to have significant pathological and physiological relevance to age-related macular degeneration, cancer and wound healing. Previously, we showed that CEPs are generated in the reaction of ε-amino groups of protein lysyl residues with 1-palmityl-2-(4-hydroxy-7-oxo-5-heptenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (HOHA-PC), a lipid oxidation product uniquely generated by oxidative truncation of docosahexanenate-containing phosphatidylcholine. More recently, we found that HOHA-PC rapidly releases HOHA-lactone and 2-lyso-PC (t1/2 = 30 min at 37 °C) by non-enzymatic transesterification/deacylation. Now we report that HOHA-lactone reacts with Ac-Gly-Lys-OMe or human serum albumin to form CEP derivatives in vitro. Incubation of human red blood cell ghosts with HOHA-lactone generates CEP derivatives of membrane proteins and ethanolamine phospholipids. Quantitative analysis of the products generated in the reaction HOHA-PC with Ac-Gly-Lys-OMe showed that HOHA-PC mainly forms CEP-dipeptide that is not esterified to 2-lysophosphatidycholine. Thus, the HOHA-lactone pathway predominates over the direct reaction of HOHA-PC to produce the CEP-PC-dipeptide derivative. Myleoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− promoted in vitro oxidation of either 1-palmityl-2-docosahexaneoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DHA-PC) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) generates HOHA-lactone in yields of 0.45% and 0.78%, respectively. Lipid oxidation in human red blood cell ghosts also releases HOHA-lactone. Oxidative injury of ARPE-19 human retinal pigmented epithelial cells by exposure to H2O2 generated CEP derivatives. Treatment of ARPE-19 cells with HOHA-lactone generated CEP-modified proteins. Low (submicromolar), but not high, concentrations of HOHA-lactone promote increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by ARPE-19 cells. Therefore, HOHA-lactone not only serves as an intermediate for the generation of CEPs but

  1. Polarity protein Crumbs homolog-3 (CRB3) regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics through its action on F-actin organization in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Lui, Wing-yee; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs homolog 3 (or Crumbs3, CRB3) is a polarity protein expressed by Sertoli and germ cells at the basal compartment in the seminiferous epithelium. CRB3 also expressed at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), co-localized with F-actin, TJ proteins occludin/ZO-1 and basal ES (ectoplasmic specialization) proteins N-cadherin/β-catenin at stages IV-VII only. The binding partners of CRB3 in the testis were the branched actin polymerization protein Arp3, and the barbed end-capping and bundling protein Eps8, illustrating its possible role in actin organization. CRB3 knockdown (KD) by RNAi in Sertoli cells with an established tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier perturbed the TJ-barrier via changes in the distribution of TJ- and basal ES-proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes were the result of CRB3 KD-induced re-organization of actin microfilaments, in which actin microfilaments were truncated, and extensively branched, thereby destabilizing F-actin-based adhesion protein complexes at the BTB. Using Polyplus in vivo-jetPEI as a transfection medium with high efficiency for CRB3 KD in the testis, the CRB3 KD testes displayed defects in spermatid and phagosome transport, and also spermatid polarity due to a disruption of F-actin organization. In summary, CRB3 is an actin microfilament regulator, playing a pivotal role in organizing actin filament bundles at the ES. PMID:27358069

  2. Deoxyhypusine Modification of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 5A (eIF5A) Is Essential for Trypanosoma brucei Growth and for Expression of Polyprolyl-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Suong; Leija, Chrisopher; Kinch, Lisa; Regmi, Sandesh; Li, Qiong; Grishin, Nick V.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. Polyamine biosynthesis is essential in T. brucei, and the polyamine spermidine is required for synthesis of a novel cofactor called trypanothione and for deoxyhypusine modification of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). eIF5A promotes translation of proteins containing polyprolyl tracts in mammals and yeast. To evaluate the function of eIF5A in T. brucei, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down eIF5A levels and found that it is essential for T. brucei growth. The RNAi-induced growth defect was complemented by expression of wild-type human eIF5A but not by a Lys-50 mutant that blocks modification by deoxyhypusine. Bioinformatics analysis showed that 15% of the T. brucei proteome contains 3 or more consecutive prolines and that actin-related proteins and cysteine proteases were highly enriched in the group. Steady-state protein levels of representative proteins containing 9 consecutive prolines that are involved in actin assembly (formin and CAP/Srv2p) were significantly reduced by knockdown of eIF5A. Several T. brucei polyprolyl proteins are involved in flagellar assembly. Knockdown of TbeIF5A led to abnormal cell morphologies and detached flagella, suggesting that eIF5A is important for translation of proteins needed for these processes. Potential specialized functions for eIF5A in T. brucei in translation of variable surface glycoproteins were also uncovered. Inhibitors of deoxyhypusination would be expected to cause a pleomorphic effect on multiple cell processes, suggesting that deoxyhypusine/hypusine biosynthesis could be a promising drug target in not just T. brucei but in other eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:26082486

  3. Mechanical force-induced polymerization and depolymerization of F-actin at water/solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Hu, Xiuyuan; Lei, Haozhi; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin polymerization and depolymerization behaviors at water/solid interfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in liquid. By raster scanning an AFM probe on a substrate surface with a certain load, it was found that actin monomers could polymerize into filaments without the help of actin related proteins (ARPs). Further study indicated that actin monomers were inclined to form filaments only under a small scanning load. The polymerized actin filaments would be depolymerized when the mechanical force was stronger. A possible mechanism has been suggested to explain the mechanical force induced actin polymerization.Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin

  4. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation (polymyalgia rheumatica). Taking whey protein in a dairy product twice daily for 8 weeks does not improve muscle function, walking speed, or other movement tests in people with polymyalgia rheumatica. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to rate whey protein for these uses.

  5. A conformational change within the WAVE2 complex regulates its degradation following cellular activation

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Noah; Biber, Guy; Fried, Sophia; Reicher, Barak; Levy, Omer; Sabag, Batel; Noy, Elad; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2017-01-01

    WASp family Verprolin-homologous protein-2 (WAVE2), a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family of actin nucleation promoting factors, is a central regulator of actin cytoskeleton polymerization and dynamics. Multiple signaling pathways operate via WAVE2 to promote the actin-nucleating activity of the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. WAVE2 exists as a part of a pentameric protein complex known as the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), which is unstable in the absence of its individual proteins. While the involvement of WAVE2 in actin polymerization has been well documented, its negative regulation mechanism is poorly characterized to date. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE2 undergoes ubiquitylation in a T-cell activation dependent manner, followed by proteasomal degradation. The WAVE2 ubiquitylation site was mapped to lysine 45, located at the N-terminus where WAVE2 binds to the WRC. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we reveal that the autoinhibitory conformation of the WRC maintains the stability of WAVE2 in resting cells; the release of autoinhibition following T-cell activation facilitates the exposure of WAVE2 to ubiquitylation, leading to its degradation. The dynamic conformational structures of WAVE2 during cellular activation dictate its degradation. PMID:28332566

  6. Formin 1 Regulates Ectoplasmic Specialization in the Rat Testis Through Its Actin Nucleation and Bundling Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Wong, Chris K. C.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.

    2015-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, developing spermatids and preleptotene spermatocytes are transported across the adluminal compartment and the blood-testis barrier (BTB), respectively, so that spermatids line up near the luminal edge to prepare for spermiation, whereas preleptotene spermatocytes enter the adluminal compartment to differentiate into late spermatocytes to prepare for meiosis I/II. These cellular events involve actin microfilament reorganization at the testis-specific, actin-rich Sertoli-spermatid and Sertoli-Sertoli cell junction called apical and basal ectoplasmic specialization (ES). Formin 1, an actin nucleation protein known to promote actin microfilament elongation and bundling, was expressed at the apical ES but limited to stage VII of the epithelial cycle, whereas its expression at the basal ES/BTB stretched from stage III to stage VI, diminished in stage VII, and was undetectable in stage VIII tubules. Using an in vitro model of studying Sertoli cell BTB function by RNA interference and biochemical assays to monitor actin bundling and polymerization activity, a knockdown of formin 1 in Sertoli cells by approximately 70% impeded the tight junction-permeability function. This disruptive effect on the tight junction barrier was mediated by a loss of actin microfilament bundling and actin polymerization capability mediated by changes in the localization of branched actin-inducing protein Arp3 (actin-related protein 3), and actin bundling proteins Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8) and palladin, thereby disrupting cell adhesion. Formin 1 knockdown in vivo was found to impede spermatid adhesion, transport, and polarity, causing defects in spermiation in which elongated spermatids remained embedded into the epithelium in stage IX tubules, mediated by changes in the spatiotemporal expression of Arp3, Eps8, and palladin. In summary, formin 1 is a regulator of ES dynamics. PMID:25901598

  7. Rapid signaling of estrogen to WAVE1 and moesin controls neuronal spine formation via the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angel Matias; Flamini, Marina Ines; Fu, Xiao-Dong; Mannella, Paolo; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Goglia, Lorenzo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2009-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of neuronal cell morphology, and this is thought to be critical for gender-specific differences in brain function and dysfunction. Dendritic spine formation is dependent on actin remodeling by the WASP-family verprolin homologous (WAVE1) protein, which controls actin polymerization through the actin-related protein (Arp)-2/3 complex. Emerging evidence indicates that estrogens are effective regulators of the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types via rapid, extranuclear signaling mechanisms. We here show that 17beta-estradiol (E2) administration to rat cortical neurons leads to phosphorylation of WAVE1 on the serine residues 310, 397, and 441 and to WAVE1 redistribution toward the cell membrane at sites of dendritic spine formation. WAVE1 phosphorylation is found to be triggered by a Galpha(i)/Gbeta protein-dependent, rapid extranuclear signaling of estrogen receptor alpha to c-Src and to the small GTPase Rac1. Rac1 recruits the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk5) that directly phosphorylates WAVE1 on the three serine residues. After WAVE1 phosphorylation by E2, the Arp-2/3 complex concentrates at sites of spine formation, where it triggers the local reorganization of actin fibers. In parallel, E2 recruits a Galpha(13)-dependent pathway to RhoA and ROCK-2, leading to activation of actin remodeling via the actin-binding protein, moesin. Silencing of WAVE1 or of moesin abrogates the increase in dendritic spines induced by E2 in cortical neurons. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the control of actin polymerization and branching via moesin or WAVE1 is a key function of estrogen receptor alpha in neurons, which may be particularly relevant for the regulation of dendritic spines.

  8. Identification of a novel regulatory sequence of actin nucleation promoting factor encoded by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Shili; Hu, Xue; Zhou, Yuan; Mu, Jingfang; Pei, Rongjuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2015-04-10

    Actin polymerization induced by nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) is one of the most fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic cells. NPFs contain a conserved output domain (VCA domain) near the C terminus, which interacts with and activates the cellular actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) to induce actin polymerization and a diverse regulatory domain near the N terminus. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsid protein P78/83 is a virus-encoded NPF that contains a C-terminal VCA domain and induces actin polymerization in virus-infected cells. However, there is no similarity between the N terminus of P78/83 and that of other identified NPFs, suggesting that P78/83 may possess a unique regulatory mechanism. In this study, we identified a multifunctional regulatory sequence (MRS) located near the N terminus of P78/83 and determined that one of its functions is to serve as a degron to mediate P78/83 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In AcMNPV-infected cells, the MRS also binds to another nucleocapsid protein, BV/ODV-C42, which stabilizes P78/83 and modulates the P78/83-Arp2/3 interaction to orchestrate actin polymerization. In addition, the MRS is also essential for the incorporation of P78/83 into the nucleocapsid, ensuring virion mobility powered by P78/83-induced actin polymerization. The triple functions of the MRS enable P78/83 to serve as an essential viral protein in the AcMNPV replication cycle, and the possible roles of the MRS in orchestrating the virus-induced actin polymerization and viral genome decapsidation are discussed.

  9. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 215. Read More Agammaglobulinemia Albumin - blood (serum) test Amino acids Antibody Burns Chronic Congenital nephrotic syndrome Fibrinogen blood test Glomerulonephritis Hemoglobin Liver disease Malabsorption Multiple myeloma Polycythemia vera Protein in diet ...

  10. Coordinated autoinhibition of F-BAR domain membrane binding and WASp activation by Nervous Wreck

    PubMed Central

    Stanishneva-Konovalova, Tatiana B.; Kelley, Charlotte F.; Eskin, Tania L.; Messelaar, Emily M.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Sokolova, Olga S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane remodeling by Fes/Cip4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs167 (F-BAR) proteins is regulated by autoinhibitory interactions between their SRC homology 3 (SH3) and F-BAR domains. The structural basis of autoregulation, and whether it affects interactions of SH3 domains with other cellular ligands, remain unclear. Here we used single-particle electron microscopy to determine the structure of the F-BAR protein Nervous Wreck (Nwk) in both soluble and membrane-bound states. On membrane binding, Nwk SH3 domains do not completely dissociate from the F-BAR dimer, but instead shift from its concave surface to positions on either side of the dimer. Unexpectedly, along with controlling membrane binding, these autoregulatory interactions inhibit the ability of Nwk-SH3a to activate Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp)/actin related protein (Arp) 2/3-dependent actin filament assembly. In Drosophila neurons, Nwk autoregulation restricts SH3a domain-dependent synaptopod formation, synaptic growth, and actin organization. Our results define structural rearrangements in Nwk that control F-BAR–membrane interactions as well as SH3 domain activities, and suggest that these two functions are tightly coordinated in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27601635

  11. Protein Crystallizability.

    PubMed

    Smialowski, Pawel; Wong, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining diffracting quality crystals remains a major challenge in protein structure research. We summarize and compare methods for selecting the best protein targets for crystallization, construct optimization and crystallization condition design. Target selection methods are divided into algorithms predicting the chance of successful progression through all stages of structural determination (from cloning to solving the structure) and those focusing only on the crystallization step. We tried to highlight pros and cons of different approaches examining the following aspects: data size, redundancy and representativeness, overfitting during model construction, and results evaluation. In summary, although in recent years progress was made and several sequence properties were reported to be relevant for crystallization, the successful prediction of protein crystallization behavior and selection of corresponding crystallization conditions continue to challenge structural researchers.

  12. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  13. Differential expression of genes and proteins between electric organ and skeletal muscle in the mormyrid electric fish Brienomyrus brachyistius

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Jason R.; Hopkins, Carl D.; Deitcher, David L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Electric organs (EOs) have evolved independently in vertebrates six times from skeletal muscle (SM). The transcriptional changes accompanying this developmental transformation are not presently well understood. Mormyrids and gymnotiforms are two highly convergent groups of weakly electric fish that have independently evolved EOs: while much is known about development and gene expression in gymnotiforms, very little is known about development and gene expression in mormyrids. This lack of data limits prospects for comparative work. We report here on the characterization of 28 differentially expressed genes between SM and EO tissues in the mormyrid Brienomyrus brachyistius, which were identified using suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). Forward and reverse SSH was performed on tissue samples of EO and SM resulting in one cDNA library enriched with mRNAs expressed in EO, and a second library representing mRNAs unique to SM. Nineteen expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified in EO and nine were identified in SM using BLAST searching of Danio rerio sequences available in NCBI databases. We confirmed differential expression of all 28 ESTs using RT-PCR. In EO, these ESTs represent four classes of proteins: (1) ion pumps, including the α- and β-subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase, and a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase; (2) Ca2+-binding protein S100, several parvalbumin paralogs, calcyclin-binding protein and neurogranin; (3) sarcomeric proteins troponin I, myosin heavy chain and actin-related protein complex subunit 3 (Arcp3); and (4) the transcription factors enhancer of rudimentary homolog (ERH) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to demonstrate the translation of seven proteins (myosin heavy chain, Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase, MEF2, troponin and parvalbumin) and their cellular localization in EO and SM. Our findings suggest that mormyrids express several paralogs of muscle-specific genes

  14. Inhibition of the Expression of the Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Inhibits Exosome Secretion in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Gangalum, Rajendra K; Bhat, Ankur M; Kohan, Sirus A; Bhat, Suraj P

    2016-06-17

    Exosomes carry cell type-specific molecular cargo to extracellular destinations and therefore act as lateral vectors of intercellular communication and transfer of genetic information from one cell to the other. We have shown previously that the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) is exported out of the adult human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE19) packaged in exosomes. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of the expression of αB via shRNA inhibits exosome secretion from ARPE19 cells indicating that exosomal cargo may have a role in exosome biogenesis (synthesis and/or secretion). Sucrose density gradient fractionation of the culture medium and cellular extracts suggests continued synthesis of exosomes but an inhibition of exosome secretion. In cells where αB expression was inhibited, the distribution of CD63 (LAMP3), an exosome marker, is markedly altered from the normal dispersed pattern to a stacked perinuclear presence. Interestingly, the total anti-CD63(LAMP3) immunofluorescence in the native and αB-inhibited cells remains unchanged suggesting continued exosome synthesis under conditions of impaired exosome secretion. Importantly, inhibition of the expression of αB results in a phenotype of the RPE cell that contains an increased number of vacuoles and enlarged (fused) vesicles that show increased presence of CD63(LAMP3) and LAMP1 indicating enhancement of the endolysosomal compartment. This is further corroborated by increased Rab7 labeling of this compartment (RabGTPase 7 is known to be associated with late endosome maturation). These data collectively point to a regulatory role for αB in exosome biogenesis possibly via its involvement at a branch point in the endocytic pathway that facilitates secretion of exosomes.

  15. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  16. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/.

  17. Endocytic protein intersectin-l regulates actin assembly via Cdc42 and N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Hussain, N K; Jenna, S; Glogauer, M; Quinn, C C; Wasiak, S; Guipponi, M; Antonarakis, S E; Kay, B K; Stossel, T P; Lamarche-Vane, N; McPherson, P S

    2001-10-01

    Intersectin-s is a modular scaffolding protein regulating the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. In addition to the Eps15 homology (EH) and Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of intersectin-s, the neuronal variant (intersectin-l) also has Dbl homology (DH), pleckstrin homology (PH) and C2 domains. We now show that intersectin-l functions through its DH domain as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42. In cultured cells, expression of DH-domain-containing constructs cause actin rearrangements specific for Cdc42 activation. Moreover, in vivo studies reveal that stimulation of Cdc42 by intersectin-l accelerates actin assembly via N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex. N-WASP binds directly to intersectin-l and upregulates its GEF activity, thereby generating GTP-bound Cdc42, a critical activator of N-WASP. These studies reveal a role for intersectin-l in a novel mechanism of N-WASP activation and in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Screening a yeast library of temperature-sensitive mutants reveals a role for actin in tombusvirus RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Baker, Jannine; Nagy, Peter D

    2016-02-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses drives the evolutionary arms race with host's antiviral strategies and recombination also facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. In this paper, the authors used tombusvirus and a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant library of yeast to identify 40 host proteins affecting viral recombination in yeast model host. Subsequent detailed analysis with two identified actin-related proteins, Act1p and Arp3p, has revealed that the wt actin network helps TBSV to maintain low level viral recombination. Pharmacological inhibition of actin in plant protoplasts confirmed the role of the actin network in tombusvirus recombination. An in vitro approach revealed the altered activity of the tombusvirus replicase in the presence of mutated Act1p. The authors show more efficient recruitment of a cellular DEAD-box helicase, which enhances tombusvirus recombination, into the membrane-bound replicase in Act1p mutant yeast. Overall, this work shows that the actin network affects tombusvirus recombination in yeast and plant cells.

  19. The properties of hub proteins in a yeast-aggregated cell cycle network and its phase sub-networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomei; Guo, Jie; Zhang, Da-Yong; Lin, Kui

    2009-10-01

    Currently, most researches on the properties of interacting proteins, hubs in particular, are mainly based on an aggregated network of binary interactions. Here, by projecting a yeast-aggregated cell cycle network into four phase (G1, S, G2 and M) sub-networks, we explored the properties of the hubs of the aggregated network. We found, as expected that only 69% (103 of 149) of hubs still act as hubs in at least one of the four sub-networks. Interestingly, those (19%) that are not hubs in any phase tend to perform multiple functions and differ from the others in their network positions. We also analyzed the potential biological features among the dynamic and static hubs. Finally, we investigated the dynamic properties of two complexes, the anaphase-promoting complex and the chromatin-remodeling complex. The dynamic function of the anaphase-promoting complex is represented by its interactions with CDC28 at different stages of mitotic cell cycle. The chromatin-remodeling complex is assembled when its dynamic component, ARP7, is periodically expressed in S phase to function in chromatin remodeling, which could reflect the just-in-time assembly of protein complexes. In conclusion, the study of decomposing the aggregated network and characterizing the hubs in decomposed sub-networks is useful for further understanding the dynamic functions of yeast cell cycle.

  20. SWR1 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Subunits and H2A.Z Have Non-overlapping Functions in Immunity and Gene Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Berriri, Souha; Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Kumar, S Vinod

    2016-07-06

    Incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z into nucleosomes by the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex is a critical step in eukaryotic gene regulation. In Arabidopsis, SWR1c and H2A.Z have been shown to control gene expression underlying development and environmental responses. Although they have been implicated in defense, the specific roles of the complex subunits and H2A.Z in immunity are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the SWR1c subunits, PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1 (PIE1), ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), and SWR1 COMPLEX 6 (SWC6), as well as H2A.Z, in defense and gene regulation. We found that SWR1c components play different roles in resistance to different pathogens. Loss of PIE1 and SWC6 function as well as depletion of H2A.Z led to reduced basal resistance, while loss of ARP6 fucntion resulted in enhanced resistance. We found that mutations in PIE1 and SWC6 resulted in impaired effector-triggered immunity. Mutation in SWR1c components and H2A.Z also resulted in compromised jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated immunity. Genome-wide expression analyses similarly reveal distinct roles for H2A.Z and SWR1c components in gene regulation, and suggest a potential role for PIE1 in the regulation of the cross talk between defense signaling pathways. Our data show that although they are part of the same complex, Arabidopsis SWR1c components could have non-redundant functions in plant immunity and gene regulation.

  1. Identification of candidates for interacting partners of the tail domain of DcNMCP1, a major component of the Daucus carota nuclear lamina-like structure.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Ryota; Tsugama, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Michihiro; Fujino, Kaien; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    NMCP/CRWN (NUCLEAR MATRIX CONSTITUENT PROTEIN/CROWDED NUCLEI) is a major component of a protein fibrous meshwork (lamina-like structure) on the plant inner nuclear membrane. NMCP/CRWN contributes to regulating nuclear shape and nuclear functions. An NMCP/CRWN protein in Daucus carota (DcNMCP1) is localized to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells, and surrounds chromosomes in cells in metaphase and anaphase. The N-terminal region and the C-terminal region of DcNMCP1 are both necessary for localizing DcNMCP1 to the nuclear periphery. Here candidate interacting partners of the amino acid position 975-1053 of DcNMCP1 (T975-1053), which is present in the C-terminal region and contains a conserved sequence that plays a role in localizing DcNMCP1 to the nuclear periphery, are screened for. Arabidopsis thaliana nuclear proteins were subjected to far-Western blotting with GST-fused T975-1053 as a probe, and signals were detected at the positions corresponding to ∼70, ∼40, and ∼18 kDa. These ∼70, ∼40, and ∼18 kDa nuclear proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, and subjected to a yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) analysis with T975-1053 as bait. In this analysis, the ∼40 kDa protein ARP7, which is a nuclear actin-related protein possibly involved in regulating chromatin structures, was confirmed to interact with T975-1053. Independently of the far-Western blotting, a Y2H screen was performed using T975-1053 as bait. Targeted Y2H assays confirmed that 3 proteins identified in the screen, MYB3, SINAT1, and BIM1, interact with T975-1053. These proteins might have roles in NMCP/CRWN protein-mediated biologic processes.

  2. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Learning About Proteins KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Proteins A A ... the foods you eat. continue Different Kinds of Protein Protein from animal sources, such as meat and ...

  3. Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David A.; Ptacek, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Protein chips have emerged as a promising approach for a wide variety of applications including the identification of protein-protein interactions, protein-phospholipid interactions, small molecule targets, and substrates of proteins kinases. They can also be used for clinical diagnostics and monitoring disease states. This article reviews current methods in the generation and applications of protein microarrays. PMID:17126887

  4. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  5. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  6. Localization and role of MYO-1, an endocytic protein in hyphae of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bartnicki-García, Salomón; Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa R

    2016-03-01

    The subapical endocytic collar is a prominent feature of hyphae of Neurospora crassa. It comprises a dynamic collection of actin patches associated with a number of proteins required for endocytosis, namely, ARP-2/3 complex, fimbrin, coronin, etc. We presently show that MYO-1 is another key component of this endocytic collar. A myo-1 sequence was identified in the genome of N. crassa and used it to generate a strain with a myo-1-sgfp allele under the ccg1 promoter. Examination of living hyphae by confocal microscopy, revealed MYO-1-GFP located mainly as a dynamic collection of small patches arranged in collar-like fashion in the hyphal subapex. Dual tagging showed MYO-1-GFP partially colocalized with two other endocytic proteins, fimbrin and coronin. MYO-1 was also present during septum formation. By recovering a viable strain, albeit severely inhibited, after deletion of myo-1, it was possible to investigate the phenotypic consequences of the elimination of MYO-1. Deletion of myo-1 caused a severe reduction in growth rate (95%), near absence of aerial mycelium and no conidiation. A reduced uptake of the lipophilic dye FM4-64 indicated a deficiency in endocytosis in the Δmyo-1 mutant. Hyphae were produced by the Δmyo-1 mutant but their morphogenesis was severely affected; hyphal morphology was distorted displaying irregular periods of isotropic and polarized growth. The morphological alterations were accompanied, and presumably caused, by a disruption in the organization and dynamics of a myosin-deprived actin cytoskeleton that, ultimately, compromised the stability and function of the Spitzenkörper as a vesicle supply center.

  7. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  8. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  9. Retrolinkin recruits the WAVE1 protein complex to facilitate BDNF-induced TrkB endocytosis and dendrite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenchang; Fu, Xiuping; Zhu, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Retrolinkin, a neuronal membrane protein, coordinates with endophilin A1 and mediates early endocytic trafficking and signal transduction of the ligand–receptor complex formed between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), in dendrites of CNS neurons. Here we report that retrolinkin interacts with the CYFIP1/2 subunit of the WAVE1 complex, a member of the WASP/WAVE family of nucleation-promoting factors that binds and activates the Arp2/3 complex to promote branched actin polymerization. WAVE1, not N-WASP, is required for BDNF-induced TrkB endocytosis and dendrite outgrowth. Disruption of the interaction between retrolinkin and CYFIP1/2 impairs recruitment of WAVE1 to neuronal plasma membrane upon BDNF addition and blocks internalization of activated TrkB. We also show that WAVE1-mediated endocytosis of BDNF-activated TrkB is actin dependent and clathrin independent. These results not only reveal the mechanistic role of retrolinkin in BDNF–TrkB endocytosis, but also indicate that WASP/WAVE-dependent actin polymerization during endocytosis is regulated by cell type–specific and cargo-specific modulators. PMID:27605705

  10. Genetic ablation of N-linked glycosylation reveals two key folding pathways for R345W fibulin-3, a secreted protein associated with retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2015-01-01

    An R345W mutation in the N-glycoprotein, fibulin-3 (F3), results in inefficient F3 folding/secretion and higher intracellular F3 levels. Inheritance of this mutation causes the retinal dystrophy malattia leventinese. N-Linked glycosylation is a common cotranslational protein modification that can regulate protein folding efficiency and energetics. Therefore, we explored how N-glycosylation alters the protein homeostasis or proteostasis of wild-type (WT) and R345W F3 in ARPE-19 cells. Enzymatic and lectin binding assays confirmed that WT and R345W F3 are both primarily N-glycosylated at Asn249. Tunicamycin treatment selectively reduced R345W F3 secretion by 87% (vs. WT F3). Genetic elimination of F3 N-glycosylation (via an N249Q mutation) caused R345W F3 to aggregate intracellularly and adopt an altered secreted conformation. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein 78) and GRP94 (glucose-regulated protein 94), and the ER lectins calnexin and calreticulin were identified as F3 binding partners by immunoprecipitation. Significantly more N249Q and N249Q/R345W F3 interacted with GRP94, while substantially less N249Q and N249Q/R345W interacted with the ER lectins than their N-glycosylated counterparts. Inhibition of GRP94 ATPase activity reduced only N249Q/R345W F3 secretion (by 62%), demonstrating this variant’s unique reliance on GRP94 for secretion. These observations suggest that R345W F3, but not WT F3, requires N-glycosylation to acquire a stable, native-like structure.—Hulleman, J. D., Kelly, J. W. Genetic ablation of N-linked glycosylation reveals two key folding pathways for R345W fibulin-3, a secreted protein associated with retinal degeneration. PMID:25389134

  11. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  12. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  13. Protein splicing: selfish genes invade cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Neff, N F

    1993-12-01

    Protein splicing is a series of enzymatic events involving intramolecular protein breakage, rejoining and intron homing, in which introns are able to promote the recombinative transposition of their own coding sequences. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic spliced proteins have conserved similar gene structure, but little amino acid identity. The genes coding for these spliced proteins contain internal in-frame introns that encode polypeptides that apparently self-excise from the resulting host protein sequences. Excision of the 'protein intron' is coupled with joining of the two flanking protein regions encoded by exons of the host gene. Some introns of this type encode DNA endonucleases, related to Group I RNA intron gene products, that stimulate gene conversion and self-transmission.

  14. Nck adaptors, besides promoting N-WASP mediated actin-nucleation activity at pedestals, influence the cellular levels of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir effector

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Pelegrin, Elvira; Kenny, Brendan; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) binding to human intestinal cells triggers the formation of disease-associated actin rich structures called pedestals. The latter process requires the delivery, via a Type 3 secretion system, of the translocated Intimin receptor (Tir) protein into the host plasma membrane where binding of a host kinase-modified form to the bacterial surface protein Intimin triggers pedestal formation. Tir-Intimin interaction recruits the Nck adaptor to a Tir tyrosine phosphorylated residue where it activates neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP); initiating the major pathway to actin polymerization mediated by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. Previous studies with Nck-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) identified a key role for Nck in pedestal formation, presumed to reflect a lack of N-WASP activation. Here, we show the defect relates to reduced amounts of Tir within Nck-deficient cells. Indeed, Tir delivery and, thus, pedestal formation defects were much greater for MEFs than HeLa (human epithelial) cells. Crucially, the levels of two other effectors (EspB/EspF) within Nck-deficient MEFs were not reduced unlike that of Map (Mitochondrial associated protein) which, like Tir, requires CesT chaperone function for efficient delivery. Interestingly, drugs blocking various host protein degradation pathways failed to increase Tir cellular levels unlike an inhibitor of deacetylase activity (Trichostatin A; TSA). Treatments with TSA resulted in significant recovery of Tir levels, potentiation of actin polymerization and improvement in bacterial attachment to cells. Our findings have important implications for the current model of Tir-mediated actin polymerization and opens new lines of research in this area. PMID:25482634

  15. Screening of candidate genes for primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Xie, Lin; Ye, Jian; Liu, Yuewuyang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness in the world. To make progress in understanding POAG, it is necessary to identify more POAG-causing genes. Methods Using haplotype analysis, we found that mutational region is located on chromosome 2 in two families. Furthermore, we screened 11 candidate genes on chromosome 2 by protein–protein interaction (PPI) analysis, including mutS homolog 6 (MSH6), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), v-rel reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog (REL), endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), vaccinia related kinase 2 (VRK2), F-box protein 11 (FBXO11), EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1), reticulon 4 (RTN4), RAB1A, member RAS oncogene family (RAB1A), ARP2 actin-related protein 2 homolog (ACTR2), and calmodulin 2 (phosphorylase kinase, delta; CALM2). These 11 genes are all predicted to be related to trabecular meshwork changes and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells in POAG patients. Results According to our study, FBXO11 and VRK2 may interact with tumor protein p53 to regulate mitochondrial membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane organization, and apoptosis. MSH2 is responsible for repairing DNA mismatches and RTN4 is for neuronal regeneration. Therefore, they are supposed to play a negative role in cellular process in POAG. CALM2 may be involved in retinal ganglion cell death and oxidative damage to cell communication. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the genes above may be associated with pathogenesis of POAG. PMID:22876139

  16. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  17. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  18. Insights on the Cuprate High Energy Anomaly Observed in ARPES

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, Brian

    2011-08-16

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). The anomaly is present for both hole- and electron-doped cuprates as well as the half-filled parent insulators with different energy scales arising on either side of the phase diagram. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. creating a 'waterfall'-like appearance, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram. We find that the anomaly demarcates a transition, or cross-over, from a quasiparticle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character.

  19. Combat Resource Management (11bm) Applied Research Project (ARP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Right of Canada as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2009 c© Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le...temps critiques représentent des défis significatifs pour les futurs systèmes de commandement et contrôle embarqués. En plus d’autres

  20. Genetic ablation of N-linked glycosylation reveals two key folding pathways for R345W fibulin-3, a secreted protein associated with retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-02-01

    An R345W mutation in the N-glycoprotein, fibulin-3 (F3), results in inefficient F3 folding/secretion and higher intracellular F3 levels. Inheritance of this mutation causes the retinal dystrophy malattia leventinese. N-Linked glycosylation is a common cotranslational protein modification that can regulate protein folding efficiency and energetics. Therefore, we explored how N-glycosylation alters the protein homeostasis or proteostasis of wild-type (WT) and R345W F3 in ARPE-19 cells. Enzymatic and lectin binding assays confirmed that WT and R345W F3 are both primarily N-glycosylated at Asn249. Tunicamycin treatment selectively reduced R345W F3 secretion by 87% (vs. WT F3). Genetic elimination of F3 N-glycosylation (via an N249Q mutation) caused R345W F3 to aggregate intracellularly and adopt an altered secreted conformation. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein 78) and GRP94 (glucose-regulated protein 94), and the ER lectins calnexin and calreticulin were identified as F3 binding partners by immunoprecipitation. Significantly more N249Q and N249Q/R345W F3 interacted with GRP94, while substantially less N249Q and N249Q/R345W interacted with the ER lectins than their N-glycosylated counterparts. Inhibition of GRP94 ATPase activity reduced only N249Q/R345W F3 secretion (by 62%), demonstrating this variant's unique reliance on GRP94 for secretion. These observations suggest that R345W F3, but not WT F3, requires N-glycosylation to acquire a stable, native-like structure.

  1. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  2. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  3. Molecular modelling of protein-protein/protein-solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchko, Tyler

    The inner workings of individual cells are based on intricate networks of protein-protein interactions. However, each of these individual protein interactions requires a complex physical interaction between proteins and their aqueous environment at the atomic scale. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations are used in three theoretical studies to gain insight at the atomic scale about protein hydration, protein structure and tubulin-tubulin (protein-protein) interactions, as found in microtubules. Also presented, in a fourth project, is a molecular model of solvation coupled with the Amber molecular modelling package, to facilitate further studies without the need of explicitly modelled water. Basic properties of a minimally solvated protein were calculated through an extended study of myoglobin hydration with explicit solvent, directly investigating water and protein polarization. Results indicate a close correlation between polarization of both water and protein and the onset of protein function. The methodology of explicit solvent molecular dynamics was further used to study tubulin and microtubules. Extensive conformational sampling of the carboxy-terminal tails of 8-tubulin was performed via replica exchange molecular dynamics, allowing the characterisation of the flexibility, secondary structure and binding domains of the C-terminal tails through statistical analysis methods. Mechanical properties of tubulin and microtubules were calculated with adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics. The function of the M-loop in microtubule stability was demonstrated in these simulations. The flexibility of this loop allowed constant contacts between the protofilaments to be maintained during simulations while the smooth deformation provided a spring-like restoring force. Additionally, calculating the free energy profile between the straight and bent tubulin configurations was used to test the proposed conformational change in tubulin, thought to cause microtubule

  4. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  5. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  6. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  7. Protein S blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  8. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, and protecting you from disease. All About Amino Acids When you eat foods that contain protein, the ... called amino (say: uh-MEE-no) acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins ...

  9. The nucleotide switch in Cdc42 modulates coupling between the GTPase-binding and allosteric equilibria of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    The GTP/GDP nucleotide switch in Ras superfamily GTPases generally involves differential affinity toward downstream effectors, with the GTP-bound state having a higher affinity for effector than the GDP-bound state. We have developed a quantitative model of allosteric regulation of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) by the Rho GTPase Cdc42 to better understand how GTPase binding is coupled to effector activation. The model accurately predicts WASP affinity for Cdc42, activity toward Arp2/3 complex, and activation by Cdc42 as functions of a two-state allosteric equilibrium in WASP. The ratio of GTPase affinities for the inactive and active states of WASP is appreciably larger for Cdc42–GTP than for Cdc42–GDP. The greater ability to distinguish between the two states of WASP makes Cdc42–GTP a full WASP agonist, whereas Cdc42–GDP is only a partial agonist. Thus, the nucleotide switch controls not only the affinity of Cdc42 for its effector but also the efficiency of coupling between the Cdc42-binding and allosteric equilibria in WASP. This effect can ensure high fidelity and specificity in Cdc42 signaling in crowded membrane environments. PMID:15821030

  10. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  11. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  12. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  13. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  14. Texturized dairy proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey prote...

  15. Overview of Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reymond Sutandy, FX; Qian, Jiang; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarray is an emerging technology that provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput way. Two major classes of protein microarrays are defined to describe their applications: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be fractionated and spotted on a slide to form a reverse-phase protein microarray. While the fabrication technology is maturing, applications of protein microarrays, especially functional protein microarrays, have flourished during the past decade. Here, we will first review recent advances in the protein microarray technologies, and then present a series of examples to illustrate the applications of analytical and functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. The research areas will include detection of various binding properties of proteins, study of protein posttranslational modifications, analysis of host-microbe interactions, profiling antibody specificity, and identification of biomarkers in autoimmune diseases. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:23546620

  16. The E5 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Daniel; Petti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The E5 proteins are short transmembrane proteins encoded by many animal and human papillomaviruses. These proteins display transforming activity in cultured cells and animals, and they presumably also play a role in the productive virus life cycle. The E5 proteins are thought to act by modulating the activity of cellular proteins. Here, we describe the biological activities of the best-studied E5 proteins and discuss the evidence implicating specific protein targets and pathways in mediating these activities. The primary target of the 44-amino acid BPV1 E5 is the PDGF β receptor, whereas the EGF receptor appears to be an important target of the 83-amino acid HPV16 E5 protein. Both E5 proteins also bind to the vacuolar ATPase and affect MHC class I expression and cell-cell communication. Continued studies of the E5 proteins will elucidate important aspects of transmembrane protein-protein interactions, cellular signal transduction, cell biology, virus replication, and tumorigenesis. PMID:23731971

  17. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    PubMed Central

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  18. Protein-protein interactions in multienzyme megasynthetases.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Kira J; Müller, Rolf

    2008-04-14

    The multienzyme polyketide synthases (PKSs), nonribosomal polypeptide synthetases (NRPSs), and their hybrids are responsible for the construction in bacteria of numerous natural products of clinical value. These systems generate high structural complexity by using a simple biosynthetic logic--that of the assembly line. Each of the individual steps in building the metabolites is designated to an independently folded domain within gigantic polypeptides. The domains are clustered into functional modules, and the modules are strung out along the proteins in the order in which they act. Every metabolite results, therefore, from the successive action of up to 100 individual catalysts. Despite the conceptual simplicity of this division-of-labor organization, we are only beginning to decipher the molecular details of the numerous protein-protein interactions that support assembly-line biosynthesis, and which are critical to attempts to re-engineer these systems as a tool in drug discovery. This review aims to summarize the state of knowledge about several aspects of protein-protein interactions, including current architectural models for PKS and NRPS systems, the central role of carrier proteins, and the structural basis for intersubunit recognition.

  19. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  20. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  1. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  2. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  3. [Atypical ubiquitination of proteins].

    PubMed

    Buneeva, O A; Medvedev, A E

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitination is a type of posttranslational modification of intracellular proteins characterized by covalent attachment of one (monoubiquitination) or several (polyubiquitination) of ubiquitin molecules to target proteins. In the case of polyubiquitination, linear or branched polyubiquitin chains are formed. Their formation involves various lysine residues of monomeric ubiquitin. The best studied is Lys48-polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for proteasomal degradation. In this review we have considered examples of so-called atypical polyubiquitination, which mainly involves other lysine residues (Lys6, Lys11, Lys27, Lys29, Lys33, Lys63) and also N-terminal methionine. The considered examples convincingly demonstrate that polyubiquitination of proteins not necessarily targets proteins for their proteolytic degradation in proteasomes. Atypically polyubiquitinated proteins are involved in regulation of various processes and altered polyubiquitination of certain proteins is crucial for development of serious diseases.

  4. Protein and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Kate A; Munn, Elizabeth A; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    A vegetarian diet can easily meet human dietary protein requirements as long as energy needs are met and a variety of foods are eaten. Vegetarians should obtain protein from a variety of plant sources, including legumes, soy products, grains, nuts and seeds. Eggs and dairy products also provide protein for those following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. There is no need to consciously combine different plant proteins at each meal as long as a variety of foods are eaten from day to day, because the human body maintains a pool of amino acids which can be used to complement dietary protein. The consumption of plant proteins rather than animal proteins by vegetarians may contribute to their reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

  5. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Predictions of Protein-Protein Interfaces within Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari; Abdolmaleki, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    Background Prediction of interaction sites within the membrane protein complexes using the sequence data is of a great importance, because it would find applications in modification of molecules transport through membrane, signaling pathways and drug targets of many diseases. Nevertheless, it has gained little attention from the protein structural bioinformatics community. Methods In this study, a wide variety of prediction and classification tools were applied to distinguish the residues at the interfaces of membrane proteins from those not in the interfaces. Results The tuned SVM model achieved the high accuracy of 86.95% and the AUC of 0.812 which outperforms the results of the only previous similar study. Nevertheless, prediction performances obtained using most employed models cannot be used in applied fields and needs more effort to improve. Conclusion Considering the variety of the applied tools in this study, the present investigation could be a good starting point to develop more efficient tools to predict the membrane protein interaction site residues. PMID:23919118

  7. WAVE1 in neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor regulates cellular and behavioral actions of cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Ceglia, Ilaria; Lee, Ko-Woon; Cahill, Michael E.; Graves, Steven M.; Dietz, David; Surmeier, Dalton J.; Nestler, Eric J.; Nairn, Angus C.; Kim, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family verprolin homologous protein 1 (WAVE1) regulates actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex-mediated actin polymerization. Our previous studies have found WAVE1 to be inhibited by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation in brain and to play a role in the regulation of dendritic spine morphology. Here we report that mice in which WAVE1 was knocked out (KO) in neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor (D1-KO), but not mice where WAVE1 was knocked out in neurons expressing the D2 dopamine receptor (D2-KO), exhibited a significant decrease in place preference associated with cocaine. In contrast to wild-type (WT) and WAVE1 D2-KO mice, cocaine-induced sensitized locomotor behavior was not maintained in WAVE1 D1-KO mice. After chronic cocaine administration and following withdrawal, an acute cocaine challenge induced WAVE1 activation in striatum, which was assessed by dephosphorylation. The cocaine-induced WAVE1 dephosphorylation was attenuated by coadministration of either a D1 dopamine receptor or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist. Upon an acute challenge of cocaine following chronic cocaine exposure and withdrawal, we also observed in WT, but not in WAVE1 D1-KO mice, a decrease in dendritic spine density and a decrease in the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic AMPA receptor currents in medium spiny projection neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor (D1-MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that WAVE1 is involved selectively in D1-MSNs in cocaine-evoked neuronal activity-mediated feedback regulation of glutamatergic synapses. PMID:28115704

  8. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  9. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  10. Protein flexibility as a biosignal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinyi

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic properties of a protein are crucial for all protein functions, and those of signaling proteins are closely related to the biological function of living beings. The protein flexibility signal concept can be used to analyze this relationship. Protein flexibility controls the rate of protein conformational change and influences protein function. The modification of protein flexibility results in a change of protein activity. The logical nature of protein flexibility cannot be explained by applying the principles of protein three-dimensional structure theory or conformation concept. Signaling proteins show high protein flexibility. Many properties of signaling can be traced back to the dynamic natures of signaling protein. The action mechanism of volatile anesthetics and universal cellular reactions are related to flexibility in the change of signaling proteins. We conclude that protein dynamics is an enzyme-enhanced process, called dynamicase.

  11. Antimicrobial proteins: From old proteins, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Valerie J; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. The review further considers proteins or protein fragments from crustaceans that have antimicrobial properties but are more usually associated with other biological functions, or are derived from such proteins. It discusses how these unconventional AMPs might be generated at, or delivered to, sites of infection and how they might contribute to crustacean host defence in vivo. It also highlights recent work that is starting to reveal the extent of multi-functionality displayed by some decapod AMPs, particularly their participation in other aspects of host protection. Examples of such activities include proteinase inhibition, phagocytosis, antiviral activity and haematopoiesis.

  12. Protein-protein Interactions using Radiolytic Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto,K.; Chance, M.

    2006-01-01

    Structural proteomics approaches using mass spectrometry are increasingly used in biology to examine the composition and structure of macromolecules. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting using mass spectrometry has recently been developed to define structure, assembly, and conformational changes of macromolecules in solution based on measurements of reactivity of amino acid side chain groups with covalent modification reagents. Accurate measurements of side chain reactivity are achieved using quantitative liquid-chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry, whereas the side chain modification sites are identified using tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the use of footprinting data in conjunction with computational modeling approaches is a powerful new method for testing and refining structural models of macromolecules and their complexes. In this review, we discuss the basic chemistry of hydroxyl radical reactions with peptides and proteins, highlight various approaches to map protein structure using radical oxidation methods, and describe state-of-the-art approaches to combine computational and footprinting data.

  13. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation.

  14. Mayaro virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Mezencio, J M; Rebello, M A

    1993-01-01

    Mayaro virus was grown in BHK-21 cells and purified by centrifugation in a potassium-tartrate gradient (5-50%). The electron microscopy analyses of the purified virus showed an homogeneous population of enveloped particles with 69 +/- 2.3 nm in diameter. Three structural virus proteins were identified and designated p1, p2 and p3. Their average molecular weight were p1, 54 KDa; p2, 50 KDa and p3, 34 KDa. In Mayaro virus infected Aedes albopictus cells and in BHK-21 infected cells we detected six viral proteins, in which three of them are the structural virus proteins and the other three were products from processing of precursors of viral proteins, whose molecular weights are 62 KDa, 64 KDa and 110 KDa. The 34 KDa protein was the first viral protein synthesized at 5 hours post-infection in both cell lines studied.

  15. TRIM proteins and diseases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2017-01-07

    Ubiquitination is one of the posttranslational modifications that regulates a number of intracellular events including signal transduction, protein quality control, transcription, cell cycle, apoptosis and development. The ubiquitin system functions as a garbage machine to degrade target proteins and as a regulator for several signalling pathways. Biochemical reaction of ubiquitination requires several enzymes including E1, E2 and E3, and E3 ubiquitin ligases play roles as receptors for recognizing target proteins. Most of the tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases. Recent studies have shown that some TRIM proteins function as important regulators for a variety of diseases including cancer, inflammatory diseases, infectious diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, chromosomal abnormalities and developmental diseases. In this review, we summarize the involvement of TRIM proteins in the aetiology of various diseases.

  16. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  17. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  18. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  19. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  20. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  1. Chemical Synthesis of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Bradley L.; Soellner, Matthew B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins have become accessible targets for chemical synthesis. The basic strategy is to use native chemical ligation, Staudinger ligation, or other orthogonal chemical reactions to couple synthetic peptides. The ligation reactions are compatible with a variety of solvents and proceed in solution or on a solid support. Chemical synthesis enables a level of control on protein composition that greatly exceeds that attainable with ribosome-mediated biosynthesis. Accordingly, the chemical synthesis of proteins is providing previously unattainable insight into the structure and function of proteins. PMID:15869385

  2. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Tina, K. G.; Bhadra, R.; Srinivasan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic–aromatic interactions, aromatic–sulphur interactions and cation–π interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar–apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside. PMID:17584791

  3. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    PubMed

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside.

  4. Dietary proteins and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-17

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  5. Consensus protein design

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  6. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  7. TRIM proteins in development.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Francesca; Meroni, Germana

    2012-01-01

    TRIM proteins play important roles in several patho-physiological processes. Their common activity within the ubiquitylation pathway makes them amenable to a number of diverse biological roles. Many of the TRIM genes are highly and sometimes specifically expressed during embryogenesis, it is therefore not surprising that several of them might be involved in developmental processes. Here, we primarily discuss the developmental implications of two subgroups of TRIM proteins that conserved domain composition and functions from their invertebrate ancestors. The two groups are: the TRIM-NHL proteins implicated in miRNA processing regulation and the TRIM-FN3 proteins involved in ventral midline development.

  8. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  9. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  10. Protein intakes in India.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sumathi; Vaz, Mario; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-08-01

    Indian diets derive almost 60 % of their protein from cereals with relatively low digestibility and quality. There have been several surveys of diets and protein intakes in India by the National Nutrition Monitoring Board (NNMB) over the last 25 years, in urban and rural, as well as in slum dwellers and tribal populations. Data of disadvantaged populations from slums, tribals and sedentary rural Indian populations show that the protein intake (mainly from cereals) is about 1 gm/kg/day. However, the protein intake looks less promising in terms of the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), using lysine as the first limiting amino acid, where all populations, particularly rural and tribal, appear to have an inadequate quality to their protein intake. The protein: energy (PE) ratio is a measure of dietary quality, and has been used in the 2007 WHO/FAO/UNU report to define reference requirement values with which the adequacy of diets can be evaluated in terms of a protein quality corrected PE ratio. It is likely that about one third of this sedentary rural population is at risk of not meeting their requirements. These levels of risk of deficiency are in a population with relatively low BMI populations, whose diets are also inadequate in fruits and vegetables. Therefore, while the burden of enhancing the quality of protein intake in rural India exists, the quality of the diet, in general, represents a challenge that must be met.

  11. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  12. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  13. Regulation of protein secretion by ... protein secretion?

    PubMed

    Atmakuri, Krishnamohan; Fortune, Sarah M

    2008-09-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires an alternative protein secretion system, ESX1, for virulence. Recently, Raghavan et al. (2008) reported a new regulatory circuit that may explain how ESX1 activity is controlled during infection. Mtb appears to regulate ESX1 by modulating transcription of associated genes rather than structural components of the secretion system itself.

  14. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  15. Engineered Protein Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-31

    of each pure polymer, we plan to combine the various polymer solutions in different ratios to tune the composition and physico-chemical properties...protein materials as vehicles for storage and delivery of small molecules. Each protein polymer under concentrations for particle formation ( vida

  16. Multidomain proteins under force.

    PubMed

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-28

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91-two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins-ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  17. Archaeal chromatin proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhenFeng; Guo, Li; Huang, Li

    2012-05-01

    Archaea, along with Bacteria and Eukarya, are the three domains of life. In all living cells, chromatin proteins serve a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the structure and function of the genome. An array of small, abundant and basic DNA-binding proteins, considered candidates for chromatin proteins, has been isolated from the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota, the two major phyla in Archaea. While most euryarchaea encode proteins resembling eukaryotic histones, crenarchaea appear to synthesize a number of unique DNA-binding proteins likely involved in chromosomal organization. Several of these proteins (e.g., archaeal histones, Sac10b homologs, Sul7d, Cren7, CC1, etc.) have been extensively studied. However, whether they are chromatin proteins and how they function in vivo remain to be fully understood. Future investigation of archaeal chromatin proteins will lead to a better understanding of chromosomal organization and gene expression in Archaea and provide valuable information on the evolution of DNA packaging in cellular life.

  18. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  19. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Michael H.; Squire, Christopher J.; Mercer, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK) are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range. PMID:25690795

  20. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  1. Enhancement of Peripheral Nerve Regrowth by the Purine Nucleoside Analog and Cell Cycle Inhibitor, Roscovitine

    PubMed Central

    Law, Vincent; Dong, Sophie; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Jeong, Myung-Yung; Zochodne, Douglas; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a slow process that can be associated with limited outcomes and thus a search for novel and effective therapy for peripheral nerve injury and disease is crucial. Here, we found that roscovitine, a synthetic purine nucleoside analog, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal-like PC12 cells. Furthermore, ex vivo analysis of pre-injured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons showed that roscovitine enhances neurite regrowth in these cells. Likewise, in vivo transected sciatic nerves in rats locally perfused with roscovitine had augmented repopulation of new myelinated axons beyond the transection zone. By mass spectrometry, we found that roscovitine interacts with tubulin and actin. It interacts directly with tubulin and causes a dose-dependent induction of tubulin polymerization as well as enhances Guanosine-5′-triphosphate (GTP)-dependent tubulin polymerization. Conversely, roscovitine interacts indirectly with actin and counteracts the inhibitory effect of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 (Cdk5) on Actin-Related Proteins 2/3 (Arp2/3)-dependent actin polymerization, and thus, causes actin polymerization. Moreover, in the presence of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF), roscovitine-enhanced neurite outgrowth is mediated by increased activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Since microtubule and F-actin dynamics are critical for axonal regrowth, the ability of roscovitine to activate the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways and support polymerization of tubulin and actin indicate a major role for this purine nucleoside analog in the promotion of axonal regeneration. Together, our findings demonstrate a therapeutic potential for the purine nucleoside analog, roscovitine, in peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27799897

  2. Actin-associated Proteins in the Pathogenesis of Podocyte Injury.

    PubMed

    He, Fang-Fang; Chen, Shan; Su, Hua; Meng, Xian-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2013-11-01

    Podocytes have a complex cellular architecture with interdigitating processes maintained by a precise organization of actin filaments. The actin-based foot processes of podocytes and the interposed slit diaphragm form the final barrier to proteinuria. The function of podocytes is largely based on the maintenance of the normal foot process structure with actin cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal dynamics play important roles during normal podocyte development, in maintenance of the healthy glomerular filtration barrier, and in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. In this review, we focused on recent findings on the mechanisms of organization and reorganization of these actin-related molecules in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury and potential therapeutics targeting the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in podocytopathies.

  3. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  4. Proteins in unexpected locations.

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, N R

    1996-01-01

    Members of all classes of proteins--cytoskeletal components, secreted growth factors, glycolytic enzymes, kinases, transcription factors, chaperones, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix proteins--have been identified in cellular compartments other than their conventional sites of action. Some of these proteins are expressed as distinct compartment-specific isoforms, have novel mechanisms for intercompartmental translocation, have distinct endogenous biological actions within each compartment, and are regulated in a compartment-specific manner as a function of physiologic state. The possibility that many, if not most, proteins have distinct roles in more than one cellular compartment has implications for the evolution of cell organization and may be important for understanding pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:8862516

  5. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  6. Transdermal delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Haripriya; Banga, Ajay K

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptides and proteins avoids the disadvantages associated with the invasive parenteral route of administration and other alternative routes such as the pulmonary and nasal routes. Since proteins have a large size and are hydrophilic in nature, they cannot permeate passively across the skin due to the stratum corneum which allows the transport of only small lipophilic drug molecules. Enhancement techniques such as chemical enhancers, iontophoresis, microneedles, electroporation, sonophoresis, thermal ablation, laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation and noninvasive jet injectors aid in the delivery of proteins by overcoming the skin barrier in different ways. In this review, these enhancement techniques that can enable the transdermal delivery of proteins are discussed, including a discussion of mechanisms, sterility requirements, and commercial development of products. Combination of enhancement techniques may result in a synergistic effect allowing increased protein delivery and these are also discussed.

  7. Protein crystallization in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, S; Shibata, K; Morita, Y

    1997-12-01

    A space experiment involving protein crystallization was conducted in a microgravity environment using the space shuttle "Endeavour" of STS-47, on a 9-day mission from September 12th to 20th in 1992. The crystallization was carried out according to a batch method, and 5 proteins were selected as flight samples for crystallization. Two of these proteins: hen egg-white lysozyme and co-amino acid: pyruvate aminotransferase from Pseudomonas sp. F-126, were obtained as single crystals of good diffraction quality. Since 1992 we have carried out several space experiments for protein crystallization aboard space shuttles and the space station MIR. Our experimental results obtained mainly from hen egg-white lysozyme are described below, focusing on the effects of microgravity on protein crystal growth.

  8. Protein expression-yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline.

  9. Protein Unfolding and Alzheimer's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (Aβ) proteins with neurons have been associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Knowledge pertaining to the role of lipid molecules, particularly cholesterol, in modulating the single Aβ interactions with neurons at the atomic length and picosecond time resolutions, remains unclear. In our research, we have used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore early molecular events including protein insertion kinetics, protein unfolding, and protein-induced membrane disruption of Aβ in lipid domains that mimic the nanoscopic raft and non-raft regions of the neural membrane. In this talk, I will summarize our current work on investigating the role of cholesterol in regulating the Aβ interaction events with membranes at the molecular level. I will also explain how our results will provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease associated with the Aβ proteins.

  10. Junin virus structural proteins.

    PubMed Central

    De Martínez Segovia, Z M; De Mitri, M I

    1977-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified Junin virus revealed six distinct structural polypeptides, two major and four minor ones. Four of these polypeptides appeared to be covalently linked with carbohydrate. The molecular weights of the six proteins, estimated by coelectrophoresis with marker proteins, ranged from 25,000 to 91,000. One of the two major components (number 3) was identified as a nucleoprotein and had a molecular weight of 64,000. It was the most prominent protein and was nonglycosylated. The other major protein (number 5), with a molecular weight of 38,000, was a glucoprotein and a component of the viral envelope. The location on the virion of three additional glycopeptides with molecular weights of 91,000, 72,000, and 52,000, together with a protein with a molecular weight of 25,000, was not well defined. PMID:189088

  11. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates the entire process, so

  12. Protein disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Sultana, Kazi Zakia; Craig, Douglas B

    2014-01-21

    Improving the stability of proteins is an important goal in many biomedical and industrial applications. A logical approach is to emulate stabilizing molecular interactions found in nature. Disulfide bonds are covalent interactions that provide substantial stability to many proteins and conform to well-defined geometric conformations, thus making them appealing candidates in protein engineering efforts. Disulfide engineering is the directed design of novel disulfide bonds into target proteins. This important biotechnological tool has achieved considerable success in a wide range of applications, yet the rules that govern the stabilizing effects of disulfide bonds are not fully characterized. Contrary to expectations, many designed disulfide bonds have resulted in decreased stability of the modified protein. We review progress in disulfide engineering, with an emphasis on the issue of stability and computational methods that facilitate engineering efforts.

  13. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  14. [Controversies around diet proteins].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2013-12-01

    Critical theories regarding proteins of anima origin are still and still popularized, though they are ungrounded from scientific point of view. Predominance of soya proteins over the animal ones in relation to their influence on calcium metabolism, bone break risk or risk of osteoporosis morbidity has not been confirmed in any honest, reliable research experiment. Statement, that sulphur amino acids influence disadvantageously on calcium metabolism of human organism and bone status, is completely groundless, the more so as presence of sulphur amino acids in diet (animal proteins are their best source) is the condition of endogenic synthesis of glutathione, the key antioxidant of the organism, and taurine stimulating brain functioning. Deficiency of proteins in the diet produce weakness of intellectual effectiveness and immune response. There is no doubt that limitation of consumption of animal proteins of standard value is not good for health.

  15. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Associated Protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 Crosslinks Actin Filaments through Its Actin Binding and Multimerization Properties In Vitro and Enhances Endocytosis in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Akama, Takeshi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Ito, Koichi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-crosslinking proteins control actin filament networks and bundles and contribute to various cellular functions including regulation of cell migration, cell morphology, and endocytosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 has been reported to be localized to actin filaments (F-actin) and required for cell migration in thyroid carcinoma cells. Here, we show a role for PI3KAP/XB130 as an actin-crosslinking protein. First, we found that the carboxyl terminal region of PI3KAP/XB130 containing amino acid residues 830–840 was required and sufficient for localization to F-actin in NIH3T3 cells, and this region is directly bound to F-actin in vitro. Moreover, actin-crosslinking assay revealed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinked F-actin. In general, actin-crosslinking proteins often multimerize to assemble multiple actin-binding sites. We then investigated whether PI3KAP/XB130 could form a multimer. Blue native-PAGE analysis showed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 was detected at 250–1200 kDa although the molecular mass was approximately 125 kDa, suggesting that PI3KAP/XB130 formed multimers. Furthermore, we found that the amino terminal 40 amino acids were required for this multimerization by co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293T cells. Deletion mutants of PI3KAP/XB130 lacking the actin-binding region or the multimerizing region did not crosslink actin filaments, indicating that actin binding and multimerization of PI3KAP/XB130 were necessary to crosslink F-actin. Finally, we examined roles of PI3KAP/XB130 on endocytosis, an actin-related biological process. Overexpression of PI3KAP/XB130 enhanced dextran uptake in HEK 293 cells. However, most of the cells transfected with the deletion mutant lacking the actin-binding region incorporated dextran to a similar extent as control cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinks F-actin through both its actin-binding region and multimerizing region and

  17. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  18. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system.

  19. Purifying protein complexes for mass spectrometry: applications to protein translation.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J; Fleischer, Tracey C; Weaver, Connie M; Gerbasi, Vincent R; Jennings, Jennifer L

    2005-03-01

    Proteins control and mediate most of the biological activities in the cell. In most cases, proteins either interact with regulatory proteins or function in large molecular assemblies to carryout biological processes. Understanding the functions of individual proteins requires the identification of these interacting proteins. With its speed and sensitivity, mass spectrometry has become the dominant method for identifying components of protein complexes. This article reviews and discusses various approaches to purify protein complexes and analyze the proteins using mass spectrometry. As examples, methods to isolate and analyze protein complexes responsible for the translation of messenger RNAs into polypeptides are described.

  20. Prediction of protein-protein interactions: unifying evolution and structure at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2011-06-01

    The vast majority of the chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Providing details of protein interactions at the residue level and incorporating them into protein interaction networks are crucial toward the elucidation of a dynamic picture of cells. Despite the rapid increase in the number of structurally known protein complexes, we are still far away from a complete network. Given experimental limitations, computational modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete structural networks. In this work, we focus on the question 'how do proteins interact?' rather than 'which proteins interact?' and we review structure-based protein-protein interaction prediction approaches. As a sample approach for modeling protein interactions, PRISM is detailed which combines structural similarity and evolutionary conservation in protein interfaces to infer structures of complexes in the protein interaction network. This will ultimately help us to understand the role of protein interfaces in predicting bound conformations.

  1. NMCP/LINC proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Lamins are the main components of the metazoan lamina, and while the organization of the nuclear lamina of metazoans and plants is similar, there are apparently no genes encoding lamins or most lamin-binding proteins in plants. Thus, the plant lamina is not lamin-based and the proteins that form this structure are still to be characterized. Members of the plant NMCP/LINC/CRWN protein family share the typical tripartite structure of lamins, although the 2 exhibit no sequence similarity. However, given the many similarities between NMCP/LINC/CRWN proteins and lamins (structural organization, position of conserved regions, sub-nuclear distribution, solubility, and pattern of expression), these proteins are good candidates to carry out the functions of lamins in plants. Moreover, functional analysis of NMCP/LINC mutants has revealed their involvement in maintaining nuclear size and shape, another activity fulfilled by lamins. This review summarizes the current understanding of NMCP/LINC proteins and discusses future studies that will be required to demonstrate definitively that these proteins are plant analogs of lamins. PMID:24128696

  2. TRIM proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Valeria; Giuliani, Virginia; Lombardi, Sara; Marinelli, Cristiano; Toffalorio, Francesca; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Some members of the tripartite motif (TRIM/RBCC) protein family are thought to be important regulators of carcinogenesis. This is not surprising as the TRIM proteins are involved in several biological processes, such as cell growth, development and cellular differentiation and alteration of these proteins can affect transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, four TRIM family genes are frequently translocated to other genes, generating fusion proteins implicated in cancer initiation and progression. Among these the most famous is the promyelocytic leukaemia gene PML, which encodes the protein TRIM19. PML is involved in the t(15;17) translocation that specifically occurs in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia (APL), resulting in a PML-retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML-RARalpha) fusion protein. Other members of the TRIM family are linked to cancer development without being involved in chromosomal re-arrangements, possibly through ubiquitination or loss of tumour suppression functions. This chapter discusses the biological functions of TRIM proteins in cancer.

  3. Bacterial ice crystal controlling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lorv, Janet S H; Rose, David R; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  4. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  5. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  6. Piezoelectric allostery of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins.

  7. Proteins : paradigms of complexity /

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans,

    2001-01-01

    Proteins are the working machines of living systems. Directed by the DNA, of the order of a few hundred building blocks, selected from twenty different amino acids, are covalently linked into a linear polypeptide chain. In the proper environment, the chain folds into the working protein, often a globule of linear dimensions of a few nanometers. The biologist considers proteins units from which living systems are built. Many physical scientists look at them as systems in which the laws of complexity can be studied better than anywhere else. Some of the results of such studies will be sketched.

  8. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  9. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2007-10-02

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  10. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  11. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell (standing), Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC),and Marc Pusey of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) use a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for marcromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of marcromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystalized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression.

  13. Evolution of proteins.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  14. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  15. Teaching resources. Protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Salton, Stephen R

    2005-03-01

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein phosphatases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the importance of phosphatases in physiology, recognized by the award of a Nobel Prize in 1992, and then proceeds to describe the two types of protein phosphatases: serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases. The information covered includes the structure, regulation, and substrate specificity of protein phosphatases, with an emphasis on their importance in disease and clinical settings.

  16. Electrochromatographic separation of proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basak, S. K.; Velayudhan, A.; Kohlmann, K.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a modified electrochromatography system which minimizes Joule heating at electric field strengths up to 125 V/cm. A non-linear equilibrium model is described which incorporates electrophoretic mobility, hydrodynamic flow velocity, and an electrically induced concentration polarization at the surface of the stationary phase. This model is able to provide useful estimates of protein retention time and velocity in a column packed with Sephadex gel and subjected to an electric field. A correlation of electrophoretic mobility of peptide and proteins with respect to their charge, molecular mass, and asymmetry enables the selection of solute target molecules for electrochromatographic separations. Good separation of protein mixtures have been obtained.

  17. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  18. Plant protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an essential co- and post-translational modification of secretory and membrane proteins in all eukaryotes. The initial steps of N-glycosylation and N-glycan processing are highly conserved between plants, mammals and yeast. In contrast, late N-glycan maturation steps in the Golgi differ significantly in plants giving rise to complex N-glycans with β1,2-linked xylose, core α1,3-linked fucose and Lewis A-type structures. While the essential role of N-glycan modifications on distinct mammalian glycoproteins is already well documented, we have only begun to decipher the biological function of this ubiquitous protein modification in different plant species. In this review, I focus on the biosynthesis and function of different protein N-linked glycans in plants. Special emphasis is given on glycan-mediated quality control processes in the ER and on the biological role of characteristic complex N-glycan structures. PMID:26911286

  19. Protein Model Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  20. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  1. Fully automated protein purification

    PubMed Central

    Camper, DeMarco V.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining highly purified proteins is essential to begin investigating their functional and structural properties. The steps that are typically involved in purifying proteins can include an initial capture, intermediate purification, and a final polishing step. Completing these steps can take several days and require frequent attention to ensure success. Our goal was to design automated protocols that will allow the purification of proteins with minimal operator intervention. Separate methods have been produced and tested that automate the sample loading, column washing, sample elution and peak collection steps for ion-exchange, metal affinity, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. These individual methods are designed to be coupled and run sequentially in any order to achieve a flexible and fully automated protein purification protocol. PMID:19595984

  2. Protein fabrication automation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. Colin; Lape, Janel; Sayed, Mahmood A.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2007-01-01

    Facile “writing” of DNA fragments that encode entire gene sequences potentially has widespread applications in biological analysis and engineering. Rapid writing of open reading frames (ORFs) for expressed proteins could transform protein engineering and production for protein design, synthetic biology, and structural analysis. Here we present a process, protein fabrication automation (PFA), which facilitates the rapid de novo construction of any desired ORF from oligonucleotides with low effort, high speed, and little human interaction. PFA comprises software for sequence design, data management, and the generation of instruction sets for liquid-h