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Sample records for acting antitussive drugs

  1. Current and future peripherally-acting antitussives.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2006-07-28

    Cough is among the most common complaints for which medical evaluation is sought. The clinical significance of this problem is evidenced by the enormous financial expenditure on prescription and non-prescription cough remedies worldwide. Centrally-acting antitussive agents, such as opiates, are often associated with undesirable or intolerable side effects, including sedation, nausea, and constipation. Therefore, safe and effective peripherally-acting antitussive agents are particularly desirable. Relatively few commercially-available products suppress cough through a peripheral mechanism of action. Recent research in the field of cough has resulted in the development of several new classes of compounds that may prove to be clinically useful peripherally-acting antitussives.

  2. Peripheral mechanisms II: the pharmacology of peripherally active antitussive drugs.

    PubMed

    Spina, D; McFadzean, I; Bertram, F K R; Page, C P

    2009-01-01

    Cough is an indispensable defensive reflex. Although generally beneficial, it is also a common symptom of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, upper respiratory tract infections, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. Cough remains a major unmet medical need and although the centrally acting opioids have remained the antitussive of choice for decades, they have many unwanted side effects. However, new research into the behaviour of airway sensory nerves has provided greater insight into the mechanisms of cough and new avenues for the discovery of novel non-opioid antitussive drugs. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms of cough and the development of novel antitussive drugs are reviewed.

  3. Antitussive drugs--past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, P V; Morice, A H; Birring, S S; McGarvey, L; Smith, J A; Canning, B J; Page, C P

    2014-01-01

    Cough remains a serious unmet clinical problem, both as a symptom of a range of other conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and as a problem in its own right in patients with chronic cough of unknown origin. This article reviews our current understanding of the pathogenesis of cough and the hypertussive state characterizing a number of diseases as well as reviewing the evidence for the different classes of antitussive drug currently in clinical use. For completeness, the review also discusses a number of major drug classes often clinically used to treat cough but that are not generally classified as antitussive drugs. We also reviewed a number of drug classes in various stages of development as antitussive drugs. Perhaps surprising for drugs used to treat such a common symptom, there is a paucity of well-controlled clinical studies documenting evidence for the use of many of the drug classes in use today, particularly those available over the counter. Nonetheless, there has been a considerable increase in our understanding of the cough reflex over the last decade that has led to a number of promising new targets for antitussive drugs being identified and thus giving some hope of new drugs being available in the not too distant future for the treatment of this often debilitating symptom.

  4. Centrally acting non-narcotic antitussives prevent hyperactivity in mice: Involvement of GIRK channels.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Fumio; Fujieda, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Mizue; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    We have previously reported that centrally acting non-narcotic antitussives inhibited G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel-activated currents, and that the antitussives had multiple pharmacological actions on various models of intractable brain diseases in rodents. In this study, the question of whether these antitussives inhibit drug-induced hyperactivity in mice was investigated. Antitussives, such as cloperastine and tipepidine, at cough suppressant doses, inhibited an increase in ambulation of mice neonatally treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. In addition, all antitussives studied inhibited an increase in methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in mice. Methylphenidate, which is used for treatment of ADHD, inhibited 6-hydroxydopamine-lesion-induced, but not methamphetamine-induced, hyperactivity in mice. By the rota-rod test, the drugs had little effect on motor coordination of the hyperactive mice. Significant correlation was found between the ameliorating effects of antitussives on methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and their inhibitory actions on GIRK channel currents (coefficient factor, 0.998). Furthermore, tertiapin, a GIRK channel blocker, prevented an increase in methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity of mice. These results demonstrated that antitussive drugs (cloperastine, tipepidine and caramiphen) possessing inhibitory action on GIRK channels inhibit drug-induced hyperactivity in mice, suggesting that such antitussives may potentially be therapeutic for patients with ADHD. PMID:26892760

  5. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect. PMID:20621160

  6. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect.

  7. Anaphylaxis caused by tipepidine hibenzate, a central antitussive drug

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Eisuke; Shirai, Toshihiro; Noguchi, Rie; Mitsui, Chihiro; Taniguchi, Masami; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Tipepidine hibenzate, a central antitussive drug, is widely used in the management of cough and is generally safe and well tolerated. We present here a case of anaphylaxis caused by this drug. When the patient had caught a cold over the previous 10 years, she had received medications, including tipepidine hibenzate, from her family doctor. However, this time, she developed dyspnea, skin eruption, and anaphylactic shock after taking a Chinese herbal medicine and this drug. After her conditions improved due to adequate treatment, she was referred to our hospital to confirm the causative drug. Double-blind placebo-controlled oral challenge tests were performed after obtaining informed consent. Oral challenge with one-third tablet dose of tipepidine hibenzate caused a positive reaction. Urinary leukotriene E4 rose during the challenge with tipepidine hibenzate, but not with control. Clinicians should keep in mind that common antitussive drug use can cause anaphylactic reactions in very rare cases and can be harmful. PMID:25802739

  8. An evaluation of the genotoxicity of the antitussive drug Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Aardema, Marilyn J; Robison, Steven H; Gatehouse, David; Johnston, Gail

    2008-04-01

    Dextromethorphan (DMP) is an effective and widely used antitussive drug. While DMP has over a 50 year safe-marketing history, the only available genotoxicity data was an unpublished, negative Ames assay (Roche). Lack of a complete genotoxicity profile on DMP, specifically covering the chromosomal damage endpoint, prompted a regulatory request for an in vitro chromosome aberration assay. In accordance with EC and CPMP Guidance, we evaluated data for a number of chemicals with a structural relationship to DMP. DMP contains no structural alerts for genotoxicity or carcinogenicity using the Deductive Estimation of Risk from Existing Knowledge (DEREK) software tool, confirming the negative results obtained in the existing Ames assay. This is also consistent with the mostly negative genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data available on structurally related chemicals including morphine, codeine, nalbuphine, buprenorphine, naloxone, hydromorphone, levorphanol, and oxycodone. A state-of-the-science, in vitro chromosome aberration assay was also conducted, which demonstrated a lack of genotoxicity for DMP. The overall weight of evidence for DMP and its structural analogues, supports the conclusion that this class of phenanthrene-based chemicals, and DMP, in particular, are not genotoxic in vitro or in vivo, and do not represent a carcinogenic risk to patients.

  9. 21 CFR 341.74 - Labeling of antitussive drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...,” “reduction,” “relief,” or “suppression”) “of cough.” (b) (Select one of the following: “Alleviates..., consult a doctor.” (2) For oral and topical antitussives labeled for adults or for adults and children... products containing codeine ingredients identified in § 341.14(a)(2) when labeled only for adults. “Do...

  10. 21 CFR 341.74 - Labeling of antitussive drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” “reduction,” “relief,” or “suppression”) “of cough.” (b) (Select one of the following: “Alleviates..., consult a doctor.” (2) For oral and topical antitussives labeled for adults or for adults and children... products containing codeine ingredients identified in § 341.14(a)(2) when labeled only for adults. “Do...

  11. 21 CFR 341.74 - Labeling of antitussive drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,” “reduction,” “relief,” or “suppression”) “of cough.” (b) (Select one of the following: “Alleviates..., consult a doctor.” (2) For oral and topical antitussives labeled for adults or for adults and children... products containing codeine ingredients identified in § 341.14(a)(2) when labeled only for adults. “Do...

  12. 21 CFR 341.74 - Labeling of antitussive drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,” “reduction,” “relief,” or “suppression”) “of cough.” (b) (Select one of the following: “Alleviates..., consult a doctor.” (2) For oral and topical antitussives labeled for adults or for adults and children... products containing codeine ingredients identified in § 341.14(a)(2) when labeled only for adults. “Do...

  13. 21 CFR 341.74 - Labeling of antitussive drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...,” “reduction,” “relief,” or “suppression”) “of cough.” (b) (Select one of the following: “Alleviates..., consult a doctor.” (2) For oral and topical antitussives labeled for adults or for adults and children... products containing codeine ingredients identified in § 341.14(a)(2) when labeled only for adults. “Do...

  14. A common antitussive drug, clobutinol, precipitates the long QT syndrome 2.

    PubMed

    Bellocq, Chloé; Wilders, Ronald; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Louérat-Oriou, Bénédicte; Boisseau, Pierre; Le Marec, Hervé; Escande, Denis; Baró, Isabelle

    2004-11-01

    QT prolongation, a classic risk factor for arrhythmias, can result from a mutation in one of the genes governing cardiac repolarization and also can result from the intake of a medication acting as blocker of the cardiac K(+) channel human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG). Here, we identified the arrhythmogenic potential of a nonopioid antitussive drug, clobutinol. The deleterious effects of clobutinol were suspected when a young boy, with a diagnosis of congenital long QT syndrome, experienced arrhythmias while being treated with this drug. Using the patch-clamp technique, we showed that clobutinol dose-dependently inhibited the HERG K(+) current with a half-maximum block concentration of 2.9 microM. In the proband, we identified a novel A561P HERG mutation. Two others long QT mutations (A561V and A561T) had been reported previously at the same position. None of the three mutants led to a sizeable current in heterologous expression system. When coexpressed with wild-type (WT) HERG channels, the three Ala561 mutants reduced the trafficking of WT and mutant heteromeric channels, resulting in decreased K(+) current amplitude (dominant-negative effects). In addition, A561P but not A561V and A561T mutants induced a approximately -11 mV shift of the current activation curve and accelerated deactivation, thereby partially counteracting the dominant-negative effects. A561P mutation and clobutinol effects on the human ventricular action potential characteristics were simulated using the Priebe-Beuckelmann model. Our work shows that clobutinol has limited effects on WT action potential but should be classified as a "drug to be avoided by congenital long QT patients" rather than as a "drug with risk of torsades de pointes".

  15. A common antitussive drug, clobutinol, precipitates the long QT syndrome 2.

    PubMed

    Bellocq, Chloé; Wilders, Ronald; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Louérat-Oriou, Bénédicte; Boisseau, Pierre; Le Marec, Hervé; Escande, Denis; Baró, Isabelle

    2004-11-01

    QT prolongation, a classic risk factor for arrhythmias, can result from a mutation in one of the genes governing cardiac repolarization and also can result from the intake of a medication acting as blocker of the cardiac K(+) channel human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG). Here, we identified the arrhythmogenic potential of a nonopioid antitussive drug, clobutinol. The deleterious effects of clobutinol were suspected when a young boy, with a diagnosis of congenital long QT syndrome, experienced arrhythmias while being treated with this drug. Using the patch-clamp technique, we showed that clobutinol dose-dependently inhibited the HERG K(+) current with a half-maximum block concentration of 2.9 microM. In the proband, we identified a novel A561P HERG mutation. Two others long QT mutations (A561V and A561T) had been reported previously at the same position. None of the three mutants led to a sizeable current in heterologous expression system. When coexpressed with wild-type (WT) HERG channels, the three Ala561 mutants reduced the trafficking of WT and mutant heteromeric channels, resulting in decreased K(+) current amplitude (dominant-negative effects). In addition, A561P but not A561V and A561T mutants induced a approximately -11 mV shift of the current activation curve and accelerated deactivation, thereby partially counteracting the dominant-negative effects. A561P mutation and clobutinol effects on the human ventricular action potential characteristics were simulated using the Priebe-Beuckelmann model. Our work shows that clobutinol has limited effects on WT action potential but should be classified as a "drug to be avoided by congenital long QT patients" rather than as a "drug with risk of torsades de pointes". PMID:15280442

  16. Effects of common antitussive drugs on the hERG potassium channel current.

    PubMed

    Deisemann, Heike; Ahrens, Nadine; Schlobohm, Irene; Kirchhoff, Christian; Netzer, Rainer; Möller, Clemens

    2008-12-01

    A common over-the-counter (OTC) non-opioid antitussive drug, clobutinol, was recently withdrawn from the market due to its potential to induce cardiac arrhythmias by a blockade of the potassium channel coded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG). In this study, we investigated the effects of a number of antitussive compounds on the hERG ion channel current using patch-clamp electrophysiology, and compared the effects to that of clobutinol. The compounds clobutinol, pentoxyverine, dextromethorphan, and codeine inhibited the outward current in hERG transfected cells with half-maximal inhibition concentrations (IC50) of 1.9 microM, 3.0 microM, 5.1 microM, and 97 microM, respectively. For theobromine, no significant effect on the hERG current at a concentration up to 100 microM was detected. Safety margins between the effects of the drugs on the hERG ion channel current and their calculated maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration were calculated. These results were compared to assess potential risks of the compounds to induce torsade de pointes-type arrhythmias.

  17. Effects of common antitussive drugs on the hERG potassium channel current.

    PubMed

    Deisemann, Heike; Ahrens, Nadine; Schlobohm, Irene; Kirchhoff, Christian; Netzer, Rainer; Möller, Clemens

    2008-12-01

    A common over-the-counter (OTC) non-opioid antitussive drug, clobutinol, was recently withdrawn from the market due to its potential to induce cardiac arrhythmias by a blockade of the potassium channel coded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG). In this study, we investigated the effects of a number of antitussive compounds on the hERG ion channel current using patch-clamp electrophysiology, and compared the effects to that of clobutinol. The compounds clobutinol, pentoxyverine, dextromethorphan, and codeine inhibited the outward current in hERG transfected cells with half-maximal inhibition concentrations (IC50) of 1.9 microM, 3.0 microM, 5.1 microM, and 97 microM, respectively. For theobromine, no significant effect on the hERG current at a concentration up to 100 microM was detected. Safety margins between the effects of the drugs on the hERG ion channel current and their calculated maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration were calculated. These results were compared to assess potential risks of the compounds to induce torsade de pointes-type arrhythmias. PMID:19034038

  18. TRPV1 antagonists as potential antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Correll, Craig C; Jia, Yanlin; Anthes, John C

    2008-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids, or foreign materials from the airways. However, when cough is exceptionally intense or when it is chronic and/or nonproductive it may require pharmacologic suppression. For many patients, antitussive therapies consist of OTC products with inconsequential efficacies. On the other hand, the prescription antitussive market is dominated by older opioid drugs such as codeine. Unfortunately, "codeine-like" drugs suppress cough at equivalent doses that also often produce significant ancillary liabilities such as GI constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Thus, the discovery of a novel and effective antitussive drug with an improved side effect profile relative to codeine would fulfill an unmet clinical need in the treatment of cough. Afferent pulmonary nerves are endowed with a multitude of potential receptor targets, including TRPV1, that could act to attenuate cough. The evidence linking TRPV1 to cough is convincing. TRPV1 receptors are found on sensory respiratory nerves that are important in the generation of the cough reflex. Isolated pulmonary vagal afferent nerves are responsive to TRPV1 stimulation. In vivo, TRPV1 agonists such as capsaicin elicit cough when aerosolized and delivered to the lungs. Pertinent to the debate on the potential use of TRPV1 antagonist as antitussive agents are the observations that airway afferent nerves become hypersensitive in diseased and inflamed lungs. For example, the sensitivity of capsaicin-induced cough responses following upper respiratory tract infection and in airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD is increased relative to that of control responses. Indeed, we have demonstrated that TRPV1 antagonism can attenuate antigen-induced cough in the allergic guinea pig. However, it remains to be determined if the emerging pharmacologic profile of TRPV1 antagonists will translate into a novel human antitussive drug. Current

  19. Effects of the antitussive drug cloperastine on ventricular repolarization in halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Akira; Fujiwara, Kaori; Ohtsuki, Atsushi; Oka, Takayuki; Namekata, Iyuki; Tanaka, Hikaru

    2012-01-01

    Cloperastine is an antitussive drug, which can be received as an over-the-counter cold medicine. The chemical structure of cloperastine is quite similar to that of the antihistamine drug diphenhydramine, which is reported to inhibit hERG K⁺ channels and clinically induce long QT syndrome after overdose. To analyze its proarrhythmic potential, we compared effects of cloperastine and diphenhydramine on the hERG K⁺ channels expressed in HEK293 cells. We further assessed their effects on the halothane-anesthetized guinea-pig heart under the monitoring of monophasic action potential (MAP) of the ventricle. Cloperastine inhibited the hERG K⁺ currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC₅₀ value of 0.027 μM, whose potency was 100 times greater than that of diphenhydramine (IC₅₀; 2.7 μM). In the anesthetized guinea pigs, cloperastine at a therapeutic dose of 1 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval and MAP duration without affecting PR interval or QRS width. Diphenhydramine at a therapeutic dose of 10 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval and MAP duration together with increase in PR interval and QRS width. The present results suggest that cloperastine may be categorized as a QT-prolonging drug that possibly induces arrhythmia at overdoses like diphenhydramine does.

  20. Effects of the antitussive drug cloperastine on ventricular repolarization in halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Akira; Fujiwara, Kaori; Ohtsuki, Atsushi; Oka, Takayuki; Namekata, Iyuki; Tanaka, Hikaru

    2012-01-01

    Cloperastine is an antitussive drug, which can be received as an over-the-counter cold medicine. The chemical structure of cloperastine is quite similar to that of the antihistamine drug diphenhydramine, which is reported to inhibit hERG K⁺ channels and clinically induce long QT syndrome after overdose. To analyze its proarrhythmic potential, we compared effects of cloperastine and diphenhydramine on the hERG K⁺ channels expressed in HEK293 cells. We further assessed their effects on the halothane-anesthetized guinea-pig heart under the monitoring of monophasic action potential (MAP) of the ventricle. Cloperastine inhibited the hERG K⁺ currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC₅₀ value of 0.027 μM, whose potency was 100 times greater than that of diphenhydramine (IC₅₀; 2.7 μM). In the anesthetized guinea pigs, cloperastine at a therapeutic dose of 1 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval and MAP duration without affecting PR interval or QRS width. Diphenhydramine at a therapeutic dose of 10 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval and MAP duration together with increase in PR interval and QRS width. The present results suggest that cloperastine may be categorized as a QT-prolonging drug that possibly induces arrhythmia at overdoses like diphenhydramine does. PMID:23047467

  1. Structure-antitussive activity relationships of naltrindole derivatives. Identification of novel and potent antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Sakami, Satoshi; Maeda, Masayuki; Kawai, Koji; Aoki, Takumi; Kawamura, Kuniaki; Fujii, Hideaki; Hasebe, Ko; Nakajima, Mayumi; Endo, Takashi; Ueno, Shinya; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Kamei, Junzo; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2008-08-14

    We have previously reported antitussive effects of naltrindole (NTI), a typical delta opioid receptor antagonist, in a rat model. The ED50 values of NTI by intraperitoneal and peroral injections were 104 microg/kg and 1840 microg/kg, respectively, comparable to those of codeine. Codeine, one of the most reliable centrally acting antitussive drugs, has micro agonist activity and thus the same side effects as morphine, e.g., constipation, dependency, and respiratory depression. Because NTI is a delta opioid antagonist, its derivatives have potential as highly potent antitussives, free from the mu opioid agonist side effects. We attempted to optimize the NTI derivatives to develop novel antitussive agents. On the basis of the studies of structure-antitussive activity relationships of alkyl substituted NTI derivatives, we designed NTI derivatives with extra ring fused structures. As a clinical candidate, we identified a highly potent new compound, (5R,9R,13S,14S)-17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-didehydro-4,5-epoxy-5',6'-dihydro-3-methoxy-4'H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinolino[2',1':6,7]morphinan-14-ol (5b) methanesulfonate (TRK-850) which was effective even by oral administration (ED50 6.40 microg/kg).

  2. Codeine: A Relook at the Old Antitussive.

    PubMed

    Vora, Agam; Nadkar, Milind Y

    2015-04-01

    Cough is the most frequent complaint of patients seeking medical attention in general and hospital practice. Cough is controlled by treating the cause, however, when no cause can be found, symptomatic relief of cough must be considered. Treatment of dry cough resulting from increased sensitivity of the cough reflex remains a challenge in some subjects. Codeine in combination with other medicines has been a mainstay for the effective short-term symptomatic relief of dry or nonproductive cough in clinical practice. This article focuses on the current status of codeine as an antitussive formulation in the treatment of dry cough. Codeine is one of the centrally acting narcotic opioids approved for use as an antitussive, a prodrug that is bioactivated by CYP2D6 into morphine in the liver. The opioid effects of codeine are related to plasma morphine concentrations. Codeine is one of the most frequently used antitussive in clinical practice and has been widely regarded as the standard cough suppressant against which newer drugs are being evaluated. Codeine has an advantage as an antitussive because of its multifaceted effect as an analgesic and sedative along with cough suppression. However, codeine may have efficacy to suppress cough in humans only in specific situations. Caution is also needed to limit its use only when and as long as it is clinically necessary, particularly in children.

  3. Codeine: A Relook at the Old Antitussive.

    PubMed

    Vora, Agam; Nadkar, Milind Y

    2015-04-01

    Cough is the most frequent complaint of patients seeking medical attention in general and hospital practice. Cough is controlled by treating the cause, however, when no cause can be found, symptomatic relief of cough must be considered. Treatment of dry cough resulting from increased sensitivity of the cough reflex remains a challenge in some subjects. Codeine in combination with other medicines has been a mainstay for the effective short-term symptomatic relief of dry or nonproductive cough in clinical practice. This article focuses on the current status of codeine as an antitussive formulation in the treatment of dry cough. Codeine is one of the centrally acting narcotic opioids approved for use as an antitussive, a prodrug that is bioactivated by CYP2D6 into morphine in the liver. The opioid effects of codeine are related to plasma morphine concentrations. Codeine is one of the most frequently used antitussive in clinical practice and has been widely regarded as the standard cough suppressant against which newer drugs are being evaluated. Codeine has an advantage as an antitussive because of its multifaceted effect as an analgesic and sedative along with cough suppression. However, codeine may have efficacy to suppress cough in humans only in specific situations. Caution is also needed to limit its use only when and as long as it is clinically necessary, particularly in children. PMID:26591180

  4. A categorical review on electroanalytical determination of non-narcotic over-the-counter abused antitussive drugs.

    PubMed

    Thapliyal, Neeta; Patel, Harun; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar; Goyal, Rajendra N; Patel, Rajkumar

    2015-09-01

    Dextromethorphan (DXM) and diphenhydramine (DPH) are two commonly used over-the-counter non-narcotic antitussive drugs. Recent reports reveal the widespread abuse of DXM and DPH due to their euphoric and alcohol-like effects. Due to their medicinal importance as well as the apparent increase in their use as abused drugs, it has become critical to determine them in samples of biological, clinical and pharmaceutical interest. The electrochemical techniques for drug analysis have gathered considerable attention due to their pronounced selectivity, sensitivity and simplicity. The given review presents a compilation of published voltammetric and potentiometric methods developed for determination of DXM and DPH. It critically highlights the analytical performances, revealing the recent trends and progress in the specified approach for their analysis. The review forms a basis for further progress in this field and development of improved electrochemical sensors to determine the drug.

  5. RSD931, a novel anti-tussive agent acting on airway sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, J J; Douglas, G J; Garabette, M; Gascoigne, M; Beatch, G; Walker, M; Page, C P

    2003-01-01

    The anti-tussive effects, of the local anaesthetic, lidocaine and carcainium chloride (RSD931) have been investigated in guinea-pigs and rabbits. Pre-treatment of guinea-pigs with aerosols of lidocaine or RSD931 at 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg ml−1 reduced the number of citric acid-induced coughs by 9.3, 32.6 and 40.9% (P>0.05) for lidocaine and by 25.3% (P>0.05), 40.4% (P>0.05) and 97.6% (P<0.01) for RSD931, respectively and increased the latency to onset of cough at 10.0 mg ml−1 only. In addition, RSD931 at 10 mg ml−1 reduced citric acid-evoked cough responses in rabbits (with prior exposure to ozone at 3 p.p.m. for 1 h) from 22.1±5.1 to 2.7±0.9 coughs (P<0.01). Acute pre-treatment of guinea-pigs with aerosols of lidocaine or RSD931 at 10.0 and 30.0 mg ml−1 reduced the number of capsaicin-evoked coughs by 42.2 and 10.3% (P>0.05) (lidocaine) and by 25% (P>0.05) and 76.9% (P<0.01) (RSD931), respectively. Lidocaine had little effect on the latency of cough onset at either 10.0 or 30.0 mg ml−1, however, RSD at 30.0 mg ml−1 significantly (P<0.05) prolonged the latency of cough onset. RSD931 (10.0 mg ml−1) significantly (P<0.05–<0.01) reduced the spontaneous and histamine-evoked discharges in Aδ-fibres originating from airway, rapidly adapting stretch receptors (RARs) without affecting histamine-evoked bronchoconstriction. Lidocaine at 10.0 mg ml−1 also significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced discharges of RARs without affecting histamine-evoked bronchoconstriction. Aerosols of RSD931 (10.0 mg ml−1) caused a transient, but significant (P<0.05), activation of pulmonary C-fibre endings 2.5 min after administration started. RSD931 had no significant (P>0.05) effects on discharges in bronchial C-fibres originating from bronchial C-fibre endings, capsaicin-evoked discharges of either pulmonary or bronchial C-fibre endings or on capsaicin-evoked bronchoconstriction. In contrast, lidocaine (10.0 mg ml−1) significantly (P<0

  6. Antitussive activity of Withania somnifera and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nosálová, Gabriela; Sivová, Veronika; Ray, Bimalendu; Fraňová, Soňa; Ondrejka, Igor; Flešková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan is a polysaccharide isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera L. It contains 65% arabinose and 18% galactose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan in conscious, healthy adult guinea pigs and the role of the opioid pathway in the antitussive action. A polysaccharide extract was given orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg. Cough was induced by an aerosol of citric acid in a concentration 0.3 mol/L, generated by a jet nebulizer into a plethysmographic chamber. The intensity of cough response was defined as the number of cough efforts counted during a 3-min exposure to the aerosol. The major finding was that arabinogalactan clearly suppressed the cough reflex; the suppression was comparable with that of codeine that was taken as a reference drug. The involvement of the opioid system was tested with the use of a blood-brain barrier penetrable, naloxone hydrochloride, and non-penetrable, naloxone methiodide, to distinguish between the central and peripheral mu-opioid receptor pathways. Both opioid antagonists acted to reverse the arabinogalactan-induced cough suppression; the reversion was total over time with the latter antagonist. We failed to confirm the presence of a bronchodilating effect of the polysaccharide, which could be involved in its antitussive action. We conclude that the polysaccharide arabinogalactan from Withania somnifera has a distinct antitussive activity consisting of cough suppression and that this action involves the mu-opioid receptor pathways.

  7. Antitussives and substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jarrett M; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of antitussive preparations is a continuing problem in the United States and throughout the world. Illicit, exploratory, or recreational use of dextromethorphan and codeine/promethazine cough syrups is widely described. This review describes the pharmacology, clinical effects, and management of toxicity from commonly abused antitussive formulations. PMID:24648790

  8. Antitussives and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jarrett M; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of antitussive preparations is a continuing problem in the United States and throughout the world. Illicit, exploratory, or recreational use of dextromethorphan and codeine/promethazine cough syrups is widely described. This review describes the pharmacology, clinical effects, and management of toxicity from commonly abused antitussive formulations. PMID:24648790

  9. Antitussive properties of levodropropizine.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, S; Melillo, G; Bestetti, A; Borsa, M; Giuliani, P; Tonon, G C

    1988-08-01

    The antitussive activity of levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs and rabbits and in unanaesthetized guinea-pigs. Levodropropizine was shown to have good antitussive activity. Intravenously, it was 1/10 to 1/20 as active as codeine and comparable to dropropizine, from which it is derived, on mechanically and electrically induced coughing in rabbits and guinea-pigs. After oral administration to the guinea-pig the antitussive activity of levodropropizine was comparable with those of both dropropizine and codeine against coughing induced by irritant aerosols.

  10. Antitussive properties of levodropropizine.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, S; Melillo, G; Bestetti, A; Borsa, M; Giuliani, P; Tonon, G C

    1988-08-01

    The antitussive activity of levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs and rabbits and in unanaesthetized guinea-pigs. Levodropropizine was shown to have good antitussive activity. Intravenously, it was 1/10 to 1/20 as active as codeine and comparable to dropropizine, from which it is derived, on mechanically and electrically induced coughing in rabbits and guinea-pigs. After oral administration to the guinea-pig the antitussive activity of levodropropizine was comparable with those of both dropropizine and codeine against coughing induced by irritant aerosols. PMID:3196407

  11. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management.

  12. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management. PMID:11762966

  13. [Comparative study of two antitussive drugs in the treatment of acute dry cough of infectious origin (prospective, randomized, single blind study)].

    PubMed

    Pujet, J C; Keddad, K; Sévenier, F; Jolivet-Landreau, I

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to compare, during a 5-day therapy, the efficacy and tolerability of an antihistaminic antitussive syrup, oxomemazine, combining a small quantity of guaifenesine (T), with a centrally acting antitussive, clobutinol (S), in adult patients aged from 18 to 70 years and presenting with a dry cough of infectious origin. This study was performed by 22 general practitioners and 130 ambulatory patients were enrolled. The primary criterion of this multicenter, randomized, single blind study was to compare the evolution of cough intensity using a Visual Analog Squale (VAS) graduated from 0 to 10 cm. Nine secondary criteria including tolerability were also assessed. With regard to cough intensity, the treatments were not equivalent. A greater reduction was observed with T (-5.2 +/- 2.3 versus -4.3 +/- 2.3). This result was confirmed by a further reduction in cough intensity at days: 2 (p = 0.04), 4 (p = 0.05), and 5 (p = 0.02). The frequency of cough disappearance before the end of the study was significantly greater for T than for S: 46% versus 29% (p = 0.05). The time before disappearance of the cough was 4.0 + 1.1 days for both medicines. Induction of sleep and the frequency of nocturnal wakening were significantly better for T from day 4 (p = 0.02). The drowsiness induced by T meant that diurnal quality of life was better with S on days 1 (p = 0.002) and 2 (p = 0.01). Tolerability was similar for both medicines. In conclusion, as a symptomatic treatment of dry cough, T is efficient and well tolerated. Moreover, we have observed a tendency towards superior efficacy of T than S. T is therefore a useful alternative in the therapeutic armamentarium available to the general practitioner.

  14. [Comparative study of two antitussive drugs in the treatment of acute dry cough of infectious origin (prospective, randomized, single blind study)].

    PubMed

    Pujet, J C; Keddad, K; Sévenier, F; Jolivet-Landreau, I

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to compare, during a 5-day therapy, the efficacy and tolerability of an antihistaminic antitussive syrup, oxomemazine, combining a small quantity of guaifenesine (T), with a centrally acting antitussive, clobutinol (S), in adult patients aged from 18 to 70 years and presenting with a dry cough of infectious origin. This study was performed by 22 general practitioners and 130 ambulatory patients were enrolled. The primary criterion of this multicenter, randomized, single blind study was to compare the evolution of cough intensity using a Visual Analog Squale (VAS) graduated from 0 to 10 cm. Nine secondary criteria including tolerability were also assessed. With regard to cough intensity, the treatments were not equivalent. A greater reduction was observed with T (-5.2 +/- 2.3 versus -4.3 +/- 2.3). This result was confirmed by a further reduction in cough intensity at days: 2 (p = 0.04), 4 (p = 0.05), and 5 (p = 0.02). The frequency of cough disappearance before the end of the study was significantly greater for T than for S: 46% versus 29% (p = 0.05). The time before disappearance of the cough was 4.0 + 1.1 days for both medicines. Induction of sleep and the frequency of nocturnal wakening were significantly better for T from day 4 (p = 0.02). The drowsiness induced by T meant that diurnal quality of life was better with S on days 1 (p = 0.002) and 2 (p = 0.01). Tolerability was similar for both medicines. In conclusion, as a symptomatic treatment of dry cough, T is efficient and well tolerated. Moreover, we have observed a tendency towards superior efficacy of T than S. T is therefore a useful alternative in the therapeutic armamentarium available to the general practitioner. PMID:12611200

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of some anti-tussive and anti-spasmodic drugs through ion-pair complex formation with thiocyanate and cobalt(II) or molybdenum(V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shiekh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; El-Fetouh Gouda, Ayman Abou

    2007-04-01

    Two rapid, simple and sensitive extractive specrophotometric methods has been developed for the determination of anti-tussive drugs, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DEX) and pipazethate hydrochloride (PiCl) and anti-spasmodic drugs, e.g., drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) and trimebutine maleate (TM) in bulk and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of cobalt(II)-thiocyanate (method A) and molybdenum(V)-thiocyanate ions (method B) with the cited drugs to form stable ion-pair complexes which extractable with an n-butnol-dichloromethane solvent mixture (3.5:6.5) and methylene chloride for methods A and B, respectively. The blue and orange red color complexes are determined either colorimetrically at λmax 625 nm (using method A) and 467 or 470 nm for (DEX and PiCl) or (DvCl and TM), respectively (using method B). The concentration range is 20-400 and 2.5-50 μg mL -1 for methods A and B, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations applying the standard additions technique and the results obtained in good agreement well with those obtained by the official method.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of some anti-tussive and anti-spasmodic drugs through ion-pair complex formation with thiocyanate and cobalt(II) or molybdenum(V).

    PubMed

    El-Shiekh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; El-Fetouh Gouda, Ayman Abou

    2007-04-01

    Two rapid, simple and sensitive extractive specrophotometric methods has been developed for the determination of anti-tussive drugs, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DEX) and pipazethate hydrochloride (PiCl) and anti-spasmodic drugs, e.g., drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) and trimebutine maleate (TM) in bulk and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of cobalt(II)-thiocyanate (method A) and molybdenum(V)-thiocyanate ions (method B) with the cited drugs to form stable ion-pair complexes which extractable with an n-butnol-dichloromethane solvent mixture (3.5:6.5) and methylene chloride for methods A and B, respectively. The blue and orange red color complexes are determined either colorimetrically at lambdamax 625 nm (using method A) and 467 or 470 nm for (DEX and PiCl) or (DvCl and TM), respectively (using method B). The concentration range is 20-400 and 2.5-50 microg mL-1 for methods A and B, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations applying the standard additions technique and the results obtained in good agreement well with those obtained by the official method. PMID:17142094

  17. Potential transducers based man-tailored biomimetic sensors for selective recognition of dextromethorphan as an antitussive drug.

    PubMed

    El-Naby, Eman H; Kamel, Ayman H

    2015-09-01

    A biomimetic potentiometric sensor for specific recognition of dextromethorphan (DXM), a drug classified according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a "drug of concern", is designed and characterized. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), with special molecular recognition properties of DXM, was prepared by thermal polymerization in which DXM acted as template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) and acrylonitrile (AN) acted as functional monomers in the presence of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker. The sensors showed a high selectivity and a sensitive response to the template in aqueous system. Electrochemical evaluation of these sensors revealed near-Nernstian response with slopes of 49.6±0.5 and 53.4±0.5 mV decade(-1) with a detection limit of 1.9×10(-6), and 1.0×10(-6) mol L(-1) DXM with MIP/MAA and MIP/AN membrane based sensors, respectively. Significantly improved accuracy, precision, response time, stability, selectivity and sensitivity were offered by these simple and cost-effective potentiometric sensors compared with other standard techniques. The method has the requisite accuracy, sensitivity and precision to assay DXM in pharmaceutical products. PMID:26046285

  18. Potential transducers based man-tailored biomimetic sensors for selective recognition of dextromethorphan as an antitussive drug.

    PubMed

    El-Naby, Eman H; Kamel, Ayman H

    2015-09-01

    A biomimetic potentiometric sensor for specific recognition of dextromethorphan (DXM), a drug classified according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a "drug of concern", is designed and characterized. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), with special molecular recognition properties of DXM, was prepared by thermal polymerization in which DXM acted as template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) and acrylonitrile (AN) acted as functional monomers in the presence of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker. The sensors showed a high selectivity and a sensitive response to the template in aqueous system. Electrochemical evaluation of these sensors revealed near-Nernstian response with slopes of 49.6±0.5 and 53.4±0.5 mV decade(-1) with a detection limit of 1.9×10(-6), and 1.0×10(-6) mol L(-1) DXM with MIP/MAA and MIP/AN membrane based sensors, respectively. Significantly improved accuracy, precision, response time, stability, selectivity and sensitivity were offered by these simple and cost-effective potentiometric sensors compared with other standard techniques. The method has the requisite accuracy, sensitivity and precision to assay DXM in pharmaceutical products.

  19. The centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive tipepidine produces antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Inoue, Masako; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2009-12-14

    The antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine was studied in rats. Tipepidine at 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p. reduced immobility in the forced swimming test and tipepidine at 40 mg/kg, i.p. increased climbing in the test. The drug at 40 mg/kg, i.p. had no effect on the locomotor activity and motor coordination. These results suggest that tipepidine may be a novel drug with antidepressant-like activity.

  20. Novel antitussive strategies.

    PubMed

    Morjaria, Jaymin B; Dickinson, Rebecca S; Morice, Alyn H

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic cough represent one of the most common symptoms of medical importance but effective pharmacotherapy is, to all intents and purposes, absent. Numerous initiatives targeting the recently discovered tussive pathways are in progress. Here, we review the current antitussive armamentarium and provide an update on the novel strategies and compounds in development.

  1. Currently available antitussives.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2009-04-01

    Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients seek medical attention. Acute cough, usually due to a viral upper respiratory tract infection, generates a huge expenditure on prescription and over-the-counter cough and cold preparations worldwide. Most of these agents, however, have not been shown to be more effective than placebo in adequately performed clinical trials. The goal of management in chronic cough is treatment of its underlying cause. However, certain situations will necessitate cough suppressant therapy for symptomatic relief. Unfortunately, currently available antitussives, such as the opioids, are not consistently effective, or achieve therapeutic effect at the expense of unpleasant or intolerable side effects. Safer and more effective cough suppressants are desperately needed. Potential novel antitussives will need to be evaluated in properly formulated clinical trials, measuring relevant subjective and objective end points in appropriate subject populations. PMID:18771744

  2. Studies on the potency of various antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, S C; Chou, D T; Wallenstein, M C

    1977-09-01

    Several antitussive agents were assessed for their cough-suppressant activity. Cough responses were obtained by electrically stimulating the lower brainstem, in cats lightly anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital or in unanesthetized midcollicular decerebrate preparations. Cough sounds were recorded with the aid of a microphone. The cough reactive region was concentrated in an area dorsomedial to the trigeminal tract and nucleus. The potency of these antitussive agents (dextromethorphan, RO 21-4790-001, codeine, clonazepam, diazepam and caramiphen) were determined by studying their effect on the centrally induced cough responses. Each of these agents was administered in graded doses intravenously to determine the minimal effective doses for suppressing the cough responses. They are 0.57, 2.55, 1.71, 0.048, 0.28 and 3.18 mg/kg for the above listed drugs. The results indicate that clonazepam was found to be the most potent antitussive among these agents, the mean effective dose being about 1/35 of that of codeine. The antitussive potency of benzodiazepines is not well correlated with their muscle relaxant activity. For instance, clonazepam and diazepam have the same potency in depressing polysynaptic spinal reflexes, whereas the former is six times more potent than diazepam as an antitussive. This finding indicates that clonazepam has a high specificity as an antitussive.

  3. 21 CFR 341.14 - Antitussive active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE... established for each ingredient in § 341.74(d): (a) Oral antitussives. (1) Chlophedianol hydrochloride. (2... and 21 CFR 1308.15(c). (i) Codeine. (ii) Codeine phosphate. (iii) Codeine sulfate....

  4. 21 CFR 341.14 - Antitussive active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE... established for each ingredient in § 341.74(d): (a) Oral antitussives. (1) Chlophedianol hydrochloride. (2... and 21 CFR 1308.15(c). (i) Codeine. (ii) Codeine phosphate. (iii) Codeine sulfate....

  5. 21 CFR 341.14 - Antitussive active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE... established for each ingredient in § 341.74(d): (a) Oral antitussives. (1) Chlophedianol hydrochloride. (2... and 21 CFR 1308.15(c). (i) Codeine. (ii) Codeine phosphate. (iii) Codeine sulfate....

  6. 21 CFR 341.14 - Antitussive active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE... established for each ingredient in § 341.74(d): (a) Oral antitussives. (1) Chlophedianol hydrochloride. (2... and 21 CFR 1308.15(c). (i) Codeine. (ii) Codeine phosphate. (iii) Codeine sulfate....

  7. 21 CFR 341.14 - Antitussive active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE... established for each ingredient in § 341.74(d): (a) Oral antitussives. (1) Chlophedianol hydrochloride. (2... and 21 CFR 1308.15(c). (i) Codeine. (ii) Codeine phosphate. (iii) Codeine sulfate....

  8. A comparative randomized double-blind clinical trial of isoaminile citrate and chlophedianol hydrochloride as antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Diwan, J; Dhand, R; Jindal, S K; Malik, S K; Sharma, P L

    1982-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of a new centrally acting antitussive agent, isoaminile citrate, was compared with that of chlophedianol hydrochloride in a double-blind, randomized interpatient study. A total of 66 patients participated, two and four patients were lost to follow-up with isoaminile and chlophedianol, respectively. In the experimentally induced cough in 12 normal human subjects, isoaminile (40 mg) was as effective as chlophedianol (20 mg), but its duration of action was somewhat longer. One subject developed allergic skin rash with chlophedianol and was withdrawn from the study. In 60 patients with cough associated with chest diseases, isoaminile (40 mg, 3 x daily) was as effective as chlophedianol (20 mg, 3 x daily) in suppressing cough as judged from the 3-h and 24-h cough counts. The increase in PEFR at day 7 of treatment was somewhat more marked with chlophedianol as compared with isoaminile. None of the drugs interfered with the expectoration process. The side effects observed were few, mild in nature, and did not require a decrease in dose or withdrawal of treatment in any of the patients. Isoaminile citrate was concluded to be an effective and relatively safe antitussive agent. Isoaminile citrate, alpha(isopropyl)-alpha-(beta-dimethylaminoproyl) phenylacetonitrile citrate, is a centrally acting antitussive agent. In animal experiments this drug was as efficacious as codeine but was devoid of any respiratory depressant effect [Krause 1958, Kuroda et al. 1971]. This controlled double-randomized interpatient study was designed to test the comparative efficacy and safety of isoaminile and chlophedianol, another centrally acting antitussive, in humans. PMID:6749701

  9. A comparative randomized double-blind clinical trial of isoaminile citrate and chlophedianol hydrochloride as antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Diwan, J; Dhand, R; Jindal, S K; Malik, S K; Sharma, P L

    1982-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of a new centrally acting antitussive agent, isoaminile citrate, was compared with that of chlophedianol hydrochloride in a double-blind, randomized interpatient study. A total of 66 patients participated, two and four patients were lost to follow-up with isoaminile and chlophedianol, respectively. In the experimentally induced cough in 12 normal human subjects, isoaminile (40 mg) was as effective as chlophedianol (20 mg), but its duration of action was somewhat longer. One subject developed allergic skin rash with chlophedianol and was withdrawn from the study. In 60 patients with cough associated with chest diseases, isoaminile (40 mg, 3 x daily) was as effective as chlophedianol (20 mg, 3 x daily) in suppressing cough as judged from the 3-h and 24-h cough counts. The increase in PEFR at day 7 of treatment was somewhat more marked with chlophedianol as compared with isoaminile. None of the drugs interfered with the expectoration process. The side effects observed were few, mild in nature, and did not require a decrease in dose or withdrawal of treatment in any of the patients. Isoaminile citrate was concluded to be an effective and relatively safe antitussive agent. Isoaminile citrate, alpha(isopropyl)-alpha-(beta-dimethylaminoproyl) phenylacetonitrile citrate, is a centrally acting antitussive agent. In animal experiments this drug was as efficacious as codeine but was devoid of any respiratory depressant effect [Krause 1958, Kuroda et al. 1971]. This controlled double-randomized interpatient study was designed to test the comparative efficacy and safety of isoaminile and chlophedianol, another centrally acting antitussive, in humans.

  10. In vivo antitussive potentiality of Lagerstroemia parviflora flower extract using a cough model induced by sulfur dioxide in mice.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Avijit; Bhattacharya, S; Mazumder, Rupa

    2007-03-01

    The methanol extract of the flowers of Lagerstroemia parviflora Roxb (Family: Lythraceae) was investigated for its effect on a cough model induced by sulphur dioxide gas in mice. It exhibited significant antitussive activity when compared with the control in a dose-dependent manner. The extract (100, 200, 300 mg kg(-1)) showed maximum inhibition of cough reflex at 90 min after drug administration and the antitussive activity was comparable to that of codeine phosphate, a standard antitussive agent.

  11. Evaluation of antitussive agents in man.

    PubMed

    Parvez, L; Vaidya, M; Sakhardande, A; Subburaj, S; Rajagopalan, T G

    1996-01-01

    Methodology to evaluate the efficacy of antitussive drugs rely largely on subjective methods and cough counts. There are few studies in cough due to natural disease especially using objective techniques. This paper presents data from a series of randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trials in cough due to both chronic bronchopulmonary disease and acute upper respiratory tract infections. In these studies, cough was quantified using a standardized and validated computerized system for the acquisition and multidimensional analysis of the cough sound. Key objective parameters like cough counts, intensity, latency and total effort expended were studied. Guaiphenesin and bromhexine showed significant expectorant effects in patients with productive cough due to chronic bronchopulmonary disease. Differences were observed in speed of action, and objective and subjective measures, that probably indicate differences in drug action. More recently, three studies evaluated the antitussive drug dextromethorphan in non-productive cough due to uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections. Reproducible cough suppressant effects were demonstrated after a single 30 mg dose using objective measures of cough counts, latency and total effort. These results establish the sensitivity and robustness of the cough quantitation methodology in the objective evaluation of cough treatments. PMID:9232667

  12. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  13. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  14. Antitussive effect of nociceptin/orphanin FQ in experimental cough models.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Bolser, Donald C; Jia, Yanlin; Parra, Leonard E; Mutter, Jennifer C; Wang, Xin; Tulshian, Deen B; Egan, Robert W; Hey, John A

    2002-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids or foreign materials from the airways. However, often cough is non-productive and requires suppression. Opioid mu receptor agonists, such as codeine are commonly used as antitussive agents and are among the most widely administered drugs in the world. Codeine suppresses the responsiveness of one or more components of the central reflex pathway for cough and is an efficacious antitussive drug for cough due to diverse aetiologies. However, opioids produce side effects that include sedation, addiction potential and constipation. Therefore, novel cough suppressant therapies should maintain or improve upon the antitussive efficacy profile of opioids. Moreover, these novel therapies should have a safety profile significantly better than current antitussive therapies. Presently, we discuss preclinical findings showing that activation of the 'opioid-like' receptor (NOP(1)) inhibits cough in the guinea pig and cat. PMID:12099766

  15. The Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, R B

    1988-10-01

    The Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 is described, and its implications for hospitals and other health-care entities are discussed. The act, which became effective on July 21, 1988, is intended to reduce public health risks from adulterated, misbranded, and counterfeit drug products that enter the marketplace through drug diversion. The law provides that prescription drug products manufactured in the United States and exported can no longer be reimported, except by the product's manufacturer. It also establishes restrictions on sales of prescription drug products and samples. Samples of prescription drug products may be distributed only if a licensed prescriber requests them. Other distribution channels for samples specified in the law are permissible, provided records are maintained. Under the law, wholesale distributors must be licensed by the state and meet uniform standards. Penalties for violations of the law are also identified. According to FDA's advisory guidelines on the statute, the law will permit hospitals to return drug products, provided the return is made to the manufacturer or wholesaler and provided written notice is secured that the goods were received (for manufacturers) or the goods were destroyed or returned to the manufacturer (for wholesalers). The final chapter on drug diversion must await issuance of final FDA regulations. PMID:3228083

  16. Antitussive effects of levodropropizine in the dog.

    PubMed

    Munt, P L; Clavenna, G; Algate, D R; Leach, R M

    1994-02-01

    The antitussive activity of levodropropizine (S(-)3-(4-phenyl-piperazine-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526, CAS 99291-25-5) was evaluated after oral administration to the conscious dog. Levodropropizine had a good antitussive activity, comparable with, but having a longer duration of action than dropropizine, the racemate from which it is derived. The antitussive activity of levodropropizine in the dog was approximately 1/20 of that of codeine phosphate.

  17. Antitussive effects of levodropropizine in the dog.

    PubMed

    Munt, P L; Clavenna, G; Algate, D R; Leach, R M

    1994-02-01

    The antitussive activity of levodropropizine (S(-)3-(4-phenyl-piperazine-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526, CAS 99291-25-5) was evaluated after oral administration to the conscious dog. Levodropropizine had a good antitussive activity, comparable with, but having a longer duration of action than dropropizine, the racemate from which it is derived. The antitussive activity of levodropropizine in the dog was approximately 1/20 of that of codeine phosphate. PMID:8147948

  18. [Antitussive constituents of Disporum cantoniense].

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiu-Hai; Zhao, Chao; Liang, Zhi-Yuan; Gong, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Hua-Guo; Zhou, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The antitussive activity assay for the root extraction of Disporum cantoniense was carried out with coughing mice induced by ammonia liquor. The results showed that the ethanol and water extractions of D. cantoniense possess strong antitussive activity, and the high dose of the former was better than positive control, and then the constituents of the ethanol extraction were separated and purified by various modern chromatographic techniques. Their structures were identified by physico-chemical properties and spectroscopic data. As a result, eight compounds were isolated and identified as stigmast-4-en-3-one(1), (22E, 24R)-ergosta-5, 7, 22-trien-3beta-ol(2), obtucarbamate A(3), obtucarbamate B(4), neotigogenin(5), azo-2, 2'-bis[Z-(2,3-dihydroxy-4-methyl-5-methoxy) phenyl ethylene] (6),dimethyl {[carbonylbis (azanediyl)] bis( 2-methyl-5, 1-phenylene) j dicarbamate (7) , and quercetin-3-O-pB-D-glucopyranoside(8). All compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time, and the result of bioactivity-directed isolation showed that compounds 3, 4, and 6 had obvious effect on antitussive activity, and compound 6 had the same level as positive control.

  19. Levocloperastine in the treatment of chronic nonproductive cough: comparative efficacy versus standard antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Aliprandi, P; Castelli, C; Bernorio, S; Dell'Abate, E; Carrara, M

    2004-01-01

    The medical and social impact of cough is substantial. Current antitussive agents at effective doses have adverse events such as drowsiness, nausea and constipation that limit their use. There is also recent evidence that standard antitussive agents, such as codeine, may not reduce cough during upper respiratory infections. Therefore, there is a need for more effective and better-tolerated agents. The efficacy of levocloperastine, a novel antitussive, which acts both centrally on the cough center and on peripheral receptors in the tracheobronchial tree in treating chronic cough, was compared with that of other standard antitussive agents (codeine, levodropropizine and DL-cloperastine) in six open clinical trials. The studies enrolled patients of all ages with cough associated with various respiratory disorders including bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Levocloperastine significantly improved cough symptoms (intensity and frequency of cough) in all trials, and improvements were observed after the first day of treatment. In children, levocloperastine reduced nighttime awakenings and irritability, and in adults it was effective in treating cough induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. When compared with other antitussive agents, levocloperastine had improved or comparable efficacy, with a more rapid onset of action. Importantly, no evidence of central adverse events was recorded with levocloperastine, whereas drowsiness was reported by a significant number of patients receiving codeine. Levocloperastine is an effective antitussive agent for the treatment of cough in patients of all ages. It has a more rapid onset of action than standard agents with an improved tolerability profile.

  20. Levocloperastine in the treatment of chronic nonproductive cough: comparative efficacy versus standard antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Aliprandi, P; Castelli, C; Bernorio, S; Dell'Abate, E; Carrara, M

    2004-01-01

    The medical and social impact of cough is substantial. Current antitussive agents at effective doses have adverse events such as drowsiness, nausea and constipation that limit their use. There is also recent evidence that standard antitussive agents, such as codeine, may not reduce cough during upper respiratory infections. Therefore, there is a need for more effective and better-tolerated agents. The efficacy of levocloperastine, a novel antitussive, which acts both centrally on the cough center and on peripheral receptors in the tracheobronchial tree in treating chronic cough, was compared with that of other standard antitussive agents (codeine, levodropropizine and DL-cloperastine) in six open clinical trials. The studies enrolled patients of all ages with cough associated with various respiratory disorders including bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Levocloperastine significantly improved cough symptoms (intensity and frequency of cough) in all trials, and improvements were observed after the first day of treatment. In children, levocloperastine reduced nighttime awakenings and irritability, and in adults it was effective in treating cough induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. When compared with other antitussive agents, levocloperastine had improved or comparable efficacy, with a more rapid onset of action. Importantly, no evidence of central adverse events was recorded with levocloperastine, whereas drowsiness was reported by a significant number of patients receiving codeine. Levocloperastine is an effective antitussive agent for the treatment of cough in patients of all ages. It has a more rapid onset of action than standard agents with an improved tolerability profile. PMID:15553659

  1. Current and future centrally acting antitussives☆

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight some important issues regarding current centrally acting antitussive drugs as well as discuss the implications of these matters on the development of future cough suppressants. Drugs that act in the central nervous system to inhibit cough are termed centrally acting and this designation is based exclusively on evidence obtained from animal models. This classification can include drugs that act both at peripheral and central sites following systemic administration. These drugs are intended to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing resulting from disorders of any etiology. There are a number of central cough suppressants identified by their efficacy in animal models and the most prominent of these are codeine and dextromethorphan. Although the exact neural elements on which these drugs act are currently unknown, they are thought to inhibit a functionally identified component of the central system for cough known as the gating mechanism. The efficacy of codeine and dextromethorphan in humans has recently been questioned. These drugs are less effective on cough induced by upper airway disorders than in pathological conditions involving the lower airways in humans. The reasons for this difference in antitussive sensitivity are not clear. We propose that sensory afferents from different regions of the airways actuate coughing in humans by antitussive sensitive and insensitive control elements in the central nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with results from an animal model in which laryngeal and tracheobronchial cough had different sensitivities to codeine. Other factors that may be very important in the action of central antitussive drugs in humans include the role of sensations produced by a tussigenic stimulus as well as plasticity of central pathways in response to airway inflammation. Resolution of these issues in the human will be a challenging process, but one which will lay the foundation for the

  2. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium.

  3. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium. PMID:3196411

  4. Antitussive indole alkaloids from Kopsia hainanensis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Jia; Yin, Chun; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2011-06-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named kopsihainins A-C (1-3), and two known compounds, kopsinine (4) and methyl demethoxycarbonylchanofruticosinate (5), were isolated from the stems of Kopsia hainanensis. Their structures were determined using extensive spectroscopic methods. The two main constituents 4 and 5 exhibited significant antitussive activity in a citric acid induced guinea pig cough model. The antitussive effect of 4 was demonstrated to interact with the δ-opioid receptor. This is the first report of antitussive effects of aspidofractinine type and chanofruticosinate type alkaloids.

  5. Modulation of the cough reflex by antitussive agents within the caudal aspect of the nucleus tractus solitarii in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Mutolo, Donatella; Bongianni, Fulvia; Cinelli, Elenia; Fontana, Giovanni A; Pantaleo, Tito

    2008-07-01

    We have previously shown that ionotropic glutamate receptors in the caudal portion of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), especially in the commissural NTS, play a prominent role in the mediation of tracheobronchial cough and that substance P potentiates this reflex. This NTS region could be a site of action of some centrally acting antitussive agents and a component of a drug-sensitive gating mechanism of cough. To address these issues, we investigated changes in baseline respiratory activity and cough responses to tracheobronchial mechanical stimulation following microinjections (30-50 nl) of centrally acting antitussive drugs into the caudal NTS of pentobarbitone-anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rabbits. [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and baclofen decreased baseline respiratory frequency because of increases in the inspiratory time only at the higher concentration employed (5 mM and 1 mM, respectively). DAMGO (0.5 mM) and baclofen (0.1 mM) significantly decreased cough number, peak abdominal activity, peak tracheal pressure, and increased cough-related total cycle duration. At the higher concentrations, these agents suppressed the cough reflex. The effects of these two drugs were counteracted by specific antagonists (10 mM naloxone and 25 mM CGP-35348, respectively). The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist CP-99,994 (10 mM) abolished cough responses, whereas the NK2 receptor antagonist MEN 10376 (5 mM) had no effect. The results indicate that the caudal NTS is a site of action of some centrally acting drugs and a likely component of a neural system involved in cough regulation. A crucial role of substance P release in the mediation of reflex cough is also suggested.

  6. Antitussive effect of naringin on experimentally induced cough in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sen; Li, Peibo; Yang, Hongliang; Fang, Siqi; Su, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of naringin has been investigated in different models of experimentally induced cough in guinea pigs. In contrast to codeine phosphate (6 mg/kg, intravenous administration [i. v.]), naringin (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i. v.) had no central antitussive effect on cough elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Naringin (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µmol) could not prevent the cough reflex induced by stimulation of the trachea after intracerebroventricular injection (i. c. v.), while codeine phosphate (0.5 µmol) was highly effective. Further characterizing the peripheral mechanism of naringin, we found that its effect (50 mg/kg, i. v.) was not affected by the depletion of sensory neuropeptides, whereas levodropropizine (10 mg/kg, i. v.) lost its capacity to prevent cough in the capsaicin-desensitized guinea pig. Furthermore, pretreatment with glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i. p.]) significantly reduced the antitussive effect of pinacidil (5 mg/kg, subcutaneous [s. c.]), but could not antagonize the antitussive effect of naringin (30 mg/kg, s. c.). Our present results suggest that naringin is not a central antitussive drug. And naringin does not exert its peripheral antitussive effect through either the sensory neuropeptides system or the modulation of ATP-sensitive K (+) channels.

  7. Antitussive effect of naringin on experimentally induced cough in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sen; Li, Peibo; Yang, Hongliang; Fang, Siqi; Su, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of naringin has been investigated in different models of experimentally induced cough in guinea pigs. In contrast to codeine phosphate (6 mg/kg, intravenous administration [i. v.]), naringin (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i. v.) had no central antitussive effect on cough elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Naringin (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µmol) could not prevent the cough reflex induced by stimulation of the trachea after intracerebroventricular injection (i. c. v.), while codeine phosphate (0.5 µmol) was highly effective. Further characterizing the peripheral mechanism of naringin, we found that its effect (50 mg/kg, i. v.) was not affected by the depletion of sensory neuropeptides, whereas levodropropizine (10 mg/kg, i. v.) lost its capacity to prevent cough in the capsaicin-desensitized guinea pig. Furthermore, pretreatment with glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i. p.]) significantly reduced the antitussive effect of pinacidil (5 mg/kg, subcutaneous [s. c.]), but could not antagonize the antitussive effect of naringin (30 mg/kg, s. c.). Our present results suggest that naringin is not a central antitussive drug. And naringin does not exert its peripheral antitussive effect through either the sensory neuropeptides system or the modulation of ATP-sensitive K (+) channels. PMID:20645246

  8. The Orphan Drug Act: Restoring the Mission to Rare Diseases.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Michael G; Pawlik, Timothy M; Fader, Amanda N; Esnaola, Nestor F; Makary, Martin A

    2016-04-01

    The Orphan Drug Act has fostered drug development for patients with rare cancers and other diseases; however, current data suggest that companies are gaming the system to use the law for mainstream drugs. We identify a pattern of pharmaceutical companies submitting drugs to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as orphan drugs but once approved, the drugs are used broadly off-label with the lucrative orphan drug protections and exclusivity benefits. Since the law was passed, the proportion of new FDA-approved drugs that were submitted as orphan drugs has increased with a peak last year of 41% of all FDA-approved drugs approved as orphan drugs. On the basis of the current data, we suggest that patients with rare cancers and other diseases may suffer due to dilution of the incentives and benefits. We propose reform to increase submission scrutiny, decrease benefits based on off-label use, and increase price transparency. PMID:26580246

  9. [Preparation and antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone-bile acids salts].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Pi, Hui-Fang; Chen, Chang; Wu, Ji-Zhou

    2007-03-01

    To search for potential drugs with potent antitussive, expectorant, antiasthmatic activities and low toxicity, a series of verticinone-bile acids salts were prepared based on the clearly elucidated antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone in bulbs of Fritillaria and different bile acids in Snake Bile. The antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of these verticinone-bile acid salts were then screened with different animal models. Ver-CA (verticinone-cholic acid salt) and Ver-CDCA (verticinone-chenodeoxycholic acid salt) showed much more potent activities than other compounds. The bioactivities of Ver-CA and Ver-CDCA are worthy to be intensively studied, and it is also deserved to pay much attention to their much more potent antitussive effects than codeine phosphate. In order to elucidate whether they have synergistic effect and attenuated toxicity, their activities will be continuously compared with single verticinone, cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid at the same doses on different animal models. The application of "combination principles" in traditional Chinese medicinal formulations may be a novel way in triditional Chinese medicine research and discovery.

  10. Drug-Resistant Malaria: The Era of ACT

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jessica T.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    As drug-resistant falciparum malaria has continued to evolve and spread worldwide, artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) have become the centerpiece of global malaria control over the past decade. This review discusses how advances in antimalarial drug resistance monitoring and rational use of the array of ACTs now available can maximize the impact of this highly efficacious therapy, even as resistance to artemisinins is emerging in Southeast Asia. PMID:21308525

  11. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  12. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  13. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  14. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  15. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  16. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  19. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  20. Comprehensive evidence-based review on European antitussives

    PubMed Central

    Morice, Alyn; Kardos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Acute cough caused by viral respiratory tract infections is probably the most common illness to afflict mankind. Despite the widespread but ineffective prescribing of antibiotics, there is no specific therapy. Home remedies and over-the-counter medicines are the mainstay for treatment of this short-lived but debilitating condition where cough is a major troublesome symptom. Across Europe, there are large variations in the recommendations made by healthcare professionals for the treatment of acute cough. This has arisen through custom and practice based on the evidence of historical studies performed to standards well short of what would be considered legitimate today. Acute cough is particularly difficult to study in a controlled setting because of the high rate of spontaneous remission and a large placebo effect. Here we detail the validated modern methodology used to assess the efficacy of antitussives and review the drugs commonly used in Europe against these standards. PMID:27547407

  1. Comprehensive evidence-based review on European antitussives.

    PubMed

    Morice, Alyn; Kardos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Acute cough caused by viral respiratory tract infections is probably the most common illness to afflict mankind. Despite the widespread but ineffective prescribing of antibiotics, there is no specific therapy. Home remedies and over-the-counter medicines are the mainstay for treatment of this short-lived but debilitating condition where cough is a major troublesome symptom. Across Europe, there are large variations in the recommendations made by healthcare professionals for the treatment of acute cough. This has arisen through custom and practice based on the evidence of historical studies performed to standards well short of what would be considered legitimate today. Acute cough is particularly difficult to study in a controlled setting because of the high rate of spontaneous remission and a large placebo effect. Here we detail the validated modern methodology used to assess the efficacy of antitussives and review the drugs commonly used in Europe against these standards. PMID:27547407

  2. Multitarget drugs of plants origin acting on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, P; Frustaci, A; Del Bufalo, A; Fini, M; Cesario, A

    2013-01-01

    The etiopathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is extremely complex and heterogeneous, often associated with comorbidities. As a result it may be unlikely that AD may be mitigated by drug acting on a single specific target. The current tendency in drug design and discovery in AD is the rational design or "serendipitous" discovery of new drug entities challenging multiple targets. Since two of the presently approved drugs for AD are based on natural products (galantamine and the physostigmine-derivative rivastigmine), many plants are now under investigation as a potential source of new drugs. Multifunctional drugs often have their origin in natural sources. This review is limited to plant chemicals having different targets with actual (galantamine) or promising (drugs from Crocus sativus, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia species, and Huperzia serrata) clinical evidence in people with dementia or AD.

  3. Antitussive and toxicological evaluation of Vitex negundo.

    PubMed

    Haq, Rizwan-ul; Shah, Azhar-ul-Haq Ali; Khan, Arif-ullah; Ullah, Zahoor; Khan, Habib-ullah; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Malik, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Vitex negundo Linn. (Verbenaceae) is used in traditional medical system for respiratory disorders. This study was carried out to investigate its cough-relieving potential. The antitussive effect of the butanolic extract of V. negundo (Vn) on sulphur dioxide (SO(2))-induced cough was examined in mice. Safety profile of Vn was carried out by observing acute neurotoxicity, median lethal dose (LD(50)) and behavioural signs. Vn dose-dependently (250-1000 mg kg(-1)) inhibited the cough provoked by SO(2) gas in mice and exhibited maximum protection after 60 min of administration. At 1000 mg kg(-1), Vn caused maximum cough-suppressive effects i.e. cough inhibition at 60 min was 67.4%, as compared to codeine (10 mg kg(-1)), dextromethorphan (10 mg kg(-1)) and saline having cough-inhibitory potential 75.7%, 74.7% and 0%, respectively. LD(50) value of V. negundo was found to be greater than 5000 mg kg(-1). In toxicity tests, no signs of neural impairment and acute behavioural toxicity were observed at antitussive doses and extract has been well tolerated at higher doses. These results indicate that V. negundo exhibits antitussive effect and it was found devoid of toxicity.

  4. Review of the 2015 Drug Supply Chain Security Act.

    PubMed

    Brechtelsbauer, Erich D; Pennell, Benjamin; Durham, Mary; Hertig, John B; Weber, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    The integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain is threatened by medication counterfeiting, importation of unapproved and substandard drugs, and grey markets - all of which have the potential to distribute drug products with the potential for serious harm. On November 27, 2013, President Obama signed into law Title II of the Drug Quality and Security Act, now known as the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Over the next 10 years, the DSCSA will require the pharmaceutical supply chain to implement medication tracking and tracing; serialization, verification, and detection of suspicious products; and strict guidelines for wholesaler licensing and reporting. This article reviews the important aspects of the DSCSA and outlines the role of health-system pharmacy leaders in ensuring compliance to the DSCSA. By verifying that medication supplies are free from adulteration and tampering, the DSCSA serves as a foundational law to ensure quality in providing patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:27354753

  5. Current drugs for the treatment of dry cough.

    PubMed

    Padma, L

    2013-05-01

    Cough is one of the commonest symptoms of respiratory tract infections and is a frequent problem encountered in general practice as well as in hospital practice. A wide range of disease processes may present with cough and definitive treatment depends on identifying the cause and diagnosis. Specific treatment of the cause should control the cough, but this may not occur in all cases and in a sizeable proportion of patients, no associated cause can be found. An increased sensitivity of the cough reflex can be observed in patients with dry cough. Symptomatic relief must be considered when the cough interferes with the patient's daily activities and this is effectively treated with antitussive preparations which are available as combinations of codeine or dextromethorphan with antihistamines, decongestants and expectorants Antitussives are used for effective symptomatic relief of dry or non-productive cough. First generation antihistamines like chlorpheniramine and centrally acting opioid derivatives like codeine are often used alone or in combination in the management of nonspecific cough. Sedation caused by these is valuable, particularly if the cough is disturbing the sleep. Although there is extensive experimental data on single agent antitussives and antitussive combinations, there is a major paucity of published literature on these combinations in nonspecific cough. Treatment of dry cough remains a challenge in some patients and this article reviews the scope of the current drugs and combination of Codeine and Chlorpheniramine in the effective management of dry cough.

  6. 76 FR 58277 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request... comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting on the Animal Generic Drug... on the Internet at...

  7. Drug Interactions of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, John Leonard; Howes, Laurence Guy

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, new direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been introduced into clinical practice that specifically inhibit either factor Ia or Xa. These drugs have, to a large extent, replaced warfarin for the treatment of venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. They have potential advantages over warfarin in providing more stable anticoagulation and the lack of a need for regular venesection to monitor activity. They also have the promise of less drug and food interactions. All of these drugs are substrates for the permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) excretion system, and several are metabolised, in part, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. This current article assesses the interactions that do or may occur with the DOACs, particularly with respect to the P-gp and CYP3A4 systems. PMID:27435452

  8. Preparation and antitussive, expectorant, and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone's derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Pi, Hui-Fang; Wu, Ji-Zhou; Sun, Han-Dong; Fujita, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    To prepare verticinone derivatives with significant antitussive, expectorant, and antiasthmatic activities, the compounds 3beta-acetylverticinone (1), 3-ketoverticinone (2), 3beta-benzoylverticinone (3), 3beta-propionylverticinone (4), 3beta-butyrylverticinone (5), and 3beta-butoxycarbonylverticinone (6) have been prepared. All of these are new compounds. Among them, 1-6 exhibited potent antitussive and expectorant activities; 1 and 3-6 displayed various antiasthmatic activities. The antitussive activity of 1-6, the expectorant activity of 1-2 and 4-6, and the antiasthmatic activity of 1 are higher than those of verticinone. The results demonstrated that 1 had dominant biological activities, suggesting that it would be a potential antitussive, expectorant, and antiasthmatic agent.

  9. Alkaloids from roots of Stemona sessilifolia and their antitussive activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Zhou; Zhu, Jian-Yu; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Cheng, Tin-Yan; Rudd, John A; Ye, Yang

    2009-02-01

    Protostemonamide ( 1), a new protostemonine-type alkaloid, and 12 known compounds were isolated from the roots of Stemona sessilifolia. Their structures were elucidated by 1 D and 2 D NMR spectral and other spectroscopic studies. The main alkaloidal constituents, protostemonine ( 2), stemospironine ( 4), and maistemonine ( 7), showed significant antitussive activity in a citric acid-induced guinea pig cough model following peripheral administration; stemonamine ( 11) had antitussive activity following i. c. v. administration.

  10. Depression of cough reflex by microinjections of antitussive agents into caudal ventral respiratory group of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Mutolo, Donatella; Bongianni, Fulvia; Cinelli, Elenia; Pantaleo, Tito

    2010-10-01

    We have previously shown that the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii is a site of action of some antitussive drugs and that the caudal ventral respiratory group (cVRG) region has a crucial role in determining both the expiratory and inspiratory components of the cough motor pattern. These findings led us to suggest that the cVRG region, and possibly other neural substrates involved in cough regulation, may be sites of action of antitussive drugs. To address this issue, we investigated changes in baseline respiratory activity and cough responses to tracheobronchial mechanical stimulation following microinjections (30-50 nl) of some antitussive drugs into the cVRG of pentobarbital-anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rabbits. [D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and baclofen at the lower concentrations (0.5 mM and 0.1 mM, respectively) decreased cough number, peak abdominal activity, and peak tracheal pressure and increased cough-related total cycle duration (Tt). At the higher concentrations (5 mM and 1 mM, respectively), both drugs abolished the cough reflex. DAMGO and baclofen also affected baseline respiratory activity. Both drugs reduced peak abdominal activity, while only DAMGO increased Tt, owing to increases in expiratory time. The neurokinin-1 (NK(1)) receptor antagonist CP-99,994 (10 mM) decreased cough number, peak abdominal activity, and peak tracheal pressure, without affecting baseline respiration. The NK(2) receptor antagonist MEN 10376 (5 mM) had no effect. The results indicate that the cVRG is a site of action of some antitussive agents and support the hypothesis that several neural substrates involved in cough regulation may share this characteristic.

  11. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  12. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  13. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  14. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  15. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  16. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  17. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice, request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing...

  18. 78 FR 36711 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII-Drug Supply Chain; Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Chapter I Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII--Drug Supply Chain; Standards for Admission of Imported Drugs, Registration of...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting; request for...

  19. Clinical trials with the new antitussive levodropropizine in adult bronchitic patients.

    PubMed

    Allegra, L; Bossi, R

    1988-08-01

    The results of 6 clinical trials involving a total of 174 patients are reported. Levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526) was compared in double-blind manner with placebo, morclofone and cloperastine. The antitussive activity and therapeutic efficacy of the drug were shown to be greater than those of placebo and morclofone and similar to those of cloperastine. Levodropropizine was effective in about 80% of patients; in responders, cough frequency was reduced by an average of 33-51%. Levodropropizine was generally well tolerated and mild side-effects were reported for only 3% of patients.

  20. Clinical trials with the new antitussive levodropropizine in adult bronchitic patients.

    PubMed

    Allegra, L; Bossi, R

    1988-08-01

    The results of 6 clinical trials involving a total of 174 patients are reported. Levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526) was compared in double-blind manner with placebo, morclofone and cloperastine. The antitussive activity and therapeutic efficacy of the drug were shown to be greater than those of placebo and morclofone and similar to those of cloperastine. Levodropropizine was effective in about 80% of patients; in responders, cough frequency was reduced by an average of 33-51%. Levodropropizine was generally well tolerated and mild side-effects were reported for only 3% of patients. PMID:3058135

  1. Provisions of Anti-Drug Abuse Amendments Act of 1988 Relating to Drug Law Enforcement. Information Memorandum 89-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthias, Mary

    This document describes major provisions of the Anti-Drug Abuse Amendments Act of 1988, a federal law relating to enforcement of controlled substances laws which authorizes over two billion dollars for anti-drug activities. Provisions of the Act relating primarily to drug abuse education, prevention or treatment and regulation of the manufacture,…

  2. Subcutaneous implants for long-acting drug therapy in laboratory animals may generate unintended drug reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael; Tyler, Betty M.; DeTolla, Louis; Zhao, Ming; Kobrin, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background: Long-acting therapy in laboratory animals offers advantages over the current practice of 2-3 daily drug injections. Yet little is known about the disintegration of biodegradable drug implants in rodents. Objective: Compare bioavailability of buprenorphine with the biodegradation of lipid-encapsulated subcutaneous drug pellets. Methods: Pharmacokinetic and histopathology studies were conducted in BALB/c female mice implanted with cholesterol-buprenorphine drug pellets. Results: Drug levels are below the level of detection (0.5 ng/mL plasma) within 4-5 days of implant. However, necroscopy revealed that interstitial tissues begin to seal implants within a week. Visual inspection of the implant site revealed no evidence of inflammation or edema associated with the cholesterol-drug residue. Chemical analyses demonstrated that the residues contained 10-13% of the initial opiate dose for at least two weeks post implant. Discussion: The results demonstrate that biodegradable scaffolds can become sequestered in the subcutaneous space. Conclusion: Drug implants can retain significant and unintended reservoirs of drugs. PMID:24459402

  3. Antitussive effect of Carum copticum in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Boskabady, M H; Jandaghi, P; Kiani, S; Hasanzadeh, L

    2005-02-10

    Several therapeutic effects including anti-asthma and dyspnea have been described for the seeds of Carum copticum In previous studies the relaxant and anticholinergic (functional antagonism) effects, histamine (H(1)) inhibitory effect of Carum copticum have been demonstrated on guinea pig tracheal chains. In the present study the antitussive effect of this plant was evaluated. The antitussive effects of aerosols of two different concentrations of aqueous and macerated extracts and carvacrol, codeine, and saline were tested by counting the number of coughs produced due to aerosol of citric acid 10 min after exposing animals to aerosols of different solutions (for carvacrol n=5 and for other solutions n=6). The results showed significant reduction of cough number obtained in the presence of both concentrations of aqueous and macerated extracts and codeine (p<0.001 for extracts and p<0.01 for codeine). The cough number obtained in the presence of higher concentration of aqueous and macerated extracts was significantly less than those of lower concentrations (p<0.05 for both extracts). In addition the cough number obtained in the presence of both concentrations of aqueous and macerated extracts was significantly lower than that of codeine (p<0.05 to 0.001). However, carvacrol did not show any antitussive effect. These results indicated an antitussive effect of Carum copticum which was even greater than that of codeine at concentrations used. In addition the antitussive effect of Carum copticum was not due to its main constituent, carvacrol.

  4. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, Jiri; Dong, Lan-Feng; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as an intriguing target for anti-cancer drugs, inherent to vast majority if not all types of tumours. Drugs that target mitochondria and exert anti-cancer activity have become a focus of recent research due to their great clinical potential (which has not been harnessed thus far). The exceptional potential of mitochondria as a target for anti-cancer agents has been reinforced by the discouraging finding that even tumours of the same type from individual patients differ in a number of mutations. This is consistent with the idea of personalised therapy, an elusive goal at this stage, in line with the notion that tumours are unlikely to be treated by agents that target only a single gene or a single pathway. This endows mitochondria, an invariant target present in all tumours, with an exceptional momentum. This train of thoughts inspired us to define a class of anti-cancer drugs acting by way of mitochondrial 'destabilisation', termed 'mitocans'. In this communication, we define mitocans (many of which have been known for a long time) and classify them into several classes based on their molecular mode of action. We chose the targets that are of major importance from the point of view of their role in mitochondrial destabilisation by small compounds, some of which are now trialled as anti-cancer agents. The classification starts with targets at the surface of mitochondria and ending up with those in the mitochondrial matrix. The purpose of this review is to present in a concise manner the classification of compounds that hold a considerable promise as potential anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. PMID:26927160

  6. 76 FR 79195 - Animal Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... September 20, 2011 (76 FR 58279). In that notice, FDA requested comments on the Animal Drug User Fee Act... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment...

  7. Antitussive stemoninine alkaloids from the roots of Stemona tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Gen; Li, Kan Man; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Rudd, John A; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2008-06-01

    Investigation of the roots of Stemona tuberosa afforded five minor constituents, stemoenonine (1), 9a- O-methylstemoenonine (2), oxystemoenonine (3), 1,9a- seco-stemoenonine (4), and oxystemoninine (5), along with the known compound stemoninoamide (6). Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectra and other spectroscopic studies. Alkaloids 1, 2, and 6, as well as the representative stemoninine-type alkaloid, stemoninine (7), were screened for antitussive activity in the citric acid-induced guinea pig cough model. Compounds 6 and 7 exhibited strong antitussive activity after oral and intraperitoneal administrations.

  8. Evaluation of antitussive activity of formulations with herbal extracts in sulphur dioxide (SO2) induced cough model in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y K; Katyal, Jatinder; Kumar, Gajendra; Mehla, Jogender; Katiyar, C K; Sharma, Naveen; Yadav, Satpal

    2009-01-01

    Cough is the most common symptom of respiratory diseases. When cough becomes serious, opioids are effective, but they have side effects like sedation, constipation, some addiction liability and also compromise the respiratory function. Therefore, there is need to have effective anti-tussive agent which do not have respiratory suppressant activity. The present study was carried out to evaluate anti-tussive activity of combination of herbal drugs as formulations in sulphur dioxide (SO2)-induced cough model in mice. Albino mice of either sex, weighing 25-30 g were divided into eight groups, (n = 6). Group 1 served as normal control, group 2 mice were given distilled water, group 3 was positive control and received codeine sulphate (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and group 4, 5, 6, 7 received coded 1 formulations 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively at a dose of 0.3 ml/mice, orally, while group VIII was the vehicle control. Thirty minutes later, the mice were exposed to sulphur dioxide again for 45 sec. The mice were then placed in an observation chamber for counting of cough bouts, by two independent observers, for five minutes. All the formulations used showed significant antitussive activity in sulphur dioxide induced cough model. Thus, these formulations can prove to be useful for alleviating cough.

  9. Evaluation of antitussive activity of formulations with herbal extracts in sulphur dioxide (SO2) induced cough model in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y K; Katyal, Jatinder; Kumar, Gajendra; Mehla, Jogender; Katiyar, C K; Sharma, Naveen; Yadav, Satpal

    2009-01-01

    Cough is the most common symptom of respiratory diseases. When cough becomes serious, opioids are effective, but they have side effects like sedation, constipation, some addiction liability and also compromise the respiratory function. Therefore, there is need to have effective anti-tussive agent which do not have respiratory suppressant activity. The present study was carried out to evaluate anti-tussive activity of combination of herbal drugs as formulations in sulphur dioxide (SO2)-induced cough model in mice. Albino mice of either sex, weighing 25-30 g were divided into eight groups, (n = 6). Group 1 served as normal control, group 2 mice were given distilled water, group 3 was positive control and received codeine sulphate (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and group 4, 5, 6, 7 received coded 1 formulations 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively at a dose of 0.3 ml/mice, orally, while group VIII was the vehicle control. Thirty minutes later, the mice were exposed to sulphur dioxide again for 45 sec. The mice were then placed in an observation chamber for counting of cough bouts, by two independent observers, for five minutes. All the formulations used showed significant antitussive activity in sulphur dioxide induced cough model. Thus, these formulations can prove to be useful for alleviating cough. PMID:19810578

  10. 76 FR 30727 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Inspections and Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Inspections and Compliance AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a...

  11. [Antitussive action of extracts and polysaccharides of marsh mallow (Althea officinalis L., var. robusta)].

    PubMed

    Nosál'ova, G; Strapková, A; Kardosová, A; Capek, P; Zathurecký, L; Bukovská, E

    1992-03-01

    The complex extract and the polysaccharide isolated from the roots of marsh mallow were tested for antitussive activity in unanaesthetized cats of both sexes. Cough was elicited by mechanical stimulation of laryngopharyngeal and tracheobronchial mucous area of the respiratory system with a Nylon fibre (diameter 0.35 mm). Cough was evaluated on the basis of the changes in lateral tracheal pressure. The polysaccharide and the complex extract were administered p.o. in a dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg b.w., respectively. The efficiency of the mentioned compounds was compared with the cough-suppressing effect of drugs belonging to the non-narcotic antitussics. The results of the experiments showed that administration of the polysaccharide led to a statistically significant decrease of the number of cough efforts both from laryngopharyngeal and tracheobronchial areas of the the respiratory system. The polysaccharide in a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w. was as effective in inhibition of the cough reflex as Sirupus Althaeae in a dose of 1000 mg/kg b.w. and more effective than prenoxdiazine in a dose of 30 mg/kg b.w. However, the cough-suppressing effect of the polysaccharide was lower than that of dropropizine. The extract was less effective than the polysaccharide.

  12. Analgesic and Antineuropathic Drugs Acting Through Central Cholinergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Alessandro; Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo Di; Ghelardini, Carla

    2011-01-01

    The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in analgesia and neuropathic pain relief is relatively unknown. This review describes how such drugs induce analgesia or alleviate neuropathic pain by acting on the central cholinergic system. Several pharmacological strategies are discussed which increase synthesis and release of acetylcholine (ACh) from cholinergic neurons. The effects of their acute and chronic administration are described. The pharmacological strategies which facilitate the physiological functions of the cholinergic system without altering the normal modulation of cholinergic signals are highlighted. It is proposed that full agonists of muscarinic or nicotinic receptors should be avoided. Their activation is too intense and un-physiological because neuronal signals are distorted when these receptors are constantly activated. Good results can be achieved by using agents that are able to a) increase ACh synthesis, b) partially inhibit cholinesterase activity c) selectively block the autoreceptor or heteroreceptor feedback mechanisms. Activation of M1 subtype muscarinic receptors induces analgesia. Chronic stimulation of nicotinic (N1) receptors has neuronal protective effects. Recent experimental results indicate a relationship between repeated cholinergic stimulation and neurotrophic activation of the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family. At least 9 patents covering novel chemicals for cholinergic system modulation and pain control are discussed. PMID:21585331

  13. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  14. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  15. Structural features and in vivo antitussive activity of the water extracted polymer from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipta; Nosál'ová, Gabriella; Ghosh, Debjani; Flešková, Dana; Capek, Peter; Ray, Bimalendu

    2011-05-01

    Antitussive drugs are amongst the most widely used medications worldwide; however no new class of drugs has been introduced into the market for many years. Herein, we have analyzed the water-extracted polymeric fraction (WE) of Glycyrrhiza glabra. This arabinogalactan protein enriched fraction, ≥ 85% of which gets precipitated with Yariv reagent, consisted mainly of 3- and 3,6-linked galactopyranosyl, and 5- and 3,5-linked arabinofuranosyl residues. Peroral administration of this polymer in a dose of 50mg/kg body weight decreases the number of citric acid induced cough efforts in guinea pigs more effectively than codeine. It does not induce significant change in the values of specific airway resistance or provoked any observable adverse effects.

  16. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY...

  17. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY...

  18. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY...

  19. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY...

  20. 21 CFR 874.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 874.9 Section 874.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT...

  1. 21 CFR 874.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 874.9 Section 874.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT...

  2. 21 CFR 874.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 874.9 Section 874.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT...

  3. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND...

  4. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND...

  5. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND...

  6. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND...

  7. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND...

  8. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC...

  9. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC...

  10. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC...

  11. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC...

  12. Antitussive activity of ethanolic extract of Curcuma aromatica rhizomes on sulfur dioxide induced cough in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marina, G.D.; Kekuda, T.R Prashith; Sudarshan, S.J

    2008-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of rhizomes of Curcuma aromatica (Zingiberaceae) was investigated for its antitussive effect on Sulfur dioxide induced cough model in mice. The extract exhibited significant antitussive activity in a dose dependant manner. The activity was compared with the prototype antitussive agent codeine phosphate. The ethanolic extract at the dose of lOOmg. 200mg and 400mg/kg body weight, po, showed 68%, 74% and 79% of inhibition of cough with respect to control group. PMID:22557276

  13. 75 FR 69093 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment... for the notice of public meeting that published in the Federal Register of March 16, 2010 (75 FR 12555...) requires public review of the recommendations for the human drug review program after negotiations with...

  14. Sleep-wake mechanisms and drug discovery: sleep EEG as a tool for the development of CNS-acting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Staner, Luc

    2002-01-01

    Sleep laboratory investigations constitute a unique noninvasive tool to analyze brain functioning, Polysomnographic recordings, even in the very early phase of development in humans, are mandatory in a developmental plan of a new sleep-acting compound. Sleep is also an interesting tool for the development of other drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS), Indeed, changes in sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics are a very sensitive indication of the objective central effects of psychoactive drugs, and these changes are specific to the way the drug acts on the brain neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, new compounds can be compared with reference drugs in terms of the sleep EEG profile they induce. For instance, cognitive enhancers involving cholinergic mechanism have been consistently demonstrated to increase rapid eye movement (REM) sleep pressure, and studying drug-induced slow wave sleep (SWS) alteration is a particularly useful tool for the development of CNS compounds acting at the 5-HT2A/C receptor, such as most atypical antipsychotics and some antidepressant drugs. The sleep EEG profile of antidepressants, and particularly their effects on REM sleep, are specific to their ability to enhance noradrenergic or serotonergic transmission, it is suggested that the effects of noradrenergic versus serotonergic reuptake inhibition could be disentangled using specific monoamine depletion tests and by studying drug effects on sleep microsiructure. PMID:22034388

  15. Antitussive arabinogalactan of Andrographis paniculata demonstrates synergistic effect with andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Nosáľová, Gabriela; Majee, Sujay Kumar; Ghosh, Kanika; Raja, Washim; Chatterjee, Udipta Ranjan; Jureček, Ludovít; Ray, Bimalendu

    2014-08-01

    Traditional Indian medicines have been used in humans for thousands of years. While the link to a particular indication has been established in man, the active principle of the formulations often remains unknown. In this study, we aim to investigate the structural features and antitussive activity of fractions from Andrographis paniculata leaves. In vivo investigations of water extract (WE), and both ethanol-soluble (WES) and precipitated (WEP) fractions from WE on the citric-acid induced cough efforts and airways smooth muscle reactivity in guinea pigs were performed. Chemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis revealed the existence of a highly branched pectic arabinogalactan (109kDa) in WEP and andrographolide in WES. WEP showed significant antitussive activity while the potencies of WE and WES are even higher. Neither WE nor WES significantly alter specific airway smooth muscle reactivity. Remarkably, the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan could be increased by synergistic action with andrographolide. Finally, traditional aqueous extraction method provides an arabinogalactan from A. paniculata, which stimulate biological response but without addiction.

  16. Novel antitussive effect of suplatast tosilate in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Rong; Syono, Ryo-ichi; Fukumi, Syu-ichi; Kimoto, Kenji; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Soeda, Fumio; Takahama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We studied the antitussive effects of suplatast, a Th2 cytokine inhibitor, and compared them with the effects of codeine using an experimental cough model in guinea pigs. Suplatast and codeine dose-dependently inhibited cough caused by mechanical stimulation of the larynx, but they did not inhibit cough caused by mechanical stimulation of the bifurcation of the trachea. In guinea pigs with bronchitis, suplatast had an antitussive effect on cough caused by stimulation of the larynx, whereas codeine did not inhibit such cough. In SO2-exposed guinea pigs, suplatast tended to inhibit cough caused by mechanical stimulation of the tracheal bifurcation. Further, suplatast inhibited citric acid-induced cough augmented by pretreatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, whereas codeine did not inhibit such cough. Suplatast also inhibited bradykinin-induced discharges of airway vagal afferent nerves and significantly inhibited 4-aminopyridine-induced discharges of airway vagal afferent nerves. These findings indicate that the antitussive effects of suplatast are mediated by a novel mechanism involving the peripheral nervous system.

  17. Antitussive, expectorant activity of Marsilea minuta L., an Indian vegetable

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Raja; De, Biplab; Devanna, N.; Sen, Saikat

    2013-01-01

    Marsilea minuta L., an aquatic or sub-aquatic fern used as a vegetable, has wide applications in traditional/folk medicine in India and Bangladesh. In our study, we evaluated the antitussive, expectorant activity of M. minuta crude extracts. The antitussive activity of M. minuta methanol, ethyl acetate, and petroleum ether extracts was evaluated using ammonia and sulfur dioxide induced mice coughing. The expectorant activity was evaluated by the volume of phenol red in mice's tracheas. Extracts significantly increased mice's cough latent period and inhibited the frequency of cough induced by ammonia and sulfur dioxide, and improved tracheal phenol red output in expectorant evaluation. Methanol extract produced the highest activity in all tested models. Methanol extract at 500 mg/kg showed 59.5% and 55.8% inhibition in the number of coughing induced by ammonium liquor and SO2, respectively, while it showed 89.3% increase in phenol red secretion at the same dose, which showed superior activity compared to other extracts. The present study provided evidence for M. minuta to be used as an antitussive and expectorant in Indian folk medicine. PMID:23662283

  18. Exercise acts as a drug; the pharmacological benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vina, J; Sanchis-Gomar, F; Martinez-Bello, V; Gomez-Cabrera, MC

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of regular exercise for the promotion of health and cure of diseases have been clearly shown. In this review, we would like to postulate the idea that exercise can be considered as a drug. Exercise causes a myriad of beneficial effects for health, including the promotion of health and lifespan, and these are reviewed in the first section of this paper. Then we deal with the dosing of exercise. As with many drugs, dosing is extremely important to get the beneficial effects of exercise. To this end, the organism adapts to exercise. We review the molecular signalling pathways involved in these adaptations because understanding them is of great importance to be able to prescribe exercise in an appropriate manner. Special attention must be paid to the psychological effects of exercise. These are so powerful that we would like to propose that exercise may be considered as a psychoactive drug. In moderate doses, it causes very pronounced relaxing effects on the majority of the population, but some persons may even become addicted to exercise. Finally, there may be some contraindications to exercise that arise when people are severely ill, and these are described in the final section of the review. Our general conclusion is that exercise is so effective that it should be considered as a drug, but that more attention should be paid to the dosing and to individual variations between patients. PMID:22486393

  19. 76 FR 79195 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is extending to January 15, 2013, the comment period for the notice of public meeting; request for public comments, published in the Federal Register of September 20, 2011 (76 FR 58277). In that notice, FDA requested comments on the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act (AGDUFA) program to date and solicited suggestions regarding the features FDA......

  20. Antitussive profile of the NOP agonist Ro-64-6198 in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Jia, Yanlin; Fernandez, Xiomara; Parra, Leonard E; Wang, Xin; Tulshian, Deen B; Kiselgof, Eugenia J; Tan, Zheng; Fawzi, Ahmad B; Smith-Torhan, April; Zhang, Hongtao; Hey, John A

    2004-07-01

    We have previously shown that N/OFQ, the endogenous peptide ligand for the 'opioid-like' NOP receptor, inhibits cough in guinea pigs and cats. In the present study we sought to continue our characterization of the cough-suppressant effects of NOP stimulation by profiling the pulmonary and antitussive effects of a novel non-peptide NOP agonist, Ro-64-6198, in guinea pigs. In receptor-binding assays, we confirmed that Ro-64-6198 selectively binds to NOP receptors over other opioid receptors. The Ki values for Ro-64-6198 at NOP, MOP, KOP and DOP receptors was 0.3, 36, 214 and 3,787 nmol/l, respectively. In GTPgammaS-binding assays, Ro-64-6198 displayed >900-fold functional selectivity at NOP relative to MOP receptors. We evaluated the effects of Ro-64-6198 (3 and 10 micromol/l) in isolated guinea pig nodose ganglia cells on the increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration evoked by capsaicin stimulation (1 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-6) mol/l). Similar to previously reported data with N/OFQ, Ro-64-6198 (3 and 10 micromol/l) significantly attenuated Ca2+ responses in nodose ganglia cells produced by exposure to capsaicin. The effect of Ro-64-6198 (3 micromol/l) on capsaicin-induced intracellular Ca2+ responses was blocked by the NOP antagonist, J113397 (3 micromol/l). In guinea pig in vivo studies, aerosolized capsaicin (10-300 micromol/l) produced a dose-dependent increase in cough number. Ro-64-6198 given i.p. significantly inhibited cough due to capsaicin (300 micromol/l) exposure. In a duration study we found that the maximum antitussive effect (42 +/- 8% inhibition) of Ro-64-6198 (3 mg/kg) was observed at 1 h after i.p. administration. Also at 1 h after administration, Ro-64-6198 (0.003-3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of cough. The antitussive effect of Ro-64-6198 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was blocked by J113397 (12 mg/kg, i.p.) but not by the classical opioid antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Although the antitussive action of Ro-64-6198 may be mediated

  1. Steroidal glycosides from Reineckia carnea herba and their antitussive activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Na; Chen, Ling Li; Wang, Yao; Xue, Rui; Zou, Li Bo; Liu, Fang; Yin, Jun

    2013-06-01

    Two new steroidal glycosides, 1α,3α-dihydroxy-5β-pregn-16-en-20-one 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (1) and 1β,3β,27-trihydroxycholest-16-en-22-one 1,3-di-O-α-L-rhamnoside (2), along with seven known steroidal glycosides (3-9), were isolated from Reineckia carnea herba. Their structures were determined by detailed analysis of their 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS spectra. Compound 9 was isolated for the first time from the Reineckia genus. Except for 8, compounds 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9 displayed clear in vitro antitussive activity.

  2. Retrograde amnesia induced by drugs acting on different molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bonini, Juliana S; Coitinho, Adriana S; Vianna, Monica R M; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2004-06-01

    The gamma aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-sub(A)) agonist, muscimol, the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), and the inhibitor of the extracellularly regulated kinases (ERKs), UO 126, cause retrograde amnesia when administered to the hippocampus. In the present study, the authors found that they all cause retrograde amnesia for 1-trial inhibitory avoidance, not only when infused into the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus, but also when infused into the basolateral amygdala or the entorhinal, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices. The posttraining time course of the effect of each drug was, however, quite different across brain structures. Thus, in all of them, NMDA receptors and the ERK pathway are indispensable for memory consolidation, and GABA-sub(A) receptor activation inhibits memory consolidation: but in each case, their influence is interwoven differently.

  3. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  4. Antitussive and immunomodulating activities of instant coffee arabinogalactan-protein.

    PubMed

    Nosáľová, G; Prisenžňáková, L; Paulovičová, E; Capek, P; Matulová, M; Navarini, L; Liverani, F Suggi

    2011-11-01

    A low molecular mass arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) composed of galactose and arabinose with a low protein content, isolated from the instant coffee powder of Coffea arabica beans, has been tested on antitussive (in vivo) and immunomodulating (ex vivo) activities. The results of antitussive tests revealed a significant dose dependant cough-suppressive effect of coffee AGP. It was observed 30 or 60 min after AGP administration and its efficacy lasted during the entire experiment course. Immunological tests showed that AGP affected some mediators of immunocompetent cells of immune system as TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 cytokines. It seems that coffee AGP is a good inductor of both pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ, however, less potent in TNF-α induction in comparison with that of β-D-glucan. Evident induction of TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ cytokines, pro-TH1 polarization supports our conclusion about bio-immunological efficacy of AGP with an emphasis on the cellular immunity.

  5. 28 CFR 0.177 - Applications for orders under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. 0.177 Section 0.177 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF... the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. Notwithstanding the delegation of functions... Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, 84 Stat. 1276, to approve the application of a U.S....

  6. Industry invites regulation: the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906.

    PubMed

    Barkan, I D

    1985-01-01

    Ending its 27-year stranglehold on proposals for federal pure food and drug legislation, Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act and its companion bill, the Meat Inspection Act, on June 30, 1906. An unprecedented convergence of consumer, scientific, and industrial support in 1906 prompted such action; most industries even planned for it, hoping regulation would restore the competitiveness of their products on weak foreign and domestic markets. The ways in which these interests converged, and the reasons therefore, suggest a change in their relationships to each other and with the federal government as America headed into the twentieth century. PMID:3881052

  7. Industry invites regulation: the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906.

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, I D

    1985-01-01

    Ending its 27-year stranglehold on proposals for federal pure food and drug legislation, Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act and its companion bill, the Meat Inspection Act, on June 30, 1906. An unprecedented convergence of consumer, scientific, and industrial support in 1906 prompted such action; most industries even planned for it, hoping regulation would restore the competitiveness of their products on weak foreign and domestic markets. The ways in which these interests converged, and the reasons therefore, suggest a change in their relationships to each other and with the federal government as America headed into the twentieth century. Images p21-a p21-b PMID:3881052

  8. The Controlled Substances Act: how a "big tent" reform became a punitive drug law.

    PubMed

    Courtwright, David T

    2004-10-01

    The 1970 Controlled Substances Act was part of an omnibus reform package designed to rationalize, and in some respects to liberalize, American drug policy. While the legislation provided additional resources for law enforcement and a systematic means for regulating the use of most psychoactive drugs, it also did away with mandatory minimum sentences and provided more support for treatment and research. Over the next three decades, and in response to public alarm about drug abuse, the US Congress continuously amended the law to produce a more punitive system of drug control. The amendments, which gave the Drug Enforcement Administration greater control over scheduling and maintenance and which substantially increased penalties for illicit trafficking, transformed the law into the legal foundation of America's "drug war," as the stricter criminal approach came to be known. By the 1980s, the flexibility and innovative spirit of the original Controlled Substances Act (and that of Nixon-era drug strategy generally) had largely disappeared from American drug policy. PMID:15380284

  9. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1295724

  11. 77 FR 70166 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases; Establishment of a Public Docket AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a...

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of glaucine as an antitussive agent.

    PubMed

    Gastpar, H; Criscuolo, D; Dieterich, H A

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and thirty out-patients, affected by acute and chronic cough caused by upper respiratory tract inflammation, took part in two clinical studies aimed at evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of glaucine , a new antitussive agent. The first study involved 90 patients in a double-blind comparative trial of glaucine and codeine: both treatments were administered as a syrup at a dosage of 30 mg 3-times daily for 7 days. The cough suppressant effect of the two treatments was checked by the physician and the patient using a 4-point scale (from absent to severe), and by the patient using a visual analogue scale. Mean scores of the physician's evaluation decreased from 3.0 to 1.10 after codeine and from 3.0 to 0.47 after glaucine (p less than 0.001 between treatments). Mean values of the patients' visual analogue scales decreased from 83 mm to 17 mm after codeine, and from 85 mm to 7 mm after glaucine (p less than 0.001 between treatments). Constipation and nausea were reported by 9 patients on codeine and by no patient on glaucine (p less than 0.01). One patient on codeine was withdrawn from the study after 3 days because of vomiting, constipation and nausea. The second study was an open trial in 40 patients who received glaucine capsules at a dosage of 30 mg 3-times daily for 28 days. The antitussive effect of the treatment was evaluated on the basis of the same criteria as in the first study. The mean score of the physician's evaluation decreased from 3.0 to 0.15 (p less than 0.001); the mean value of the patients' visual analogue scales decreased from 93 mm to 1 mm (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6373156

  13. 77 FR 28620 - Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... (59 FR 11308). This 15th report, covering 2010-2011, the period since the previous report, is to be... COMMISSION Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication AGENCY... Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication. DATES: July 3, 2012: Deadline...

  14. 75 FR 24967 - Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... in the Federal Register of March 10, 1994 (59 FR 11308). This 14th report, covering the period since... COMMISSION Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication AGENCY.... 332-352, Andean ] Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop...

  15. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of...

  16. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  17. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  18. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  19. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  20. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of...

  1. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of...

  2. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of...

  3. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  4. 28 CFR 0.177 - Applications for orders under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. 0.177 Section 0.177 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF... the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. Notwithstanding the delegation of functions... authorized to exercise the authority vested in the Attorney General by section 514 of the Comprehensive...

  5. 28 CFR 0.177 - Applications for orders under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. 0.177 Section 0.177 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF... the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. Notwithstanding the delegation of functions... authorized to exercise the authority vested in the Attorney General by section 514 of the Comprehensive...

  6. 28 CFR 0.177 - Applications for orders under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. 0.177 Section 0.177 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF... the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. Notwithstanding the delegation of functions... authorized to exercise the authority vested in the Attorney General by section 514 of the Comprehensive...

  7. Extracted polysaccharide from Nyctanthes arbor-tristis leaves: chemical and antitussive properties.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanika; Nosalova, Gabriela; Ray, Sayani; Sivova, Veronika; Nosal, Slavomir; Ray, Bimalendu

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of cough is reflected in antitussives being one of the most widely used therapies in the world; however no new class of drugs has been introduced into the market for many years. Water decoction of the leaves of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis L. is used in Indian Ayurvedic system to alleviate a wide range of diseases including cough. Herein, we have isolated a carbohydrate polymer (CP) containing fraction from its leaves by aqueous extraction method. CP is a branched polysaccharide containing, amongst others, 1,3-/1,3,6-linked galactopyranosyl, 1,5-/1,3,5-linked arabinofuranosyl and 1,2-/1,2,4-linked rhamnopyranosyl residues. Oral administration of CP fraction in doses of 25 and 50 mg kg(-1) body weight significantly inhibited the number of citric acid-induced cough efforts in guinea pigs in a dose dependent manner. Remarkably, CP did not altered specific airway resistance of animals significantly. Consequently, aqueous extraction method provided a molecular entity, which exhibited the cough suppressive activity: this could symbolize an attractive approach in phytotherapeutic treatment.

  8. [Evaluation of the safety of antitussive agents during respiratory rehabilitation. A clinical study of L-dropropizine].

    PubMed

    Bejor, M; Arrigo, A

    1990-06-30

    This study proves that L-dropropizine, a new peripheral antitussive drug, does not hinder the positive and useful effect of cough. This is particularly the case of physiokinesis in chronic obstructive lung disease patients. To quantify results, the respiratory voluntary muscles have been examined by surface electromyography and the peak expiratory flow has been registered by a computer-assisted device. By analysing the curves obtained relating the intensity of muscle contraction to expiratory flow, i.e. the muscle work exerted, no difference has been found after L-dropropizine and placebo. Statistical analysis evidenced increase in maximal peak expiratory flow and decrease in muscle work with both therapies. Both were significant (Student's test for paired data: p less than 0.01) in attaining functional improvement. Levodropropizine does not seem to impair the efficacy of cough elicited as part of respiratory clearance mechanisms.

  9. [Evaluation of the safety of antitussive agents during respiratory rehabilitation. A clinical study of L-dropropizine].

    PubMed

    Bejor, M; Arrigo, A

    1990-06-30

    This study proves that L-dropropizine, a new peripheral antitussive drug, does not hinder the positive and useful effect of cough. This is particularly the case of physiokinesis in chronic obstructive lung disease patients. To quantify results, the respiratory voluntary muscles have been examined by surface electromyography and the peak expiratory flow has been registered by a computer-assisted device. By analysing the curves obtained relating the intensity of muscle contraction to expiratory flow, i.e. the muscle work exerted, no difference has been found after L-dropropizine and placebo. Statistical analysis evidenced increase in maximal peak expiratory flow and decrease in muscle work with both therapies. Both were significant (Student's test for paired data: p less than 0.01) in attaining functional improvement. Levodropropizine does not seem to impair the efficacy of cough elicited as part of respiratory clearance mechanisms. PMID:2147884

  10. Antitussive activity of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Brown, Claire; Fezoui, Malika; Selig, William M; Schwartz, Carl E; Ellis, James L

    2004-01-01

    1. Current antitussive medications have limited efficacy and often contain the opiate-like agent dextromethorphan (DEX). The mechanism whereby DEX inhibits cough is ill defined. DEX displays affinity at both NMDA and sigma receptors, suggesting that the antitussive activity may involve central or peripheral activity at either of these receptors. This study examined and compared the antitussive activity of DEX and various putative sigma receptor agonists in the guinea-pig citric-acid cough model. 2. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DEX (30 mg kg(-1)) and the sigma-1 agonists SKF-10,047 (1-5 mg kg(-1)), Pre-084 (5 mg kg(-1)), and carbetapentane (1-5 mg kg(-1)) inhibited citric-acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs. Intraperitoneal administration of a sigma-1 antagonist, BD 1047 (1-5 mg kg(-1)), reversed the inhibition of cough elicited by SKF-10,047. In addition, two structurally dissimilar sigma agonists SKF-10,047 (1 mg ml(-1)) and Pre-084 (1 mg ml(-1)) inhibited cough when administered by aerosol. 3. Aerosolized BD 1047 (1 mg ml(-1), 30 min) prevented the antitussive action of SKF-10,047 (5 mg kg(-1)) or DEX (30 mg kg(-1)) given by i.p. administration and, likewise, i.p. administration of BD 1047 (5 mg kg(-1)) prevented the antitussive action of SKF-10,047 given by aerosol (1 mg ml(-1)). 4. These results therefore support the argument that antitussive effects of DEX may be mediated via sigma receptors, since both systemic and aerosol administration of sigma-1 receptor agonists inhibit citric-acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs. While significant systemic exposure is possible with aerosol administration, the very low doses administered (estimated <0.3 mg kg(-1)) suggest that there may be a peripheral component to the antitussive effect.

  11. Phytochemicals increase the antibacterial activity of antibiotics by acting on a drug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Mowla, Rumana; Rahman, Taufiq; Venter, Henrietta

    2014-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps confer resistance upon bacteria to a wide range of antibiotics from various classes. The expression of efflux pumps are also implicated in virulence and biofilm formation. Moreover, organisms can only acquire resistance in the presence of active drug efflux pumps. Therefore, efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are attractive compounds to reverse multidrug resistance and to prevent the development of resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. We investigated the potential of pure compounds isolated from plants to act as EPIs. In silico screening was used to predict the bioactivity of plant compounds and to compare that with the known EPI, phe-arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Subsequently, promising products have been tested for their ability to inhibit efflux. Plumbagin nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA) and to a lesser degree shikonin, acted as sensitizers of drug-resistant bacteria to currently used antibiotics and were able to inhibit the efflux pump-mediated removal of substrate from cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of in silico screening to identify compounds that potentiate the action of antibiotics against drug-resistant strains and which might be potentially useful lead compounds for an EPI discovery program. PMID:25224951

  12. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug–Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug–drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. PMID:26927160

  13. Antitussive, expectorant and analgesic effects of the ethanol seed extract of Picralima nitida (Stapf) Th. & H. Durand

    PubMed Central

    Dapaah, Gabriel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ben, Inemesit Okon

    2016-01-01

    Picralima nitida is used traditionally for management of cough. This study, therefore, investigated the antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic seed extract of Picralima nitida (PNE), and ascertained its safety for use. Presence of secondary metabolites, and safety of PNE (10-2000 mg/kg) were evaluated by preliminary phytochemical screening, and by Irwin's test respectively. Percentage reduction in cough count, percentage increase in latency of cough, and percentage protection offered by PNE were established by the citric acid-induced cough, acetylcholine- and Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction models. Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were treated with 100-500 mg/kg PNE or reference drugs, dihydrocodiene, atropine, mepyramine. Expectorant property of PNE (100-1000 mg/kg) was determined using the tracheal phenol red secretion; with ammonium chloride as a reference medication. Percentage maximal possible analgesic effect in the tail immersion test and the total nociceptive score in acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes, after treatment of BALB/c mice with PNE (100-500 mg/kg), diclofenac, and morphine were also estimated. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, steroids, terpenoids and anthraquinones. PNEdid not cause any extract-related physical, pharmacological and CNS toxicities or mortality; sedation was observed at doses 1000-2000 mg/kg. It showed significant dose-dependent reduction in cough count, and increased cough latency. PNE (1000 mg/kg) enhanced tracheal phenol red secretion. PNE (100–500 mg/kg) significantly and dose dependently increased tail withdrawal latencies, and nociceptive score. PNE has antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties, with an LD50>2000 mg/kg. PMID:27168749

  14. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes

    PubMed Central

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A.; Irwin, John J.; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to “de-orphanize” drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration—approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  15. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes.

    PubMed

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A; Irwin, John J; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L; Shoichet, Brian K

    2012-07-10

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to "de-orphanize" drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  16. The effects of centrally acting drugs on the EEG correlates of meditation.

    PubMed

    Sim, M K; Tsoi, W F

    1992-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of three centrally acting drugs on the significant increase in the intermediate alpha frequency of the electroencephalogram (EEG) that accompanied meditation in a male volunteer. When compared to the EEG recorded before each of the three drugs was administered, naloxone tended to enhance the increase in the power of the intermediate alpha EEG (9.4-10.4 Hz), while diazepam tended to spread the increase to the slow (7.4-9.4 Hz) alpha EEG, and flumazenil was without much effect on the overall EEG pattern. However, these EEG changes when compared to similar changes obtained with saline administration were not significantly different from the latter. Thus, it is unlikely that the EEG correlates of meditation are causally related to the rise or fall of endogenous opioid peptides or benzodiazepinelike substances in the brain.

  17. 77 FR 31039 - Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Commission's notice published in the Federal Register on May 15, 2012 (77 FR 28620) contained an error that... COMMISSION Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication AGENCY... under investigation No. 332-352, Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on...

  18. Targeting primary afferent nerves for novel antitussive therapy.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The best available data support the hypothesis that there are at least two types of vagal nerves responsible for initiating coughing reflexes. One type of nerve conducts action potentials in the A-range and is characterized by rapidly adapting responses to mechanical probing or acidification of the large airway epithelium. Stimulation of these nerves can evoke cough in unconscious experimental animals and humans. These nerves are important in immediate cough evoked by aspiration and as such perform a critical role in airway defense. The other type of primary afferent nerve involved in cough is the vagal C-fiber. Inhalation of selective C-fiber stimulants leads to cough only in conscious animals. In clinical studies, inhalation of a low concentration of a C-fiber stimulant causes an irritating, itchy urge-to-cough sensation that mimics the urge-to-cough sensations associated with respiratory tract infection, post-infection, gastroesophageal reflux disorders, and inflammatory airway diseases. Here we discuss the recent advances in sensory neurobiology that allow for the targeting of vagal C-fibers for novel antitussive therapy. No attempts are made to be all-inclusive with respect to the numerous possible molecular targets being considered to accomplish this goal. Rather, two general strategies are discussed: decreasing generator potential amplitude and decreasing the efficiency by which a generator potential evokes action-potential discharge. For the first category we focus on two targets, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and transient receptor potential A1. For the latter category we focus on recent advances in voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channel biology.

  19. 78 FR 26374 - An Evaluation of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act Workload Adjuster; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...,'' subsection B, which was reauthorized by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA... changes in workload volume and complexity in the human drug review program and present options to... public comment, FDA can adopt appropriate change to the workload adjustment methodology, if...

  20. Pharmacological properties and therapeutic possibilities for drugs acting upon endocannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    Clinical trial data are beginning to emerge with respect to the therapeutic efficacy of cannabis extracts for the treatment of chronic pain. Although there is some evidence of efficacy, a major issue concerns the narrow margin between doses producing therapeutic effects and those producing the "highs" associated with cannabis misuse. In addition, long-term use is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric illness. These negative aspects constrain the doses of cannabis extracts and psychoactive cannabinoids that can be given to patients, and raise the risk that properly conducted clinical trials with too low dosages will impact negatively on subsequent drug development in this field. However, recent research has opened up a number of avenues whereby compounds acting directly upon cannabinoid (CB) receptors may have therapeutic potential. In this review, two such areas are discussed, namely a) the possible use of peripherally acting CB agonists and CB2 receptor-selective agonists for the treatment of pain, and b) the possible utility of CB2 receptor agonists for the prevention of stress-induced exacerbations of skin disorders such as psoriasis. A second area of drug development at present is that of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, spearheaded by rimonabant, for the treatment of obesity and as an aid for smoking cessation. An important aspect of these compounds is their efficacy and selectivity, and this is discussed in detail in the present review.

  1. Antitussive activity of Abies webbiana Lindl. leaf extract against sulphur dioxide-induced cough reflex in mice.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S S; Ghosh, A K; Srikanth, K; Debnath, B; Jha, T

    2003-09-01

    The methanol extract of A. webbiana Lindl was evaluated for its effect on a cough model induced by sulphur dioxide gas in mice. When administered orally it exhibited significant antitussive activity compared with the control in a dose dependent manner. The antitussive activity of the extract was compared with that of codeine phosphate, a prototype antitussive agent. The A. webbiana leaf extract (400 and 600 mg/kg) showed maximum inhibition of cough frequency by 71.69% and 78.67%, respectively, when compared with the control group and was comparable in effect to codeine phosphate.

  2. Antitussive and bronchodilatory effects of Lythrum salicaria polysaccharide-polyphenolic conjugate.

    PubMed

    Šutovská, M; Capek, P; Fraňová, S; Pawlaczyk, I; Gancarz, R

    2012-12-01

    A high molecular mass polysaccharide-polyphenolic conjugate has been isolated from flowering parts of Lythrum salicaria by hot alkaline extraction. Its chemical analysis revealed 74% of carbohydrates and 17% of phenolics. Compositional analysis of carbohydrate part showed a high GalA content (49%), Rha (25%), Gal (13%) and Ara (9%) residues, and indicated thus rhamnogalacturonan associated with arabinogalactan in Lythrum conjugate. Antitussive activity tests, performed in three doses of Lythrum conjugate - 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg of animal body weight, showed the reduction of the number of cough efforts even 5h after administration. However, their antitussive effects were lower in comparison with that of codeine, the strongest narcotic antitussive agent. The tests evaluating the influence of different doses on airways smooth muscle reactivity revealed more significant effect of Lythrum conjugate in comparison with that of salbutamol, a commercial bronchodilator used in a clinical practice. Measurements of specific airway resistance pointed at both, the dose-dependent bronchodilatory activity and possible participation of bronchodilation on antitussive effect of Lythrum conjugate. This study represents the first sight into pharmacodynamic properties of Lythrum polysaccharide-polyphenolic glycoconjugate.

  3. Antitussive Efficacy and Safety Profile of Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Terminalia chebula

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Abdul; Ayub, Khurshed; Sherkheli, M. Azhar; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Raza, Mohsin

    2013-01-01

    Antitussive effects of ethyl acetate fraction of Terminalia chebula on sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas induced cough have been examined in mice. Safety profile of Terminalia chebula was established by determining LD50 and acute neurotoxicity. The result showed that extract of Terminalia chebula dose dependently suppressed SO2 gas induced cough in mice. Terminalia chebula, after i.p. administration at dose level 500 mg/kg, offered maximum cough suppressive effects; that is, number of coughs at 60 min was 12 ± 1.52 (mean ± SEM) as compared to codeine 10 mg/kg; i.p., dextromethorphan 10 mg/kg; i.p., and saline, having frequency of cough 10.375 ± 0.866, 12.428 ± 0.81, and 46 ± 2.61, respectively. LD50 value of Terminalia chebula was approximately 1265 mg/kg, respectively. No sign of neural impairment was observed at antitussive doses of extract. Antitussive effect of Terminalia chebula was partly reversed with treatment by naloxone (3 mg/kg; s.c.) while rimcazole (3 mg/kg; s.c.) did not antagonize its cough suppression activity. This may suggest that opioid receptors partially contribute in antitussive action of Terminalia chebula. Along with this, the possibility of presence of single or multiple mechanisms activated by several different pharmacological actions (mainly anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, spasmolytic, antibacterial, and antiphlegmatic) could not be eliminated. PMID:24024039

  4. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    PubMed

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability. PMID:25217142

  5. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    PubMed

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability.

  6. The rush to adrenaline: drugs in sport acting on the β-adrenergic system

    PubMed Central

    Davis, E; Loiacono, R; Summers, R J

    2008-01-01

    Athletes attempt to improve performance with drugs that act on the β-adrenergic system directly or indirectly. Of three β-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes, the β2-AR is the main target in sport; they have bronchodilator and anabolic actions and enhance anti-inflammatory actions of corticosteroids. Although demonstrable in animal experiments and humans, there is little evidence that these properties can significantly improve performance in trained athletes. Their actions may also be compromised by receptor desensitization and by common, naturally occurring receptor mutations (polymorphisms) that can influence receptor signalling and desensitization properties in individuals. Indirectly acting agents affect release and reuptake of noradrenaline and adrenaline, thereby influencing all AR subtypes including the three β-ARs. These agents can have potent psychostimulant effects that provide an illusion of better performance that does not usually translate into improvement in practice. Amphetamines and cocaine also have considerable potential for cardiac damage. β-AR antagonists (β-blockers) are used in sports that require steadiness and accuracy, such as archery and shooting, where their ability to reduce heart rate and muscle tremor may improve performance. They have a deleterious effect in endurance sports because they reduce physical performance and maximum exercise load. Recent studies have identified that many β-AR antagonists not only block the actions of agonists but also activate other (mitogen-activated PK) signalling pathways influencing cell growth and fate. The concept that many compounds previously regarded as ‘blockers' may express their own spectrum of pharmacological properties has potentially far-reaching consequences for the use of drugs both therapeutically and illicitly. PMID:18500380

  7. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen C; Roach, Dwayne R; Chauhan, Vinita S; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R; Sheen, Tamsin R; Doran, Kelly S; Pritchard, David G; Almeida, Raul A; Nelson, Daniel C; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C; Donovan, David M

    2016-04-28

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics.

  8. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stephen C.; Roach, Dwayne R.; Chauhan, Vinita S.; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M.; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A.; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J.; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R.; Sheen, Tamsin R.; Doran, Kelly S.; Pritchard, David G.; Almeida, Raul A.; Nelson, Daniel C.; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C.; Donovan, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics. PMID:27121552

  9. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen C; Roach, Dwayne R; Chauhan, Vinita S; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R; Sheen, Tamsin R; Doran, Kelly S; Pritchard, David G; Almeida, Raul A; Nelson, Daniel C; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C; Donovan, David M

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics. PMID:27121552

  10. Discovery and Characterization of ACT-451840: an Antimalarial Drug with a Novel Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Boss, Christoph; Aissaoui, Hamed; Amaral, Nathalie; Bauer, Aude; Bazire, Stephanie; Binkert, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Bürki, Cédric; Ciana, Claire-Lise; Corminboeuf, Olivier; Delahaye, Stephane; Dollinger, Claire; Fischli, Christoph; Fischli, Walter; Flock, Alexandre; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Girault, Malory; Grisostomi, Corinna; Friedli, Astrid; Heidmann, Bibia; Hinder, Claire; Jacob, Gael; Le Bihan, Amelie; Malrieu, Sophie; Mamzed, Saskia; Merot, Aurelien; Meyer, Solange; Peixoto, Sabrina; Petit, Nolwenn; Siegrist, Romain; Trollux, Julien; Weller, Thomas; Wittlin, Sergio

    2016-09-20

    More than 40 % of the world's population is at risk of being infected with malaria. Most malaria cases occur in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America, and Asia. Resistance to standard therapy, including artemisinin combinations, is increasing. There is an urgent need for novel antimalarials with new mechanisms of action. In a phenotypic screen, we identified a series of phenylalanine-based compounds that exhibit antimalarial activity via a new and yet unknown mechanism of action. Our optimization efforts culminated in the selection of ACT-451840 [(S,E)-N-(4-(4-acetylpiperazin-1-yl)benzyl)-3-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-N-(1-(4-(4-cyanobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-oxo-3-phenylpropan-2-yl)acrylamide] for clinical development. Herein we describe our optimization efforts from the screening hit to the potential drug candidate with respect to antiparasitic activity, drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) properties, and in vivo pharmacological efficacy.

  11. Drug Interactions with the Direct-Acting Antiviral Combination of Ombitasvir and Paritaprevir-Ritonavir

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sandeep; Wang, Haoyu; Podsadecki, Thomas J.; Polepally, Akshanth R.; Khatri, Amit; Zha, Jiuhong; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Awni, Walid M.; Menon, Rajeev M.

    2015-01-01

    The two direct-acting antiviral (2D) regimen of ombitasvir and paritaprevir (administered with low-dose ritonavir) is being developed for treatment of genotype subtype 1b and genotypes 2 and 4 chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Drug-drug interactions were evaluated in healthy volunteers to develop dosing recommendations for HCV-infected subjects. Mechanism-based interactions were evaluated for ketoconazole, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, digoxin, warfarin, and omeprazole. Interactions were also evaluated for duloxetine, escitalopram, methadone, and buprenorphine-naloxone. Ratios of geometric means with 90% confidence intervals for the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve were estimated to assess the magnitude of the interactions. For most medications, coadministration with the 2D regimen resulted in a <50% change in exposures. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin exposures increased by up to 105%, 58%, 76%, and 161%, respectively, and omeprazole exposures decreased by approximately 50%. Clinically meaningful changes in ombitasvir, paritaprevir, or ritonavir exposures were not observed. In summary, all 11 medications evaluated can be coadministered with the 2D regimen, with most medications requiring no dose adjustment. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin require lower doses, and omeprazole may require a higher dose. No dose adjustment is required for the 2D regimen. PMID:26459906

  12. Drug Interactions with the Direct-Acting Antiviral Combination of Ombitasvir and Paritaprevir-Ritonavir.

    PubMed

    Badri, Prajakta S; Dutta, Sandeep; Wang, Haoyu; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Polepally, Akshanth R; Khatri, Amit; Zha, Jiuhong; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Awni, Walid M; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-01-01

    The two direct-acting antiviral (2D) regimen of ombitasvir and paritaprevir (administered with low-dose ritonavir) is being developed for treatment of genotype subtype 1b and genotypes 2 and 4 chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Drug-drug interactions were evaluated in healthy volunteers to develop dosing recommendations for HCV-infected subjects. Mechanism-based interactions were evaluated for ketoconazole, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, digoxin, warfarin, and omeprazole. Interactions were also evaluated for duloxetine, escitalopram, methadone, and buprenorphine-naloxone. Ratios of geometric means with 90% confidence intervals for the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve were estimated to assess the magnitude of the interactions. For most medications, coadministration with the 2D regimen resulted in a <50% change in exposures. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin exposures increased by up to 105%, 58%, 76%, and 161%, respectively, and omeprazole exposures decreased by approximately 50%. Clinically meaningful changes in ombitasvir, paritaprevir, or ritonavir exposures were not observed. In summary, all 11 medications evaluated can be coadministered with the 2D regimen, with most medications requiring no dose adjustment. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin require lower doses, and omeprazole may require a higher dose. No dose adjustment is required for the 2D regimen. PMID:26459906

  13. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  14. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  15. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  16. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  17. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  18. 21 CFR 310.201 - Exemption for certain drugs limited by new-drug applications to prescription sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hydrochloride is prepared with appropriate amounts of a suitable antitussive, with or without other drugs, in a... relief of cough due to minor conditions in which it is indicated. (vi) The dosages recommended or... physician. (c) A clear warning statement against use of the drug in the presence of high fever or if...

  19. Designating Additions to the Current List of Tropical Diseases in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-08-20

    The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) authorizes the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) to award priority review vouchers (PRVs) to tropical disease product applicants when the applications meet certain criteria. The FD&C Act lists the diseases that are considered to be tropical diseases for purposes of obtaining PRVs, and also provides for Agency expansion of that list to include other diseases that satisfy the definition of ``tropical diseases'' as set forth in the FD&C Act. FDA has determined that Chagas disease and neurocysticercosis satisfy this definition, and therefore is adding them to the list of designated tropical diseases whose product applications may result in the award of PRVs. Sponsors submitting certain applications for the treatment of Chagas disease and neurocysticercosis may be eligible to receive a PRV if such applications are approved by FDA.

  20. Designating Additions to the Current List of Tropical Diseases in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-08-20

    The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) authorizes the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) to award priority review vouchers (PRVs) to tropical disease product applicants when the applications meet certain criteria. The FD&C Act lists the diseases that are considered to be tropical diseases for purposes of obtaining PRVs, and also provides for Agency expansion of that list to include other diseases that satisfy the definition of ``tropical diseases'' as set forth in the FD&C Act. FDA has determined that Chagas disease and neurocysticercosis satisfy this definition, and therefore is adding them to the list of designated tropical diseases whose product applications may result in the award of PRVs. Sponsors submitting certain applications for the treatment of Chagas disease and neurocysticercosis may be eligible to receive a PRV if such applications are approved by FDA. PMID:26292373

  1. 78 FR 78366 - Draft Generic Drug User Fee Act Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... shortages, drug supply chain, safety, security, and drug innovation. As generic drugs account for more than... approvals, drug supply chain, and other topics related to human pharmaceuticals. The draft GDUFA IT plan... the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane,...

  2. Differential profile and treatment development of drug-addicted patients depending on violent behaviours and/or criminal acts.

    PubMed

    López-Goñi, José J; Fernández-Montalvo, Javier; Arteaga, Alfonso; Cacho, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the prevalence of violent and/or criminal behaviors in drug-addicted patients. A sample of 252 drug-addicted patients who sought treatment was assessed. Information was collected on violent behaviors, criminal acts, socio-demographic factors, consumption factors, psychopathological factors, and personality variables. The sample was divided into 4 groups according to the presence of violence and/or criminal behaviors. There were significant differences between the groups on some variables. In general, patients associated with both violence and criminal behaviors showed a greater severity in drug consumption and maladjustment variables, as well as a higher rate of treatment dropout and re-entry.

  3. Differential profile and treatment development of drug-addicted patients depending on violent behaviours and/or criminal acts.

    PubMed

    López-Goñi, José J; Fernández-Montalvo, Javier; Arteaga, Alfonso; Cacho, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the prevalence of violent and/or criminal behaviors in drug-addicted patients. A sample of 252 drug-addicted patients who sought treatment was assessed. Information was collected on violent behaviors, criminal acts, socio-demographic factors, consumption factors, psychopathological factors, and personality variables. The sample was divided into 4 groups according to the presence of violence and/or criminal behaviors. There were significant differences between the groups on some variables. In general, patients associated with both violence and criminal behaviors showed a greater severity in drug consumption and maladjustment variables, as well as a higher rate of treatment dropout and re-entry. PMID:25774971

  4. 78 FR 17611 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... On July 9, 2012, President Obama signed the Food and Drug Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) (Pub. L... Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the U.S. Senate and the Committee on Energy and... these new sections. On November 23, 2012 (77 FR 70166), FDA issued a Federal Register...

  5. Three alkaloids from Reineckia carnea herba and their antitussive and expectorant activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Han, Na; Wang, Yao; Wang, Yichun; Liu, Zhihui; Wang, Yu; Yin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Three alkaloids, (3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) trimethylammonium chloride (1), p-(acetylamino)-phenol (2) and 4,4'-diacetamidodiphenyl ether (3), were isolated from Reineckia carnea herba. Their structures were determined by detailed analysis of their 1D and 2D NMR spectra and MS. Compounds 1 and 3 were new natural products. Compound 2 was isolated for the first time from the Reineckia genus. Compound 1 displayed significant in vivo antitussive and expectorant activities.

  6. Expectorant and Antitussive Effect of Hedera helix and Rhizoma coptidis Extracts Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kee Jae; Shin, Young-June; Lee, Kang Ro; Lee, Eun Jung; Suh, Yun Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to investigate the additive effect of the Hedera helix (HH) and Rhizoma coptidis (RC) extracts mixture on antitussive and expectorant activities in animals. Materials and Methods The expectorant assay was performed with phenol red secretion in mice trachea. Mice or guinea pigs were randomly divided into groups of 8 each, including negative and positive control groups. After gastric administration of the test extracts in mice, 2.5% phenol red solution (0.2 mL) was intraperitoneally injected. Trachea was dissected and optical density of tracheal secretion was measured. After gastric administration of the test extracts in guinea pigs, the antitussive activities were assessed using a citric acid-induced cough measurement. Results The extracts of HH and RC significantly increased tracheal secretion and inhibited cough. The mixture of HH and RC extracts in a 1:1 concentration at a dose of 200 mg/kg showed a more potent effect on phenol red secretion (25.25±3.14) and cough inhibition (61.25±5.36) than the individual use of each extracts [phenol red secretion; HH 13.39±4.22 (p=0.000), RC 20.78±2.50 (p=0.010), cough inhibition; HH 9.89±4.14 (p=0.010), RC 30.25±7.69 (p=0.000)]. A 3:1 ratio mixture of HH to RC demonstrated an optimal expectorant effect (p<0.001), and this mixture showed expectorant and antitussive effects in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion This study provides evidence for antitussive and expectorant effect of a 3:1 mixture of HH and RC, which may be a useful therapeutic option for respiratory diseases. PMID:25837191

  7. In vitro analysis of the cariogenic and erosive potential of paediatric antitussive liquid oral medications.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Alessandro L; De Sousa, Rayanne I M; Clementino, Marayza A; Vieira, Fernando F; Cavalcanti, Christiane L; Xavier, Alidianne F C

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated in vitro the cariogenic and erosive potential of antitussive liquid oral medications for paediatric use. Fifteen paediatric liquid antitussives were sampled. The endogenous pH was evaluated by potentiometry, titratable acidity was measured according to the method adopted by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, total soluble solids content (TSSC) readings were performed by Brix refractometry using the Abbé refractometer, and the total sugar content was determined according to the Fehling methodology. The experiments were performed in triplicate and the obtained data were entered in the Excel software, analyzed and presented by descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations). Endogenous pH values ranged from 2.49 ± 0.09 (Iodetox®) to 6.75 ± 0.005 (Carbocysteine®) and twelve medications showed pHs below the critical value of 5.5 for enamel demineralization. Iodetox® (0.021 ± 0.01) presented the lowest titratable acidity and Aerofrin® (1.171 ± 0.01) presented the highest titratable acidity. Celergin® presented the highest TSSC (62.26 ± 0.40) and Acetyleysteine® (100 mg granules bags) presented the lowest TSSC (3.25 ± 0.43). Only 5 medications contained sugar, with total sugar content ranging from 35.93% ± 6.65 (Iodetox®) to 59.60% DP ± 6.66 (Celergin®). The paediatric antitussive medications showed low endogenous pH, some of them even below the critical value for enamel dissolution (pH<5.5). These antitussives are potentially cariogenic and erosive to dental structures if used frequently because of the high titratable acidity and high sugar concentration, especially when adequate oral clearance is not performed after administration of each dose.

  8. Evaluation of symptomatic slow-acting drugs in osteoarthritis using the GRADE system

    PubMed Central

    Bruyère, Olivier; Burlet, Nansa; Delmas, Pierre D; Rizzoli, René; Cooper, Cyrus; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Background Symptomatic slow-acting drugs (SYSADOA) have been largely studied over the last decade. The objective of this study is to prepare a document providing recommendations for the use of SYSADOA in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods The following interventions were taken into consideration: avocado/soybean unsaponifiables, chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, hyaluronic acid, oral calcitonin, risedronate, strontium ranelate. Recommendations were based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. The GRADE system is based on a sequential assessment of the quality of evidence, followed by assessment of the balance between benefits versus downsides and subsequent judgment about the strength of recommendations. Results Chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, avocado/soybean unsaponifiables and hyaluronic acid have demonstrated pain reduction and physical function improvement with very low toxicity, with moderate to high quality evidence. Even if pre-clinical data and some preliminary in vivo studies have suggested that oral calcitonin and strontium ranelate could be of potential interest in OA, additional well-designed studies are needed. Conclusion In the benefit/risk ratio, the use of chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, avocado/soybean unsaponifiables and hyaluronic acid could be of potential interest for the symptomatic management of OA. PMID:19087296

  9. Federal Strategy for Prevention of Drug Abuse and Drug Trafficking, 1982. Prepared for the President Pursuant to the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Policy Development, Washington, DC.

    This document describes the Federal response to drug abuse and drug trafficking. The actions of President Reagan, in Executive Order 12368, establishing an official advisor on drug abuse policy matters, and the priorities, issues, and objectives (international cooperation, drug law enforcement, education and prevention, detoxification and…

  10. 78 FR 57320 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules on Foreign Supplier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... importers currently rely to help manage the safety of their global food supply chains. The purpose of these... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1 and 16 Food and Drug Administration Food... of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies; Public Meetings AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  11. 78 FR 49988 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules on Foreign Supplier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... importers currently rely to help manage the safety of their global food supply chains. The purpose of the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1 and 16 Food and Drug Administration Food... of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  12. 77 FR 58848 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Patient-Focused Drug Development; Consultation Meetings; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... product's marketing application review. The human drug and biologic review process could benefit from a... FDA White Oak Campus, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, Rm. 1300, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002... Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave. Bldg. 51, Rm. 1168, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-7641, FAX:...

  13. Do cyclodextrins bound to dextran microspheres act as sustained delivery systems of drugs?

    PubMed

    Constantin, Marieta; Bucatariu, Sanda; Harabagiu, Valeria; Ascenzi, Paolo; Fundueanu, Gheorghe

    2014-07-20

    The use of cyclodextrins (CDs) for controlled delivery of drugs is largely presented in the literature. However, the question of whether CDs themselves linked to a polymeric network are able to sustain the release of drugs still persists. Here, CD immobilization within dextran microspheres is reported, and CD-dextran complexes were packed in a glass column and then, the retention time of different drugs and drug model compounds was determined by liquid chromatography. The release profiles of drugs and of drug model compounds (indole, 3-nitrophenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, diclofenac), characterized by different values of the retention time (high, moderate or low), were investigated. The release rates were quite high even for drugs that exhibit very high retention time (high association equilibrium constant). Moreover, the volume of the release fluid strongly influences the rate of drug release. As a whole, "the sink conditions" must be continuously maintained, since at each drug concentration in the release medium, equilibrium occurs between the free and the CD-bound drug.

  14. The ethics of postmarketing observational studies of drug safety under section 505(o)(3) of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    PubMed

    Evans, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, Congress granted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) new powers to order pharmaceutical companies to conduct drug safety studies and clinical trials in the postmarketing period after drugs are approved The methodologies include observational studies that examine patients' insurance claims data and clinical records to infer whether drugs are safe in actual clinical practice. Such studies offer a valuable tool for improving drug safety, but they raise ethical and privacy concerns because they would entail widespread use of patients' health information in commercial research by drug manufacturers. This is the first article to explore the ethics of these section 505(0)(3) observational studies, so named after the section of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that authorizes them. Data access problems threaten to make the FDA's section 505(0)(3) study requirements unenforceable. Under existing federal privacy regulations, it appears highly unlikely that pharmaceutical companies will have reliable access to crucial data resources, such as insurance claims data and healthcare records, to use in these studies. State privacy laws present another potential barrier to data access. If pharmaceutical companies do manage to gain access to the needed data, this will raise serious privacy concerns because section 505(0)(3) observational studies do not appear to be covered by any of the major federal regulations that afford ethical and privacy protections to persons whose data are used in research. If the FDA's program of section 505(o)(3) observational studies fails because of the above problems, this failure will have a number of bad consequences: the public will be exposed to avoidable drug safety risks; taxpayers may be forced to bear the costs of having the FDA conduct drug safety investigations that would have been funded by drug manufacturers if data had been available; and, perhaps most troubling, the FDA may be forced to order postmarketing clinical trials to

  15. Pharmacological study of the antitussive and respiratory-analeptic properties of N-(2'-ethylpyrrolidino)diphenylacetamide hydrochloride (F 1459).

    PubMed

    Tarayre, J P; Vilain, P; Lauressergues, H; Cauquil, J; Bru, M; Caillol, V; Pouget, G; Jougla, A M; Go, M

    1983-01-01

    The antitussive and respiratory stimulant properties of N-(2'-ethylpyrrolidino)diphenylacetamide hydrochloride (F 1459) in animals are reported. In the mechanical stimulation of the trachea in guinea pigs and after intraperitoneal administration of the product, F 1459 showed a better antitussive action as compared to oxeladin, zipeprol, codeine and clobutinol. Low intraduodenal doses of F 1459 also reduced in cats the cough induced by the electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. In anesthetized dogs whose respiratory functions had been depressed by morphine, F 1459 significantly increased the volume inspired per minute, an effect not due to any uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation. F 1459 has local anesthetic and broncholytic properties that may play a role in the mechanism of its antitussive action. Contrarily to codeine, the test compound did not induce a decrease in the intestinal transit.

  16. Pharmacological study of the antitussive and respiratory-analeptic properties of N-(2'-ethylpyrrolidino)diphenylacetamide hydrochloride (F 1459).

    PubMed

    Tarayre, J P; Vilain, P; Lauressergues, H; Cauquil, J; Bru, M; Caillol, V; Pouget, G; Jougla, A M; Go, M

    1983-01-01

    The antitussive and respiratory stimulant properties of N-(2'-ethylpyrrolidino)diphenylacetamide hydrochloride (F 1459) in animals are reported. In the mechanical stimulation of the trachea in guinea pigs and after intraperitoneal administration of the product, F 1459 showed a better antitussive action as compared to oxeladin, zipeprol, codeine and clobutinol. Low intraduodenal doses of F 1459 also reduced in cats the cough induced by the electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. In anesthetized dogs whose respiratory functions had been depressed by morphine, F 1459 significantly increased the volume inspired per minute, an effect not due to any uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation. F 1459 has local anesthetic and broncholytic properties that may play a role in the mechanism of its antitussive action. Contrarily to codeine, the test compound did not induce a decrease in the intestinal transit. PMID:6684929

  17. Metabolomic profiling of the antitussive and expectorant plant Tussilago farfara L. by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Yu; Zhi, Hai-Juan; Zhang, Fu-Sheng; Sun, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Li-Zeng; Jia, Jin-Ping; Xing, Jie; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to find metabolites responsible for antitussive and expectorant activities of Tussilago farfara L. by metabolomic approach. Different parts (roots, flower buds, and leaves) of the title plant were analyzed systematically. The in vivo study revealed that the leaves and flower buds had strong antitussive and expectorant effects. Then ¹H NMR spectrometry together with principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant (PLS-DA) analysis were used to investigate the compounds responsible for the bioactivities. PCA was used to find the differential metabolites, while PLS-DA confirmed a strong correlation between the observed effects and the metabolic profiles of the plant. The result revealed that chlorogenic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and rutin may be closely related with the antitussive and expectorant activities. The overall results of this study confirm the benefits of using metabolic profiling for screening active principles in medicinal plants.

  18. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  19. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  20. Modeling the Overproduction of Ribosomes when Antibacterial Drugs Act on Cells.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arijit; Dill, Ken A

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria that are subjected to ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic drugs show an interesting behavior: Although the drug slows down cell growth, it also paradoxically increases the cell's concentration of ribosomes. We combine our earlier nonlinear model of the energy-biomass balance in undrugged Escherichia coli cells with Michaelis-Menten binding of drugs that inactivate ribosomes. Predictions are in good agreement with experiments on ribosomal concentrations and synthesis rates versus drug concentrations and growth rates. The model indicates that the added drug drives the cell to overproduce ribosomes, keeping roughly constant the level of ribosomes producing ribosomal proteins, an important quantity for cell growth. The model also predicts that ribosomal production rates should increase and then decrease with added drug. This model gives insights into the driving forces in cells and suggests new experiments. PMID:26840738

  1. Intoxication with over-the-counter antitussive medication containing dihydrocodeine and chlorpheniramine causes generalized convulsion and mixed acidosis.

    PubMed

    Murao, Satoshi; Manabe, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Sekikawa, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old man who was referred to our hospital with generalized convulsion and mixed acidosis presumably caused by abuse of SS-BRON tablets, an over-the-counter (OTC) antitussive medication sold in Japan. These tablets contain dihydrocodeine phosphate, methylephedrine, chlorpheniramine, and caffeine. Although it is difficult to discern which component caused these symptoms, it seems that dihydrocodeine phosphate or methylephedrine was involved in the addiction to SS-BRON and chlorpheniramine may have caused the generalized convulsion. It should be recognized that an OTC antitussive, which is quite easy to obtain, can be abused and subsequently induce serious intoxication.

  2. 78 FR 78367 - Draft Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... affecting drug and biologics approvals, drug supply chain, and other topics related to human pharmaceuticals... http://www.regulations.gov . Submit written comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305... http://www.regulations.gov or written comments to the Division of Dockets Management (see...

  3. Tragedy, transformation, and triumph: comparing the factors and forces that led to the adoption of the 1860 Adulteration Act in England and the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act in the United States.

    PubMed

    London, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    The 1860 Adulteration Act in England and the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act in the United States were two of the earliest pieces of legislation to provide generalized regulation of food and drugs on a national scale. While significant scholarly attention has been given to explaining the factors and forces that led to the passage of each Act independent of the other, few books or articles have directly compared the similar individuals and events that led to the adoption of both Acts. This paper attempts to fill that gap. Through a comparative examination, this paper reveals that four main components were key to the national pure food and drug movements in both countries: individuals who crusaded for national adulteration legislation; tragedies that shocked the public into calling for reform; press and publicity that was willing and able to bring the evils of adulteration to the forefront of the public mind; and a transformation of the social, political, and economic systems, which created atmospheres conducive to reform. This paper aims to shed new light on the 1860 Adulteration Act and the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act--two acts that derive their importance not just from the effect that they directly had on the regulation of food and drugs but also as some of the earliest examples of western governments coming to recognize the need for national regulation to protect the public from harm and coming to embrace their changing role as spearheads of modern regulatory states. PMID:25163213

  4. 76 FR 58279 - Animal Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... Parks, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, 7519 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD... Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, 7519 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD 20855, 240-276-9724, FAX:...

  5. The Regulation of Medical Computer Software as a “Device” under the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act

    PubMed Central

    Brannigan, Vincent

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in computer software have raised the possibility that federal regulators may claim to control medical computer software as a “device” under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the FDCA to determine whether computer software is included in the statutory scheme, examine constitutional arguments relating to computer software, and discuss regulatory principles that should be taken into account when deciding appropriate regulation. This paper is limited to computer program output used by humans in deciding appropriate medical therapy for a patient.

  6. Natural and Drug Rewards Act on Common Neural Plasticity Mechanisms with ΔFosB as a Key Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Pitchers, Kyle K.; Vialou, Vincent; Nestler, Eric J.; Laviolette, Steven R.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse induce neuroplasticity in the natural reward pathway, specifically the nucleus accumbens (NAc), thereby causing development and expression of addictive behavior. Recent evidence suggests that natural rewards may cause similar changes in the NAc, suggesting that drugs may activate mechanisms of plasticity shared with natural rewards, and allowing for unique interplay between natural and drug rewards. In this study, we demonstrate that sexual experience in male rats when followed by short or prolonged periods of loss of sex reward causes enhanced amphetamine reward, indicated by sensitized conditioned place preference for low-dose (0.5 mg/kg) amphetamine. Moreover, the onset, but not the longer-term expression, of enhanced amphetamine reward was correlated with a transient increase in dendritic spines in the NAc. Next, a critical role for the transcription factor ΔFosB in sex experience-induced enhanced amphetamine reward and associated increases in dendritic spines on NAc neurons was established using viral vector gene transfer of the dominant-negative binding partner ΔJunD. Moreover, it was demonstrated that sexual experience-induced enhanced drug reward, ΔFosB, and spinogenesis are dependent on mating-induced dopamine D1 receptor activation in the NAc. Pharmacological blockade of D1 receptor, but not D2 receptor, in the NAc during sexual behavior attenuated ΔFosB induction and prevented increased spinogenesis and sensitized amphetamine reward. Together, these findings demonstrate that drugs of abuse and natural reward behaviors act on common molecular and cellular mechanisms of plasticity that control vulnerability to drug addiction, and that this increased vulnerability is mediated by ΔFosB and its downstream transcriptional targets. PMID:23426671

  7. 75 FR 32483 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Meetings on Reauthorization; Request for Notification of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... reauthorization (75 FR 12555, March 16, 2010). This meeting and written comments submitted to the docket have...; Request for Notification of Stakeholder Intention to Participate AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... by establishing consistent stakeholder representation. DATES: Submit notification of intention...

  8. 77 FR 72356 - Animal Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD. A transcript... persons may submit either written comments regarding this meeting to the Division of Dockets Management... document. Received comments may be seen in the Division of Dockets Management between 9 a.m. and 4...

  9. 77 FR 72359 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... ] at the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm... Dockets Management (see Transcripts) or electronic comments to http://www.regulations.gov . It is only... heading of this document. Received comments may be seen in the Division of Dockets Management between 9...

  10. Triple-acting Peptidoglycan hydrolase treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  11. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  12. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  13. 76 FR 41434 - Removal of Certain Requirements Related to the Prescription Drug Marketing Act; Opportunity for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... of March 14, 1994 (59 FR 11842), we issued a proposed rule related to certain provisions of the PDMA... all parties to each prior transaction involving the drug, starting with the manufacturer.'' (59 FR 11865). A final rule was issued in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720) (the...

  14. Comparison of the effects of two opioid antitussives, vadocaine hydrochloride, clobutinol and lidocaine on lung mechanics in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Salonen, R O

    1988-04-01

    Intravenous administration of opioids, e.g. morphine and codeine, causes bronchoconstriction in animals and susceptible patients such as asthmatics. Therefore, the effects of two opioid antitussives (codeine and dextromethorphan), two non-opioid antitussives (vadocaine hydrochloride (2',4'-dimethyl-6'-methoxy-3-(2-methylpiperidyl) propionanilide hydrochloride, OR K-242-HCl; INN: vadocaine) and clobutinol), and lidocaine on basal lung mechanics and methacholine (MeCh, 6 micrograms/kg i.v.)-induced airway obstruction were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Intravenous administration of codeine (10-20 mg/kg) produced a dual response in the airways; initial bronchoconstriction was followed by attenuation of the MeCh-response. Dextromethorphan (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused bronchoconstriction only. Both the opioids affected dynamic lung compliance (CDyn) more than lung resistance (RL). At doses between 1 and 20 mg/kg i.v., vadocaine, clobutinol, and lidocaine had no obvious effect on the airways. Dextromethorphan and vadocaine, both at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, and clobutinol (15 and 20 mg/kg) caused irreversible bradycardia and hypotension, whereas codeine (5-20 mg/kg) increased blood pressure, and to a lesser extent heart rate. These results suggest that intravenous administration of an opioid antitussive influences the small peripheral airways more than the large airways, whether the opioid has euphoric analgesic properties or not. In contrast to this, non-opioid antitussives such as vadocaine and clobutinol are without effect. At large doses, all antitussives influence the cardiovascular system considerably.

  15. Comparison of the effects of two opioid antitussives, vadocaine hydrochloride, clobutinol and lidocaine on lung mechanics in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Salonen, R O

    1988-04-01

    Intravenous administration of opioids, e.g. morphine and codeine, causes bronchoconstriction in animals and susceptible patients such as asthmatics. Therefore, the effects of two opioid antitussives (codeine and dextromethorphan), two non-opioid antitussives (vadocaine hydrochloride (2',4'-dimethyl-6'-methoxy-3-(2-methylpiperidyl) propionanilide hydrochloride, OR K-242-HCl; INN: vadocaine) and clobutinol), and lidocaine on basal lung mechanics and methacholine (MeCh, 6 micrograms/kg i.v.)-induced airway obstruction were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Intravenous administration of codeine (10-20 mg/kg) produced a dual response in the airways; initial bronchoconstriction was followed by attenuation of the MeCh-response. Dextromethorphan (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused bronchoconstriction only. Both the opioids affected dynamic lung compliance (CDyn) more than lung resistance (RL). At doses between 1 and 20 mg/kg i.v., vadocaine, clobutinol, and lidocaine had no obvious effect on the airways. Dextromethorphan and vadocaine, both at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, and clobutinol (15 and 20 mg/kg) caused irreversible bradycardia and hypotension, whereas codeine (5-20 mg/kg) increased blood pressure, and to a lesser extent heart rate. These results suggest that intravenous administration of an opioid antitussive influences the small peripheral airways more than the large airways, whether the opioid has euphoric analgesic properties or not. In contrast to this, non-opioid antitussives such as vadocaine and clobutinol are without effect. At large doses, all antitussives influence the cardiovascular system considerably. PMID:3395396

  16. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid uptake and peripheral distribution of centrally acting drugs: relation to lipid solubility.

    PubMed

    Ochs, H R; Greenblatt, D J; Abernethy, D R; Arendt, R M; Gerloff, J; Eichelkraut, W; Hahn, N

    1985-06-01

    In an anaesthetized dog model, serum kinetics and CSF entry were determined after i.v. administration of the following 8 drugs: salicylic acid (as acetylsalicylic acid), antipyrine, acetaminophen (paracetamol), lidocaine (lignocaine), trimipramine, amitriptyline, haloperidol, and imipramine. Kinetic variables were evaluated in relation to in-vitro lipophilicity, measured by the reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index. After correction for individual values of serum binding (determined as the CSF: serum ratio at equilibrium), in-vivo volume of distribution was highly correlated with HPLC retention (r = 0.92). Conversely, the time of peak CSF concentration and the CSF entry half-life were negatively correlated with HPLC retention (r = -0.83 and -0.63, respectively). Thus lipophilicity is a physiochemical property which has an influence on the peripheral distribution of drugs as well as their rate of entry into CSF. PMID:2862269

  18. Time to act: a call for comprehensive responses to HIV in people who use drugs

    PubMed Central

    Beyrer, Chris; Malinowska-Sempruch, Kasia; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kazatchkine, Michel; Sidibe, Michel; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2013-01-01

    The published work on HIV in people who use drugs shows that the global burden of HIV infection in this group can be reduced. Concerted action by governments, multilateral organisations, health systems, and individuals could lead to enormous benefits for families, communities, and societies. We review the evidence and identify synergies between biomedical science, public health, and human rights. Cost-effective interventions, including needle and syringe exchange programmes, opioid substitution therapy, and expanded access to HIV treatment and care, are supported on public health and human rights grounds; however, only around 10% of people who use drugs worldwide are being reached, and far too many are imprisoned for minor offences or detained without trial. To change this situation will take commitment, advocacy, and political courage to advance the action agenda. Failure to do so will exacerbate the spread of HIV infection, undermine treatment programmes, and continue to expand prison populations with patients in need of care. PMID:20650515

  19. [Experimental techniques for developing new drugs acting on dementia (4)--Aged rats].

    PubMed

    Egashira, T

    1994-08-01

    We have devised a method for the procurement and breeding of aged rats used for aiding in the development of drugs for disease, involving Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular dementia. The changes in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), muscarinic receptor binding (mAChR) and Na(+)-dependent high affinity choline uptake (HACU) are generally consistent with age-dependent declines in cholinergic neurotransmission, although these decreases may include differences in strain/species, sex, tissue sampling and assay procedures. So, the choice of time points during the life cycle selected for comparison between young and aged rats is particularly important when using laboratory animals. These observations support the utility of the senescent rat model in studying aging and development of nootropic drugs.

  20. Levetiracetam might act as an efficacious drug to attenuate cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a homologue of piracetam with an a-ethyl side-chain substitution and it is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antiepileptic drug. Recently, several studies have found that levetiracetam was able to reduce seizure frequency in epileptic seizures patients without affecting their cognitive functions. In the present review, the effects of levetiracetam on cognitive improvement were summarized in epileptic seizures patients with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-grade glioma (HGG) patients and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. In addition, levetiracetam was observed to improve the cognitive deficits in normal aged animals and the transgenic animal models with AD, suggesting that levetiracetam may be a better choice for the prevention or treatment of AD.

  1. Evaluation of the antitussive effect of stigma and petals of saffron (Crocus sativus) and its components, safranal and crocin in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Ghenaati, Jafar

    2006-09-01

    The antitussive activity of Crocus sativus stigma and petal extracts and its components, safranal and crocin, was evaluated using the nebolized solution of citric acid 20% in guinea pigs. The extract and agents were injected intraperitoneally. The ethanolic extract of C. sativus (100-800 mg/kg) and safranal (0.25-0.75 ml/kg) reduced the number of cough. The ethanolic and aqueous extracts of petal and crocin did not show antitussive activity.

  2. Glycoprotein mucin molecular brush on cancer cell surface acting as mechanical barrier against drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shah, Aalok A.; Campbell, Robert B.; Wan, Kai-tak

    2010-12-01

    Uptake of cytotoxic drugs by typical tumor cells is limited by the dense dendritic network of oligosaccharide mucin chains that forms a mechanical barrier. Atomic force microscopy is used to directly measure the force needed to pierce the mucin layer to reach the cell surface. Measurements are analyzed by de Gennes' steric reptation theory. Multidrug resistant ovarian tumor cells shows significantly larger penetration load compared to the wide type. A pool of pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and breast cells are also characterized. The chemotherapeutic agent, benzyl-α-GalNac, for inhibiting glycosylation is shown to be effective in reducing the mechanical barrier.

  3. Directly acting drugs prostacyclin or nitroglycerine and endothelin receptor blocker bosentan improve cell engraftment in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Bahde, Ralf; Kapoor, Sorabh; Bandi, Sriram; Bhargava, Kuldeep K.; Palestro, Christopher J.; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    To optimize strategies for liver-directed cell therapy prevention of initial transplanted cell losses is particularly important for subsequent liver repopulation. After cell transplantation in hepatic sinusoids, perturbations in hepatic microcirculation along with changes in various liver cell types are among the earliest changes. Therefore, for advancing further concepts in cell engraftment, we studied vascular and related events in the liver after transplanting syngeneic hepatocytes into dipeptidyl peptidase IV-deficient rats. We treated rats with vascular drugs to define whether deleterious cell transplantation-induced events could be controlled followed by improvements in transplanted cell engraftment and proliferation. We found cell transplantation altered liver gene expression related to vessel tone, inflammation, cell adhesion, thrombosis, or tissue damage/remodeling. This was due to hepatic ischemia, endothelial injury and activation of neutrophils, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells. Treatment of rats before cell transplantation with angiotensin converting enzyme blocker, lisinopril, or angiotensin II receptor blocker, losartan, did not improve cell engraftment. By contrast, direct-acting nitroglycerine or prostacyclin improved cell engraftment and also kinetics of liver repopulation. These drugs lowered hepatic ischemia and inflammation. Whereas pretreatment of rats with the dual endothelin-1 receptor blocker, bosentan, improved cell engraftment independently of hepatic ischemia or inflammation, without improving liver repopulation. However, incubation of hepatocytes with bosentan protected cells from cytokine toxicity in vitro and produced superior cell engraftment and proliferation in vivo. We concluded that cell transplantation-induced changes in hepatic microcirculation contributed to transplanted cell clearances from liver. Vascular drugs, such as nitroglycerine, prostacyclin and bosentan, offer opportunities for improving cell therapy results

  4. Antitussive, expectorant and anti-inflammatory alkaloids from Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Zhu, Jingyi; Wang, Shu; Wang, Xiaoxia; Ou, Yang; Wei, Dandan; Li, Xueping

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the antitussive, expectorant and anti-inflammatory effects of alkaloids imperialine (I), chuanbeinone (II), verticinone (III), and verticine (IV), which were isolated from the Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae (BFC) using phytochemical method. The results showed that all the alkaloids significantly inhibited cough frequency and increased latent period of cough in mice induced by ammonia. Besides, imperialine(I), verticinone(III) and verticine(IV) markedly enhanced mice's tracheal phenol red output in expectorant evaluation, and imperialine(I), chuanbeinone(II) significantly inhibited the development of ear edema in a dose-dependent manner in anti-inflammatory assessment. Moreover, important differences were found among the structure-activity relationships for the four alkaloids. These results confirmed that the four alkaloids imperialine, chuanbeinone, verticinone and verticine may be the active ingredients of the Bulbus F. Cirrhosae (BFC).

  5. Affordable Care Act Qualified Health Plan Enrollment for AIDS Drug Assistance Program Clients: Virginia's Experience and Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Rodney, Robert C.; Rhodes, Anne; Bailey, Steven; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014, many safety net resources, including state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs), incorporated ACA Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) into their healthcare delivery model. This article highlights the benefits of the ACA for persons living with HIV. It also describes the range of strategies employed by state ADAPs to enroll patients in QHPs. The Virginia ADAP ACA implementation experience is described to illustrate one ADAP's shift to purchasing QHPs in addition to providing direct medications. Virginia ADAP is in a Medicaid nonexpansion state and funds the full costs of the QHP premiums, deductibles, and medication copayments. Virginia's experience is applicable to other Medicaid nonexpansion states and to state ADAPs in Medicaid expansion states, who are looking for options for their Medicaid ineligible clients. This article provides practical details of Virginia ADAP's ACA implementation as well as insights and best practices at both the state and clinic level. PMID:27346694

  6. Affordable Care Act Qualified Health Plan Enrollment for AIDS Drug Assistance Program Clients: Virginia's Experience and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    McManus, Kathleen A; Rodney, Robert C; Rhodes, Anne; Bailey, Steven; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014, many safety net resources, including state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs), incorporated ACA Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) into their healthcare delivery model. This article highlights the benefits of the ACA for persons living with HIV. It also describes the range of strategies employed by state ADAPs to enroll patients in QHPs. The Virginia ADAP ACA implementation experience is described to illustrate one ADAP's shift to purchasing QHPs in addition to providing direct medications. Virginia ADAP is in a Medicaid nonexpansion state and funds the full costs of the QHP premiums, deductibles, and medication copayments. Virginia's experience is applicable to other Medicaid nonexpansion states and to state ADAPs in Medicaid expansion states, who are looking for options for their Medicaid ineligible clients. This article provides practical details of Virginia ADAP's ACA implementation as well as insights and best practices at both the state and clinic level. PMID:27346694

  7. Affordable Care Act Qualified Health Plan Enrollment for AIDS Drug Assistance Program Clients: Virginia's Experience and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    McManus, Kathleen A; Rodney, Robert C; Rhodes, Anne; Bailey, Steven; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014, many safety net resources, including state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs), incorporated ACA Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) into their healthcare delivery model. This article highlights the benefits of the ACA for persons living with HIV. It also describes the range of strategies employed by state ADAPs to enroll patients in QHPs. The Virginia ADAP ACA implementation experience is described to illustrate one ADAP's shift to purchasing QHPs in addition to providing direct medications. Virginia ADAP is in a Medicaid nonexpansion state and funds the full costs of the QHP premiums, deductibles, and medication copayments. Virginia's experience is applicable to other Medicaid nonexpansion states and to state ADAPs in Medicaid expansion states, who are looking for options for their Medicaid ineligible clients. This article provides practical details of Virginia ADAP's ACA implementation as well as insights and best practices at both the state and clinic level.

  8. Uliginosin B, a Possible New Analgesic Drug, Acts by Modulating the Adenosinergic System.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Eveline Dischkaln; da Costa, Paola Fontoura; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; Souza, Andressa; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; von Poser, Gilsane Lino; Bonan, Carla; Torres, Iraci L S; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze

    2016-01-01

    Uliginosin B (ULI) is a natural acylphloroglucinol that has been proposed as a new molecular scaffold for developing analgesic and antidepressant drugs. Its effects seem to be due to its ability to increase monoamines in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting their neuronal uptake without binding to their respective transporters, but its exact mode of action is still unknown. Considering the importance of the purinergic system to pain transmission and its modulation by monoamines availability, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of adenosinergic signaling in antinociceptive effect of uliginosin B. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX and the selective A2A antagonist ZM 241385 prevented the effect of ULI in the hot-plate test in mice. Pretreatment with inhibitors of adenosine reuptake (dipyridamole) or adenosine deaminase (EHNA) did not affect the ULI effect. On the other hand, its effect was completely prevented by an inhibitor of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (AMPCP). This finding was confirmed ex vivo, whereby ULI treatment increased AMP and ATP hydrolysis in spinal cord and cerebral cortex synaptosomes, respectively. Altogether, these data indicate that activation of A1 and A2A receptors and the modulation of ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity contribute to the antinociceptive effect of ULI.

  9. Uliginosin B, a Possible New Analgesic Drug, Acts by Modulating the Adenosinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Eveline Dischkaln; da Costa, Paola Fontoura; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; Souza, Andressa; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; von Poser, Gilsane Lino; Bonan, Carla; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze

    2016-01-01

    Uliginosin B (ULI) is a natural acylphloroglucinol that has been proposed as a new molecular scaffold for developing analgesic and antidepressant drugs. Its effects seem to be due to its ability to increase monoamines in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting their neuronal uptake without binding to their respective transporters, but its exact mode of action is still unknown. Considering the importance of the purinergic system to pain transmission and its modulation by monoamines availability, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of adenosinergic signaling in antinociceptive effect of uliginosin B. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX and the selective A2A antagonist ZM 241385 prevented the effect of ULI in the hot-plate test in mice. Pretreatment with inhibitors of adenosine reuptake (dipyridamole) or adenosine deaminase (EHNA) did not affect the ULI effect. On the other hand, its effect was completely prevented by an inhibitor of ecto-5′-nucleotidase (AMPCP). This finding was confirmed ex vivo, whereby ULI treatment increased AMP and ATP hydrolysis in spinal cord and cerebral cortex synaptosomes, respectively. Altogether, these data indicate that activation of A1 and A2A receptors and the modulation of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity contribute to the antinociceptive effect of ULI. PMID:27087824

  10. Hepatitis C virus cures after direct acting antiviral-related drug-induced liver injury: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Yaakov; Shteingart, Shimon; Dahari, Harel; Gafanovich, Inna; Floru, Sharon; Braun, Marius; Shlomai, Amir; Verstandig, Anthony; Dery, Ilana; Uprichard, Susan L; Cotler, Scott J; Lurie, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently warned that the direct acting antiviral (DAA) combination hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment of Paritaprevir, Ombitasvir, Dasabuvir, Ritonavir, and Ribavirin (PODr + R) can cause severe liver injury in patients with advanced liver disease. Drug induced liver injury was observed in a small number of patients with decompensated cirrhosis treated with other DAAs, but has not been reported in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic HCV and Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis (compensated cirrhosis) treated with PODr + R. The patient presented on day 14 of PODr + R therapy with jaundice and new-onset ascites. Her total bilirubin level increased to 23 mg/dL and international normalized ratio rose to 1.65, while aminotransferase levels remained relatively stable. Hepatitis C treatment was discontinued on day 24 and she gradually recovered. Follow-up testing showed that she achieved a sustained virologic response. In conclusion, hepatic decompensation developed within two weeks of starting treatment with PODr + R in a patient with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis and was characterized by jaundice and ascites with stable aminotransferase levels. Careful monitoring is warranted in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis treated with PODr + R. PMID:27458506

  11. Hepatitis C virus cures after direct acting antiviral-related drug-induced liver injury: Case report.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Yaakov; Shteingart, Shimon; Dahari, Harel; Gafanovich, Inna; Floru, Sharon; Braun, Marius; Shlomai, Amir; Verstandig, Anthony; Dery, Ilana; Uprichard, Susan L; Cotler, Scott J; Lurie, Yoav

    2016-07-18

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently warned that the direct acting antiviral (DAA) combination hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment of Paritaprevir, Ombitasvir, Dasabuvir, Ritonavir, and Ribavirin (PODr + R) can cause severe liver injury in patients with advanced liver disease. Drug induced liver injury was observed in a small number of patients with decompensated cirrhosis treated with other DAAs, but has not been reported in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic HCV and Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis (compensated cirrhosis) treated with PODr + R. The patient presented on day 14 of PODr + R therapy with jaundice and new-onset ascites. Her total bilirubin level increased to 23 mg/dL and international normalized ratio rose to 1.65, while aminotransferase levels remained relatively stable. Hepatitis C treatment was discontinued on day 24 and she gradually recovered. Follow-up testing showed that she achieved a sustained virologic response. In conclusion, hepatic decompensation developed within two weeks of starting treatment with PODr + R in a patient with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis and was characterized by jaundice and ascites with stable aminotransferase levels. Careful monitoring is warranted in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis treated with PODr + R. PMID:27458506

  12. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. Methods We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. Results None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Conclusions Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised. PMID:22029602

  13. The long-term administration of Orai 1 antagonist possesses antitussive, bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects in experimental asthma model.

    PubMed

    Sutovská, Martina; Kocmálová, Michaela; Adamkov, Marian; Výbohová, Desanka; Mikolka, Pavol; Mokrá, Daniela; Hatok, Jozef; Antošová, Martina; Fraňová, Soňa

    2013-06-01

    The best-studied store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCs), Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels, are activated by depleting endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pool and mediate Ca2+ influx vitally important for Ca2+ restoration and many cellular function. CRAC channels were identified on immune and airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Emerging evidence points to its involvement in allergic airways diseases. This article evaluated therapeutic potency of CRAC antagonist in experimental animal model of allergic asthma. Allergic asthma, induced by repetitive exposure of guinea pigs to ovalbumine, was followed by 14 days therapy by CRAC antagonist (3-fluoropyridine-4-carboxylic acid, FPCA). In vivo changes of specific airways resistance (sRaw) evaluated bronchodilatory effect of FPCA and salbutamol. The method of citric acid-induced cough reflex assessed antitussive activity of FPCA and codeine. The measurement of exhaled NO (ENO), expression of inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining of airways tissue verified anti-inflammatory effect of FPCA. Long-term administration of FPCA resulted in significant cough suppression and bronchodilation, both comparable to the effect of control drugs. FPCA significantly decreased ENO and iNOS expression, which together with immunohistochemical analysis validated its anti-inflammatory effect. Presented data confirmed CRAC channels as a promising target for treatment of respiratory diseases associated with allergic inflammation.

  14. The redox-active drug metronidazole and thiol-depleting garlic compounds act synergistically in the protist parasite Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Vacca, A R; Dunham, L; Lloyd, D; Coogan, M P; Evans, G; Graz, M; Cable, J

    2016-01-01

    Spironucleus vortens is a protozoan parasite associated with significant mortalities in the freshwater angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare. Control of this parasite is especially problematic due to restrictions on the use of the drug of choice, metronidazole (MTZ), on fish farms. Use of garlic (Allium sativum) is undergoing a renaissance following experimental validations of its antimicrobial efficiency. Ajoene ((E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide), is a stable transformation product of allicin, the primary biologically active component of garlic. In the current study, an ajoene oil crude extract had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 40μg/ml against S. vortens. GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy revealed this ajoene extract contained a mixture of the (E) and (Z)-ajoene isomers along with diallyl disulphide (DADS) and diallyl trisulphide (DATS). The only component of the ajoene crude oil found to substantially inhibit S. vortens growth by optical density monitoring (Bioscreen C Reader) was (Z)-ajoene (MIC 16μg/ml). Ajoene oil acted in synergy with MTZ in vitro, reducing the individual MIC of this drug (4μg/ml) by 16-fold, and that of ajoene oil by 200-fold with a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index of 0.263. This synergistic interaction was confirmed in vivo. S. vortens-infected Pterophyllum scalare angelfish dosed orally with 0.5% (v/w) MTZ combined with 0.05% (v/w) ajoene displayed a significant reduction in faecal trophozoite count, whilst those fed on 0.5% MTZ flakes (half the recommended oral dose) alone did not. This study demonstrates for the first time the synergistic interaction between the synthetic drug MTZ and natural ajoene oil both in vitro and in vivo. Future work should evaluate the potential synergy of ajoene and MTZ against MTZ-resistant bacteria and protists. PMID:26968264

  15. The redox-active drug metronidazole and thiol-depleting garlic compounds act synergistically in the protist parasite Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Vacca, A R; Dunham, L; Lloyd, D; Coogan, M P; Evans, G; Graz, M; Cable, J

    2016-01-01

    Spironucleus vortens is a protozoan parasite associated with significant mortalities in the freshwater angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare. Control of this parasite is especially problematic due to restrictions on the use of the drug of choice, metronidazole (MTZ), on fish farms. Use of garlic (Allium sativum) is undergoing a renaissance following experimental validations of its antimicrobial efficiency. Ajoene ((E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide), is a stable transformation product of allicin, the primary biologically active component of garlic. In the current study, an ajoene oil crude extract had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 40μg/ml against S. vortens. GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy revealed this ajoene extract contained a mixture of the (E) and (Z)-ajoene isomers along with diallyl disulphide (DADS) and diallyl trisulphide (DATS). The only component of the ajoene crude oil found to substantially inhibit S. vortens growth by optical density monitoring (Bioscreen C Reader) was (Z)-ajoene (MIC 16μg/ml). Ajoene oil acted in synergy with MTZ in vitro, reducing the individual MIC of this drug (4μg/ml) by 16-fold, and that of ajoene oil by 200-fold with a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index of 0.263. This synergistic interaction was confirmed in vivo. S. vortens-infected Pterophyllum scalare angelfish dosed orally with 0.5% (v/w) MTZ combined with 0.05% (v/w) ajoene displayed a significant reduction in faecal trophozoite count, whilst those fed on 0.5% MTZ flakes (half the recommended oral dose) alone did not. This study demonstrates for the first time the synergistic interaction between the synthetic drug MTZ and natural ajoene oil both in vitro and in vivo. Future work should evaluate the potential synergy of ajoene and MTZ against MTZ-resistant bacteria and protists.

  16. Design and synthesis of a metabolically stable and potent antitussive agent, a novel delta opioid receptor antagonist, TRK-851.

    PubMed

    Sakami, Satoshi; Kawai, Koji; Maeda, Masayuki; Aoki, Takumi; Fujii, Hideaki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Nakao, Kaoru; Izumimoto, Naoki; Matsuura, Hirotoshi; Endo, Takashi; Ueno, Shinya; Natsume, Kazuto; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported on antitussive effect of (5R,9R,13S,14S)-17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-didehydro-4,5-epoxy-5',6'-dihydro-3-methoxy-4'H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinolino[2',1':6,7]morphinan-14-ol(1b) methanesulfonate (TRK-850), a selective delta opioid receptor antagonist which markedly reduced the number of coughs in a rat cough model. We designed TRK-850 based on naltrindole (NTI), a typical delta opioid receptor antagonist, to improve its permeability through the blood-brain barrier by introducing hydrophobic moieties to NTI. The ED(50) values of NTI and compound 1b by intraperitoneal injections were 104 microg/kg and 2.07 microg/kg, respectively. This increased antitussive potency probably resulted from the improved brain exposure of compound 1b. However, 1b was extremely unstable toward metabolism by cytochrome P450. In this study, we designed and synthesized compound 1b derivatives to improve the metabolic instability, which resulted in affording highly potent and metabolically stable oral antitussive agent (5R,9R,13S,14S)-17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-didehydro-4,5-epoxy-8'-fluoro-5',6'-dihydro-4'H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinolino[2',1':6,7]morphinan-3,14-diol (1c) methanesulfonate (TRK-851).

  17. 21 CFR 341.70 - Labeling of OTC drug products containing ingredients that are used for treating concurrent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as a “cough suppressant/oral anesthetic” or “antitussive (cough suppressant)/oral anesthetic.” The indications shall be combined from § 341.74(b) and...

  18. 21 CFR 341.70 - Labeling of OTC drug products containing ingredients that are used for treating concurrent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as a “cough suppressant/oral anesthetic” or “antitussive (cough suppressant)/oral anesthetic.” The indications shall be combined from § 341.74(b) and...

  19. Pharmacology and antitussive efficacy of 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Scott, Brian P; Nasser, Nadia; Ao, Hong; Maher, Michael P; Dubin, Adrienne E; Swanson, Devin M; Shankley, Nigel P; Wickenden, Alan D; Chaplan, Sandra R

    2007-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays an integral role in modulating the cough reflex, and it is an attractive antitussive drug target. The purpose of this study was to characterize a TRPV1 antagonist, 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), against the guinea pig TRPV1 receptor in vitro followed by a proof-of-principle study in an acid-induced model of cough. The affinity of JNJ17203212 for the recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 receptor was estimated by radioligand binding, and it was functionally characterized by antagonism of low-pH and capsaicin-induced activation of the ion channel (fluorometric imaging plate reader and electrophysiology). The nature of antagonism was further tested against the native channel in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. Following pharmacokinetic characterization of JNJ17203212 in guinea pigs, pharmacodynamic and efficacy studies were undertaken to establish the antitussive efficacy of the TRPV1 antagonist. The pK(i) of JNJ17203212 for recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.14 +/- 0.06. JNJ17203212 inhibited both pH (pIC(50) of 7.23 +/- 0.05) and capsaicin (pIC(50) of 6.32 +/- 0.06)-induced channel activation. In whole-cell patch clamp, the pIC(50) for inhibition of guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.3 +/- 0.01. JNJ17203212 demonstrated surmountable antagonism in isolated trachea, with a pK(B) value of 6.2 +/- 0.1. Intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg JNJ17203212 achieved a maximal plasma exposure of 8.0 +/- 0.4 microM, and it attenuated capsaicin evoked coughs with similar efficacy to codeine (25 mg/kg). Last, JNJ17203212 dose-dependently produced antitussive efficacy in citric acid-induced experimental cough in guinea pigs. Our data provide preclinical support for developing TRPV1 antagonists for the treatment of cough.

  20. Reducing Prescriptions of Long-Acting Benzodiazepine Drugs in Denmark: A Descriptive Analysis of Nationwide Prescriptions during a 10-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Sophie Isabel; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-06-01

    Prolonged consumption of benzodiazepine drugs (BZD) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone; altogether Z drugs) is related to potential physiological and psychological dependence along with other adverse effects. This study aimed to analyse the prescribing of long-acting BZD (half-life >10 hr), compared to short-acting BZD in Denmark during a 10-year period. Descriptive analysis of total sales data from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, to individuals in the primary healthcare sector, of all BZD and Z drugs in the period of 2003-2013. Prescription data derive from all community and hospital pharmacies in Denmark. The prescribing of long-acting BZD was reduced from 25.8 defined daily doses (DDD)/1000 inhabitants/day in 2003 to 8.8 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day in 2013, a relative reduction of 66%. The prescribing of short-acting BZD was reduced from 26.1 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day in 2003 to 16.4 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day in 2013, a relative reduction of 37%. Prescription data in this study did not include information about indications for initiating treatments. In addition, due to compliance problems, some of the prescribed drugs may not have been consumed according to the prescription. The observed reduction in BZD use was correlated to the introduction of new national guidelines on prescription of addictive drugs, but this study was not designed to detect a causal relationship. The prescribing of long-acting BZD decreased considerably more than the prescribing of short-acting BZD in the 10-year period. PMID:25382355

  1. Immunomodulatory drugs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases and induce PU.1 up-regulation in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shinya; Amano, Masayuki; Nishimura, Nao; Ueno, Niina; Ueno, Shikiko; Yuki, Hiromichi; Fujiwara, Shiho; Wada, Naoko; Hirata, Shinya; Hata, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Okuno, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide are efficacious in the treatment of multiple myeloma and significantly prolong their survival. However, the mechanisms of such effects of IMiDs have not been fully elucidated. Recently, cereblon has been identified as a target binding protein of thalidomide. Lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cell lines often lose the expression of cereblon, suggesting that IMiDs act as an anti-myeloma agent through interacting with cereblon. Cereblon binds to damaged DNA-binding protein and functions as a ubiquitin ligase, inducing degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 that are essential transcription factors for B and T cell development. Degradation of both IKZF1 and IKZF3 reportedly suppresses myeloma cell growth. Here, we found that IMiDs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DMNTs). We previously reported that PU.1, which is an ETS family transcription factor and essential for myeloid and lymphoid development, functions as a tumor suppressor in myeloma cells. PU.1 induces growth arrest and apoptosis of myeloma cell lines. In this study, we found that low-dose lenalidomide and pomalidomide up-regulate PU.1 expression through inducing demethylation of the PU.1 promoter. In addition, IMiDs inhibited DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b activities in vitro. Furthermore, lenalidomide and pomalidomide decreased the methylation status of the whole genome in myeloma cells. Collectively, IMiDs exert demethylation activity through inhibiting DNMT1, 3a, and 3b, and up-regulating PU.1 expression, which may be one of the mechanisms of the anti-myeloma activity of IMiDs.

  2. The effect of administering long-acting oxytetracycline and tilmicosin either by dart gun or by hand on injection site lesions and drug residues in beef cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, J; VanderKop, M; Salisbury, C; Sears, L; Holowath, J

    1999-01-01

    Forty yearling cattle were injected intramuscularly with long-acting oxytetracycline and subcutaneously with tilmicosin by dart gun or by hand in a chute 28 days prior to slaughter. The drugs caused injection site lesions and antibiotic residues in the neck and thigh that varied by technique, dose, and site. PMID:12001341

  3. A comparison of complex sleep behaviors with two short-acting Z-hypnosedative drugs in nonpsychotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Fen; Lin, Ching-En; Chou, Yu-Ching; Mao, Wei-Chung; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective Complex sleep behaviors (CSBs) are classified as “parasomnias” in the International Classifcation of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition (ICSD-2). To realize the potential danger after taking two short-acting Z-hypnosedative drugs, we estimated the incidence of CSBs in nonpsychotic patients in Taiwan. Methods Subjects (N = 1,220) using zolpidem or zopiclone were enrolled from the psychiatric outpatient clinics of a medical center in Taiwan over a 16-month period in 2006–2007. Subjects with zolpidem (N = 1,132) and subjects with zopiclone (N = 88) were analyzed. All subjects completed a questionnaire that included demographic data and complex sleep behaviors after taking hypnotics. Results Among zolpidem and zopiclone users, 3.28% of patients reported incidents of somnambulism or amnesic sleep-related behavior problems. The incidence of CSBs with zolpidem and zopiclone were 3.27%, and 3.41%, respectively, which was signifcantly lower than other studies in Taiwan. Conclusion These results serve as a reminder for clinicians to make inquiries regarding any unusual performance of parasomnic activities when prescribing zolpidem or zopiclone. PMID:23976857

  4. Rapid Acting Insulin Use and Persistence among Elderly Type 2 Diabetes Patients Adding RAI to Oral Antidiabetes Drug Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Steve; Fan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We examined the real-world utilization and persistence of rapid acting insulin (RAI) in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes who added RAI to their drug (OAD) regimen. Insulin-naïve patients aged ≥65 years, with ≥1 OAD prescription during the baseline period, who were continuously enrolled in the US Humana Medicare Advantage insurance plan for 18 months and initiated RAI were included. Among patients with ≥2 RAI prescriptions (RAIp), persistence during the 12-month follow-up was assessed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified factors affecting RAI use and persistence. Of 3734 patients adding RAI to their OAD regimen, 2334 (62.5%) had a RAIp during follow-up. Factors associated with RAIp included using ≤2 OADs; cognitive impairment, basal insulin use during follow-up; and higher RAI out-of-pocket costs ($36 to <$56 versus $0 to $6.30). Patients were less likely to persist with RAI when on ≤2 OADs versus ≥3 OADs and when having higher RAI out-of-pocket costs ($36 to <$56 versus $0 to $6.30) and more likely to persist when they had cognitive impairment and basal insulin use during follow-up. Real-world persistence of RAI in insulin-naïve elderly patients with type 2 diabetes was very poor when RAI was added to an OAD regimen. PMID:27761472

  5. Comparison of the antitussive effect of remifentanil during recovery from propofol and sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Choi, S-H; Choi, Y-S; Lee, J-H; Kim, N-O; Lee, J-R

    2012-07-01

    This prospective randomised study compared the antitussive effect of remifentanil during recovery from either propofol or sevoflurane anaesthesia. Seventy-four female patients undergoing thyroidectomy were anaesthetised with either propofol and remifentanil or sevoflurane and remifentanil. During recovery, remifentanil was maintained at an effect-site concentration of 2 ng.ml(-1) until extubation and the occurrence of coughing, haemodynamic parameters and recovery profiles were compared between the two groups. During recovery, neither the incidence nor the severity of cough (incidence 20% with propofol; 24% with sevoflurane, p = 0.77), nor the haemodynamic parameters were different between the two groups. Time to awakening and time to extubation were significantly shorter in the propofol group (4.7 min, 6.1 min min, respectively) compared with the sevoflurane group (7.9 min and 8.9 min respectively) (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). An effect-site concentration of 2 ng.ml(-1) of remifentanil was associated with smooth emergence from both propofol and sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  6. The role of trigeminal nasal TRPM8-expressing afferent neurons in the antitussive effects of menthol.

    PubMed

    Plevkova, J; Kollarik, M; Poliacek, I; Brozmanova, M; Surdenikova, L; Tatar, M; Mori, N; Canning, B J

    2013-07-15

    The cold-sensitive cation channel TRPM8 is a target for menthol, which is used routinely as a cough suppressant and as an additive to tobacco and food products. Given that cold temperatures and menthol activate neurons through gating of TRPM8, it is unclear how menthol actively suppresses cough. In this study we describe the antitussive effects of (-)-menthol in conscious and anesthetized guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs, cough evoked by citric acid applied topically to the tracheal mucosa was suppressed by menthol only when it was selectively administered as vapors to the upper airways. Menthol applied topically to the tracheal mucosa prior to and during citric acid application or administered continuously as vapors or as an aerosol to the lower airways was without effect on cough. These actions of upper airway menthol treatment were mimicked by cold air delivered to the upper airways but not by (+)-menthol, the inactive isomer of menthol, or by the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin administered directly to the trachea. Subsequent molecular analyses confirmed the expression of TRPM8 in a subset of nasal trigeminal afferent neurons that do not coincidently express TRPA1 or TRPV1. We conclude that menthol suppresses cough evoked in the lower airways primarily through a reflex initiated from the nose.

  7. The role of trigeminal nasal TRPM8-expressing afferent neurons in the antitussive effects of menthol.

    PubMed

    Plevkova, J; Kollarik, M; Poliacek, I; Brozmanova, M; Surdenikova, L; Tatar, M; Mori, N; Canning, B J

    2013-07-15

    The cold-sensitive cation channel TRPM8 is a target for menthol, which is used routinely as a cough suppressant and as an additive to tobacco and food products. Given that cold temperatures and menthol activate neurons through gating of TRPM8, it is unclear how menthol actively suppresses cough. In this study we describe the antitussive effects of (-)-menthol in conscious and anesthetized guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs, cough evoked by citric acid applied topically to the tracheal mucosa was suppressed by menthol only when it was selectively administered as vapors to the upper airways. Menthol applied topically to the tracheal mucosa prior to and during citric acid application or administered continuously as vapors or as an aerosol to the lower airways was without effect on cough. These actions of upper airway menthol treatment were mimicked by cold air delivered to the upper airways but not by (+)-menthol, the inactive isomer of menthol, or by the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin administered directly to the trachea. Subsequent molecular analyses confirmed the expression of TRPM8 in a subset of nasal trigeminal afferent neurons that do not coincidently express TRPA1 or TRPV1. We conclude that menthol suppresses cough evoked in the lower airways primarily through a reflex initiated from the nose. PMID:23640596

  8. Comparative efficacy of maropitant and selected drugs in preventing emesis induced by centrally or peripherally acting emetogens in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, H S; Ramsey, D S; Boucher, J F; Eagleson, J S; Conder, G A; Clemence, R G

    2008-12-01

    Maropitant (Cerenia; a novel, selective neurokinin(1) receptor antagonist), chlorpromazine, metoclopramide and ondansetron were compared in two randomized, placebo-controlled studies for efficacy in preventing emesis induced by emetogens acting centrally (apomorphine; Study 1) or peripherally (syrup of ipecac; Study 2) in dogs. In each study, ten male and ten female beagles were treated in a five-treatment, five-period crossover design. The five treatments were 0.9% saline (0.1 mL/kg), maropitant (1 mg/kg), metoclopramide (0.5 mg/kg), or chlorpromazine (0.5 mg/kg) all administered subcutaneously, or ondansetron (0.5 mg/kg) administered intravenously. One hour posttreatment dogs were challenged with apomorphine at 0.1 mg/kg intravenously (Study 1) or syrup of ipecac at 0.5 mL/kg orally (Study 2). Following emetogen challenge, dogs were observed for 30 min (Study 1) or 1 h (Study 2) for emesis. No clinical signs, other than those related to emesis, were observed. Efficacy of maropitant in preventing emesis induced centrally by apomorphine was not different (P > 0.05) from metoclopramide or chlorpromazine but was superior (P < 0.0001) to ondansetron. Efficacy of maropitant in preventing emesis induced by syrup of ipecac was not different (P > 0.05) from ondansetron but was superior (P drugs examined prevented vomiting caused by central (metoclopramide and chlorpromazine; P < 0.0001) or peripheral (ondansetron; P < 0.0001) stimulation but not both.

  9. Similar in vitro drug release as a surrogate of therapeutic equivalence of locally acting gastrointestinal products--what is the right in vitro method?

    PubMed

    Klein, S

    2015-08-01

    There is--apart from clinical trials--an ongoing discussion on how to demonstrate therapeutic equivalence for locally applied and locally acting products in the gastrointestinal tract. Possibly, among other alternatives, in vitro drug release models could be considered surrogates of drug release and availability at the site of action. However, to date the conditions in which in vitro models provide valid surrogates of in vivo release and availability at the site of action would have to be defined. To demonstrate the potential applicability of in vitro test methods for screening therapeutic equivalence of locally applied and locally acting gastrointestinal products and also to get an idea of which would be the right dosage form for an individual patient a series of in vitro studies was performed comparing a variety of in vitro release methods ranging from pharmacopoeial methods to "patient-specific" release methods in examining drug release of four mesalazine tablet formulations intended for local drug delivery in the gastrointestinal tract. Results from this study indicated that pharmacopoeial quality control methods are hardly applicable to predict the therapeutic equivalence of such products. Moreover, comparison of the results obtained with the different in vitro methods reveal that a prediction of the therapeutic equivalence for locally acting products in the gastrointestinal tract is unlikely based on release profiles obtained in a single drug release experiment. However, results from the study also indicated that a set of individualized biorelevant in vitro test scenarios might be very useful for both demonstrating therapeutic equivalence and selecting the appropriate drug product for a particular patient.

  10. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  11. Metabolism and excretion studies of oral administered naringin, a putative antitussive, in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Menghua; Zou, Wei; Yang, Cuiping; Peng, Wei; Su, Weiwei

    2012-04-01

    Naringin, a major active flavonone glycoside from a traditional Chinese medicine Huajuhong, has been demonstrated to have activities such as peripheral antitussive, mucoregulator and anti-inflammatory. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the metabolism and mass balance of orally administered naringin in rats and dogs. After oral administration of naringin to rats and dogs at doses of 42 mg/kg and 12.4 mg/kg, respectively, metabolites in excreta were identified using a LC-Q-TOF system. The major metabolites including naringin, total naringenin (including free naringenin and its conjugates) and 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid in excreta were quantified by a LC-MS/MS system. Twenty-two metabolites were identified in dogs and 17 metabolites were detected in rats. The observed routes of naringin metabolism were hydroxylation, methylation, acetylation, hydrogenation, deglycosylation, dehydrogenation, glucuronidation, sulfation, glucosylation, ring-fission, oxidation, glycine conjugation and dehydroxylation. On the basis of these identified metabolites, a comprehensive metabolic pathway of naringin was proposed. About 21% of administered naringin was recovered in rat excreta in the form of naringin, total naringenin and 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and about 60% was recovered in dog excreta. The levels of 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid in excreta were higher than those of naringin and total naringenin, and the quantified metabolites were excreted more through feces, rather than urine. Most of these metabolites were excreted within 36 h post dose. The results of metabolism and excretion studies provide an explanation for future pharmacological and toxicological findings and are the groundwork for clinical studies.

  12. Re-re-treatment of hepatitis C virus: Eight patients who relapsed twice after direct-acting-antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Joshua; Bichoupan, Kian; Patel, Neal; Chekuri, Sweta; Harty, Alyson; Dieterich, Douglas; Perumalswami, Ponni; Branch, Andrea D

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine risk factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment failure after direct acting antivirals in patients with complex treatment histories. METHODS: All HCV mono-infected patients who received treatment at our institution were queried. Analysis was restricted to patients who previously failed treatment with boceprevir (BOC) or telaprevir (TVR) and started simeprevir (SMV) and sofosbuvir (SOF) ± ribavirin (RBV) between December 2013 and June 2014. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV co-infection or patients who received a liver transplant in the past were excluded. Viral loads were recorded while on treatment and after treatment. Data collection continued until December, 31st 2014 when data analysis was initiated. Patients missing virologic outcomes data were not included in the analysis. Analysis of 35 patients who had virologic outcome data available resulted in eight patients who were viral load negative at the end of treatment with SMF/SOF but later relapsed. Data related to patient demographics, HCV infection, and treatment history was collected in order to identify risk factors shared among patients who failed treatment with SMF/SOF. RESULTS: Eight patients who were treated with the first generation HCV protease inhibitors BOC or TVR in combination with pegylated-interferon (PEG) and RBV who failed this triple therapy were subsequently re-treated with an off-label all-oral regimen of SMV and SOF for 12 wk, with RBV in seven cases. Treatment was initiated before the Food and Drug Administration approved a 24-wk SMV/SOF regimen for patients with liver cirrhosis. All eight patients had an end of treatment response, but later relapsed. Eight (100%) patients were male. Mean age was 56 (range, 49-64). Eight (100%) patients had previously failed PEG/RBV dual therapy at least once in addition to prior failure with triple therapy. Total number of times treated ranged from 3-6 (mean 3.8). Eight (100%) patients were male had

  13. Final notice regarding section 602 of the Veterans Health Care Act of 1992 duplicate discounts and rebates on drug purchases--HRSA. Final notice.

    PubMed

    1993-06-23

    Section 602 of Public Law 102-585, the "Veterans Health Care Act of 1992," enacted section 340B of the Public Health Service Act, "Limitation on Prices of Drugs Purchased by Covered Entities." Section 340B provides discounts on covered outpatient drugs to eligible entities. Section 340B(a)(5)(A) provides that a drug purchase shall not be subject to both a discount under section 340B and a Medicaid rebate under section 1927 of the Social Security Act. The Department is directed to establish a mechanism to assure that covered entities comply with this prohibition. The purpose of this notice is to announce the final mechanism to prevent duplicate discounts and rebates. The proposed mechanism was announced in the Federal Register at 58 FR 27293 on May 7, 1993. A comment period of 30 days was established to allow public comment on the proposed mechanism. Two comments were received. Both comments concerned issues involving implementation of the mechanism and did not raise substantive issues concerning the mechanism itself; therefore, we will address both comments in the Effective Date section. The mechanism, in its final form, is adopted as proposed.

  14. Antitussive activity of Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax extracts and improvement in lung function via adjustment of multi-cytokine levels.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wensheng; Lin, Siding; Dai, Qiwen; Zhang, Hongcheng; Hu, Juan

    2011-04-19

    Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax is one of the most widespread herbal and healthcare products in China. Extensive clinical use has shown that it has functions which "strengthens qi and generates saliva, moistens the lung and relieves cough". The ethyl acetate fraction extracted from the roots of the plant Pseudostellaria heterophylla exhibited a dose-dependent antitussive effect between 100 to 500 mg/kg. At a dose of 400 mg/kg, the ethyl acetate fraction treatment markedly prolonged the cough latent period and reduced the number of coughs in a guinea pig model induced by citric acid. Fall lung airway resistance, rise in dynamic lung compliance, decreased serum levels of IL-8, GM-CSF, TNF-α, and ET-1 in rat model of stable phase chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by cigarette smoke exposure were also observed. These results suggest that ethyl acetate fraction has antitussive activity related to its improvement in lung function via attenuation of airway inflammation by adjustment of multi-cytokine levels.

  15. Antitussive activity of Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax extracts and improvement in lung function via adjustment of multi-cytokine levels.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wensheng; Lin, Siding; Dai, Qiwen; Zhang, Hongcheng; Hu, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax is one of the most widespread herbal and healthcare products in China. Extensive clinical use has shown that it has functions which "strengthens qi and generates saliva, moistens the lung and relieves cough". The ethyl acetate fraction extracted from the roots of the plant Pseudostellaria heterophylla exhibited a dose-dependent antitussive effect between 100 to 500 mg/kg. At a dose of 400 mg/kg, the ethyl acetate fraction treatment markedly prolonged the cough latent period and reduced the number of coughs in a guinea pig model induced by citric acid. Fall lung airway resistance, rise in dynamic lung compliance, decreased serum levels of IL-8, GM-CSF, TNF-α, and ET-1 in rat model of stable phase chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by cigarette smoke exposure were also observed. These results suggest that ethyl acetate fraction has antitussive activity related to its improvement in lung function via attenuation of airway inflammation by adjustment of multi-cytokine levels. PMID:21512444

  16. 76 FR 64354 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...'' that appeared in the Federal Register of August 1, 2011 (76 FR 45818). In that document, FDA announced.... Background In the Federal Register of August 1, 2011 (76 FR 45818), FDA published a notice with a 78-day... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food...

  17. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  18. Drug-Drug Interaction between the Direct-Acting Antiviral Regimen of Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir plus Dasabuvir and the HIV Antiretroviral Agent Dolutegravir or Abacavir plus Lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Trinh, Roger; Zhao, Weihan; Podsadecki, Thomas; Menon, Rajeev

    2016-10-01

    The direct-acting antiviral regimen of 25 mg ombitasvir-150 mg paritaprevir-100 mg ritonavir once daily (QD) plus 250 mg dasabuvir twice daily (BID) is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection, including patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. This study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, safety, and tolerability effects of coadministering the regimen of 3 direct-acting antivirals with two antiretroviral therapies (dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine). Healthy volunteers (n = 24) enrolled in this phase I, single-center, open-label, multiple-dose study received 50 mg dolutegravir QD for 7 days or 300 mg abacavir plus 300 mg lamivudine QD for 4 days, the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen for 14 days, followed by the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen with dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine for 10 days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated to compare combination therapy with 3-direct-acting-antiviral or antiretroviral therapy alone, and safety/tolerability were assessed throughout the study. Coadministration of the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen increased the geometric mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) of dolutegravir by 22% (central value ratio [90% confidence intervals], 1.219 [1.153, 1.288]) and 38% (1.380 [1.295, 1.469]), respectively. Abacavir geometric mean Cmax and AUC values decreased by 13% (0.873 [0.777, 0.979]) and 6% (0.943 [0.901, 0.986]), while those for lamivudine decreased by 22% (0.778 [0.719, 0.842]) and 12% (0.876 [0.821, 0.934]). For the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen, geometric mean Cmax and AUC during coadministration were within 18% of measurements made during administration of the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen alone, although trough concentrations for paritaprevir were 34% (0.664 [0.585, 0.754]) and 27% (0.729 [0.627, 0.847]) lower with dolutegravir and abacavir-lamivudine, respectively. All study treatments were generally

  19. Vascular action as the primary mechanism of cognitive effects of cholinergic, CNS-acting drugs, a rat phMRI BOLD study

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Pál; Gyertyán, István; Éles, János; Laszy, Judit; Hegedűs, Nikolett; Gajári, Dávid; Deli, Levente; Pozsgay, Zsófia; Dávid, Szabolcs; Tihanyi, Károly

    2014-01-01

    Concordant results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioral tests prove that some non-blood–brain barrier-penetrating drugs produce robust central nervous system (CNS) effects. The anticholinergic scopolamine interferes with learning when tested in rats, which coincides with a negative blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) change in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as demonstrated by fMRI. The peripherally acting butylscopolamine also evokes a learning deficit in a water-labyrinth test and provokes a negative BOLD signal in the PFC. Donepezil—a highly CNS-penetrating cholinesterase inhibitor—prevents the negative BOLD and cognitive deficits regardless whether the provoking agent is scopolamine or butylscopolamine. Interestingly, the non-BBB-penetrating cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine also prevents or substantially inhibits those cognitive and fMRI changes. Intact cerebral blood flow and optimal metabolism are crucial for the normal functioning of neurons and other cells in the brain. Drugs that are not BBB penetrating yet act on the CNS highlight the importance of unimpaired circulation, and point to the cerebral vasculature as a primary target for drug action in diseases where impaired circulation and consequently suboptimal energy metabolism are followed by upstream pathologic events. PMID:24643080

  20. Distribution of blood derivatives by registered blood establishments that qualify as health care entities; Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; delay of applicability date. Final rule; delay of applicability date.

    PubMed

    2006-11-13

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2008, the applicability date of a certain requirement of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720) (the final rule). The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The provisions of the final rule became effective on December 4, 2000, except for certain provisions whose effective or applicability dates were delayed in five subsequent Federal Register notices, until December 1, 2006. The provision with the delayed applicability date would prohibit wholesale distribution of blood derivatives by registered blood establishments that meet the definition of a "health care entity." In the Federal Register of February 1, 2006 (71 FR 5200), FDA published a proposed rule specific to the distribution of blood derivatives by registered blood establishments that qualify as health care entities (the proposed rule). The proposed rule would amend certain limited provisions of the final rule to allow certain registered blood establishments that qualify as health care entities to distribute blood derivatives. In response to the proposed rule, FDA received substantive comments. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document, further delaying the applicability of Sec. 203.3(q) (21 CFR 203.3(q)) to the wholesale distribution of blood derivatives by health care entities is necessary to give the agency additional time to address comments on the proposed rule, consider whether regulatory changes are appropriate, and, if so, to initiate such changes.

  1. Competency to be resentenced and the Rockefeller Drug Law reform act: how does it affect the mentally Ill?

    PubMed

    Ford, Elizabeth; Winkler, Barry; Barber-Rioja, Virginia; Dell'anno, Christina; Cohen, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    Many of the mentally ill prisoners in this country have been convicted of drug crimes. New York State's Rockefeller Drug Laws from the 1970s established harsh sentences for drug crimes to quell a perceived epidemic. These laws were reformed in 2004 to allow the option of resentencing, with the possibility of lighter sentences. However, there is no formal mechanism in New York for a postconviction hearing for competency to be resentenced, thus affecting the severely mentally ill who were sentenced under the old Rockefeller laws. The purpose of this article is to highlight the psychiatric and legal difficulties that can arise without an option for a resentencing competency hearing and to argue that despite the low number of inmates to whom this would apply, there is an important duty to ensure due process to the mentally ill.

  2. Fabrication of long-acting drug release property of hierarchical porous bioglasses/polylactic acid fibre scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Lin, Huiming; Jiang, Jingjie; Jin, Qumei; Li, Lei; Dong, Yan; Qu, Fengyu

    2015-04-01

    Hierarchical porous fibre scaffolds with mesoporous bioglasses (MBGs) and polylactic acid (PLA) were successfully fabricated by the electrospinning method. These compound scaffolds possess macropores with sizes of about 100 nm because of the solvent evaporation from the fibre and the mesoporous structure ( ∼4.0 nm) originated from MBGs. The biomineralisation ability was investigated in simulated body fluid. The fibre structure is beneficial for inducing the growth of hydroxyapatite. In addition, compared with pure MBGs, the materials (MP-1 and MP-2) exhibit a long-acting drug release process up to 140 h and the drug release process corresponds with the Fickian diffusion mechanism. With the special fibre morphology and the hierarchical porous structure, the MBGs/PLA fibre scaffolds are expected to have potential application for bone tissue repair and regeneration.

  3. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Act as a Drug Shuttle Through the Blood Brain Barrier and Reduce Glioblastoma After Intravenous or Oral Administration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Fiel, Luana A; Shimada, Ana L; Pereira, Natalia R; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra H

    2016-05-01

    Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) are formed by an organogel surrounded by poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and stabilized by polysorbate 80. LNCs increase the concentration of drugs in the brain after oral or intravenous administration. We proposed to determine whether the drug is released from the LNC to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) or the drug-loaded LNCs can cross the BBB to release the drug. We synthesized a Rhodamine B-polymer conjugate to prepare a fluorescent-labeled LNC formulation, and intravital microscopy was used to determine the ability of the LNCs to cross the brain barrier using different administration routes in C57BI/6 mice. A glioblastoma model was used to determine the impact of the LNC as a shuttle for treatment. After pial vessel exposure, intense fluorescence was detected inside the vessels 10 min after intravenous or 20 min after intraperitoneal injections of fluorescent-labeled LNC. The fluorescence was observed in the perivascular tissue after 30 and 60 min, respectively. Increased tissue fluorescence was detected 240 min after oral administration. The integrity of the barrier was determined during the experiments. Normal leukocyte and platelet adhesion to the vessel wall indicated that Rhodamine B-labeled LNC did not cause pial vessel alterations. After intravenous or oral administration, Rhodamine B-labeled LNC-containing co-encapsulated indomethacin and indomethacin ethyl ester exhibited similar behavior in pial vessels, being more efficient in the treatment of mice with glioblastoma than indomethacin in solution. Therefore, we demonstrated that LNCs act as drug shuttles through the BBB, delivering drugs in brain tissue with high efficiency and reducing glioblastoma after intravenous or oral administration.

  4. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Act as a Drug Shuttle Through the Blood Brain Barrier and Reduce Glioblastoma After Intravenous or Oral Administration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Fiel, Luana A; Shimada, Ana L; Pereira, Natalia R; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra H

    2016-05-01

    Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) are formed by an organogel surrounded by poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and stabilized by polysorbate 80. LNCs increase the concentration of drugs in the brain after oral or intravenous administration. We proposed to determine whether the drug is released from the LNC to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) or the drug-loaded LNCs can cross the BBB to release the drug. We synthesized a Rhodamine B-polymer conjugate to prepare a fluorescent-labeled LNC formulation, and intravital microscopy was used to determine the ability of the LNCs to cross the brain barrier using different administration routes in C57BI/6 mice. A glioblastoma model was used to determine the impact of the LNC as a shuttle for treatment. After pial vessel exposure, intense fluorescence was detected inside the vessels 10 min after intravenous or 20 min after intraperitoneal injections of fluorescent-labeled LNC. The fluorescence was observed in the perivascular tissue after 30 and 60 min, respectively. Increased tissue fluorescence was detected 240 min after oral administration. The integrity of the barrier was determined during the experiments. Normal leukocyte and platelet adhesion to the vessel wall indicated that Rhodamine B-labeled LNC did not cause pial vessel alterations. After intravenous or oral administration, Rhodamine B-labeled LNC-containing co-encapsulated indomethacin and indomethacin ethyl ester exhibited similar behavior in pial vessels, being more efficient in the treatment of mice with glioblastoma than indomethacin in solution. Therefore, we demonstrated that LNCs act as drug shuttles through the BBB, delivering drugs in brain tissue with high efficiency and reducing glioblastoma after intravenous or oral administration. PMID:27305820

  5. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  6. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D M; Mellors, John W; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2015-12-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  7. 21 CFR 511.1 - New animal drugs for investigational use exempt from section 512(a) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... discs are intended for use in determining susceptibility of microorganisms to the new animal drug or... organization, a statement containing the name and address of the contract research organization, identification... section when U.S. Department of Agriculture approval has been obtained as provided in 9 CFR...

  8. 21 CFR 511.1 - New animal drugs for investigational use exempt from section 512(a) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CFR 103.2. Conditional authorization may be granted in advance of identification of the name(s) and... discs are intended for use in determining susceptibility of microorganisms to the new animal drug or... organization, identification of the clinical study, and a listing of the obligations transferred. If...

  9. 21 CFR 511.1 - New animal drugs for investigational use exempt from section 512(a) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... discs are intended for use in determining susceptibility of microorganisms to the new animal drug or... organization, a statement containing the name and address of the contract research organization, identification... section when U.S. Department of Agriculture approval has been obtained as provided in 9 CFR...

  10. 21 CFR 511.1 - New animal drugs for investigational use exempt from section 512(a) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR 103.2. Conditional authorization may be granted in advance of identification of the name(s) and... discs are intended for use in determining susceptibility of microorganisms to the new animal drug or... organization, identification of the clinical study, and a listing of the obligations transferred. If...

  11. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  12. Analysis of U.S. Food and Drug Administration food allergen recalls after implementation of the food allergen labeling and consumer protection act.

    PubMed

    Gendel, Steven M; Zhu, Jianmei

    2013-11-01

    To avoid potentially life-threatening reactions, food allergic consumers rely on information on food labels to help them avoid exposure to a food or ingredient that could trigger a reaction. To help consumers in the United States obtain the information that they need, the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 defined a major food allergen as being one of eight foods or food groups and any ingredient that contains protein from one of these foods or food groups. A food that contains an undeclared major food allergen is misbranded under the U.S. Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and is subject to recall. Food allergen labeling problems are the most common cause of recalls for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated food products. To help understand why food allergen recalls continue to occur at a high rate, information on each food allergen recall that occurred in fiscal years 2007 through 2012 was obtained from the FDA recall database. This information was analyzed to identify the food, allergen, root cause, and mode of discovery for each food allergen recall. Bakery products were the most frequently recalled food type, and milk was the most frequently undeclared major food allergen. Use of the wrong package or label was the most frequent problem leading to food allergen recalls. These data are the first reported that indicate the importance of label and package controls as public health measures.

  13. Sulfa and trimethoprim-like drugs - antimetabolites acting as carbonic anhydrase, dihydropteroate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in microbial genomics, synthetic organic chemistry and X-ray crystallography provided opportunities to identify novel antibacterial targets for the development of new classes of antibiotics and to design more potent antimicrobial compounds derived from existing antibiotics in clinical use for decades. The antimetabolites, sulfa drugs and trimethoprim (TMP)-like agents, are inhibitors of three families of enzymes. One family belongs to the carbonic anhydrases, which catalyze a simple but physiologically relevant reaction in all life kingdoms, carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons. The other two enzyme families are involved in the synthesis of tetrahydrofolate (THF), i.e. dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and dihydrofolate reductase. The antibacterial agents belonging to the THF and DHPS inhibitors were developed decades ago and present significant bacterial resistance problems. However, the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance both to sulfa drugs and TMP-like inhibitors were understood in detail only recently, when several X-ray crystal structures of such enzymes in complex with their inhibitors were reported. Here, we revue the state of the art in the field of antibacterials based on inhibitors of these three enzyme families.

  14. Turning low-molecular-weight drugs into prolonged acting prodrugs by reversible pegylation: a study with gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Yonit; Sasson, Keren; Fridkin, Mati; Shechter, Yoram

    2008-07-24

    Pegylation is a powerful technology to prolong the action of proteins in vivo, but it is impractical for low-molecular-weight (LMW) drugs, which are usually inactivated upon such modification. Here, we have applied a recently developed strategy of reversible pegylation to gentamicin, a LMW antibiotic. Variable length polyethyleneglycol (PEG-SH) chains were covalently linked to gentamicin using two heterobifunctional agents, each containing a spontaneously hydrolyzable bond. The inactive derivatives regained full antibacterial potency upon incubation under physiological conditions in vitro, and following systemic administration to rats, they released native active gentamicin with half-lives 7- to 15-fold greater than those of systemically administered nonderivatized gentamicin. In conclusion, reversibly pegylated prodrug derivatives of gentamicin were found to be capable of releasing gentamicin for prolonged periods in vivo. Most importantly, the major drawback of conventional pegylation, namely, the loss of pharmacological potency following irreversible derivatization, has been overcome.

  15. Disorder in Milk Proteins: α-Lactalbumin. Part B. A Multifunctional Whey Protein Acting as an Oligomeric Molten Globular "Oil Container" in the Anti-Tumorigenic Drugs, Liprotides.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Serge E; Breydo, Leonid; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Almehdar, Hussein A; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2016-07-15

    This is a second part of the three-part article from a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. We continue to describe α-lactalbumin, a small globular Ca2+-binding protein, which besides being one of the two components of lactose synthase that catalyzes the final step of the lactose biosynthesis in the lactating mammary gland, possesses a multitude of other functions. In fact, recent studies indicated that some partially folded forms of this protein possess noticeable bactericidal activity and other forms might be related to induction of the apoptosis of tumor cells. In its anti-tumorigenic function, oligomeric α-lactalbumin serves as a founding member of a new family of anticancer drugs termed liprotides (for lipids and partially denatured proteins), where an oligomeric molten globular protein acts as an "oil container" or cargo for the delivery of oleic acid to the cell membranes.

  16. The success of the citizen suit: protecting consumers from inaccurate food labeling by amending the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    PubMed

    Springer, James

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FDCA"), amended in 1990 by the Nutrition Education and Labeling Act ("NLEA"), established a national framework for the administration and promulgation of uniform food labeling standards. Specifically, the NLEA created affirmative obligations for the food--requiring detailed disclosure of food content and strict adherence to regulations governing the use of health and nutritional claims on food packaging. To accomplish these goals, Congress tasked the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") with the sole responsibility of the enforcement of these new requirements. Under the statutory framework of the FDCA, the United States Supreme Court ("Court") has held that there is no private right of action, of which extended to the enforcement of NLEA standards. This interpretation has left individuals with no federal outlet for relief in the enforcement of federal food labeling standards. Adherence to this interpretation is especially concerning when the FDA currently faces exponential growth in administrative responsibilities while simultaneously experiencing employment reduction, a $206 million "Sequester," and a recent government-wide shutdown. As a result, the American people are left to depend on an Agency that is struggling with drastic resource reduction while being accountable for ever increasing enforcement responsibilities. To ensure consumer protection, this Article argues that Congress should amend the FDCA to include a citizen suit provision in order to provide individuals with a right of private action for the enforcement of NLEA standards. Borrowing from the successes realized under similar citizen suit provisions found in environmental legislation, this Article argues that a citizen suit provision is amendable to the FDCA and would relieve fiscal pressures, strengthen the current enforcement framework of the FDCA, encourage more robust enforcement by the FDA and states, and ensure uniform interpretation of NLEA

  17. The success of the citizen suit: protecting consumers from inaccurate food labeling by amending the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    PubMed

    Springer, James

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FDCA"), amended in 1990 by the Nutrition Education and Labeling Act ("NLEA"), established a national framework for the administration and promulgation of uniform food labeling standards. Specifically, the NLEA created affirmative obligations for the food--requiring detailed disclosure of food content and strict adherence to regulations governing the use of health and nutritional claims on food packaging. To accomplish these goals, Congress tasked the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") with the sole responsibility of the enforcement of these new requirements. Under the statutory framework of the FDCA, the United States Supreme Court ("Court") has held that there is no private right of action, of which extended to the enforcement of NLEA standards. This interpretation has left individuals with no federal outlet for relief in the enforcement of federal food labeling standards. Adherence to this interpretation is especially concerning when the FDA currently faces exponential growth in administrative responsibilities while simultaneously experiencing employment reduction, a $206 million "Sequester," and a recent government-wide shutdown. As a result, the American people are left to depend on an Agency that is struggling with drastic resource reduction while being accountable for ever increasing enforcement responsibilities. To ensure consumer protection, this Article argues that Congress should amend the FDCA to include a citizen suit provision in order to provide individuals with a right of private action for the enforcement of NLEA standards. Borrowing from the successes realized under similar citizen suit provisions found in environmental legislation, this Article argues that a citizen suit provision is amendable to the FDCA and would relieve fiscal pressures, strengthen the current enforcement framework of the FDCA, encourage more robust enforcement by the FDA and states, and ensure uniform interpretation of NLEA

  18. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis.

  19. HCV Drug Resistance Challenges in Japan: The Role of Pre-Existing Variants and Emerging Resistant Strains in Direct Acting Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Sustained virological response (SVR) rates have increased dramatically following the approval of direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. While individual DAAs have a low barrier to resistance, most patients can be successfully treated using DAA combination therapy. However, DAAs are vulnerable to drug resistance, and resistance-associated variants (RAVs) may occur naturally prior to DAA therapy or may emerge following drug exposure. While most RAVs are quickly lost in the absence of DAAs, compensatory mutations may reinforce fitness. However, the presence of RAVs does not necessarily preclude successful treatment. Although developments in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy in Asia have largely paralleled those in the United States, Japan’s July 2014 approval of asunaprevir plus daclatasvir combination therapy as the first all-oral interferon-free therapy was not repeated in the United States. Instead, two different combination therapies were approved: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir. This divergence in treatment approaches may lead to differences in resistance challenges faced by Japan and the US. However, the recent approval of sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir in Japan and the recent submissions of petitions for approval of paritaprevir/ritonavir plus ombitasvir suggest a trend towards a new consensus on emerging DAA regimens. PMID:26473914

  20. HCV Drug Resistance Challenges in Japan: The Role of Pre-Existing Variants and Emerging Resistant Strains in Direct Acting Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C Nelson

    2015-10-01

    Sustained virological response (SVR) rates have increased dramatically following the approval of direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. While individual DAAs have a low barrier to resistance, most patients can be successfully treated using DAA combination therapy. However, DAAs are vulnerable to drug resistance, and resistance-associated variants (RAVs) may occur naturally prior to DAA therapy or may emerge following drug exposure. While most RAVs are quickly lost in the absence of DAAs, compensatory mutations may reinforce fitness. However, the presence of RAVs does not necessarily preclude successful treatment. Although developments in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy in Asia have largely paralleled those in the United States, Japan's July 2014 approval of asunaprevir plus daclatasvir combination therapy as the first all-oral interferon-free therapy was not repeated in the United States. Instead, two different combination therapies were approved: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir. This divergence in treatment approaches may lead to differences in resistance challenges faced by Japan and the US. However, the recent approval of sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir in Japan and the recent submissions of petitions for approval of paritaprevir/ritonavir plus ombitasvir suggest a trend towards a new consensus on emerging DAA regimens. PMID:26473914

  1. Interaction of pentobarbital with gabaergic drugs acting on the Cl(-)-ATPase activity of the plasma membranes from bream brain (Abramis brama L.).

    PubMed

    Menzikov, Sergey; Menzikova, Olga

    2002-12-16

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of the interaction of pentobarbital with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic drugs acting on the Cl(-)-adenosine triphosphate (ATP)ase activity of the plasma membranes fraction of bream brain. The preincubation and then incubation of the membranes with pentobarbital as well as with other GABAergic ligands was conducted at physiologic pH (7.4), i.e. at the condition where the Cl(-)-ATPase activity is not detected. Pentobarbital (1-100 microM) induces Cl(-)-ATPase activity, however at high concentration (1,000 microM) no effect of the ligand was found. In addition pentobarbital (50 microM) enhances the effect of low concentration of GABA (1 microM) on the Cl(-)-ATPase activity, but inhibits the action of high concentration of GABA (100 microM) on the enzyme. Whereas no activating effect of pentobarbital in the presence of baclofen (1 microM) was found. The blocker of GABA(A)-receptors, picrotoxin (50 microM) and bicuculline (5 microM) eliminated the action of pentobarbital on the enzyme. The present results provide evidence for the first time that at physiologic pH in incubation medium the interaction of pentobarbital with GABAergic drugs on the Cl(-)-ATPase activity is similar to the effects of these ligands on the GABA(A)-receptor.

  2. In Vivo Evaluation of the Antiasthmatic, Antitussive, and Expectorant Activities and Chemical Components of Three Elaeagnus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yuebin; Zhang, Fei; Qin, Qin; Shang, Yingying; Wan, Dingrong

    2015-01-01

    The leaf of Elaeagnus lanceolata and Elaeagnus henryi as well as Elaeagnus pungens has been documented as an effective herb for the treatment of asthma and chronic bronchitis in traditional clinical medicine. This study was aimed at evaluating the antiasthmatic, antitussive, and expectorant activities of the water extracts from the three plants in vivo and analyzing their chemical components by HPLC-DAD. At the medium and high doses, the water extracts of three Elaeagnus leaves significantly prolonged the preconvulsive time (P < 0.01) in guinea pigs, lengthened the latent period of cough (P < 0.01) and decreased the cough frequency caused by aqueous ammonia in mice (P < 0.01), and enhanced tracheal phenol red output in mice (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the pharmacological actions between the three Elaeagnus leaves. Moreover, there was more similarity on overlap peaks in the range of retention time from 10 to 40 min by HPLC and many peaks that belonged to flavonoids compounds. It suggested that the main constituents of the three Elaeagnus leaves were flavonoid for the pharmacological activities. These effects were the important evidence for the traditional use of E. henryi leaf and E. lanceolata leaf as well as E. pungens to treat asthma and chronic bronchitis. PMID:26576193

  3. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  4. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  5. N-acyl-2-substituted-1,3-thiazolidines, a new class of non-narcotic antitussive agents: studies leading to the discovery of ethyl 2-[(2-methoxyphenoxy)methyl]-beta-oxothiazolidine-3-propanoate.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, C A; Di Domenico, R; Spinelli, S; Gallico, L; Fiocchi, L; Lotto, A; Menta, E; Borghi, A; Dalla Rosa, C; Tognella, S

    1995-02-01

    The synthesis of a novel class of antitussive agents is described. The compounds were examined for antitussive activity in guinea pig after cough induction by electrical or chemical stimulation. Ethyl 2-[(2-methoxyphenoxy)methyl]-beta-oxothiazolidine-3-propanoate (BBR 2173, moguisteine, 7) and other structurally related compounds showed a significant level of activity, comparable to that of codeine and dextromethorphan. The compounds presented in this paper are characterized by the N-acyl-2-substituted-1,3-thiazolidine moiety, which is a novel entry in the field of antitussive agents. The serendipitous discovery of the role played by the thiazolidine moiety in determining the antitussive effect promoted extensive investigations on these structures. This optimization process on N-acyl-2-substituted-1,3-thiazolidines led to the initial identification of 2-[(2-methoxypheoxy)methyl]-3-[2-(acetylthio)acetyl]- 1,3-thiazolidine (18a) as an interesting lead compound. The careful study of the rapid and very complicated metabolism of 18a provided further insights for the design of newer related derivatives. The observation that the metabolic oxidation on the lateral chain's sulfur of 18a to sulfoxide maintained the antitussive properties suggested the introduction of isosteric functional groups with respect to the sulfoxide moiety. Subsequent structural modifications showed that hydrolyzable malonic residues in the 3-position of the thiazolidine ring were able to assure high antitussive activity. This optimization ultimately led to the selection of moguisteine (7) as the most effective and safest representative of the series. Moguisteine is completely devoid of unwanted side effects (such as sedation and addiction), and its activity was demonstrated also in clinical studies.

  6. Deeming Tobacco Products To Be Subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as Amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act; Restrictions on the Sale and Distribution of Tobacco Products and Required Warning Statements for Tobacco Products. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this final rule to deem products meeting the statutory definition of "tobacco product,'' except accessories of the newly deemed tobacco products, to be subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act). The Tobacco Control Act provides FDA authority to regulate cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, smokeless tobacco, and any other tobacco products that the Agency by regulation deems to be subject to the law. With this final rule, FDA is extending the Agency's "tobacco product'' authorities in the FD&C Act to all other categories of products that meet the statutory definition of "tobacco product" in the FD&C Act, except accessories of such newly deemed tobacco products. This final rule also prohibits the sale of "covered tobacco products" to individuals under the age of 18 and requires the display of health warnings on cigarette tobacco, roll-your own tobacco, and covered tobacco product packages and in advertisements. FDA is taking this action to reduce the death and disease from tobacco products. In accordance with the Tobacco Control Act, we consider and intend the extension of our authorities over tobacco products and the various requirements and prohibitions established by this rule to be severable. PMID:27192730

  7. Deeming Tobacco Products To Be Subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as Amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act; Restrictions on the Sale and Distribution of Tobacco Products and Required Warning Statements for Tobacco Products. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this final rule to deem products meeting the statutory definition of "tobacco product,'' except accessories of the newly deemed tobacco products, to be subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act). The Tobacco Control Act provides FDA authority to regulate cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, smokeless tobacco, and any other tobacco products that the Agency by regulation deems to be subject to the law. With this final rule, FDA is extending the Agency's "tobacco product'' authorities in the FD&C Act to all other categories of products that meet the statutory definition of "tobacco product" in the FD&C Act, except accessories of such newly deemed tobacco products. This final rule also prohibits the sale of "covered tobacco products" to individuals under the age of 18 and requires the display of health warnings on cigarette tobacco, roll-your own tobacco, and covered tobacco product packages and in advertisements. FDA is taking this action to reduce the death and disease from tobacco products. In accordance with the Tobacco Control Act, we consider and intend the extension of our authorities over tobacco products and the various requirements and prohibitions established by this rule to be severable.

  8. Directly Acting Triple Drug Anti-HCV Therapy Induces Sustained Virologic Response with a Six Week Regimen: A Proof of Concept Phase 2a Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Anita; Osinusi, Anuoluwapo; Sims, Zayani; Nelson, Amy; Meissner, Eric G.; Barrett, Lisa L.; Bon, Dimitra; Marti, Miriam M; Silk, Rachel; Kotb, Colleen; Gross, Chloe; Jolley, Tim A; Sidharthan, Sreetha; Petersen, Tess; Townsend, Kerry; Egerson, D’Andrea; Kapoor, Rama; Spurlin, Emily; Sneller, Michael; Proschan, Michael; Herrmann, Eva; Kwan, Richard; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Talwani, Rohit; Diaz, Gabbie; Kleiner, David E.; Wood, Brad J.; Chavez, Jose; Abbott, Stephen; Symonds, William T.; Subramanian, G. Mani; Pang, Phillip S.; McHutchison, John; Polis, Michael A.; Fauci, Anthony S; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct acting anti-HCV drugs have demonstrated a high cure rate and favorable tolerability. The development of shorter courses of therapy may improve affordability and adherence. Sofosbuvir and ledipasvir together with ribavirin have yielded high efficacy when administered for 8, but not for 6 weeks. We hypothesized that addition of a third potent directly acting antiviral to sofosbuvir and ledipasvir would allow for shortened durations of therapy. Methods In this single center, open-label cohort, phase 2 atrial, sixty HCV GT-1 treatment naïve patients were sequentially enrolled onto three arms and treated with 12 weeks of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir (an NS5B nucleotide polymerase inhibitor and an NS5A inhibitor, respectively) (n=20); or 6 weeks with sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and GS-9669 (a non-nucleoside NS5B inhibitor) (n=20) or 6 weeks with sofosbuvir, ledipasvir and GS-9451 (an NS3/4A protease inhibitor) (n=20). Patients and investigators were unmasked to treatment assignment. The primary efficacy analysis was SVR12 (HCV RNA less than the level of quantitation 12 weeks after treatment completion). Findings All subjects treated with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir for 12 weeks achieved SVR12 (95%CI: 83–100%). Nineteen of 20 patients (95% CI: 75–100%) treated with sofosbuvir, ledipasvir and GS-9669 achieved SVR12, with 1 patient relapsing 2 weeks after completion of therapy. Nineteen of 20 patients (95% CI: 75–100%) treated with sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and GS-9451 for 6 weeks achieved SVR12, one patient was lost to follow up after achieving SVR4. There were no discontinuations of treatment due to adverse events. Interpretation In this small proof of concept study, two different three drug regimens administered for 6 weeks resulted in high cure rates for HCV infection with excellent tolerability. Funding NIAID, National Cancer Institute and Clinical Center Intramural Program. Clinical Trials.gov number NCT01805882. The study was also supported in part by

  9. Genetic Diversity and Selective Pressure in Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes 1-6: Significance for Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Lize; Li, Guangdi; Libin, Pieter; Piampongsant, Supinya; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Theys, Kristof

    2015-09-01

    Treatment with pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals, targeting different viral proteins, is the best option for clearing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in chronically infected patients. However, the diversity of the HCV genome is a major obstacle for the development of antiviral drugs, vaccines, and genotyping assays. In this large-scale analysis, genome-wide diversity and selective pressure was mapped, focusing on positions important for treatment, drug resistance, and resistance testing. A dataset of 1415 full-genome sequences, including genotypes 1-6 from the Los Alamos database, was analyzed. In 44% of all full-genome positions, the consensus amino acid was different for at least one genotype. Focusing on positions sharing the same consensus amino acid in all genotypes revealed that only 15% was defined as pan-genotypic highly conserved (≥99% amino acid identity) and an additional 24% as pan-genotypic conserved (≥95%). Despite its large genetic diversity, across all genotypes, codon positions were rarely identified to be positively selected (0.23%-0.46%) and predominantly found to be under negative selective pressure, suggesting mainly neutral evolution. For NS3, NS5A, and NS5B, respectively, 40% (6/15), 33% (3/9), and 14% (2/14) of the resistance-related positions harbored as consensus the amino acid variant related to resistance, potentially impeding treatment. For example, the NS3 variant 80K, conferring resistance to simeprevir used for treatment of HCV1 infected patients, was present in 39.3% of the HCV1a strains and 0.25% of HCV1b strains. Both NS5A variants 28M and 30S, known to be associated with resistance to the pan-genotypic drug daclatasvir, were found in a significant proportion of HCV4 strains (10.7%). NS5B variant 556G, known to confer resistance to non-nucleoside inhibitor dasabuvir, was observed in 8.4% of the HCV1b strains. Given the large HCV genetic diversity, sequencing efforts for resistance testing purposes may need to be

  10. Evolution of the National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act (NASPER): a public law for balancing treatment of pain and drug abuse and diversion.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Whitfield, Ed; Pallone, Frank

    2005-10-01

    In the United States, physicians are faced with two opposing dilemmas in the treatment of pain - the potential for drug abuse and diversion, and the possible undertreatment of pain. While controlled prescription drugs such as narcotic analgesics, anxiolytics, antidepressants, stimulants, and sedative-hypnotics, play a legitimate role in managing chronic pain and other conditions, the illicit use of prescribed medicines is increasing at epidemic proportions. Diversion and abuse of prescription drugs is costly in terms of addiction, overdose, death, and related criminal activities, but chronic pain carries significant economic, social, and health impact as well. The American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), as the introducing organization, was joined by several physician and nurse practitioner organizations in support of the National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting (NASPER) Act of 2005, legislation that not only will give physicians an information tool to aid in prescribing controlled substances but also will help identify illicit use and abuse. NASPER is the law that provides for the establishment of a controlled substances monitoring program in each state. The concept for NASPER originated with ASIPP and was modeled after the highly successful Kentucky All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Program (KASPER). Legislation was introduced in the United States House of Representatives during three different Congresses, the 107th, 108th, and 109th, by Reps. Edward Whitfield (R-KY) and Frank Pallone (D-NJ). It was first introduced in the United States Senate in the 107th Congress by Sen. Tim Hutchinson (R-AK), and in the 108th and 109th by Sens. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) and Dick Durbin (D-IL), with multiple cosponsors in both chambers. NASPER passed the House on July 27, 2005, by voice vote and passed the Senate by unanimous consent on July 29, 2005. President George W. Bush signed NASPER on August 11, 2005, and it became Public Law

  11. Genetic Diversity and Selective Pressure in Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes 1–6: Significance for Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Lize; Li, Guangdi; Libin, Pieter; Piampongsant, Supinya; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Theys, Kristof

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals, targeting different viral proteins, is the best option for clearing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in chronically infected patients. However, the diversity of the HCV genome is a major obstacle for the development of antiviral drugs, vaccines, and genotyping assays. In this large-scale analysis, genome-wide diversity and selective pressure was mapped, focusing on positions important for treatment, drug resistance, and resistance testing. A dataset of 1415 full-genome sequences, including genotypes 1–6 from the Los Alamos database, was analyzed. In 44% of all full-genome positions, the consensus amino acid was different for at least one genotype. Focusing on positions sharing the same consensus amino acid in all genotypes revealed that only 15% was defined as pan-genotypic highly conserved (≥99% amino acid identity) and an additional 24% as pan-genotypic conserved (≥95%). Despite its large genetic diversity, across all genotypes, codon positions were rarely identified to be positively selected (0.23%–0.46%) and predominantly found to be under negative selective pressure, suggesting mainly neutral evolution. For NS3, NS5A, and NS5B, respectively, 40% (6/15), 33% (3/9), and 14% (2/14) of the resistance-related positions harbored as consensus the amino acid variant related to resistance, potentially impeding treatment. For example, the NS3 variant 80K, conferring resistance to simeprevir used for treatment of HCV1 infected patients, was present in 39.3% of the HCV1a strains and 0.25% of HCV1b strains. Both NS5A variants 28M and 30S, known to be associated with resistance to the pan-genotypic drug daclatasvir, were found in a significant proportion of HCV4 strains (10.7%). NS5B variant 556G, known to confer resistance to non-nucleoside inhibitor dasabuvir, was observed in 8.4% of the HCV1b strains. Given the large HCV genetic diversity, sequencing efforts for resistance testing purposes may need to be

  12. Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Select Education and Civil Rights of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives. One Hundred Third Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1993

    This document presents prepared statements and witness testimonies from the first in a series of Congressional hearings regarding the reauthorization of the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1986. The testimonies examine the progress made toward achieving the sixth of the national education goals which states, "By the year 2000 every school…

  13. Uncovering pharmacological mechanisms of Wu-tou decoction acting on rheumatoid arthritis through systems approaches: drug-target prediction, network analysis and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Chunfang; Guo, Qiuyan; Sun, Yanqun; Wang, Danhua; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Yini; Lin, Na; Li, Shao

    2015-03-30

    Wu-tou decoction (WTD) has been extensively used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Due to lack of appropriate methods, pharmacological mechanisms of WTD acting on RA have not been fully elucidated. In this study, a list of putative targets for compositive compounds containing in WTD were predicted by drugCIPHER-CS. Then, the interaction network of the putative targets of WTD and known RA-related targets was constructed and hub nodes were identified. After constructing the interaction network of hubs, four topological features of each hub, including degree, node betweenness, closeness and k-coreness, were calculated and 79 major hubs were identified as candidate targets of WTD, which were implicated into the imbalance of the nervous, endocrine and immune (NEI) systems, leading to the main pathological changes during the RA progression. Further experimental validation also demonstrated the preventive effects of WTD on inflammation and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats and its regulatory effects on candidate targets both in vitro and in vivo systems. In conclusion, we performed an integrative analysis to offer the convincing evidence that WTD may attenuate RA partially by restoring the balance of NEI system and subsequently reversing the pathological events during RA progression.

  14. Drug Supply Chain Security Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Bennet, Michael F. [D-CO

    2013-05-15

    05/15/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3204, which became Public Law 113-54 on 11/27/2013. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Microtubule-acting drugs lead to the nonpolarized delivery of the influenza hemagglutinin to the cell surface of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rindler, M J; Ivanov, I E; Sabatini, D D

    1987-02-01

    The synchronized directed transfer of the envelope glycoproteins of the influenza and vesicular stomatitis viruses from the Golgi apparatus to the apical and basolateral surfaces, respectively, of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells can be achieved using temperature-sensitive mutant viruses and appropriate temperature shift protocols (Rindler, M. J., I. E. Ivanov, H. Plesken, and D. D. Sabatini, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:136-151). The microtubule-depolymerizing agents colchicine and nocodazole, as well as the microtubule assembly-promoting drug taxol, were found to interfere with the normal polarized delivery and exclusive segregation of hemagglutinin (HA) to the apical surface but not with the delivery and initial accumulation of G on the basolateral surface. Immunofluorescence analysis of permeabilized monolayers of influenza-infected MDCK cells treated with the microtubule-acting drugs demonstrated the presence of substantial amounts of HA protein on both the apical and basolateral surfaces. Moreover, in cells infected with the wild-type influenza virus, particles budded from both surfaces. Viral counts in electron micrographs showed that approximately 40% of the released viral particles accumulated in the intercellular spaces or were trapped between the cell and monolayer and the collagen support as compared to less than 1% on the basolateral surface of untreated infected cells. The effect of the microtubule inhibitors was not a result of a rapid redistribution of glycoprotein molecules initially delivered to the apical surface since a redistribution was not observed when the inhibitors were added to the cells after the HA was permitted to reach the apical surface at the permissive temperature and the synthesis of new HA was inhibited with cycloheximide. The altered segregation of the HA protein that occurs may result from the dispersal of the Golgi apparatus induced by the inhibitors or from the disruption of putative microtubules containing tracks

  16. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders.

  17. Clinically significant drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ament, P W; Bertolino, J G; Liszewski, J L

    2000-03-15

    A large number of drugs are introduced every year, and new interactions between medications are increasingly reported. Consequently, it is no longer practical for physicians to rely on memory alone to avoid potential drug interactions. Multiple drug regimens carry the risk of adverse interactions. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. Regularly updated manuals of drug interactions and CD-ROM-formatted programs are useful office references. PMID:10750880

  18. [On the Differential Diagnosis of Intractable Psychogenic Chronic Cough: Neuropathic Larynx Irritable - Gabapentin's Antitussive Action].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Ossowski, A; Schubert, M; Gall, H; Steinkamp, I; Richter, L E; Khalil-Boutros, Y; Nefedev, A; Kuhlmann, R

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 76 year old female inpatient who suffered from a chronic intractable cough which arose simultaneously to a severe major depression and was secondary to an exorbitant psychological distress. Chronic cough had never been experienced before and was initially considered to have a mere psychogenic origin since a comprehensive and guideline-based diagnostic screening did not reveal any underlying somatic cause. However, several factors cast doubt on the solitary psychic genesis of the chronic cough: i) occurrence immediately after a penetrant cold, ii) embedding in other complaints of laryngeal hyperreagibility (larynx irritable), such as persistent globus pharyngeus sensation, throat clearing and episodic dysphonia, iii) first occurrence on old life, iv) erupting from sleep as well, v) persistence despite remission of the major depression, and v) no sustaining benefit from specific psychotherapy and speech therapy. Therefore, diagnostics were extended to apparative tools for objective evaluation of swallowing by using fiberoptic videoendoscopic (FEES) and videofluoroscopic (VFS) techniques, which revealed signs of laryngeal neuropathy but without evidence of penetration or aspiration. A co-existing small goiter and an impaired glucose tolerance along with a putative intracellular vitamin B12 or folate deficiency (as indirectly derived from an apparent hyperhomocysteinemia) were assumed to be responsible for the neuropathy and underwent specific treatments. The impaired glucose tolerance and putative vitamin deficit were compatible with a distal symmetric sensorimotoric, even subclinical polyneuropathy of the lower extremities. The larynx irritable improved under gabapentin being confirmed by drug removals several times, and finally calmed down almost completely under gabapentin, which was in line with the scant literature of this topic. Re-examination of the larynx per FEES nine months later showed no deficits any more under the well

  19. Central mechanisms II: pharmacology of brainstem pathways.

    PubMed

    Bolser, D C

    2009-01-01

    Following systemic administration, centrally acting antitussive drugs are generally assumed to act in the brainstem to inhibit cough. However, recent work in humans has raised the possibility of suprapontine sites of action for cough suppressants. For drugs that may act in the brainstem, the specific locations, types of neurones affected, and receptor specificities of the compounds represent important issues regarding their cough-suppressant actions. Two medullary areas that have received the most attention regarding the actions of antitussive drugs are the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) and the caudal ventrolateral respiratory column. Studies that have implicated these two medullary areas have employed both microinjection and in vitro recording methods to control the location of action of the antitussive drugs. Other brainstem regions contain neurones that participate in the production of cough and could represent potential sites of action of antitussive drugs. These regions include the raphe nuclei, pontine nuclei, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. Specific receptor subtypes have been associated with the suppression of cough at central sites, including 5-HT1A, opioid (mu, kappa, and delta), GABA-B, tachykinin neurokinin-1 (NK-1) and neurokinin-2, non-opioid (NOP-1), cannabinoid, dopaminergic, and sigma receptors. Aside from tachykinin NK-1 receptors in the NTS, relatively little is known regarding the receptor specificity of putative antitussive drugs in particular brainstem regions. Our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antitussive drugs would be significantly advanced by further work in this area. PMID:18825342

  20. Tumour-associated macrophages act as a slow-release reservoir of nano-therapeutic Pt(IV) pro-drug

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Gadde, Suresh; Pfirschke, Christina; Zope, Harshal; Engblom, Camilla; Kohler, Rainer H.; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Yang, Katherine S.; Askevold, Bjorn; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pittet, Mikael; Lippard, Stephen J.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic nanoparticles (TNPs) aim to deliver drugs more safely and effectively to cancers, yet clinical results have been unpredictable owing to limited in vivo understanding. Here we use single-cell imaging of intratumoral TNP pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to better comprehend their heterogeneous behaviour. Model TNPs comprising a fluorescent platinum(IV) pro-drug and a clinically tested polymer platform (PLGA-b-PEG) promote long drug circulation and alter accumulation by directing cellular uptake toward tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs). Simultaneous imaging of TNP vehicle, its drug payload and single-cell DNA damage response reveals that TAMs serve as a local drug depot that accumulates significant vehicle from which DNA-damaging Pt payload gradually releases to neighbouring tumour cells. Correspondingly, TAM depletion reduces intratumoral TNP accumulation and efficacy. Thus, nanotherapeutics co-opt TAMs for drug delivery, which has implications for TNP design and for selecting patients into trials. PMID:26503691

  1. 21 CFR 1230.2 - Scope of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of the act. 1230.2 Section 1230.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS... CAUSTIC POISON ACT General Provisions § 1230.2 Scope of the act. The provisions of the act apply to...

  2. 21 CFR 1210.2 - Scope of act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of act. 1210.2 Section 1210.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER... MILK ACT General Provisions § 1210.2 Scope of act. The provisions of the act apply to all milk...

  3. Dual-acting, function-responsive, and high drug payload nanospheres for combining simplicity and efficacy in both self-targeted multi-drug co-delivery and synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Liu, Guihua; Ma, Jinyuan; Xie, Liya; Guo, Fuqiang; Zhu, Xuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2016-10-15

    Recently, the global trend in the field of nanomedicine has been toward the design of highly sophisticated drug delivery systems with specific targeting and synergistic therapeutic functions for improving therapeutic efficacy. But offering sophistication generally increases their complexity that might be disadvantageous in pharmaceutical development. We hypothesize that using a macromolecular prodrug with a dual role will be conductive to integrating its dual function into self-targeted multidrug co-delivery and combination cancer therapy. In this paper, the on-off switching function-responsive, macromolecular methotrexate (MTX) prodrug-self-targeted, controlled-/sustained-release, and high drug-loading hydroxylcamptothecin (HCPT) drug nanospheres were prepared and characterized. The self-targeting system can co-deliver multi-drug to different action sites with distinct anticancer mechanisms to specifically target folate receptors-overexpressing cancer cells with synergistic therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27566011

  4. From Bench-Top to Bedside: A Prospective In Vitro Antibiotic Combination Testing (iACT) Service to Guide the Selection of Rationally Optimized Antimicrobial Combinations against Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR) Gram Negative Bacteria (GNB)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tze-Peng; Teo, Jocelyn Qi-Min; Lee, Winnie; Kurup, Asok; Koh, Tse-Hsien; Tan, Thuan-Tong; Kwa, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Combination therapy is increasingly utilized against extensively-drug resistant (XDR) Gram negative bacteria (GNB). However, choosing a combination can be problematic as effective combinations are often strain-specific. An in vitro antibiotic combination testing (iACT) service, aimed to guide the selection of individualized and rationally optimized combination regimens within 48 hours, was developed. We described the role and feasibility of the iACT service in guiding individualized antibiotic combination selection in patients with XDR-GNB infections. Methods A retrospective case review was performed in two Singapore hospitals from April 2009–June 2014. All patients with XDR-GNB and antibiotic regimen guided by iACT for clinical management were included. The feasibility and role of the prospective iACT service was evaluated. The following patient outcomes were described: (i) 30-day in-hospital all-cause and infection-related mortality, (ii) clinical response, and (iii) microbiological eradication in patients with bloodstream infections. Results From 2009–2014, the iACT service was requested by Infectious Disease physicians for 39 cases (20 P. aeruginosa, 13 A. baumannii and 6 K. pneumoniae). Bloodstream infection was the predominant infection (36%), followed by pneumonia (31%). All iACT recommendations were provided within 48h from request for the service. Prior to iACT-guided therapy, most cases were prescribed combination antibiotics empirically (90%). Changes in the empiric antibiotic regimens were recommended in 21 (54%) cases; in 14 (36%) cases, changes were recommended as the empiric regimens were found to be non-bactericidal in vitro. In 7 (18%) cases, the number of antibiotics used in combination empirically was reduced by the iACT service. Overall, low 30-day infection-related mortality (15%) and high clinical response (82%) were observed. Microbiological eradication was observed in 79% of all bloodstream infections. Conclusions The iACT

  5. 21 CFR 341.70 - Labeling of OTC drug products containing ingredients that are used for treating concurrent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .../cough suppressant” or “antihistamine/antitussive (cough suppressant).” The indications shall be combined... “antitussive (cough suppressant)/oral anesthetic.” The indications shall be combined from § 341.74(b) and...

  6. 21 CFR 341.70 - Labeling of OTC drug products containing ingredients that are used for treating concurrent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .../cough suppressant” or “antihistamine/antitussive (cough suppressant).” The indications shall be combined... “antitussive (cough suppressant)/oral anesthetic.” The indications shall be combined from § 341.74(b) and...

  7. 21 CFR 341.70 - Labeling of OTC drug products containing ingredients that are used for treating concurrent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .../cough suppressant” or “antihistamine/antitussive (cough suppressant).” The indications shall be combined... “antitussive (cough suppressant)/oral anesthetic.” The indications shall be combined from § 341.74(b) and...

  8. Understanding the Tobacco Control Act: efforts by the US Food and Drug Administration to make tobacco-related morbidity and mortality part of the USA's past, not its future.

    PubMed

    Husten, Corinne G; Deyton, Lawrence R

    2013-05-01

    The USA has a rich history of public health efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality from tobacco use. Comprehensive tobacco-prevention programmes, when robustly implemented, reduce the prevalence of youth and adult smoking, decrease cigarette consumption, accelerate declines in tobacco-related deaths, and diminish health-care costs from tobacco-related diseases. Effective public health interventions include raising the price of tobacco products, smoke-free policies, counter-marketing campaigns, advertising restrictions, augmenting access to treatment for tobacco use through insurance coverage and telephone help lines, and comprehensive approaches to prevent children and adolescents from accessing tobacco products. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has six major areas of regulatory authority: regulation of tobacco products; regulation of the advertising, marketing, and promotion of tobacco products; regulation of the distribution and sales of tobacco products; enforcement of the provisions of the Tobacco Control Act and tobacco regulations; regulatory science to support FDA authorities and activities; and public education about the harms of tobacco products and to support FDA regulatory actions. With passing of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act) in June, 2009, important new regulatory approaches were added to the tobacco prevention and control arsenal. PMID:23642698

  9. ACT: Acting Out Central Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kise, Joan Duff

    1982-01-01

    The author describes ACT (Acting Out Central Theme), a method for dealing with psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains in slow readers. The ACT approach involves three sessions which focus on discussion of a theme such as friendship, presentaton of the theme as a skit, and assignment of topics to individual students. (SW)

  10. Present, old and future strategies for anti-HCV treatment in patients infected by genotype-1: estimation of the drug costs in the Calabria Region in the era of the directly acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Italy, anti-HCV drugs are provided free of charge by the National Health System. Since 2011, three drug regimens including a directly acting antiviral (DAA) are considered the gold standard for HCV treatment. However, these drugs add a significant cost (roughly €26,000) to the combination of pegylated-interferon-α/ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV), which before DAA represented the unique treatment. To provide the National Health System potential useful information, we estimated costs to provide anti-HCV drugs to treat a population experienced for PEG-INF/RBV. Methods Genotype 1 HCV mono-infected or HIV/HCV co-infected individuals who were treated with PEG-IFN/RBV between 2008 and 2013 were included. The cost to treat these patients with PEG-IFN/RBV was calculated (cost 1). We also estimated costs if we had to treat these patients with a lead-in period of PEG-INF/RBV followed by PEG-IFN/RBV and a DAA in naïves (cost 2), in addition to cost 1 plus the estimated cost to re-treat with PEG-IFN/RBV and a DAA patients who had a relapse or a non response (cost 3). Moreover, all costs were normalized by SVR. Rates of foreseen response with DAA were obtained from literature data. Results The overall study population consisted of 104 patients. The rate of sustained virological response (SVR) was 55%, while it was estimated that SVR would be obtained in 75% of patients with a lead-in period with PEG-IFN/RBV followed by a DAA combination, and in 78% if this treatment is used to re-treat experienced patients with a DAA. Drug costs associated with these treatments were: €1,214,283 for cost 1, €3,474,977 for cost 2 and €3,002,095 for cost 3. Costs per SVR achieved were: €22,284 for cost 1, €44,643 for cost 2 and €38,322 for cost 3. Conclusions Treatments including DAAs achieve a SVR in more patients than PEG-IFN/RBV but they cost around three times more than PEG-IFN/RBV alone regimens. Also, cost per SVR is almost twofold greater than PEG-IFN/RBV regimens

  11. Pituitary apoplexy causing spontaneous remission of acromegaly following long-acting octreotide therapy: a rare drug side effect or just a coincidence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-04-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is characterized by abrupt onset of haemorrhage or non-haemorrhagic infarction of a pituitary adenoma. The clinical features include acute onset severe headache, visual field defects, meningeal irritation, ophthalmoplegia and hypopituitarism. The pituitary apoplexy may be clinically silent in ∼25% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly due to pituitary macroadenoma. The patient was started on long-acting octreotide therapy. On 3-month follow-up, the patient showed clinical and biochemical remission and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed subclinical haemorrhage and resolution of tumour. The octreotide therapy was stopped. On 6-month follow-up, the patient was still in remission and the MRI of brain revealed non-enhancing mixed intensities haemorrhagic and cystic areas of the pituitary gland. In our patient, whether spontaneous remission of acromegaly due to subclinical pituitary haemorrhage was coincidental or due to long-acting octreotide therapy is still a dilemma. We report this case because of rarity and clinical importance of this unusual occurrence. PMID:27123308

  12. Pituitary apoplexy causing spontaneous remission of acromegaly following long-acting octreotide therapy: a rare drug side effect or just a coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is characterized by abrupt onset of haemorrhage or non-haemorrhagic infarction of a pituitary adenoma. The clinical features include acute onset severe headache, visual field defects, meningeal irritation, ophthalmoplegia and hypopituitarism. The pituitary apoplexy may be clinically silent in ∼25% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly due to pituitary macroadenoma. The patient was started on long-acting octreotide therapy. On 3-month follow-up, the patient showed clinical and biochemical remission and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed subclinical haemorrhage and resolution of tumour. The octreotide therapy was stopped. On 6-month follow-up, the patient was still in remission and the MRI of brain revealed non-enhancing mixed intensities haemorrhagic and cystic areas of the pituitary gland. In our patient, whether spontaneous remission of acromegaly due to subclinical pituitary haemorrhage was coincidental or due to long-acting octreotide therapy is still a dilemma. We report this case because of rarity and clinical importance of this unusual occurrence. PMID:27123308

  13. Antitussive effect of bakumondoto a fixed kampo medicine (six herbal components) for treatment of post-infectious prolonged cough: controlled clinical pilot study with 19 patients.

    PubMed

    Irifune, Kazunori; Hamada, Hironobu; Ito, Ryoji; Katayama, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kato, Aki; Miyoshi, Seigo; Hamaguchi, Naohiko; Toyozawa, Ryo; Hamaguchi, Sachiko; Abe, Masahiro; Nishimura, Kazutaka; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2011-06-15

    Bakumondoto (TJ-29) is a traditional herbal medicine that has been used in Japan for the treatment of bronchitis, bronchial asthma, and cough. This study investigated the effect of TJ-29 for the treatment of post-infectious prolonged cough. We performed a multicenter randomized controlled trial treating patients without (group A, n=11) or with TJ-29 (group B, n=8) for a total of 2 weeks using a beta 2 stimulant as the basal agent. Efficacy and safety were compared by a cough diary, VAS and sleeping questionnaire. At 4 and 5 days after treatment, the cough score of group B showed significant improvement compared with group A, demonstrating an early antitussive effect. At the assessment 2 weeks after treatment start, both groups showed similar levels of improvement in the cough score. No significant difference was observed in the VAS and the sleeping questionnaire items. In conclusion, oral TJ-29 administration could be useful and safe for the treatment of post-infectious prolonged cough.

  14. Juggling Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudalevige, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Two education bills from George W. Bush's first term are long overdue for reauthorization. One, of course, is the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), passed in late 2001. The other is the Education Sciences Reform Act (ESRA), which in November 2002 replaced the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) with a new Institute of Education…

  15. Section 506 of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003--limitation on charges for services furnished by Medicare participating inpatient hospitals to individuals eligible for care purchased by Indian health programs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-01

    The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) hereby issues this final rule establishing regulations required by section 506 of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA), (Pub. L. 108-173). Section 506 of the MMA amended section 1866 (a)(1) of the Social Security Act to add subparagraph (U) which requires hospitals that furnish inpatient hospital services payable under Medicare to participate in the contract health services program (CHS) of the Indian Health Service (IHS) operated by the IHS, Tribes, and Tribal organizations, and to participate in programs operated by urban Indian organizations that are funded by IHS (collectively referred to as I/T/Us) for any medical care purchased by those programs. Section 506 also requires such participation to be in accordance with the admission practices, payment methodology, and payment rates set forth in regulations established by the Secretary, including acceptance of no more than such payment rates as payment in full. PMID:17577967

  16. Design of novel sheet-shaped chitosan hydrogel for wound healing: a hybrid biomaterial consisting of both PEG-grafted chitosan and crosslinkable polymeric micelles acting as drug containers.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoki; Yoshida, Chikara; Murakami, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we successfully prepared a novel "sheet-shaped" chitosan hydrogel for wound healing consisting of both PEG-g-chitosan and a crosslinkable polymeric micelle. The study's findings clarify that the PEG modification percentage (PMP) of PEG-g-chitosan increased proportionally as the weight ratio of PEG/chitosan increased. Furthermore, the positive second virial coefficient of PEG-g-chitosans from a Debye plot strongly suggests that the PEG modification greatly improved the solubility of the water-insoluble chitosan. Finally, the "sheet-shaped" "flexible" hydrogel formed by mixing solutions containing either PEG-g-chitosan with moderate PMP or polymeric micelles exhibited the highest storage modulus. The sheet itself exhibited an attractive feature insofar as polymeric micelles, which can act as drug containers facilitating the incorporation and the gradual release of drugs, are covalently immobilized in the polymeric network of the hydrogel. The results obtained in the present study show that the hybrid PEG-g-chitosan hydrogel containing crosslinkable polymeric micelles has the potential to address the need for novel functional biomaterials. PMID:23910266

  17. Metabolomic signatures of drug response phenotypes for ketamine and esketamine in subjects with refractory major depressive disorder: new mechanistic insights for rapid acting antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Rotroff, D M; Corum, D G; Motsinger-Reif, A; Fiehn, O; Bottrel, N; Drevets, W C; Singh, J; Salvadore, G; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, at sub-anesthetic doses, is reported to rapidly decrease depression symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Many patients do not respond to currently available antidepressants, (for example, serotonin reuptake inhibitors), making ketamine and its enantiomer, esketamine, potentially attractive options for treatment-resistant MDD. Although mechanisms by which ketamine/esketamine may produce antidepressant effects have been hypothesized on the basis of preclinical data, the neurobiological correlates of the rapid therapeutic response observed in patients receiving treatment have not been established. Here we use a pharmacometabolomics approach to map global metabolic effects of these compounds in treatment-refractory MDD patients upon 2 h from infusion with ketamine (n=33) or its S-enantiomer, esketamine (n=20). The effects of esketamine on metabolism were retested in the same subjects following a second exposure administered 4 days later. Two complementary metabolomics platforms were used to provide broad biochemical coverage. In addition, we investigated whether changes in particular metabolites correlated with treatment outcome. Both drugs altered metabolites related to tryptophan metabolism (for example, indole-3-acetate and methionine) and/or the urea cycle (for example, citrulline, arginine and ornithine) at 2 h post infusion (q<0.25). In addition, we observed changes in glutamate and circulating phospholipids that were significantly associated with decreases in depression severity. These data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine and esketamine, and constitute some of the first detailed metabolomics mapping for these promising therapies. PMID:27648916

  18. The Potential Impact of a Hepatitis C Vaccine for People Who Inject Drugs: Is a Vaccine Needed in the Age of Direct-Acting Antivirals?

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Martin, Natasha K.; Hickman, Matthew; Hellard, Margaret; Scott, Nick; McBryde, Emma; Drummer, Heidi; Vickerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims The advent of highly effective hepatitis C (HCV) treatments has questioned the need for a vaccine to control HCV amongst people who inject drugs (PWID). However, high treatment costs and ongoing reinfection risk suggest it could still play a role. We compared the impact of HCV vaccination amongst PWID against providing HCV treatment. Methods Dynamic HCV vaccination and treatment models among PWID were used to determine the vaccination and treatment rates required to reduce chronic HCV prevalence or incidence in the UK over 20 or 40 years. Projections considered a low (50% protection for 5 years), moderate (70% protection for 10 years) or high (90% protection for 20 years) efficacy vaccine. Sensitivities to various parameters were examined. Results To halve chronic HCV prevalence over 40 years, the low, moderate and high efficacy vaccines required annual vaccination rates (coverage after 20 years) of 162 (72%), 77 (56%) and 44 (38%) per 1000 PWID, respectively. These vaccination rates were 16, 7.6 and 4.4 times greater than corresponding treatment rates. To halve prevalence over 20 years nearly doubled these vaccination rates (moderate and high efficacy vaccines only) and the vaccination-to-treatment ratio increased by 20%. For all scenarios considered, required annual vaccination rates and vaccination-to-treatment ratios were at least a third lower to reduce incidence than prevalence. Baseline HCV prevalence had little effect on the vaccine’s impact on prevalence or incidence, but substantially affected the vaccination-to-treatment ratios. Behavioural risk heterogeneity only had an effect if we assumed no transitions between high and low risk states and vaccinations were targeted or if PWID were high risk for their first year. Conclusions Achievable coverage levels of a low efficacy prophylactic HCV vaccine could greatly reduce HCV transmission amongst PWID. Current high treatment costs ensure vaccination could still be an important

  19. Metabolomic signatures of drug response phenotypes for ketamine and esketamine in subjects with refractory major depressive disorder: new mechanistic insights for rapid acting antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Rotroff, D M; Corum, D G; Motsinger-Reif, A; Fiehn, O; Bottrel, N; Drevets, W C; Singh, J; Salvadore, G; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, at sub-anesthetic doses, is reported to rapidly decrease depression symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Many patients do not respond to currently available antidepressants, (for example, serotonin reuptake inhibitors), making ketamine and its enantiomer, esketamine, potentially attractive options for treatment-resistant MDD. Although mechanisms by which ketamine/esketamine may produce antidepressant effects have been hypothesized on the basis of preclinical data, the neurobiological correlates of the rapid therapeutic response observed in patients receiving treatment have not been established. Here we use a pharmacometabolomics approach to map global metabolic effects of these compounds in treatment-refractory MDD patients upon 2 h from infusion with ketamine (n=33) or its S-enantiomer, esketamine (n=20). The effects of esketamine on metabolism were retested in the same subjects following a second exposure administered 4 days later. Two complementary metabolomics platforms were used to provide broad biochemical coverage. In addition, we investigated whether changes in particular metabolites correlated with treatment outcome. Both drugs altered metabolites related to tryptophan metabolism (for example, indole-3-acetate and methionine) and/or the urea cycle (for example, citrulline, arginine and ornithine) at 2 h post infusion (q<0.25). In addition, we observed changes in glutamate and circulating phospholipids that were significantly associated with decreases in depression severity. These data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine and esketamine, and constitute some of the first detailed metabolomics mapping for these promising therapies. PMID:27648916

  20. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  1. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  2. The common antitussive agent dextromethorphan protects against hyperoxia-induced cell death in established in vivo and in vitro models of neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Posod, A; Pinzer, K; Urbanek, M; Wegleiter, K; Keller, M; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, U; Griesmaier, E

    2014-08-22

    Preterm infants are prematurely subjected to relatively high oxygen concentrations, even when supplemental oxygen is not administered. There is increasing evidence to show that an excess of oxygen is toxic to the developing brain. Dextromethorphan (DM), a frequently used antitussive agent with pleiotropic mechanisms of action, has been shown to be neuroprotective in various models of central nervous system pathology. Due to its numerous beneficial properties, it might also be able to counteract detrimental effects of a neonatal oxygen insult. The aim of the current study was to evaluate its therapeutic potential in established cell culture and rodent models of hyperoxia-induced neonatal brain injury. For in vitro studies pre- and immature oligodendroglial (OLN-93) cells were subjected to hyperoxic conditions for 48 h after pre-treatment with increasing doses of DM. For in vivo studies 6-day-old Wistar rat pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of DM in two different dosages prior to being exposed to hyperoxia for 24h. Cell viability and caspase-3 activation were assessed as outcome parameters at the end of exposure. DM significantly increased cell viability in immature oligodendroglial cells subjected to hyperoxia. In pre-oligodendroglial cells cell viability was not significantly affected by DM treatment. In vivo caspase-3 activation induced by hyperoxic exposure was significantly lower after administration of DM in gray and white matter areas. In control animals kept under normoxic conditions DM did not significantly influence caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. The present results indicate that DM is a promising and safe treatment strategy for neonatal hyperoxia-induced brain injury that merits further investigation.

  3. Review: Effect of drugs on human cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent extract of red peppers, has been used in clinical research for almost three decades. Capsaicin has gained favor as the provocative agent of choice to measure cough reflex sensitivity, as it induces cough in a safe, reproducible, and dose-dependent manner. One of the major uses of capsaicin cough challenge testing has been to evaluate the effect of a pharmacological intervention on the human cough reflex. The current review summarizes the published experience with capsaicin inhalation challenge in the evaluation of drug effects on cough reflex sensitivity. A notable contrast evident between studies demonstrating a drug effect (inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity) and those that do not, is the predominance of healthy volunteers as subjects in the latter. This observation suggests that subjects with pathological cough, rather than normal volunteers, comprise the optimal group in which to evaluate the effect of potential antitussive agents on human cough reflex sensitivity. PMID:23146824

  4. Child Labor Act of 1990. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Labor and Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session on S. 2548 To Amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 To Increase Penalities for Employers Who Violate the Child Labor Provisions of Such Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    On May 8, 1990, testimony concerning the Child Labor Act of 1990 was heard at a joint hearing of two U.S. Senate subcommittees. Opening statements by Senators Metzenbaum and Jeffords concerned: (1) the increase in child labor law violations since 1983; (2) the lack of increase in penalty fines since that time; (3) child death and injury during…

  5. The relationship between dose-dependent antitussive and bronchodilatory effects of Opilia celtidifolia polysaccharide and nitric oxide in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sutovská, M; Franová, S; Sadlonová, V; Grønhaug, T E; Diallo, D; Paulsen, B S; Capek, P

    2010-11-01

    A crude polysaccharide composed of uronic acids (32%), arabinose (26%), glucose (15%), galactose (11%), rhamnose (7%), mannose (5%), xylose (4%) and small amount of fucose residues has been isolated from the leaves of Opilia celtidifolia by boiled water extraction. Chemical analyses of Opilia polysaccharide revealed the prevalence of a pectin material with high arabinose and galacturonic acid contents. Opilia polysaccharide showed significant biological effects on chemically induced cough reflex and reactivity of airways smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo conditions in guinea pigs test system. Tests confirmed the dose-dependent cough-suppressive effect of Opilia polysaccharide comparable with activity of centrally acting codeine. Further, the bronchodilatory tests resulted in significant decrease in the values of specific airway resistance, which is very sensitive predictor of airway smooth muscle reactivity in vivo conditions regardless of bronchoconstricting mechanism. The results of in vitro experiments confirmed not only the bronchodilatory effect Opilia polysaccharide but revealed that its bronchodilatory mechanism is partially accompanied with enhanced NO production.

  6. Physician Dispensing of Drugs. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on H.R. 2093, a Bill To Amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act To Limit the Dispensing of Certain Drugs by Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    The text of a Congressional hearing considering limitations on the dispensing of drugs by physicians for profit is presented in this document. It focuses in particular on H.R. 2093, a bill introduced by Representative Ron Wyden which would generally prohibit physicians and other practitioners from directly profiting from the sale of drugs which…

  7. Unmuzzle the Drug Czar Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Cohen, Steve [D-TN-9

    2014-02-11

    03/20/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Dangerous Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2016

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Dent, Charles W. [R-PA-15

    2015-09-17

    09/27/2016 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Dent, Charles W. [R-PA-15

    2011-03-30

    12/08/2011 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Prescription Drug Labeling Promotion Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Markey, Edward J. [D-MA-7

    2012-02-24

    02/24/2012 Referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3187, which became Public Law 112-144 on 7/9/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Major Drug Trafficking Prosecution Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Waters, Maxine [D-CA-43

    2013-09-12

    10/15/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Dangerous Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2016

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Katko, John [R-NY-24

    2016-09-06

    09/15/2016 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Transnational Drug Trafficking Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Marino, Tom [R-PA-10

    2013-05-22

    06/14/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Medicare Prescription Drug Integrity Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Pallone, Frank, Jr. [D-NJ-6

    2013-08-01

    09/13/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Counterfeit Drug Penalty Enhancement Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Meehan, Patrick [R-PA-7

    2011-12-14

    06/19/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance is not final...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act'' to the Division of...

  17. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  18. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  19. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  20. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  1. Federal Strategy for Drug Abuse and Drug Traffic Prevention 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strategy Council on Drug Abuse, Washington, DC.

    The Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972 directed the development and promulgation of a comprehensive, coordinated long-term Federal strategy for all drug abuse prevention and drug traffic control functions conducted, sponsored, or supported by the Federal Government. This second annual report of the Strategy Council builds on the…

  2. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  3. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  4. 76 FR 20686 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Labeling Changes; Implementation of the Federal Food, Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...; Implementation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) added new provisions to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C...

  5. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Pediatric Uses of Medical Devices Under Section 515A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' FDA is... information required under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). This draft guidance is...

  6. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  7. 77 FR 45629 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act of 2008 (AGDUFA), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for...

  8. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  9. Erosive and cariogenicity potential of pediatric drugs: study of physicochemical parameters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric medications may possess a high erosive potential to dental tissues due to the existence of acid components in their formulations. The purpose was to determine the erosive and cariogenic potential of pediatric oral liquid medications through the analysis of their physicochemical properties in vitro. Methods A total of 59 substances were selected from the drug reference list of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), which belong to 11 therapeutic classes, as follows: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, corticosteroids, antihistamines, antitussives, bronchodilators, antibacterials, antiparasitics, antiemetics, anticonvulsants and antipsychotics. Measurement of pH was performed by potentiometry, using a digital pH meter. For the Total Titratable Acidity (TTA) chemical assay, a 0.1 N NaOH standard solution was used, which was titrated until drug pH was neutralized. The Total Soluble Solids Contents (TSSC) quantification was carried out by refractometry using Brix scale and the analysis of Total Sugar Content was performed according to Fehling’s method. In addition, it was analyzed the information contained in the drug inserts with regard to the presence of sucrose and type of acid and sweetener added to the formulations. Results All drug classes showed acidic pH, and the lowest mean was found for antipsychotics (2.61 ± 0.08). There was a large variation in the TTA (0.1% - 1.18%) and SST (10.44% - 57.08%) values. High total sugar contents were identified in the antitussives (53.25%) and anticonvulsants (51.75%). As described in the drug inserts, sucrose was added in 47.5% of the formulations, as well as citric acid (39.0%), sodium saccharin (36.4%) and sorbitol (34.8%). Conclusion The drugs analyzed herein showed physicochemical characteristics indicative of a cariogenic and erosive potential on dental tissues. Competent bodies’ strategies should be implemented in order to broaden the knowledge of health professionals

  10. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  11. 77 FR 15960 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Pergolide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Pergolide... (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original new animal drug... 21 CFR Part 520 Animal drugs. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and...

  12. 21 CFR 316.36 - Insufficient quantities of orphan drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insufficient quantities of orphan drugs. 316.36... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.36 Insufficient quantities of orphan drugs. (a) Under section 527 of the act, whenever the Director has reason to believe...

  13. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  14. 21 CFR 310.519 - Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC) daytime sedatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs...) is regarded as a new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for which an approved new drug application under section 505 of the act and part 314 of...

  15. Drug companies, UNAIDS make drugs available.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) initiative is working with several drug companies and four countries on a pilot program to build a health infrastructure that provides affordable drugs to insure that combination therapies are used appropriately. The countries involved in the program are Uganda, Chile, Vietnam and Cote d'Ivoire, and the drug companies are Glaxo Wellcome, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Virco NV. Each country agreed to form national HIV/AIDS drug advisory boards, and non-profit companies will act as clearinghouses. Financing will come from the pharmaceutical companies, local health ministries, and a $1 million grant from UNAIDS. The program will be evaluated in terms of improvements to overall health care delivery, number of people treated, the impact on emergency care, and the rate of illness and death.

  16. 77 FR 21808 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Drug Enforcement Administration, United States Department... Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the United States Department of Justice (``DOJ'' or ``Department'') Drug... System'' (``IRFS''). IRFS was last published in its entirety in the Federal Register at 61 FR 54219,...

  17. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  18. 78 FR 18373 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. ] The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes the collection of information concerning... of the President, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Research & Data Analysis, Washington,...

  19. 75 FR 160 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes the collection of information concerning...

  20. 78 FR 56737 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task.... Accordingly, the Executive Office for OCDETF is renaming this system as the ``Organized Crime Drug Enforcement.../OCDETF-001 SYSTEM NAME: Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces Management Information...

  1. Does Drug Testing Deter Drug Court Participants from Using Drugs or Alcohol?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinpeter, Christine B.; Brocato, Jo; Koob, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates 3 drug-testing strategies implemented in 5 different jurisdictions with drug courts in Orange County, California. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the sweat patch acts as a deterrent and under what conditions it can be used to improve outcomes. Results indicated that although the use of the sweat patch did not…

  2. Parental Leave: Estimated Cost of Revised Parental and Medical Leave Act Proposal. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs, and Alcoholism, Committee on Labor and Human Resources, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Provided is a revised estimate of the cost of The Parental and Medical Leave Act of 1987 that takes into account possible revisions in employee eligibility, and the duration of allowable leave. As revised, the proposal would cover employees in firms with 50 or more workers who have been with the firm at least a year and have worked 1,000 or more…

  3. Debating the Controlled Substances Act.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Joseph F

    2004-10-01

    In the United States, the basis of modern drug regulation is the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) of 1970. The CSA laid out the authority of the federal government and provided a framework within which all existing and new substances could be regulated on their abuse potential, safety, and medical utility. The debates over the CSA centered on several critical issues: where to place the authority to make scheduling designations, the impact of scheduling on drug research, and defining what constituted drug "abuse" for purposes of scheduling. Passage of the CSA was aided by broad language that provided a kind of "big tent" which could accommodate diverse points of view. A retrospective assessment of the CSA shows it to have greatly expanded federal administrative authority over the nation's drug supply, much as its authors intended. Other impacts of the CSA, however, are much less certain. This article concludes by highlighting the issues and questions that should guide future retrospective research on the efficacy of drug control regimes. PMID:15380285

  4. Extractions of oil from Descurainia sophia seed using supercritical CO2, chemical compositions by GC-MS and evaluation of the anti-tussive, expectorant and anti-asthmatic activities.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian-Hong; Zhang, Yan-Li; He, Jin-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Ke; Feng, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Lan; Kuang, Hai-Xue; Li, Chun-Ge; Cao, Yan-Gang

    2015-07-22

    Descurainia sophia is widely distributed in China and is one of the most troublesome annual weeds. It has diverse medicinal usage. D. sophia has abundant oil, making it an important oil plant in China. The main goal of this study was to obtain the maximum yield of the oil by an optimal selection of supercritical fluid extraction parameters. According to the central composite design and response surface methodology for supercritical fluid extraction method, a quadratic polynomial model was used to predict the yield of D. sophia seed oil. A series of runs was performed to assess the optimal extraction conditions. The results indicated that the extraction pressure had the greatest impact on oil yield within the range of the operating conditions studied. A total of approximately 67 compounds were separated in D. sophia seed oil by GC-MS, of which 51 compounds represented 98.21% of the total oils, for the first time. This study was also aimed at evaluating the anti-asthmatic, anti-tussive and expectorant activities in vivo of D. sophia seed oil which supplied for further research on bioactive constituents and pharmacological mechanisms.

  5. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), procedural information on how to fulfill section 522... INFORMATION: I. Background Postmarket surveillance under section 522 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 306l) is one... Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 amended section 522 of the FD&C ] Act to expand...

  6. Interoception and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stewart, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The role of interoception and its neural basis with relevance to drug addiction is reviewed. Interoception consists of the receiving, processing, and integrating body-relevant signals with external stimuli to affect ongoing motivated behavior. The insular cortex is the central nervous system hub to process and integrate these signals. Interoception is an important component of several addiction relevant constructs including arousal, attention, stress, reward, and conditioning. Imaging studies with drug-addicted individuals show that the insular cortex is hypo-active during cognitive control processes but hyperactive during cue reactivity and drug-specific, reward-related processes. It is proposed that interoception contributes to drug addiction by incorporating an “embodied” experience of drug uses together with the individual’s predicted versus actual internal state to modulate approach or avoidance behavior, i.e. whether to take or not to take drugs. This opens the possibility of two types of interventions. First, one may be able to modulate the embodied experience by enhancing insula reactivity where necessary, e.g. when engaging in drug seeking behavior, or attenuating insula when exposed to drug-relevant cues. Second, one may be able to reduce the urge to act by increasing the frontal control network, i.e. inhibiting the urge to use by employing cognitive training. PMID:23855999

  7. 21 CFR 201.100 - Prescription drugs for human use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prescription drugs for human use. 201.100 Section 201.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... for human use. A drug subject to the requirements of section 503(b)(1) of the act shall be exempt...

  8. 76 FR 76738 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration... Drug User Fee Act (GDUFA), which will authorize FDA to collect fees and use them for the process...

  9. 75 FR 45636 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by...

  10. 76 FR 45814 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... right-hand corner of your completed Animal Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet. Also write the FDA post... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended...

  11. 78 FR 46958 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2013, which was signed by the President on June...

  12. Parent Drug Education: A Participatory Action Research Study into Effective Communication about Drugs between Parents and Unrelated Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Parent drug education is considered a key aspect of drug prevention. Effective communication acts as protective factor for drug misuse in young people. This study is a Participatory Action Research study of "Drugsbridge", a drug education programme that has an emphasis on facilitating intergenerational communication about drugs between parents and…

  13. Cough management: a practical approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms for which patients seek medical attention from primary care physicians and pulmonologists. Cough is an important defensive reflex that enhances the clearance of secretions and particles from the airways and protects the lower airways from the aspiration of foreign materials. Therapeutic suppression of cough may be either disease-specific or symptom related. The potential benefits of an early treatment of cough could include the prevention of the vicious cycle of cough. There has been a long tradition in acute cough, which is frequently due to upper respiratory tract infections, to use symptom-related anti-tussives. Suppression of cough (during chronic cough) may be achieved by disease-specific therapies, but in many patients it is often necessary to use symptomatic anti-tussives, too. According to the current guidelines of the American College of Chest Physician on "Cough Suppressants and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy" and additional clinical trials on the most frequent anti-tussive drugs, it should be possible to diagnose and treat cough successfully in a majority of cases. Among drugs used for the symptomatic treatment of cough, peripherally acting anti-tussives such as levodropropizine and moguisteine show the highest level of benefit and should be recommended especially in children. By improving our understanding of the specific effects of these anti-tussive agents, the therapeutic use of these drugs may be refined. The present review provides a summary of the most clinically relevant anti-tussive drugs in addition to their potential mechanism of action. PMID:21985340

  14. Cough management: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Francesco; Virchow, Johann C; Polverino, Mario; Zanasi, Alessandro; Behrakis, Panagiotis K; Kilinç, Gunsely; Balsamo, Rossella; De Danieli, Gianluca; Lanata, Luigi

    2011-10-10

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms for which patients seek medical attention from primary care physicians and pulmonologists. Cough is an important defensive reflex that enhances the clearance of secretions and particles from the airways and protects the lower airways from the aspiration of foreign materials. Therapeutic suppression of cough may be either disease-specific or symptom related. The potential benefits of an early treatment of cough could include the prevention of the vicious cycle of cough. There has been a long tradition in acute cough, which is frequently due to upper respiratory tract infections, to use symptom-related anti-tussives. Suppression of cough (during chronic cough) may be achieved by disease-specific therapies, but in many patients it is often necessary to use symptomatic anti-tussives, too. According to the current guidelines of the American College of Chest Physician on "Cough Suppressants and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy" and additional clinical trials on the most frequent anti-tussive drugs, it should be possible to diagnose and treat cough successfully in a majority of cases. Among drugs used for the symptomatic treatment of cough, peripherally acting anti-tussives such as levodropropizine and moguisteine show the highest level of benefit and should be recommended especially in children. By improving our understanding of the specific effects of these anti-tussive agents, the therapeutic use of these drugs may be refined. The present review provides a summary of the most clinically relevant anti-tussive drugs in addition to their potential mechanism of action.

  15. Cough management: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Francesco; Virchow, Johann C; Polverino, Mario; Zanasi, Alessandro; Behrakis, Panagiotis K; Kilinç, Gunsely; Balsamo, Rossella; De Danieli, Gianluca; Lanata, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms for which patients seek medical attention from primary care physicians and pulmonologists. Cough is an important defensive reflex that enhances the clearance of secretions and particles from the airways and protects the lower airways from the aspiration of foreign materials. Therapeutic suppression of cough may be either disease-specific or symptom related. The potential benefits of an early treatment of cough could include the prevention of the vicious cycle of cough. There has been a long tradition in acute cough, which is frequently due to upper respiratory tract infections, to use symptom-related anti-tussives. Suppression of cough (during chronic cough) may be achieved by disease-specific therapies, but in many patients it is often necessary to use symptomatic anti-tussives, too. According to the current guidelines of the American College of Chest Physician on "Cough Suppressants and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy" and additional clinical trials on the most frequent anti-tussive drugs, it should be possible to diagnose and treat cough successfully in a majority of cases. Among drugs used for the symptomatic treatment of cough, peripherally acting anti-tussives such as levodropropizine and moguisteine show the highest level of benefit and should be recommended especially in children. By improving our understanding of the specific effects of these anti-tussive agents, the therapeutic use of these drugs may be refined. The present review provides a summary of the most clinically relevant anti-tussive drugs in addition to their potential mechanism of action. PMID:21985340

  16. 21 CFR 310.543 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.543 Drug products... new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act... the use of investigational new drugs set forth in part 312 of this chapter. (d) After May 7, 1991,...

  17. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  18. Drug-facilitated sexual assault ('date rape').

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Milteer, R; LeBeau, M A

    2000-06-01

    In the past few years, drug-facilitated sexual assaults have received widespread media coverage. In addition to alcohol, the most frequently used date-rape drug, flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), a fast-acting benzodiazepine, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its congeners are among the most popular drugs used for this purpose. The latter drug is easily procured at some gymnasiums, popular bars, discos, and rave clubs, as well as over the Internet. Perpetrators choose these drugs because they act rapidly, produce disinhibition and relaxation of voluntary muscles, and cause the victim to have lasting anterograde amnesia for events that occur under the influence of the drug. Alcoholic beverages potentiate the drug effects. We review several date-rape drugs, provide information on laboratory testing for them, and offer guidelines for preventing drug-facilitated sexual assault. PMID:10881768

  19. Child Labor Amendments of 1991. Joint Hearing on S.600 To Amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 To Improve Enforcement of the Child Labor Provisions of Such Act, and for Other Purposes, before the Subcommittee on Labor and Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    A joint hearing was held to consider S. 600, a U.S. Senate bill designed to help educate the public about federal child labor laws and strengthen enforcement of child labor laws through an amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. Senator Howard M. Metzenbaum presided. The hearings were called because of sporadic enforcement of inadequate…

  20. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia.

  1. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Programs for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    In a national poll conducted in 1988, 83 percent of the American people felt that the nation's drug problem was "out of control." In 1988, Congress, responding to the public mandate, passed the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. Title III of the Act specifically addressed these issues by authorizing two anti-drug programs for youth. These two programs…

  2. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 22599), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.''...

  3. The Employee Polygraph Protection Act of 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patrick J.

    1989-01-01

    Aspects of the new Employee Polygraph Protection Act are discussed, including exemptions, prohibited devices, limitations, exceptions, injury and access requirements, reasonable suspicion, drug industry investigations, procedural requirements, disclosure, basis for discharge, enforcement and remedies, and preemption and existing state laws. (MSE)

  4. 77 FR 56914 - Privacy Act of 1974

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... related to drug abuse, alcoholism or alcohol abuse, sickle cell anemia or infection with the human... abuse, sickle cell anemia or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, that information cannot be... Management and Budget (OMB) as required by 5 U.S.C. 552a(r) (Privacy Act) and guidelines issued by OMB (65...

  5. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  6. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  7. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  8. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  9. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  10. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  11. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  12. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  13. The dermatology acting internship.

    PubMed

    Stephens, John B; Raimer, Sharon S; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-07-15

    Acting internships are an important component of modern day medical school curriculum. Several specialties outside of internal medicine now offer acting internship experiences to fourth year medical students. We have found that a dermatology acting internship is a valuable experience for fourth year medical students who are interested in pursuing a residency in dermatology. Our experience with the dermatology acting internship over the 2010-2011 academic year is described.

  14. Forgetting ACT UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    When ACT UP is remembered as the pinnacle of postmodern activism, other forms and forums of activism that were taking place during that time--practices that were linked, related, just modern, in dialogue or even opposition to ACT UP's "confrontational activism"--are forgotten. In its time, ACT UP was embedded in New York City, and a larger world,…

  15. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  16. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  17. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse.

  18. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  19. 49 CFR 40.281 - Who is qualified to act as a SAP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) 49 CFR Part 40 and DOT agency drug and alcohol testing rules; (iii) Key DOT drug testing requirements... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who is qualified to act as a SAP? 40.281 Section... § 40.281 Who is qualified to act as a SAP? To be permitted to act as a SAP in the DOT drug and...

  20. 49 CFR 40.281 - Who is qualified to act as a SAP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) 49 CFR Part 40 and DOT agency drug and alcohol testing rules; (iii) Key DOT drug testing requirements... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is qualified to act as a SAP? 40.281 Section... § 40.281 Who is qualified to act as a SAP? To be permitted to act as a SAP in the DOT drug and...

  1. 49 CFR 40.281 - Who is qualified to act as a SAP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) 49 CFR Part 40 and DOT agency drug and alcohol testing rules; (iii) Key DOT drug testing requirements... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is qualified to act as a SAP? 40.281 Section... § 40.281 Who is qualified to act as a SAP? To be permitted to act as a SAP in the DOT drug and...

  2. Drug Testing. ERIC Digest Series Number EA35 (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauke, Amy; Hadderman, Margaret

    Despite privacy concerns, school administrators are feeling pressure to adopt urgent measures to keep drugs and alcohol from further endangering our youth's well-being and undermining staff performance. This urgency is reinforced by a national anti-drug campaign and Congressional passage of the Drug-Free Workplace Act (1988) and the Drug-Free…

  3. 49 CFR 28.131 - Illegal use of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... current illegal use of drugs and who— (i) Has successfully completed a supervised drug rehabilitation... Rehabilitation Act to an individual on the basis of that individual's current illegal use of drugs, if the... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Illegal use of drugs. 28.131 Section...

  4. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but...

  6. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but...

  7. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but...

  8. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but...

  9. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Morsica, Giulia

    2016-04-01

    Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs) were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV) or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV) was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4%) in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2%) in 1a isolates, p = 0.040). Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1%) G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5%) harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001). Finally, 28 (2.3%) G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs. PMID:27023593

  10. Act II of the Sunshine Act.

    PubMed

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    To coincide with the introduction in the United States of the Sunshine Act, Genevieve Pham-Kanter discusses what we need to look for to fight hidden bias and deliberate or unconscious corruption. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  11. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  12. 78 FR 14669 - Privacy Act of 1974; Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... Part 16 Privacy Act of 1974; Implementation AGENCY: Drug Enforcement Administration, United States Department of Justice. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Justice (DOJ or Department), Drug... notice (SORN) for IRFS at 77 FR 21808, a DEA system of records notice originally published on August...

  13. [Resistance to the antimalarial drugs].

    PubMed

    Venanzi, E; López-Vélez, R

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases around the world with 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths in 2015. In the early twentieth century it was described for the first time the resistance to quinine and, since then, drug resistance to antimalarial drugs has spread up to represent a global challenge in the fight and control of malaria. Understanding the mechanisms, geography and monitoring tools that we can act against resistance to antimalarial drugs is critical to prevent its expansion. PMID:27608319

  14. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  15. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  16. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  17. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  18. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  19. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  20. Drugs as research tools in psychology: experiments with drugs in personality research.

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that psychotropic drugs act to shift a person's behaviour on the three major dimensions of personality in one direction or another, in predictable ways, and that it is possible to create a taxonomy of psychotropic drugs according to these effects. The history of this concept is traced and many examples given to illustrate how drug action and personality theory interact, and how this interaction can be used to gain greater insight into both personality and drug action.

  1. ACT and College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyaert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between ACT scores and success in college? For decades, admissions policies in colleges and universities across the country have required applicants to submit scores from a college entrance exam, most typically the ACT (American College Testing) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). This requirement suggests that high school…

  2. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updating School Board Policies, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Addressed to school board members, this article attempts to summarize requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its implications for school districts. It warns against hasty purchase of private compliance assistance; then provides an overview of each of the Act's five Titles which address employment practices, activities…

  3. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  4. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  5. The Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, commonly called the Clean Water Act (CWA), was adopted on 18 October 1972. Since then it has been amended 18 times, the last amendments were adopted on 4 February 1987. As established, its objective is: to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation`s waters. And has, as an interim goal: water quality which provides for the protection and propagation of fish, shellfish, and wildlife and provides for recreation in and on the water. It should be noted that Congress established as the Act`s ultimate goal: the discharge of pollutants into the navigable waters be eliminated. The Act set out to meet this lofty objective and goal through the development and implementation of controls on the point source discharges and the nonpoint source release of pollutants. The regulation of point and nonpoint sources as well as future requirements are discussed.

  6. Narcotic Drug and Marihuana Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald E.

    As a background paper for the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Drug Education Conference held in November, 1966, this paper focuses first on narcotic control in general, and second, on the reasons for insisting on marijuana control. Brief descriptions are given of the currently existing narcotics acts at federal and state…

  7. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  8. Pharmacosomes: An Emerging Novel Vesicular Drug Delivery System for Poorly Soluble Synthetic and Herbal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the arena of solubility enhancement, several problems are encountered. A novel approach based on lipid drug delivery system has evolved, pharmacosomes. Pharmacosomes are colloidal, nanometric size micelles, vesicles or may be in the form of hexagonal assembly of colloidal drug dispersions attached covalently to the phospholipid. They act as befitting carrier for delivery of drugs quite precisely owing to their unique properties like small size, amphiphilicity, active drug loading, high entrapment efficiency, and stability. They help in controlled release of drug at the site of action as well as in reduction in cost of therapy, drug leakage and toxicity, increased bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs, and restorative effects. There has been advancement in the scope of this delivery system for a number of drugs used for inflammation, heart diseases, cancer, and protein delivery along with a large number of herbal drugs. Hence, pharmacosomes open new challenges and opportunities for improved novel vesicular drug delivery system. PMID:24106615

  9. 21 CFR 1210.27 - Permits waiving clauses 2 and 5, section 2 of the Federal Import Milk Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... raw milk into the United States will contain a waiver of clauses 2 and 5 of section 2 of the Federal... Federal Import Milk Act. 1210.27 Section 1210.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control §...

  10. 21 CFR 1210.27 - Permits waiving clauses 2 and 5, section 2 of the Federal Import Milk Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... raw milk into the United States will contain a waiver of clauses 2 and 5 of section 2 of the Federal... Federal Import Milk Act. 1210.27 Section 1210.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control §...

  11. 21 CFR 1210.27 - Permits waiving clauses 2 and 5, section 2 of the Federal Import Milk Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... raw milk into the United States will contain a waiver of clauses 2 and 5 of section 2 of the Federal... Federal Import Milk Act. 1210.27 Section 1210.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control §...

  12. 21 CFR 1210.27 - Permits waiving clauses 2 and 5, section 2 of the Federal Import Milk Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... raw milk into the United States will contain a waiver of clauses 2 and 5 of section 2 of the Federal... Federal Import Milk Act. 1210.27 Section 1210.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control §...

  13. 21 CFR 1210.27 - Permits waiving clauses 2 and 5, section 2 of the Federal Import Milk Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... raw milk into the United States will contain a waiver of clauses 2 and 5 of section 2 of the Federal... Federal Import Milk Act. 1210.27 Section 1210.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control §...

  14. Clinical pharmacology of analgesic drugs in cattle.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matthew L; Coetzee, Johann F

    2015-03-01

    Providing pain relief in cattle is challenging. In the absence of labeled drugs, the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act regulates the extralabel drug use of analgesics in cattle within the United States. Given the variety of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pain-relieving drugs, evidence needs to drive the development of analgesic protocols for cattle during pain-related events. This article reviews the commonly used analgesics investigated in cattle including local anesthetics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, α2-agonists, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists, and gabapentin. These compounds are examined with respect to evidence of analgesia in cattle during pain states. PMID:25578387

  15. New Support for the Drug Fight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1990-01-01

    The November 1989 amendments to the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1986 earmarked $173 million directed primarily toward school Districts in disadvantaged areas. Attempts by some Congressional representatives and the President to interfere in sensitive local school issues (drug testing and mandated curricula) were dampened by education…

  16. Hazardous Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  17. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  18. Drug models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Stone, James M

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  19. Pharmacogenetics of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanna; Gubbay, Anthony; Branford, Ruth; Sato, Hiroe

    2013-01-01

    Summary points • Individual variability in pain perception and differences in the efficacy of analgesic drugs are complex phenomena and are partly genetically predetermined. • Analgesics act in various ways on the peripheral and central pain pathways and are regarded as one of the most valuable but equally dangerous groups of medications. • While pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, metabolism in particular, have been scrutinised by genotype–phenotype correlation studies, the clinical significance of inherited variants in genes governing pharmacodynamics of analgesics remains largely unexplored (apart from the µ-opioid receptor). • Lack of replication of the findings from one study to another makes meaningful personalised analgesic regime still a distant future. • This narrative review will focus on findings related to pharmacogenetics of commonly used analgesic medications and highlight authors’ views on future clinical implications of pharmacogenetics in the context of pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26516523

  20. Drug models of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  1. 21 CFR 16.24 - Regulatory hearing required by the act or a regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulation. 16.24 Section 16.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....24 Regulatory hearing required by the act or a regulation. (a) A regulatory hearing required by the act or a regulation under § 16.1(b) will be initiated in the same manner as other regulatory...

  2. 21 CFR 16.24 - Regulatory hearing required by the act or a regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulation. 16.24 Section 16.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....24 Regulatory hearing required by the act or a regulation. (a) A regulatory hearing required by the act or a regulation under § 16.1(b) will be initiated in the same manner as other regulatory...

  3. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  4. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  5. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  6. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  7. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  8. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  9. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, E, Adam, Molly, Hug Beans, and Love Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known ...

  10. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  11. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... community treatment? Assertive community treatment (ACT) is a model of psychiatric care that can be very effective ... it the most. Similar to the “treatment team” model of an inpatient psychiatric unit, which includes nurses, ...

  12. The ACTS propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy; Davarian, Faramaz

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is to demonstrate the feasibility of the Ka-band (20 and 30 GHz) spectrum for satellite communications, as well as to help maintain U.S. leadership in satellite communications. ACTS incorporates such innovative schemes as time division multiple access (TDMA), microwave and baseband switching, onboard regeneration, and adaptive application of coding during rain-fade conditions. The success or failure of the ACTS experiment will depend on how accurately the rain-fade statistics and fade dynamics can be predicted in order to derive an appropriate algorithm that will combat weather vagaries, specifically for links with small terminals, such as very small aperture terminals (VSAT's) where the power margin is a premium. This article describes the planning process and hardware development program that will comply with the recommendations of the ACTS propagation study groups.

  13. 75 FR 32952 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “‘Harmful and Potentially...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Products as Used in Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance... Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance, when finalized, will discuss the meaning of the term ``harmful...

  14. Medical device reporting: manufacturer reporting, importer reporting, user facility reporting, distributor reporting. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-01-26

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing reporting by manufacturers, importers, distributors and health care (user) facilities of adverse events related to medical devices. Amendments are being made to implement revisions to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA).

  15. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  16. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  17. Centrally acting agents and visceral sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    2002-07-01

    The evidence relating to the site and mechanism of action of "centrally acting" agents which may affect visceral sensitivity is reviewed. Antidepressant drugs such as amitriptyline as well as the newer selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are thought to act at the level of the CNS. Opiates, including morphine as well as compounds such as trimebutine or fedotozine designed for therapeutic use in irritable bowel syndrome, are effective in reducing visceral nociception. Cytokines in the CNS are known to be involved in the modulation of pain and there is also evidence to suggest that centrally acting cytokines may play a role in the production of visceral hypersensitivity. Consequently, they may provide an interesting target for future research. PMID:12077076

  18. 21 CFR 341.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (c) Topical antitussive drug. A drug that relieves cough when inhaled after being applied topically... COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... the wheezing and shortness of breath of asthma. (b) Oral antitussive drug. A drug that either is...

  19. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.509... immediate container is not generally recognized as safe and effective, is a new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the act, and requires an approved new drug application as a condition for marketing....

  20. Drug to genome to drug: discovery of new antiplasmodial compounds.

    PubMed

    Beghyn, Terence B; Charton, Julie; Leroux, Florence; Laconde, Guillaume; Bourin, Arnaud; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Deprez, Benoit

    2011-05-12

    The dominant strategy for discovery of new antimalarial drugs relies on cell-free assays on specific biochemical pathways of Plasmodium falciparum . However, it appears that screening directly on the parasite is a more rewarding approach. The "drug to genome to drug" approach consists of testing a small set of structural analogues of a drug acting on human proteins that have plasmodial orthologues. Both man and plasmodium possess cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that are key players of cell homeostasis. We synthesized and tested 40 analogues of tadalafil, a human PDE5 inhibitor, on P. falciparum in culture and obtained potent inhibitors of parasite growth. We discuss the structure-activity relationships, which support the hypothesis that our compounds kill the parasite via inhibition of plasmodial PDE activity. We also prove that antiplasmodial derivatives inhibit the hydrolysis of cyclic nucleotides of the parasite, validating the cAMP/cGMP pathways as therapeutic targets against Plasmodium falciparum.

  1. Drug misuse.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  2. The CEO's second act.

    PubMed

    Nadler, David A

    2007-01-01

    When a CEO leaves because of performance problems, the company typically recruits someone thought to be better equipped to fix what the departing executive couldn't--or wouldn't. The board places its confidence in the new person because of the present dilemma's similarity to some previous challenge that he or she dealt with successfully. But familiar problems are inevitably succeeded by less familiar ones, for which the specially selected CEO is not quite so qualified. More often than not, the experiences, skills, and temperament that yielded triumph in Act I turn out to be unequal to Act II's difficulties. In fact, the approaches that worked so brilliantly in Act I may be the very opposite of what is needed in Act II. The CEO has four choices: refuse to change, in which case he or she will be replaced; realize that the next act requires new skills and learn them; downsize or circumscribe his or her role to compensate for deficiencies; or line up a successor who is qualified to fill a role to which the incumbent's skills and interests are no longer suited. Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina exemplifies the first alternative; Merrill Lynch's Stanley O'Neal the second; Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page the third; and Quest Diagnostics' Ken Freeman the fourth. All but the first option are reasonable responses to the challenges presented in the second acts of most CEOs' tenures. And all but the first require a power of observation, a propensity for introspection, and a strain of humility that are rare in the ranks of the very people who need those qualities most. There are four essential steps executives can take to discern that they have entered new territory and to respond accordingly: recognition that their leadership style and approach are no longer working; acceptance of others' advice on why performance is faltering; analysis and understanding of the nature of the Act II shift; and, finally, decision and action.

  3. The CEO's second act.

    PubMed

    Nadler, David A

    2007-01-01

    When a CEO leaves because of performance problems, the company typically recruits someone thought to be better equipped to fix what the departing executive couldn't--or wouldn't. The board places its confidence in the new person because of the present dilemma's similarity to some previous challenge that he or she dealt with successfully. But familiar problems are inevitably succeeded by less familiar ones, for which the specially selected CEO is not quite so qualified. More often than not, the experiences, skills, and temperament that yielded triumph in Act I turn out to be unequal to Act II's difficulties. In fact, the approaches that worked so brilliantly in Act I may be the very opposite of what is needed in Act II. The CEO has four choices: refuse to change, in which case he or she will be replaced; realize that the next act requires new skills and learn them; downsize or circumscribe his or her role to compensate for deficiencies; or line up a successor who is qualified to fill a role to which the incumbent's skills and interests are no longer suited. Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina exemplifies the first alternative; Merrill Lynch's Stanley O'Neal the second; Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page the third; and Quest Diagnostics' Ken Freeman the fourth. All but the first option are reasonable responses to the challenges presented in the second acts of most CEOs' tenures. And all but the first require a power of observation, a propensity for introspection, and a strain of humility that are rare in the ranks of the very people who need those qualities most. There are four essential steps executives can take to discern that they have entered new territory and to respond accordingly: recognition that their leadership style and approach are no longer working; acceptance of others' advice on why performance is faltering; analysis and understanding of the nature of the Act II shift; and, finally, decision and action. PMID:17286076

  4. 21 CFR 310.537 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.537... regarded as a new drug within the meaning of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act... comply with the requirements and procedures governing the use of investigational new drugs set forth...

  5. Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act) pertaining to Medicaid reimbursement for covered outpatient drugs (CODs). This final rule also revises other requirements related to CODs, including key aspects of their Medicaid coverage and payment and the Medicaid drug rebate program. PMID:26859897

  6. Pathology and drug action in schizophrenia: insights from molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Strange, P G

    1998-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe disorder of personality which has a genetic basis. Schizophrenia arises from a change in brain development. There is no strong evidence that disturbances in neurotransmitter systems are a primary cause. Anti-psychotic drugs act primarily through D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. The atypical drug clozapine may act through a number of different receptors, including D2, D3 and D4 dopamine receptors. Anti-psychotic drugs are inverse agonists at D2 dopamine receptors.

  7. ACTS broadband aeronautical terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, M. J.; Densmore, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of, and experiments with, the ACTS Broadband Aeronautical Terminal. As part of the ongoing effort to investigate commercial applications of ACTS technologies, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and various industry/government partners are developing a broadband mobile terminal for aeronautical applications. The ACTS Broadband Aeronautical Terminal is designed to explore the use of K/Ka-band for high data rate aeronautical satellite communications. Currently available commercial aeronautical satellite communications systems are only capable of achieving data rates on the order of tens of kilobits per second. The broadband terminal used in conjunction with the ACTS mechanically steerable antenna, can achieve data rates of 384 kilobits per second, while use of an ACTS spot beam antenna with this terminal will allow up to T1 data rates (1.544 megabits per second). The aeronautical terminal will be utilized to test a variety of applications that require a high data rate communications link. The use of the K/Ka-band for wideband aeronautical communications has the advantages of spectrum availability and smaller antennas, while eliminating the one major drawback of this frequency band, rain attenuation, by flying above the clouds the majority of the time.

  8. [Why do good drugs disappear?].

    PubMed

    Brezis, Mayer; Tomer, Ron; Klang, Samuel; Hammerman, Ariel

    2010-10-01

    Old drugs, with proved efficacy and safety, are disappearing from the market. For instance, nitrofurantoin, an inexpensive effective agent for urinary tract infections with low incidence of bacterial resistance in comparison to other antibiotics, is becoming unavailable. Alpha-methyldopa and hydraLazine, drugs of choice for pregnancy hypertension, are no longer available. Chlorthalidone, a Long acting thiazide with best evidence on efficacy, is no Longer marketed in Israel. Switching to newer agents increases costs and is often associated with relative uncertainty about safety and efficacy. The reason for the disappearance of old drugs is a combination of market failures and failures in production and regulatory processes. System revisions are needed to allow continued availability of old, safe and effective drugs.

  9. Servicemembers and Veterans Prescription Drug Safety Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Cartwright, Matt [D-PA-17

    2013-12-12

    01/27/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Pharmaceutical Market Access and Drug Safety Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Dorgan, Byron L. [D-ND

    2009-06-10

    06/11/2009 Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 73. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Generic Drug and Biosimilar User Fee Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Murphy, Tim [R-PA-18

    2012-02-08

    02/10/2012 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3187, which became Public Law 112-144 on 7/9/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Drug Trafficking Safe Harbor Elimination Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Smith, Lamar [R-TX-21

    2011-01-18

    12/14/2011 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. FEHBP Prescription Drug Integrity, Transparency, and Cost Savings Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Lynch, Stephen F. [D-MA-9

    2011-03-09

    03/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service, and Labor Policy. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Medicare Prescription Drug Savings and Choice Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2013-02-28

    02/28/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1016-1017) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Medicare Prescription Drug Savings and Choice Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2011-03-10

    03/10/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1561-1563) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. 75 FR 12555 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... applications could reach approval in the first review cycle. A sound financial footing and support for limited... Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategies (REMS), order safety labeling changes, and require...

  17. Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Klobuchar, Amy [D-MN

    2009-06-18

    06/18/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3397, which became Public Law 111-273 on 10/12/2010. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Stupak, Bart [D-MI-1

    2009-03-05

    04/27/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3397, which became Public Law 111-273 on 10/12/2010. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. 76 FR 56201 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... reauthorization process with a public meeting held on April 12, 2010 (75 FR 12555, March 16, 2010). The meeting... scientific and computational capacity, causing delays in FDA findings that prolong public uncertainty. This.... Part of FDA's decision-making lies in thinking about the context of the decision, including gaining...

  20. Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Rahall, Nick J., II [D-WV-3

    2013-02-13

    04/08/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, And Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation: