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Sample records for acting antivirals daas

  1. Global prevalence of pre-existing HCV variants resistant to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs): mining the GenBank HCV genome data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Li, Hu; Ren, Hong; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins open a whole new era for anti-HCV therapy, but DAA resistance associated variants (RAVs) could jeopardize the effectiveness of DAAs. We reported the global prevalence of DAA RAVs using published GenBank data. 58.7% of sequences (854/1455) harbored at least one dominant resistance variant and the highest RAV frequency occurred in Asia (74.1%), followed by Africa (71.9%), America (53.5%) and Europe (51.4%). The highest RAV frequency was observed in genotype (GT) 6 sequences (99%), followed by GT2 (87.9%), GT4 (85.5%), GT1a (56%), GT3 (50.0%) and GT1b (34.3%). Furthermore, 40.0% and 29.6% of sequences were detected RAVs of non-structural (NS) 5A inhibitors and NS3 protease inhibitors, respectively. However, RAVs to NS5B nucleo(t)ide inhibitor (NI) and NI-based combinations were uncommon (<4% of sequences). As expected, combinations of multiple RAVs to the IFN-free regimens recommended by current guidelines were rarely detected (0.2%-2.0%). Our results showed that the overall global prevalence of DAA RAVs was high irrespective of geography or genotype. However, the NI-based multi-DAA regimens had a low RAV prevalence, suggesting that these regimens are the most promising strategies for cure of the long-term HCV infection. PMID:26842909

  2. Global prevalence of pre-existing HCV variants resistant to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs): mining the GenBank HCV genome data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Li, Hu; Ren, Hong; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins open a whole new era for anti-HCV therapy, but DAA resistance associated variants (RAVs) could jeopardize the effectiveness of DAAs. We reported the global prevalence of DAA RAVs using published GenBank data. 58.7% of sequences (854/1455) harbored at least one dominant resistance variant and the highest RAV frequency occurred in Asia (74.1%), followed by Africa (71.9%), America (53.5%) and Europe (51.4%). The highest RAV frequency was observed in genotype (GT) 6 sequences (99%), followed by GT2 (87.9%), GT4 (85.5%), GT1a (56%), GT3 (50.0%) and GT1b (34.3%). Furthermore, 40.0% and 29.6% of sequences were detected RAVs of non-structural (NS) 5A inhibitors and NS3 protease inhibitors, respectively. However, RAVs to NS5B nucleo(t)ide inhibitor (NI) and NI-based combinations were uncommon (<4% of sequences). As expected, combinations of multiple RAVs to the IFN-free regimens recommended by current guidelines were rarely detected (0.2%–2.0%). Our results showed that the overall global prevalence of DAA RAVs was high irrespective of geography or genotype. However, the NI-based multi-DAA regimens had a low RAV prevalence, suggesting that these regimens are the most promising strategies for cure of the long-term HCV infection. PMID:26842909

  3. Vertical transmission of hepatitis C: towards universal antenatal screening in the era of new direct acting antivirals (DAAs)? Short review and analysis of the situation in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Aebi-Popp, Karoline; Duppenthaler, Andrea; Rauch, Andri; De Gottardi, Andrea; Kahlert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    At present, routine antenatal hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening is not recommended in pregnant women who do not have known risk factors for infection. The main reason for this attitude has been the lack of effective treatment options to avoid mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) during pregnancy or delivery. Hitherto available treatment regimens based on interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) were associated with sometimes long-lasting and severe side-effects and thus their indication had to be carefully evaluated. In addition, ribavirin has teratogenic and embryocidal effects and is absolutely contraindicated during pregnancy. The situation has substantially changed with the advent of the newly available treatment regimens based on very effective and well-tolerated direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). The aim of this viewpoint is to briefly analyse, using the example of Switzerland, how recent developments in HCV therapy might impact prevention of HCV vertical transmission. PMID:27482435

  4. [A new challenge in clinical practice: resistance to directly acting antivirals in hepatitis C treatment].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z W; Hu, P; Ren, H

    2016-03-20

    Directly acting antivirals (DAAs) is a major treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) overseas. But DAAs resistance is getting more and more clinicians' attention. DAAs have not been approved in China to date, even though some of them are in clinical trials. However, a good knowledge of DAAs resistance is important on optimizing HCV treatment regimens, increasing sustained virological response (SVR) and decreasing treatment failure in clinical. In this review, DAAs resistance mechanism and virologic barrier to resistance, the prevalence of pre-existing DAAs resistance-associated variants (RAVs), the impact of RAVs on treatment outcome, the options of treatment regimens after resistance and drug resistance testing are discussed, hoping to provide some help for DAAs' standardized treatment in China in the future. PMID:27095757

  5. Update on hepatitis C: Direct-acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Leon L; Perumpail, Ryan B; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered 26 years ago. For decades, interferon-based therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for HCV. Recently, several direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been approved for treatment of HCV-infected patients and to help combat the virus. These drugs have revolutionized the management of HCV as all-oral regimens with favorable side effect profiles and superior rates of sustained virological response. Emerging real-world data are demonstrating results comparable to registration trials for DAA agents. Suddenly, the potential for eradicating HCV is on the horizon. PMID:26668694

  6. Efficient Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Combination Treatment with miR-122 Antagonism and Direct-acting Antivirals in Cell Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanwei; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Murai, Kazuhisa; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Funaki, Masaya; Honda, Masao; Murakami, Seishi; Yi, Minkyung; Tang, Hong; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) show effective antiviral activity with few side effects. However, the selection of DAA-resistance mutants is a growing problem that needs to be resolved. In contrast, miR-122 antagonism shows extensive antiviral effects among all HCV genotypes and a high barrier to drug resistance. In the present study, we evaluated three DAAs (simeprevir, daclatasvir, and sofosbuvir) in combination with anti-miR-122 treatment against HCV genotype 1a in cell cultures. We found that combination treatments with anti-miR-122 and a DAA had additive or synergistic antiviral effects. The EC50 values of simeprevir in simeprevir-resistant mutants were significantly decreased by combining simeprevir with anti-miR-122. A similar reduction in EC50 in daclatasvir-resistant mutants was achieved by combining daclatasvir with anti-miR-122. Combination treatment in HCV-replicating cells with DAA and anti-miR-122 sharply reduced HCV RNA amounts. Conversely, DAA single treatment with simeprevir or daclatasvir reduced HCV RNA levels initially, but the levels later rebounded. DAA-resistant mutants were less frequently observed in combination treatments than in DAA single treatments. In summary, the addition of miR-122 antagonism to DAA single treatments had additive or synergistic antiviral effects and helped to efficiently suppress HCV replication and the emergence of DAA-resistant mutants. PMID:27484655

  7. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura; Barth, Heidi; Soulier, Eric; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Bukh, Jens; Patel, Arvind H; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs. PMID:24830295

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Cell-Cell Transmission and Resistance to Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Heydmann, Laura; Barth, Heidi; Soulier, Eric; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Bukh, Jens; Patel, Arvind H.; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs. PMID:24830295

  9. Synergy of entry inhibitors with direct-acting antivirals uncovers novel combinations for prevention and treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Thumann, Christine; Mailly, Laurent; Alles, Roxane; Robinet, Eric; Meyer, Nicolas; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Leyssen, Pieter; Neyts, Johan; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have markedly improved the outcome of treatment in chronic HCV infection, there continues to be an unmet medical need for improved therapies in difficult-to-treat patients as well as liver graft infection. Viral entry is a promising target for antiviral therapy. Design Aiming to explore the role of entry inhibitors for future clinical development, we investigated the antiviral efficacy and toxicity of entry inhibitors in combination with DAAs or other host-targeting agents (HTAs). Screening a large series of combinations of entry inhibitors with DAAs or other HTAs, we uncovered novel combinations of antivirals for prevention and treatment of HCV infection. Results Combinations of DAAs or HTAs and entry inhibitors including CD81-, scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)- or claudin-1 (CLDN1)-specific antibodies or small-molecule inhibitors erlotinib and dasatinib were characterised by a marked and synergistic inhibition of HCV infection over a broad range of concentrations with undetectable toxicity in experimental designs for prevention and treatment both in cell culture models and in human liver-chimeric uPA/SCID mice. Conclusions Our results provide a rationale for the development of antiviral strategies combining entry inhibitors with DAAs or HTAs by taking advantage of synergy. The uncovered combinations provide perspectives for efficient strategies to prevent liver graft infection and novel interferon-free regimens. PMID:24848265

  10. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals: The role of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; España Contreras, Pilar; Pinazo Martínez, Isabel; de la Cruz Lombardo, Jesús; Olmedo Martín, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    The use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to treat chronic hepatitis C has resulted in a significant increase in rates of sustained viral response (around 90%-95%) as compared with the standard treatment of peginterferon/ribavirin. Despite this, however, the rates of therapeutic failure in daily clinical practice range from 10%-15%. Most of these cases are due to the presence of resistant viral variants, resulting from mutations produced by substitutions of amino acids in the viral target protein that reduce viral sensitivity to DAAs, thus limiting the efficacy of these drugs. The high genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus has resulted in the existence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs), sometimes even before starting treatment with DAAs, though generally at low levels. These pre-existing RAVs do not appear to impact on the sustained viral response, whereas those that appear after DAA therapy could well be determinant in virological failure with future treatments. As well as the presence of RAVs, virological failure to treatment with DAAs is generally associated with other factors related with a poor response, such as the degree of fibrosis, the response to previous therapy, the viral load or the viral genotype. Nonetheless, viral breakthrough and relapse can still occur in the absence of detectable RAVs and after the use of highly effective DAAs, so that the true clinical impact of the presence of RAVs in therapeutic failure remains to be determined. PMID:27547001

  11. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals: The role of resistance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; España Contreras, Pilar; Pinazo Martínez, Isabel; de la Cruz Lombardo, Jesús; Olmedo Martín, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    The use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to treat chronic hepatitis C has resulted in a significant increase in rates of sustained viral response (around 90%-95%) as compared with the standard treatment of peginterferon/ribavirin. Despite this, however, the rates of therapeutic failure in daily clinical practice range from 10%-15%. Most of these cases are due to the presence of resistant viral variants, resulting from mutations produced by substitutions of amino acids in the viral target protein that reduce viral sensitivity to DAAs, thus limiting the efficacy of these drugs. The high genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus has resulted in the existence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs), sometimes even before starting treatment with DAAs, though generally at low levels. These pre-existing RAVs do not appear to impact on the sustained viral response, whereas those that appear after DAA therapy could well be determinant in virological failure with future treatments. As well as the presence of RAVs, virological failure to treatment with DAAs is generally associated with other factors related with a poor response, such as the degree of fibrosis, the response to previous therapy, the viral load or the viral genotype. Nonetheless, viral breakthrough and relapse can still occur in the absence of detectable RAVs and after the use of highly effective DAAs, so that the true clinical impact of the presence of RAVs in therapeutic failure remains to be determined. PMID:27547001

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Direct-Acting Antiviral Drug Interactions and Use in Renal and Hepatic Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs exhibit considerable variability in mechanisms of metabolism and the extent to which they are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of cytochrome P450 enzymes or P-glycoprotein and other drug transporters. Thus, potential drug-drug interactions with other commonly used therapies also vary, as do the effects of renal and hepatic impairment on DAA drug exposure. Drug-drug interaction profiles and use in cases of renal or hepatic impairment are reviewed for the DAAs simeprevir; sofosbuvir; ledipasvir; the fixed-dose combination regimen of paritaprevir, ritonavir, and ombitasvir plus dasabuvir; and the investigational drugs daclatasvir and asunaprevir. This article summarizes a presentation by Lucas Hill, PharmD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in Chicago, Illinois, in October 2014. PMID:26200709

  13. Containing "The Great Houdini" of viruses: combining direct acting antivirals with the host immune response for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ahlén, Gustaf; Frelin, Lars; Brenndörfer, Erwin Daniel; Brass, Anette; Weiland, Ola; Chen, Margaret; Sällberg, Matti

    2013-01-01

    Presently the development of new therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is rapidly moving forward. Almost every week new data appear on how direct acting antivirals (DAAs) succeed or fail in clinical trials. Despite the potency of many of the DAA combinations, the effect exerted by ribavirin (RBV) is still needed for an effective therapy in many new DAA combinations. Due to the strong antiviral effect of DAAs, it is likely that a major complementary therapeutic effect exerted by RBV is immune modulation resulting in an increased barrier to development of resistance. For HCV genotype 1a infections elimination of pegylated interferon, is not possible in many DAA combinations without jeopardizing the results. The host immune response is thus likely to play a key role even during DAA-based therapies. Hence, T cells may recognize and eliminate viral variants with resistance to the DAAs. We herein show several examples where this may be the case, supporting the rationale of including the host response also in the new therapeutic regimens. This review will describe the potential benefits of combining various DAAs with means to activate the specific immune response against HCV. PMID:23911647

  14. Clinical impact of the hepatitis C virus mutations in the era of directly acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Nicola; Minichini, Carmine; Starace, Mario; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2016-10-01

    Introduced in 2013-2014, the second- and third-wave directly acting antivirals (DAAs) have strongly enhanced the efficacy and tolerability of anti-HCV treatment, with a sustained virological response (SVR) in 90-95% of cases treated. The majority of patients who did not achieve an SVR were found to be infected with HCV strains with a reduced susceptibility to these drugs. Indeed, the high error rate of the viral polymerase and a fast virion production (100-fold higher than the human immunodeficiency virus) result in a mixture of viral genetic populations (quasi-species) pre-existing treatment initiation. These mutants occur frequently in the NS5A region, with a moderate frequency in the NS3/4A region and rarely in the NS5B region. Treatment-induced resistant mutants to NS5A DAAs persist for years after treatment discontinuation, whereas those resistant to the NS3 DAAs have a shorter duration. This review focuses on the type and prevalence of viral strains with a reduced sensitivity to DAAs, their clinical impact and influence on the response to treatment and, consequently, on treatment choice for DAA-experienced patients. J. Med. Virol. 88:1659-1671, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991255

  15. Successful Treatment of Hepatitis C in Renal Transplant Recipients With Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    PubMed

    Sawinski, D; Kaur, N; Ajeti, A; Trofe-Clark, J; Lim, M; Bleicher, M; Goral, S; Forde, K A; Bloom, R D

    2016-05-01

    The direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) constitute an emerging group of small molecule inhibitors that effectively treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, a common comorbidity in end-stage renal disease patients. To date, there are no data to guide use of these agents in kidney transplant patients. The authors collected data from 20 consecutive kidney recipients treated with interferon-free treatment regimens for HCV at their center: 88% were infected with genotype 1; 50% had biopsy-proved advanced hepatic fibrosis on their most recent liver biopsy preceding treatment (Metavir stage 3 fibrosis [F3] or F4); and 60% had failed treatment pretransplantation with interferon-based therapy. DAA treatment was initiated a median of 888 days after renal transplantation. All patients cleared the virus while on therapy, and 100% have achieved a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after completion of DAA therapy. The most commonly used regimen was sofosbuvir 400 mg daily in combination with simeprevir 150 mg daily. However, four different treatment approaches were used, with comparable results. The DAAs were well tolerated, and less than half of patients required calcineurin inhibitor dose adjustment during treatment. Eradication of HCV infection with DAAs is feasible after kidney transplantation with few treatment-related side effects. PMID:26604182

  16. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Kishta, Sara; Ei-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  17. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Kishta, Sara; EI-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness.

  18. Era of direct acting antivirals in chronic hepatitis C: Who will benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Fung, James

    2015-01-01

    In the era of highly effective direct acting antiviral (DAA) drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection, where eradication is almost ensured with minimal side effects, all hepatitis C carriers should benefit theoretically. In the real world setting however, only a small proportion will benefit at this time point due to the multiple barriers to accessing therapy. Given that universal treatment is unlikely, treatment with DAAs will likely be restricted to those with the highest health benefits, and for those who can afford the high expense of a treatment course. Those with the highest unmet needs include those who have failed previous interferon-based therapy or who are interferon-ineligible with evidence of active disease, those with advance liver disease, and those with recurrence of hepatitis C after liver transplantation. In the future, the focus should be on increasing access to treatment for those infected with CHC. PMID:26523206

  19. [Rethinking the reimbursement policy of direct acting antivirals against chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Girardin, F; Goossens, N; Vernaz, N; Negro, F

    2015-09-01

    New direct-acting antivirals (DAA) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) have led to a therapeutic revolution in HCV management and virological cure rates approaching 100% while potentially avoiding significant complications of HCV (first cause of liver transplantation). We estimated the price of sustained virological response (SVR) depending on treatment strategy and patient profile. Costs of treatment with recent DAAs being so high, the accessibility to those drugs for the majority of subjects is hitherto limited to advanced stages of hepatitis C. This current situation increases the inequity and strengthens the dominant position of insurers and pharmaceutical companies with a rationing of care. We suggest herein global approaches from a population-level and health-care perspective aiming to reduce the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality related to HCV. PMID:26502622

  20. HCV Drug Resistance Challenges in Japan: The Role of Pre-Existing Variants and Emerging Resistant Strains in Direct Acting Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Sustained virological response (SVR) rates have increased dramatically following the approval of direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. While individual DAAs have a low barrier to resistance, most patients can be successfully treated using DAA combination therapy. However, DAAs are vulnerable to drug resistance, and resistance-associated variants (RAVs) may occur naturally prior to DAA therapy or may emerge following drug exposure. While most RAVs are quickly lost in the absence of DAAs, compensatory mutations may reinforce fitness. However, the presence of RAVs does not necessarily preclude successful treatment. Although developments in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy in Asia have largely paralleled those in the United States, Japan’s July 2014 approval of asunaprevir plus daclatasvir combination therapy as the first all-oral interferon-free therapy was not repeated in the United States. Instead, two different combination therapies were approved: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir. This divergence in treatment approaches may lead to differences in resistance challenges faced by Japan and the US. However, the recent approval of sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir in Japan and the recent submissions of petitions for approval of paritaprevir/ritonavir plus ombitasvir suggest a trend towards a new consensus on emerging DAA regimens. PMID:26473914

  1. HCV Drug Resistance Challenges in Japan: The Role of Pre-Existing Variants and Emerging Resistant Strains in Direct Acting Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C Nelson

    2015-10-01

    Sustained virological response (SVR) rates have increased dramatically following the approval of direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. While individual DAAs have a low barrier to resistance, most patients can be successfully treated using DAA combination therapy. However, DAAs are vulnerable to drug resistance, and resistance-associated variants (RAVs) may occur naturally prior to DAA therapy or may emerge following drug exposure. While most RAVs are quickly lost in the absence of DAAs, compensatory mutations may reinforce fitness. However, the presence of RAVs does not necessarily preclude successful treatment. Although developments in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy in Asia have largely paralleled those in the United States, Japan's July 2014 approval of asunaprevir plus daclatasvir combination therapy as the first all-oral interferon-free therapy was not repeated in the United States. Instead, two different combination therapies were approved: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir. This divergence in treatment approaches may lead to differences in resistance challenges faced by Japan and the US. However, the recent approval of sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir in Japan and the recent submissions of petitions for approval of paritaprevir/ritonavir plus ombitasvir suggest a trend towards a new consensus on emerging DAA regimens. PMID:26473914

  2. Direct-acting Antivirals and Host-targeting Agents against the Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Wu, Shuang; Nakamura, Masato; Jiang, Xia; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is a major cause of acute hepatitis and occasionally leads to acute liver failure in both developing and developed countries. Although effective vaccines for HAV are available, the development of new antivirals against HAV may be important for the control of HAV infection in developed countries where no universal vaccination program against HAV exists, such as Japan. There are two forms of antiviral agents against HAV: direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) and host-targeting agents (HTAs). Studies using small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) have suggested that the HAV internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) is an attractive target for the control of HAV replication and infection. Among the HTAs, amantadine and interferon-lambda 1 (IL-29) inhibit HAV IRES-mediated translation and HAV replication. Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors inhibit La protein expression, HAV IRES activity, and HAV replication. Based on this review, both DAAs and HTAs may be needed to control effectively HAV infection, and their use should continue to be explored. PMID:26623267

  3. Next Steps Toward Eradication of Hepatitis C in the Era of Direct Acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Sharafi, Heidar; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Behnava, Bita; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Context After the introduction of safe and highly effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments, eradication of HCV in the next 20 years is the ultimate goal. Since 2011, the advent of first generation direct acting antivirals (DAAs) were started and followed by the introduction of a new wave of DAAs in 2013 which exhibit outstanding efficacy. It is obvious that the eradication of hepatitis C is not restricted to development of DAAs. Evidence Acquisition An electronic search of available literature published was conducted in all peer-reviewed journal indexed in PubMed, Scopus and Google scholar. The literature search was done among articles related treatment of hepatitis C with DAAs in different patient groups with mass screening of the patients and cost benefit of new treatments as main key words. Results There are major steps that should be taken to eradicate HCV, including (1) the development of screening strategies, particularly for groups such as intravenous drug users and recipients of blood or blood products before the introduction of HCV screening in donors; (2) the development of strategies to overcome issues with the high cost of recently introduced treatments; (3) special attention to special patient groups, such as HIV/HCV co-infection, hemophilia, thalassemia, hemodialysis, and liver-transplant patients; and (4) development of preventive strategies, such as the development of an efficient HCV vaccine, special attention to harm reduction in high-risk groups, and promotion of mass awareness of HCV. Conclusions The eradication of HCV will require significant governmental financial investment for screening, prevention, and treatment of infected patients. Although, we have a long way to eradication of HCV, the next steps could be including proper planning to patient finding, availability of new treatments to all patients and development of HCV prevention strategies such as vaccines. PMID:27275164

  4. Minimum target prices for production of direct-acting antivirals and associated diagnostics to combat hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Nikolien; Fortunak, Joe; Simmons, Bryony; Ford, Nathan; Cooke, Graham S; Khoo, Saye; Hill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) can cure hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the majority of treatment-naïve patients. Mass treatment programs to cure HCV in developing countries are only feasible if the costs of treatment and laboratory diagnostics are very low. This analysis aimed to estimate minimum costs of DAA treatment and associated diagnostic monitoring. Clinical trials of HCV DAAs were reviewed to identify combinations with consistently high rates of sustained virological response across hepatitis C genotypes. For each DAA, molecular structures, doses, treatment duration, and components of retrosynthesis were used to estimate costs of large-scale, generic production. Manufacturing costs per gram of DAA were based upon treating at least 5 million patients per year and a 40% margin for formulation. Costs of diagnostic support were estimated based on published minimum prices of genotyping, HCV antigen tests plus full blood count/clinical chemistry tests. Predicted minimum costs for 12-week courses of combination DAAs with the most consistent efficacy results were: US$122 per person for sofosbuvir+daclatasvir; US$152 for sofosbuvir+ribavirin; US$192 for sofosbuvir+ledipasvir; and US$115 for MK-8742+MK-5172. Diagnostic testing costs were estimated at US$90 for genotyping US$34 for two HCV antigen tests and US$22 for two full blood count/clinical chemistry tests. Conclusions: Minimum costs of treatment and diagnostics to cure hepatitis C virus infection were estimated at US$171-360 per person without genotyping or US$261-450 per person with genotyping. These cost estimates assume that existing large-scale treatment programs can be established. (Hepatology 2015;61:1174–1182) PMID:25482139

  5. Clinical relevance of HCV antiviral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Welsch, C; Zeuzem, S

    2012-10-01

    The approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease revolutionized antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C. They mark the beginning of an era with drugs designed to inhibit specific viral proteins involved in the virus life cycle rather than the nonspecific antiviral activity of interferon. Upcoming generations of antivirals are expected that lead to viral eradication in most patients who undergo treatment with hope held for years that HCV can be cured without interferon. Antiviral drug resistance plays a key role in DAA-treatment failure. Knowledge on molecular escape mechanisms of resistant variants, their time to wild-type reversal and potential persistence is of upmost importance to design treatment strategies for patients with previous DAA-treatment failure. PMID:23006585

  6. Minimum Costs for Producing Hepatitis C Direct-Acting Antivirals for Use in Large-Scale Treatment Access Programs in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Andrew; Khoo, Saye; Fortunak, Joe; Simmons, Bryony; Ford, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several combinations of 2 or 3 direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) can cure hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the majority of treatment-naive patients. DAAs for HCV infection have similar mechanisms of action and chemical structures to antiretrovirals for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Generic antiretrovirals are currently manufactured at very low prices, to treat 10 million people with HIV/AIDS in developing countries. Methods. Four HCV DAAs, currently either in phase 3 development or recent approval (daclatasvir, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, faldaprevir), and ribavirin were classified by chemical structure, molecular weight, total daily dose, and complexity of synthesis. The likely range of manufacturing costs per gram of DAA were then projected as formulated product cost, based upon treating a minimum of 1 million patients annually (to arrive at volume demand) combined with an analysis of the complexity of synthesis and a 40% margin for formulation. Projections were then compared with actual costs of antiretrovirals with similar structures. Results. Minimum manufacturing costs of antiretrovirals were US$0.2–$2.1 per gram. The complexity of chemical synthesis for HCV DAAs was ranked from lowest to highest: ribavirin, daclatasvir, sofosbuvir, faldaprevir, and simeprevir. Predicted manufacturing costs (US dollars) for 12-week courses of HCV DAAs were $21–$63 for ribavirin, $10–$30 for daclatasvir, $68–$136 for sofosbuvir, $100–$210 for faldaprevir, and $130–$270 for simeprevir. Conclusions. Within the next 15 years, large-scale manufacture of 2 or 3 drug combinations of HCV DAAs is feasible, with minimum target prices of $100–$250 per 12-week treatment course. These low prices could make widespread access to HCV treatment in low- and middle-income countries a realistic goal. PMID:24399087

  7. Hepatitis C virus markers in infection by hepatitis C virus: In the era of directly acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Zampino, Rosa; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    About 130-170 million people are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide and more than 350000 people die each year of HCV-related liver diseases. The combination of pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) was recommended as the treatment of choice for chronic hepatitis C for nearly a decade. In 2011 the directly acting antivirals (DAA) HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors, telaprevir and boceprevir, were approved to treat HCV-genotype-1 infection, each in triple combination with Peg-IFN and RBV. These treatments allowed higher rates of SVR than the double Peg-IFN + RBV, but the low tolerability and high pill burden of these triple regimes were responsible for reduced adherence and early treatment discontinuation. The second and third wave DAAs introduced in 2013-2014 enhanced the efficacy and tolerability of anti-HCV treatment. Consequently, the traditional indicators for disease management and predictors of treatment response should be revised in light of these new therapeutic options. This review article will focus on the use of the markers of HCV infection and replication, of laboratory and instrumental data to define the stage of the disease and of predictors, if any, of response to therapy in the DAA era. The article is addressed particularly to physicians who have patients with hepatitis C in care in their everyday clinical practice. PMID:26478667

  8. Direct-acting antiviral treatment in adults infected with hepatitis C virus: Reactivation of hepatitis B virus coinfection as a further challenge.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Anne; Courjon, Johan; Anty, Rodolphe; Cua, Eric; Naqvi, Alissa; Mondain, Véronique; Cottalorda, Jacqueline; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    Use of direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) greatly improves management of adults infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) whether patients are treatment-naive or unsuccessfully pre-treated. Several inhibitors of viral nonstructural proteins (NS3/4A protease, NS5A and NS5B polymerase) allow a rapid HCV clearance and increase rates of sustained virological response. Both the EASL and AASLD guidelines have recently published up-to-date recommendations for their use, addressing each HCV genotype and particular situations. However, management of patients coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been developed by these guidelines with reference to cases of HBV reactivation reported during previous anti-HCV regimens containing interferon known active against both HBV and HCV. In the setting of the interferon-free HCV therapies with DAAs only, the possibility of HBV reactivation during treatment of hepatitis C is raised due to viral interferences in HCV/HBV coinfected persons. Herein, we report a case of early HBV reactivation during DAAs-based anti-HCV treatment (ledipasvir/sofosbuvir) in a patient having a resolved HBV infection and chronically infected with HCV genotype 4 and HIV. Moreover, we review similar recent cases of HBV reactivation in patients infected with HBV and HCV genotype 1 during treatment of hepatitis C by regimen incorporating other combination of DAAs (sofosbuvir/simeprevir or daclatasvir/asunaprevir). Due to the potential risk of early HBV reactivation in HCV/HBV-coinfected patients during interferon-free DAAs-based HCV therapies, altogether these cases highlight the necessity to closely monitor HBV coinfection, regardless its stage (chronic, occult, resolved), whatever HCV genotype or class of DAAs used. PMID:26967675

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Echevarria, Desarae; Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Major, Marian; Del Valle, Sara; Cotler, Scott J.; Dahari, Harel

    2015-08-21

    New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID). Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.

  10. Potent Antiviral Activities of the Direct-Acting Antivirals ABT-493 and ABT-530 with Three-Day Monotherapy for Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Riordan, William D.; Asatryan, Armen; Freilich, Bradley L.; Box, Terry D.; Overcash, J. Scott; Lovell, Sandra; Ng, Teresa I.; Liu, Wei; Campbell, Andrew; Lin, Chih-Wei; Yao, Betty; Kort, Jens

    2015-01-01

    ABT-493 is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural (NS) protein 3/4A protease inhibitor, and ABT-530 is an HCV NS5A inhibitor. These direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) demonstrated potent antiviral activity against major HCV genotypes and high barriers to resistance in vitro. In this open-label dose-ranging trial, antiviral activity and safety were assessed during 3 days of monotherapy with ABT-493 or ABT-530 in treatment-naive adults with HCV genotype 1 infection, with or without compensated cirrhosis. The presence of baseline resistance-associated variants (RAVs) was also evaluated. The mean maximal decreases in HCV RNA levels from baseline were approximately 4 log10 IU/ml for all ABT-493 doses ranging from 100 mg to 700 mg and for ABT-530 doses of ≥40 mg. There were no meaningful differences in viral load declines for patients with versus without compensated cirrhosis. Twenty-four (50%) of the baseline samples from patients treated with ABT-493 had RAVs to NS3/4A protease inhibitors. Among 40 patients treated with ABT-530, 6 (15%) carried baseline RAVs to NS5A inhibitors. Viral load declines in patients with single baseline NS5A RAVs were similar to those in patients without RAVs. One patient harbored baseline RAVs at 3 NS5A positions and appeared to have a slightly less robust viral load decline on day 3 of monotherapy. No serious or grade 3 (severe) or higher adverse events and no clinically relevant laboratory abnormalities were observed with either compound. ABT-493 and ABT-530 demonstrated potent antiviral activity and acceptable safety during 3-day monotherapy in patients with HCV genotype 1 infection, with or without compensated cirrhosis. Based on these results, phase II studies assessing the combination of these DAAs for the treatment of chronic HCV infection in patients with or without compensated cirrhosis have been initiated. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01995071.) PMID:26711747

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Direct Acting Antivirals in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming V.; Sise, Meghan E.; Pavlakis, Martha; Amundsen, Beth M.; Chute, Donald; Rutherford, Anna E.; Chung, Raymond T.; Curry, Michael P.; Hanifi, Jasmine M.; Gabardi, Steve; Chandraker, Anil; Heher, Eliot C.; Elias, Nahel; Riella, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is significantly higher in patients with end-stage renal disease compared to the general population and poses important clinical challenges in patients who undergo kidney transplantation. Historically, interferon-based treatment options have been limited by low rates of efficacy and significant side effects, including risk of precipitating rejection. Limited data exist on the use of all-oral, interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies in kidney transplant recipients. In this study, we performed a retrospective chart review with prospective clinical follow-up of post-kidney transplant patients treated with DAA therapies at three major hospitals in Boston, MA. A total of 24 kidney recipients with HCV infection received all-oral DAA therapy post-transplant. Patients were predominantly male (79%) with a median age of 60 years (range 34–70 years), median creatinine of 1.2 mg/dL (0.66–1.76), and 42% had advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. The majority had HCV genotype 1a infection (58%). All patients received full-dose sofosbuvir; it was paired with simeprevir (9 patients without and 3 patients with ribavirin), ledipasvir (7 patients without and 1 patient with ribavirin) or ribavirin alone (4 patients). The overall sustained virologic response (SVR12) was 91% (21 out of 23 patients). One patient achieved SVR4 but demised prior to SVR12 check point due to treatment unrelated cause. Two treatment failures were successfully retreated with alternative DAA regimens and achieved SVR. Both initials failures occurred in patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, with genotype 1a infection, and prior HCV treatment failure. Adverse events were reported in 11 patients (46%) and were managed clinically without discontinuation of therapy. Calcineurin inhibitor trough levels did not significantly change during therapy. In this multi-center series of patients, all-oral DAA therapy appears to be safe and effective in

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Direct Acting Antivirals in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming V; Sise, Meghan E; Pavlakis, Martha; Amundsen, Beth M; Chute, Donald; Rutherford, Anna E; Chung, Raymond T; Curry, Michael P; Hanifi, Jasmine M; Gabardi, Steve; Chandraker, Anil; Heher, Eliot C; Elias, Nahel; Riella, Leonardo V

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is significantly higher in patients with end-stage renal disease compared to the general population and poses important clinical challenges in patients who undergo kidney transplantation. Historically, interferon-based treatment options have been limited by low rates of efficacy and significant side effects, including risk of precipitating rejection. Limited data exist on the use of all-oral, interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies in kidney transplant recipients. In this study, we performed a retrospective chart review with prospective clinical follow-up of post-kidney transplant patients treated with DAA therapies at three major hospitals in Boston, MA. A total of 24 kidney recipients with HCV infection received all-oral DAA therapy post-transplant. Patients were predominantly male (79%) with a median age of 60 years (range 34-70 years), median creatinine of 1.2 mg/dL (0.66-1.76), and 42% had advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. The majority had HCV genotype 1a infection (58%). All patients received full-dose sofosbuvir; it was paired with simeprevir (9 patients without and 3 patients with ribavirin), ledipasvir (7 patients without and 1 patient with ribavirin) or ribavirin alone (4 patients). The overall sustained virologic response (SVR12) was 91% (21 out of 23 patients). One patient achieved SVR4 but demised prior to SVR12 check point due to treatment unrelated cause. Two treatment failures were successfully retreated with alternative DAA regimens and achieved SVR. Both initials failures occurred in patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, with genotype 1a infection, and prior HCV treatment failure. Adverse events were reported in 11 patients (46%) and were managed clinically without discontinuation of therapy. Calcineurin inhibitor trough levels did not significantly change during therapy. In this multi-center series of patients, all-oral DAA therapy appears to be safe and effective in post

  13. Recent Advances in Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major worldwide health problem. Chronic infection induces continuous inflammation in the liver, progression of hepatic fibrosis, eventual cirrhosis, and possible hepatocellular carcinoma. Eradication of the virus is one of the most important treatment aims. A number of promising new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been developed over the past 10 years. Due to their increased efficacy, safety, and tolerability, interferon-free oral therapies with DAAs have been approved for patients with HCV, including those with cirrhosis. This review introduces the characteristics and results of recent clinical trials of several DAAs: NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B inhibitors. DAA treatment failure and prognosis after DAA therapy are also discussed. PMID:27022210

  14. Hepatitis C virus cures after direct acting antiviral-related drug-induced liver injury: Case report.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Yaakov; Shteingart, Shimon; Dahari, Harel; Gafanovich, Inna; Floru, Sharon; Braun, Marius; Shlomai, Amir; Verstandig, Anthony; Dery, Ilana; Uprichard, Susan L; Cotler, Scott J; Lurie, Yoav

    2016-07-18

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently warned that the direct acting antiviral (DAA) combination hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment of Paritaprevir, Ombitasvir, Dasabuvir, Ritonavir, and Ribavirin (PODr + R) can cause severe liver injury in patients with advanced liver disease. Drug induced liver injury was observed in a small number of patients with decompensated cirrhosis treated with other DAAs, but has not been reported in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic HCV and Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis (compensated cirrhosis) treated with PODr + R. The patient presented on day 14 of PODr + R therapy with jaundice and new-onset ascites. Her total bilirubin level increased to 23 mg/dL and international normalized ratio rose to 1.65, while aminotransferase levels remained relatively stable. Hepatitis C treatment was discontinued on day 24 and she gradually recovered. Follow-up testing showed that she achieved a sustained virologic response. In conclusion, hepatic decompensation developed within two weeks of starting treatment with PODr + R in a patient with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis and was characterized by jaundice and ascites with stable aminotransferase levels. Careful monitoring is warranted in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis treated with PODr + R. PMID:27458506

  15. Hepatitis C virus cures after direct acting antiviral-related drug-induced liver injury: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Yaakov; Shteingart, Shimon; Dahari, Harel; Gafanovich, Inna; Floru, Sharon; Braun, Marius; Shlomai, Amir; Verstandig, Anthony; Dery, Ilana; Uprichard, Susan L; Cotler, Scott J; Lurie, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently warned that the direct acting antiviral (DAA) combination hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment of Paritaprevir, Ombitasvir, Dasabuvir, Ritonavir, and Ribavirin (PODr + R) can cause severe liver injury in patients with advanced liver disease. Drug induced liver injury was observed in a small number of patients with decompensated cirrhosis treated with other DAAs, but has not been reported in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic HCV and Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis (compensated cirrhosis) treated with PODr + R. The patient presented on day 14 of PODr + R therapy with jaundice and new-onset ascites. Her total bilirubin level increased to 23 mg/dL and international normalized ratio rose to 1.65, while aminotransferase levels remained relatively stable. Hepatitis C treatment was discontinued on day 24 and she gradually recovered. Follow-up testing showed that she achieved a sustained virologic response. In conclusion, hepatic decompensation developed within two weeks of starting treatment with PODr + R in a patient with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis and was characterized by jaundice and ascites with stable aminotransferase levels. Careful monitoring is warranted in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis treated with PODr + R. PMID:27458506

  16. The Impact of Direct-Acting Antivirals in the Hepatitis C-Sustained Viral Response in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients With Ongoing Barriers to Care

    PubMed Central

    Cachay, Edward R.; Wyles, David; Hill, Lucas; Ballard, Craig; Torriani, Francesca; Colwell, Bradford; Kuo, Alexander; Schooley, Robert; Mathews, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Access to hepatitis C virus (HCV) medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with ongoing barriers to care is restricted by healthcare payers in the absence of HCV treatment outcomes data in the era of direct-acting antivirals (DAA). Methods. Retrospective analysis of HCV treatment outcomes using interferon (IFN)-free DAA regimens and an inclusive treatment protocol in an urban HIV clinic where ongoing barriers to care (drug or alcohol use, psychiatric disease, and/or unstable housing) are common. Then, using logistic regression analysis, we compared the proportion of HIV-infected patients who achieved HCV sustained viral response (SVR) in the pegylated-IFN plus ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV, 2008–2011), pegylated-IFN plus ribavirin and telaprevir (PEG-IFN/RBV/PI, 2011–2013), and IFN-free DAA therapy eras (2014). Results are displayed using forest plots. Results. The proportion of patients who achieved HCV SVR in the PEG-IFN/RBV, PEG-IFN/RBV/PI, and IFN-free DAA therapy eras increased from 38.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.2–53.7) and 48% (95% CI, 28.4–67.6) to 83.3% (95% CI, 70.0–96.7), respectively. Similar proportions of patients with ongoing barriers to care were treated during the PEG-IFN/RBV (25 of 39 [64%]), PEG-IFN/RBV/PI (14 of 25 [56%]), and IFN-free DAA (16 of 30 [53%]) eras. Hepatitis C virus SVR among patients with ongoing barriers to care improved from 40% (95% CI, 21–59) to 76.5% (95% CI, 56–97) in the PEG-IFN/RBV and IFN-free DAA eras, respectively. After stratification for factors associated with HCV SVR such as HCV genotype and cirrhosis, HCV SVR were similar in patients regardless of the presence of ongoing barriers to care. Conclusions. Using IFN-free DAA and an inclusive HCV treatment protocol, 76.5% of HIV/HCV-treated patients with ongoing barriers to care achieved HCV SVR. PMID:26697509

  17. Direct-acting antiviral drug approvals for treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: Scientific and regulatory approaches to clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Poonam; Murray, Jeffrey; Birnkrant, Debra

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic options for treatment of chronic hepatitis C have improved substantially since the approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). Several interferon (IFN)-free or IFN- and ribavirin (RBV)-free treatment regimens with shorter durations and improved efficacy and safety profiles are now available. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) used several scientific approaches and regulatory mechanisms, such as (1) use of a "validated" surrogate (sustained virological response) for a primary endpoint, (2) shortening the time point for measuring the surrogate by 12 weeks, (3) use of historical controls when clinically appropriate, and (4) use of modeling when scientifically sound to extend treatment indications to subpopulations not fully evaluated in clinical trials, which had an impact on DAA development and subsequent approvals. This article intends to provide increased transparency about the FDA's scientific approaches and regulatory processes that supported drug development and marketing approval of DAAs for treatment of hepatitis C, a serious, life-threatening infection. PMID:25953139

  18. Hepatitis C virus infection treatment: An era of game changer direct acting antivirals and novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Imran; ALMalki, Waleed Hassan; Hafeez, Muhammad Hassan; Hassan, Sajida

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and associated liver diseases represent a major health care burden all over the world. The current standard of care, i.e. peginterferon-alfa (PEG-IFNα) plus ribavirin (RBV) are associated with frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects and contraindications, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. The approval of first and second generation HCV protease inhibitors represents a major breakthrough in the development of novel direct acting antivirals (DAAs) against different HCV genotypes and establishes a new standard of care for chronically infected HCV genotypes 1 patients. Similarly, next generation protease inhibitors and HCV RNA polymerase inhibitors have shown better pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in terms of broader HCV genotypes coverage, better safety profile, fewer drug interactions and possible once daily administration than first generation direct acting antivirals. The testing of adenovirus-based vector vaccines, which escalates the innate and acquired immune responses against the most conserved regions of the HCV genome in chimpanzees and humans, may be a promising therapeutic approach against HCV infection in coming future. This review article presents up-to-date knowledge and recent developments in HCV therapeutics, insights the shortcomings of current HCV therapies and key lessons from the therapeutic potential of improved anti-HCV treatment strategies. PMID:25373616

  19. Direct Acting Antivirals for the Treatment of Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karayiannis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The development and evaluation of antiviral agents through carefully designed clinical trials over the last 25 years have heralded a new dawn in the treatment of patients chronically infected with the hepatitis B and C viruses, but not so for the D virus (HBV, HCV, and HDV). The introduction of direct acting antivirals (DDAs) for the treatment of HBV carriers has permitted the long-term use of these compounds for the continuous suppression of viral replication, whilst in the case of HCV in combination with the standard of care [SOC, pegylated interferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin] sustained virological responses (SVRs) have been achieved with increasing frequency. Progress in the case of HDV has been slow and lacking in significant breakthroughs.This paper aims to summarise the current state of play in treatment approaches for chonic viral hepatitis patients and future perspectives. PMID:24278700

  20. Geno2pheno[HCV] - A Web-based Interpretation System to Support Hepatitis C Treatment Decisions in the Era of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    PubMed

    Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sikorski, Anna Maria; Knops, Elena; Rupp, Daniel; Sierra, Saleta; Heger, Eva; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Beggel, Bastian; Walker, Andreas; Timm, Jörg; Walter, Hauke; Obermeier, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The face of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy is changing dramatically. Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) specifically targeting HCV proteins have been developed and entered clinical practice in 2011. However, despite high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90%, a fraction of patients do not eliminate the virus and in these cases treatment failure has been associated with the selection of drug resistance mutations (RAMs). RAMs may be prevalent prior to the start of treatment, or can be selected under therapy, and furthermore they can persist after cessation of treatment. Additionally, certain DAAs have been approved only for distinct HCV genotypes and may even have subtype specificity. Thus, sequence analysis before start of therapy is instrumental for managing DAA-based treatment strategies. We have created the interpretation system geno2pheno[HCV] (g2p[HCV]) to analyse HCV sequence data with respect to viral subtype and to predict drug resistance. Extensive reviewing and weighting of literature related to HCV drug resistance was performed to create a comprehensive list of drug resistance rules for inhibitors of the HCV protease in non-structural protein 3 (NS3-protease: Boceprevir, Paritaprevir, Simeprevir, Asunaprevir, Grazoprevir and Telaprevir), the NS5A replicase factor (Daclatasvir, Ledipasvir, Elbasvir and Ombitasvir), and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Dasabuvir and Sofosbuvir). Upon submission of up to eight sequences, g2p[HCV] aligns the input sequences, identifies the genomic region(s), predicts the HCV geno- and subtypes, and generates for each DAA a drug resistance prediction report. g2p[HCV] offers easy-to-use and fast subtype and resistance analysis of HCV sequences, is continuously updated and freely accessible under http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/index.php. The system was partially validated with respect to the NS3-protease inhibitors Boceprevir, Telaprevir and Simeprevir by using data generated with recombinant, phenotypic

  1. Antiretroviral Use in the CEASE Cohort Study and Implications for Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Martinello, Marianne; Dore, Gregory J.; Skurowski, Jasmine; Bopage, Rohan I.; Finlayson, Robert; Baker, David; Bloch, Mark; Matthews, Gail V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens for hepatitis C virus (HCV) provide a major advance in clinical management, including in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfection. Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) require consideration. This study aimed to characterize the cART regimens in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals and assess the clinical significance of DDIs with DAAs in a real-world cohort. Methods. This analysis included participants enrolled in CEASE-D, a prospective cohort of HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in Sydney, Australia, between July 2014 and December 2015. A simulation of potential DDIs between participants' cART and interferon-free DAA regimens was performed using www.hep-druginteractions.org and relevant prescribing information. Results. In individuals on cART with HCV genotype (GT) 1 and 4 (n = 128), category 3 DDIs (contraindicated or not recommended) were noted in 0% with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir, 0% with sofosbuvir plus daclatasvir, 17% with sofosbuvir/velpatasvir, 36% with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir ± dasabuvir, 51% with grazoprevir/elbasvir, and 51% with sofosbuvir plus simeprevir; current cART regimens were suitable for coadministration in 100%, 100%, 73%, 64%, 49%, and 49%, respectively. In individuals with HCV GT 2 or 3 (n = 53), category 3 DDIs were evident in 0% with sofosbuvir plus daclatasvir, 0% with sofosbuvir and ribavirin, and 13% with sofosbuvir/velpatasvir; current cART regimens were suitable in 100%, 100%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions. Potential DDIs are expected and will impact on DAA prescribing in HIV/HCV coinfection. Sofosbuvir in combination with an NS5A inhibitor or ribavirin appeared to be the most suitable regimens in this cohort. Evaluation of potential DDIs is required to prevent adverse events or treatment failure. PMID:27419177

  2. Geno2pheno[HCV] – A Web-based Interpretation System to Support Hepatitis C Treatment Decisions in the Era of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sikorski, Anna Maria; Knops, Elena; Rupp, Daniel; Sierra, Saleta; Heger, Eva; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Beggel, Bastian; Walker, Andreas; Timm, Jörg; Walter, Hauke; Obermeier, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The face of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy is changing dramatically. Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) specifically targeting HCV proteins have been developed and entered clinical practice in 2011. However, despite high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90%, a fraction of patients do not eliminate the virus and in these cases treatment failure has been associated with the selection of drug resistance mutations (RAMs). RAMs may be prevalent prior to the start of treatment, or can be selected under therapy, and furthermore they can persist after cessation of treatment. Additionally, certain DAAs have been approved only for distinct HCV genotypes and may even have subtype specificity. Thus, sequence analysis before start of therapy is instrumental for managing DAA-based treatment strategies. We have created the interpretation system geno2pheno[HCV] (g2p[HCV]) to analyse HCV sequence data with respect to viral subtype and to predict drug resistance. Extensive reviewing and weighting of literature related to HCV drug resistance was performed to create a comprehensive list of drug resistance rules for inhibitors of the HCV protease in non-structural protein 3 (NS3-protease: Boceprevir, Paritaprevir, Simeprevir, Asunaprevir, Grazoprevir and Telaprevir), the NS5A replicase factor (Daclatasvir, Ledipasvir, Elbasvir and Ombitasvir), and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Dasabuvir and Sofosbuvir). Upon submission of up to eight sequences, g2p[HCV] aligns the input sequences, identifies the genomic region(s), predicts the HCV geno- and subtypes, and generates for each DAA a drug resistance prediction report. g2p[HCV] offers easy-to-use and fast subtype and resistance analysis of HCV sequences, is continuously updated and freely accessible under http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/index.php. The system was partially validated with respect to the NS3-protease inhibitors Boceprevir, Telaprevir and Simeprevir by using data generated with recombinant, phenotypic

  3. Hepatitis C virus treatment for prevention among people who inject drugs: Modeling treatment scale-up in the age of direct-acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Natasha K; Vickerman, Peter; Grebely, Jason; Hellard, Margaret; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Lima, Viviane D; Foster, Graham R; Dillon, John F; Goldberg, David J; Dore, Gregory J; Hickman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Substantial reductions in hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID) cannot be achieved by harm reduction interventions such as needle exchange and opiate substitution therapy (OST) alone. Current HCV treatment is arduous and uptake is low, but new highly effective and tolerable interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatments could facilitate increased uptake. We projected the potential impact of DAA treatments on PWID HCV prevalence in three settings. A dynamic HCV transmission model was parameterized to three chronic HCV prevalence settings: Edinburgh, UK (25%); Melbourne, Australia (50%); and Vancouver, Canada (65%). Using realistic scenarios of future DAAs (90% sustained viral response, 12 weeks duration, available 2015), we projected the treatment rates required to reduce chronic HCV prevalence by half or three-quarters within 15 years. Current HCV treatment rates may have a minimal impact on prevalence in Melbourne and Vancouver (<2% relative reductions) but could reduce prevalence by 26% in 15 years in Edinburgh. Prevalence could halve within 15 years with treatment scale-up to 15, 40, or 76 per 1,000 PWID annually in Edinburgh, Melbourne, or Vancouver, respectively (2-, 13-, and 15-fold increases, respectively). Scale-up to 22, 54, or 98 per 1,000 PWID annually could reduce prevalence by three-quarters within 15 years. Less impact occurs with delayed scale-up, higher baseline prevalence, or shorter average injecting duration. Results are insensitive to risk heterogeneity or restricting treatment to PWID on OST. At existing HCV drug costs, halving chronic prevalence would require annual treatment budgets of US $3.2 million in Edinburgh and approximately $50 million in Melbourne and Vancouver. Conclusion: Interferon-free DAAs could enable increased HCV treatment uptake among PWID, which could have a major preventative impact. However, treatment costs may limit scale-up, and should be addressed. (Hepatology 2013;58:1598

  4. Efficacy of Second Generation Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Treatment Naïve Hepatitis C Genotype 1: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sobhonslidsuk, Abhasnee; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) infections has significantly changed in the past few years due to the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). DAAs could improve the sustained virological response compared to pegylated interferon with ribavirin (PR). However, there has been no evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that directly compare the efficacy among the different regimens of DAAs. Aim Therefore, we performed a systematic review and network meta-analysis aiming to compare the treatment efficacy between different DAA regimens for treatment naïve HCV genotype 1. Methods Medline and Scopus were searched up to 25th May 2015. RCTs investigating the efficacy of second generation DAA regimens for treatment naïve HCV genotype 1 were eligible for the review. Due to the lower efficacy and more side effects of first generation DAAs, this review included only second generation DAAs approved by the US or EU Food and Drug Administration, that comprised of simeprevir (SMV), sofosbuvir (SOF), daclatasvir (DCV), ledipasvir (LDV), and paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir (PrOD). Primary outcomes were sustained virological response at weeks 12 (SVR12) and 24 (SVR24) after the end of treatment and adverse drug events (i.e. serious adverse events, anemia, and fatigue). Efficacy of all treatment regimens were compared by applying a multivariate random effect meta-analysis. Incidence rates of SVR12 and SVR24, and adverse drug events of each treatment regimen were pooled using ‘pmeta’ command in STATA program. Results Overall, 869 studies were reviewed and 16 studies were eligible for this study. Compared with the PR regimen, SOF plus PR, SMV plus PR, and DVC plus PR regimens yielded significantly higher probability of having SVR24 with pooled risk ratios (RR) of 1.98 (95% CI 1.24, 3.14), 1.46 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.75), and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.46), respectively. Pooled incidence rates of SVR12 and SVR24 in all treatment regimens

  5. Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Viral Resistance to Direct Acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Asma; Felmlee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a remarkable transformation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in recent years with the development of direct acting antiviral agents targeting virus encoded proteins important for viral replication including NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B. These agents have shown high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90% in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials; however, this is slightly lower in real-life cohorts. Hepatitis C virus resistant variants are seen in most patients who do not achieve SVR due to selection and outgrowth of resistant hepatitis C virus variants within a given host. These resistance associated mutations depend on the class of direct-acting antiviral drugs used and also vary between hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes. The understanding of these mutations has a clear clinical implication in terms of choice and combination of drugs used. In this review, we describe mechanism of action of currently available drugs and summarize clinically relevant resistance data. PMID:26694454

  6. Pros and Cons: Usage of organs from donors infected with hepatitis C virus - Revision in the direct-acting antiviral era.

    PubMed

    Coilly, Audrey; Samuel, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Should organs from hepatitis C antibody positive donors (HCVD+) be used for transplantation? Organ shortage forces transplant teams to use donors with extended criteria. The decision to transplant a HCVD+ graft is a balance between the risk of transmission of a virus that could lead to end-stage liver diseases and the benefit of access to transplantation, specifically in patients with life-threatening disease. The other issue is the impact of HCV-related liver fibrosis in the donor graft on the long-term outcome in the recipient. Thus, the use of HCVD+ demonstrated a shorter meantime on the waiting list in kidney transplantation. When a HCVD+ graft is transplanted, the risk of HCV transmission depends on; 1) the quality of screening of the donor; 2) the presence of viral replication in the donor at the time of transplantation and the ability to detect it; and 3) the HCV status of the recipient but also the type of transplanted organ. In liver transplantation, the use of HCVD+ graft is usually restricted to recipients with a chronic HCV infection. Several reports showed some competition between HCV donor and recipient strain without deleterious impact on graft and patient survival. Controversies are still pending regarding the quality of the graft and the progression of fibrosis. The recent approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) dramatically changes the landscape of HCV infection treatment. After transplantation, combinations of DAA show high efficacy and good safety profile. In the near future, extensive use of DAA should reduce the number of HCVD+ with a positive HCV RNA, limiting the risk of transmission but also the number of patients on waiting lists for a disease related to HCV. PMID:26375245

  7. Detection of Natural Resistance-Associated Substitutions by Ion Semiconductor Technology in HCV1b Positive, Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents-Naïve Patients.

    PubMed

    Marascio, Nadia; Pavia, Grazia; Strazzulla, Alessio; Dierckx, Tim; Cuypers, Lize; Vrancken, Bram; Barreca, Giorgio Settimo; Mirante, Teresa; Malanga, Donatella; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Torti, Carlo; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo; The Sinergie-Umg Study Group

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) can negatively impact the response to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) agents-based therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Herein, we set out to characterize the RASs in the HCV1b genome from serum samples of DAA-naïve patients in the context of the SINERGIE (South Italian Network for Rational Guidelines and International Epidemiology, 2014) project. We deep-sequenced the NS3/4A protease region of the viral population using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine, and patient-specific majority rule consensus sequence summaries were constructed with a combination of freely available next generation sequencing data analysis software. We detected NS3/4A protease major and minor variants associated with resistance to boceprevir (V36L), telaprevir (V36L, I132V), simeprevir (V36L), and grazoprevir (V36L, V170I). Furthermore, we sequenced part of HCV NS5B polymerase using Sanger-sequencing and detected a natural RAS for dasabuvir (C316N). This mutation could be important for treatment strategies in cases of previous therapy failure. PMID:27618896

  8. Direct-acting antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: Interferon free is now.

    PubMed

    Florian, J; Mishra, P; Arya, V; Harrington, P; Connelly, S; Reynolds, K S; Sinha, V

    2015-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a global, serious, and life-threatening disease. Virologic response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) signifies a durable virologic response and is currently the primary efficacy endpoint used in registrational trials. This change led to more rapid clinical development and earlier approvals of highly effective and well-tolerated therapies, facilitating access to those in need. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a therapeutic area where mathematical modeling has proven helpful in understanding the drug mechanism and characterizing viral kinetics to inform therapy decisions. The availability of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provides various treatment options for HIV/HCV coinfected patients, but the complexity of predicting and managing drug-drug interactions presents a unique challenge. Real-world experience or noninterventional studies can provide insight regarding the safety and use of therapeutics that may not be readily available from traditional clinical trials. This article provides a brief overview of the development of promising drugs for the treatment of CHC. PMID:26179495

  9. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Naqvi, Alissa; Obry-Roguet, Véronique; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Billaud, Eric; Cheret, Antoine; Rey, David; Jacomet, Christine; Duvivier, Claudine; Pugliese, Pascal; Pradat, Pierre; Cotte, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA) offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART) is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Methods Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the multicenter French Dat’AIDS cohort. A simulation of drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral treatment and DAAs available in 2015 was performed. Results Of 16,634 HIV-infected patients, 2,511 had detectable anti-HCV antibodies, of whom 1,196 had a detectable HCV-RNA and were not receiving HCV treatment at the time of analysis. 97.1% of these patients were receiving cART and 81.2% had a plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/mL. cART included combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a boosted protease inhibitor in 43.6%, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 17.3%, an integrase inhibitor in 15.4% and various combinations or antiretroviral drugs in 23.7% of patients. A previous treatment against HCV had been administered in 64.4% of patients. Contraindicated associations/potential interactions were expected between cART and respectively sofosbuvir (0.2%/0%), sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (0.2%/67.6%), daclatasvir (0%/49.4%), ombitasvir/boosted paritaprevir (with or without dasabuvir) (34.4%/52.2%) and simeprevir (78.8%/0%). Conclusions Significant potential drug-drug interactions are expected between cART and the currently available DAAs in the majority of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and sofosbuvir/daclatasvir with or without ribavirin appeared the most suitable combinations in our population. A close collaboration between hepatologists and HIV/AIDS specialists appears necessary for the management of HCV treatment concomitantly to c

  10. Are Interferon-Free Direct-Acting Antivirals for the Treatment of HCV Enough to Control the Epidemic among People Who Inject Drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Rozada, Ignacio; Grebely, Jason; Hull, Mark; Lourenco, Lillian; Nosyk, Bohdan; Krajden, Mel; Yoshida, Eric; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Widely access to interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens (IFN-free DAA) is poised to dramatically change the impact of the HCV epidemic among people who inject drugs (PWID). We evaluated the long-term effect of increasing HCV testing, treatment and engagement into harm-reduction activities, focused on active PWID, on the HCV epidemic in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We built a compartmental model of HCV disease transmission stratified by disease progression, transmission risk, and fibrosis level. We explored the effect of: (1) Increasing treatment rates from 8 to 20, 40 and 80 per 1000 infected PWID/year; (2) Increasing treatment eligibility based on fibrosis level; (3) Maximizing the effect of testing by performing it immediately upon ending the acute phase; (4) Increasing access to harm-reduction activities to reduce the risk of re-infection; (5) Different HCV antiviral regimens on the Control Reproduction Number Rc. We assessed the impact of these interventions on incidence, prevalence and mortality from 2016 to 2030. Results Of all HCV antiviral regimens, only IFN-free DAAs offered a high chance of disease elimination (i.e. Rc < 1), but it would be necessary to substantially increase the current low testing and treatment rates. Assuming a treatment rate of 80 per 1000 infected PWID per year, coupled with a high testing rate, the incidence rate, at the end of 2030, could decrease from 92.9 per 1000 susceptible PWID per year (Status Quo) to 82.8 (by treating only PWID with fibrosis level F2 and higher) or to 65.5 (by treating PWID regardless of fibrosis level). If PWID also had access to increased harm-reduction activities, the incidence rate further decreased to 53.1 per 1000 susceptible PWID per year. We also obtained significant decreases in prevalence and mortality at the end of 2030. Conclusions The combination of increased access to HCV testing, highly efficacious antiviral treatment and harm-reduction programs can substantially

  11. Can Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment as Prevention Reverse the HCV Epidemic Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in the United Kingdom? Epidemiological and Modeling Insights

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Natasha K.; Thornton, Alicia; Hickman, Matthew; Sabin, Caroline; Nelson, Mark; Cooke, Graham S.; Martin, Thomas C. S.; Delpech, Valerie; Ruf, Murad; Price, Huw; Azad, Yusef; Thomson, Emma C.; Vickerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. We report on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United Kingdom and model its trajectory with or without scaled-up HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods. A dynamic HCV transmission model among HIV–diagnosed MSM in the United Kingdom was calibrated to HCV prevalence (antibody [Ab] or RNA positive), incidence, and treatment from 2004 to 2011 among HIV-diagnosed MSM in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC). The epidemic was projected with current or scaled-up HCV treatment, with or without a 20% behavioral risk reduction. Results. HCV prevalence among HIV-positive MSM in UK CHIC increased from 7.3% in 2004 to 9.9% in 2011, whereas primary incidence was flat (1.02–1.38 per 100 person-years). Over the next decade, modeling suggests 94% of infections are attributable to high-risk individuals, comprising 7% of the population. Without treatment, HCV chronic prevalence could have been 38% higher in 2015 (11.9% vs 8.6%). With current treatment and sustained virological response rates (status quo), chronic prevalence is likely to increase to 11% by 2025, but stabilize with DAA introduction in 2015. With DAA scale-up to 80% within 1 year of diagnosis (regardless of disease stage), and 20% per year thereafter, chronic prevalence could decline by 71% (to 3.2%) compared to status quo in 2025. With additional behavioral interventions, chronic prevalence could decline further to <2.5% by 2025. Conclusions. Epidemiological data and modeling suggest a continuing HCV epidemic among HIV-diagnosed MSM in the United Kingdom driven by high-risk individuals, despite high treatment rates. Substantial reductions in HCV transmission could be achieved through scale-up of DAAs and moderately effective behavioral interventions. PMID:26908813

  12. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K; Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nandakumar, Ramya; Cheshenko, Natalia; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Krzyzowska, Malgosha; Kratholm, Sine K; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Petersen, Steen V; Goriely, Stanislas; Bibby, Bo Martin; Eriksson, Kristina; Ruland, Jürgen; Thomsen, Allan R; Herold, Betsy C; Wandall, Hans H; Frische, Sebastian; Holm, Christian K; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative. PMID:26595890

  13. The importance of resistance to direct antiviral drugs in HCV infection in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response. Remaining factors associated with treatment failure include advanced stages of liver fibrosis, response to previous antiviral therapy and viral factors such as baseline viral load and suboptimal interaction of the DAA with the target based on viral variants. Heterogeneity within NS3, NS5A, and NS5B areas interacting with DAAs exist between HCV geno- and subtypes as well as HCV isolates of the same geno- and subtype and amino acid polymorphisms associated with suboptimal efficacy of DAAs are termed resistance-associated variants (RAVs). RAVs may be associated with virologic treatment failure. However, virologic treatment failure typically occurs only if other negative predictive host or viral factors are present at the same time, susceptibility to additional antiviral agents is reduced or duration of treatment is suboptimal. In this review geno- and phenotypic resistance testing as well as clinical data on the importance of RAVs for conventional triple therapies with sofosbuvir, simeprevir, and daclatasvir and available interferon-free DAA combinations are discussed. PMID:26409317

  14. Genetic Barrier to Direct Acting Antivirals in HCV Sequences Deposited in the European Databank

    PubMed Central

    Tovo, Cristiane Valle; Gorini da Veiga, Ana Beatriz; Machado, André Luiz; West, John

    2016-01-01

    556 G/N/R positions required only one transition for up to 98.8% of the sequences analyzed. A single variant in position 448 in genotype 1a is less likely to become the resistance variant 448H because it requires two transversions. Also, in the position 559D a transversion and a transition were necessary to generate the resistance mutant D559H. Conclusion Results revealed that in 14 out of 16 positions, conversion to a drug-resistant variant of HCV required only one single nucleotide substitutions threatening direct acting antivirals from all three classes. PMID:27504952

  15. Indian National Association for Study of the Liver (INASL) Guidance for Antiviral Therapy Against HCV Infection in 2015.

    PubMed

    Puri, Pankaj; Anand, Anil C; Saraswat, Vivek A; Acharya, Subrat K; Dhiman, Radha K; Sarin, Shiv K; Singh, Shivaram P; Chawla, Yogesh K; Aggarwal, Rakesh; Amarapurkar, Deepak; Arora, Anil; Dixit, Vinod K; Sood, Ajit; Shah, Samir; Duseja, Ajay; Kapoor, Dharmesh; Shalimar; Madan, Kaushal; Pande, Gaurav; Nagral, Aabha; Kar, Premashis; Koshy, Abraham; Puri, Amarender S; Eapen, C E; Thareja, Sandeep

    2015-09-01

    Overall prevalence of HCV infection in India has been estimated to be approximately 1.3% in the general population. Recent introduction of sofosbuvir in India at a relatively affordable price has led to great optimism about prospects of cure for these patients. This drug is likely to form the backbone of current and future treatment regimes for HCV infection, displacing pegylated interferon. Availability of directly acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) has necessitated revision of INASL guidelines for the treatment of HCV published in 2014, as has happened across the world. Current considerations for the treatment of HCV in India include the poorer response of genotype 3, nonavailability of many of the DAAs recommended by other guidelines and the cost of therapy. Since only one DAA, sofosbuvir, is available in India, only two sofosbuvir-based regimes are possible: either dual drug therapy in combination with ribavirin alone for 6 months or triple drug therapy in combination with ribavirin and pegylated interferon for 3 months. The utility of these regimes in various situations has been discussed. Availability of a few other newer DAAs, expected in 2016, is expected to lead to more widespread use of these agents. Current guidance will be updated once newer DAAs, newer evidence with DAAs and 'real-life experience' with use of DAAs accumulate in India. PMID:26628840

  16. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) function description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, A. J.; Bailey, D. G.; Gaabo, R. J.; Lahn, T. G.; Larson, J. C.; Peterson, E. M.; Schuck, J. W.; Rodgers, D. L.; Wroblewski, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Demonstration Advanced Avionics System, DAAS, is an integrated avionics system utilizing microprocessor technologies, data busing, and shared displays for demonstrating the potential of these technologies in improving the safety and utility of general aviation operations in the late 1980's and beyond. Major hardware elements of the DAAS include a functionally distributed microcomputer complex, an integrated data control center, an electronic horizontal situation indicator, and a radio adaptor unit. All processing and display resources are interconnected by an IEEE-488 bus in order to enhance the overall system effectiveness, reliability, modularity and maintainability. A detail description of the DAAS architecture, the DAAS hardware, and the DAAS functions is presented. The system is designed for installation and flight test in a NASA Cessna 402-B aircraft.

  17. Direct acting antiviral therapy is curative for chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahebjam, Farhad; Hajdu, Cristina H; Nortey, Esther; Sigal, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena are common in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Management of chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis syndrome has until recently been problematic due to the adverse effects of interferon on autoimmune processes and immunosuppression on viral replication. In this report we describe 3 patients with chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome who responded rapidly to direct acting anti-viral therapy. The resolution of the autoimmune process supports a direct viral role in its pathophysiology. PMID:27190580

  18. Future mobile access for open-data platforms and the BBC-DaaS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlich, Stefan; Singh, Sonam; Pfennigstorf, Ingo

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we develop an open data platform on multimedia devices to act as marketplace of data for information seekers and data providers. We explore the important aspects of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) service in the cloud with a mobile access point. The basis of the DaaS service is to act as a marketplace for information, utilizing new technologies and recent new scalable polyglot architectures based on NoSql databases. Whereas Open-Data platforms are beginning to be widely accepted, its mobile use is not. We compare similar products, their approach and a possible mobile usage. We discuss several approaches to address the mobile access as a native app, html5 and a mobile first approach together with the several frontend presentation techniques. Big data visualization itself is in the early days and we explore some possibilities to get big data / open data accessed by mobile users.

  19. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS), Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, A. J.; Bailey, D. G.; Gaabo, R. J.; Lahn, T. G.; Larson, J. C.; Peterson, E. M.; Schuck, J. W.; Rodgers, D. L.; Wroblewski, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstration advanced anionics system (DAAS) function description, hardware description, operational evaluation, and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) are provided. Projected advanced avionics system (PAAS) description, reliability analysis, cost analysis, maintainability analysis, and modularity analysis are discussed.

  20. Antiviral Therapy in Elderly Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rheem, Justin; Sundaram, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents has revolutionized the treatment schema for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. From cure rates to tolerability, DAA agents have shown outstanding profiles compared with the prior therapy of pegylated interferon with ribavirin. However, the efficacy and safety profiles of DAA therapy in older patients, particularly the elderly, have been unclear, and patients in the 1945 to 1965 birth cohort constitute the largest proportion of the HCV population in the United States. Treating elderly patients with pegylated interferon and ribavirin has been challenging due to the frequent presence of multiple comorbidities in the elderly and high discontinuation rates caused by adverse events. Now, as more DAA agents have become widely studied and approved, subgroup analyses for the elderly population are being elucidated. Analysis of the current literature shows that these agents have been effective, well tolerated, and safe in the elderly population. This article highlights the efficacy and safety differences in interferon-based therapy and interferon-free regimens for elderly patients with HCV infection.

  1. Multi-scale model for hepatitis C viral load kinetics under treatment with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Harnisch, Julia; Kaderali, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a global health problem, and extensive research over the last decades has been targeted at understanding its molecular biology and developing effective antiviral treatments. Recently, a number of potent direct acting antiviral drugs have been developed targeting specific processes in the viral life cycle. Here, we developed a mathematical multi-scale model of the within-host dynamics of HCV infection by integrating a standard model for viral infection with a detailed model of the viral replication cycle inside infected cells. We use this model to study patient time courses of viral load under treatment with daclatasvir, an inhibitor of the viral non-structural protein NS5A. Model analysis predicts that treatment efficacy can be increased by combining daclatasvir with dedicated viral polymerase inhibitors, corresponding to promising current strategies in drug development. Hence, our model presents a predictive tool for in silico simulations, which can be used to study and optimize direct acting antiviral drug treatment. PMID:26409026

  2. Drug–drug interactions during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Jennifer J.; Burton, James R.; Everson, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for HCV infection represents a major advance in treatment. The NS3 protease inhibitors, boceprevir and telaprevir, were the first DAAs to receive regulatory approval. When combined with PEG-IFN and ribavirin, these agents increase rates of sustained virologic response in HCV genotype 1 to ~70%. However, this treatment regimen is associated with several toxicities. In addition, both boceprevir and telaprevir are substrates for and inhibitors of the drug transporter P-glycoprotein and the cytochrome P450 enzyme 3A4 and are, therefore, prone to clinically relevant drug interactions. Several new DAAs for HCV are in late stages of clinical development and are likely to be approved in the near future. These include the protease inhibitors, simeprevir and faldaprevir, the NS5A inhibitor, daclatasvir, and the nucleotide polymerase inhibitor, sofosbuvir. Herein, we review the clinical pharmacology and drug interactions of boceprevir, telaprevir and these investigational DAAs. Although boceprevir and telaprevir are involved in many interactions, these interactions are manageable if health-care providers proactively identify and adjust treatments. Emerging DAAs seem to have a reduced potential for drug interactions, which will facilitate their use in the treatment of HCV. PMID:23817323

  3. 78 FR 63218 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct... of development of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C....

  4. Analysis of UAS DAA Alerting in Fast-Time Simulations without DAA Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, David P.; Santiago, Confesor; Isaacson, Douglas R.; Lee, Seung Man; Park, Chunki; Refai, Mohamad Said; Snow, James

    2015-01-01

    Realization of the expected proliferation of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) depends on the development and validation of performance standards for UAS Detect and Avoid (DAA) Systems. The RTCA Special Committee 228 is charged with leading the development of draft Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA Systems. NASA, as a participating member of RTCA SC-228 is committed to supporting the development and validation of draft requirements for DAA alerting system performance. A recent study conducted using NASA's ACES (Airspace Concept Evaluation System) simulation capability begins to address questions surrounding the development of draft MOPS for DAA alerting systems. ACES simulations were conducted to study the performance of alerting systems proposed by the SC-228 DAA Alerting sub-group. Analysis included but was not limited to: 1) correct alert (and timeliness), 2) false alert (and severity and duration), 3) missed alert, and 4) probability of an alert type at the time of loss of well clear. The performance of DAA alerting systems when using intent vs. dead-reckoning for UAS ownship trajectories was also compared. The results will be used by SC-228 to inform decisions about the surveillance standards of UAS DAA systems and future requirements development and validation efforts.

  5. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Morsica, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs) were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV) or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV) was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4%) in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2%) in 1a isolates, p = 0.040). Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1%) G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5%) harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001). Finally, 28 (2.3%) G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs. PMID:27023593

  6. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Morsica, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs) were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV) or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV) was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4%) in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2%) in 1a isolates, p = 0.040). Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1%) G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5%) harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001). Finally, 28 (2.3%) G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs. PMID:27023593

  7. Clinical efficacy of the highly sensitive hepatitis C virus RNA quantitative assay in patients with relapse following interferon-based therapy with second-generation direct-acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, TORU; ABE, SATOSHI; WATANABE, TAKAYUKI; NOZAWA, YUJIRO; SANO, TOMOE; IWANAGA, AKITO; SEKI, KEIICHI; HONMA, TERASU; YOSHIDA, TOSHIAKI

    2016-01-01

    For refractory chronic hepatitis C, interferon (IFN)-based triple-agent combination therapy with second-generation direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has been established as the standard treatment method. The rate of decrease in the viral load and the negative conversion of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in the early phase following treatment initiation are considered important factors for predicting the therapeutic outcome. In the present study, the Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HCV v2.0 assay and the AccuGENE m-HCV RNA quantitative assay [Abbott RealTime HCV (ART) assay] were analyzed for their clinical efficacy and ability to predict therapeutic outcomes in the early phase in patients with relapse following IFN-based second-generation DAA therapy. Of the 56 patients who received IFN-based second-generation DAA therapy since December 2013, 6 achieved an end-of-treatment response (ETR), but subsequently experienced relapse. In these 6 patients, fluctuations in viral loads in the early phase detected by the CAP/CTM and ART assays were compared. At 4 weeks after treatment initiation, 4 of the 6 patients were diagnosed as negative by the CAP/CTM assay, whereas 2 of these 4 patients were not identified as negative by the ART assay. Of the 2 patients, one was signal-positive with an HCV RNA load <1.08 Log IU/ml, and the other patient had a viral load of 1.12 Log IU/ml. At 8 weeks after treatment initiation, 1 patient was found to be negative by the CAP/CTM assay, but signal-positive with a viral load <1.08 Log IU/ml by the ART assay. From 4 to 8 weeks after treatment initiation, 3 of the 6 patients appeared to be discrepant cases. In conclusion, of the 6 patients who achieved an ETR, 4 were determined to have achieved a rapid virological response (RVR) by the CAP/CTM assay, but may not have actually become negative. The ART assay is highly sensitive, has a wide measurement range, may be suitable for monitoring HCV RNA loads, and is expected to have an

  8. Analysis of UAS DAA Surveillance in Fast-Time Simulations without DAA Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, David P.; Santiago, Confesor; Isaacson, David R.; Lee, Seung Man; Refai, Mohamad Said; Snow, James William

    2015-01-01

    Realization of the expected proliferation of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) depends on the development and validation of performance standards for UAS Detect and Avoid (DAA) Systems. The RTCA Special Committee 228 is charged with leading the development of draft Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA Systems. NASA, as a participating member of RTCA SC-228 is committed to supporting the development and validation of draft requirements for DAA surveillance system performance. A recent study conducted using NASA's ACES (Airspace Concept Evaluation System) simulation capability begins to address questions surrounding the development of draft MOPS for DAA surveillance systems. ACES simulations were conducted to study the performance of sensor systems proposed by the SC-228 DAA Surveillance sub-group. Analysis included but was not limited to: 1) number of intruders (both IFR and VFR) detected by all sensors as a function of UAS flight time, 2) number of intruders (both IFR and VFR) detected by radar alone as a function of UAS flight time, and 3) number of VFR intruders detected by all sensors as a function of UAS flight time. The results will be used by SC-228 to inform decisions about the surveillance standards of UAS DAA systems and future requirements development and validation efforts.

  9. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. Objective: To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA. Materials and methods:    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. Results: We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. Conclusion: BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org. PMID:27547378

  10. Direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C: structural and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Götte, Matthias; Feld, Jordan J

    2016-06-01

    The treatment of HCV infection has evolved at an extremely rapid pace over the past few years. The development of direct-acting antiviral agents, which potently inhibit different stages in the viral life cycle, has led to the replacement of interferon with well-tolerated oral therapies with cure rates of >90% in most patient populations. Understanding the mechanisms of action of the various agents as well as related issues, including the molecular basis for resistance, helps to guide drug development and clinical use. In this Review, we provide a mechanistic description of NS3/4A protease inhibitors, nucleotide and non-nucleotide inhibitors of the NS5B viral polymerase and inhibitors of the NS5A protein, followed by a summary of clinical data from studies of each drug class alone and in combination. Remaining challenges in drug development efforts are also discussed. PMID:27147491

  11. Rapid progression of antiviral treatments of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pol, S; Corouge, M; Mallet, V; Sogni, P

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin leads to a sustained virologic response in around 50% of patients with HCV genotype 1, 65% with HCV genotype 4, 75% with HCV genotype 3 and around 80% with HCV genotype 2. A better understanding of the HCV life-cycle recently resulted in the development of several potential direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) targeting viral proteins (NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B nucleos(t)idic and non nucleos(t)idic polymerase inhibitors, NS5A replication complex inhibitors). A lot of data have been reported with the combinations of pegylated interferon-alfa/ribavirin and the first generation oral DAAs, Telaprevir and Boceprevir. These regimens have demonstrated a high level of antiviral efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in treatment-naïve patients and in prior non-responders to pegylated interferon-alfa/ribavirin. After this first major step, the combination of the second generation DAAs with pegylated interferon-alfa/ribavirin will impact antiviral potency and tolerance and will reduce the duration of therapies and the pill burden. The next step will be the oral combination of new DAAs which is likely to become the standard of care for chronic HCV after 2015. Most studies are conducted in small numbers of "easy-to-treat" patients with short post-treatment period for concluding to a sustained virologic response: extension of both the numbers of treated patients and post-treatment follow-up, inclusion of more difficult-to-treat patients (experienced genotype 3-infected or genotype 1-infected patients who failed to first generation protease inhibitors, cirrhotic, HIV co-infected patients, allograft recipients or candidates to transplantation) will probably reduce the overall rate of cure. PMID:23831907

  12. Both Cyclophilin Inhibitors and Direct-Acting Antivirals Prevent PKR Activation in HCV-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobardt, Michael; Chatterji, Udayan; Lim, Precious; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Gallay, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We and others demonstrated that the contact between NS5A and the host factor CypA is critical for HCV replication. CypI, by disrupting NS5A-CypA complexes, block HCV replication both in vitro and in patients. Since NS5A also binds to PKR, a central component of the IFN response, we investigated the possibility of a relationship between CypA, NS5A and PKR in the IFN response to HCV. HCV-infected cells treated with CypI, DAAs or IFN were analyzed for the expression and activation of various components of the innate response. We found that CypI (cyclosporine A, alisporivir, NIM811 and sanglifehrins), drastically prevented the activation/phosphorylation, but not the expression of IFN-induced PKR in HCV-infected cells. CypI had no effect on the expression or phosphorylation of other components of the innate response such as eiF2, NF-kB, IRF3, IRF9, STAT1 and STAT2, suggesting a specific effect on PKR. No significant activation of IFN-induced PKR was observed in the absence of HCV. Importantly, we found that several classes of DAAs such as NS3/4A protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A inhibitors also prevented PKR activation. Furthermore, we found that PKR activation by the dsRNA mimic poly I:C cannot be prevented by CypI or DAAs. Our findings suggest that CypI do not have a unique effect on PKR activation, but rather the suppression of HCV replication by any anti-HCV inhibitor, abrogates PKR activation induced by IFN. Moreover, they suggest that the accumulation of dsRNA intermediates allows HCV to exploit the activation of PKR to counteract the IFN response. PMID:24799968

  13. Drug Interactions with the Direct-Acting Antiviral Combination of Ombitasvir and Paritaprevir-Ritonavir.

    PubMed

    Badri, Prajakta S; Dutta, Sandeep; Wang, Haoyu; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Polepally, Akshanth R; Khatri, Amit; Zha, Jiuhong; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Awni, Walid M; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-01-01

    The two direct-acting antiviral (2D) regimen of ombitasvir and paritaprevir (administered with low-dose ritonavir) is being developed for treatment of genotype subtype 1b and genotypes 2 and 4 chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Drug-drug interactions were evaluated in healthy volunteers to develop dosing recommendations for HCV-infected subjects. Mechanism-based interactions were evaluated for ketoconazole, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, digoxin, warfarin, and omeprazole. Interactions were also evaluated for duloxetine, escitalopram, methadone, and buprenorphine-naloxone. Ratios of geometric means with 90% confidence intervals for the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve were estimated to assess the magnitude of the interactions. For most medications, coadministration with the 2D regimen resulted in a <50% change in exposures. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin exposures increased by up to 105%, 58%, 76%, and 161%, respectively, and omeprazole exposures decreased by approximately 50%. Clinically meaningful changes in ombitasvir, paritaprevir, or ritonavir exposures were not observed. In summary, all 11 medications evaluated can be coadministered with the 2D regimen, with most medications requiring no dose adjustment. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin require lower doses, and omeprazole may require a higher dose. No dose adjustment is required for the 2D regimen. PMID:26459906

  14. Hepatitis C Virus in Children: Deferring Treatment in Expectation of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    PubMed

    Granot, Esther; Sokal, Etienne M

    2015-11-01

    The major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the pediatric age group is vertical, with infection occurring in up to 5% of infants born to mothers positive for HCV-RNA. The natural course of pediatric HCV infection is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous clearance, an asymptomatic clinical course, and normal or mild histologic changes. Cirrhosis is reported in 1-2% of children, and progression to severe chronic liver disease and HCC occurs 20-30 years after infection. Treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) + ribavirin results in a sustained viral response (SVR) reaching 100% in children with HCV genotypes 2 or 3 but only 45-55% in those infected with genotypes 1 or 4. Treatment is associated with adverse effects ranging from flu-like symptoms, myalgia, anemia and thrombocytopenia, to less commonly observed thyroid-related symptoms, alopecia, neuropsychiatric manifestations and possible long-term effects on growth. Ongoing trials with direct-acting antiviral agents in adults show promising results with treatment regimens of shorter duration and high tolerance. The next few years will likely see these advances introduced to the pediatric population as well. In the meantime, in children with HCV an expectant approach is advocated and treatment should be offered only to those at high risk for more severe, progressive disease. PMID:26757569

  15. Drug Interactions with the Direct-Acting Antiviral Combination of Ombitasvir and Paritaprevir-Ritonavir

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sandeep; Wang, Haoyu; Podsadecki, Thomas J.; Polepally, Akshanth R.; Khatri, Amit; Zha, Jiuhong; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Awni, Walid M.; Menon, Rajeev M.

    2015-01-01

    The two direct-acting antiviral (2D) regimen of ombitasvir and paritaprevir (administered with low-dose ritonavir) is being developed for treatment of genotype subtype 1b and genotypes 2 and 4 chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Drug-drug interactions were evaluated in healthy volunteers to develop dosing recommendations for HCV-infected subjects. Mechanism-based interactions were evaluated for ketoconazole, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, digoxin, warfarin, and omeprazole. Interactions were also evaluated for duloxetine, escitalopram, methadone, and buprenorphine-naloxone. Ratios of geometric means with 90% confidence intervals for the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve were estimated to assess the magnitude of the interactions. For most medications, coadministration with the 2D regimen resulted in a <50% change in exposures. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin exposures increased by up to 105%, 58%, 76%, and 161%, respectively, and omeprazole exposures decreased by approximately 50%. Clinically meaningful changes in ombitasvir, paritaprevir, or ritonavir exposures were not observed. In summary, all 11 medications evaluated can be coadministered with the 2D regimen, with most medications requiring no dose adjustment. Ketoconazole, digoxin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin require lower doses, and omeprazole may require a higher dose. No dose adjustment is required for the 2D regimen. PMID:26459906

  16. Accessibility to Oral Antiviral Therapy for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Sammy; Jimenez, Melissa; Fong, Tiffany; Wu, Crystal; Bau, Sherona; Jamal, Zoha; Grotts, Jonathan; Elashoff, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hepatitis C (HCV) direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are safe, effective, and tolerable. Most contraindications to interferon-based treatment are no long applicable. The aims of this study were to understand the predictors of approval to drug accessibility. Methods: We studied all consecutive patients with HCV prescribed DAAs between October 2014 and July 2015. Data on demographic, socio-economic status, comorbidities, baseline laboratory values, and assessment of liver disease severity, insurance, and specialty pharmacy type were collected. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of prescription approval. Results: In total, 410 patients were prescribed DAAs between October 2014 and July 2015. Of those, 332 (81%) patients were insurance approved for therapy. Of the 332 patients accepted, 251 were accepted after the first prescription attempt, and 38 were accepted after the second and third attempts. The number of attempts for the other 43 approved patients was unknown. Older age (p = 0.001), employment (p = 0.001), lack of comorbidities (p = 0.02), liver transplantation (p = 0.018), and advanced liver disease (p = 0.001) were more likely associated with obtaining approval. Household income was not associated with insurance approval. In the multivariate analysis, Medicare insurance (odds ratio [OR]) 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96–7.20), lack of nonliver comorbidities (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.35–5.43), and the presence of advanced liver disease (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.04–3.24) independently predicted drug approval. Conclusion: Despite the availability of DAAs for HCV, barriers from insurance carriers continue to impair widespread use. Patients with advanced liver disease, Medicare, and without comorbidities are most likely to be insurance approved for DAAs. PMID:27350937

  17. Liver-targeted antiviral peptide nanocomplexes as potential anti-HCV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinjin; Garrison, Jered C; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Bronich, Tatiana K; Osna, Natalia A

    2015-11-01

    Great success in HCV therapy was achieved by the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA). However, the unsolved issues such as high cost and genotype dependency drive us to pursue additional therapeutic agents to be used instead or in combination with DAA. The cationic peptide p41 is one of such candidates displaying submicromolar anti-HCV potency. By electrostatic coupling of p41 with anionic poly(amino acid)-based block copolymers, antiviral peptide nanocomplexes (APN) platform was developed to improve peptide stability and to reduce cytotoxicity associated with positive charge. Herein, we developed a facile method to prepare galactosylated Gal-APN and tested their feasibility as liver-specific delivery system. In vitro, Gal-APN displayed specific internalization in hepatoma cell lines. Even though liver-targeted and non-targeted APN displayed comparable antiviral activity, Gal-APN offered prominent advantages to prevent HCV association with lipid droplets and suppress intracellular expression of HCV proteins. Moreover, in vivo preferential liver accumulation of Gal-APN was revealed in the biodistribution study. Altogether, this work illustrates the potential of Gal-APN as a novel liver-targeted therapy against HCV. PMID:26298393

  18. Bilateral simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, an extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C cured with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Sylvie; Nevens, Frederik; Casteels, Ingele

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with a bilateral optic anterior ischemic neuropathy as an extrahepatic complication of a chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. The patient presented with a bilateral visual acuity loss and bilateral optic disc oedema. The optic neuropathy was associated with a sudden increase in the viral HCV load after a recent liver transplantation. The stop of the calcineurin inhibitor had no effect on the course of the optic neuropathy. Visual improvement and normalization of HCV viraemia occurred after treatment with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir, which are direct acting antivirals. PMID:27625964

  19. Bilateral simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, an extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C cured with direct acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Prud’homme, Sylvie; Nevens, Frederik; Casteels, Ingele

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with a bilateral optic anterior ischemic neuropathy as an extrahepatic complication of a chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. The patient presented with a bilateral visual acuity loss and bilateral optic disc oedema. The optic neuropathy was associated with a sudden increase in the viral HCV load after a recent liver transplantation. The stop of the calcineurin inhibitor had no effect on the course of the optic neuropathy. Visual improvement and normalization of HCV viraemia occurred after treatment with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir, which are direct acting antivirals. PMID:27625964

  20. Software modifications to the Demonstration Advanced Avionics Systems (DAAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedell, B. F.; Hardy, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Critical information required for the design of integrated avionics suitable for generation aviation is applied towards software modifications for the Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS). The program emphasizes the use of data busing, distributed microprocessors, shared electronic displays and data entry devices, and improved functional capability. A demonstration advanced avionics system (DAAS) is designed, built, and flight tested in a Cessna 402, twin engine, general aviation aircraft. Software modifications are made to DAAS at Ames concurrent with the flight test program. The changes are the result of the experience obtained with the system at Ames, and the comments of the pilots who evaluated the system.

  1. Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Treatment-Naive Hepatitis C Genotype 1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qi; Zou, Zhuo-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Na; Chen, Da-Zhi; Zou, Tian-Tian; Shi, Ke-Qing; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-03-01

    All possible direct-acting antiviral agent (DAA) regimens for treatment-naive hepatitis C genotype 1 were evaluated by many randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the optimum regimen remains inconclusive. We aim to compare interventions in terms of sustained virological response at 12 (SVR12) and 24 (SVR24) weeks after the end of treatment and adverse effects (AEs) (fatigue, headache, nausea, insomnia). PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for RCTs until July 31, 2015. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) between treatments on clinical outcomes. Twenty-two eligible RCTs were included. Compared with peginterferon-ribavirin (PR), daclatasvir plus PR (OR 8.90, P < 0.001), faldaprevir plus PR (OR 3.72, P < 0.001), simeprevir plus PR (OR 3.59, P < 0.001), sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 4.69, P < 0.001) yield a significant effect in improving SVR12. Consistently, simeprevir plus PR (OR 3.49, P < 0.001), sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 4.51, P < 0.001), daclatasvir plus PR (OR 4.77, P < 0.001) also improved the rates of SVR24 significantly compared with PR. With respect to AEs, compared with PR, ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 2.13, P < 0.001) confer a significant AE in nausea, whereas daclatasvir plus PR (OR 0.20, P < 0.001 and OR 0.18, P < 0.001, respectively) lowered the incidence of fatigue and nausea significantly when compared with ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir plus PR. Daclatasvir plus PR was the most effective in SVR12 and SVR24, but caused an increased AEs profile (headache and insomnia). Combined ledipasvir with sofosbuvir or combination of PR was associated with higher incidence of fatigue and nausea. PMID:26945424

  2. Defining the Collision Avoidance Region for DAA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, David; Cone, Andrew; Park, Chunki; Lee, Seung Man; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) will be required to equip with a detect-­-and-­-avoid (DAA) system in order to satisfy the federal aviation regulations to maintain well clear of other aircraft, some of which may be equipped with a Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) to mitigate the possibility of mid-­-air collisions. As such, the minimum operational performance standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA systems are being designed with TCAS interoperability in mind by a group of industry, government, and academic institutions named RTCA Special Committee-228 (SC-228). This document will discuss the development of the spatial-­-temporal volume known as the collision avoidance region in which the DAA system is not allowed to provide vertical guidance to maintain or regain DAA well clear that could conflict with resolution advisories (RAs) issued by the intruder aircraft's TCAS system. Three collision avoidance region definition candidates were developed based on the existing TCAS RA and DAA alerting definitions. They were evaluated against each other in terms of their interoperability with TCAS RAs and DAA alerts in an unmitigated factorial encounter analysis of 1.3 million simulated pairs.

  3. 75 FR 11189 - Expanded Access to Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ...) (74 FR 40900, August 13, 2009). Under these regulations, a treatment IND, which permits patients... Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in Patients With Unmet Medical Need; Public Hearing; Request for... agents (DAAs) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection in patients with unmet...

  4. Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Review of Current Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Johnathan; Nguyen, Douglas; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection carries a significant clinical burden in the United States, affecting more than 4.6 million Americans. Untreated chronic HCV infection can result in cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous interferon based treatment carried low rates of success and significant adverse effects. The advent of new generation oral antiviral therapy has led to major improvements in efficacy and tolerability but has also resulted in an explosion of data with increased treatment choice complexity. Treatment guidelines are constantly evolving due to emerging regimens and real world treatment data. There also still remain subpopulations for whom current treatments are lacking or unclearly defined. Thus, the race for development of HCV treatment regimens still continues. This review of the current literature will discuss the current recommended treatment strategies and briefly overview next generation agents. PMID:27293521

  5. New direct-acting antivirals in hepatitis C therapy: a review of sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, daclatasvir, simeprevir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir and dasabuvir.

    PubMed

    McConachie, Sean M; Wilhelm, Sheila M; Kale-Pradhan, Pramodini B

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C is a chronic infection associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. In recent years, there has been a shift in treatment paradigm with the discovery and approval of agents that target specific proteins vital for hepatitis C replication. The NS3/4A inhibitors simeprevir and paritaprevir, the NS5A inhibitors ombitasvir, ledipasvir, and daclatasvir, and the NS5B inhibitors sofosbuvir and dasabuvir have been newly FDA approved and incorporated as first-line agents into the latest IDSA-AASLD guidelines for Hepatitis C treatment. Used in combination, these agents produce higher rates of sustained virologic response and less adverse effects than historical options, along with limited rates of resistance. Pertinent clinical data, pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics are reviewed for these new direct acting antiviral agents. PMID:26651915

  6. Hepatitis C Virus and Natural Compounds: a New Antiviral Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Calland, Noémie; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves; Séron, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a major global health burden with an estimated 160 million infected individuals worldwide. This long-term disease evolves slowly, often leading to chronicity and potentially to liver failure. There is no anti-HCV vaccine, and, until recently, the only treatment available, based on pegylated interferon and ribavirin, was partially effective, and had considerable side effects. With recent advances in the understanding of the HCV life cycle, the development of promising direct acting antivirals (DAAs) has been achieved. Their use in combination with the current treatment has led to encouraging results for HCV genotype 1 patients. However, this therapy is quite expensive and will probably not be accessible for all patients worldwide. For this reason, constant efforts are being made to identify new antiviral molecules. Recent reports about natural compounds highlight their antiviral activity against HCV. Here, we aim to review the natural molecules that interfere with the HCV life cycle and discuss their potential use in HCV therapy. PMID:23202460

  7. Discovering novel direct acting antiviral agents for HBV using in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiki; Hayakawa, Michiyo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Enomoto, Masaru; Tamori, Akihiro; Kawada, Norifumi; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The treatments for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are interferon and nucleoside analogues reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. Because both treatments are less than ideal, we conducted to identify novel anti-viral agents for HBV-reverse transcriptase (HBV-RT). We determined the ligand-binding site of the HBV-RT by conducting a homological search of the amino acid sequence and then we also determined not only structural arrangement of the target protein but the target protein-binding site of the ligand using known protein-ligand complexes in registered in the protein data bank (PDB). Finally we simulated binding between the ligand candidates and the HBV-RT and evaluated the degree of binding (in silico screening). PXB cells derived from human-mouse chimeric mouse liver, infected with HBV were administrated with the candidates, and HBVDNA in the culture medium was monitored by realtime qPCR. Among compounds from the AKosSamples database, twelve candidates that can inhibit RT were also identified, two of which seem to have the potential to control HBV replication in vitro. PMID:25446116

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a Subgenomic Replicons for Evaluation of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wose Kinge, Constance N.; Espiritu, Christine; Prabdial-Sing, Nishi; Sithebe, Nomathamsaqa Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists as six major genotypes that differ in geographical distribution, pathogenesis, and response to antiviral therapy. In vitro replication systems for all HCV genotypes except genotype 5 have been reported. In this study, we recovered genotype 5a full-length genomes from four infected voluntary blood donors in South Africa and established a G418-selectable subgenomic replicon system using one of these strains. The replicon derived from the wild-type sequence failed to replicate in Huh-7.5 cells. However, the inclusion of the S2205I amino acid substitution, a cell culture-adaptive change originally described for a genotype 1b replicon, resulted in a small number of G418-resistant cell colonies. HCV RNA replication in these cells was confirmed by quantification of viral RNA and detection of the nonstructural protein NS5A. Sequence analysis of the viral RNAs isolated from multiple independent cell clones revealed the presence of several nonsynonymous mutations, which were localized mainly in the NS3 protein. These mutations, when introduced back into the parental backbone, significantly increased colony formation. To facilitate convenient monitoring of HCV RNA replication levels, the mutant with the highest replication level was further modified to express a fusion protein of firefly luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase. Using such replicons from genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 4a, and 5a, we compared the effects of various HCV inhibitors on their replication. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro replication system for HCV genotype 5a, which will be useful for the development of pan-genotype anti-HCV compounds. PMID:24982066

  9. Assorted Processing of Synthetic Trans-Acting siRNAs and Its Activity in Antiviral Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingmin; San León, David; Mesel, Frida; García, Juan Antonio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The use of syn-tasiRNAs has been proposed as an RNA interference technique alternative to those previously described: hairpin based, virus induced gene silencing or artificial miRNAs. In this study we engineered the TAS1c locus to impair Plum pox virus (PPV) infection by replacing the five native siRNAs with two 210-bp fragments from the CP and the 3´NCR regions of the PPV genome. Deep sequencing analysis of the small RNA species produced by both constructs in planta has shown that phased processing of the syn-tasiRNAs is construct-specific. While in syn-tasiR-CP construct the processing was as predicted 21-nt phased in register with miR173-guided cleavage, the processing of syn-tasiR-3NCR is far from what was expected. A 22-nt species from the miR173-guided cleavage was a guide of two series of phased small RNAs, one of them in an exact 21-nt register, and the other one in a mixed of 21-/22-nt frame. In addition, both constructs produced abundant PPV-derived small RNAs in the absence of miR173 as a consequence of a strong sense post-transcriptional gene silencing induction. The antiviral effect of both constructs was also evaluated in the presence or absence of miR173 and showed that the impairment of PPV infection was not significantly higher when miR173 was present. The results show that syn-tasiRNAs processing depends on construct-specific factors that should be further studied before the so-called MIGS (miRNA-induced gene silencing) technology can be used reliably. PMID:26147769

  10. New directly acting antivirals for hepatitis C: potential for interaction with antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Seden, Kay; Back, David; Khoo, Saye

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in the development of agents that act specifically to inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) are set to fundamentally change the way that patients will be treated. New directly acting anti-HCV agents such as protease and polymerase inhibitors will initially be added to standard of care with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin. However, future therapy is likely to constitute combinations of agents which act at distinct stages of viral replication and have differing resistance profiles. While directly acting anti-HCV agents will undoubtedly improve treatment outcomes, the introduction of combination therapy may not be without complications in some patient groups. HIV-positive patients who are receiving antiretrovirals (ARVs) are relatively highly represented among those with HCV infection, and are at high risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). As combination anti-HCV treatment gradually evolves to resemble anti-HIV therapy, it is essential to consider the increased potential for DDIs in patients receiving combination anti-HCV therapy, and particularly in HCV/HIV-co-infected individuals. Therapeutic drug monitoring is likely to play a role in the clinical management of such interactions. PMID:20335191

  11. Management of Patients Coinfected With HCV and HIV: A Close Look at the Role for Direct-Acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Naggie, Susanna; Sulkowski, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of effective therapies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with both infections (coinfection). In addition to the high prevalence of chronic HCV, particularly among HIV-infected injection drug users, the rate of incident HIV infections is increasing among HIV-infected men who have sex with men, leading to recommendations for education and screening for HCV in this population. Liver disease is the second leading and, in some cases, a preventable cause of death among coinfected patients. Those at risk for liver disease progression are usually treated with a combination of interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), which is not highly effective; it has low rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), especially for coinfected patients with HCV genotype 1 and those of African descent. Direct-acting antivirals might overcome factors such as immunodeficiency that can reduce the efficacy of IFN. However, for now it remains challenging to treat coinfected patients due to interactions among drugs, additive drug toxicities, and the continued need for combination therapies that include pegylated IFN. Recently developed HCV protease inhibitors such as telaprevir and boceprevir, given in combination with pegylated IFN and RBV, could increase the rate of SVR with manageable toxicity and drug interactions. We review the latest developments and obstacles to treating coinfected patients. PMID:22537439

  12. Management of patients coinfected with HCV and HIV: a close look at the role for direct-acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Naggie, Susanna; Sulkowski, Mark S

    2012-05-01

    With the development of effective therapies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with both infections (coinfection). In addition to the high prevalence of chronic HCV, particularly among HIV-infected injection drug users, the rate of incident HIV infections is increasing among HIV-infected men who have sex with men, leading to recommendations for education and screening for HCV in this population. Liver disease is the second leading and, in some cases, a preventable cause of death among coinfected patients. Those at risk for liver disease progression are usually treated with a combination of interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), which is not highly effective; it has low rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), especially for coinfected patients with HCV genotype 1 and those of African descent. Direct-acting antivirals might overcome factors such as immunodeficiency that can reduce the efficacy of IFN. However, for now it remains challenging to treat coinfected patients due to interactions among drugs, additive drug toxicities, and the continued need for combination therapies that include pegylated IFN. Recently developed HCV protease inhibitors such as telaprevir and boceprevir, given in combination with pegylated IFN and RBV, could increase the rate of SVR with manageable toxicity and drug interactions. We review the latest developments and obstacles to treating coinfected patients. PMID:22537439

  13. Re-re-treatment of hepatitis C virus: Eight patients who relapsed twice after direct-acting-antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Joshua; Bichoupan, Kian; Patel, Neal; Chekuri, Sweta; Harty, Alyson; Dieterich, Douglas; Perumalswami, Ponni; Branch, Andrea D

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine risk factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment failure after direct acting antivirals in patients with complex treatment histories. METHODS: All HCV mono-infected patients who received treatment at our institution were queried. Analysis was restricted to patients who previously failed treatment with boceprevir (BOC) or telaprevir (TVR) and started simeprevir (SMV) and sofosbuvir (SOF) ± ribavirin (RBV) between December 2013 and June 2014. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV co-infection or patients who received a liver transplant in the past were excluded. Viral loads were recorded while on treatment and after treatment. Data collection continued until December, 31st 2014 when data analysis was initiated. Patients missing virologic outcomes data were not included in the analysis. Analysis of 35 patients who had virologic outcome data available resulted in eight patients who were viral load negative at the end of treatment with SMF/SOF but later relapsed. Data related to patient demographics, HCV infection, and treatment history was collected in order to identify risk factors shared among patients who failed treatment with SMF/SOF. RESULTS: Eight patients who were treated with the first generation HCV protease inhibitors BOC or TVR in combination with pegylated-interferon (PEG) and RBV who failed this triple therapy were subsequently re-treated with an off-label all-oral regimen of SMV and SOF for 12 wk, with RBV in seven cases. Treatment was initiated before the Food and Drug Administration approved a 24-wk SMV/SOF regimen for patients with liver cirrhosis. All eight patients had an end of treatment response, but later relapsed. Eight (100%) patients were male. Mean age was 56 (range, 49-64). Eight (100%) patients had previously failed PEG/RBV dual therapy at least once in addition to prior failure with triple therapy. Total number of times treated ranged from 3-6 (mean 3.8). Eight (100%) patients were male had

  14. Sustained viral response in a hepatitis C virus-infected chimpanzee via a combination of direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Olsen, David B; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Handt, Larry; Koeplinger, Kenneth; Zhang, Nanyan Rena; Ludmerer, Steven W; Graham, Donald; Liverton, Nigel; MacCoss, Malcolm; Hazuda, Daria; Carroll, Steven S

    2011-02-01

    Efforts to develop novel, interferon-sparing therapies for treatment of chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection are contingent on the ability of combination therapies consisting of direct antiviral inhibitors to achieve a sustained virologic response. This work demonstrates a proof of concept that coadministration of the nucleoside analogue MK-0608 with the protease inhibitor MK-7009, both of which produced robust viral load declines as monotherapy, to an HCV-infected chimpanzee can achieve a cure of infection. PMID:21115793

  15. 2015 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship. Curing Hepatitis C Virus Infection with Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents: The Arc of a Medicinal Chemistry Triumph.

    PubMed

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2016-08-25

    The development of direct-acting antiviral agents that can cure a chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after 8-12 weeks of daily, well-tolerated therapy has revolutionized the treatment of this insidious disease. In this article, three of Bristol-Myers Squibb's HCV programs are summarized, each of which produced a clinical candidate: the NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir (64), marketed as Sunvepra, the NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir (117), marketed as Daklinza, and the allosteric NS5B polymerase inhibitor beclabuvir (142), which is in late stage clinical studies. A clinical study with 64 and 117 established for the first time that a chronic HCV infection could be cured by treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents alone in the absence of interferon. The development of small molecule HCV therapeutics, designed by medicinal chemists, has been hailed as "the arc of a medical triumph" but may equally well be described as "the arc of a medicinal chemistry triumph". PMID:27501244

  16. In Vitro Antiviral Activity and Resistance Profile Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Inhibitor Ledipasvir

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yang; Doehle, Brian; Peng, Betty; Corsa, Amoreena; Lee, Yu-Jen; Gong, Ruoyu; Yu, Mei; Han, Bin; Xu, Simin; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Perron, Michel; Xu, Yili; Mo, Hongmei; Pagratis, Nikos; Link, John O.; Delaney, William

    2016-01-01

    Ledipasvir (LDV; GS-5885), a component of Harvoni (a fixed-dose combination of LDV with sofosbuvir [SOF]), is approved to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here, we report key preclinical antiviral properties of LDV, including in vitro potency, in vitro resistance profile, and activity in combination with other anti-HCV agents. LDV has picomolar antiviral activity against genotype 1a and genotype 1b replicons with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 0.031 nM and 0.004 nM, respectively. LDV is also active against HCV genotypes 4a, 4d, 5a, and 6a with EC50 values of 0.11 to 1.1 nM. LDV has relatively less in vitro antiviral activity against genotypes 2a, 2b, 3a, and 6e, with EC50 values of 16 to 530 nM. In vitro resistance selection with LDV identified the single Y93H and Q30E resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the NS5A gene; these RAVs were also observed in patients after a 3-day monotherapy treatment. In vitro antiviral combination studies indicate that LDV has additive to moderately synergistic antiviral activity when combined with other classes of HCV direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents, including NS3/4A protease inhibitors and the nucleotide NS5B polymerase inhibitor SOF. Furthermore, LDV is active against known NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitor RAVs with EC50 values equivalent to those for the wild type. PMID:26824950

  17. Antiviral characteristics of GSK1265744, an HIV integrase inhibitor dosed orally or by long-acting injection.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kobayashi, Masanori; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Suyama-Kagitani, Akemi; Kawauchi-Miki, Shinobu; Taishi, Teruhiko; Kawasuji, Takashi; Johns, Brian A; Underwood, Mark R; Garvey, Edward P; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 is a new HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) engineered to deliver efficient antiviral activity with a once-daily, low-milligram dose that does not require a pharmacokinetic booster. The in vitro antiviral profile and mechanism of action of GSK1265744 were established through integrase enzyme assays, resistance passage experiments, and cellular assays with site-directed molecular (SDM) HIV clones resistant to other classes of anti-HIV-1 agents and earlier INSTIs. GSK1265744 inhibited HIV replication with low or subnanomolar efficacy and with a selectivity index of at least 22,000 under the same culture conditions. The protein-adjusted half-maximal inhibitory concentration (PA-EC50) extrapolated to 100% human serum was 102 nM. When the virus was passaged in the presence of GSK1265744, highly resistant mutants with more than a 10-fold change (FC) in EC50 relative to that of the wild-type were not observed for up to 112 days of culture. GSK1265744 demonstrated activity against SDM clones containing the raltegravir (RAL)-resistant Y143R, Q148K, N155H, and G140S/Q148H signature variants (FC less than 6.1), while these mutants had a high FC in the EC50 for RAL (11 to >130). Either additive or synergistic effects were observed when GSK1265744 was tested in combination with representative anti-HIV agents, and no antagonistic effects were seen. These findings demonstrate that, similar to dolutegravir, GSK1265744 is differentiated as a new INSTI, having a markedly distinct resistance profile compared with earlier INSTIs, RAL, and elvitegravir (EVG). The collective data set supports further clinical development of GSK1265744. PMID:25367908

  18. Direct antiviral agent treatment of decompensated hepatitis C virus-induced liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohkoshi, Shogo; Hirono, Haruka; Yamagiwa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, direct antiviral agents (DAAs) have been increasingly used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, replacing interferon-based regimens that have severe adverse effects and low tolerability. The constant supply of new DAAs makes shorter treatment periods with enhanced safety possible. The efficacy of DAAs for treatment of compensated liver cirrhosis (LC) is not less than that for treatment of non-cirrhotic conditions. These clinical advantages have been useful in pre- and post-liver transplantation (LT) settings. Moreover, DAAs can be used to treat decompensated HCV-induced LC in elderly patients or those with severe complications otherwise having poor prognosis. Although encouraging clinical data are beginning to appear, the actual efficacy of DAAs for suppressing disease progression, allowing delisting for LT and, most importantly, improving prognosis of patients with decompensated HCV-LC remains unknown. Case-control studies to examine the short- or long-term effects of DAAs for treatment of decompensated HCV-LC are urgently need. PMID:26558145

  19. Direct costs of interferon-based and interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; O'Leary, A; Kieran, J A; Fogarty, E; Dowling, T; Norris, S

    2016-09-01

    Given the increasing budget impact of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment, robust real-world cost data are essential for healthcare decision-makers to evaluate and understand the costs and benefits of these treatments. To determine the direct cost of treating HCV infection in a hospital-based ambulatory care setting in Ireland based on available data from the Irish national hepatitis C treatment registry. A microcosting study of the direct costs of patients with hepatitis C treated with interferon-based and interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens was conducted. Attendance at the outpatient clinic for clinical assessment, the quantity of resources used per patient, the medication prescribed and the identification and timing of staff involvement was measured and combined to establish a mean cost of treatment per patient and a cost per sustained virological response (SVR). One hundred and sixty-eight patients were included in the analysis; 119 treated with interferon-based direct-acting antiviral regimens and 47 treated with interferon-free regimens. The mean costs of treatment with the interferon-based regimens per patient were €38 286 (95% CI €35 305-€41 061). The cost per SVR was €62 457. The mean cost of treatment with interferon-free regimens per patient was €55 734 (95% CI €50 906-€60 880). The cost per SVR was €81 873. Real-world cost data provide valuable information to enhance reimbursement decisions. While the direct costs associated with hepatitis C treatment in Ireland are substantial, it is reasonable to expect that the mean cost of treatment and the cost per SVR will reduce as patients with less advanced disease are treated with interferon-free therapies. PMID:26996144

  20. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) functional description. [Cessna 402B aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive set of general aviation avionics were defined for integration into an advanced hardware mechanization for demonstration in a Cessna 402B aircraft. Block diagrams are shown and system and computer architecture as well as significant hardware elements are described. The multifunction integrated data control center and electronic horizontal situation indicator are discussed. The functions that the DAAS will perform are examined. This function definition is the basis for the DAAS hardware and software design.

  1. How Generalizable Are the Results From Trials of Direct Antiviral Agents to People Coinfected With HIV/HCV in the Real World?

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Sahar; Strumpf, Erin C.; Walmsley, Sharon L.; Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen; Pick, Neora; Martel-Laferrière, Valerie; Hull, Mark; Gill, M. John; Cox, Joseph; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been described as revolutionary. However, it remains uncertain how effective these drugs will be for individuals coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–HCV. Bridging this gap between efficacy and effectiveness requires a focus on the generalizability of clinical trials. Methods. Generalizability of DAA trials was assessed by applying the eligibility criteria from 5 efficacy trials: NCT01479868, PHOTON-1 (NCT01667731), TURQUOISE-I (NCT01939197), ION-4 (NCT02073656), and ALLY-2 (NCT02032888) that evaluated simeprevir; sofosbuvir; ombitasvir, paritaprevir/ritonavir/dasabuvir; sofosbuvir/ledipasvir; and daclatasvir/sofosbuvir, respectively, to the Canadian Coinfection Cohort, representing approximately 23% of the total coinfected population in care in Canada. Results. Of 874 active participants, 70% had chronic HCV, of whom 410, 26, 94, and 11 had genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. After applying trial eligibility criteria, only 5.9% (24/410) would have been eligible for enrollment in the simeprevir trial, 9.8% (52/530) in PHOTON-1, 6.3% (26/410) in TURQUOISE-I, and 8.1% (34/421) in ION-4. The ALLY-2 study was more inclusive; 43% (233/541) of the cohort would have been eligible. The most exclusive eligibility criteria across all trials with the exception of ALLY-2 were restriction to specific antiretroviral therapies (63%–79%) and active illicit drug use (53%–55%). Conclusions. DAA trial results may have limited generalizability, since the majority of coinfected individuals were not eligible to participate. Exclusions appeared to be related to improving treatment outcomes by not including those at higher risk of poor adherence and reinfection—individuals for whom real-world data are urgently needed. PMID:26743093

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Desarae; Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Major, Marian; Del Valle, Sara; Cotler, Scott J; Dahari, Harel

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID). Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago. Methods To estimate the HCV antibody and HCV-RNA (chronic infection) prevalence among the metropolitan Chicago PWID population, we used empirical data from three large epidemiological studies. Cost of DAAs is assumed $50,000 per person. Results Approximately 32,000 PWID reside in metropolitan Chicago with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 47% or 15,040 cases. Approximately 22,000 PWID (69% of the total PWID population) attend harm reduction (HR) programs, such as syringe exchange programs, and have an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 30%. There are about 11,000 young PWID (<30 years old) with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 10% (PWID in these two subpopulations overlap). The model suggests that the following treatment scale-up is needed to reduce the baseline HCV-RNA prevalence by one-half over 10 years of treatment [cost per year, min-max in millions]: 35 per 1,000 [$50-$77] in the overall PWID population, 19 per 1,000 [$20-$26] for persons in HR programs, and 5 per 1,000 [$3-$4] for young PWID. Conclusions Treatment scale-up could dramatically reduce the prevalence of chronic HCV infection among PWID in Chicago, who are the main reservoir for on-going HCV transmission. Focusing treatment on PWID attending HR programs and/or young PWID could have a significant impact on HCV prevalence in these subpopulations at an attainable cost. PMID:26295805

  3. Human subtilase SKI-1/S1P is a master regulator of the HCV Lifecycle and a potential host cell target for developing indirect-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Andrea D; Knecht, Wolfgang; Lazarov, Ina; Dixit, Surjit B; Jean, François

    2012-01-01

    HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer and liver transplantation worldwide. Overstimulation of host lipid metabolism in the liver by HCV-encoded proteins during viral infection creates a favorable environment for virus propagation and pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes acting as master regulators of lipid homeostasis could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with human Flaviviridae viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose assembly and pathogenesis depend on interaction with lipid droplets (LDs). One such master regulator of cholesterol metabolic pathways is the host subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1)--or site-1 protease (S1P). SKI-1/S1P plays a critical role in the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), which control expression of the key enzymes of cholesterol and fatty-acid biosynthesis. Here we report the development of a SKI-1/S1P-specific protein-based inhibitor and its application to blocking the SREBP signaling cascade. We demonstrate that SKI-1/S1P inhibition effectively blocks HCV from establishing infection in hepatoma cells. The inhibitory mechanism is associated with a dramatic reduction in the abundance of neutral lipids, LDs, and the LD marker: adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP)/perilipin 2. Reduction of LD formation inhibits virus assembly from infected cells. Importantly, we confirm that SKI-1/S1P is a key host factor for HCV infection by using a specific active, site-directed, small-molecule inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P: PF-429242. Our studies identify SKI-1/S1P as both a novel regulator of the HCV lifecycle and as a potential host-directed therapeutic target against HCV infection and liver steatosis. With identification of an increasing number of human viruses that use host LDs for infection, our results suggest that SKI-1/S1P inhibitors may allow development of

  4. Drug-Drug Interaction of Omeprazole With the HCV Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents Paritaprevir/Ritonavir and Ombitasvir With and Without Dasabuvir.

    PubMed

    Polepally, Akshanth R; Dutta, Sandeep; Hu, Beibei; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Awni, Walid M; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-07-01

    Paritaprevir (administered with low-dose ritonavir), ombitasvir, and dasabuvir are direct-acting antiviral agents administered as combination regimens for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Drug-drug interactions between 2D (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir) or 3D (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir) regimens and omeprazole, a CYP2C19 substrate and acid-reducing agent, were evaluated in 24 healthy volunteers. Subjects received omeprazole (40 mg once daily) on day 1 and days 20-24 and the 2D or 3D regimen (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir 25/150/100 mg once daily ± dasabuvir 250 mg twice daily) on days 6-24. Compared with omeprazole alone, coadministration with the 2D or 3D regimen decreased omeprazole geometric mean Cmax and AUCt values by 40% to 50%. Ombitasvir, dasabuvir, and ritonavir mean exposures showed <10% change, and paritaprevir mean exposures showed <20% change when the 2D or 3D regimen was administered with omeprazole compared with administration without omeprazole. Although no a priori dose adjustment is needed, a higher omeprazole dose should be considered if clinically indicated when coadministered with the 2D or 3D regimen. No dose adjustment is required for the 2D or 3D regimen when administered with omeprazole, other acid-reducing agents, or CYP2C19 inhibitors. PMID:27310328

  5. Treatment of naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C genotypes 2 and 3 with pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin in a real world setting: relevance for the new era of DAA.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Benjamin; Wiegand, Steffen B; Buggisch, Peter; Hinrichsen, Holger; Link, Ralph; Möller, Bernd; Böker, Klaus H W; Teuber, Gerlinde; Klinker, Hartwig; Zehnter, Elmar; Naumann, Uwe; Busch, Heiner W; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Baum, Undine; Hardtke, Svenja; Manns, Michael P; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Petersen, Jörg; Cornberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Evidence based clinical guidelines are implemented to treat patients efficiently that include efficacy, tolerability but also health economic considerations. This is of particular relevance to the new direct acting antiviral agents that have revolutionized treatment of chronic hepatitis C. For hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 interferon free treatment is already available with sofosbuvir plus ribavirin. However, treatment with sofosbuvir-based regimens is 10-20 times more expensive compared to pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV). It has to be discussed if PegIFN/RBV is still an option for easy to treat patients. We assessed the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 with PegIFN/RBV in a real world setting according to the latest German guidelines. Overall, 1006 patients were recruited into a prospective patient registry with 959 having started treatment. The intention-to-treat analysis showed poor SVR (GT2 61%, GT3 47%) while patients with adherence had excellent SVR in the per protocol analysis (GT2 96%, GT3 90%). According to guidelines, 283 patients were candidates for shorter treatment duration, namely a treatment of 16 weeks (baseline HCV-RNA <800.000 IU/mL, no cirrhosis and RVR). However, 65% of these easy to treat patients have been treated longer than recommended that resulted in higher costs but not higher SVR rates. In conclusion, treatment with PegIFN/RBV in a real world setting can be highly effective yet similar effective than PegIFN± sofosbuvir/RBV in well-selected naïve G2/3 patients. Full adherence to guidelines could be further improved, because it would be important in the new era with DAA, especially to safe resources. PMID:25302676

  6. Treatment of Naïve Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Genotypes 2 and 3 with Pegylated Interferon Alpha and Ribavirin in a Real World Setting: Relevance for the New Era of DAA

    PubMed Central

    Buggisch, Peter; Hinrichsen, Holger; Link, Ralph; Möller, Bernd; Böker, Klaus H. W.; Teuber, Gerlinde; Klinker, Hartwig; Zehnter, Elmar; Naumann, Uwe; Busch, Heiner W.; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Baum, Undine; Hardtke, Svenja; Manns, Michael P.; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Petersen, Jörg; Cornberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Evidence based clinical guidelines are implemented to treat patients efficiently that include efficacy, tolerability but also health economic considerations. This is of particular relevance to the new direct acting antiviral agents that have revolutionized treatment of chronic hepatitis C. For hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 interferon free treatment is already available with sofosbuvir plus ribavirin. However, treatment with sofosbuvir-based regimens is 10–20 times more expensive compared to pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV). It has to be discussed if PegIFN/RBV is still an option for easy to treat patients. We assessed the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 with PegIFN/RBV in a real world setting according to the latest German guidelines. Overall, 1006 patients were recruited into a prospective patient registry with 959 having started treatment. The intention-to-treat analysis showed poor SVR (GT2 61%, GT3 47%) while patients with adherence had excellent SVR in the per protocol analysis (GT2 96%, GT3 90%). According to guidelines, 283 patients were candidates for shorter treatment duration, namely a treatment of 16 weeks (baseline HCV-RNA <800.000 IU/mL, no cirrhosis and RVR). However, 65% of these easy to treat patients have been treated longer than recommended that resulted in higher costs but not higher SVR rates. In conclusion, treatment with PegIFN/RBV in a real world setting can be highly effective yet similar effective than PegIFN± sofosbuvir/RBV in well-selected naïve G2/3 patients. Full adherence to guidelines could be further improved, because it would be important in the new era with DAA, especially to safe resources. PMID:25302676

  7. Novel action of 3,4-DAA ameliorating acute liver allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Ding, Ji-Guang; Sheng, Ji-Fang; Zhu, Man-Hua; Li, Jun-Jie; Sheng, Zi-Ke; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-12-01

    The anti-allergic drug, N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl) anthranilic acid (3,4-DAA), is a synthetic anthranilic acid derivative that has been used therapeutically in Japan for many years. In this study, to investigate the effects of 3,4-DAA in allograft immunorejection model, liver orthotopic transplants were performed using inbred male Dark Agouti donors and Lewis rat recipients (allografts). The levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases (IDO) enzymic activities in five groups, allografts (control), dimethyl sulphoxide-treated group (vehicle control), 200 mg·kg(-1) ·day(-1) of 3,4-DAA-treated group and 200 mg·kg(-1) ·day(-1) of 3,4-DAA + 5 mg·ml(-1) of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT)-treated group were confirmed by determination of L-kynurenine (L-Kyn) concentrations. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels in 3,4-DAA-treated rats significantly decreased compared with those in mock and control group, whereas treatment of 1-MT in allografts led to the opposite effect. Administration of 3,4-DAA reduced histological severity of allograft immunorejection, decreased serum levels of cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and raised serum levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), suggesting that 3,4-DAA has both anti-inflammatory and anti-immunorejection properties through IDO in immune regulation and may therefore be useful in filling an unmet need, in the treatment of allograft immunorejection. PMID:21932299

  8. UAS Integration into the NAS: iHTL: DAA Display Evaluation Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad; Shively, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The integrated human-in-the-loop (iHITL) simulation examined the effect of four different Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) display concepts on unmanned aircraft system (UAS) pilots' ability to maintain safe separation. The displays varied in the type and amount of guidance they provided to pilots. The study's background and methodology are discussed, followed by a presentation of the preliminary 'measured response' data (i.e., pilots' end-to-end response time in reacting to traffic alerts on their DAA display). Results indicate that display type had moderate to no affect on pilot measured response times.

  9. Enhancement of the Replication of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons of Genotypes 1 to 4 by Manipulation of CpG and UpA Dinucleotide Frequencies and Use of Cell Lines Expressing SECL14L2 for Antiviral Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Martin-Gans, Marion; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved greatly through the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their effectiveness and potential for drug resistance development in non-genotype 1 variants of HCV remain relatively unexplored, as in vitro assays to assess drug susceptibility are poorly developed and unsuited for a transient-transfection format. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of dinucleotide frequency changes in the replicon and the use of a SEC14L2-expressing cell line on the replication of HCVs of different genotypes and evaluated the resulting assay formats for measurements of susceptibility to the DAA sofosbuvir. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides from the luciferase gene used in HCV replicons of genotype 1b (Con1) and genotype 2a (JFH-1) achieved between 10- and 100-fold enhancement of replication over that of the wild type posttransfection. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides in the neomycin gene or deletion of the whole gene in replicons of genotype 3a (S52) and genotype 4a (ED43) enhanced replication, but phenotypic effects on altering luciferase gene composition were minimal. A further 10-fold replication enhancement of replicons from all four genotypes was achieved by using a transgenic Huh7.5 cell line expressing SECL14L2, whose expression showed a dose-dependent effect on HCV replication that was reversible by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of gene expression. By combining these strategies, the 100- to 1,000-fold enhancement of replication allowed the susceptibility of all four genotypes to the RNA polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir to be robustly determined in a transient-transfection assay format. These methods of replication enhancement provide new tools for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to DAAs. PMID:26953209

  10. Enhancement of the Replication of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons of Genotypes 1 to 4 by Manipulation of CpG and UpA Dinucleotide Frequencies and Use of Cell Lines Expressing SECL14L2 for Antiviral Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Martin-Gans, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved greatly through the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their effectiveness and potential for drug resistance development in non-genotype 1 variants of HCV remain relatively unexplored, as in vitro assays to assess drug susceptibility are poorly developed and unsuited for a transient-transfection format. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of dinucleotide frequency changes in the replicon and the use of a SEC14L2-expressing cell line on the replication of HCVs of different genotypes and evaluated the resulting assay formats for measurements of susceptibility to the DAA sofosbuvir. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides from the luciferase gene used in HCV replicons of genotype 1b (Con1) and genotype 2a (JFH-1) achieved between 10- and 100-fold enhancement of replication over that of the wild type posttransfection. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides in the neomycin gene or deletion of the whole gene in replicons of genotype 3a (S52) and genotype 4a (ED43) enhanced replication, but phenotypic effects on altering luciferase gene composition were minimal. A further 10-fold replication enhancement of replicons from all four genotypes was achieved by using a transgenic Huh7.5 cell line expressing SECL14L2, whose expression showed a dose-dependent effect on HCV replication that was reversible by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of gene expression. By combining these strategies, the 100- to 1,000-fold enhancement of replication allowed the susceptibility of all four genotypes to the RNA polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir to be robustly determined in a transient-transfection assay format. These methods of replication enhancement provide new tools for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to DAAs. PMID:26953209

  11. The Relative Pedagogical Value of Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Odesma; Sears, David A.; Evangelou, Demetra

    2013-01-01

    Inherently a discovery-based pedagogy, Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) activities start with the artefact--an instance of a typically well-engineered solution. Through systemized disassembly and the subsequent analysis of components, students engage in an iterative process of observation and follow-up probing. In-turn, this process helps…

  12. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interactions between Direct-Acting Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Combination Regimens and the HIV-1 Antiretroviral Agents Raltegravir, Tenofovir, Emtricitabine, Efavirenz, and Rilpivirine.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Dutta, Sandeep; Dunbar, Martin; Podsadecki, Thomas; Trinh, Roger; Awni, Walid; Menon, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    The three direct-acting antiviral agent (3D) regimen is a novel combination of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) that has proven effective for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Given the potential for coadministration in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, possible drug interactions with antiretroviral drugs must be carefully considered. Four phase 1, multiple-dose pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in healthy volunteers (n = 66). The 3D regimen of 150/100 mg daily paritaprevir/ritonavir, 25 mg daily ombitasvir, and 400 mg twice-daily dasabuvir was administered alone or in combination with 200 mg daily of emtricitabine and 300 mg daily of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (tenofovir DF), 25 mg daily of rilpivirine, or 400 mg of raltegravir twice daily. A 2-DAA regimen of 150/100 mg daily paritaprevir/ritonavir and 400 mg of dasabuvir twice daily was also studied in combination with efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF at 600/200/300 mg daily, respectively (Atripla; Bristol-Myers Squibb). Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from plasma drug concentrations. No clinically significant drug interactions were observed (≤32% change in exposure) between the 3D regimen and that of emtricitabine plus tenofovir DF. Raltegravir exposure was increased up to 134% when the drug was coadministered with the 3D regimen. Although coadministration with rilpivirine was well tolerated in healthy volunteers, observed elevations in rilpivirine exposures may increase the potential for adverse drug reactions. Concomitant use of the 2-DAA regimen and efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF was discontinued owing to poor tolerability and adverse events. No dose adjustment is required during coadministration of raltegravir, tenofovir DF, or emtricitabine with the 3D regimen. Rilpivirine is not recommended and efavirenz is contraindicated for coadministration with the 3D regimen. PMID:26953200

  13. [Coincidence of a chronic Hepatitis C and an autoimmune Hepatitis Type 3 - successful therapy with the new direct-acting antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Dikopoulos, N; Zizer, E

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection may be associated with several features of autoimmunity (i. e., detection of different kinds of autoantibodies in the serum). Hepatitis C is also associated with different autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, lichen ruber planus, and membranous glomerulonephritis being the most relevant. There are very few cases of a coincidence of chronic hepatitis C with an autoimmune hepatitis, that is usually diagnosed by detection of specific autoantibodies and typical histological features. During the time of interferon-based antiviral therapies, we often faced a therapeutic dilemma as interferon could lead to an exacerbation of the coincident autoimmune disease. So, in these cases, a prophylactic immunosuppression had to be started before initiation of interferon therapy. Meanwhile, in the new era of direct antiviral agents against hepatitis C, highly specific and effective therapeutic options are available. The case report presented here describes the very rare coincidence of a chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1 with an autoimmune hepatitis type 3 diagnosed by the presence of anti-SLA-antibodies. In the past, the patient had several unsuccessful interferon-based therapies without achieving a sustained virological response in parallel with an immunosuppressive treatment with azathioprine. During the further course of the disease, the patient generated a liver cirrhosis CHILD A after only a few years. After the approval of the direct antiviral agents sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in 2014, we conducted an antiviral therapy, including ribavirin, for 24 weeks and fortunately achieved a sustained virological response. Due to the persistent disease activity caused by the autoimmune hepatitis after the end of antiviral therapy, we treated the patient with prednisolone and azathioprine and could induce a stable and persistent remission of the autoimmune disease. PMID:27529527

  14. Concordance of sustained virologic response at weeks 4, 12 and 24 post-treatment of hepatitis c in the era of new oral direct-acting antivirals: A concise review.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Sarah V; Hussaini, Trana; Yoshida, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    The goal of treatment for chronic hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection is to cure the infection rather than suppress the virus. Historically, a sustained virological response (SVR) defined as undetectable HCV RNA at 24 weeks following the completion of treatment was considered the gold standard to define successful eradication of the virus as a primary endpoint in clinical trials. SVR measured at 12 weeks post-treatment has been shown to be highly concordant with SVR24 in trials of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The appropriateness and durability of SVR12 as the efficacy endpoint with new oral direct-acting antivirals is less established. A literatura search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases to identify any studies that examined the concordance between SVR24 and earlier time points. Two studies and 4 abstracts were found that performed concordance analyses using positive and negative predictive values. Overall, SVR4 and SVR12 were highly concordant with SVR24 with high positive (> 97%) and negative (> 94%) predictive values; however there was a higher risk of HCV relapse occurring after post-treatment week 4. The majority of the data focused on SVR12 and demonstrated that SVR12 reliably predicted SVR24 in several populations infected with HCV (treatment-naïve, prior null responders, different genotypes) using various new oral direct-acting antiviral regimens. In conclusion, the available data suggests that SVR12 is a reliable assessment of HCV eradication and could be used instead of SVR24 for drug development clinical trials assessing efficacy of new direct-acting antivirals. Data on the long-term durability of SVR12 is still needed. PMID:26845592

  15. Indian National Association for Study of the Liver (INASL) Guidance for Antiviral Therapy Against HCV Infection: Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Puri, Pankaj; Saraswat, Vivek A; Dhiman, Radha K; Anand, Anil C; Acharya, Subrat K; Singh, Shivaram P; Chawla, Yogesh K; Amarapurkar, Deepak N; Kumar, Ajay; Arora, Anil; Dixit, Vinod K; Koshy, Abraham; Sood, Ajit; Duseja, Ajay; Kapoor, Dharmesh; Madan, Kaushal; Srivastava, Anshu; Kumar, Ashish; Wadhawan, Manav; Goel, Amit; Verma, Abhai; Shalimar; Pandey, Gaurav; Malik, Rohan; Agrawal, Swastik

    2016-06-01

    India contributes significantly to the global burden of HCV. While the nucleoside NS5B inhibitor sofosbuvir became available in the Indian market in March 2015, the other directly acting agents (DAAs), Ledipasvir and Daclatasvir, have only recently become available in the India. The introduction of these DAA in India at a relatively affordable price has led to great optimism about prospects of cure for these patients as not only will they provide higher efficacy, but combination DAAs as all-oral regimen will result in lower side effects than were seen with pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin therapy. Availability of these newer DAAs has necessitated revision of INASL guidelines for the treatment of HCV published in 2015. Current considerations for the treatment of HCV in India include the poorer response of genotype 3, nonavailability of many of the DAAs recommended by other guidelines and the cost of therapy. The availability of combination DAA therapy has simplified therapy of HCV with decreased reliance of evaluation for monitoring viral kinetics or drug related side effects. PMID:27493460

  16. Direct Binding of Ledipasvir to HCV NS5A: Mechanism of Resistance to an HCV Antiviral Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Xing, Weimei; Chan, Katie; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Brendza, Katherine M.; Kirschberg, Thorsten; Kato, Darryl; Link, John O.; Cheng, Guofeng; Liu, Xiaohong; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Ledipasvir, a direct acting antiviral agent (DAA) targeting the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A protein, exhibits picomolar activity in replicon cells. While its mechanism of action is unclear, mutations that confer resistance to ledipasvir in HCV replicon cells are located in NS5A, suggesting that NS5A is the direct target of ledipasvir. To date co-precipitation and cross-linking experiments in replicon or NS5A transfected cells have not conclusively shown a direct, specific interaction between NS5A and ledipasvir. Using recombinant, full length NS5A, we show that ledipasvir binds directly, with high affinity and specificity, to NS5A. Ledipasvir binding to recombinant NS5A is saturable with a dissociation constant in the low nanomolar range. A mutant form of NS5A (Y93H) that confers resistance to ledipasvir shows diminished binding to ledipasvir. The current study shows that ledipasvir inhibits NS5A through direct binding and that resistance to ledipasvir is the result of a reduction in binding affinity to NS5A mutants. PMID:25856426

  17. Direct binding of ledipasvir to HCV NS5A: mechanism of resistance to an HCV antiviral agent.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Xing, Weimei; Chan, Katie; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Brendza, Katherine M; Kirschberg, Thorsten; Kato, Darryl; Link, John O; Cheng, Guofeng; Liu, Xiaohong; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Ledipasvir, a direct acting antiviral agent (DAA) targeting the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A protein, exhibits picomolar activity in replicon cells. While its mechanism of action is unclear, mutations that confer resistance to ledipasvir in HCV replicon cells are located in NS5A, suggesting that NS5A is the direct target of ledipasvir. To date co-precipitation and cross-linking experiments in replicon or NS5A transfected cells have not conclusively shown a direct, specific interaction between NS5A and ledipasvir. Using recombinant, full length NS5A, we show that ledipasvir binds directly, with high affinity and specificity, to NS5A. Ledipasvir binding to recombinant NS5A is saturable with a dissociation constant in the low nanomolar range. A mutant form of NS5A (Y93H) that confers resistance to ledipasvir shows diminished binding to ledipasvir. The current study shows that ledipasvir inhibits NS5A through direct binding and that resistance to ledipasvir is the result of a reduction in binding affinity to NS5A mutants. PMID:25856426

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Sofosbuvir-Based Antiviral Therapy to Treat Hepatitis C Virus Infection After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kamar, N; Marion, O; Rostaing, L; Cointault, O; Ribes, D; Lavayssière, L; Esposito, L; Del Bello, A; Métivier, S; Barange, K; Izopet, J; Alric, L

    2016-05-01

    There is no approved therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after kidney transplantation, and no data regarding the use of new-generation direct antiviral agents (DAAs) have been published so far. The aims of this pilot study were to assess the efficacy and safety of an interferon-free sofosbuvir-based regimen to treat chronic HCV infection in kidney transplant recipients. Twenty-five kidney transplant recipients with chronic HCV infection were given, for 12 (n = 19) or 24 weeks (n = 6), sofosbuvir plus ribavirin (n = 3); sofosbuvir plus daclatasvir (n = 4); sofosbuvir plus simeprevir, with (n = 1) or without ribavirin (n = 6); sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir, with (n = 1) or without ribavirin (n = 9); and sofosbuvir plus pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin (n = 1). A rapid virological response, defined by undetectable viremia at week 4 after starting DAA therapy, was observed in 22 of the 25 patients (88%). At the end of therapy, HCV RNA was undetectable in all patients. At 4 and 12 weeks after completing DAA therapy, all had a sustained virological response. The tolerance to anti-HCV therapy was excellent and no adverse event was observed. A significant decrease in calcineurin inhibitor levels was observed after HCV clearance. New-generation oral DAAs are efficient and safe to treat HCV infection after kidney transplantation. PMID:26587971

  19. The pedagogical value of Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) activities: Assessing the potential for motivation and transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, Odesma Onika

    Undergraduate engineering institutions are currently seeking to improve recruiting practices and to retain engineering majors particularly by addressing what many studies document as a major challenge of poor instruction. There is an undisputed need for instructional practices that motivate students in addition to facilitating the transfer of learning beyond the classroom. Reverse engineering and product dissection, more broadly termed Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) activities, have shown potential to address these concerns, based on the reviews of students and professors alike. DAA activities involve the systematic deconstruction of an artifact, the subsequent analysis and possible reconstruction of its components for the purpose of understanding the embodied fundamental concepts, design principles and developmental processes. These activities have been part of regular industry practice for some time; however, the systematic analysis of their benefits for learning and instruction is a relatively recent phenomenon. A number of studies have provided highly descriptive accounts of curricula and possible outcomes of DAA activities; but, relatively few have compared participants doing DAA activities to a control group doing more traditional activities. In this respect, two quasi-experiments were conducted as part of a first-year engineering laboratory, and it was hypothesized that students who engaged in the DAA activity would be more motivated and would demonstrate higher frequencies of transfer than the control. A DAA activity that required students to disassemble a single-use camera and analyze its components to discover how it works was compared to a step-by-step laboratory activity in the first experiment and a lecture method of instruction in the second experiment. In both experiments, over forty percent of the students that engaged in the DAA activity demonstrated the ability to transfer the knowledge gained about the functions of the camera's components and

  20. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: DAA-TCAS Interoperability "mini" HITL Primary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Conrad; Fern, Lisa; Shively, Jay; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    At the May 2015 SC-228 meeting, requirements for TCAS II interoperability became elevated in priority. A TCAS interoperability workgroup was formed to identify and address key issues/questions. The TCAS workgroup came up with an initial list of questions and a plan to address those questions. As part of that plan, NASA proposed to run a mini HITL to address display, alerting and guidance issues. A TCAS Interoperability Workshop was held to determine potential display/alerting/guidance issues that could be explored in future NASA mini HITLS. Consensus on main functionality of DAA guidance when TCAS II RA occurs. Prioritized list of independent variables for experimental design. Set of use cases to stress TCAS Interoperability.

  1. Directional antenna array (DAA) for communications, control, and data link protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.; Contarino, Vincent M.

    2013-06-01

    A next generation of Smart antennas with point-to-point communication and jam, spoof protection capability by verification of spatial position is offered. A directional antenna array (DAA) with narrow irradiation beam provides counter terrorism protection for communications, data link, control and GPS. Communications are "invisible" to guided missiles because of 20 dB smaller irradiation outside the beam and spatial separation. This solution can be implemented with current technology. Directional antennas have higher gain and can be multi-frequency or have wide frequency band in contrast to phase antenna arrays. This multi-directional antenna array provides a multi-functional communication network and simultaneously can be used for command control, data link and GPS.

  2. Des-aspartate angiotensin I (DAA-I) reduces endothelial dysfunction in the aorta of the spontaneously hypertensive rat through inhibition of angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Loh, Wei Mee; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani D; Lau, Yeh Siang; Achike, Francis I; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2015-08-01

    Des-aspartate angiotensin I (DAA-I), an endogenous nonapeptide, counteracts several effects of angiotensin II on vascular tone. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute protective effect of DAA-I on endothelial function in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as well as its effect on angiotensin II-induced contractions and oxidative stress. Aortic rings were incubated with DAA-I (0.1μM) for 30min prior to the assessment of angiotensin II-induced contractions (0.1nM-10μM) in WKY and SHR aortas. Total nitrate and nitrite levels were assessed using a colorimetric method and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. The effect of DAA-I was also assessed against endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxations to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Angiotensin II-induced contractions were significantly reduced by DAA-I, losartan and tempol. Incubation with ODQ (soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) and removal of the endothelium prevented the reduction of angiotensin II-induced contractions by DAA-I. Total nitrate and nitrite levels were increased in DAA-I, losartan and tempol treated-SHR tissues while ROS level was reduced by DAA-I and the latter inhibitors. In addition, DAA-I significantly improved the impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation in SHR aortas whilst sodium nitroprusside-induced endothelium-independent relaxation remained unaffected. The present findings indicate that improvement of endothelial function by DAA-I in the SHR aorta is mediated through endothelium-dependent release of nitric oxide and inhibition of angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress. PMID:25869508

  3. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Wade; Cox, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV); however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza (flu). Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections. PMID:26962437

  4. An Evaluation of Detect and Avoid (DAA) Displays for Unmanned Aircraft Systems: The Effect of Information Level and Display Location on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, R. Conrad; Pack, Jessica S.; Shively, R. Jay; Draper, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    A consortium of government, industry and academia is currently working to establish minimum operational performance standards for Detect and Avoid (DAA) and Control and Communications (C2) systems in order to enable broader integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). One subset of these performance standards will need to address the DAA display requirements that support an acceptable level of pilot performance. From a pilot's perspective, the DAA task is the maintenance of self separation and collision avoidance from other aircraft, utilizing the available information and controls within the Ground Control Station (GCS), including the DAA display. The pilot-in-the-loop DAA task requires the pilot to carry out three major functions: 1) detect a potential threat, 2) determine an appropriate resolution maneuver, and 3) execute that resolution maneuver via the GCS control and navigation interface(s). The purpose of the present study was to examine two main questions with respect to DAA display considerations that could impact pilots' ability to maintain well clear from other aircraft. First, what is the effect of a minimum (or basic) information display compared to an advanced information display on pilot performance? Second, what is the effect of display location on UAS pilot performance? Two levels of information level (basic, advanced) were compared across two levels of display location (standalone, integrated), for a total of four displays. The authors propose an eight-stage pilot-DAA interaction timeline from which several pilot response time metrics can be extracted. These metrics were compared across the four display conditions. The results indicate that the advanced displays had faster overall response times compared to the basic displays, however, there were no significant differences between the standalone and integrated displays. Implications of the findings on understanding pilot performance on the DAA task, the

  5. Antiviral Drug Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Milpied-Homsi, Brigitte; Moran, Ellen M.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis C are common causes of delayed drug hypersensitivities for which many of the more severe reactions have been recently shown to be immunogenetically mediated such as abacavir hypersensitivity where HLA-B*57:01 is now used routinely as a screening test to exclude patients carrying this allele from abacavir prescription. Most antiviral drug allergies consist of mild to moderate delayed rash without other serious features (e.g. fever, mucosal involvement, blistering rash, organ impairment. In these cases treatment can be continued with careful observation and symptomatic management and the discontinuation rate is low. PMID:25017682

  6. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization. PMID:26297577

  7. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  8. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    PubMed

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  9. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  10. H-NS controls pap and daa fimbrial transcription in Escherichia coli in response to multiple environmental cues.

    PubMed

    White-Ziegler, C A; Villapakkam, A; Ronaszeki, K; Young, S

    2000-11-01

    A comparative study was completed to determine the influence of various environmental stimuli on the transcription of three different fimbrial operons in Escherichia coli and to determine the role of the histone-like protein H-NS in this environmental regulation. The fimbrial operons studied included the pap operon, which encodes pyelonephritis-associated pili (P pili), the daa operon, which encodes F1845 fimbriae, and the fan operon, which encodes K99 fimbriae. Using lacZYA transcriptional fusions within each of the fimbrial operons, we tested temperature, osmolarity, carbon source, rich medium, oxygen levels, pH, amino acids, solid medium, and iron concentration for their effects on fimbrial gene expression. Low temperature, high osmolarity, glucose as a carbon source, and rich medium repressed transcription of all three operons. High iron did not alter transcription of any of the operons tested, whereas the remaining stimuli had effects on individual operons. For the pap and daa operons, introduction of the hns651 mutation relieved the repression, either fully or partially, due to low temperature, glucose as a carbon source, rich medium, and high osmolarity. Taken together, these data indicate that there are common environmental cues that regulate fimbrial transcription in E. coli and that H-NS is an important environmental regulator for fimbrial transcription in response to several stimuli. PMID:11053383

  11. Dancing with chemical formulae of antivirals: A panoramic view (Part 2).

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-15

    In this second part of "Dancing with antivirals as chemical formulae" I will focus on a number of chemical compounds that in the last few years have elicited more than common attraction from a commercial viewpoint: (i) favipiravir (T-705), as it is active against influenza, but also several other RNA viruses; (ii) neuraminidase inhibitors such as zanamivir and oseltamivir; (iii) peramivir and laninamivir octanoate, which might be effective against influenza virus following a single (intravenous or inhalation) administration; (iv) sofosbuvir, the (anticipated) cornerstone for the interferon-free therapy of HCV infections; (v) combinations of DAAs (direct antiviral agents) to achieve, in no time, a sustained virus response (SVR) against HCV infection; (vi) HIV protease inhibitors, the latest and most promising being darunavir; (vii) the integrase inhibitors (INIs) (raltegravir, elvitegravir, dolutegravir), representing a new dimension in the anti-HIV armamentarium; (viii), a new class of helicase primase inhibitors (HPIs) that may exceed acyclovir and the other anti-herpes compounds in both potency and safety; (ix) CMX-001, as the latest of Dr. Antonín Holý's legacy for its activity against poxviruses and CMV infections, and (x) noroviruses for which the ideal antiviral compounds are still awaited for. PMID:24070654

  12. Antiviral immunity in Drosophila requires systemic RNAi spread

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maria-Carla; Tassetto, Michel; van Rij, Ronald P.; Goic, Bertsy; Gausson, Valérie; Berry, Bassam; Jacquier, Caroline; Antoniewski, Christophe; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular organisms evolved sophisticated defense systems to confer protection against pathogens. An important characteristic of these immune systems is their ability to act both locally at the site of infection and at distal uninfected locations1-4. In insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, RNA interference (RNAi) mediates antiviral immunity5-7. However, the antiviral RNAi defense in flies is thought to be a local, cell-autonomous process, since flies are considered unable to generate a systemic RNAi response8. Here we show that a recently defined double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) uptake pathway9 is essential for effective antiviral RNAi immunity in adult flies. Mutant flies defective in this dsRNA uptake pathway were hypersensitive to infection with Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Sindbis virus. Mortality in dsRNA-uptake defective flies was accompanied by 100-to 105-fold increases in viral titers and higher levels of viral RNA. Furthermore, inoculating naked dsRNA into flies elicited a sequence specific antiviral immune response that required an intact dsRNA uptake pathway. These findings suggest that spread of dsRNA to uninfected sites is essential for effective antiviral immunity. Strikingly, infection with Sindbis-GFP suppressed expression of host-encoded GFP at a distal site. Thus, similar to protein-based immunity in vertebrates, the antiviral RNAi-response in flies also relies on the systemic spread of a virus-specific immunity signal. PMID:19204732

  13. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  14. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20(th) century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  15. RNA silencing: an antiviral mechanism.

    PubMed

    Csorba, T; Pantaleo, V; Burgyán, J

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific gene-inactivation system that also functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To overcome antiviral RNA silencing, viruses express silencing-suppressor proteins which can counteract the host silencing-based antiviral process. After the discovery of virus-encoded silencing suppressors, it was shown that these viral proteins can target one or more key points in the silencing machinery. Here we review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism and function of antiviral RNA silencing in plants, and on the virus's counterattack by expression of silencing-suppressor proteins. We also discuss emerging evidence that RNA silencing and expression of viral silencing-suppressor proteins are tools forged as a consequence of virus-host coevolution for fine-tuning host-pathogen coexistence. PMID:20109663

  16. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025. PMID:18764719

  17. Syntheses of D-A-A Type Small Molecular Donor Materials Having Various Electron Accepting Moiety for Organic Photovoltaic Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahyeon; Park, Sangman; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Changjin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2016-03-01

    Small molecular donor, DTDCTB achieved a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 6.6 ± 0.2% in vacuum-deposited planar mixed heterojunction (PMHJ) structure. However, the same material just recorded PCE of 0.34% in solution processed small molecule based bulk heterjunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells. For the improvement of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), In this study, we designed and synthesized several D-A-A (donor-acceptor-acceptor) type molecular electron donating materials. Ditolylaminothienyl moiety as an electron donating group connected to 1,2,5-benzothiadiazole as a conjugated electron accepting unit, simultaneously with an electron accepting terminal group such as cyano alkyl acetate and N-alkyl rhodanine. The thermal, photophysical, and electrochemical properties of prepared small molecules were investigated by DSC, UV/Vis spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltametry, respectively. As a result, 0.89% of PCE can be obtained from OPV using a mixture of DTATBTER and PCBM as an active layer with a Voc of 0.87 V, a Jsc of 3.20 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 31.9%. PMID:27455734

  18. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  19. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  20. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  1. Radiation Dosimetry and Biodistribution of the Translocator Protein Radiotracer [11C]DAA1106 Determined with PET/CT in Healthy Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Arthur L.; Okita, Kyoji; Shieh, Jennifer; Liang, Lidia; Hubert, Robert; Mamoun, Michael; Farahi, Judah; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction When microglia become activated (an integral part of neuroinflammation), cellular morphology changes and expression of translocator protein (TSPO) 18 kDa is increased. Over the past several years, [11C]DAA1106 has emerged as a reliable radiotracer for labeling TSPO with high affinity during positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. While [11C]DAA1106 PET scanning has been used in several research studies, a radiation dosimetry study of this radiotracer in humans has not yet been published. Methods Twelve healthy participants underwent full body dynamic [11C]DAA1106 PET scanning, with 8 sequential whole body scans (approximately 12 bed positions each), following a single injection. Regions of interest were drawn manually and time activity curves (TACs) were obtained for 15 organs. OLINDA/EXM 1.1 was used to compute radiation absorbed doses to the target organs, as well as effective dose (ED) and effective dose equivalent (EDE). Results The ED and EDE were 4.06 ± 0.58 μSv/MBq and 5.89 ± 0.83 μSv/MBq, respectively. The highest absorbed doses were to the heart wall, kidney, liver, pancreas, and spleen. TACs revealed that peak dose rates are during the first scan (at 6 min) for all organs other than the urinary bladder wall, which had its peak dose rate during the fourth scan (at 30 min). Conclusions The recently developed radiotracer [11C]DAA1106 has its EDE and target-organ absorbed dose such that, for a single administration, its radiation dosimetry is well within the U.S. FDA guidelines for basic research studies in adults. This dose level implies that the dosimetry for multiple [11C]DAA1106 scans within a given year also falls within FDA guidelines, and this favorable property makes this radiotracer suitable for examining microglial activation repeatedly over time, which may in the future be useful for longitudinal tracking of disease progression and monitoring of therapy response in conditions marked by neuroinflammation (e.g., head trauma and

  2. [Significance of hepatitis C virus baseline polymorphism during the antiviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Tornai, István

    2015-05-24

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C has developed significantly during the last 25 years. In patients with genotype 1 infection 40-50% sustained virologic response could be achieved using pegylated interferon and ribavirin dual combination, which could be increased significantly with the introduction of direct acting antivirals. Three major groups of direct acting antivirals are known, which directly inhibit different phases of viral life cycle, by inhibiting the function of several non-structural proteins (NS3/4A protease, NS5A protein and NS5B polymerase). Due to the rapid replication rate of hepatitis C virus and the error-prone NS5B polymerase activity, mutant virions are generated, which might have reduced susceptibility to direct acting antiviral therapy. Since these resistance associated variants might exist before the antiviral therapy, they are still able to replicate during the direct acting antiviral treatment. Due to this selection pressure, the resistant virus will replace the wild type. This was especially detected during monotherapy, therefore, the first generation of direct acting antivirals have been combined with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, while recently interferon-free combinations are being developed including 2 or 3 direct acting antivirals. Using the first generation protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir, it could have been seen, that the rate of resistance associated variants is higher and the therapeutic outcome is worse in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1a, than in 1b. Similar phenomenon was seen with the second generation of NS3/4A protease inhibitors as well as with NS5A or NS5B polymerase. This is due to the lower genetic barrier to resistance, ie. usually fewer mutations are enough for the emergence of resistance in genotype 1a. The selection of resistance associated variants is one of the most important challenges during the interferon-free therapy. PMID:26038992

  3. Dioscin's antiviral effect in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaohong; Wang, Yun; Wu, Chunchen; Pei, Rongjuan; Song, Jianhua; Chen, Shiyun; Chen, Xinwen

    2013-03-01

    Dioscin is chemical compound obtained from an extract from a medical plant, air potato that is a yam species. Its potential antiviral properties were analyzed in this study. In this study, dioscin's antiviral effects were tested against several viruses including adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). By time-of-addition assay, dioscin not only blocked the initial stage of adenovirus infection, but also affected the host cell's response for viral infection. In addition, 293 cells treated with dioscin displayed decreased mRNA levels for adenovirus receptor (CAR). Over expression of CAR in 293 cells pretreated with dioscin restored the infectivity of adenovirus. The inhibitory effect of dioscin against VSV infection was observed only in 293 cells pretreated with dioscin prior to infection. Finally, dioscin's inhibitory effect on secretion of HBeAg and HBsAg in HBV positive cell line HepG2 2.215 was observed by ELISA assay. PMID:23238077

  4. Competitive coexistence in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Arnaout, R A; Nowak, M A

    2000-06-01

    Adaptive immunity to viruses in vertebrates is mediated by two distinct but complementary branches of the immune system: the cellular response, which eliminates infected cells, and the humoral response, which eliminates infectious virus. This leads to an interesting contest, since the two responses compete, albeit indirectly, for proliferative stimuli. How can a host mount a coordinated antiviral campaign? Here we show that competition may lead to a state of "competitive coexistence" in which, counterintuitively, each branch complements the other, with clinical benefit to the host. The principle is similar to free-market economics, in which firms compete, but the consumer benefits. Experimental evidence suggests this is a useful paradigm in antiviral immunity. PMID:10816366

  5. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field. PMID:25634624

  6. Approaches towards rational antiviral chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Present epidemic influenza is uncontrolled by immuno- or chemoprophylaxis. Mutants of varying antigenic composition arise with relatively high frequency in nature and are able to circumvent herd, or induced, immunity. Also, drug-resistant viruses can be selected in vitro and this resistance can be exchanged to other viruses by gene reassortment. Combined immuno- and chemoprophylaxis may provide a more effective approach to the ultimate control of the disease. Most antiviral compounds have been selected by random screening in the laboratory. Application of more specific enzyme assays such as the virion-associated RNA transcriptase assays may produce other compounds with a defined mode of action - semi-rational chemotherapy. RNA and polypeptide sequence studies are in progress elsewhere to define transcription and translation initiation sites or virus adsorption sites. Such knowledge could lead to a new generation of antiviral compounds. Specific delivery of virus inhibitory compounds is an interesting problem. Liposomes are lipid spheres, and these have been used for the delivery of antiviral compounds. Images Fig. 3a. Fig. 3b. Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:461275

  7. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  8. [ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF THE DIHYDROQUERCETIN DURING THE COXSACKIEVIRUS B4 REPLICATION IN VITRO].

    PubMed

    Galochkina, A V; Zarubaev, V V; Kiselev, O I; Babkin, V A; Ostroukhova, L A

    2016-01-01

    A study of the antiviral activity of antioxidants against viral infections is believed to be essential for creating complex antiviral agents. Dihydroquercetin is considered as the most active antioxidant extracted from Larix gmelinii. In this work, we present results of experiments of the antiviral properties of dihydroquercetin against a member of the family Picarnaviridae--Coxsackievirus B4 in vitro. We have estimated that dihydroquercetin reduces viral titers at 100 µg/ml concentration as compared with control of virus. We have shown using the plaque assay that CPE of virusis reduced in the presence of dihydroquercetin at 100 µg/ml. Study of the phase of viral lifecycle, in which dihydroquercetin acted, demonstrated that the highest efficacy of the antiviral therapy was reached at early stages of virus reproduction (1-3 hours post infection). These results show that dihydroquercetin has antiviralproperty against Coxsackievirus B4. This drug and other antioxidants can be tested as inhibitors of viral replication. PMID:27145597

  9. What You Should Know about Flu Antiviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent seasonal influenza . Antiviral drugs are a second line of defense to treat the flu (including seasonal flu and variant flu viruses ) if you get sick. What are the benefits of antiviral drugs? When used for treatment, antiviral ...

  10. Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Todd H.; Zook, Christina E.; Boettcher, Tara L.; Wick, Scott T.; Pancoast, Jennifer S.; Zusman, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Activated Caspase Oligomerizer (DRACO) that selectively induces apoptosis in cells containing viral dsRNA, rapidly killing infected cells without harming uninfected cells. We have created DRACOs and shown that they are nontoxic in 11 mammalian cell types and effective against 15 different viruses, including dengue flavivirus, Amapari and Tacaribe arenaviruses, Guama bunyavirus, and H1N1 influenza. We have also demonstrated that DRACOs can rescue mice challenged with H1N1 influenza. DRACOs have the potential to be effective therapeutics or prophylactics for numerous clinical and priority viruses, due to the broad-spectrum sensitivity of the dsRNA detection domain, the potent activity of the apoptosis induction domain, and the novel direct linkage between the two which viruses have never encountered. PMID:21818340

  11. Antiviral targets of human noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bv Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Deng, Lisheng; Choi, Jae-Mun; Estes, Mary K; Song, Yongcheng; Palzkill, Timothy; Atmar, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Human noroviruses are major causative agents of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis both in children and adults. Currently there are no licensed therapeutic intervention measures either in terms of vaccines or drugs available for these highly contagious human pathogens. Genetic and antigenic diversity of these viruses, rapid emergence of new strains, and their ability to infect a broad population by using polymorphic histo-blood group antigens for cell attachment, pose significant challenges for the development of effective antiviral agents. Despite these impediments, there is progress in the design and development of therapeutic agents. These include capsid-based candidate vaccines, and potential antivirals either in the form of glycomimetics or designer antibodies that block HBGA binding, as well as those that target essential non-structural proteins such as the viral protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition to these classical approaches, recent studies suggest the possibility of interferons and targeting host cell factors as viable approaches to counter norovirus infection. This review provides a brief overview of this progress. PMID:27318434

  12. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:17886224

  13. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  14. Mx proteins: antiviral gatekeepers that restrain the uninvited.

    PubMed

    Verhelst, Judith; Hulpiau, Paco; Saelens, Xavier

    2013-12-01

    Fifty years after the discovery of the mouse Mx1 gene, researchers are still trying to understand the molecular details of the antiviral mechanisms mediated by Mx proteins. Mx proteins are evolutionarily conserved dynamin-like large GTPases, and GTPase activity is required for their antiviral activity. The expression of Mx genes is controlled by type I and type III interferons. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Mx genes are present in almost all vertebrates, usually in one to three copies. Mx proteins are best known for inhibiting negative-stranded RNA viruses, but they also inhibit other virus families. Recent structural analyses provide hints about the antiviral mechanisms of Mx proteins, but it is not known how they can suppress such a wide variety of viruses lacking an obvious common molecular pattern. Perhaps they interact with a (partially) symmetrical invading oligomeric structure, such as a viral ribonucleoprotein complex. Such an interaction may be of a fairly low affinity, in line with the broad target specificity of Mx proteins, yet it would be strong enough to instigate Mx oligomerization and ring assembly. Such a model is compatible with the broad "substrate" specificity of Mx proteins: depending on the size of the invading viral ribonucleoprotein complexes that need to be wrapped, the assembly process would consume the necessary amount of Mx precursor molecules. These Mx ring structures might then act as energy-consuming wrenches to disassemble the viral target structure. PMID:24296571

  15. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Sai Gopal, D. V. R.

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases. PMID:23738078

  16. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  17. Virus assembly, allostery, and antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana

    2010-01-01

    Assembly of virus capsids and surface proteins must be regulated to ensure that the resulting complex is an infectious virion. Here we examine assembly of virus capsids, focusing on hepatitis B virus and bacteriophage MS2, and formation of glycoproteins in the alphaviruses. These systems are structurally and biochemically well-characterized and are simplest-case paradigms of self-assembly. Published data suggest that capsid and glycoprotein assembly is subject to allosteric regulation, that is, regulation at the level of conformational change. The hypothesis that allostery is a common theme in viruses suggests that deregulation of capsid and glycoprotein assembly by small molecule effectors will be an attractive antiviral strategy, as has been demonstrated with hepatitis B virus. PMID:21163649

  18. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  19. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Hsu, Wen-Chan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines. PMID:24872930

  20. 75 FR 16810 - Determination and Declarations Regarding Emergency Use of Certain In vitro Diagnostic, Antiviral...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... determination, published at 74 FR 38628 (August 4, 2009), enabled the then Acting Commissioner to issue EUAs for certain in vitro diagnostic, antiviral, and personal respiratory protection products, published at 74 FR 38636 (August 4, 2009), 71 FR 38641 (August 4, 2009) and 71 FR 38645 (August 4, 2009). The CDC...

  1. The antiviral activity of arctigenin in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Li, Wentao; Jin, Erguang; He, Qigai; Yan, Weidong; Yang, Hanchun; Gong, Shiyu; Guo, Yi; Fu, Shulin; Chen, Xiabing; Ye, Shengqiang; Qian, Yunguo

    2016-06-01

    Arctigenin (ACT) is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan extracted from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) with anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of ACT found in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that dosing of 15.6-62.5μg/mL ACT could significantly inhibit the PCV2 proliferation in PK-15 cells (P<0.01). Dosing of 62.5μg/mL ACT 0, 4 or 8h after challenge inoculation significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1MOI and 10MOI in PK-15 cells (P<0.01), and the inhibitory effect of ACT dosing 4h or 8h post-inoculation was greater than 0h after dosing (P<0.01). In vivo test with mice challenge against PCV2 infection demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of 200μg/kg ACT significantly inhibited PCV2 proliferation in the lungs, spleens and inguinal lymph nodes, with an effect similar to ribavirin, demonstrating the effectiveness of ACT as an antiviral agent against PCV2 in vitro and in vivo. This compound, therefore, may have the potential to serve as a drug for protection of pigs against the infection of PCV2. PMID:27234554

  2. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  3. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  4. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  5. BEI Resources: Supporting antiviral research

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Robert; Peacock, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Biodefense and Emerging Infections Research Resources Repository (BEI Resources) provides unique, quality-assured reagents to the scientific community for use in basic research and product development involving biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. These include microorganisms (up to Biosafety Level-3) on the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists of Category A, B and C priority pathogens. In addition to live microorganisms, related products such as polyclonal antisera, monoclonal antibodies, isolated nucleic acid preparations, overlapping peptide arrays, purified proteins, and assay kits are also available. Many of these materials have direct or indirect applications in antiviral research. These reagents are available free of charge to all registered investigators, regardless of funding source or affiliation. Acquisition of new reagents for the repository is one of the critically necessary and challenging tasks for BEI Resources. Therefore, investigators are encouraged to deposit relevant items, so as to provide access to materials, relief from the burden of distribution, protection of intellectual property rights, and secure storage. In addition, BEI Resources has the capability of contracting for the preparation of specific reagents. If there is a resource needed to advance a specific research area, contact an NIAID program officer or use the “suggest a reagent” option on the BEI Resources homepage, www.beiresources.org. PMID:18675849

  6. Helicases as Antiviral Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Helicases catalytically unwind duplex DNA or RNA using energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates and are attractive drug targets because they are required for viral replication. This review discusses methods for helicase identification, classification and analysis, and presents an overview of helicases that are necessary for the replication of human pathogenic viruses. Newly developed methods to analyze helicases, coupled with recently determined atomic structures, have led to a better understanding of their mechanisms of action. The majority of this research has concentrated on enzymes encoded by the herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Helicase inhibitors that target the HSV helicase–primase complex comprised of the UL5, UL8 and UL52 proteins have recently been shown to effectively control HSV infection in animal models. In addition, several groups have reported structures of the HCV NS3 helicase at atomic resolutions, and mechanistic studies have uncovered characteristics that distinguish the HCV helicase from related cellular proteins. These new developments should eventually lead to new antiviral medications. PMID:12973446

  7. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  8. Type I Interferons in Newborns-Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  9. Type I Interferons in Newborns—Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  10. Intracellular osteopontin stabilizes TRAF3 to positively regulate innate antiviral response

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Peng; Song, Guanhua; Liu, Bingyu; Wu, Haifeng; Yin, Zhinan; Gao, Chengjiang

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein involved in both innate immunity and adaptive immunity. However, the function of OPN, especially the intracellular form OPN (iOPN) on innate antiviral immune response remains elusive. Here, we demonstrated that iOPN is an essential positive regulator to protect the host from virus infection. OPN deficiency or knockdown significantly attenuated virus-induced IRF3 activation, IFN-β production and antiviral response. Consistently, OPN-deficient mice were more susceptible to VSV infection than WT mice. Mechanistically, iOPN was found to interact with tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and inhibit Triad3A-mediated K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation of TRAF3 through the C-terminal fragment of iOPN. Therefore, our findings delineated a new function for iOPN to act as a positive regulator in innate antiviral immunity through stabilization of TRAF3. PMID:27026194

  11. An evolutionary perspective on the broad antiviral specificity of MxA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick S; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2013-08-01

    Germ line encoded antiviral defenses in vertebrate cells tend to be either broadly acting factors that exploit general features of viral replication or effectors with strong pathogen preference by virtue of specific recognition of viral proteins. The Mx GTPases, however, are atypical since they have broad antiviral activity against a wide range of RNA and DNA viruses despite specifically targeting different proteins across virus families. This review presents recent advances in understanding the biochemical properties and evolution of the primate ortholog MxA, and discusses how this information begins to provide molecular insights into the mechanisms behind the intriguing conundrum of how MxA is able to engage a diversity of viral proteins yet elicit antiviral breadth. PMID:23725670

  12. Divergent antiviral effects of bioflavonoids on the hepatitis C virus life cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Raychaudhuri, Santanu; Yeh, George K.; Maloney, Eden M.; Wang, Julie; and others

    2012-11-25

    We have previously demonstrated that quercetin, a bioflavonoid, blocks hepatitis C virus (HCV) proliferation by inhibiting NS5A-driven internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation of the viral genome. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of antiviral activity of quercetin and six additional bioflavonoids. We demonstrate that catechin, naringenin, and quercetin possess significant antiviral activity, with no associated cytotoxicity. Infectious virion secretion was not significantly altered by these bioflavonoids. Catechin and naringenin demonstrated stronger inhibition of infectious virion assembly compared to quercetin. Quercetin markedly blocked viral translation whereas catechin and naringenin demonstrated mild activity. Similarly quercetin completely blocked NS5A-augmented IRES-mediated translation in an IRES reporter assay, whereas catechin and naringenin had only a mild effect. Moreover, quercetin differentially inhibited HSP70 induction compared to catechin and naringenin. Thus, the antiviral activity of these bioflavonoids is mediated through different mechanisms. Therefore combination of these bioflavonoids may act synergistically against HCV.

  13. Advances in Antiviral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. While early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  14. Advances in antiviral vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2013-09-01

    Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. Although early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high-throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  15. Therapeutic outcome of 6198 interferon-naïve Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C: a real-life experience and lessons to be learned in DAAs' era.

    PubMed

    Zayed, N; Gamal Eldeen, H; Elmakhzangy, H; Seif, M; El-Akel, W; Awad, T; Esmat, G; Mabrouk, M

    2016-07-01

    Antiviral therapy for HCV infection has been validated in randomized controlled clinical trials, but its value in the real world is less well studied. There is relatively little data on real-world responses to interferon-based therapies for patients with genotype 4 infection. We aimed to examine experience with large-scale access to antiviral therapy in chronic HCV in a real-life clinical setting in Egypt. Detailed pretreatment data of 6198 IFN-naïve chronic HCV patients who had received PEG-IFN/RBV therapy at Cairo-Fatemic Hospital, Egypt, between 2009 and 2012 were obtained from the HCV database. At week 12, 95.7% of patients had undetectable HCV RNA, and by week 24 and 48, breakthrough was 6% and 4%, respectively. However, 43.7% of patients discontinued treatment prematurely, and intent to treat end of treatment response was 44.6% (79.3% per protocol). Sustai-ned response data were available from only 1281 patients and was 84.9%. Haematological abnormalities were comparable in patients who did or did not comply with therapy. This is the first real-world, large-scale experience of antiviral therapy in chronic HCV in Egypt. Suboptimal response in HCV predominantly genotype 4 was mainly driven by noncompliance as well as gaps in the healthcare system leading to treatment discontinuation. These results need to be considered in the era of all oral antiviral regimes. PMID:26936687

  16. Addressing the Challenges of Hepatitis C Virus Resistance and Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Colpitts, Che C.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a major cause of chronic liver disease, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) revolutionized hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment by offering genuine prospects for the first comprehensive cure of a chronic viral infection in humans. While antiviral resistance is a significant limitation for interferon-based therapies, resistance and treatment failure still appear to be present in a small fraction of patients even in state-of-the-art DAA combination therapies. Therefore, treatment failure and resistance still remain a clinical challenge for the management of patients not responding to DAAs. In this special issue of Viruses on HCV drug resistance, mechanisms of antiviral resistance for different classes of antiviral drugs are described. Furthermore, the detection and monitoring of resistance in clinical practice, the clinical impact of resistance in different patient groups and strategies to prevent and address resistance and treatment failure using complementary antiviral strategies are reviewed. PMID:27537906

  17. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance. PMID:16086663

  18. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO. PMID:19127652

  19. Emerging paramyxoviruses: molecular mechanisms and antiviral strategies

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several paramyxoviruses have emerged to infect humans, including previously unidentified zoonoses. Hendra and Nipah virus (henipavirus (HNV)) zoonoses were first identified in 1994 or 1998, causing deaths in animals and humans in Australia or Malaysia, respectively. Other paramyxoviruses, such as menangle virus, tioman virus, human metapneumovirus, and avian paramyxovirus-1, with less morbidity in humans, have also been recently identified. Although the Paramyxoviridae family of viruses has been previously recognized as biomedically and veterinarily important, the recent emergence of these paramyxoviruses has increased our attention to this family. Antiviral drugs can be designed to target specific important determinants of the viral/cell life cycle. Therefore, identifying and understanding the mechanistic underpinnings of viral entry, replication, assembly, and budding will be critical in the development of antiviral therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms discovered and the antiviral strategies pursued in recent years for emerging paramyxoviruses, with a concentration on viral entry and exit mechanisms. PMID:21345285

  20. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  1. Influence of Ribavirin Serum Levels on Outcome of Antiviral Treatment and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuntzen, Thomas; Kuhn, Sereina; Kuntzen, Daniela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Müllhaupt, Beat; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Ribavirin blood levels vary considerably between patients with standard weight-based dosing. Their impact on sustained virological response (SVR) with pegylated interferon and ribavirin is controversial, but has mostly been studied before the IL28b gene polymorphism as a possible confounder was discovered. Methods The impact of serum ribavirin trough levels at week 4, at the end of treatment and of mean levels across the entire antiviral treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin on relapse, SVR rates and anemia was retrospectively studied by univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses in 214 patients with HCV genotype 1–4 infection, including 88 patients with available IL28b genotyping. Results Mean ribavirin levels varied between 0.68–5.65 mg/l and significantly differed between patients with or without SVR. By multivariable regression including age, sex, HCV viral load, HCV genotype, liver fibrosis stage, prior treatments, immunosuppression and IL28b genotype, ribavirin levels consistently displayed significant influence on SVR and relapse without indication for a specific importance of higher concentrations early or late in the treatment course. Although hemoglobin decline was on average more pronounced in patients with higher ribavirin levels, hemoglobin remained relatively stable in a significant proportion of these, indicating that ribavirin levels alone are insufficient to predict anemia. Conclusion While data are scarce to draw conclusions applicable for modern DAA therapies, these results support ribavirin treatment based on serum levels instead of purely weight-based dosing in combination with pegylated interferon. PMID:27388623

  2. Autophagy and selective deployment of Atg proteins in antiviral defense

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process eukaryotic cells utilize to remove and recycle intracellular material in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. In metazoans, the autophagy machinery not only functions in this capacity but also has evolved to perform a diverse repertoire of intracellular transport and regulatory functions. In response to virus infections, the autophagy machinery degrades viruses, shuttles viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns to endosomes containing Toll-like receptors, facilitates viral-antigen processing for major histocompatibility complex presentation and transports antiviral proteins to viral replication sites. This is accomplished through canonical autophagy or through processes involving distinct subsets of the autophagy-related genes (Atgs). Herein, we discuss how the variable components of the autophagy machinery contribute to antiviral defense and highlight three emerging themes: first, autophagy delivers viral cytosolic components to several distinct endolysosomal compartments; second, Atg proteins act alone, as subgroups or collectively; and third, the specificity of autophagy and the autophagy machinery is achieved by recognition of triggers and selective targeting by adaptors. PMID:23042773

  3. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals. This article discusses drug resistance in herpesviruses and hepatitis B. PMID:20466277

  4. Antiviral activity of constituents of Tamus communis.

    PubMed

    Aquino, R; Conti, C; De Simone, F; Orsi, N; Pizza, C; Stein, M L

    1991-10-01

    The antiviral activity of the phenanthrene derivatives 1-6, of the spyrostane triglycosides dioscin (7) and gracillin (8), of the furostanol tetraglycosides methylprotodioscin (9), its (25S) epimer methylprotoneodioscin (10), and methylprotogracillin 11, have been tested towards two RNA viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus and human rhinovirus type 1B. All these products were extracted from the rizomes of Tamus communis L; compound 11 was isolated also from Asparagus cochinchinesis, together with pseudoprotodioscin (12), a 20 (22)-unsaturated furostanoside, which was also investigated for antiviral activity. The results were of some interest mainly for the phenanthrene derivatives. PMID:1667189

  5. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... PATIENTS and their FAMILIES BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS This information sheet is provided to help you understand the role of steroids and antiviral drugs for treating Bell’s palsy. Neurologists ...

  6. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  7. Viral genome imaging of hepatitis C virus to probe heterogeneous viral infection and responses to antiviral therapies.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Vyas; Trehan, Kartik; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Luna, Joseph M; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Espiritu, Christine; Sheahan, Timothy P; Chandrasekar, Hamsika; Schwartz, Robert E; Christine, Kathleen S; Rice, Charles M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus of enormous global health importance, with direct-acting antiviral therapies replacing an immunostimulatory interferon-based regimen. The dynamics of HCV positive and negative-strand viral RNAs (vRNAs) under antiviral perturbations have not been studied at the single-cell level, leaving a gap in our understanding of antiviral kinetics and host-virus interactions. Here, we demonstrate quantitative imaging of HCV genomes in multiple infection models, and multiplexing of positive and negative strand vRNAs and host antiviral RNAs. We capture the varying kinetics with which antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action clear HCV infection, finding the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir to induce a rapid decline in negative-strand viral RNAs. We also find that the induction of host antiviral genes upon interferon treatment is positively correlated with viral load in single cells. This study adds smFISH to the toolbox available for analyzing the treatment of RNA virus infections. PMID:27128351

  8. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  9. New hypoxanthine nucleosides with RNA antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, V; Ussery, M A

    1992-08-01

    A series of novel C-2 functionalized hypoxanthine and purine ribonucleosides have been synthesized and evaluated against exotic RNA viruses of the family or genus alpha, arena, flavi, and rhabdo. Both specific and broad-spectrum antiviral activities were discovered but only with hypoxanthine nucleosides. PMID:1444325

  10. Anti-viral Responses in Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the study of anti-viral responses in insects has lagged behind studies of responses to other types of pathogens, progress has begun to rapidly accelerate over the past few years. Insects are subject to infection by many different kinds of DNA and RNA viruses. These include viruses that ar...

  11. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  12. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  13. Targeting Innate Immunity for Antiviral Therapy through Small Molecule Agonists of the RLR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pattabhi, Sowmya; Wilkins, Courtney R.; Dong, Ran; Knoll, Megan L.; Posakony, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Shari; Mire, Chad E.; Wang, Myra L.; Ireton, Renee C.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Bedard, Kristin M.; Iadonato, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cellular response to virus infection is initiated when pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) engage viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). This process results in induction of downstream signaling pathways that activate the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). IRF3 plays a critical role in antiviral immunity to drive the expression of innate immune response genes, including those encoding antiviral factors, type 1 interferon, and immune modulatory cytokines, that act in concert to restrict virus replication. Thus, small molecule agonists that can promote IRF3 activation and induce innate immune gene expression could serve as antivirals to induce tissue-wide innate immunity for effective control of virus infection. We identified small molecule compounds that activate IRF3 to differentially induce discrete subsets of antiviral genes. We tested a lead compound and derivatives for the ability to suppress infections caused by a broad range of RNA viruses. Compound administration significantly decreased the viral RNA load in cultured cells that were infected with viruses of the family Flaviviridae, including West Nile virus, dengue virus, and hepatitis C virus, as well as viruses of the families Filoviridae (Ebola virus), Orthomyxoviridae (influenza A virus), Arenaviridae (Lassa virus), and Paramyxoviridae (respiratory syncytial virus, Nipah virus) to suppress infectious virus production. Knockdown studies mapped this response to the RIG-I-like receptor pathway. This work identifies a novel class of host-directed immune modulatory molecules that activate IRF3 to promote host antiviral responses to broadly suppress infections caused by RNA viruses of distinct genera. IMPORTANCE Incidences of emerging and reemerging RNA viruses highlight a desperate need for broad-spectrum antiviral agents that can effectively control infections caused by viruses of distinct genera. We identified small molecule compounds that can

  14. Ultrasensitive HCV RNA Quantification in Antiviral Triple Therapy: New Insight on Viral Clearance Dynamics and Treatment Outcome Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Visco-Comandini, Ubaldo; Lionetti, Raffaella; Lapa, Daniele; Castiglione, Filippo; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Taibi, Chiara; Montalbano, Marzia; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Paci, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identifying the predictive factors of Sustained Virological Response (SVR) represents an important challenge in new interferon-based DAA therapies. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of antiviral response associated with a triple drug regimen, and the association between negative residual viral load at different time points during treatment. Methods Twenty-three HCV genotype 1 (GT 1a n = 11; GT1b n = 12) infected patients were included in the study. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was used to establish possible association between HCV RNA values at days 1 and 4 from start of therapy and SVR. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to analyze the correlation between HCV RNA slope and SVR. A ultrasensitive (US) method was established to measure the residual HCV viral load in those samples which resulted “detected <12IU/ml” or undetectable with ABBOTT standard assay, and was retrospectively used on samples collected at different time points to establish its predictive power for SVR. Results According to LDA, there was no association between SVR and viral kinetics neither at time points earlier than 1 week (days 1 and 4) after therapy initiation nor later. The slopes were not relevant for classifying patients as SVR or no-SVR. No significant differences were observed in the median HCV RNA values at T0 among SVR and no-SVR patients. HCV RNA values with US protocol (LOD 1.2 IU/ml) after 1 month of therapy were considered; the area under the ROC curve was 0.70. Overall, PPV and NPV of undetectable HCV RNA with the US method for SVR was 100% and 46.7%, respectively; sensitivity and specificity were 38.4% and 100% respectively. Conclusion HCV RNA “not detected” by the US method after 1 month of treatment is predictive of SVR in first generation Protease inhibitor (PI)-based triple therapy. The US method could have clinical utility for advanced monitoring of virological response in new interferon based DAA combination regimens. PMID:27560794

  15. Management of post transplant hepatitis C in the direct antiviral agents era.

    PubMed

    Coilly, Audrey; Roche, Bruno; Duclos-Vallée, Jean-Charles; Samuel, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the main indications for liver transplantation. Viral recurrence occurs in all patients with detectable serum HCV RNA at the time of transplantation leading to cirrhosis in 20-30% of patients within 5 years. Viral eradication using antiviral therapy has been shown to improve patient and graft survival. Pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) antiviral therapy achieved SVR in around 30% of transplant recipients. In the non-transplant setting, first generation NS3/4 protease inhibitors, boceprevir or telaprevir associated with PEG-IFN and RBV, has improved the SVR rates to 75% in genotype 1 infected patients. However, tolerability and drug-drug interactions with calcineurin inhibitors are both limiting factors of their use in transplant recipients. In the non-transplant patients, using new direct-acting antiviral therapy has dramatically improved the efficacy of antiviral C therapy over recent years leading to SVR rates over 90% in phase II and III clinical trials, without PEG-IFN and/or RBV. Preliminary results in transplant patients showed better efficacy, better tolerability and less drug-drug interactions. PMID:25820797

  16. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  17. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of developing an integrated avionics system suitable for general aviation was determined. A design of reliable integrated avionics which provides expanded functional capability that significantly enhances the utility and safety of general aviation at a cost commensurate with the general aviation market was developed. The use of a data bus, microprocessors, electronic displays and data entry devices, and improved function capabilities were emphasized. An avionics system capable of evaluating the most critical and promising elements of an integrated system was designed, built and flight tested in a twin engine general aviation aircraft.

  18. Synthesis and antiviral activity of 5'-deoxypyrazofurin.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Schneller, S W; Ikeda, S; Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1993-11-12

    In searching for derivatives of pyrazofurin that could display antiviral properties by means that do not require C-5' phosphorylation, 5'-deoxypyrazofurin (3) has been synthesized in six steps from methyl5-deoxy-2,3-O-isopropylidene-beta-D-ribofuranoside (4). Compound 3 was evaluated for antiviral activity against a large number of viruses including herpes-, pox-, myxo-, toga-, arena-, rhabdo-, picorna-,reo-, and retroviruses. Compound 3 proved active against respiratory syncytial virus (in HeLa cells), vaccinia virus (in embryonic skin-muscle fibroblast cells), vesicular stomatitis virus (in HeLa cells), and influenza A virus (in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells) at concentrations (ranging from 4 to 20 micrograms/mL) that were nontoxic to the confluent host cell cultures. PMID:8246242

  19. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  20. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    PubMed

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:10548761

  1. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Timothy C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:26389935

  2. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides. PMID:15308605

  3. Antiviral therapy: old and current issues.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Guido; Turriziani, Ombretta

    2012-08-01

    Many antiviral drugs are currently approved and formally licensed for clinical use in the treatment of viral infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus, herpes simplex viruses, varicella-zoster virus, respiratory syncytial virus, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus or influenza virus. Recent decades have seen major advances in our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of viral diseases as well as ongoing developments and improvements in antiviral therapy. However, research is far from complete and indeed previously unknown and unexpected issues are currently arising. This review aims to discuss some of these issues in the belief that they should be carefully addressed to enhance the management of patients with viral infections. PMID:22727532

  4. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. PMID:21116410

  5. Inhibition of immune functions by antiviral drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Crumpacker, C; Lopez, P A; Finberg, R W

    1991-01-01

    Immune functions were evaluated in vitro for PBMC isolated from healthy donors and cultured with the antiviral agents, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), ribavirin, ganciclovir, 2'3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), or acyclovir. To identify methods for assessing the effects of antiviral drugs on immune cells, the PBMC response to mitogens, Con A, or phytohemagglutinin was evaluated from measurements of [3H]thymidine and [14C]-leucine incorporation, cell growth, cellular RNA, DNA, and protein levels, and the PBMC proliferative cycle (i.e., progression from G0----G1----S----G2 + M). At clinically relevant concentrations, AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir diminished PBMC responsiveness to mitogen. The numbers of proliferating cells in G1, S, and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle, DNA content, and [3H]thymidine uptake were decreased in cultures treated with AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir. AZT or ribavirin but not ganciclovir reduced RNA and protein in the cultures and inhibited cell growth. Whereas AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir were antiproliferative, ddI or acyclovir had little, if any, effect on PBMC mitogenesis. The inhibitory effects of antivirals on immune cells may contribute to the immune deterioration observed in patients following prolonged use of the drugs. PMID:1904068

  6. Hyperbilirubinemia without Transaminitis during Combined Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hayato; Tajiri, Kazuto; Nagata, Kohei; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) are direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Combined therapy with DCV and ASV shows high efficacy and safety even in patients with cirrhosis. We encountered a patient exhibiting severe hyperbilirubinemia during combined therapy, which is an unreported side effect of DCV and ASV. A 78-year-old woman with cirrhosis developed hyperbilirubinemia >10 mg/dl without transaminitis 3 weeks after starting combined therapy. We suspected DAAs-induced liver disorder and discontinued treatment, which resulted in the improvement of hyperbilirubinemia. Caution is required in the use of DAAs for patients with advanced cirrhosis. PMID:27504082

  7. Drug-induced lung injury associated with combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir: The first case report.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Takahiro; Furuta, Kenjiro; Tomioka, Hiromi

    2016-05-01

    Combination therapy with direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) without interferon (IFN) has emerged as a treatment for chronic hepatitis C because of its high overall sustained virologic response rates and favorable side effect profile as compared to that with interferon. We report the first case of drug-induced lung injury (DLI) associated with IFN-free therapy with the DAAs, daclatasvir (NS5A inhibitor) and asunaprevir (NS3/4A protease inhibitor). Although this combination therapy of DAAs has been considered to have fewer side effects than IFN, more attention should be paid to DLI as an important side effect. PMID:27108017

  8. Hyperbilirubinemia without Transaminitis during Combined Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Hayato; Tajiri, Kazuto; Nagata, Kohei; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) are direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Combined therapy with DCV and ASV shows high efficacy and safety even in patients with cirrhosis. We encountered a patient exhibiting severe hyperbilirubinemia during combined therapy, which is an unreported side effect of DCV and ASV. A 78-year-old woman with cirrhosis developed hyperbilirubinemia >10 mg/dl without transaminitis 3 weeks after starting combined therapy. We suspected DAAs-induced liver disorder and discontinued treatment, which resulted in the improvement of hyperbilirubinemia. Caution is required in the use of DAAs for patients with advanced cirrhosis. PMID:27504082

  9. A case for developing antiviral drugs against polio.

    PubMed

    Collett, Marc S; Neyts, Johan; Modlin, John F

    2008-09-01

    Polio eradication is within sight. In bringing the world close to this ultimate goal, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has relied exclusively on the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, as eradication nears, continued OPV use becomes less tenable due to the incidence of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccine recipients and disease caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in contacts. Once wild poliovirus transmission has been interrupted globally, OPV use will stop. This will leave the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) as the only weapon to defend a polio-free world. Outbreaks caused by cVDPVs are expected post-OPV cessation, and accidental or deliberate releases of virus could also occur. There are serious doubts regarding the ability of IPV alone to control outbreaks. Here, we argue that antiviral drugs against poliovirus be added to the arsenal. Anti-poliovirus drugs could be used to treat the infected and protect the exposed, acting rapidly on their own to contain an outbreak and used as a complement to IPV. While there are no polio antiviral drugs today, the technological feasibility of developing such drugs and their probability of clinical success have been established by over three decades of drug development targeting the related rhinoviruses and non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Because of this history, there are known compounds with anti-poliovirus activity in vitro that represent excellent starting points for polio drug development. Stakeholders must come to understand the potential public health benefits of polio drugs, the feasibility of their development, and the relatively modest costs involved. Given the timelines for eradication and those for drug development, the time for action is now. PMID:18513807

  10. Cutaneous manifestations of hepatitis C in the era of new antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Garcovich, Simone; Garcovich, Matteo; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Zocco, Maria Assunta

    2015-11-28

    The association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations has been widely reported in the literature, with varying strength of epidemiological association. Skin diseases which are certainly related with chronic HCV infection due to a strong epidemiological and pathogenetic association are mixed cryoglobulinemia, lichen planus and porphyria cutanea tarda. Chronic pruritus and necrolytic acral erythema are conditions that may share a possible association with HCV infection, while several immune-mediated inflammatory skin conditions, such as psoriasis, chronic urticaria and vitiligo, have been only anecdotally reported in the setting of chronic HCV infection. Traditional interferon-based treatment regimens for HCV infection are associated with substantial toxicity and a high-risk of immune-related adverse events, while the advent of new direct-acting antivirals with sustained virological response and improved tolerability will open the door for all-oral, interferon-free regimens. In the new era of these direct acting antivirals there will be hopefully a renewed interest in extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection. The aim of the present paper is to review the main cutaneous HCV-related disorders - mixed cryoglobulinemia, lichen planus, porphyria cutanea tarda and chronic pruritus - and to discuss the potential impact of new antiviral treatments on the course of these extra-hepatic manifestations of chronic HCV infection. PMID:26644817

  11. Antiviral and Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Galactomannans from Plants of Caatinga Biome

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Morais, Selene Maia; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Barroso, Naiara Dutra; Pontes Filho, Tadeu Rocha; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Lima, Danielle Malta; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious social and economic public health problem; then trying to contribute to improve its control, the objective of this research was to develop phytoterapics for dengue treatment using natural resources from Caatinga biome. Galactomannans isolated from Adenanthera pavonina L., Caesalpinia ferrea Mart., and Dimorphandra gardneriana Tull were chemically sulfated in order to evaluate the antioxidant, and antiviral activities and the role in the inhibition of virus DENV-2 in Vero cells. A positive correlation between the degree of sulfation, antioxidant and antiviral activities was observed. The sulfated galactomannans showed binding to the virus surface, indicating that they interact with DENV-2. The sulfated galactomannans from C. ferrea showed 96% inhibition of replication of DENV-2 followed by D. gardneriana (94%) and A. pavonina (77%) at 25 µg/mL and all sulfated galactomannans also showed antioxidant activity. This work is the first report of the antioxidant and antiviral effects of sulfated galactomannans against DENV-2. The results are very promising and suggest that these sulfated galactomannans from plants of Caatinga biome act in the early step of viral infection. Thus, sulfated galactomannans may act as an entry inhibitor of DENV-2. PMID:26257815

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of hepatitis C in the era of new antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Garcovich, Simone; Garcovich, Matteo; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Zocco, Maria Assunta

    2015-01-01

    The association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations has been widely reported in the literature, with varying strength of epidemiological association. Skin diseases which are certainly related with chronic HCV infection due to a strong epidemiological and pathogenetic association are mixed cryoglobulinemia, lichen planus and porphyria cutanea tarda. Chronic pruritus and necrolytic acral erythema are conditions that may share a possible association with HCV infection, while several immune-mediated inflammatory skin conditions, such as psoriasis, chronic urticaria and vitiligo, have been only anecdotally reported in the setting of chronic HCV infection. Traditional interferon-based treatment regimens for HCV infection are associated with substantial toxicity and a high-risk of immune-related adverse events, while the advent of new direct-acting antivirals with sustained virological response and improved tolerability will open the door for all-oral, interferon-free regimens. In the new era of these direct acting antivirals there will be hopefully a renewed interest in extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection. The aim of the present paper is to review the main cutaneous HCV-related disorders - mixed cryoglobulinemia, lichen planus, porphyria cutanea tarda and chronic pruritus - and to discuss the potential impact of new antiviral treatments on the course of these extra-hepatic manifestations of chronic HCV infection. PMID:26644817

  13. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  14. Telomerase-based pharmacologic enhancement of antiviral function of human CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Fauce, Steven Russell; Jamieson, Beth D; Chin, Allison C; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Parish, Stan T; Ng, Hwee L; Kitchen, Christina M Ramirez; Yang, Otto O; Harley, Calvin B; Effros, Rita B

    2008-11-15

    Telomerase reverse transcribes telomere DNA onto the ends of linear chromosomes and retards cellular aging. In contrast to most normal somatic cells, which show little or no telomerase activity, immune cells up-regulate telomerase in concert with activation. Nevertheless, during aging and chronic HIV-1 infection, there are high proportions of dysfunctional CD8(+) CTL with short telomeres, suggesting that telomerase is limiting. The present study shows that exposure of CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HIV-infected human donors to a small molecule telomerase activator (TAT2) modestly retards telomere shortening, increases proliferative potential, and, importantly, enhances cytokine/chemokine production and antiviral activity. The enhanced antiviral effects were abrogated in the presence of a potent and specific telomerase inhibitor, suggesting that TAT2 acts primarily through telomerase activation. Our study is the first to use a pharmacological telomerase-based approach to enhance immune function, thus directly addressing the telomere loss immunopathologic facet of chronic viral infection. PMID:18981163

  15. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis C: Has anything changed for pregnant/lactating women?

    PubMed

    Spera, Anna Maria; Eldin, Tarek Kamal; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele

    2016-04-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects about 3% of the world's population, with the highest prevalence in individuals under 40. The prevalence in pregnant women varies with geographical distribution (highest in developing countries). Prevalence also increases in sub-populations of women at high risk for blood-transmitted infections. HCV infection in pregnancy represents a non-negligible problem. However, most of the past antiviral regimens cannot be routinely offered to pregnant or breastfeeding women because of their side effects. We briefly reviewed the issue of treatment of HCV infection in pregnant/breastfeeding women focusing on the effects of the new direct-acting antivirals on fertility, pregnancy and lactation in animal studies and on the potential risk for humans based on the pharmacokinetic properties of each drug. Currently, all new therapy regimens are contraindicated in this setting because of lack of sufficient safety information and adequate measures of contraception are still routinely recommended for female patients of childbearing potential. PMID:27134703

  16. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  17. Systems biology: A tool for charting the antiviral landscape.

    PubMed

    Bowen, James R; Ferris, Martin T; Suthar, Mehul S

    2016-06-15

    The host antiviral programs that are initiated following viral infection form a dynamic and complex web of responses that we have collectively termed as "the antiviral landscape". Conventional approaches to studying antiviral responses have primarily used reductionist systems to assess the function of a single or a limited subset of molecules. Systems biology is a holistic approach that considers the entire system as a whole, rather than individual components or molecules. Systems biology based approaches facilitate an unbiased and comprehensive analysis of the antiviral landscape, while allowing for the discovery of emergent properties that are missed by conventional approaches. The antiviral landscape can be viewed as a hierarchy of complexity, beginning at the whole organism level and progressing downward to isolated tissues, populations of cells, and single cells. In this review, we will discuss how systems biology has been applied to better understand the antiviral landscape at each of these layers. At the organismal level, the Collaborative Cross is an invaluable genetic resource for assessing how genetic diversity influences the antiviral response. Whole tissue and isolated bulk cell transcriptomics serves as a critical tool for the comprehensive analysis of antiviral responses at both the tissue and cellular levels of complexity. Finally, new techniques in single cell analysis are emerging tools that will revolutionize our understanding of how individual cells within a bulk infected cell population contribute to the overall antiviral landscape. PMID:26795869

  18. Neuropsychiatric Effects of HIV Antiviral Medications.

    PubMed

    Treisman, Glenn J; Soudry, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically increased the lifespan of HIV patients but treatment is complicated by numerous adverse effects and toxicities. ART complications include neuropsychiatric, metabolic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, and numerous other toxicities, and clinicians often have to choose one toxicity over another to offer the best medication regimen for a patient. Some antiviral drugs cause significant neuropsychiatric complications, including depression, cognitive impairment, and sleep disturbance. Even in careful studies, it may be difficult to determine which effects are related to the virus, the immune system, or the treatment. Of the six currently marketed classes of antiviral drugs, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been most commonly associated with neuropsychiatric complications. Within these classes, certain drugs are more likely to cause difficulty than others. We review the contention regarding the central nervous system (CNS) complications of efavirenz, as well as debate about the role of CNS penetration in drug effectiveness and toxicity. A thorough working knowledge of the neuropsychiatric consequences of ART allows clinicians to tailor treatment more successfully to individual patients as well as to identify ART more quickly as the source of a problem or symptom. PMID:27534750

  19. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  20. Antiviral agents for herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Field, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    This review starts with a brief description of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), the clinical diseases they cause, and the continuing clinical need for antiviral chemotherapy. A historical overview describes the progress from the early, rather toxic antivirals to acyclovir (ACV) which led the way for its prodrug, valacyclovir, to penciclovir and its prodrug, famciclovir (FCV). These compounds have been the mainstay of HSV therapy for two decades and have established a remarkable safety record. This review focuses on these compounds, the preclinical studies which reveal potentially important differences, the clinical trials, and the clinical experience through two decades. Some possible areas for further investigation are suggested. The focus shifts to new approaches and novel compounds, in particular, the combination of ACV with hydrocortisone, known as ME609 or zovirax duo, an HSV helicase-primase inhibitor, pritelivir (AIC316), and CMX001, the cidofovir prodrug for treating resistant HSV infection in immunocompromised patients. Letermovir has established that the human cytomegalovirus terminase enzyme is a valid target and that similar compounds could be sought for HSV. We discuss the difficulties facing the progression of new compounds. In our concluding remarks, we summarize the present situation including a discussion on the reclassification of FCV from prescription-only to pharmacist-controlled for herpes labialis in New Zealand in 2010; should this be repeated more widely? We conclude that HSV research is emerging from a quiescent phase. PMID:23885997

  1. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Karla A.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus’s inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles—the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations—both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  2. Host-targeting agents for prevention and treatment of chronic hepatitis C - perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Mirjam B; Lupberger, Joachim; Fofana, Isabel; Baumert, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Furthermore, HCV-induced liver disease is a major indication of liver transplantation. In the past years, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting HCV enzymes have been developed. DAAs increase the virologic response to anti-HCV therapy but may lead to selection of drug-resistant variants and treatment failure. To date, strategies to prevent HCV infection are still lacking and antiviral therapy in immunocompromised patients, patients with advanced liver disease and HIV/HCV-co-infection remains limited. Alternative or complementary approaches addressing the limitations of current antiviral therapies are to boost the host's innate immunity or interfere with host factors required for pathogenesis. Host-targeting agents (HTAs) provide an interesting perspective for novel antiviral strategies against viral hepatitis since they have (i) a high genetic barrier to resistance, (ii) a pan-genotypic antiviral activity, and (iii) complementary mechanisms of action to DAAs and might therefore act in a synergistic manner with current standard of care or DAAs in clinical development. This review highlights HTAs against HCV infection that have potential as novel antivirals and are in preclinical or clinical development. PMID:23041307

  3. [Study of cytotoxic and antiviral effects of some eye drops].

    PubMed

    Dediulescu, Lucreţia; Dediulescu, Daniela Florentina

    2008-01-01

    The study of the cytotoxic and antiviral effect of six commercial mixtures, eye drops type, underlined the advantages of using eye drops with Indomethacin for Herpetic Keratitis, due to the antiviral effect and also for the lack of cytotoxicity. PMID:19354165

  4. Antiviral activity of luteolin against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Suhong; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-07-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of family Flaviviridae, is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE). JEV is one of the most important causative agents of viral encephalitis in humans, and this disease leads to high fatality rates. Although effective vaccines are available, no effective antiviral therapy for JE has been developed. Hence, identifying effective antiviral agents against JEV infection is important. In this study, we found that luteolin was an antiviral bioflavonoid with potent antiviral activity against JEV replication in A549 cells with IC50=4.56μg/mL. Luteolin also showed extracellular virucidal activity on JEV. With a time-of-drug addition assay revealing that JEV replication was inhibited by luteolin after the entry stage. Overall, our results suggested that luteolin can be used to develop an antiviral drug against JEV. PMID:27126774

  5. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  6. Liver toxicity associated with sofosbuvir, an NS5A inhibitor and ribavirin use.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Jessica K; Hutchinson, John; Harrison, Laura; Rotimi, Olorunda; Tiniakos, Dina; Foster, Graham R; Aldersley, Mark A; McPherson, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. There have been rapid advances in HCV treatment with the development of oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Studies have shown sustained virological response rates above 90% with combinations of DAAs, including patients with compensated cirrhosis. Thus far, significant drug toxicity has not been seen with these agents, but there is limited experience of using DAAs in decompensated HCV cirrhosis. This report describes the first experience of serious drug-induced hepatotoxicity with the new DAAs. The mechanism underlying these drug reactions is currently unknown. Few patients with decompensated cirrhosis have been treated with DAAs, so the exact pharmacokinetics in this population have not been characterised. In both cases presented here, patients were taking or had recently taken other drugs. It is possible that an unknown interaction or reaction to the drug combination caused the hepatotoxicity. Although the association with the DAAs is not proven these cases indicate that patients with advanced liver disease need close monitoring while on DAA therapy and if there is a significant unexplained deterioration in liver function the DAAs should be discontinued. PMID:26325535

  7. SOCS3 Drives Proteasomal Degradation of TBK1 and Negatively Regulates Antiviral Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Sheng, Chunjie; Gao, Shijuan; Yao, Chen; Li, Jiandong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Huiming; Wu, Jiaoxiang; Pan, Changchuan; Chen, Shuai; Huang, Wenlin

    2015-07-01

    TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1)-mediated induction of type I interferon (IFN) plays a critical role in host antiviral responses and immune homeostasis. The negative regulation of TBK1 activity is largely unknown. We report that suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) inhibits the IFN-β signaling pathway by promoting proteasomal degradation of TBK1. Overexpression and knockdown experiments indicated that SOCS3 is a negative regulator of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation and IFN-β transcription. Moreover, SOCS3 directly associates with TBK1, and they colocalize in the cytoplasm. SOCS3 catalyzes K48-linked polyubiquitination of TBK1 at Lys341 and Lys344 and promotes subsequent TBK1 degradation. On the contrary, SOCS3 knockdown markedly increases the abundance of TBK1. Interestingly, both the BOX domain of SOCS3 and Ser172 phosphorylation of TBK1 are indispensable for the processes of ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of SOCS3 significantly inhibits vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and influenza A virus strain A/WSN/33 (WSN)-induced IRF3 phosphorylation and facilitates the replication of WSN virus by detecting the transcription of its viral RNA (vRNA). Knockdown of SOCS3 represses WSN replication. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SOCS3 acts as a negative regulator of IFN-β signal by ubiquitinating and degrading TBK1, shed light on the understanding of antiviral innate immunity, and provide a potential target for developing antiviral agents. PMID:25939384

  8. Hepatitis C virus molecular evolution: Transmission, disease progression and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Preciado, Maria Victoria; Valva, Pamela; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Yamasaki, Lilian; Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos; Martinez-Guarneros, Armando; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents an important public health problem worldwide. Reduction of HCV morbidity and mortality is a current challenge owned to several viral and host factors. Virus molecular evolution plays an important role in HCV transmission, disease progression and therapy outcome. The high degree of genetic heterogeneity characteristic of HCV is a key element for the rapid adaptation of the intrahost viral population to different selection pressures (e.g., host immune responses and antiviral therapy). HCV molecular evolution is shaped by different mechanisms including a high mutation rate, genetic bottlenecks, genetic drift, recombination, temporal variations and compartmentalization. These evolutionary processes constantly rearrange the composition of the HCV intrahost population in a staging manner. Remarkable advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanism controlling HCV replication have facilitated the development of a plethora of direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV. As a result, superior sustained viral responses have been attained. The rapidly evolving field of anti-HCV therapy is expected to broad its landscape even further with newer, more potent antivirals, bringing us one step closer to the interferon-free era. PMID:25473152

  9. Antiviral effects of liposome-encapsulated PolyICLC against Dengue virus in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxin; Hu, Yanxin; Sun, Lunquan; Wong, Jonathan; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-16

    This study presents the first investigation of the antiviral effects of the liposome-encapsulated PolyICLC (LE-PolyICLC) on Dengue virus (DENV) in a mouse model. In vivo efficacy studies showed that LE-PolyICLC acted to increase antiviral mechanisms mainly through promoting cytokine expression associated with innate immunity, such as IFN-γ. In addition, the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also increased, while IL-6 level was decreased in serum. The titers of total antibodies against DENV2 in mice were also elevated. Administration of LE-PolyICLC not only alleviated the loss of body weight, degree of morbidity, and pathological damage in brains, but also reduced the viral titers and expression of viral E protein in the brain. Notably, the effectiveness of LE-PolyICLC was better than PolyICLC on the basis of the data presented in this study. These results, therefore, set a foundation for further development of LE-PolyICLC as an attractive candidate of antiviral agents to be used in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings in DENV diseases. PMID:27524246

  10. Dufulin Activates HrBP1 to Produce Antiviral Responses in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Zeng, Mengjiao; Song, Baoan; Hou, Chengrui; Hu, Deyu; Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Zhenchao; Fan, Huitao; Bi, Liang; Liu, Jiaju; Yu, Dandan; Jin, Linhong; Yang, Song

    2012-01-01

    Background Dufulin is a new antiviral agent that is highly effective against plant viruses and acts by activating systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. In recent years, it has been used widely to prevent and control tobacco and rice viral diseases in China. However, its targets and mechanism of action are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) techniques were combined with mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the target of Dufulin. More than 40 proteins were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5 fold or ≤1.5 fold) upon Dufulin treatment in Nicotiana tabacum K326. Based on annotations in the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, these proteins were found to be related to disease resistance. Directed acyclic graph (DAG) analysis of the various pathways demonstrated harpin binding protein-1 (HrBP1) as the target of action of Dufulin. Additionally, western blotting, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and real time PCR analyses were also conducted to identify the specific mechanism of action of Dufulin. Our results show that activation of HrBP1 triggers the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and thereby produces antiviral responses in the plant host. A protective assay based on lesion counting further confirmed the antiviral activity of Dufulin. Conclusion This study identified HrBP1 as a target protein of Dufulin and that Dufulin can activate the SA signaling pathway to induce host plants to generate antiviral responses. PMID:22662252

  11. Enhancement of Antiviral Immunity by Small Molecule Antagonist of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Chulbul M. I.; Dabelic, Rea; Martin, James P.; Jager, Lindsey D.; Haider, S. Mohammad; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCSs) are negative regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity via inhibition of signaling by cytokines such as type I and type II IFNs. We have developed a small peptide antagonist of SOCS-1 that corresponds to the activation loop of JAK2. SOCS-1 inhibits both type I and type II IFN activities by binding to the kinase activation loop via the kinase inhibitory region of the SOCS. The antagonist, pJAK2(1001–1013), inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and encephalomyocarditis virus in cell culture, suggesting that it possesses broad antiviral activity. In addition, pJAK2(1001–1013) protected mice against lethal vaccinia and encephalomyocarditis virus infection. pJAK2(1001–1013) increased the intracellular level of the constitutive IFN-β, which may play a role in the antagonist antiviral effect at the cellular level. Ab neutralization suggests that constitutive IFN-β may act intracellularly, consistent with recent findings on IFN-γ intracellular signaling. pJAK2(1001–1013) also synergizes with IFNs as per IFN-γ mimetic to exert a multiplicative antiviral effect at the level of transcription, the cell, and protection of mice against lethal viral infection. pJAK2(1001–1013) binds to the kinase inhibitory region of both SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 and blocks their inhibitory effects on the IFN-γ activation site promoter. In addition to a direct antiviral effect and synergism with IFN, the SOCS antagonist also exhibits adjuvant effects on humoral and cellular immunity as well as an enhancement of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid activation of TLR3. The SOCS antagonist thus presents a novel and effective approach to enhancement of host defense against viruses. PMID:20543109

  12. Novel concept on antiviral strategies to dengue.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence has revealed that asymptomatic and/or persistent dengue virus (DENV) infections play a role in the cycling pattern of dengue outbreaks. These findings add a new dimension to the continually evolving search for effective prevention strategies in dengue. Disappointing outcomes of clinical trials in anti-dengue modalities have become commonplace. These failures may result from confounding variables and/or unresolved scientific issues that surround dengue, including the replication cycle of DENV in a natural setting, the target cells and reservoir for viral replication in vivo, and the effect of asymptomatic/persistent carriers in the dissemination of dengue. This article sets forth to address these issues using the most updated information available in the literature and to propose a novel antiviral strategy for the prevention and control of dengue. PMID:27284691

  13. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection. PMID:23620845

  14. Ubiquitination in the Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Meredith E.; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has long been known to regulate fundamental cellular processes through the induction of proteasomal degradation of target proteins. More recently, ‘atypical’ nondegradative types of polyubiquitin chains have been appreciated as important regulatory moieties by modulating the activity or subcellular localization of key signaling proteins. Intriguingly, many of these non-degradative types of ubiquitination regulate the innate sensing pathways initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), ultimately coordinating an effective antiviral immune response. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the functional roles of degradative and atypical types of ubiquitination in innate immunity to viral infections, with a specific focus on the signaling pathways triggered by RIG-I-like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and the intracellular viral DNA sensor cGAS. PMID:25753787

  15. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  16. Litsea Species as Potential Antiviral Plant Sources.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yifu; Wang, Dongying; Tan, Ghee T; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Pezzuto, John M; Fong, Harry H S; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Zhang, Hongjie

    2016-04-01

    Litsea verticillata Hance (Lauraceae), a Chinese medicine used to treat swelling caused by injury or by snake bites, was the first plant identified by our National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded International Cooperative Biodiversity Group (ICBG) project to exhibit anti-HIV activities. From this plant, we discovered a class of 8 novel litseane compounds, prototypic sesquiterpenes, all of which demonstrated anti-HIV activities. In subsequent studies, 26 additional compounds of different structural types were identified. During our continuing investigation of this plant species, we identified two new litseanes, litseaverticillols L and M, and a new sesquiterpene butenolide, litseasesquibutenolide. Litseaverticillols L and M were found to inhibit HIV-1 replication, with an IC[Formula: see text] value of 49.6[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M. To further determine the antiviral properties of this plant, several relatively abundant isolates, including a litseane compound, two eudesmane sesquiterpenes and three lignans, were evaluated against an additional 21 viral targets. Lignans 8 and 9 were shown to be active against the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), with EC[Formula: see text] values of 22.0[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M ([Formula: see text]) and 16.2[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M ([Formula: see text]), respectively. Since many antiviral compounds have been discovered in L. verticillata, we further prepared 38 plant extracts made from the different plant parts of 9 additional Litsea species. These extracts were evaluated for their anti-HIV and cytotoxic activities, and four of the extracts, which ranged across three different species, displayed 97-100% inhibitory effects against HIV replication without showing cytotoxicity to a panel of human cell lines at a concentration of 20[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL. PMID:27080941

  17. Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy's current antiviral agents FactFile 2008 (2nd edition): RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2008-01-01

    Among the RNA viruses, other than the retroviruses (that is, HIV), which are dealt with separately in the current FactFile, the most important targets for the development of antiviral agents at the moment are the orthomyxoviruses (that is, influenza), the hepaciviruses (that is, hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and, to a lesser extent, the picornaviruses. Although the uncoating inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine were the first known inhibitors of influenza A, the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir have now become the prime antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. For HCV infections, standard treatment consists of the combination of pegylated interferon-alpha with ribavirin, but several other antivirals targeted at specific viral functions such as the HCV protease and/ or polymerase may be expected to soon take an important share of this important market. Still untapped is the potential of a variety of uncoating inhibitors, as well as protease and/or polymerase inhibitors against the wide spectrum of picornaviruses. While ribavirin has been available for 35 years as a broad-spectrum anti-RNA virus agent, relatively new and unexplored is favipiravir (T-705) accredited with activity against influenza as well as flaviviruses, bunyaviruses and arenaviruses. PMID:18727441

  18. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  19. Antiviral Regulation in Porcine Monocytic Cells at Different Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytic cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, exist in different activation states that are critical to the regulation of antimicrobial immunity. Many pandemic viruses are monocytotropic, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which directly infects subsets of monocytic cells and interferes with antiviral responses. To study antiviral responses in PRRSV-infected monocytic cells, we characterized inflammatory cytokine responses and genome-wide profiled signature genes to investigate response pathways in uninfected and PRRSV-infected monocytic cells at different activation states. Our findings showed suppressed interferon (IFN) production in macrophages in non-antiviral states and an arrest of lipid metabolic pathways in macrophages at antiviral states. Importantly, porcine monocytic cells at different activation states were susceptible to PRRSV and responded differently to viral infection. Based on Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, two approaches were used to potentiate antiviral activity: (i) pharmaceutical modulation of cellular lipid metabolism and (ii) in situ PRRSV replication-competent expression of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Both approaches significantly suppressed exogenous viral infection in monocytic cells. In particular, the engineered IFN-expressing PRRSV strain eliminated exogenous virus infection and sustained cell viability at 4 days postinfection in macrophages. These findings suggest an intricate interaction of viral infection with the activation status of porcine monocytic cells. An understanding and integration of antiviral infection with activation status of monocytic cells may provide a means of potentiating antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE Activation statuses of monocytic cells, including monocytes, macrophages (Mϕs), and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. Unfortunately, the activation status of porcine monocytic cells or how cell activation status

  20. Antivirals for Respiratory Viral Infections: Problems and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Yuan-Hong; Ye, Feng; Yang, Zhan-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    In the past two decades, several newly emerging and reemerging viral respiratory pathogens including several influenza viruses (avian influenza and pandemic influenza), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), have continued to challenge medical and public health systems. Thereafter, the development of cost-effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the urgent mission of both virologists and pharmacologists. Current antiviral developments have focused targets on viral entry, replication, release, and intercellular pathways essential for viral life cycle. Here, we review the current literature on challenges and prospects in the development of these antivirals. PMID:27486742

  1. Automated synthesis of 4-[(18)F]fluoroanisole, [(18)F]DAA1106 and 4-[(18)F]FPhe using Cu-mediated radiofluorination under "minimalist" conditions.

    PubMed

    Zischler, Johannes; Krapf, Philipp; Richarz, Raphael; Zlatopolskiy, Boris D; Neumaier, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    The application of the "minimalist" approach to Cu-mediated radiofluorination allows the efficient preparation of (18)F-labeled arenes regardless of their electronic properties. The implementation of this methodology on a commercially available synthesis module (hotbox(three), Scintomics, Germany) enabled the automated production of 4-[(18)F]fluoroanisole as well as the clinically relevant PET-tracers, 4-[(18)F]FPhe and [(18)F]DAA1106, in radiochemical yields of 41-61% and radiochemical purities of >95% within 30-60min. These results demonstrated the high efficacy and versatility of the developed method that will open up opportunities for a broad application of Cu-mediated radiofluorination in PET-chemistry. PMID:27372807

  2. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:26654843

  3. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  4. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  5. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  6. Antiviral RNA Interference against Orsay Virus Is neither Systemic nor Transgenerational in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sarkies, Peter; Le Pen, Jérémie; Tanguy, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiviral RNA-mediated silencing (RNA interference [RNAi]) acts as a powerful innate immunity defense in plants, invertebrates, and mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, RNAi is systemic; i.e., RNAi silencing signals can move between cells and tissues. Furthermore, RNAi effects can be inherited transgenerationally and may last for many generations. Neither the biological relevance of systemic RNAi nor transgenerational RNAi is currently understood. Here we examined the role of both pathways in the protection of C. elegans from viral infection. We studied the Orsay virus, a positive-strand RNA virus related to Nodaviridae and the first and only virus known to infect C. elegans. Immunity to Orsay virus infection requires the RNAi pathway. Surprisingly, we found that genes required for systemic or transgenerational RNAi did not have a role in antiviral defense. Furthermore, we found that Orsay virus infection did not elicit a systemic RNAi response even when a target for RNAi was provided by using transgenes. Finally, we show that viral siRNAs, the effectors of RNAi, are not inherited to a level that provides any significant resistance to viral infection in the next generation. We conclude that systemic or transgenerational RNAi does not play a role in the defense against natural Orsay virus infection. Furthermore, our data suggest that there is a qualitative difference between experimental RNAi and antiviral RNAi. Our data are consistent with a model of systemic and transgenerational RNAi that requires a nuclear or germ line component that is lacking in almost all RNA virus infections. IMPORTANCE Since its discovery in Caenorhabditis elegans, RNAi has proven a valuable scientific tool in many organisms. In C. elegans, exogenous RNAi spreads throughout the organism and can be passed between generations; however, there has been controversy as to the endogenous role(s) that the RNAi pathway plays. One endogenous role for which spreading both within the infected

  7. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  8. Optimizing Distribution of Pandemic Influenza Antiviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Chan; Morton, David P.; Johnson, Gregory P.; Gutfraind, Alexander; Galvani, Alison P.; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a data-driven method for optimizing pharmacy-based distribution of antiviral drugs during an influenza pandemic in terms of overall access for a target population and apply it to the state of Texas, USA. We found that during the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Texas Department of State Health Services achieved an estimated statewide access of 88% (proportion of population willing to travel to the nearest dispensing point). However, access reached only 34.5% of US postal code (ZIP code) areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. Optimized distribution networks increased expected access to 91% overall and 60% in hard-to-reach regions, and 2 or 3 major pharmacy chains achieved near maximal coverage in well-populated areas. Independent pharmacies were essential for reaching ZIP code areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. This model was developed during a collaboration between academic researchers and public health officials and is available as a decision support tool for Texas Department of State Health Services at a Web-based interface. PMID:25625858

  9. The antiviral activities of ISG15

    PubMed Central

    Morales, David J.; Lenschow, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification is an important strategy for the regulation of the cell proteome independent of the need for new gene expression. Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers mediate the regulation of protein levels, signaling pathways, vesicular trafficking, and many other cellular processes through their covalent conjugation to proteins. Interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is a type I interferon induced ubiquitin-like modifier. In addition to conjugating to potentially hundreds of target proteins, ISG15 can be found in an unconjugated form both inside of the cell and released from interferon stimulated cells into the extracellular environment. Due to its robust expression after type I interferon stimulation and the broad panel of proteins that it targets, ISG15 has drawn much attention as a potential regulator of the immune response and has been shown to mediate protection in a number of different viral infection models. Here we will review the current state of the field of ISG15, the viruses against which ISG15 mediates protection, and the mechanisms by which ISG15 exerts antiviral activity. PMID:24095857

  10. [Study of the antiviral action of gentamicin].

    PubMed

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Gerasimova, S S

    1975-05-01

    Experimental data on the effect of various concentrations of gentamycin on reproduction of VEE and Sindbis viruses in tissue culture are presented. It was found that gentamycin had no cytotoxic effect on the primary tripsinized chick embryon fibroblasts (CEF) when used in doses of 10, 20 or 30 mg/ml and only when used in a dose of 50 mg/ml it induced 50 percent destruction of the cell layer. Multiplication of the VEE and Sindbis viruses in the culture of CEF was inhibited in the presence of gentamycin by 1.5--3.5 lg PFU/ml. Two stages in the virus inhibiting effect of gentamycin were determined on the model of VEE, i. e. the stage of inhibition in the absence of visible damages of the cells and the stage associated with their destruction. The doses of gentamycin higher than 3 mg/ml inhibited in parallel the virus specific synthesis and synthesis of the cell proteins and nucleic acids. At the same time, when gentamycin was used in a dose of 10 mg/ml, no impairement of the cell viability was observed and the cell capacity to produce high titers of the model virus was reduced after incubation without the antibiotic for 24 hours. The antiviral activity of gentamycin were therefore determined by revers inhibition of the cell metabolic activity. PMID:1225192

  11. Virus infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Chastain, Emily M. L.; Terry, Rachael L.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a group of disorders, autoimmunity ranks as the third most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. However, the etiology of most autoimmune diseases remains unknown. Although genetic linkage studies support a critical underlying role for genetics, the geographic distribution of these disorders as well as the low concordance rates in monozygotic twins suggest that a combination of other factors including environmental ones are involved. Virus infection is a primary factor that has been implicated in the initiation of autoimmune disease. Infection triggers a robust and usually well-coordinated immune response that is critical for viral clearance. However, in some instances, immune regulatory mechanisms may falter, culminating in the breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in immune-mediated attack directed against both viral and self-antigens. Traditionally, cross-reactive T-cell recognition, known as molecular mimicry, as well as bystander T-cell activation, culminating in epitope spreading, have been the predominant mechanisms elucidated through which infection may culminate in an T-cell-mediated autoimmune response. However, other hypotheses including virus-induced decoy of the immune system also warrant discussion in regard to their potential for triggering autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which virus infection and antiviral immunity contribute to the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23947356

  12. Influenza antiviral susceptibility monitoring activities in relation to national antiviral stockpiles in Europe during the winter 2006/2007 season.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A; Lackenby, A; Hay, A; Zambon, M

    2007-04-01

    Due to the influenza pandemic threat, many countries are stockpiling antivirals in the hope of limiting the impact of a future pandemic virus. Since resistance to antiviral drugs would probably significantly alter the effectiveness of antivirals, surveillance programmes to monitor the emergence of resistance are of considerable importance. During the 2006/2007 influenza season, an inventory was conducted by the European Surveillance Network for Vigilance against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) in collaboration with the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) to evaluate antiviral susceptibility testing by the National Influenza Reference Laboratories (NIRL) in relation to the national antiviral stockpile in 30 European countries that are members of EISS. All countries except Ukraine had a stockpile of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) oseltamivir. Additionally, four countries had a stockpile of the NAI zanamivir and three of the M2 ion channel inhibitor rimantadine. Of 29 countries with a NAI stockpile, six countries' NIRLs could determine virus susceptibility by 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) and in 13 countries it could be done by sequencing. Only in one of the three countries with a rimantadine stockpile could the NIRL determine virus susceptibility, by sequencing only. However, including the 18 countries that had plans to introduce or extend antiviral susceptibility testing, the NIRLs of 21 of the 29 countries with a stockpile would be capable of susceptibility testing appropriate to the stockpiled drug by the end of the 2007/2008 influenza season. Although most European countries in this study have stockpiles of influenza antivirals, susceptibility surveillance capability by the NIRLs appropriate to the stockpiled antivirals is limited. PMID:17991386

  13. The Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Protein ZAP Restricts Human Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Goodier, John L.; Pereira, Gavin C.; Cheung, Ling E.; Rose, Rebecca J.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic immunity describes the set of recently discovered but poorly understood cellular mechanisms that specifically target viral pathogens. Their discovery derives in large part from intensive studies of HIV and SIV that revealed restriction factors acting at various stages of the retroviral life cycle. Recent studies indicate that some factors restrict both retroviruses and retrotransposons but surprisingly in ways that may differ. We screened known interferon-stimulated antiviral proteins previously untested for their effects on cell culture retrotransposition. Several factors, including BST2, ISG20, MAVS, MX2, and ZAP, showed strong L1 inhibition. We focused on ZAP (PARP13/ZC3HAV1), a zinc-finger protein that targets viruses of several families, including Retroviridae, Tiloviridae, and Togaviridae, and show that ZAP expression also strongly restricts retrotransposition in cell culture through loss of L1 RNA and ribonucleoprotein particle integrity. Association of ZAP with the L1 ribonucleoprotein particle is supported by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization with ORF1p in cytoplasmic stress granules. We also used mass spectrometry to determine the protein components of the ZAP interactome, and identified many proteins that directly interact and colocalize with ZAP, including MOV10, an RNA helicase previously shown to suppress retrotransposons. The detection of a chaperonin complex, RNA degradation proteins, helicases, post-translational modifiers, and components of chromatin modifying complexes suggest mechanisms of ZAP anti-retroelement activity that function in the cytoplasm and perhaps also in the nucleus. The association of the ZAP ribonucleoprotein particle with many interferon-stimulated gene products indicates it may be a key player in the interferon response. PMID:26001115

  14. Symbiotic chemo- and immuno-therapy for hepatitis B and C viruses

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Babita; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), both cause serious chronic infections leading to fatal liver diseases. The prototype therapy for both HBV and HCV was based on IFN-α with or without ribavirin. The advent of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for both HBV and HCV has remarkably improved the standard of treatment for both infections. While HCV can be eliminated following combination DAA therapy, HBV persists even after treatment, requiring life-long therapy with DAAs. Treatment with DAAs is also associated with high cost, the development of resistance and side effects. There is ample published evidence that both HBV and HCV can be eliminated from infected host cells through non-cytolytic immune mechanisms. We need to identify the mechanisms behind this successful elimination of replicating viruses and develop them into novel immunotherapeutic regimens. Moreover, a synergy of, chemo- and immuno-therapeutic strategies will be necessary to eradicate HBV or HCV from a host. PMID:27433078

  15. Pharmacologic Considerations in the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus in Persons With HIV.

    PubMed

    MacBrayne, Christine E; Kiser, Jennifer J

    2016-07-15

    Roughly one-third of individuals living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are coinfected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) due to shared routes of transmission. HIV accelerates the progression of HCV disease; thus, coinfected individuals are at high priority for HCV treatment. Several new HCV therapies, called direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), are available that achieve cure rates of >90% in many patient populations including individuals with HIV. The primary consideration in treating HCV in HIV-infected persons is the potential for drug interactions. We describe the clinical pharmacology and drug interaction potential of the DAAs, review the interaction data with DAAs and antiretroviral agents, and identify the knowledge gaps in the pharmacologic aspects of treating HCV in individuals with HIV coinfection. This review will focus on DAAs that have received regulatory approval in the United States and Europe and agents in late stages of clinical development. PMID:27363437

  16. Symbiotic chemo- and immuno-therapy for hepatitis B and C viruses.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Babita; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), both cause serious chronic infections leading to fatal liver diseases. The prototype therapy for both HBV and HCV was based on IFN-α with or without ribavirin. The advent of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for both HBV and HCV has remarkably improved the standard of treatment for both infections. While HCV can be eliminated following combination DAA therapy, HBV persists even after treatment, requiring life-long therapy with DAAs. Treatment with DAAs is also associated with high cost, the development of resistance and side effects. There is ample published evidence that both HBV and HCV can be eliminated from infected host cells through non-cytolytic immune mechanisms. We need to identify the mechanisms behind this successful elimination of replicating viruses and develop them into novel immunotherapeutic regimens. Moreover, a synergy of, chemo- and immuno-therapeutic strategies will be necessary to eradicate HBV or HCV from a host. PMID:27433078

  17. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics. PMID:27350309

  18. Antiviral macrophage responses in flavivirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst, Thomas Myles; Vreden, Caryn van; Munoz-Erazo, Luis; Niewold, Paula; Watabe, Kanami; Terry, Rachael L; Deffrasnes, Celine; Getts, Daniel R; Cole King, Nicholas Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are a major current and emerging threat, affecting millions of people worldwide. Global climate change, combined with increasing proximity of humans to animals and mosquito vectors by expansion into natural habitats, coupled with the increase in international travel, have resulted in significant spread and concomitant increase in the incidence of infection and severe disease. Although neuroinvasive disease has been well described for some viral infections such as Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), others such as dengue virus (DENV) have recently displayed an emerging pattern of neuroinvasive disease, distinct from the previously observed, systemically-induced encephalomyelopathy. In this setting, the immune response is a crucial component of host defence, in preventing viral dissemination and invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). However, subversion of the anti-viral activities of macrophages by flaviviruses can facilitate viral replication and spread, enhancing the intensity of immune responses, leading to severe immune-mediated disease which may be further exacerbated during the subsequent infection with some flaviviruses. Furthermore, in the CNS myeloid cells may be responsible for inducing specific inflammatory changes, which can lead to significant pathological damage during encephalitis. The interaction of virus and cells of the myeloid lineage is complex, and this interaction is likely responsible at least in part, for crucial differences between viral clearance and pathology. Recent studies on the role of myeloid cells in innate immunity and viral control, and the mechanisms of evasion and subversion used by flaviviruses are rapidly advancing our understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in flavivirus encephalitis and will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies previously not considered. PMID:24434318

  19. Antiviral immune responses of bats: a review.

    PubMed

    Baker, M L; Schountz, T; Wang, L-F

    2013-02-01

    Despite being the second most species-rich and abundant group of mammals, bats are also among the least studied, with a particular paucity of information in the area of bat immunology. Although bats have a long history of association with rabies, the emergence and re-emergence of a number of viruses from bats that impact human and animal health has resulted in a resurgence of interest in bat immunology. Understanding how bats coexist with viruses in the absence of disease is essential if we are to begin to develop therapeutics to target viruses in humans and susceptible livestock and companion animals. Here, we review the current status of knowledge in the field of bat antiviral immunology including both adaptive and innate mechanisms of immune defence and highlight the need for further investigations in this area. Because data in this field are so limited, our discussion is based on both scientific discoveries and theoretical predictions. It is hoped that by provoking original, speculative or even controversial ideas or theories, this review may stimulate further research in this important field. Efforts to understand the immune systems of bats have been greatly facilitated in recent years by the availability of partial genome sequences from two species of bats, a megabat, Pteropus vampyrus, and a microbat, Myotis lucifugus, allowing the rapid identification of immune genes. Although bats appear to share most features of the immune system with other mammals, several studies have reported qualitative and quantitative differences in the immune responses of bats. These observations warrant further investigation to determine whether such differences are associated with the asymptomatic nature of viral infections in bats. PMID:23302292

  20. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  1. The 17th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, Robert W

    2004-09-01

    The focus of the 17th International Conference on Antiviral Research was the discovery and development of antiviral agents (chemistry, biology, animal models and clinical trial results) against a variety of human infectious agents including HIV, herpes viruses, hepatitis viruses, respiratory viruses and emerging/re-emerging pathogens. The meeting included the symposium 'Clinical Update on Antiviral Drugs', plenary sessions dedicated to each of the individual classes of infectious agents, a symposium on new developments surrounding emerging pathogens, and three special award lectures, which discussed the history of nucleotide antiviral agents, mechanisms of viral persistence and drug resistance, and the therapy of herpes virus infections. Within each infectious agent session the presentations included those describing the development of new and novel anti-infectives, including research based on the preclinical development of new molecules, and the results of animal modelling and clinical studies on advanced-stage antiviral agents. A summary of the meeting highlights, segregated by infectious agent, will be presented in this review. PMID:15330752

  2. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  3. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  4. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease. PMID:24521134

  5. Pharmacological and biological antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Pinkert, Sandra; Geisler, Anja; Poller, Wolfgang; Kurreck, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Subtype B coxsackieviruses (CVB) represent the most commonly identified infectious agents associated with acute and chronic myocarditis, with CVB3 being the most common variant. Damage to the heart is induced both directly by virally mediated cell destruction and indirectly due to the immune and autoimmune processes reacting to virus infection. This review addresses antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections discovered over the last 25 years. One group represents pharmacologically active low molecular weight substances that inhibit virus uptake by binding to the virus capsid (e.g., pleconaril) or inactivate viral proteins (e.g., NO-metoprolol and ribavirin) or inhibit cellular proteins which are essential for viral replication (e.g., ubiquitination inhibitors). A second important group of substances are interferons. They have antiviral but also immunomodulating activities. The third and most recently discovered group includes biological and cellular therapeutics. Soluble receptor analogues (e.g., sCAR-Fc) bind to the virus capsid and block virus uptake. Small interfering RNAs, short hairpin RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides bind to and led to degradation of the viral RNA genome or cellular RNAs, thereby preventing their translation and viral replication. Most recently mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to possess antiviral activity in CVB3 infections. Taken together, a number of antiviral therapeutics has been developed for the treatment of myocardial CVB infection in recent years. In addition to low molecular weight inhibitors, biological therapeutics have become promising anti-viral agents. PMID:21989310

  6. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  7. Antiviral responses of arthropod vectors: an update on recent advances.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fazakerley, John K; Fragkoudis, Rennos

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, biting midges and sand flies, transmit many viruses that can cause outbreaks of disease in humans and animals around the world. Arthropod vector species are invading new areas due to globalisation and environmental changes, and contact between exotic animal species, humans and arthropod vectors is increasing, bringing with it the regular emergence of new arboviruses. For future strategies to control arbovirus transmission, it is important to improve our understanding of virus-vector interactions. In the last decade knowledge of arthropod antiviral immunity has increased rapidly. RNAi has been proposed as the most important antiviral response in mosquitoes and it is likely to be the most important antiviral response in all arthropods. However, other newly-discovered antiviral strategies such as melanisation and the link between RNAi and the JAK/STAT pathway via the cytokine Vago have been characterised in the last few years. This review aims to summarise the most important and most recent advances made in arthropod antiviral immunity. PMID:25674592

  8. Antiviral agents: characteristic activity spectrum depending on the molecular target with which they interact.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    1993-01-01

    The target protein (enzyme) with which antiviral agents interact determines their antiviral activity spectrum. Based on their activity spectrum, antiviral compounds could be divided into the following classes: (1) sulfated polysaccharides (i.e., dextran sulfate), which interact with the viral envelope glycoproteins and are inhibitory to a broad variety of enveloped viruses (i.e., retro-, herpes-, rhabdo-, and arenaviruses): (2) SAH hydrolase inhibitors (i.e., neplanocin A derivatives), which are particularly effective against poxvirus, (-)RNA viruses (paramyxovirus, rhabdovirus), and (+/-)RNA virus (reovirus); (3) OMP decarboxylase inhibitors (i.e., pyrazofurin) and CTP synthetase inhibitors (i.e., cyclopentenylcytosine), which are active against a broad range of DNA, (+)RNA, (-)RNA, and (+/-)RNA viruses; (4) IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (i.e., ribavirin), which are also active against various (+)RNA and (-)RNA viruses and, in particular, ortho- and paramyxoviruses; (5) acyclic guanosine analogs (i.e., ganciclovir) and carbocyclic guanosine analogs (i.e., cyclobut-G), which are particularly active against herpesviruses (i.e., HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, CMV); (6) thymidine analogs (i.e., BVDU, BVaraU), which are specifically active against HSV-1 and VZV because of their preferential phosphorylation by the virus-encoded thymidine kinase; (7) acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (i.e., HPMPA, HPMPC, PMEA, FPMPA), which, depending on the structure of the acyclic side chain, span an activity spectrum from DNA viruses (papova-, adeno-, herpes-, hepadna-, and poxvirus) to retroviruses (HIV); (8) dideoxynucleoside analogs (i.e., AZT, DDC), which act as chain terminators in the reverse transcriptase reaction and thus block the replication of retroviruses as well as hepadnaviruses; and (9) the TIBO, HEPT, and other TIBO-like compounds, which interact specifically with the reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 and thus block the replication of HIV-1, but not of HIV-2 or any other retrovirus

  9. Antiviral activity of Paulownia tomentosa against enterovirus 71 of hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Chen, Changmai; Hu, Yanan; Zhan, Zixuan; Pan, Wei; Li, Rongrong; Li, Erguang; Ge, Hui-Ming; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    The bark, leaves, and flowers of Paulownia trees have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious and inflammatory diseases. We investigated the antiviral effects of Paulownia tomentosa flowers, an herbal medicine used in some provinces of P. R. China for the treatment of skin rashes and blisters. Dried flowers of P. tomentosa were extracted with methanol and tested for antiviral activity against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CAV16), the predominant etiologic agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in P. R. China. The extract inhibited EV71 infection, although no effect was detected against CAV16 infection. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was performed to identify apigenin as an active component of the flowers. The EC50 value for apigenin to block EV71 infection was 11.0 µM, with a selectivity index of approximately 9.3. Although it is a common dietary flavonoid, only apigenin, and not similar compounds like naringenin and quercetin, were active against EV71 infection. As an RNA virus, the genome of EV71 has an internal ribosome entry site that interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and regulates viral translation. Cross-linking followed by immunoprecipitation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that EV71 RNA was associated with hnRNPs A1 and A2. Apigenin treatment disrupted this association, indicating that apigenin suppressed EV71 replication through a novel mechanism by targeting the trans-acting factors. This study therefore validates the effects of Paulownia against EV71 infection. It also yielded mechanistic insights on apigenin as an active compound for the antiviral activity of P. tomentosa against EV71 infection. PMID:25744451

  10. SAMHD1 Specifically Affects the Antiviral Potency of Thymidine Analog HIV Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; Badia, Roger; Terradas, Gerard; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Ruiz, Alba; Pauls, Eduardo; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Clotet, Bonaventura; Martí, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartic domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase recently recognized as an antiviral factor that acts by depleting dNTP availability for viral reverse transcriptase (RT). SAMHD1 restriction is counteracted by the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) accessory protein Vpx, which targets SAMHD1 for proteosomal degradation, resulting in an increased availability of dNTPs and consequently enhanced viral replication. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), one of the most common agents used in antiretroviral therapy, compete with intracellular dNTPs as the substrate for viral RT. Consequently, SAMHD1 activity may be influencing NRTI efficacy in inhibiting viral replication. Here, a panel of different RT inhibitors was analyzed for their different antiviral efficacy depending on SAMHD1. Antiviral potency was measured for all the inhibitors in transformed cell lines and primary monocyte-derived macrophages and CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-1 with or without Vpx. No changes in sensitivity to non-NRTI or the integrase inhibitor raltegravir were observed, but for NRTI, sensitivity significantly changed only in the case of the thymidine analogs (AZT and d4T). The addition of exogenous thymidine mimicked the change in viral sensitivity observed after Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation, pointing toward a differential effect of SAMHD1 activity on thymidine. Accordingly, sensitivity to AZT was also reduced in CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-2 compared to infection with the HIV-2ΔVpx strain. In conclusion, reduction of SAMHD1 levels significantly decreases HIV sensitivity to thymidine but not other nucleotide RT analog inhibitors in both macrophages and lymphocytes. PMID:24913159

  11. Interferon-free strategies without a nucleoside/nucleotide analogue.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Tania Mara; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The identification of viral and host factors involved in hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication was a key prerequisite for the discovery and further exploration of antiviral drug targets. As of today, numerous direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), as well as host-targeting agents (HTAs), have been developed and entered clinical testing. The goal to omit pegylated interferon due to its unfavorable side-effect profile from novel HCV therapeutic approaches led to an expedited design and competitive conduct of DAA combination trials striving for easily applicable, all-oral HCV treatments. Approval of several interferon-free regimens is awaited in the near future (2014/2015). Results of different DAA combination trials (without nucleos(t)ide polymerase inhibitors) and trials involving HTAs are reviewed herein. PMID:24782258

  12. Treatment of chronic HCV genotype 1 coinfection.

    PubMed

    Boesecke, Christoph; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Several all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) combination therapies including two fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) have been recently licensed for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection. Results of pivotal trials with these new compounds are now also available in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, highlighting that, in the DAA era, differences no longer do exist in efficacy between HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. This review will give an overview of the key DAA-containing studies in HIV/HCV genotype 1 coinfection and give guidance on how and when these should be used in clinical practice. Simplified DAA-based and potentially interferon-free HCV therapy regimens are characterized by smaller pill burden, better tolerability, shorter treatment durations, and higher cure rates. With first pilot studies in HCV treatment-naive and treatment-experienced persons with HCV/HIV coinfection demonstrating sustained virological response rates above 95 %, interferon (IFN)-free DAA combinations should be considered the new standard of care for chronic HCV. Per both European and US treatment guidelines, HCV treatment indications and DAA drug selection in HIV-coinfected patients are no longer different from HCV-monoinfected patients as cure rates in HCV-monoinfected and HCV-coinfected patients are superimposable. Drug-drug interactions with the new DAAs and concomitant antiretroviral therapy, however, have to be checked carefully prior to selecting DAAs due to commonly shared metabolization pathways. In countries with access to the new DAAs, interferon-free DAA combination therapy for HCV genotype 1 infection is strongly recommended. Agents should be selected based upon HCV genotype and according to current guidelines. Potential drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretrovirals and HCV therapy need to be checked, and if necessary, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has to be adapted to the respective HCV therapy

  13. Origins and Evolution of tetherin, an Orphan Antiviral Gene.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-10

    Tetherin encodes an interferon-inducible antiviral protein that traps a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses at infected cell surfaces. Despite the absence of any clearly related gene or activity, we describe possible scenarios by which tetherin arose that exemplify how protein modularity, evolvability, and robustness can create and preserve new functions. We find that tetherin genes in various organisms exhibit no sequence similarity and share only a common architecture and location in modern genomes. Moreover, tetherin is part of a cluster of three potential sister genes encoding proteins of similar architecture, some variants of which exhibit antiviral activity while others can be endowed with antiviral activity by a simple modification. Only in slowly evolving species (e.g., coelacanths) does tetherin exhibit sequence similarity to one potential sister gene. Neofunctionalization, drift, and genetic conflict appear to have driven a near complete loss of sequence similarity among modern tetherin genes and their sister genes. PMID:27427209

  14. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Junzhong; Yang, Dongliang

    2015-02-01

    The vaccination program against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has greatly reduced the incidence of HBV infection. However, almost one-fourth of the HBV infected patients worldwide are still located in China. The healthcare burden from chronic HBV infection is a big challenge for the Chinese government and clinicians. Antiviral therapy plays a central role in controlling chronic HBV infection and preventing the disease progression. However, due to the specific economic and medical system issues, the first-line antiviral agents recommended by the AASLD and EASL have not been widely used for Chinese patients. In this review, we will discuss some key issues in the area of antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B in China. PMID:25540038

  15. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  16. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  17. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    PubMed

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential. PMID:25613403

  18. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Tingting; Jin, Yue; Cheng, Jianpin; Wan, Changbiao; Qian, Weihe; Xing, Fei; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71) is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways. PMID:26295407

  19. Ubiquitin in the activation and attenuation of innate antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection activates danger signals that are transmitted via the retinoic acid–inducible gene 1–like receptor (RLR), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) protein signaling cascades. This places host cells in an antiviral posture by up-regulating antiviral cytokines including type-I interferon (IFN-I). Ubiquitin modifications and cross-talk between proteins within these signaling cascades potentiate IFN-I expression, and inversely, a growing number of viruses are found to weaponize the ubiquitin modification system to suppress IFN-I. Here we review how host- and virus-directed ubiquitin modification of proteins in the RLR, NLR, and TLR antiviral signaling cascades modulate IFN-I expression. PMID:26712804

  20. Antiviral Role of IFITM Proteins in African Swine Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Romero, Carles; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Galindo, Inmaculada; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Alonso, Covadonga

    2016-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) protein family is a group of antiviral restriction factors that impair flexibility and inhibit membrane fusion at the plasma or the endosomal membrane, restricting viral progression at entry. While IFITMs are widely known to inhibit several single-stranded RNA viruses, there are limited reports available regarding their effect in double-stranded DNA viruses. In this work, we have analyzed a possible antiviral function of IFITMs against a double stranded DNA virus, the African swine fever virus (ASFV). Infection with cell-adapted ASFV isolate Ba71V is IFN sensitive and it induces IFITMs expression. Interestingly, high levels of IFITMs caused a collapse of the endosomal pathway to the perinuclear area. Given that ASFV entry is strongly dependent on endocytosis, we investigated whether IFITM expression could impair viral infection. Expression of IFITM1, 2 and 3 reduced virus infectivity in Vero cells, with IFITM2 and IFITM3 having an impact on viral entry/uncoating. The role of IFITM2 in the inhibition of ASFV in Vero cells could be related to impaired endocytosis-mediated viral entry and alterations in the cholesterol efflux, suggesting that IFITM2 is acting at the late endosome, preventing the decapsidation stage of ASFV. PMID:27116236

  1. Antiviral effect of diammonium glycyrrhizinate on cell infection by porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengchong; Zou, Hao; Ren, Yudong; Zarlenga, Dante S; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2014-07-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) can cause reproductive failure in swine, resulting in economic losses to the industry. Antiviral effects of diammonium glycyrrhizinate (DG) have been reported on several animal viruses; however, to date it has yet to be tested on PPV. In this study, the antiviral activity of DG on swine testis (ST) cell infection by PPV was investigated using an empirically determined, non-toxic concentration of DG and three different experimental designs: (1) pre-treatment of virus prior to infection; (2) pre-treatment of cells prior to infection; and (3) direct treatment of virus-infected cells. The results showed that DG possesses potent inhibitory effects on PPV when the virus was treated before incubation with ST cells and that virus infectivity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Results were confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assays and real-time quantitative PCR. In addition, deoxycholate was used as a control to exclude the possibility that DG acted as a detergent to inhibit PPV infectivity. The study clearly indicates that DG has a direct anti-PPV effect in vitro. PMID:24614970

  2. Characterization of antiviral and antibacterial activity of Bombyx mori seroin proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, C P; Vaishna, R L; Kakkar, A; Arunkumar, K P; Nagaraju, J

    2014-09-01

    Lepidopterans as other insects have a very potent innate immune system, which basically comprises cellular and humoral defence mechanisms against bacterial and fungal infections. In lepidopterans, not much is known about the defence mechanisms against viral pathogens, such as baculoviruses. Here we show that small silk proteins of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, called seroins, act as antiviral agents against a baculovirus pathogen, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). Involvement of these proteins in the inhibition of baculovirus infection was revealed by estimating the viral load upon their dsRNA-mediated knockdown. Additionally, we found through antimicrobial assays that seroins are potent inhibitors of bacterial growth. Binding competition assays followed by antimicrobial assays showed that seroins bind to peptidoglycan, a cell wall component of bacteria. Analysis of bacterial load upon knockdown of seroins resulted in higher proliferation of bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis showed the recent origin of seroins in a few moth species and duplication only in Bombycids. The antiviral and antibacterial activity of seroins shown in this study using several biochemical and molecular biological assays provide strong evidence to characterize them as antimicrobial proteins. Hence, we hypothesize that seroins are potent candidates for use in development of transgene-based disease resistant silkworm strains. PMID:24628957

  3. Isoflavone Agonists of IRF-3 Dependent Signaling Have Antiviral Activity against RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Myra L.; Proll, Sean C.; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Katze, Michael G.; Gale, Michael; Iadonato, Shawn P.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for novel antiviral therapies that are broad spectrum, effective, and not subject to resistance due to viral mutations. Using high-throughput screening methods, including computational docking studies and an interferon-stimulated gene 54 (ISG54)-luciferase reporter assay, we identified a class of isoflavone compounds that act as specific agonists of innate immune signaling pathways and cause activation of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3) transcription factor. The isoflavone compounds activated the ISG54 promoter, mediated nuclear translocation of IRF-3, and displayed highly potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and influenza virus. Additionally, these agonists efficiently activated IRF-3 in the presence of the HCV protease NS3-4A, which is known to blunt the host immune response. Furthermore, genomic studies showed that discrete innate immune pathways centered on IRF signaling were regulated following agonist treatment without causing global changes in host gene expression. Following treatment, the expression of only 64 cellular genes was significantly induced. This report provides the first evidence that innate immune pathways dependent on IRF-3 can be successfully targeted by small-molecule drugs for the development of novel broad-spectrum antiviral compounds. PMID:22532686

  4. Docking studies towards exploring antiviral compounds against envelope protein of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, Amineni; Kumar, Manne Muni; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Marisetty, Hemanthkumar

    2011-03-01

    Yellow fever is among one of the most lethal viral diseases for which approved antiviral therapies were yet to be discovered. Herein, functional assignment of complete YFV proteome was done through support vector machine. Major envelope (E) protein that mediates entry of YFV into host cell was selected as a potent molecular target. Three dimensional structure of the molecular target was predicted using Modeller9v7. The model was optimized in Maestro9.0 applying OPLS AA force field and was evaluated using PROCHECK, ProSA, ProQ and Profile 3D. The BOG pocket residues Val48, Glu197, Thr200, Ile204, Thr265, Thr268 and Gly278 were located in YFV E protein using SiteMap2.3. More than one million compounds of Ligandinfo Meta database were explored using a computational virtual screening protocol targeting BOG pocket of the E protein. Finally, ten top ranked lead molecules with strong binding affinity to BOG pocket of YFV E protein were identified based on XP Gscore. Drug likeliness and comparative bioactivity analysis for these leads using QikProp3.2 had shown that these molecules would have the potential to act as better drug. Thus, the 10 lead molecules suggested in the present study would be of interest as promising starting point for designing antiviral compound against yellow fever. PMID:21369890

  5. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis C: Has anything changed for pregnant/lactating women?

    PubMed Central

    Spera, Anna Maria; Eldin, Tarek Kamal; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects about 3% of the world’s population, with the highest prevalence in individuals under 40. The prevalence in pregnant women varies with geographical distribution (highest in developing countries). Prevalence also increases in sub-populations of women at high risk for blood-transmitted infections. HCV infection in pregnancy represents a non-negligible problem. However, most of the past antiviral regimens cannot be routinely offered to pregnant or breastfeeding women because of their side effects. We briefly reviewed the issue of treatment of HCV infection in pregnant/breastfeeding women focusing on the effects of the new direct-acting antivirals on fertility, pregnancy and lactation in animal studies and on the potential risk for humans based on the pharmacokinetic properties of each drug. Currently, all new therapy regimens are contraindicated in this setting because of lack of sufficient safety information and adequate measures of contraception are still routinely recommended for female patients of childbearing potential. PMID:27134703

  6. Development of antiviral agents toward enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Pourianfar, Hamid Reza; Grollo, Lara

    2015-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection remains a public health problem at a global level, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. The infection normally manifests as hand-foot-mouth disease; however, it is capable of developing into potentially fatal neurological complications. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral substance available for the prevention or treatment of EV71 infection. This paper, thus, reviews efforts to develop or discover synthetic as well as naturally occurring compounds directed against EV71 infection. The recent achievements in cellular receptors of EV71 are also highlighted, and their contribution to the development of antiviral drugs against EV71 is discussed in this article. PMID:24560700

  7. Is Minocycline an Antiviral Agent? A Review of Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Bishburg, Eliahu

    2016-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation semi-synthetic derivative of tetracycline and has well-known anti-bacterial effects. The drug possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory effects. The drug is widely used in bacterial infections and non-infectious conditions such as acne, dermatitis, periodontitis and neurodegenerative conditions. Minocycline was shown to have antiviral activity in vitro and also against different viruses in some animal models. Some studies have been done on human patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We have review the available data regarding minocycline activity as an antiviral agent. PMID:26177421

  8. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza, More Information Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of antiviral polyoxometalates in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L; Boudinot, F D; Boudinot, S G; Henson, G W; Bossard, G E; Martellucci, S A; Ash, P W; Fricker, S P; Darkes, M C; Theobald, B R

    1994-01-01

    Polyoxometalates are soluble mineral compounds formed principally of oxide anions and early transition metal cations. The polyoxometalates K12H2[P2W12O48].24H2O (JM 1591), K10[P2W18Zn4(H2O)2O68].20H2O (JM 1596), and [(CH3)3NH]8[Si2W18Nb6O77] (JM 2820) demonstrate potent antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus in vitro. The preclinical pharmacokinetics of these three compounds were characterized after single-dose intravenous administration of 50 mg/kg to rats. Plasma, urine, and feces were collected for 168 h, and polyoxometalate concentrations were determined by atomic emission. Serum protein binding was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three compounds were highly bound to serum proteins in a concentration-dependent manner. Total and unbound concentrations of the three compounds in plasma declined in a triexponential manner with terminal half-lives of 246.0 +/- 127.0, 438.4 +/- 129.4, and 32.2 +/- 5.37 h (mean +/- standard deviation) for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Systemic clearances based on total concentrations in plasma were low, averaging 0.016 +/- 0.002, 0.015 +/- 0.002, and 0.018 +/- 0.003 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. The clearances of unbound compounds from plasma averaged 0.966 +/- 0.136, 0.050 +/- 0.005, and 0.901 +/- 0.165 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. For JM 1596, the clearance of unbound compound from the kidneys was lower than the glomerular filtration rate (0.086 liter/h/kg), suggesting this polyoxometalate underwent renal tubular reabsorption. However, JM 1591 and JM 2820 appeared to undergo tubular secretion. The fraction of the dose recovered in urine was 11.5, 46.8, and 10.6% for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Approximately 5% of the dose of each polyoxometalate was recovered in feces. The steady-state volume of distribution based on total concentrations averaged 1.44 liters

  10. Mycophenolic acid, an immunomodulator, has potent and broad-spectrum in vitro antiviral activity against pandemic, seasonal and avian influenza viruses affecting humans.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Mok, Ka-Yi; Chan, Andy S F; Cheung, Nam N; Wang, Pui; Lui, Yin-Ming; Chan, Jasper F W; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Kao, Richard Y T; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-08-01

    Immunomodulators have been shown to improve the outcome of severe pneumonia. We have previously shown that mycophenolic acid (MPA), an immunomodulator, has antiviral activity against influenza A/WSN/1933(H1N1) using a high-throughput chemical screening assay. This study further investigated the antiviral activity and mechanism of action of MPA against contemporary clinical isolates of influenza A and B viruses. The 50 % cellular cytotoxicity (CC50) of MPA in Madin Darby canine kidney cell line was over 50 µM. MPA prevented influenza virus-induced cell death in the cell-protection assay, with significantly lower IC50 for influenza B virus B/411 than that of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus H1/415 (0.208 vs 1.510 µM, P=0.0001). For H1/415, MPA interfered with the early stage of viral replication before protein synthesis. For B/411, MPA may also act at a later stage since MPA was active against B/411 even when added 12 h post-infection. Virus-yield reduction assay showed that the replication of B/411 was completely inhibited by MPA at concentrations ≥0.78 µM, while there was a dose-dependent reduction of viral titer for H1/415. The antiviral effect of MPA was completely reverted by guanosine supplementation. Plaque reduction assay showed that MPA had antiviral activity against eight different clinical isolates of A(H1N1), A(H3N2), A(H7N9) and influenza B viruses (IC50 <1 µM). In summary, MPA has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against human and avian-origin influenza viruses, in addition to its immunomodulatory activity. Together with a high chemotherapeutic index, the use of MPA as an antiviral agent should be further investigated in vivo. PMID:27259985

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  12. Mitochondrial DNA stress primes the antiviral innate immune response.

    PubMed

    West, A Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C; Pineda, Cristiana M; Lang, Sabine M; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A; Kaech, Susan M; Smiley, James R; Means, Robert E; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S

    2015-04-23

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance and segregation. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation, triggering calcium-dependent stress signalling and adaptive metabolic responses. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and ageing, remain poorly defined. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signalling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes. Mechanistically, we find that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS (also known as MB21D1) and promotes STING (also known as TMEM173)-IRF3-dependent signalling to elevate interferon-stimulated gene expression, potentiate type I interferon responses and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which enhances antiviral signalling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signalling and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully engage antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  13. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanol extract from Polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Noor Zarina Abd; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    A study was carried out to test the cytotoxicity and antiviral effects of methanolic extracts from the leaves and stem of Polygonum minus or kesum. Cytotoxicity tests were performed on Vero cells indicates the LC50 value for leaf extract towards the Vero cells was 875 mg/L and the LC50 value for stem extract was 95 mg/L. The LC50 values indidcate the non-cytotoxic effect of the extracts and worth for further testing. Antiviral test were carried out towards herpes simplex virus infected Vero cells using three concentration of extract which were equivalent to 1.0 LC50, 0.1 LC50 and 0.01 LC50. Three different treatments to detect antiviral activity were used. Mild antiviral activity of the stem extract was detected when cells were treated for 24 hours with plant extract before viral infection. This demonstrates the capability of the test compound to protect the cells from viral attachment and of the possible prophylactic effect of the P. minus stem methanol extract.

  14. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Li, Guangdi

    2016-07-01

    Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:27281742

  15. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection. PMID:26526589

  16. 75 FR 16151 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  17. 76 FR 62418 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  18. Novel antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a serious arboviral disease currently with no effective antiviral therapy or approved vaccine available. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) replication is very important. Among the natural compounds, bioflavonoids derived mainly from plants are of interest because of their biological and medicinal benefits. Methods In the present study, antiviral activity of a bioflavonoid, baicalein, was evaluated against different stages of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) replication in Vero cells using focus forming unit reduction assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Results Baicalein inhibited DENV-2 replication in Vero cells with IC50= 6.46 μg/mL and SI= 17.8 when added after adsorption to the cells. The IC50 against DENV-2 was 5.39 μg/mL and SI= 21.3 when cells were treated 5 hours before virus infection and continuously up to 4 days post infection. Baicalein exhibited direct virucidal effect against DENV-2 with IC 50= 1.55 μg/mL and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 7.14 μg/mL. Conclusions Findings presented here suggest that baicalein exerts potent antiviral activity against DENV. Baicalein possesses direct virucidal activity against DENV besides its effects against dengue virus adsorption and intracellular replication of DENV-2. Baicalein, hence, should be considered for in vivo evaluation in the development of an effective antiviral compound against DENV. PMID:23140177

  19. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part I: HSV, HPV.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Majewska, Anna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world and important cause of morbidity and mortality. Especially STDs of viral etiology are difficult to cure. In many cases the antiviral therapy can relieve the symptoms but not eliminate the virus. During the past decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of antiviral drugs. One of the oldest antiviral medications is acyclovir (ACV). It is approved to treat initial and recurrent genital herpes and as a suppressive therapy in severe recurrent genital infections as well. Drug resistance to ACV and related drugs is seen among immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus HIV-infected patients. Resistant infections can be managed by second-line drugs - foscarnet or cidofovir- but they are more toxic than ACV. In case of HPV there is not known specific target for the medication and that is why the substances used in human papilloma virus HPV infection therapy are either antimitotics or immunomodulators. The Part I review focuses on mechanisms of actions and mechanisms of resistance to antiviral agents used in a treatment of the genital herpes and genital HPV infection. In Part II we will show the therapeutic options in other sexually transmitted infections: hepatitis B, C and HIV. PMID:24032509

  20. Gutsy Microbes Fly High in the Antiviral War.

    PubMed

    Robalino, Javier; Wu, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    The importance of microbiomes in health and disease is now well appreciated. New work from Sansone and colleagues adds to this understanding by showing that gut microbes are key for the local induction of an ERK-dependent antiviral response in flies. PMID:26690611

  1. 6-azacytidine--compound with wide spectrum of antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, I; Dyachenko, N; Nosach, L; Zhovnovataya, V; Rybalko, S; Lozitskaya, R; Fedchuk, A; Lozitsky, V; Gridina, T; Shalamay, A; Palchikovskaja, L; Povnitsa, O

    2001-01-01

    6-azacytidine demonstrates activity against adenoviruses types 1, 2, 5. It inhibit synthesis of viral DNA and proteins. 6-AC shows antiherpetic and antiinfluenza action during experimental infection in mice. 6-AC is prospective for drug development as an antiviral substance with a wide spectrum of activity. PMID:11562975

  2. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  3. Novel drug delivery approaches on antiviral and antiretroviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pooja; Chawla, Anuj; Arora, Sandeep; Pawar, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    Viruses have the property to replicate very fast in host cell. It can attack any part of host cell. Therefore, the clinical efficacy of antiviral drugs and its bioavailability is more important concern taken into account to treat viral infections. The oral and parenteral routes of drug administration have several shortcomings, however, which could lead to the search for formulating better delivery systems. Now, a day's novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) proved to be a better approach to enhance the effectiveness of the antivirals and improve the patient compliance and decrease the adverse effect. The NDDS have reduced the dosing frequency and shorten the duration of treatment, thus, which could lead the treatment more cost-effective. The development of NDDS for antiviral and antiretroviral therapy aims to deliver the drug devoid of toxicity, with high compatibility and biodegradability, targeting the drug to specific sites for viral infection and in some instances it also avoid the first pass metabolism effect. This article aims to discuss the usefulness of novel delivery approaches of antiviral agents such as niosomes, microspheres, microemulsions, nanoparticles that are used in the treatment of various Herpes viruses and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. PMID:23057001

  4. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  5. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    PubMed Central

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  6. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  7. The viral RNA capping machinery as a target for antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Ferron, François; Decroly, Etienne; Selisko, Barbara; Canard, Bruno

    2012-10-01

    Most viruses modify their genomic and mRNA 5'-ends with the addition of an RNA cap, allowing efficient mRNA translation, limiting degradation by cellular 5'-3' exonucleases, and avoiding its recognition as foreign RNA by the host cell. Viral RNA caps can be synthesized or acquired through the use of a capping machinery which exhibits a significant diversity in organization, structure and mechanism relative to that of their cellular host. Therefore, viral RNA capping has emerged as an interesting field for antiviral drug design. Here, we review the different pathways and mechanisms used to produce viral mRNA 5'-caps, and present current structures, mechanisms, and inhibitors known to act on viral RNA capping. PMID:22841701

  8. Tetrameric assembly of hGBP1 is crucial for both stimulated GMP formation and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Pandita, Esha; Rajan, Sudeepa; Rahman, Safikur; Mullick, Ranajoy; Das, Saumitra; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2016-06-15

    Interferon-γ inducible human guanylate binding protein-1 (hGBP1) shows a unique characteristic that hydrolyses GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP through successive cleavages, with GMP being the major product. Like other large GTPases, hGBP1 undergoes oligomerization upon substrate hydrolysis, which is essential for the stimulation of activity. It also exhibits antiviral activity against many viruses including hepatitis C. However, which oligomeric form is responsible for the stimulated activity leading to enhanced GMP formation and its influence on antiviral activity, are not properly understood. Using mutant and truncated proteins, our data indicate that transition-state-induced tetramerization is associated with higher rate of GMP formation. This is supported by chimaeras that are defective in both tetramerization and enhanced GMP formation. Unlike wild-type protein, chimaeras did not show allosteric interactions, indicating that tetramerization and enhanced GMP formation are allosterically coupled. Hence, we propose that after the cleavage of the first phosphoanhydride bond GDP·Pi-bound protein dimers transiently associate to form a tetramer that acts as an allosteric switch for higher rate of GMP formation. Biochemical and biophysical studies reveal that sequential conformational changes and interdomain communications regulate tetramer formation via dimer. Our studies also show that overexpression of the mutants, defective in tetramer formation in Rep2a cells do not inhibit proliferation of hepatitis C virus, indicating critical role of a tetramer in the antiviral activity. Thus, the present study not only highlights the importance of hGBP1 tetramer in stimulated GMP formation, but also demonstrates its role in the antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus. PMID:27071416

  9. RNF122 suppresses antiviral type I interferon production by targeting RIG-I CARDs to mediate RIG-I degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendie; Jiang, Minghong; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Shikun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Jiyan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-23

    The activation of retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), a cytoplasmic innate sensor for viral RNA, is tightly regulated to maintain immune homeostasis properly and prevent excessive inflammatory reactions other than initiation of antiviral innate response to eliminate RNA virus effectively. Posttranslational modifications, particularly ubiquitination, are crucial for regulation of RIG-I activity. Increasing evidence suggests that E3 ligases play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation and antiviral innate signaling. Here we identify that E3 ubiquitin ligase RING finger protein 122 (RNF122) directly interacts with mouse RIG-I through MS screening of RIG-I-interacting proteins in RNA virus-infected cells. The transmembrane domain of RNF122 associates with the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs) of RIG-I; this interaction effectively triggers RING finger domain of RNF122 to deliver the Lys-48-linked ubiquitin to the Lys115 and Lys146 residues of RIG-I CARDs and promotes RIG-I degradation, resulting in a marked inhibition of RIG-I downstream signaling. RNF122 is widely expressed in various immune cells, with preferential expression in macrophages. Deficiency of RNF122 selectively increases RIG-I-triggered production of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. RNF122-deficient mice exhibit more resistance against lethal RNA virus infection, with increased production of type I IFNs. Thus, we demonstrate that RNF122 acts as a selective negative regulator of RIG-I-triggered antiviral innate response by targeting CARDs of RIG-I and mediating proteasomal degradation of RIG-I. Our study outlines a way for E3 ligase to regulate innate sensor RIG-I for the control of antiviral innate immunity. PMID:27506794

  10. Antiviral Effect of Methylated Flavonol Isorhamnetin against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3′, and 4′ positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3′-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70–80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids. PMID:25806943

  11. Discovery of Potent Broad Spectrum Antivirals Derived from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Tai, Andrew W.; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N.; Sherman, David H.; Miller, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  12. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines and their receptors to serve a variety of roles in viral life-cycle. This review focuses on the pharmacology of virus-encoded chemokine receptors, yet also the family of virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins will be touched upon. Key properties of the virus-encoded receptors, compared to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies--will be highlighted here together with the potentials of the virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins as novel anti-inflammatory biopharmaceutical strategies. PMID:15617722

  13. Should NS5A inhibitors serve as the scaffold for all-oral anti-HCV combination therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Janardhan, Sujit V; Reau, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a global health problem that affects up to 130–150 million people worldwide. The HCV treatment landscape has been transformed recently by the introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents that target viral proteins, including the NS3 protease, the NS5B polymerase, and the NS5A protein. Treatment with multiple DAAs in combination has been shown to result in high rates of sustained virologic response, without the need for pegylated interferon, and a shorter duration of therapy compared with interferon-based regimens; however, the optimal combination of DAAs has yet to be determined. The class of NS5A inhibitors has picomolar potency with pangenotypic activity, and recent clinical studies have shown these inhibitors to be an important component of DAA combination regimens. This review discusses the rational design of an optimal anti-HCV DAA cocktail, with a focus on the role of NS5A in the HCV life cycle, the attributes of the NS5A class of inhibitors, and the potential for NS5A inhibitors to act as a scaffold for DAA-only treatment regimens. PMID:25926761

  14. Epimedium koreanum Nakai displays broad spectrum of antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo by inducing cellular antiviral state.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant's known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakai markedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  15. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  16. The kinetics and protection of the antiviral state induced by recombinant iIFN1a in rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongsheng; Xu, Liming; LaPatra, Scott E; Zhao, Jingzhuang; Liu, Miao; Liu, Hongbai; Lu, Tongyan; Zhang, Qiya

    2016-08-01

    The iIFN1a (intracellular IFN-a1), that is one of the IFN-a1 variants, was shown to be functional intracellularly and act as a novel defense against an infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). To determine its antiviral properties, a recombinant iIFN1a was generated in Escherichia coli. Its antiviral activity against IHNV was 1.69×10(7)U/mg in CHSE-214 cells. Additionally, iIFN1a was capable of inducing comparable levels of IRF-1, IRF-2, IFN-I, IFN-γ and Mx transcription in head kidney, spleen and liver tissues at an early time point (6h), that was followed by a rapid decline 24h after induction. The recombinant protein also elicited protection against IHNV in vivo. At 6 and 24h after induction there was 100% protection against the virus, however, at 48 and 72h the protection decreased to 57 and 40%, respectively. The in vivo protection kinetics correlated with the kinetics of gene expression. The results of this study provide details of the antiviral state that was induced by iIFN1a in vivo for the first time. Additionally, this information will facilitate the development of this recombinant protein as a potential anti-viral treatment and/or adjuvant. PMID:27348633

  17. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  18. [Prescription of new HCV-drugs - what has to be considered judicially].

    PubMed

    Mauss, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A unique specialty of the German public health insurance system is the option to hold a physician liable for the cost of medication considered not to be in line with the indication or to not to be used in a cost efficient way. Due to the high prices of direct acting antivirals (DAA) against the hepatitis C virus the potential financial losses are substantial. In addition, some of the public health insurance companies have already announced their intent to challenge the use of DAA. In this context the options as to how to minimise this risk are analysed within the given legal environment. PMID:25594707

  19. Simplification of antiviral hepatitis C virus therapy to support expanded access in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nathan; Swan, Tracy; Beyer, Peter; Hirnschall, Gottfried; Easterbrook, Philippa; Wiktor, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Currently, access to treatment for HCV is limited, with treatment rates lowest in the more resource-limited countries, including those countries with the highest prevalence. The use of oral DAAs has the potential to provide treatment at scale by offering opportunities to simplify drug regimens, laboratory requirements, and service delivery models. Key desirable characteristics of future HCV treatment regimens include high efficacy, tolerability, pan-genotype activity, short treatment duration, oral therapy, affordability, and availability as fixed-dose combination. Using such a regimen, HCV treatment delivery could be greatly simplified. Treatment could be initiated following confirmation of the presence of viraemia, with an initial assessment of the stage of liver disease. A combination DAA therapy that is safe and effective across genotypes could remove the need for genotyping and intermediary viral load assessments for response-guided therapy and reduce the need for adverse event monitoring. Simpler, safer, shorter therapy will also facilitate simplified service delivery, including task shifting, decentralization, and integration of treatment and care. The opportunity to scale up HCV treatment using such delivery approaches will depend on efforts needed to guarantee that the new DAAs are affordable in low-income settings. This will require the engagement of all stakeholders, ranging from the companies developing these new treatments, WHO and other international organizations, including procurement and funding mechanisms, governments and civil society. PMID:25443341

  20. Toll-like receptors in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Sandra N.; Li, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are fundamental sensor molecules of the host innate immune system, which detect conserved molecular signatures of a wide range of microbial pathogens and initiate innate immune responses via distinct signaling pathways. Various TLRs are implicated in the early interplay of host cells with invading viruses, which regulates viral replication and/or host responses, ultimately impacting on viral pathogenesis. To survive the host innate defense mechanisms, many viruses have developed strategies to evade or counteract signaling through the TLR pathways, creating an advantageous environment for their propagation. Here we review the current knowledge of the roles TLRs play in antiviral innate immune responses, discuss examples of TLR-mediated viral recognition, and describe strategies used by viruses to antagonize the host antiviral innate immune responses. PMID:24316048

  1. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  2. An epimer of 5'-noraristeromycin and its antiviral properties.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, S M; Chen, X; Schneller, S W; Ikeda, S; Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1994-04-29

    A derivative of 5'-noraristeromycin epimeric at the 5'-nor center ((-)-3) has been prepared enantiospecifically in three steps from (+)-((1R,4S)-4-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten- 1-yl acetate. Compound (-)-3 was evaluated for antiviral activity against a large number of viruses and found to display marked activity against varicella-zoster virus, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, parainfluenza virus, reovirus, and cytomegalovirus. A similar antiviral activity spectrum was shown by the S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors neplanocin A and carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine. While equally potent as neplanocin A against most of the viruses tested, compound (-)-3 was significantly less cytotoxic. The results of this study suggest that (-)-3 should be pursued for the treatment of those virus infections [that is, pox (VV), rhabdo (VSV), paramyxo (parainfluenza), and reo] that appear to be exquisitively sensitive to the compound. PMID:8176716

  3. TRIM family proteins: retroviral restriction and antiviral defence.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Sébastien; Stoye, Jonathan P; Saïb, Ali

    2005-10-01

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family are involved in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, development, oncogenesis and apoptosis. Some TRIM proteins display antiviral properties, targeting retroviruses in particular. The potential activity of TRIM19, better known as promyelocytic leukaemia protein, against several viruses has been well documented and, recently, TRIM5alpha has been identified as the factor responsible for the previously described Lv1 and Ref1 antiretroviral activities. There is also evidence indicating that other TRIM proteins can influence viral replication. These findings are reviewed here, and the possibility that TRIMs represent a new and widespread class of antiviral proteins involved in innate immunity is also considered. PMID:16175175

  4. The diversity of insect antiviral immunity: insights from viruses.

    PubMed

    Marques, João T; Imler, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Insects represent over 70% of all animal species. Recent virome analyses reveal unprecedented genetic diversity of insect viruses, which appears to match that of their hosts. Thus, insect-virus interactions may provide information on a vast repertoire of antiviral immune mechanisms. Tapping into this diversity is challenging because of several constraints imposed by the uniqueness of each insect model. Nevertheless, it is clear that many conserved and divergent pathways participate in the control of viral infection in insects. Co-evolution between hosts and viruses favors the development of immune evasion mechanisms by the pathogen. Viral suppressors can offer unique perspective on host pathways and emphasize the importance of RNA interference, apoptosis, but also NF-κB pathways and translation control in insect antiviral immunity. PMID:27232381

  5. Preventing and treating secondary bacterial infections with antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacterial super-infections contribute to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with influenza and other respiratory virus infections. There are robust animal model data but only limited clinical information on the effectiveness of licensed antiviral agents for the treatment of bacterial complications of influenza. The association of secondary bacterial pathogens with fatal pneumonia during the recent H1N1 influenza pandemic highlights the need for new development in this area. Basic and clinical research into viral-bacterial interactions over the last decade has revealed several mechanisms that underlie this synergism. By applying these insights to antiviral drug development, the potential exists to improve outcomes by means other than direct inhibition of the virus. PMID:21447860

  6. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses.

    PubMed

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound. PMID:26693226

  7. Antiviral Treatment Guidelines for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yong Pil; Song, Joon Young; Seo, Yu Bin; Choi, Jae-Phil

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is an acute infectious disease of the respiratory system caused by the new betacoronavirus (MERS coronavirus, MERS-CoV), which shows high mortality rates. The typical symptoms of MERS are fever, cough, and shortness of breath, and it is often accompanied by pneumonia. The MERS-CoV was introduced to Republic of Korea in May 2015 by a patient returning from Saudi Arabia. The disease spread mostly through hospital infections, and by the time the epidemic ended in August, the total number of confirmed diagnoses was 186, among which 36 patients died. Reflecting the latest evidence for antiviral drugs in the treatment of MERS-CoV infection and the experiences of treating MERS patients in Republic of Korea, these guidelines focus on antiviral drugs to achieve effective treatment of MERS-CoV infections. PMID:26483999

  8. Microbiota-Dependent Priming of Antiviral Intestinal Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Christine L; Cohen, Jonathan; Yasunaga, Ari; Xu, Jie; Osborn, Greg; Subramanian, Harry; Gold, Beth; Buchon, Nicolas; Cherry, Sara

    2015-11-11

    Enteric pathogens must overcome intestinal defenses to establish infection. In Drosophila, the ERK signaling pathway inhibits enteric virus infection. The intestinal microflora also impacts immunity but its role in enteric viral infection is unknown. Here we show that two signals are required to activate antiviral ERK signaling in the intestinal epithelium. One signal depends on recognition of peptidoglycan from the microbiota, particularly from the commensal Acetobacter pomorum, which primes the NF-kB-dependent induction of a secreted factor, Pvf2. However, the microbiota is not sufficient to induce this pathway; a second virus-initiated signaling event involving release of transcriptional paused genes mediated by the kinase Cdk9 is also required for Pvf2 production. Pvf2 stimulates antiviral immunity by binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase PVR, which is necessary and sufficient for intestinal ERK responses. These findings demonstrate that sensing of specific commensals primes inflammatory signaling required for epithelial responses that restrict enteric viral infections. PMID:26567510

  9. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound. PMID:26693226

  10. Antiviral Activity of Carbobenzoxy Di- and Tripeptides on Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, F. A.; Dixon, G. J.; Arnett, G.; Dice, J. R.; Rightsel, W. A.; Schabel, F. M.; Mclean, I. W.

    1968-01-01

    A series of simple carbobenzoxy peptides showed high and consistent antiviral chemotherapeutic activity in cell culture. In general, greatest activity was found against the measles-distemper or herpesvirus groups, or both, but various representatives of the series had quantitatively and qualitatively different antiviral activities. Several of the compounds, showing the highest antimeasles activity, were investigated extensively. In human cell culture plaque assays, these compounds were active against measles virus at levels of from 15 to 500 μg/ml. At single doses of about 250 to 500 mg/kg, orally in three animal species, significant serum levels of drugs were detected in virus cell culture assays. The mode of action appeared to be therapeutic, as an effect was seen in cell systems infected for at least 24 hr before treatment. PMID:4971720

  11. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  12. Evaluation of macrophage antiviral activity in patients affected by neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Merendino, R A; Iannello, D; Arena, A; Bonina, L; Greco, V; Mesiti, M; Chillemi, S; Mastroeni, P

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral activity of macrophages has been studied in healthy donors and in patients affected by breast cancer and melanoma. In vitro differentiated macrophages from blood-derived monocytes were infected with measles virus, herpes simplex virus type 2 and adenovirus 17. The challenge was carried out with different multiplicities of infection and the synthesis of virus was tested by evaluating the single cycle growth curve in 24 h. The results obtained show that the restriction of virus infectivity by macrophages is strongly influenced by the multiplicity of infection. This was particularly evident with the adenovirus 17. Moreover, macrophages from patients with melanoma and breast cancer showed an impairment of the intrinsic antiviral activity in comparison with normal subjects. PMID:2842553

  13. Emerging antivirals for the treatment of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Yan; Chen, Hong-Song

    2014-06-28

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) constitutes a major global public health threat, causing substantial disease burdens such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, thus representing high unmet medical needs. Currently available therapies are safe, well tolerated, and highly effective in decreasing viremia and improving measured clinical outcomes with low rates of antiviral resistance. However, long-term management remains a clinical challenge, mainly due to the slow kinetics of HBV surface antigen clearance. In this article, we review emerging antivirals directed at novel targets derived from mechanisms of viral cellular entry, viral replication, viral assembly, and the host immune response, leading to preclinical and clinical trials for possible future therapeutic intervention. The recent therapeutic advances in the development of all categories of HBV inhibitors may pave the way for regimens of finite duration that result in long-lasting control of chronic hepatitis B infection. PMID:24976708

  14. Functionalization, cyclization and antiviral activity of A-secotriterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Grishko, Victoria V; Galaiko, Natalia V; Tolmacheva, Irina A; Kucherov, Igor I; Eremin, Vladimir F; Boreko, Eugene I; Savinova, Olga V; Slepukhin, Pavel A

    2014-08-18

    Triterpene derivatives with an α,β-alkenenitrile moiety in the five-membered ring A have been synthesized by nitrile anion cyclizations of 1-cyano-2,3-secotriterpenoids. Oxime-containing precursors, 2,3-secointermediates and five-membered ring A products of cyclizations were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against enveloped viruses - influenza A virus and human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). Lupane ketoxime and the 2,3-secolupane C-3 aldoxime which possess antiviral activities against both influenza A virus (EC50 12.9-18.2 μM) and HIV-1 (EC50 0.06 μM) were the most promising compounds. PMID:24997292

  15. Genome editing and the next generation of antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel; Niyonzima, Nixon; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-09-01

    Engineered endonucleases such as homing endonucleases (HEs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), Tal-effector nucleases (TALENS) and the RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs or CRISPR/Cas9) can target specific DNA sequences for cleavage, and are proving to be valuable tools for gene editing. Recently engineered endonucleases have shown great promise as therapeutics for the treatment of genetic disease and infectious pathogens. In this review, we discuss recent efforts to use the HE, ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing platforms as antiviral therapeutics. We also discuss the obstacles facing gene-editing antiviral therapeutics as they are tested in animal models of disease and transition towards human application. PMID:27272125

  16. Antiviral activity of doxycycline against vesicular stomatitis virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuan-Chang; Wang, Xin; Wei, Jian-Chao; Li, Bei-Bei; Shao, Dong-Hua; Li, Yu-Ming; Liu, Ke; Shi, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Bin; Qiu, Ya-Feng; Ma, Zhi-Yong

    2015-11-01

    Doxycycline (Dox) is a tetracycline derivative with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities that is used as an effector substance in inducible gene-expression systems. We investigated the antiviral activity of Dox against vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection in cultured H1299 cells. Dox at concentrations of 1.0-2.0 μg ml(-1) significantly inhibited VSV replication and the VSV-induced cytopathic effect in dose-dependent manners, suggesting that Dox may have broader activity in inhibiting viral replication, in addition to its well-defined bacteriostatic activity. Dox exerted its antiviral effect at the early-mid stage of VSV infection, suggesting that it did not interfere with VSV infectivity, adsorption, or entry into target cells. These results indicate that Dox can inhibit VSV infection and may therefore have potential applications for the treatment of viral infections. PMID:26459887

  17. [Acyclic analogs of ribavirin. Synthesis and antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Tsilevich, T L; Shchaveleva, I L; Nosach, L N; Zhovnovataia, V L; Smirnov, I P

    1988-05-01

    Activity of several ribavirin analogues, viz.1-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)-, 1-(3-hydroxypropoxymethyl)-, 1-(4-hydroxybutoxymethyl)- and 1-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-1,2,4-triazole 5- and 3-carboxamides, against human adenovirus type 2 in the Hep-2 cell culture has been studied. The ether oxygen atom imitating the ribose O4' was shown to be essential for the antiviral activity. 1-(2-Hydroxyethoxymethyl)-1,2,4-triazole 3-carboxamide, a structural analogue of ribavirin in which the hydroxyl group is apparently equivalent to the ribose 5'-OH, possesses the highest activity among the compounds studied. Lengthening of the alkyl side chain reduces essentially the antiviral activity. PMID:3422011

  18. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte activation promotes innate antiviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mahima; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Chettle, James; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Goubau, Delphine; Chakravarty, Probir; Ramsay, George; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Staeheli, Peter; Blacklaws, Barbara A; Heeney, Jonathan L; Hayday, Adrian C

    2015-01-01

    Unrelenting environmental challenges to the gut epithelium place particular demands on the local immune system. In this context, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) compose a large, highly conserved T cell compartment, hypothesized to provide a first line of defence via cytolysis of dysregulated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and cytokine-mediated re-growth of healthy IEC. Here we show that one of the most conspicuous impacts of activated IEL on IEC is the functional upregulation of antiviral interferon (IFN)-responsive genes, mediated by the collective actions of IFNs with other cytokines. Indeed, IEL activation in vivo rapidly provoked type I/III IFN receptor-dependent upregulation of IFN-responsive genes in the villus epithelium. Consistent with this, activated IEL mediators protected cells against virus infection in vitro, and pre-activation of IEL in vivo profoundly limited norovirus infection. Hence, intraepithelial T cell activation offers an overt means to promote the innate antiviral potential of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25987506

  19. Comparative in vitro imunotoxicology of acyclovir and other antiviral agents.

    PubMed Central

    Steele, R W; Marmer, D J; Keeney, R E

    1980-01-01

    In vitro lymphocyte blastogenic responses to the commonly employed mitogens phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed, and concanavalin A were evaluated when acyclovir, adenine arabinoside, cytosine arabinoside, and idoxuridine were added to the culture materials. Similarly, specific antigen-induced blastogenic responses, including herpes group antigens, and cytotoxicity and leukocyte inhibitory factor assays with herpes group viruses were determined in the presence and absence of antiviral agents. No depression of these cellular immmune responses by acyclovir or adenine arabinoside ws demonstrated. This was in contrast to the effects of cytosine arabinoside and idoxuridine, which severely inhibited blastogenic and cytotoxic responses but not leukocyte inhibitory factor production. Even at concentrations up to 20 microgram/ml, the antiviral agent acyclovir did not depress selected cellular immune responses that are important for successful elimination of invading herpes group viruses. PMID:6249751

  20. Targeting human papillomavirus genome replication for antiviral drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Jacques; Melendy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are a major human health problem; they are the cause of recurrent benign warts and of several cancers of the anogenital tract and head and neck region. Although there are two prophylactic HPV vaccines that could, if used universally, prevent as many as two-thirds of HPV-induced cancers, as well as several cytotoxic and immunomodulatory agents for localized treatment of infections, there are currently no HPV antiviral drugs in our arsenal of therapeutic agents. This review examines the status of past and ongoing research into the development of HPV antivirals, focused primarily upon approaches targeting the replication of the viral genome. The only HPV enzyme, E1, is a DNA helicase that interfaces with the cellular DNA replication machinery to replicate the HPV genome. To date, searches for small molecule inhibitors of E1 for use as antivirals have met with limited success. The lack of other viral enzymes has meant that the search for antivirals has shifted to a large degree to the modulation of protein–protein interactions. There has been some success in identifying small molecule inhibitors targeting interactions between HPV proteins but with activity against a small subset of viral types only. As noted in this review, it is thought that targeting E1 interactions with cellular replication proteins may provide inhibitors with broader activity against multiple HPV types. Herein, we outline the steps in HPV DNA replication and discuss those that appear to provide the most advantageous targets for the development of anti-HPV therapeutics. PMID:23615820

  1. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). It involves simulated trips down the ...

  2. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  3. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  4. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Hoon; Golden, Jennifer E; Adcock, Robert S; Schroeder, Chad E; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B; Cramer, Daniel E; Chilton, Paula M; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A; Prodhan, Aminul I; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons. PMID:27185801

  5. Antiviral response dictated by choreographed cascade of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Elena; Hershberg, Uri; Seto, Jeremy; Pham, Alissa M.; Marquez, Susanna; Duke, Jamie L.; Wetmur, James G.; tenOever, Benjamin R.; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) is a master regulator of immune responses. Pathogenic viruses subvert normal immune function in DCs through the expression of immune antagonists. Understanding how these antagonists interact with the host immune system requires knowledge of the underlying genetic regulatory network that operates during an uninhibited antiviral response. In order to isolate and identify this network, we studied DCs infected with Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), which is able to stimulate innate immunity and DC maturation through activation of RIG-I signaling, but lacks the ability to evade the human interferon response. To analyze this experimental model, we developed a new approach integrating genome-wide expression kinetics and time-dependent promoter analysis. We found that the genetic program underlying the antiviral cell-state transition during the first 18-hours post-infection could be explained by a single convergent regulatory network. Gene expression changes were driven by a step-wise multi-factor cascading control mechanism, where the specific transcription factors controlling expression changed over time. Within this network, most individual genes are regulated by multiple factors, indicating robustness against virus-encoded immune evasion genes. In addition to effectively recapitulating current biological knowledge, we predicted, and validated experimentally, antiviral roles for several novel transcription factors. More generally, our results show how a genetic program can be temporally controlled through a single regulatory network to achieve the large-scale genetic reprogramming characteristic of cell state transitions. PMID:20164420

  6. Antiviral agents and HIV prevention: controversies, conflicts, and consensus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Smith, M. Kumi; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral agents can be used to prevent HIV transmission before exposure as preexpo-sure prophylaxis (PrEP), after exposure as postexposure prophylaxis, and as treatment of infected people for secondary prevention. Considerable research has shed new light on antiviral agents for PrEP and for prevention of secondary HIV transmission. While promising results have emerged from several PrEP trials, the challenges of poor adherence among HIV-negative clients and possible increase in sexual risk behaviors remain a concern. In addition, a broader pipeline of antiviral agents for PrEP that focuses on genital tract pharmacology and safety and resistance issues must be developed. Antiretroviral drugs have also been used to prevent HIV transmission from HIV-infected patients to their HIV-discordant sexual partners. The HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial demonstrated nearly complete prevention of HIV transmission by early treatment of infection, but the generalizability of the results to other risk groups – including intravenous drug users and MSM – has not been determined. Most importantly, the best strategy for use of antiretroviral agents to reduce the spread of HIV at either the individual level or the population level has not been developed, and remains the ultimate goal of this area of investigation. PMID:22507927

  7. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of novel quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Wang, Mingxiao; Yao, Xue; Li, Yue; Tan, Juan; Wang, Lizhong; Qiao, Wentao; Geng, Yunqi; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral drug design. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands the discovery of novel inhibitors that are structurally as well as mechanistically different. Herein, a series of quinazolinones were designed and synthesized as novel HIV-1 inhibitors. The new synthetic route provides a practical method for the preparation of 5-hydroxy quinazolinones. Primary bioassay results indicated that most of the quinazolinones possess anti-HIV activity, especially for compound 11b with 77.5% inhibition rate at 10 μM emerged as a new active lead. Most of the synthesized compounds were also found to exhibit good anti-TMV activity, of which compo und 9a showed similar in vivo anti-TMV activity to commercial plant virucide Ribavirin. This work provides a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration and optimization of previously reported antiviral agents. PMID:22546200

  8. Antioxidants: potential antiviral agents for Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zehua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Zongtao; Tian, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is prevalent throughout eastern and southern Asia and the Pacific Rim. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. Despite the importance of JE, little is known about its pathogenesis. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections has led to increased interest in its role in JEV infections. This review focuses mainly on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of JEV infection and the antiviral effect of antioxidant agents in inhibiting JEV production. First, this review summarizes the pathogenesis of JE. The pathological changes include neuronal death, astrocyte activation, and microglial proliferation. Second, the relationship between oxidative stress and JEV infection is explored. JEV infection induces the generation of oxidants and exhausts the supply of antioxidants, which activates specific signaling pathways. Finally, the therapeutic efficacy of a variety of antioxidants as antiviral agents, including minocycline, arctigenin, fenofibrate, and curcumin, was studied. In conclusion, antioxidants are likely to be developed into antiviral agents for the treatment of JE. PMID:24780919

  9. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  10. Antiviral activity of some South American medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bermejo, P; Sanchez Palomino, S; Chiriboga, X; Carrasco, L

    1999-03-01

    Folk medicinal plants are potential sources of useful therapeutic compounds including some with antiviral activities. Extracts prepared from 10 South American medicinal plants (Baccharis trinervis, Baccharis teindalensis, Eupatorium articulatum, Eupatorium glutinosum, Tagetes pusilla, Neurolaena lobata, Conyza floribunda, Phytolacca bogotensis, Phytolacca rivinoides and Heisteria acuminata) were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against herpes simplex type I (HSV-1), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and poliovirus type 1. The most potent inhibition was observed with an aqueous extract of B. trinervis, which inhibited HSV-1 replication by 100% at 50-200 micrograms/mL, without showing cytotoxic effects. Good activities were also found with the ethanol extract of H. acuminata and the aqueous extract of E. articulatum, which exhibited antiviral effects against both DNA and RNA viruses (HSV-1 and VSV, respectively) at 125-250 micrograms/mL. The aqueous extracts of T. pusilla (100-250 micrograms/mL), B. teindalensis (50-125 micrograms/mL) and E. glutinosum (50-125 micrograms/mL) also inhibited the replication of VSV, but none of the extracts tested had any effect on poliovirus replication. PMID:10190189

  11. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03679.001 PMID:25333492

  12. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV. PMID:26997613

  13. Insect antiviral innate immunity: pathways, effectors, and connections.

    PubMed

    Kingsolver, Megan B; Huang, Zhijing; Hardy, Richard W

    2013-12-13

    Insects are infected by a wide array of viruses some of which are insect restricted and pathogenic, and some of which are transmitted by biting insects to vertebrates. The medical and economic importance of these viruses heightens the need to understand the interaction between the infecting pathogen and the insect immune system in order to develop transmission interventions. The interaction of the virus with the insect host innate immune system plays a critical role in the outcome of infection. The major mechanism of antiviral defense is the small, interfering RNA pathway that responds through the detection of virus-derived double-stranded RNA to suppress virus replication. However, other innate antimicrobial pathways such as Imd, Toll, and Jak-STAT and the autophagy pathway have also been shown to play important roles in antiviral immunity. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the main insect antiviral pathways and examine recent findings that further our understanding of the roles of these pathways in facilitating a systemic and specific response to infecting viruses. PMID:24120681

  14. RNA silencing and antiviral defense in plants.

    PubMed

    Agius, Claire; Eamens, Andrew L; Millar, Anthony A; Watson, John M; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Given the widespread impact of RNA silencing on the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, it is indeed remarkable that this means of gene regulation went undiscovered for so long. Since the publication of landmark papers in 1998 (Fire et al., Nature 391:806-811, 1998; Waterhouse et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:13959-13964, 1998), intense research efforts have resulted in much progress from the speculation of Mello and colleagues that "the mechanisms underlying RNA interference probably exist for a biological purpose" (Fire et al., Nature 391:806-811, 1998). Across the eukaryotic kingdom, with the notable exception of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Moazed, Science 326:544-550, 2009), the importance of small RNA-driven gene regulation has been recognized and implicated in central developmental processes as well as in aberrant and diseased states. Plants have by far the most complex RNA-based control of gene expression (Wang et al., Floriculture, ornamental and plant biotechnology, vol. III, 2006). Four distinct RNA silencing pathways have been recognized in plants, albeit with considerable conservation of the molecular components. These pathways are directed by various small RNA species, including microRNAs (miRNAs), trans-acting small interfering RNAs (siRNA) (ta-siRNAs), repeat-associated siRNAs (ra-siRNAs), and natural antisense transcript siRNAs (nat-siRNAs). The effective functionality of each of these pathways appear to be fundamental to the integrity of A. thaliana. Furthermore, in response to viral invasion, plants synthesize viral sRNAs as a means of defense. This process may in fact reflect the ancient origins of RNA silencing: plants may have evolved RNA silencing pathways as a defense mechanism against foreign nucleic acid species in the absence of an immune system (Wang and Metzlaff, Curr Opin Plant Biol 8:216-222, 2005). The generation of viral siRNAs is a particularly interesting illustration of RNA silencing as it provides a context to explore the potential to

  15. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a "chain terminator". Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  16. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a “chain terminator”. Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  17. Current treatment of chronic hepatitis C in China: Dilemma and potential problems.

    PubMed

    Han, Qun-Ying; Liu, Zheng-Wen

    2016-05-21

    Major advances have been made in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the advent of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). China has the most cases of HCV infection worldwide, but none of the DAAs has been approved in mainland China so far, and interferon (IFN)-α-based treatment remains the standard of care. HCV patients without response or with contraindications to IFN-based therapy have no alternative options. However, many patients buy DAAs, especially the generic forms of sofosbuvir, from other countries or areas. Under these circumstances, the use of these drugs may cause many predictable and unpredictable problems in ethics, law and medical practice. Given the obstacles of legal accessibility to DAAs and the potential problems of obtaining and using DAAs in China, the early launching of the DAAs in China or the legalization of buying drugs from areas outside China and using these drugs in China is an urgent issue and needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, in the interest of the patients. PMID:27217693

  18. Current treatment of chronic hepatitis C in China: Dilemma and potential problems

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qun-Ying; Liu, Zheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Major advances have been made in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the advent of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). China has the most cases of HCV infection worldwide, but none of the DAAs has been approved in mainland China so far, and interferon (IFN)-α-based treatment remains the standard of care. HCV patients without response or with contraindications to IFN-based therapy have no alternative options. However, many patients buy DAAs, especially the generic forms of sofosbuvir, from other countries or areas. Under these circumstances, the use of these drugs may cause many predictable and unpredictable problems in ethics, law and medical practice. Given the obstacles of legal accessibility to DAAs and the potential problems of obtaining and using DAAs in China, the early launching of the DAAs in China or the legalization of buying drugs from areas outside China and using these drugs in China is an urgent issue and needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, in the interest of the patients. PMID:27217693

  19. Antiviral immunity via RIG-I-mediated recognition of RNA bearing 5'-diphosphates.

    PubMed

    Goubau, Delphine; Schlee, Martin; Deddouche, Safia; Pruijssers, Andrea J; Zillinger, Thomas; Goldeck, Marion; Schuberth, Christine; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Rehwinkel, Jan; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Barchet, Winfried; Ludwig, Janos; Dermody, Terence S; Hartmann, Gunther; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2014-10-16

    Mammalian cells possess mechanisms to detect and defend themselves from invading viruses. In the cytosol, the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I; encoded by DDX58) and MDA5 (melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5; encoded by IFIH1) sense atypical RNAs associated with virus infection. Detection triggers a signalling cascade via the adaptor MAVS that culminates in the production of type I interferons (IFN-α and β; hereafter IFN), which are key antiviral cytokines. RIG-I and MDA5 are activated by distinct viral RNA structures and much evidence indicates that RIG-I responds to RNAs bearing a triphosphate (ppp) moiety in conjunction with a blunt-ended, base-paired region at the 5'-end (reviewed in refs 1, 2, 3). Here we show that RIG-I also mediates antiviral responses to RNAs bearing 5'-diphosphates (5'pp). Genomes from mammalian reoviruses with 5'pp termini, 5'pp-RNA isolated from yeast L-A virus, and base-paired 5'pp-RNAs made by in vitro transcription or chemical synthesis, all bind to RIG-I and serve as RIG-I agonists. Furthermore, a RIG-I-dependent response to 5'pp-RNA is essential for controlling reovirus infection in cultured cells and in mice. Thus, the minimal determinant for RIG-I recognition is a base-paired RNA with 5'pp. Such RNAs are found in some viruses but not in uninfected cells, indicating that recognition of 5'pp-RNA, like that of 5'ppp-RNA, acts as a powerful means of self/non-self discrimination by the innate immune system. PMID:25119032

  20. Antiviral immunity via RIG-I-mediated recognition of RNA bearing 5′-diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Deddouche, Safia; Pruijssers, Andrea J.; Zillinger, Thomas; Goldeck, Marion; Schuberth, Christine; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Rehwinkel, Jan; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A.; Barchet, Winfried; Ludwig, Janos; Dermody, Terence S.; Hartmann, Gunther; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian cells possess mechanisms to detect and defend themselves from invading viruses. In the cytosol, the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I; encoded by DDX58) and MDA5 (melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5; encoded by IFIH1) sense atypical RNAs associated with virus infection1,2. Detection triggers a signalling cascade via the adaptor MAVS that culminates in the production of type I interferons (IFN-α/β; hereafter IFN), key antiviral cytokines. RIG-I and MDA5 are activated by distinct viral RNA structures and much evidence indicates that RIG-I responds to RNAs bearing a triphosphate (ppp) moiety in conjunction with a blunt-ended, base-paired region at the 5′-end (reviewed in 1-3). Here we show that RIG-I also mediates antiviral responses to RNAs bearing 5′-diphosphates (5′pp). Genomes from mammalian reoviruses with 5′pp termini, 5′pp-RNA isolated from yeast L-A virus, and base-paired 5′pp-RNAs made by in vitro transcription or chemical synthesis, all bind to RIG-I and serve as RIG-I agonists. Furthermore, a RIG-I-dependent response to 5′pp-RNA is essential for controlling reovirus infection in cultured cells and in mice. Thus, the minimal determinant for RIG-I recognition is a base-paired RNA with 5′pp. Such RNAs are found in some viruses but not uninfected cells, indicating that recognition of 5′pp-RNA, like that of 5′ppp-RNA, acts as a powerful means of self/non-self discrimination by the innate immune system. PMID:25119032

  1. Natural and semisynthetic diterpenoids with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities block the ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos Alberto; Michelini, Flavia Mariana; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Gómez, Catalina Arredondo; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Alché, Laura Edith

    2015-10-01

    The pathogenesis of many viral infections lies on the damage caused by the immune response against the virus. Current antiviral drugs do not act on the inflammatory component of the disease. Thus, new compounds that inhibit both viral multiplication and the immunopathology elicited by the virus are an approach that should be considered. In the present study, we identified two jatropholones (2A and 5B) and one carnosic acid derivative (9C) that significantly inhibited multiplication of TK+ and TK- strains of HSV-1 in Vero cells. Compounds 2A, 5B and 9C also prevented HSV-1- and TLRs-induced inflammatory response in cultivated murine macrophages. In macrophages infected with HSV-1, the inhibitory effect of compounds 2A, 5B and 9C on TNF-α and IL-6 production could be associated with the block of ERK pathway, whereas NF-κB pathway was not hampered by any of the compounds. Besides, 2A, 5B and 9C also inhibited ERK pathway and reduced TNF-α production in macrophages stimulated with TLR2, TLR4 or TLR9 agonists and were able to hinder IL-6 secretion after activation with TLR2 or TLR4, but not with TLR9. The immunomodulatory effect of 2A, 5B and 9C in macrophages infected with HSV-1 may be a consequence of the inhibition of ERK pathway activated by TLRs. The availability of compounds with both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties which affect TLR signaling pathways might be a useful strategy to control the progress of virus-induced disease. PMID:25528328

  2. Combinatorial Cytokine Code Generates Anti-Viral State in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Boris M.; Marjanovic, Nada; Nudelman, German; Moran, Thomas M.; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological function of the immune system and the response to therapeutic immunomodulators may be sensitive to combinatorial cytokine micro-environments that shape the responses of specific immune cells. Previous work shows that paracrine cytokines released by virus-infected human dendritic cells (DC) can dictate the maturation state of naïve DCs. To understand the effects of paracrine signaling, we systematically studied the effects of combinations cytokines in this complex mixture in generating an anti-viral state. After naïve DCs were exposed to either IFNβ or to paracrine signaling released by DCs infected by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), microarray analysis revealed a large number of genes that were differently regulated by the DC-secreted paracrine signaling. In order to identify the cytokine mechanisms involved, we identified 20 cytokines secreted by NDV infected DCs for which the corresponding receptor gene is expressed in naïve DCs. By exposing cells to all combinations of 19 cytokines (leave-one-out studies), we identified five cytokines (IFNβ, TNFα, IL-1β, TNFSF15, and IL28) as candidates for regulating DC maturation markers. Subsequent experiments identified IFNβ, TNFα, and IL1β as the major contributors to this anti-viral state. This finding was supported by infection studies in vitro, by T-cell activation studies and by in vivo infection studies in mouse. Combination of cytokines can cause response states in DCs that differ from those achieved by the individual cytokines alone. These results suggest that the cytokine microenvironment may act via a combinatorial code to direct the response state of specific immune cells. Further elucidation of this code may provide insight into responses to infection and neoplasia as well as guide the development of combinatorial cytokine immunomodulation for infectious, autoimmune, and immunosurveillance-related diseases. PMID:24616721

  3. The Synthetic Antiviral Drug Arbidol Inhibits Globally Prevalent Pathogenic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Halfmann, Peter; Morrey, John D.; Smee, Donald F.; Prichard, Mark; Mire, Chad E.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arbidol (ARB) is a synthetic antiviral originally developed to combat influenza viruses. ARB is currently used clinically in several countries but not in North America. We have previously shown that ARB inhibits in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) by blocking HCV entry and replication. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are inhibited by ARB and demonstrate that ARB suppresses in vitro infection of mammalian cells with Ebola virus (EBOV), Tacaribe arenavirus, and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We also confirm suppression of hepatitis B virus and poliovirus by ARB. ARB inhibited EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection when added before or at the same time as virus infection and was less effective when added 24 h after EBOV infection. Experiments with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the EBOV Zaire glycoprotein showed that infection was inhibited by ARB at early stages, most likely at the level of viral entry into host cells. ARB inhibited HHV-8 replication to a similar degree as cidofovir. Our data broaden the spectrum of antiviral efficacy of ARB to include globally prevalent viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality. IMPORTANCE There are many globally prevalent viruses for which there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral medicines. Some of these viruses, such as Ebola virus or members of the arenavirus family, rapidly cause severe hemorrhagic diseases that can be fatal. Other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), establish persistent infections that cause chronic illnesses, including cancer. Thus, finding an affordable, effective, and safe drug that blocks many viruses remains an unmet medical need. The antiviral drug arbidol (ARB), already in clinical use in several countries as an anti-influenza treatment, has been previously shown to suppress the growth of many viruses. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are blocked by ARB in a laboratory setting to include Ebola virus

  4. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the “workhorse” of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  5. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the "workhorse" of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  6. Antiviral propierties of 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid and bacitracin against T-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Lara, Humberto H; Ixtepan-Turrent, Liliana; Garza-Treviño, Elsa N; Flores-Teviño, Samantha M; Borkow, Gadi; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Bacitracin and the membrane-impermeant thiol reagent 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) are agents known to inhibit protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), a cell-surface protein critical in HIV-1 entry therefore they are fusion inhibitors (FI). Here we investigated the possibility that Bacitracin and or DTNB might have other antiviral activities besides FI. By means of residual activity assays, we found that both compounds showed antiviral activity only to viruses T-tropic HIV-1 strain. Cell-based fusion assays showed inhibition on HeLa-CD4-LTR-β-gal (CD4) and HL2/3 cells treated with Bacitracin, and DTNB with the latest compound we observed fusion inhibition on both cells but strikingly in HL2/3 cells (expressing Env) indicating a possible activity on both, the cell membrane and the viral envelope. A time-of-addition experiment showed that both compounds act on HIV entry inhibition but DTNB also acts at late stages of the viral cycle. Lastly, we also found evidence of long-lasting host cell protection in vitro by DTNB, an important pharmacodynamic parameter for a topical microbicide against virus infection, hours after the extracellular drug was removed; this protection was not rendered by Bacitracin. These drugs proved to be leading compounds for further studies against HIV showing antiviral characteristics of interest. PMID:21435237

  7. Evaluation of antiviral activity of plant extracts against foot and mouth disease virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Younus, Ishrat; Siddiq, Afshan; Ishaq, Humera; Anwer, Laila; Badar, Sehrish; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antiviral activity of chloroformic leaves extracts of three plants: Azadirachta indica, Moringa oleifera and Morus alba against Foot and Mouth disease virus using MTT assay (3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). Antiviral and cytotoxic activity of each extract was evaluated as cell survival percentage and results were expressed as Means ± S.D. The concentrations which resulted in cell survival percentages of greater than 50% are considered to be effective antiviral concentrations. From the tested plant extracts, Moringa oleifera showed potent antiviral activity (p<0.05) while Azadirachta indica showed significant antiviral activity in the range of 1-50μ/ml & 12-100μ/ml respectively. In contrast no antiviral activity was observed by Morus alba as all the tested concentration resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) in cell survival percentage. PMID:27393440

  8. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  9. Decision Making with Regard to Antiviral Intervention during an Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Eunha; Chapman, Gretchen B.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiviral coverage is defined by the proportion of the population that takes antiviral prophylaxis or treatment. High coverage of an antiviral drug has epidemiological and evolutionary repercussions. Antivirals select for drug resistance within the population, and individuals may experience adverse effects. To determine optimal antiviral coverage in the context of an influenza outbreak, we compared 2 perspectives: 1) the individual level (the Nash perspective), and 2) the population level (utilitarian perspective). Methods We developed an epidemiological game-theoretic model of an influenza pandemic. The data sources were published literature and a national survey. The target population was the US population. The time horizon was 6 months. The perspective was individuals and the population overall. The interventions were antiviral prophylaxis and treatment. The outcome measures were the optimal coverage of antivirals in an influenza pandemic. Results At current antiviral pricing, the optimal Nash strategy is 0% coverage for prophylaxis and 30% coverage for treatment, whereas the optimal utilitarian strategy is 19% coverage for prophylaxis and 100% coverage for treatment. Subsidizing prophylaxis by $440 and treatment by $85 would bring the Nash and utilitarian strategies into alignment. For both prophylaxis and treatment, the optimal antiviral coverage decreases as pricing of antivirals increases. Our study does not incorporate the possibility of an effective vaccine and lacks probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Our survey also does not completely represent the US population. Because our model assumes a homogeneous population and homogeneous antiviral pricing, it does not incorporate heterogeneity of preference. Conclusions The optimal antiviral coverage from the population perspective and individual perspectives differs widely for both prophylaxis and treatment strategies. Optimal population and individual strategies for prophylaxis and treatment might

  10. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Filippini, Pietro; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most frequent causes of comorbidity and mortality in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population, and liver-related mortality is now the second highest cause of death in HIV-positive patients, so HCV infection should be countered with adequate antiviral therapy. In 2011 began the era of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) and the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir were approved to treat HCV-genotype-1 infection, each one in combination with pegylated interferon alfa (Peg-IFN) + ribavirin (RBV). The addition of the first generation DAAs, strongly improved the efficacy of antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-genotype 1, both for the HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected, and the poor response to Peg-IFN + RBV in HCV/HIV coinfection was enhanced. These treatments showed higher rates of sustained virological response than Peg-IFN + RBV but reduced tolerability and adherence due to the high pill burden and the several pharmacokinetic interactions between HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors and antiretroviral drugs. Then in 2013 a new wave of DAAs arrived, characterized by high efficacy, good tolerability, a low pill burden and shortened treatment duration. The second and third generation DAAs also comprised IFN-free regimens, which in small recent trials on HIV-positive patients have shown comforting preliminary results in terms of efficacy, tolerability and adherence. PMID:25674512

  11. Associations between serum lipids and hepatitis C antiviral treatment efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Ramcharran, Darmendra; Wahed, Abdus S.; Conjeevaram, Hari S.; Evans, Rhobert W.; Wang, Tianyi; Belle, Steven H.; Yee, Leland J.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one half of patients who undergo antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection will not respond to treatment. African Americans (AAs) are less responsive to treatment than Caucasian Americans (CAs) and the reasons for this disparity are largely unknown. Recent studies suggest that serum lipids may be associated with treatment response. The aims of this study were to evaluate baseline and changes in serum lipids during therapy, determine if serum lipids are associated with virological response, and assess if these measures explain the racial difference in efficacy. Participants were from Virahep-C, a prospective study of treatment naïve participants with type 1 HCV infection who received peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin therapy for up to 48 weeks. Fasting serum lipids were analyzed at baseline, during, and after therapy in 160 AAs and 170 CAs. A relative risk (RR) model was employed to evaluate characteristics associated with sustained virological response (SVR). Antiviral therapy was associated with changes in serum lipids during and after antiviral therapy, with the changes differing by race and the amount of PEG-IFN taken. Baseline lipid measures independently associated with a higher rate of SVR were lower TG and higher LDLc, with an interaction between high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) and gender. Lipid measures did not contribute significantly to explaining the racial difference in SVR. Conclusion Lipid levels are associated with SVR, although lipid parameters did not explain the racial difference in treatment response. Results are compatible with proposed biological mechanisms of HCV entry, replication, and secretion, and may underscore new potential therapeutic targets for HCV eradication. PMID:20690192

  12. Rationally Designed Interfacial Peptides Are Efficient In Vitro Inhibitors of HIV-1 Capsid Assembly with Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Nevot, María; Doménech, Rosa; López, Inmaculada; Abián, Olga; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Gómez, Javier; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Neira, José Luis; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2011-01-01

    Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface) and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8) were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization), or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid assembly

  13. Ethanol and Reactive Species Increase Basal Sequence Heterogeneity of Hepatitis C Virus and Produce Variants with Reduced Susceptibility to Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Seronello, Scott; Montanez, Jessica; Presleigh, Kristen; Barlow, Miriam; Park, Seung Bum; Choi, Jinah

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibits a high level of genetic variability, and variants with reduced susceptibility to antivirals can occur even before treatment begins. In addition, alcohol decreases efficacy of antiviral therapy and increases sequence heterogeneity of HCV RNA but how ethanol affects HCV sequence is unknown. Ethanol metabolism and HCV infection increase the level of reactive species that can alter cell metabolism, modify signaling, and potentially act as mutagen to the viral RNA. Therefore, we investigated whether ethanol and reactive species affected the basal sequence variability of HCV RNA in hepatocytes. Human hepatoma cells supporting a continuous replication of genotype 1b HCV RNA (Con1, AJ242652) were exposed to ethanol, acetaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, or L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) that decreases intracellular glutathione as seen in patients. Then, NS5A region was sequenced and compared with genotype 1b HCV sequences in the database. Ethanol and BSO elevated nucleotide and amino acid substitution rates of HCV RNA by 4–18 folds within 48 hrs which were accompanied by oxidative RNA damage. Iron chelator and glutathione ester decreased both RNA damage and mutation rates. Furthermore, infectious HCV and HCV core gene were sufficient to induce oxidative RNA damage even in the absence of ethanol or BSO. Interestingly, the dn/ds ratio and percentage of sites undergoing positive selection increased with ethanol and BSO, resulting in an increased detection of NS5A variants with reduced susceptibility to interferon alpha, cyclosporine, and ribavirin and others implicated in immune tolerance and modulation of viral replication. Therefore, alcohol is likely to synergize with virus-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress to modulate the basal mutation rate of HCV. Positive selection induced by alcohol and reactive species may contribute to antiviral resistance. PMID:22087316

  14. In vitro antiviral activity of germacrone against porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Dong, Yunxia; Jiao, Yiren; Hou, Lianjie; Shi, Yuzhen; Gu, Ting; Zhou, Pei; Shi, Zhongyuan; Xu, Lulu; Wang, Chong

    2015-06-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infections can lead to significant losses to the swine industry by causing reproductive failure in pigs. Germacrone has been reported to efficiently suppress the replication of influenza virus. In this report, the antiviral activity of germacrone on PPV in swine testis (ST) cells was investigated. Here, we show for the first time that germacrone protects cells from PPV infection and suppresses the synthesis of viral mRNA and protein. Furthermore, we show that germacrone inhibits PPV replication at an early stage in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that germacrone is a potential candidate for anti-PPV therapy. PMID:25813663

  15. In Vitro Efficacy of Antiviral Compounds against Enterovirus D68

    PubMed Central

    Rhoden, Eric; Zhang, Mingyu; Nix, W. Allan

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the United States experienced a large outbreak of severe respiratory illness associated with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). We used a homogeneous, cell-based assay to assess the antiviral activity of compounds developed for EV/rhinovirus infection or other indications. Three of 15 compounds were highly active against all four strains tested (the prototype and three 2014 strains), with 50% effective concentrations of 0.0012 to 0.027 μM. Additional studies are needed to assess their in vivo efficacy against EV-D68. PMID:26149998

  16. Henipavirus outbreaks to antivirals: the current status of potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Broder, Christopher C

    2012-04-01

    The henipaviruses, Hendra virus and Nipah virus, are classic examples of recently emerged viral zoonoses. In a relatively short time since their discoveries in the mid and late 1990s, respectively, a great deal of new information has been accumulated detailing their biology and certain unique characteristics. Their broad species tropism and abilities to cause severe and often fatal respiratory and/or neurologic disease in both animals and humans has sparked considerable interest in developing effective antiviral strategies to prevent or treat henipavirus infection and disease. Here, recent findings on the few most advanced henipavirus countermeasures are summarized and discussed. PMID:22482714

  17. Discovery of a Novel Series of Potent Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus NS5B

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Ryan C.; Bourdet, David L.; Brameld, Ken A.; Chin, Elbert; de Vicente, Javier; Fung, Amy; Harris, Seth F.; Lee, Eun K.; Pogam, Sophie Le; Leveque, Vincent; Li, Jim; Lui, Alfred S-T.; Najera, Isabel; Rajyaguru, Sonal; Sangi, Michael; Steiner, Sandra; Talamas, Francisco X.; Taygerly, Joshua P.; Zhao, Junping

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major global public health problem. While the current standard of care, a direct-acting antiviral (DAA) protease inhibitor taken in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, represents a major advancement in recent years, an unmet medical need still exists for treatment modalities that improve upon both efficacy and tolerability. Towards those ends, much effort has continued to focus on the discovery of new DAAs, with the ultimate goal to provide interferon-free combinations. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase enzyme NS5B represents one such DAA therapeutic target for inhibition which has attracted much interest over the past decade. Herein, we report the discovery and optimization of a novel series of inhibitors of HCV NS5B, through the use of structure-based design applied to a fragment-derived starting point. Issues of potency, pharmacokinetics and early safety were addressed in order to provide a clinical candidate in fluoropyridone 19. PMID:24069953

  18. Interferon-free combination therapies for the treatment of hepatitis C: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jacinta A; Thompson, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment landscape has rapidly changed over the past 5 years. The development of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents that specifically target various steps in the HCV lifecycle has revolutionized therapeutic options for patients with HCV, with the development of highly effective and well-tolerated oral interferon-free regimens. There are many DAAs that are currently in development or have recently been approved, which target different nonstructural HCV proteins and host targets that are essential for HCV replication. This review will focus on the different classes of DAAs and the various combinations that are in advanced development for the treatment of chronic HCV infection and will focus on the different regimens in specific patient populations. PMID:26586968

  19. Early antiviral response and virus-induced genes in fish.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Langevin, Christelle; Benmansour, Abdenour; Boudinot, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    In fish as in mammals, virus infections induce changes in the expression of many host genes. Studies conducted during the last fifteen years revealed a major contribution of the interferon system in fish antiviral response. This review describes the screening methods applied to compare the impact of virus infections on the transcriptome in different fish species. These approaches identified a "core" set of genes that are strongly induced in most viral infections. The "core" interferon-induced genes (ISGs) are generally conserved in vertebrates, some of them inhibiting a wide range of viruses in mammals. A selection of ISGs -PKR, vig-1/viperin, Mx, ISG15 and finTRIMs - is further analyzed here to illustrate the diversity and complexity of the mechanisms involved in establishing an antiviral state. Most of the ISG-based pathways remain to be directly determined in fish. Fish ISGs are often duplicated and the functional specialization of multigenic families will be of particular interest for future studies. PMID:21414349

  20. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Katharina; Hamprecht, Klaus; Jahn, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT) disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet (PFA) and cidofovir (CDV) are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97) and the polymerase-gene (UL54). Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood. PMID:25750703

  1. Inborn errors of anti-viral interferon immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; de Diego, Rebeca Perez; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The three types of interferon (IFNs) are essential for immunity against at least some viruses in the mouse model of experimental infections, type I IFNs displaying the broadest and strongest anti-viral activity. Consistently, human genetic studies have shown that type II IFN is largely redundant for immunity against viruses in the course of natural infections. The precise contributions of human type I and III IFNs remain undefined. However, various inborn errors of anti-viral IFN immunity have been described, which can result in either broad or narrow immunological and viral phenotypes. The broad disorders impair the response to (STAT1, TYK2) or the production of at least type I and type III IFNs following multiple stimuli (NEMO), resulting in multiple viral infections at various sites, including herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). The narrow disorders impair exclusively (TLR3) or mostly (UNC-93B, TRIF, TRAF3) the TLR3-dependent induction of type I and III IFNs, leading to HSE in apparently otherwise healthy individuals. These recent discoveries highlight the importance of human type I and III IFNs in protective immunity against viruses, including the TLR3-IFN pathway in protection against HSE. PMID:22347990

  2. Human IFNAR2 deficiency: lessons for antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, C.J.A.; Mohamad, S.M.B; Young, D.F.; Skelton, A.J.; Leahy, T.R.; Munday, D.C.; Butler, K.M.; Morfopoulou, S.; Brown, J.R.; Hubank, M.; Connell, J.; Gavin, P.J.; McMahon, C.; Dempsey, E.; Lynch, N.E.; Jacques, T.S.; Valappil, M.; Cant, A.J.; Breuer, J.; Engelhardt, K.R.; Randall, R.E.; Hambleton, S.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) is a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism. Mouse models have been pivotal to understanding the role of IFN-α/β in immunity, although validation of these findings in humans has been limited. We investigated a previously healthy child with fatal encephalitis following inoculation of the live-attenuated measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. By targeted resequencing we identified a homozygous mutation in the high-affinity interferon-α/β receptor (IFNAR2) in the proband, as well as a newborn sibling, that rendered cells unresponsive to IFN-α/β. Reconstitution of the proband’s cells with wild-type IFNAR2 restored IFN-α/β responsiveness and control of IFN-attenuated viruses. Despite the severe outcome of systemic live-vaccine challenge, the proband had previously shown no evidence of heightened susceptibility to respiratory viral pathogens. The phenotype of IFNAR2 deficiency, together with similar findings in STAT2 deficient patients, supports an essential but narrow role for IFN-α/β in human antiviral immunity. Summary Human IFNAR2 deficiency causes fatal susceptibility to live viral vaccines, revealing a vital but narrow nonredundant role for IFN-α/β in viral immunity. PMID:26424569

  3. Antiviral Activity of Natural Products Extracted from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Uzair, Bushra; Mahmood, Zahra; Tabassum, Sobia

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and preclinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine. PMID:23678429

  4. Drosha as an interferon-independent antiviral factor.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jillian S; Schmid, Sonja; Aguado, Lauren C; Sabin, Leah R; Yasunaga, Ari; Shim, Jaehee V; Sachs, David; Cherry, Sara; tenOever, Benjamin R

    2014-05-13

    Utilization of antiviral small interfering RNAs is thought to be largely restricted to plants, nematodes, and arthropods. In an effort to determine whether a physiological interplay exists between the host small RNA machinery and the cellular response to virus infection in mammals, we evaluated antiviral activity in the presence and absence of Dicer or Drosha, the RNase III nucleases responsible for generating small RNAs. Although loss of Dicer did not compromise the cellular response to virus infection, Drosha deletion resulted in a significant increase in virus levels. Here, we demonstrate that diverse RNA viruses trigger exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1)-dependent Drosha translocation into the cytoplasm in a manner independent of de novo protein synthesis or the canonical type I IFN system. Additionally, increased virus infection in the absence of Drosha was not due to a loss of viral small RNAs but, instead, correlated with cleavage of viral genomic RNA and modulation of the host transcriptome. Taken together, we propose that Drosha represents a unique and conserved arm of the cellular defenses used to combat virus infection. PMID:24778219

  5. Human IFNAR2 deficiency: Lessons for antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Mohamad, Siti M B; Young, Dan F; Skelton, Andrew J; Leahy, T Ronan; Munday, Diane C; Butler, Karina M; Morfopoulou, Sofia; Brown, Julianne R; Hubank, Mike; Connell, Jeff; Gavin, Patrick J; McMahon, Cathy; Dempsey, Eugene; Lynch, Niamh E; Jacques, Thomas S; Valappil, Manoj; Cant, Andrew J; Breuer, Judith; Engelhardt, Karin R; Randall, Richard E; Hambleton, Sophie

    2015-09-30

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) is a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism. Mouse models have been pivotal to understanding the role of IFN-α/β in immunity, although validation of these findings in humans has been limited. We investigated a previously healthy child with fatal encephalitis after inoculation of the live attenuated measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. By targeted resequencing, we identified a homozygous mutation in the high-affinity IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR2) in the proband, as well as a newborn sibling, that rendered cells unresponsive to IFN-α/β. Reconstitution of the proband's cells with wild-type IFNAR2 restored IFN-α/β responsiveness and control of IFN-attenuated viruses. Despite the severe outcome of systemic live vaccine challenge, the proband had previously shown no evidence of heightened susceptibility to respiratory viral pathogens. The phenotype of IFNAR2 deficiency, together with similar findings in STAT2-deficient patients, supports an essential but narrow role for IFN-α/β in human antiviral immunity. PMID:26424569

  6. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  7. Antiviral activity of Solanum paniculatum extract and constituents.

    PubMed

    Valadares, Ydia M; Brandão'a, Geraldo C; Kroon, Erna G; Filho, José D Souza; Oliveira, Alaņņde B; Braga, Fernão C

    2009-01-01

    Solanum species are traditionally employed as antiherpes and anticancer agents in different countries. S. paniculatum has widespread ethnomedical uses in Brazil, including the treatment of viral infections. This paper reports on the isolation of neotigogenin (1) and the new compound delta25(27)-tigogenin-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), obtained as a mixture of R and S diastereoisomers at C22 from an ethanol extract of S. paniculatum leaves, along with the determination of their cytotoxicity against Vero cells and antiviral effect against human herpes virus type 1 (HHV-1), murine encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCv), and vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR). The extract of S. paniculatum inhibited HHV-1 replication [EC50 = (298.0 +/- 11.2) microg/ml] and showed no effect on EMCv and VACV-WR. On its turn, 1 was inactive against the assayed strains but presented high cytotoxicity [CC50 = (2.03 +/- 0.03) microg/ml], whereas 2 exhibited significant antiherpes [EC50 = (170.8 +/- 1.7) microg/ml] and antivaccinia virus effects [EC50 = (177.0 +/- 3.3) microg/ml], with low cytotoxicity (CC50 > 400 microg/ml). The results corroborate Solanum paniculatum as a source of cytotoxic and antiviral compounds. PMID:20158151

  8. Flexibility as a Strategy in Nucleoside Antiviral Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Peters, H L; Ku, T C; Seley-Radtke, K L

    2015-01-01

    As far back as Melville Wolfrom's acyclic sugar synthesis in the 1960's, synthesis of flexible nucleoside analogues have been an area of interest. This concept, however, went against years of enzyme-substrate binding theory. Hence, acyclic methodology in antiviral drug design did not take off until the discovery and subsequent FDA approval of such analogues as Acyclovir and Tenofovir. More recently, the observation that flexible nucleosides could overcome drug resistance spawned a renewed interest in the field of nucleoside drug design. The next generation of flexible nucleosides shifted the focus from the sugar moiety to the nucleobase. With analogues such as Seley-Radtke "fleximers", and Herdewijn's C5 substituted 2'-deoxyuridines, the area of base flexibility has seen great expansion. More recently, the marriage of these methodologies with acyclic sugars has resulted in a series of acyclic flex-base nucleosides with a wide range of antiviral properties, including some of the first to exhibit anti-coronavirus activity. Various flexible nucleosides and their corresponding nucleobases will be compared in this review. PMID:26282942

  9. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  10. Antiviral Responses by Swine Primary Bronchoepithelial Cells Are Limited Compared to Human Bronchoepithelial Cells Following Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Mary J.; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Culhane, Marie R.; Wentworth, David E.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Swine generate reassortant influenza viruses because they can be simultaneously infected with avian and human influenza; however, the features that restrict influenza reassortment in swine and human hosts are not fully understood. Type I and III interferons (IFNs) act as the first line of defense against influenza virus infection of respiratory epithelium. To determine if human and swine have different capacities to mount an antiviral response the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISG) in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and normal swine bronchial epithelial (NSBE) cells was evaluated following infection with human (H3N2), swine (H1N1), and avian (H5N3, H5N2, H5N1) influenza A viruses. Expression of IFNλ and ISGs were substantially higher in NHBE cells compared to NSBE cells following H5 avian influenza virus infection compared to human or swine influenza virus infection. This effect was associated with reduced H5 avian influenza virus replication in human cells at late times post infection. Further, RIG-I expression was lower in NSBE cells compared to NHBE cells suggesting reduced virus sensing. Together, these studies identify key differences in the antiviral response between human and swine respiratory epithelium alluding to differences that may govern influenza reassortment. PMID:23875024

  11. Antiviral treatment prioritization in HCV-infected patients with extrahepatic manifestations - An Egyptian perspective.

    PubMed

    El-Fishawy, Hussein; Saadi, Gamal; Hassaballa, May; Hussein, Mohamed; Doss, Wahid; Ragab, Gaafar; Barsoum, Rashad

    2016-05-01

    Egypt, the single country with highest incidence of HCV infection in the world, has embarked on a government-sponsored mass treatment program using several combinations of DAAs. Recognizing the importance of extrahepatic manifestations, independently of the hepatic, a subcommittee was assigned to develop national guidelines for respective prioritizing indications and protocols. It evaluated the benefit of treating patients with different extrahepatic manifestations, and reviewed relevant clinical trials and guidelines concerning DAA combinations available in Egypt. The latter included Sofosbuvir plus either peg-interferon, Simeprevir, Ledipasvir or daclatasvir, and the Viekera family comprising paritaprevir/ritonavir + ombitasvir with (GT-1) or without (GT-4) Dasabuvir. Any of these protocols may be used with or without Ribavirin according to indication. A blueprint was subjected to peer debate in dedicated workshops in two national meetings and subsequently to an online professional review, eventually leading to a final report that was adopted by the health authorities. Seven compelling and 10 optional indications were identified for treating patients with predominantly extrahepatic manifestations. The former include kidney disease at different stages, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Selected treatment protocols, were encoded and their use was prioritized on the basis of evidence of efficacy and safety. We concluded that any of the studied protocols may be used, preferably with ribavirin, for 12-week treatment in all patients with extrahepatic manifestations without cirrhosis and with eGFR above 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm. Ribavirin should be included in protocols for treating patients with compensated cirrhosis. Daclatasvir-based protocols are recommended for decompensated cirrhosis, while the Viekera family is recommended in patients with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm, including those on dialysis. In kidney-transplanted patents, caution is due

  12. Antiviral treatment prioritization in HCV-infected patients with extrahepatic manifestations – An Egyptian perspective

    PubMed Central

    El-Fishawy, Hussein; Saadi, Gamal; Hassaballa, May; Hussein, Mohamed; Doss, Wahid; Ragab, Gaafar; Barsoum, Rashad

    2016-01-01

    Egypt, the single country with highest incidence of HCV infection in the world, has embarked on a government-sponsored mass treatment program using several combinations of DAAs. Recognizing the importance of extrahepatic manifestations, independently of the hepatic, a subcommittee was assigned to develop national guidelines for respective prioritizing indications and protocols. It evaluated the benefit of treating patients with different extrahepatic manifestations, and reviewed relevant clinical trials and guidelines concerning DAA combinations available in Egypt. The latter included Sofosbuvir plus either peg-interferon, Simeprevir, Ledipasvir or daclatasvir, and the Viekera family comprising paritaprevir/ritonavir + ombitasvir with (GT-1) or without (GT-4) Dasabuvir. Any of these protocols may be used with or without Ribavirin according to indication. A blueprint was subjected to peer debate in dedicated workshops in two national meetings and subsequently to an online professional review, eventually leading to a final report that was adopted by the health authorities. Seven compelling and 10 optional indications were identified for treating patients with predominantly extrahepatic manifestations. The former include kidney disease at different stages, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Selected treatment protocols, were encoded and their use was prioritized on the basis of evidence of efficacy and safety. We concluded that any of the studied protocols may be used, preferably with ribavirin, for 12-week treatment in all patients with extrahepatic manifestations without cirrhosis and with eGFR above 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm. Ribavirin should be included in protocols for treating patients with compensated cirrhosis. Daclatasvir-based protocols are recommended for decompensated cirrhosis, while the Viekera family is recommended in patients with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm, including those on dialysis. In kidney-transplanted patents, caution is due

  13. Chemical Space Mapping and Structure-Activity Analysis of the ChEMBL Antiviral Compound Set.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Kyrylo; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-08-22

    Curation, standardization and data fusion of the antiviral information present in the ChEMBL public database led to the definition of a robust data set, providing an association of antiviral compounds to seven broadly defined antiviral activity classes. Generative topographic mapping (GTM) subjected to evolutionary tuning was then used to produce maps of the antiviral chemical space, providing an optimal separation of compound families associated with the different antiviral classes. The ability to pinpoint the specific spots occupied (responsibility patterns) on a map by various classes of antiviral compounds opened the way for a GTM-supported search for privileged structural motifs, typical for each antiviral class. The privileged locations of antiviral classes were analyzed in order to highlight underlying privileged common structural motifs. Unlike in classical medicinal chemistry, where privileged structures are, almost always, predefined scaffolds, privileged structural motif detection based on GTM responsibility patterns has the decisive advantage of being able to automatically capture the nature ("resolution detail"-scaffold, detailed substructure, pharmacophore pattern, etc.) of the relevant structural motifs. Responsibility patterns were found to represent underlying structural motifs of various natures-from very fuzzy (groups of various "interchangeable" similar scaffolds), to the classical scenario in medicinal chemistry (underlying motif actually being the scaffold), to very precisely defined motifs (specifically substituted scaffolds). PMID:27410486

  14. Antiviral effect of diammonium glycyrrhizinate on cell infection by porcine parvovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) can cause reproductive failure in swine resulting in economic losses to the industry. Antiviral effects of diammonium glycyrrhizinate (DG) have been reported on several animal viruses; however, to date it has yet to be tested on PPV. In this study, the antiviral activity of ...

  15. Impact of antivirals and emergence of drug resistance: HSV-2 epidemic control.

    PubMed

    Gershengorn, H B; Blower, S M

    2000-03-01

    Genital herpes, caused by herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2), affects more people world-wide than any other sexually transmitted disease (STD). Antivirals are effective in decreasing the duration of symptoms and in reducing viral shedding; however, currently antiviral usage is extremely low. Increased usage of antivirals would have a beneficial epidemic-level effect (due to the decreased transmission of drug-sensitive strains) as well as potentially a detrimental epidemic-level effect (if drug-resistant strains emerge and are transmitted). Previously, we have developed a mathematical model that we have used to predict (with a degree of uncertainty) the beneficial and the potential detrimental epidemic-level effects of increased antiviral usage. Here, we use our model to make further predictions about the impact of increasing antiviral usage. We calculate the effect, on individual patients, of antiviral usage in terms of: (1) the decrease in the average number of infectious days per year and (2) an individual's lifetime probability of acquiring permanent drug resistance. We also use our model: (1) to determine the probability of eliminating herpes by antivirals and (2) to quantify the effect of increasing antiviral usage on decreasing HSV-2 prevalence. Our results show that theoretically it would be possible to eliminate herpes epidemics by using a drug that does not cure. PMID:10763542

  16. Respiratory Viral Testing and Influenza Antiviral Prescriptions During Hospitalization for Acute Respiratory Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly M.; Meek, James I.; Fry, Alicia M.; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined respiratory viral testing and influenza antiviral prescriptions at a US tertiary care hospital. During the 2010–11 to 2012–13 influenza seasons, antiviral prescriptions among acute respiratory illness (ARI) hospitalizations were associated with viral testing (rate ratio = 15.0), and empiric prescriptions were rare (<1% of ARI hospitalizations). PMID:26885545

  17. Hypericum in Infection: Identification of Anti-viral and Anti-inflammatory Constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Iowa Center for Research on Botanical Dietary Supplements seeks to optimize Echinacea, Hypericum and Prunella supplements for human-health benefit, focusing on anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and anti-pain effects. This paper reports on ongoing anti-viral and anti-inflammatory studies on Hypericu...

  18. Synthesis of phosphonate analogues of the antiviral cyclopropane nucleoside A-5021.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Tomoyuki; Sekiyama, Takaaki; Tsuji, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    A series of phosphonate analogues of the antiviral cyclopropane nucleoside A-5021 were synthesized from (1S*, 7R*)-3,5-dioxa-4,4-diphenylbicyclo[5. 1.0]octane-l-methanol by a 10-step process. In contrast to the potent antiherpetic activity of A-5021, they were all devoid of antiviral activity. PMID:16270661

  19. Systematic identification of type I and type II interferon-induced antiviral factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Yang; Sanchez, David Jesse; Aliyari, Roghiyh; Lu, Sun; Cheng, Genhong

    2012-03-13

    Type I and type II interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that establish the cellular antiviral state through the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). We sought to understand the basis of the antiviral activity induced by type I and II IFNs in relation to the functions of their ISGs. Based on gene expression studies, we systematically identified antiviral ISGs by performing blinded, functional screens on 288 type I and type II ISGs. We assessed and validated the antiviral activity of these ISGs against an RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and a DNA virus, murine gammaherpes virus (MHV-68). Overall, we identified 34 ISGs that elicited an antiviral effect on the replication of either one or both viruses. Fourteen ISGs have uncharacterized antiviral functions. We further defined ISGs that affect critical life-cycle processes in expression of VSV protein and MHV-68 immediate-early genes. Two previously undescribed antiviral ISGs, TAP1 and BMP2, were further validated. TAP1-deficient fibroblasts were more susceptible to VSV infection but less so to MHV-68 infection. On the other hand, exogenous BMP2 inhibits MHV-68 lytic growth but did not affect VSV growth. These results delineate common and distinct sets of type I and type II IFN-induced genes as well as identify unique ISGs that have either broad or specific antiviral effects on these viruses. PMID:22371602

  20. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  1. Antiviral activity of glycoprotein GP-1 isolated from Streptomyces kanasensis ZX01.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Feng, Juntao; Han, Lirong; Zhang, Xing

    2016-07-01

    Plant virus diseases have seriously damaged global food security. However, current antiviral agents are not efficient enough for the requirement of agriculture production. So, developing new efficient and nontoxic antiviral agents is imperative. GP-1, from Streptomyces kanasensis ZX01, is a new antiviral glycoprotein, of which the antiviral activity and the mode of action against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were investigated in this study. The results showed that GP-1 could fracture TMV particles, and the infection and accumulation of TMV in host plants were inhibited. Moreover, GP-1 could induce systematic resistance against TMV in the host, according to the results of activities of defensive enzymes increasing, MDA decreasing and overexpression of pathogenesis-related proteins. Furthermore, GP-1 could promote growth of the host plant. In conclusion, GP-1 showed the ability to be developed as an efficient antiviral agent and a fertilizer for agriculture. PMID:27091231

  2. Engineered mammalian RNAi can elicit antiviral protection that negates the requirement for the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Bouhaddou, Mehdi; Sachs, David; tenOever, Benjamin Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While the intrinsic antiviral cell defenses of many kingdoms utilize pathogen-specific small RNAs, the antiviral response of chordates is primarily protein-based and not uniquely tailored to the incoming microbe. In an effort to explain this evolutionary bifurcation, we determined whether antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) was sufficient to replace the protein-based type I interferon (IFN-I) system of mammals. To this end, we recreated an RNAi-like response in mammals and determined its effectiveness to combat influenza A virus in vivo in the presence and absence of the canonical IFN-I system. Mammalian antiviral RNAi, elicited by either host- or virus-derived small RNAs, effectively attenuated virus and prevented disease independently of the innate immune response. These data find that chordates could have utilized RNAi as their primary antiviral cell defense and suggest that the IFN-I system emerged as a result of natural selection imposed by ancient pathogens. PMID:26549455

  3. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses. PMID:26872862

  4. Conjugation of a nonspecific antiviral sapogenin with a specific HIV fusion inhibitor: a promising strategy for discovering new antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Lu; Na, Heya; Li, Xiangpeng; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zheng, Baohua; Liang, Guodong; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2014-09-11

    Triterpene saponins are a major group of active components in natural products with nonspecific antiviral activities, while T20 peptide (enfuvirtide), which contains a helix zone-binding domain (HBD), is a gp41-specific HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a group of hybrid molecules in which bioactive triterpene sapogenins were covalently attached to the HBD-containing peptides via click chemistry. We found that either the triterpenes or peptide part alone showed weak activity against HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, while the hybrids generated a strong cooperative effect. Among them, P26-BApc exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity against both T20-sensitive and -resistant HIV-1 strains and improved pharmacokinetic properties. These results suggest that this scaffold design is a promising strategy for developing new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and possibly novel antiviral therapeutics against other viruses with class I fusion proteins. PMID:25156906

  5. The Rigid Amphipathic Fusion Inhibitor dUY11 Acts through Photosensitization of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Hollmann, Axel; Lee, Jihye; Santos, Nuno C.; Jung, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors (RAFIs) are lipophilic inverted-cone-shaped molecules thought to antagonize the membrane curvature transitions that occur during virus-cell fusion and are broad-spectrum antivirals against enveloped viruses (Broad-SAVE). Here, we show that RAFIs act like membrane-binding photosensitizers: their antiviral effect is dependent on light and the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2), similar to the mechanistic paradigm established for LJ001, a chemically unrelated class of Broad-SAVE. Photosensitization of viral membranes is a common mechanism that underlies these Broad-SAVE. PMID:24284320

  6. Coronavirus membrane-associated papain-like proteases induce autophagy through interacting with Beclin1 to negatively regulate antiviral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Wang, Kai; Xing, Yaling; Tu, Jian; Yang, Xingxing; Zhao, Qian; Li, Kui; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in modulating viral replication and antiviral immune response. Coronavirus infection is associated with the autophagic process, however, little is known about the mechanisms of autophagy induction and its contribution to coronavirus regulation of host innate responses. Here, we show that the membrane-associated papain-like protease PLP2 (PLP2-TM) of coronaviruses acts as a novel autophagy-inducing protein. Intriguingly, PLP2-TM induces incomplete autophagy process by increasing the accumulation of autophagosomes but blocking the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. Furthermore, PLP2-TM interacts with the key autophagy regulators, LC3 and Beclin1, and promotes Beclin1 interaction with STING, the key regulator for antiviral IFN signaling. Finally, knockdown of Beclin1 partially reverses PLP2-TM's inhibitory effect on innate immunity which resulting in decreased coronavirus replication. These results suggested that coronavirus papain-like protease induces incomplete autophagy by interacting with Beclin1, which in turn modulates coronavirus replication and antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25311841

  7. Requirement of NOX2 and Reactive Oxygen Species for Efficient RIG-I-Mediated Antiviral Response through Regulation of MAVS Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Karin; Martel, Alexis; Jouan, Loubna; Nzengue, Yves; Lamarre, Daniel; Vande Velde, Christine; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    The innate immune response is essential to the host defense against viruses, through restriction of virus replication and coordination of the adaptive immune response. Induction of antiviral genes is a tightly regulated process initiated mainly through sensing of invading virus nucleic acids in the cytoplasm by RIG-I like helicases, RIG-I or Mda5, which transmit the signal through a common mitochondria-associated adaptor, MAVS. Although major breakthroughs have recently been made, much remains unknown about the mechanisms that translate virus recognition into antiviral genes expression. Beside the reputed detrimental role, reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as modulators of cellular signaling and gene regulation. NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes are a main source of deliberate cellular ROS production. Here, we found that NOX2 and ROS are required for the host cell to trigger an efficient RIG-I-mediated IRF-3 activation and downstream antiviral IFNβ and IFIT1 gene expression. Additionally, we provide evidence that NOX2 is critical for the expression of the central mitochondria-associated adaptor MAVS. Taken together these data reveal a new facet to the regulation of the innate host defense against viruses through the identification of an unrecognized role of NOX2 and ROS. PMID:20532218

  8. 6-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)alkoxy]pyrimidines with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Holý, Antonín; Votruba, Ivan; Masojídková, Milena; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Naesens, Lieve; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan

    2002-04-25

    6-Hydroxypyrimidines substituted at positions 2 and 4 by hydrogen, methyl, amino, cyclopropylamino, dimethylamino, methylsulfanyl, or hydroxyl group afford by the reaction with diisopropyl 2-(chloroethoxy)methylphosphonate in the presence of NaH, Cs(2)CO(3), or DBU a mixture of N(1)- and O(6)-[2-(diisopropylphosphorylmethoxy)ethyl] isomers which were converted to the free phosphonic acids by treatment with bromotrimethylsilane followed by hydrolysis. Analogously, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine gave on reaction with [(R)- and (S)-2-(diisopropylphosphorylmethoxy)propyl] tosylate, followed by deprotection, the enantiomeric 6-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propoxy]pyrimidines. 2,4-Diamino-6-sulfanylpyrimidine gave, on treatment with diisopropyl 2-(chloroethoxy)methylphosphonate in the presence of NaH and subsequent deprotection, 2,4-diamino-6-[[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]sulfanyl]pyrimidine. 2-Amino-4-hydroxy-6-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]pyrimidine was obtained from the appropriate 2-amino-4-chloropyrimidine derivative by alkaline hydrolysis and ester cleavage. Direct alkylation of 2-amino-4,6-dihydroxypyrimidine afforded a mixture of 2-amino-4,6-bis[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]- and 2-amino-1,4-bis[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]pyrimidine. None of the N(1)-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl] isomers exhibited any antiviral activity against DNA viruses or RNA viruses tested in vitro. On the contrary, the O(6)-isomers, namely the compounds derived from 2,4-diamino-, 2-amino-4-hydroxy-, or 2-amino-4-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethoxy]-6-hydroxypyrimidine, inhibited the replication of herpes viruses [herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV)] and retroviruses [Moloney sarcoma virus (MSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2)], their activity being most pronounced against the latter. The antiviral activity was lower if the oxygen at the position 6 was replaced by a sulfur atom, as in 2,4-diamino-6

  9. Identification of an endocytic signal essential for the antiviral action of IFITM3

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Rui; Xu, Fengwen; Qian, Jin; Yao, Yunfang; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Guo, Fei; Geng, Yunqi; Qiao, Wentao; Liang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Members of the interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) protein family inhibit the entry of a wide range of viruses. Viruses often exploit the endocytosis pathways to invade host cells and escape from the endocytic vesicles often in response to low pH. Localization to these endocytic vesicles is essential for IFITM3 to interfere with the cytosolic entry of pH-dependent viruses. However, the nature of the sorting signal that targets IFITM3 to these vesicles is poorly defined. In this study, we report that IFITM3 possesses a YxxΦ sorting motif, i.e., 20-YEML-23, that enables IFITM3 to undergo endocytosis through binding to the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 complex. IFITM3 accumulates at the plasma membrane as a result of either mutating 20-YEML-23, depleting the μ2 subunit, or overexpressing μ2 mutants. Importantly, blocking endocytosis of IFITM3 abrogates its ability to inhibit pH-dependent viruses. We have therefore identified a critical sorting signal, namely 20-YEML-23, that controls both the endocytic trafficking and the antiviral action of IFITM3. This finding also reveals that as an endocytic protein, IFITM3 first arrives at the plasma membrane before it is endocytosed and further traffics to the late endosomes where it acts to impede virus entry. PMID:24521078

  10. Discovery of berberine, abamectin and ivermectin as antivirals against chikungunya and other alphaviruses.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Finny S; Kaukinen, Pasi; Gläsker, Sabine; Bespalov, Maxim; Hanski, Leena; Wennerberg, Krister; Kümmerer, Beate M; Ahola, Tero

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic arbovirus of the Alphavirus genus, which has infected millions of people after its re-emergence in the last decade. In this study, a BHK cell line containing a stable CHIKV replicon with a luciferase reporter was used in a high-throughput platform to screen approximately 3000 compounds. Following initial validation, 25 compounds were chosen as primary hits for secondary validation with wild type and reporter CHIKV infection, which identified three promising compounds. Abamectin (EC50 = 1.5 μM) and ivermectin (EC50 = 0.6 μM) are fermentation products generated by a soil dwelling actinomycete, Streptomyces avermitilis, whereas berberine (EC50 = 1.8 μM) is a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid. They inhibited CHIKV replication in a dose-dependent manner and had broad antiviral activity against other alphaviruses--Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. Abamectin and ivermectin were also active against yellow fever virus, a flavivirus. These compounds caused reduced synthesis of CHIKV genomic and antigenomic viral RNA as well as downregulation of viral protein expression. Time of addition experiments also suggested that they act on the replication phase of the viral infectious cycle. PMID:26752081

  11. Delivery of suramin as an antiviral agent through liposomal systems.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Fabbri, Jacopo; Rohayem, Jacques; Ruokolainen, Janne; Nykänen, Antti; Milani, Mario; Pezzullo, Margherita; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Bolognesi, Martino

    2014-05-01

    Norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a promising target enzyme for the development of new antiviral drugs. Starting from the crystal structure of norovirus RdRp, we had previously performed an in silico docking search using a library of low-molecular-weight compounds that enabled us to select molecules with predicted enzyme inhibitory activity. Among these, the polysulfonated naphthylurea suramin proved to inhibit in vitro both murine and human norovirus polymerases, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. The negatively charged inhibitor, however, displayed poor cell permeability in cell-based experiments. Therefore, we produced different suramin-loaded liposome formulations and evaluated their activities in cell-based assays using murine norovirus cultivated in RAW 264.7 macrophages, as a model for norovirus genus. The results obtained show that suramin, when delivered through liposomes, can effectively inhibit murine norovirus replication. PMID:24616282

  12. Hepatitis C Virus. Strategies to Evade Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Nandan S.; Vazquez, Christine; Horner, Stacy M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes chronic liver disease and poses a major clinical and economic burden worldwide. HCV is an RNA virus that is sensed as non-self in the infected liver by host pattern recognition receptors, triggering downstream signaling to interferons (IFNs). The type III IFNs play an important role in immunity to HCV, and human genetic variation in their gene loci is associated with differential HCV infection outcomes. HCV evades host antiviral innate immune responses to mediate a persistent infection in the liver. This review focuses on anti-HCV innate immune sensing, innate signaling and effectors, and the processes and proteins used by HCV to evade and regulate host innate immunity. PMID:25983854

  13. Regulation of antiviral T cell responses by type I interferons.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Josh; Kalinke, Ulrich; Oxenius, Annette

    2015-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that are rapidly induced in different cell types during viral infections. The consequences of type I IFN signalling include direct antiviral activity, innate immune cell activation and regulation of adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we discuss recent conceptual advances in our understanding of indirect and direct regulation of T cell immunity by type I IFNs, which can either promote or inhibit T cell activation, proliferation, differentiation and survival. This regulation depends, to a large extent, on the timing of type I IFN exposure relative to T cell receptor signalling. Type I IFNs also provide activated T cells with resistance to natural killer cell-mediated elimination. PMID:25790790

  14. Orthopoxvirus targets for the development of new antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Mark N.; Kern, Earl R.

    2013-01-01

    Investments in the development of new drugs for orthopoxvirus infections have fostered new avenues of research, provided an improved understanding of orthopoxvirus biology and yielded new therapies that are currently progressing through clinical trials. These broad-based efforts have also resulted in the identification of new inhibitors of orthopoxvirus replication that target many different stages of viral replication cycle. This review will discuss progress in the development of new anti-poxvirus drugs and the identification of new molecular targets that can be exploited for the development of new inhibitors. The prototype of the orthopoxvirus group is vaccinia virus and its replication cycle will be discussed in detail noting specific viral functions and their associated gene products that have the potential to serve as new targets for drug development. Progress that has been achieved in recent years should yield new drugs for the treatment of these infections and might also reveal new approaches for antiviral drug development with other viruses. PMID:22406470

  15. Antiviral Strategies Based on Lethal Mutagenesis and Error Threshold.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The concept of error threshold derived from quasispecies theory is at the basis of lethal mutagenesis, a new antiviral strategy based on the increase of virus mutation rate above an extinction threshold. Research on this strategy is justified by several inhibitor-escape routes that viruses utilize to ensure their survival. Successive steps in the transition from an organized viral quasispecies into loss of biologically meaningful genomic sequences are dissected. The possible connections between theoretical models and experimental observations on lethal mutagenesis are reviewed. The possibility of using combination of virus-specific mutagenic nucleotide analogues and broad-spectrum, non-mutagenic inhibitors is evaluated. We emphasize the power that quasispecies theory has had to stimulate exploration of new means to combat pathogenic viruses. PMID:26294225

  16. Total Synthesis of the Antiviral Natural Product Houttuynoid B.

    PubMed

    Kerl, Thomas; Berger, Florian; Schmalz, Hans-Günther

    2016-02-24

    The first total synthesis of houttuynoid B, a powerful antiviral flavonoid glycoside from the Chinese plant Houttuynia cordata, is described. In a key step, a Baker-Venkataraman rearrangement employing an already glycosylated substrate was used to efficiently set up the fully functionalized carbon skeleton. The required benzofuran building block was prepared through a domino Sonogashira coupling/5-endo-dig cyclization and converted into a stable 1-hydroxybenzotriazole-derived active ester prior to linking with a galactosylated hydroxyacetophenone unit. The elaborated synthesis requires only nine steps (11 % overall yield) along the longest linear sequence and paves the way for the preparation of structurally related compounds for further biological evaluation. PMID:26748612

  17. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G.; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M.; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Garcia, Jordan A.; Mandl, Judith N.; Grodick, Rachael A.; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B.; Lenardo, Timothy E.; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cornall, Richard J.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  18. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Garcia, Jordan A; Mandl, Judith N; Grodick, Rachael A; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B; Lenardo, Timothy E; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F; Freeman, Alexandra F; Cornall, Richard J; Germain, Ronald N; Mueller, Scott N; Su, Helen C

    2014-12-15

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  19. Antiviral Activity of Some Plants Used in Nepalese Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rajbhandari, M.; Mentel, R.; Jha, P. K.; Chaudhary, R. P.; Bhattarai, S.; Gewali, M. B.; Karmacharya, N.; Hipper, M.

    2009-01-01

    Methanolic extracts of 41 plant species belonging to 27 families used in the traditional medicine in Nepal have been investigated for in vitro antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza virus A by dye uptake assay in the systems HSV-1/Vero cells and influenza virus A/MDCK cells. The extracts of Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata, Cassiope fastigiata and Thymus linearis showed potent anti-herpes viral activity. The extracts of Allium oreoprasum, Androsace strigilosa, Asparagus filicinus, Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata and Verbascum thapsus exhibited strong anti-influenza viral activity. Only the extracts of A. rivularis and B. ciliata demonstrated remarkable activity against both viruses. PMID:18955262

  20. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  1. Mucin biopolymers as broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Lieleg, Oliver; Lieleg, Corinna; Bloom, Jesse; Buck, Christopher B.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Mucus is a porous biopolymer matrix that coats all wet epithelia in the human body and serves as the first line of defense against many pathogenic bacteria and viruses. However, under certain conditions viruses are able to penetrate this infection barrier, which compromises the protective function of native mucus. Here, we find that isolated porcine gastric mucin polymers, key structural components of native mucus, can protect an underlying cell layer from infection by small viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), or a strain of influenza A virus. Single particle analysis of virus mobility inside the mucin barrier reveals that this shielding effect is in part based on a retardation of virus diffusion inside the biopolymer matrix. Our findings suggest that purified mucins may be used as a broad-range antiviral supplement to personal hygiene products, baby formula or lubricants to support our immune system. PMID:22475261

  2. TLR Ligands Induce Antiviral Responses in Chicken Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barjesteh, Neda; Behboudi, Shahriar; Brisbin, Jennifer T.; Villanueva, Alexander Ian; Nagy, Éva; Sharif, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Chicken macrophages express several receptors for recognition of pathogens, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs bind to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from bacterial or viral pathogens leading to the activation of macrophages. Macrophages play a critical role in immunity against viruses, including influenza viruses. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that treatment of chicken macrophages with TLR ligands reduces avian influenza replication. Furthermore, we sought to study the expression of some of the key mediators involved in the TLR-mediated antiviral responses of macrophages. Chicken macrophages were treated with the TLR2, 3, 4, 7 and 21 ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C), LPS, R848 and CpG ODN, respectively, at different doses and time points pre- and post-H4N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) infection. The results revealed that pre-treatment of macrophages with Pam3CSK4, LPS and CpG ODN reduced the replication of AIV in chicken macrophages. In addition, the relative expression of genes involved in inflammatory and antiviral responses were quantified at 3, 8 and 18 hours post-treatment with the TLR2, 4 and 21 ligands. Pam3CSK4, LPS and CpG ODN increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ, IFN-β and interferon regulatory factor (IFR) 7. The expression of these genes correlated with the reduction of viral replication in macrophages. These results shed light on the process of immunity to AIV in chickens. PMID:25165812

  3. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses. PMID:25726922

  4. Predictive factors associated with hepatitis C antiviral therapy response.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Lourianne Nascimento; Lyra, André Castro

    2015-06-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may lead to significant liver injury, and viral, environmental, host, immunologic and genetic factors may contribute to the differences in the disease expression and treatment response. In the early 2000s, dual therapy using a combination of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR) became the standard of care for HCV treatment. In this PR era, predictive factors of therapy response related to virus and host have been identified. In 2010/2011, therapeutic regimens for HCV genotype 1 patients were modified, and the addition of NS3/4a protease inhibitors (boceprevir or telaprevir) to dual therapy increased the effectiveness and chances of sustained virologic response (SVR). Nevertheless, the first-generation triple therapy is associated with many adverse events, some of which are serious and associated with death, particularly in cirrhotic patients. This led to the need to identify viral and host predictive factors that might influence the SVR rate to triple therapy and avoid unnecessary exposure to these drugs. Over the past four years, hepatitis C treatment has been rapidly changing with the development of new therapies and other developments. Currently, with the more recent generations of pangenotipic antiviral therapies, there have been higher sustained virologic rates, and prognostic factors may not have the same importance and strength as before. Nonetheless, some variables may still be consistent with the low rates of non-response with regimens that include sofosbuvir, daclatasvir and ledipasvir. In this manuscript, we review the predictive factors of therapy response across the different treatment regimens over the last decade including the new antiviral drugs. PMID:26140082

  5. Simultaneous Antibiofilm and Antiviral Activities of an Engineered Antimicrobial Peptide during Virus-Bacterium Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Yang, Guanyi; Deslouches, Berthony; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    formed by the ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during coinfection with respiratory syncytial virus. We also observed antiviral activity, indicating the ability of engineered antimicrobial peptides to act as cross-kingdom single-molecule combination therapies. PMID:27303744

  6. Simultaneous Antibiofilm and Antiviral Activities of an Engineered Antimicrobial Peptide during Virus-Bacterium Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Jeffrey A; Lashua, Lauren P; Kiedrowski, Megan R; Yang, Guanyi; Deslouches, Berthony; Montelaro, Ronald C; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during coinfection with respiratory syncytial virus. We also observed antiviral activity, indicating the ability of engineered antimicrobial peptides to act as cross-kingdom single-molecule combination therapies. PMID:27303744

  7. Dysbiosis-induced IL-33 contributes to impaired antiviral immunity in the genital mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Meehyang; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Inhwa; Yu, Je-Wook; Nakae, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Commensal microbiota are well known to play an important role in antiviral immunity by providing immune inductive signals; however, the consequence of dysbiosis on antiviral immunity remains unclear. We demonstrate that dysbiosis caused by oral antibiotic treatment directly impairs antiviral immunity following viral infection of the vaginal mucosa. Antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to mucosal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection more rapidly than water-fed mice, and also showed delayed viral clearance at the site of infection. However, innate immune responses, including type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine production at infection sites, as well as induction of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in draining lymph nodes, were not impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. By screening the factors controlling antiviral immunity, we found that IL-33, an alarmin released in response to tissue damage, was secreted from vaginal epithelium after the depletion of commensal microbiota. This cytokine suppresses local antiviral immunity by blocking the migration of effector T cells to the vaginal tissue, thereby inhibiting the production of IFN-γ, a critical cytokine for antiviral defense, at local infection sites. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of homeostasis maintained by commensal bacteria, and reveal a deleterious consequence of dysbiosis in antiviral immune defense. PMID:26811463

  8. Antiviral activity of silver nanoparticle/chitosan composites against H1N1 influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasutaka; Ono, Takeshi; Miyahira, Yasushi; Nguyen, Vinh Quang; Matsui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticle (Ag NP)/chitosan (Ch) composites with antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus were prepared. The Ag NP/Ch composites were obtained as yellow or brown floc-like powders following reaction at room temperature in aqueous medium. Ag NPs (3.5, 6.5, and 12.9 nm average diameters) were embedded into the chitosan matrix without aggregation or size alternation. The antiviral activity of the Ag NP/Ch composites was evaluated by comparing the TCID50 ratio of viral suspensions treated with the composites to untreated suspensions. For all sizes of Ag NPs tested, antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus increased as the concentration of Ag NPs increased; chitosan alone exhibited no antiviral activity. Size dependence of the Ag NPs on antiviral activity was also observed: antiviral activity was generally stronger with smaller Ag NPs in the composites. These results indicate that Ag NP/Ch composites interacting with viruses exhibit antiviral activity.

  9. Dysbiosis-induced IL-33 contributes to impaired antiviral immunity in the genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Meehyang; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Inhwa; Yu, Je-Wook; Nakae, Susumu; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Commensal microbiota are well known to play an important role in antiviral immunity by providing immune inductive signals; however, the consequence of dysbiosis on antiviral immunity remains unclear. We demonstrate that dysbiosis caused by oral antibiotic treatment directly impairs antiviral immunity following viral infection of the vaginal mucosa. Antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to mucosal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection more rapidly than water-fed mice, and also showed delayed viral clearance at the site of infection. However, innate immune responses, including type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine production at infection sites, as well as induction of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in draining lymph nodes, were not impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. By screening the factors controlling antiviral immunity, we found that IL-33, an alarmin released in response to tissue damage, was secreted from vaginal epithelium after the depletion of commensal microbiota. This cytokine suppresses local antiviral immunity by blocking the migration of effector T cells to the vaginal tissue, thereby inhibiting the production of IFN-γ, a critical cytokine for antiviral defense, at local infection sites. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of homeostasis maintained by commensal bacteria, and reveal a deleterious consequence of dysbiosis in antiviral immune defense. PMID:26811463

  10. Antiviral activity of ginsenosides against coxsackievirus B3, enterovirus 71, and human rhinovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Hwa-Jung; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Choi, Kwangman; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Lee, Yong-Pyo; Cho, Sungchan; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Background Ginsenosides are the major components responsible for the biochemical and pharmacological actions of ginseng, and have been shown to have various biological activities. In this study, we investigated the antiviral activities of seven ginsenosides [protopanaxatriol (PT) type: Re, Rf, and Rg2; protopanaxadiol (PD) type: Rb1, Rb2, Rc, and Rd)] against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), enterovirus 71 (EV71), and human rhinovirus 3 (HRV3). Methods Assays of antiviral activity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by the sulforhodamine B method using the cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay. Results The antiviral assays demonstrated that, of the seven ginsenosides, the PT-type ginsenosides (Re, Rf, and Rg2) possess significant antiviral activities against CVB3 and HRV3 at a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Among the PT-type ginsenosides, only ginsenoside Rg2 showed significant anti-EV71 activity with no cytotoxicity to cells at 100 μg/mL. The PD-type ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rc, and Rd), by contrast, did not show any significant antiviral activity against CVB3, EV71, and HRV3, and exhibited cytotoxic effects to virus-infected cells. Notably, the antiviral efficacies of PT-type ginsenosides were comparable to those of ribavirin, a commonly used antiviral drug. Conclusion Collectively, our findings suggest that the ginsenosides Re, Rf, and Rg2 have the potential to be effective in the treatment of CVB3, EV71, and HRV3 infection. PMID:25378991

  11. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  12. [Antiviral activity of aqueous extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus on the human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Shibnev, V A; Garaev, T M; Finogenova, M P; Kalnina, L B; Nosik, D N

    2015-01-01

    Fractions of aqueous and water-alcohol extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus have antiviral effect against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Antiviral properties of low toxic extracts were manifested in the concentration of 5.0 μg/ml upon simultaneous application with the virus in the lymphoblastoid cells culture MT-4. The extract of the birch fungus can be used for development of new antiviral drugs, inhibitors of HIV-replication when used both in the form of individual drugs and as a part of complex therapy. PMID:26182655

  13. Antiviral activities of isometric dideoxynucleosides of D- and L-related stereochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, V; Jahnke, T S

    1995-01-01

    In summary, many isomeric analogs of ddNs of both D-related and L-related absolute stereochemistries have been synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their antiviral activities. A few of these compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity and, interestingly, belong to both the D and L families. The synthetic methodologies developed will allow accessibility to many more novel modified nucleosides. While some structure-activity relationships are emerging from this work, it is clear that these chiral isomeric nucleosides have opened a new chapter in the field of antiviral nucleosides. PMID:7625783

  14. [Effectiveness and safety of antiviral therapy of military personnel suffering from chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, K V; Gusev, D A; Kozlov, K V; Shishkin, M K; Sukachev, V S; Shakhmanov, D M; Zhabrov, S S

    2015-04-01

    In order to evaluate effectiveness and safety of antiviral therapy schemes examined and treated 191 patients with chronic bepatitis C were assigned standard interferon and ribavirin, pegslated interferon and ribavirin, the total duration of the course coput 24-48 weeks. Based on clinical and laboratory parameters evaluated the safety of antiviral therapy. Formation of sustainable viral response, depending on the genotype observed, was given at 58,9-70%.of patients. In case of insufficient. antiviral therapy was prescribed a second course that will improve the effectiveness of treatment to 90-95%. Correction of adverse events was held lower dosages of interferon and/or ribavirin. PMID:26454938

  15. Surfactant-Modified Nanoclay Exhibits an Antiviral Activity with High Potency and Broad Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian-Jong; Wei, Jiun-Chiou; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanomaterials have the characteristics associated with high surface-to-volume ratios and have been explored for their antiviral activity. Despite some success, cytotoxicity has been an issue in nanomaterial-based antiviral strategies. We previously developed a novel method to fully exfoliate montmorillonite clay to generate the most fundamental units of nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP). We further modified NSP by capping with various surfactants and found that the surfactant-modified NSP (NSQ) was less cytotoxic. In this study, we tested the antiviral potentials of a series of natural-clay-derived nanomaterials. Among the derivatives, NSP modified with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (NSQc), but not the pristine clay, unmodified NSP, a silver nanoparticle-NSP hybrid, NSP modified with cationic n-octadecanylamine hydrochloride salt, or NSP modified with nonionic Triton X-100, significantly suppressed the plaque-forming ability of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) at noncytotoxic concentrations. NSQc also blocked infection with dengue virus (DEN) and influenza A virus. Regarding the antiviral mechanism, NSQc interfered with viral binding through electrostatic interaction, since its antiviral activity can be neutralized by Polybrene, a cationic polymer. Furthermore, NSQc reduced the lethality of JEV and DEN infection in mouse challenge models. Thus, the surfactant-modified exfoliated nanoclay NSQc may be a novel nanomaterial with broad and potent antiviral activity. IMPORTANCE Nanomaterials have being investigated as antimicrobial agents, yet their antiviral potential is overshadowed by their cytotoxicity. By using a novel method, we fully exfoliated montmorillonite clay to generate the most fundamental units of nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP). Here, we show that the surfactant-modified NSP (NSQ) is less cytotoxic and that NSQc (NSP modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate) could potently block infection by dengue virus (DEN), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV

  16. The antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice, a widely-used Chinese herb

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Yang, Rui; Yuan, Bochuan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is a common herb which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. More than 20 triterpenoids and nearly 300 flavonoids have been isolated from licorice. Recent studies have shown that these metabolites possess many pharmacological activities, such as antiviral, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and other activities. This paper provides a summary of the antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice. The active components and the possible mechanisms for these activities are summarized in detail. This review will be helpful for the further studies of licorice for its potential therapeutic effects as an antiviral or an antimicrobial agent. PMID:26579460

  17. Isolation of the anthropogenic compound fluoranthene in a screening of Chinese medicinal plants for antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Yip, L; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    1995-04-01

    Thirty-one species of medicinal plants used in the treatment of diseases of viral origin in Yunnan Province of China were assayed for inhibition of Sindbis and murine cytomegalovirus in mammalian cell cultures. Sixteen species displayed antiviral activity. A compound, which exhibited long wavelength UV-mediated antiviral activity, was isolated from leaves and twigs of Elsholtzia ciliata (Lamiaceae) using bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, fluoranthene. The discovery of an anthropogenic photosensitizer with antiviral activity in a plant has implications in studies of plants as sources of bioactive constituents. PMID:7753931

  18. Rapid induction and persistence of paracrine-induced cellular antiviral states arrest viral infection spread in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Yin, John

    2016-09-01

    The virus/host interaction is a complex interplay between pro- and anti-viral factors that ultimately determines the spread or halt of virus infections in tissues. This interplay develops over multiple rounds of infection. The purpose of this study was to determine how cellular-level processes combine to impact the spatial spread of infection. We measured the kinetics of virus replication (VSV), antiviral paracrine signal upregulation and secretion, spatial spread of virus and paracrine antiviral signaling, and inhibition of virus production in antiviral-exposed A549 human lung epithelial cells. We found that initially infected cells released antiviral signals 4-to-7h following production of virus. However, the subsequent rapid dissemination of signal and fast induction of a robust and persistent antiviral state ultimately led to a suppression of infection spread. This work shows how cellular responses to infection and activation of antiviral responses can integrate to ultimately control infection spread across host cell populations. PMID:27254596

  19. Progress in the development of poliovirus antiviral agents and their essential role in reducing risks that threaten eradication.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, Mark A; Collett, Marc S; Hincks, Jeffrey R; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark A; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Sutter, Roland W; Modlin, John F; Dowdle, Walter R

    2014-11-01

    Chronic prolonged excretion of vaccine-derived polioviruses by immunodeficient persons (iVDPV) presents a personal risk of poliomyelitis to the patient as well as a programmatic risk of delayed global eradication. Poliovirus antiviral drugs offer the only mitigation of these risks. Antiviral agents may also have a potential role in the management of accidental exposures and in certain outbreak scenarios. Efforts to discover and develop poliovirus antiviral agents have been ongoing in earnest since the formation in 2007 of the Poliovirus Antivirals Initiative. The most advanced antiviral, pocapavir (V-073), is a capsid inhibitor that has recently demonstrated activity in an oral poliovirus vaccine human challenge model. Additional antiviral candidates with differing mechanisms of action continue to be profiled and evaluated preclinically with the goal of having 2 antivirals available for use in combination to treat iVDPV excreters. PMID:25316866

  20. Ribavirin: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Jacques, Jérémie; Alain, Sophie; Marquet, Pierre; Sautereau, Denis; Rousseau, Annick; Carrier, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Before the advent of direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) ribavirin, associated to pegylated-interferon played a crucial role in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, preventing relapses and breakthroughs. In the present era of new potent DAAs, a place is still devoted to the drug. Ribavirin associated with sofosbuvir alone is efficient in the treatment of most cases of G2 infected patients. All options currently available for the last difficult-to-treat cirrhotic G3 patients contain ribavirin. Reducing treatment duration to 12 wk in G1 or G4 cirrhotic compensated patients is feasible thanks to ribavirin. Retreating patients with acquired anti NS5A resistance-associated variants using ribavirin-based strategies could be useful. The addition of ribavirin with DAAs combinations however, leads to more frequent but mild adverse events especially in cirrhotic patients. Preliminary data with interferon-free second generation DAAs combinations without ribavirin suggest that future of the drug is jeopardized even in difficult-to-treat patients: The optimization of ribavirin dosage according to an early monitoring of blood levels has been suggested to be relevant in double therapy with peginterferon or sofosbuvir but not with very potent combinations of more than two DAAs. PMID:26807208

  1. New perspectives for preventing hepatitis C virus liver graft infection.

    PubMed

    Felmlee, Daniel J; Coilly, Audrey; Chung, Raymond T; Samuel, Didier; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease that necessitates liver transplantation. The incidence of virus-induced cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase, making liver transplantation increasingly common. Infection of the engrafted liver is universal and accelerates progression to advanced liver disease, with 20-30% of patients having cirrhosis within 5 years of transplantation. Treatments of chronic HCV infection have improved dramatically, albeit with remaining challenges of failure and access, and therapeutic options to prevent graft infection during liver transplantation are emerging. Developments in directed use of new direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) to eliminate circulating HCV before or after transplantation in the past 5 years provide renewed hope for prevention and treatment of liver graft infection. Identification of the ideal regimen and use of DAAs reveals new ways to treat this specific population of patients. Complementing DAAs, viral entry inhibitors have been shown to prevent liver graft infection in animal models and delay graft infection in clinical trials, which shows their potential for use concomitant to transplantation. We review the challenges and pathology associated with HCV liver graft infection, highlight current and future strategies of DAA treatment timing, and discuss the potential role of entry inhibitors that might be used synergistically with DAAs to prevent or treat graft infection. PMID:27301929

  2. Molecular basis of interferon resistance in hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Beach, Nathan M; Sheldon, Julie; Domingo, Esteban

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to interferon (IFN) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) differs from resistance to standard, directly-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in that the virus confronts a multicomponent antiviral state evoked by IFN. This renders unlikely the repeated selection of the same specific mutations that confer an IFN-resistance phenotype. Comparison of amino acid sequences of viral proteins in HCV that replicates in the presence of IFN in vivo or in cell culture (with entire virus or subgenomic replicons) reveals very few common candidate IFN resistance substitutions. Multiple host and viral factors contribute to divergent responses to IFN. The environmental heterogeneity in which exogenous IFN is expected to exert its selective effect may increase as a result of incorporation of new DAAs in therapy. PMID:24968186

  3. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-03-16

    The standard antiviral therapy for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is (pegylated) interferon monotherapy, but its efficacy is insufficient. Oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have recently been developed for chronic hepatitis C patients. However, some DAAs have contraindications for chronic renal failure (CRF). Daclatasvir and asunaprevir are metabolized largely in the liver and are not contraindicated in CRF. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was used for 4 dialysis patients infected with genotype 1b HCV. One patient had viral breakthrough, and the 3 others had sustained virological response 12. One patient was admitted for heart failure and percutaneous coronary intervention due to concomitant ischemic disease. Heart failure was unlikely to be caused by the combination therapy, as it was probably due to water overload. The patient continued to receive the combination therapy after the remission of the heart failure. The combination therapy was well tolerated in the other patients. PMID:26989674

  4. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    The standard antiviral therapy for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is (pegylated) interferon monotherapy, but its efficacy is insufficient. Oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have recently been developed for chronic hepatitis C patients. However, some DAAs have contraindications for chronic renal failure (CRF). Daclatasvir and asunaprevir are metabolized largely in the liver and are not contraindicated in CRF. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was used for 4 dialysis patients infected with genotype 1b HCV. One patient had viral breakthrough, and the 3 others had sustained virological response 12. One patient was admitted for heart failure and percutaneous coronary intervention due to concomitant ischemic disease. Heart failure was unlikely to be caused by the combination therapy, as it was probably due to water overload. The patient continued to receive the combination therapy after the remission of the heart failure. The combination therapy was well tolerated in the other patients. PMID:26989674

  5. Pharmacokinetics, Efficacy, and Safety of Hepatitis C Virus Drugs in Patients with Liver and/or Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Elise J; de Kanter, Clara T M M; van Hoek, Bart; Arends, Joop E; Drenth, Joost P H; Burger, David M

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients often suffer from liver cirrhosis, which can be complicated by renal impairment. Therefore, in this review we describe the treatment possibilities in HCV patients with hepatic and renal impairment. Cirrhosis alters the structure of the liver, which affects drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters. These modifications influence the plasma concentration of substrates of drugs metabolized/transported by these enzymes. The direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are substrates of, for example, cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Most DAAs are not studied in HCV-infected individuals with decompensated cirrhosis, and therefore awareness is needed when these patients are treated. Most DAAs are contraindicated in cirrhotic patients; however, patients with a Child-Pugh score of B or C can be treated safely with a normal dose sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir or daclatasvir, in combination with ribavirin. Patients with renal impairment (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] <90 mL/min) or who are dependent on dialysis often tolerate ribavirin treatment poorly, even after dose adjustments. However, most DAAs can be used at the normal dose because DAAs are not renally excreted. To date, grazoprevir plus elbasvir is the preferred DAA regimen in patients with renal impairment as data are pending for sofosbuvir patients with GFR <30 mL/min (as for ledipasvir and velpatasvir). However, sofosbuvir has been used in a small number of patients with severe renal impairment and, based on these trials, we recommend sofosbuvir 400 mg every day when no other DAA regimen is available. Ledipasvir and velpatasvir are not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:27098247

  6. Antiviral activity of carnosic acid against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory infection and a major public health threat worldwide. To date, no vaccine or effective therapeutic agent has been developed. In a screen for potential therapeutic agents against hRSV, we discovered that an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis exerted a strong inhibitory effect against hRSV infection. Subsequent studies identified carnosic acid as a bioactive constituent responsible for anti-hRSV activity. Carnosic acid has been shown to exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. Anti-RSV activity of carnosic acid was further investigated in this study. Methods Effects of extracts from various plants and subfractions from R. officinalis on hRSV replication were determined by microneutralization assay and plaque assay. Several constituents were isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of R. officinalis and their anti-RSV activities were assessed by plaque assay as well as reverse-transcription quantitative PCR to determine the synthesis of viral RNAs. Results Among the tested bioactive constituents of R. officinalis, carnosic acid displayed the most potent anti-hRSV activity and was effective against both A- and B-type viruses. Carnosic acid efficiently suppressed the replication of hRSV in a concentration-dependent manner. Carnosic acid effectively suppressed viral gene expression without inducing type-I interferon production or affecting cell viability, suggesting that it may directly affect viral factors. A time course analysis showed that addition of carnosic acid 8 hours after infection still effectively blocked the expression of hRSV genes, further suggesting that carnosic acid directly inhibited the replication of hRSV. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that carnosic acid, a natural compound that has already been shown to be safe for human consumption, has anti-viral activity against hRSV, efficiently blocking the replication of this virus. Carnosic

  7. New treatment strategies for hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, Fatih; Senocak Tasci, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C infection can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and it is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Achieving a sustained virological response has been the major aim for decades. Interferon treatment was the primarily developed therapy against the infection. Addition of the guanosine analog ribavirin to stop viral RNA synthesis increased the response rates as well as the adverse effects of the treatment. The increasing demands for alternative regimens led to the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). The approval of sofosbuvir and simeprevir signaled a new era of antiviral treatment for hepatitis C infection. Although the majority of studies have been performed with DAAs in combination with interferon and resulted in a decrease in treatment duration and increase in response rates, the response rates achieved with interferon-free regimens provided hope for patients ineligible for therapy with interferon. Most DAA studies are in phase II leading to phase III. In the near future more DAAs are expected to be approved. The main disadvantage of the therapy remains the cost of the drugs. Here, we focus on new treatment strategies for hepatitis C infection as well as agents targeting hepatitis C virus replication that are in clinical development. PMID:26301052

  8. Successful Eradication of Hepatitis C Virus by Interferon-Free Regimens in Two Patients with Advanced Liver Fibrosis following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Yamato, Mutsumi; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Mikami, Shigeru; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following kidney transplantation, HCV increases the risk of graft loss and patient mortality compared with uninfected patients. The achievement of a sustained virological response with antiviral therapy improves survival and diminishes the risk of hepatic decompensation in HCV patients after a kidney transplant. It has been reported that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are relatively safe and highly effective for the eradication of HCV in patients who are liver transplant recipients. In the present study, we investigated HCV eradication via interferon-free therapies with DAAs in two HCV patients with advanced liver fibrosis following renal transplantation. In both cases, the interferon-free regimens with DAAs were effective in eradicating HCV in the patients after kidney transplantation. No adverse events caused by interferon were identified with the exception of anemia. Interferon-free regimens with DAAs for recurrent HCV in patients following kidney transplantation are relatively safe and effective. However, attention should be focused on anemia during these treatments. PMID:27462193

  9. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  10. Antiviral Potential of Algae Polysaccharides Isolated from Marine Sources: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Azin; Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    From food to fertilizer, algal derived products are largely employed in assorted industries, including agricultural, biomedical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Among different chemical compositions isolated from algae, polysaccharides are the most well-established compounds, which were subjected to a variety of studies due to extensive bioactivities. Over the past few decades, the promising results for antiviral potential of algae-derived polysaccharides have advocated them as inordinate candidates for pharmaceutical research. Numerous studies have isolated various algal polysaccharides possessing antiviral activities, including carrageenan, alginate, fucan, laminaran, and naviculan. In addition, different mechanisms of action have been reported for these polysaccharides, such as inhibiting the binding or internalization of virus into the host cells or suppressing DNA replication and protein synthesis. This review strives for compiling previous antiviral studies of algae-derived polysaccharides and their mechanism of action towards their development as natural antiviral agents for future investigations. PMID:26484353

  11. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies. PMID:26315688

  12. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  13. Photo-distributed lichenoid eruption secondary to direct anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cory L; McCausland, Drew; Chu, Emily Y

    2015-10-01

    Novel direct anti-viral agents are emerging as effective treatments for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and provide an alternative to the year-long standard therapy with interferon and ribavirin. However, cutaneous side effects from these new medications, including rash, pruritus and photosensitivity, are among the most commonly reported adverse events and have resulted in therapy discontinuation in some cases. Here, we report two cases of a photo-distributed lichenoid eruption that occurred within 1  month of starting anti-viral therapy with simeprevir and sofosbuvir without interferon or ribavirin. This report provides the first histologic description of the cutaneous eruption associated with direct anti-viral therapy for HCV and highlights the importance of recognizing and treating the often intolerable dermatologic side effects of these novel medications, the incidence of which is likely to increase as direct anti-viral agents may become the standard of care for HCV. PMID:25974215

  14. AXL receptor tyrosine kinase is required for T cell priming and antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Edward T; Pang, Iris K; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; Bosurgi, Lidia; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S; Iwasaki, Akiko; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) AXL is induced in response to type I interferons (IFNs) and limits their production through a negative feedback loop. Enhanced production of type I IFNs in Axl(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro have led to speculation that inhibition of AXL would promote antiviral responses. Notwithstanding, type I IFNs also exert potent immunosuppressive functions. Here we demonstrate that ablation of AXL enhances the susceptibility to infection by influenza A virus and West Nile virus. The increased type I IFN response in Axl(-/-) mice was associated with diminished DC maturation, reduced production of IL-1β, and defective antiviral T cell immunity. Blockade of type I IFN receptor or administration of IL-1β to Axl(-/-) mice restored the antiviral adaptive response and control of infection. Our results demonstrate that AXL is essential for limiting the immunosuppressive effects of type I IFNs and enabling the induction of protective antiviral adaptive immunity. PMID:27350258

  15. The role of antifungal and antiviral agents in primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mike

    2014-11-01

    In comparison to the range of antibiotics used in medicine, the spectrum of antifungal and antiviral drugs used in primary dental care is relatively limited. In practical terms, there are only three antifungal agents and two antiviral agents that have a role. This paper will describe the clinical presentation of orofacial candidal and viral infections and the use of antimicrobial drugs in their management. PMID:25668378

  16. Optimizing Tactics for Use of the U.S. Antiviral Strategic National Stockpile for Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Nedialko B.; Goll, Sebastian; Hupert, Nathaniel; Pourbohloul, Babak; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, public health agencies across the globe worked to mitigate the impact of the swine-origin influenza A (pH1N1) virus. These efforts included intensified surveillance, social distancing, hygiene measures, and the targeted use of antiviral medications to prevent infection (prophylaxis). In addition, aggressive antiviral treatment was recommended for certain patient subgroups to reduce the severity and duration of symptoms. To assist States and other localities meet these needs, the U.S. Government distributed a quarter of the antiviral medications in the Strategic National Stockpile within weeks of the pandemic's start. However, there are no quantitative models guiding the geo-temporal distribution of the remainder of the Stockpile in relation to pandemic spread or severity. We present a tactical optimization model for distributing this stockpile for treatment of infected cases during the early stages of a pandemic like 2009 pH1N1, prior to the wide availability of a strain-specific vaccine. Our optimization method efficiently searches large sets of intervention strategies applied to a stochastic network model of pandemic influenza transmission within and among U.S. cities. The resulting optimized strategies depend on the transmissability of the virus and postulated rates of antiviral uptake and wastage (through misallocation or loss). Our results suggest that an aggressive community-based antiviral treatment strategy involving early, widespread, pro-rata distribution of antivirals to States can contribute to slowing the transmission of mildly transmissible strains, like pH1N1. For more highly transmissible strains, outcomes of antiviral use are more heavily impacted by choice of distribution intervals, quantities per shipment, and timing of shipments in relation to pandemic spread. This study supports previous modeling results suggesting that appropriate antiviral treatment may be an effective mitigation strategy during the early stages of future influenza

  17. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses trigger the type I interferon (IFN) pathway upon infection, resulting in the transcription of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which define the antiviral state of the host. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious viral disease endangering the pig industry in many countries. However, anti-CSFV ISGs are poorly documented. Here we screened 20 ISGs that are commonly induced by type I IFNs against CSFV in lentivirus-delivered cell lines, resulting in the identification of guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent anti-CSFV ISG. We observed that overexpression of GBP1, an IFN-induced GTPase, remarkably suppressed CSFV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous GBP1 expression by small interfering RNAs significantly promoted CSFV growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GBP1 acted mainly on the early phase of CSFV replication and inhibited the translation efficiency of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV. In addition, we found that GBP1 was upregulated at the transcriptional level in CSFV-infected PK-15 cells and in various organs of CSFV-infected pigs. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays revealed that GBP1 interacted with the NS5A protein of CSFV, and this interaction was mapped in the N-terminal globular GTPase domain of GBP1. Interestingly, the K51 of GBP1, which is crucial for its GTPase activity, was essential for the inhibition of CSFV replication. We showed further that the NS5A-GBP1 interaction inhibited GTPase activity, which was critical for its antiviral effect. Taking our findings together, GBP1 is an anti-CSFV ISG whose action depends on its GTPase activity. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only a few host restriction factors against CSFV

  18. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-07-19

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host-virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects. PMID:27357659

  19. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ding Y; Hurt, Aeron C

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titer of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness. PMID:26870031

  20. Bcl6 Sets a Threshold for Antiviral Signaling by Restraining IRF7 Transcriptional Program

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Kang, Yanhua; Zhuang, Ningtong; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Hang; Xu, Dakang; Ding, Yina; Yin, Hongping; Shi, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of restraining and priming of antiviral signaling constitute a fundamental aspect of immunological functions. However, we currently know little about the molecular events that can translate the pathogenic cues into the appropriate code for antiviral defense. Our present study reports a specific role of B cell lymphoma (Bcl)6 as a checkpoint in the initiation of the host response to cytosolic RNA viruses. Remarkably, Bcl6 specifically binds to the interferon-regulatory factor (IRF)7 loci and restrains its transcription, thereby functioning as a negative regulator for interferon (IFN)-β production and antiviral responses. The signal-controlled turnover of the Bcl6, most likely mediated by microRNA-127, coordinates the antiviral response and inflammatory sequelae. Accordingly, de-repression of Bcl6 resulted in a phenotypic conversion of macrophages into highly potent IFN-producing cells and rendered mice more resistant to pathogenic RNA virus infection. The failure to remove the Bcl6 regulator, however, impedes the antiviral signaling and exaggerates viral pneumonia in mice. We thus reveal a novel key molecular checkpoint to orchestrate antiviral innate immunity. PMID:26728228

  1. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ding Y.; Hurt, Aeron C.

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titer of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness. PMID:26870031

  2. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host–virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects. PMID:27357659

  3. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  4. Antiviral Activity of Graphene–Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  5. Antiviral Activity of Graphene-Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  6. Current management and recommendations for access to antiviral therapy of herpes labialis

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Anthony; Griffiths, Paul; Leone, Peter; Mindel, Adrian; Patel, Rajul; Stanberry, Lawrence; Whitley, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Herpes labialis is a common skin infective condition, worldwide, which is primarily caused by HSV-1. Recurrent episodes of herpes labialis, also known as cold sores, can be frequent, painful, long-lasting and disfiguring for infected patients. At present, there are two types of antivirals for the treatment of herpes labialis, topical and oral, which are available over the counter or as prescription-only. The aim of antiviral therapy is to block viral replication to enable shortening the duration of symptoms and to accelerate healing of the lesions associated with herpes labialis. This review examines the evidence for the effectiveness of current topical and oral antivirals in the management of recurrent episodes of herpes labialis. In most countries, oral antivirals for herpes labialis are available as prescription-only. However, in early 2010, the oral antiviral famciclovir was reclassified from prescription-only medicine to pharmacist-controlled status in New Zealand. The benefits and risks associated with moving an antiviral therapy for herpes labialis from prescription-only to pharmacist-controlled status are reviewed here, and the implications for patients, general physicians and pharmacists are considered. PMID:21889905

  7. Antiviral Indolosesquiterpenoid Xiamycins C-E from a Halophilic Actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hwan; Ha, Thi-Kim-Quy; Oh, Won Keun; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2016-01-22

    New metabolites, xiamycins C-E (1-3), were isolated from a Streptomyces. sp (#HK18) culture inhabiting the topsoil in a Korean solar saltern. The planar structures of the xiamycins C-E were elucidated as carbazole-bearing indolosesquiterpenoids using a combined analysis of NMR, MS, UV, and IR spectroscopic data. The absolute configurations of these new compounds were determined by analyses of NOESY and ECD data. When the xiamycins were tested for inhibitory activity on porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), xiamycin D (2) showed the strongest inhibitory effect on PEDV replication (EC50 = 0.93 μM) with low cytotoxicity (CC50 = 56.03 μM), thus displaying a high selective index (60.31). Quantitative real-time PCR data revealed the inhibitory effect of 2 on genes encoding essential structural proteins (GP6 nucleocapsid, GP2 spike, and GP5 membrane) for PEDV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiviral activity of xiamycin D (2) was also supported by both Western blotting of the GP2 spike and GP6 nucleocapsid protein synthesis of PEDV. Therefore, xiamycin D shows the potential of indolosesquiterpenoids as new and promising chemical skeletons against PEDV-related viruses. PMID:26698879

  8. [Antiviral activity of representatives of the family Crassulaceae].

    PubMed

    Shirobokov, V P; Evtushenko, A I; Lapchik, V F; Shirobokova, D N; Suptel', E A

    1981-12-01

    The antiviral properties of the juice of 11 species of the orpine family were studied. 8 of them belonged to the genera Kalanchoe, i. e. Kalanchoe diagremontiona R. Hamet, K. pinnata (Zam.) Persoon, K. Peteri Werd., K. prolifera (Bovie) R. Hamet, K. marnierriana (Mann. et Boit) Jacobs; K. blossfeldiana v. Poelln, K. beharensis Drake del Gastillo, K. waldheimii R. Hamet et Perr and 3 belonged to the Sedum genera, i. e. Sedum telephium L., S. spectabile Boreau, S. acre L. A high virus neutralizing activity of the juice from 4 species of Kalanchoe, i. e. K. blossfeldiana, K. waldheimii, K. pinnata and K. beharensis was shown. Inhibition of the virus infecting activity was observed at the juice dilutions from 1-2 to 1-8000 and higher. The viricidal factor of Kalanchoe is stable. It is not destroyed by ether, alcohol and potassium periodate. It is not absorbed by bentonite at the acid pH values. Addition of cattle serum or purified proteins to the juice resulted in their precipitation which suppressed the viricidal activity of the juice. PMID:7198890

  9. Regulation of the Host Antiviral State by Intercellular Communications.

    PubMed

    Assil, Sonia; Webster, Brian; Dreux, Marlène

    2015-08-01

    Viruses usually induce a profound remodeling of host cells, including the usurpation of host machinery to support their replication and production of virions to invade new cells. Nonetheless, recognition of viruses by the host often triggers innate immune signaling, preventing viral spread and modulating the function of immune cells. It conventionally occurs through production of antiviral factors and cytokines by infected cells. Virtually all viruses have evolved mechanisms to blunt such responses. Importantly, it is becoming increasingly recognized that infected cells also transmit signals to regulate innate immunity in uninfected neighboring cells. These alternative pathways are notably mediated by vesicular secretion of various virus- and host-derived products (miRNAs, RNAs, and proteins) and non-infectious viral particles. In this review, we focus on these newly-described modes of cell-to-cell communications and their impact on neighboring cell functions. The reception of these signals can have anti- and pro-viral impacts, as well as more complex effects in the host such as oncogenesis and inflammation. Therefore, these "broadcasting" functions, which might be tuned by an arms race involving selective evolution driven by either the host or the virus, constitute novel and original regulations of viral infection, either highly localized or systemic. PMID:26295405

  10. The antiviral activity of tetrazole phosphonic acids and their analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D W; Naylor, M

    1985-01-01

    5-(Phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and a number of related tetrazoles have been prepared and their effects on the replication of Herpes Simplex Viruses-1 and -2 have been investigated as well as their abilities to inhibit the DNA polymerases induced by these viruses and the RNA transcriptase activity of influenza virus A. Contrary to an earlier report, 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was not an efficient inhibitor of the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in tissue culture. Analogues of 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole were also devoid of significant antiviral activity. Only 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and 5-(thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole inhibited the influenza virus transcriptase, and both were more effective as inhibitors than phosphonoacetic acid under the same conditions. The DNA polymerases induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2 were inhibited slightly by 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and to a lesser extent by its N-ethyl analogue and 3-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole. None of these compounds were as effective as phosphonoacetic acid. 5-(Thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was a better inhibitor of the DNA polymerase induced by HSV-1 than 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole. PMID:2417198

  11. CMV infection, diagnosis and antiviral strategies after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2009-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant pathogen complicating the post-transplant course of organ recipients. In liver transplant patients, the febrile clinical illness caused by CMV may be associated with end-organ disease, such as hepatitis or infection of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition to direct effects, CMV may have indirect effects including the risk of other infections or graft rejection. Recently, major advances in the management of CMV infection have been achieved through the development of new diagnostic techniques and antiviral strategies to prevent CMV disease. Quantitative nucleic acid testing to monitor viral load is now commonly used to diagnose and guide the treatment of CMV infections. The standardization of the testing, however, needs to be improved. There are two main strategies to prevent CMV disease after liver transplantation: prophylaxis and pre-emptive therapy. Both strategies are effective, but also have disadvantages. The disadvantages of prophylaxis include prolonged drug exposure, the development of resistance and, most of all, the development of delayed and late-onset CMV disease. On the other hand, the pre-emptive strategy is based on frequent laboratory monitoring of viral loads, and some patients may develop symptomatic infection before the diagnosis of CMV. This overview summarizes the current status of CMV in liver transplantation. PMID:19619175

  12. Antiviral mechanism of polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Vacas-Córdoba, Enrique; Maly, Marek; De la Mata, Francisco J; Gómez, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology-derived platforms, such as dendrimers, are very attractive in several biological applications. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers have shown great potential as antiviral agents in the development of novel microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1. In this work, we studied the mechanism of two sulfated and naphthylsulfonated functionalized carbosilane dendrimers, G3-S16 and G2-NF16. They are able to inhibit viral infection at fusion and thus at the entry step. Both compounds impede the binding of viral particles to target cell surface and membrane fusion through the blockage of gp120–CD4 interaction. In addition, and for the first time, we demonstrate that dendrimers can inhibit cell-to-cell HIV transmission and difficult infectious synapse formation. Thus, carbosilane dendrimers’ mode of action is a multifactorial process targeting several proteins from viral envelope and from host cells that could block HIV infection at different stages during the first step of infection. PMID:27103798

  13. Predicting antiviral compliance: physicians' responsibilities vs. patients' rights.

    PubMed

    Senak, M

    1997-06-01

    Predicting which patients will comply with anti-HIV drug regimens is a very serious issue, since lack of compliance may cause development of drug-resistant strains of HIV that can be passed on to others. Ethical issues include addressing the well-being of the patient versus public health. Physicians are put in the position of trying to judge whether patients will comply with treatment; there are many factors involved in making this judgment. Some of these involve socioeconomic factors, e.g., a patient might sell his drugs, while other factors are failure to keep appointments or taking drugs incorrectly. Physicians should carefully examine the question of a possible noncompliance before prescribing common antiviral therapies; however, there is concern that physicians' personal biases may enter into this decision. Appropriate care and helping patients comply necessitates a partnership between the physician and patient, and decision making should be a shared process. Physicians should try to understand and address the reasons for noncompliance, so that their patients can be treated. If at all possible, the regimen should be simplified to help the patient comply with a less-difficult regimen. PMID:11364430

  14. Regulation of the Host Antiviral State by Intercellular Communications

    PubMed Central

    Assil, Sonia; Webster, Brian; Dreux, Marlène

    2015-01-01

    Viruses usually induce a profound remodeling of host cells, including the usurpation of host machinery to support their replication and production of virions to invade new cells. Nonetheless, recognition of viruses by the host often triggers innate immune signaling, preventing viral spread and modulating the function of immune cells. It conventionally occurs through production of antiviral factors and cytokines by infected cells. Virtually all viruses have evolved mechanisms to blunt such responses. Importantly, it is becoming increasingly recognized that infected cells also transmit signals to regulate innate immunity in uninfected neighboring cells. These alternative pathways are notably mediated by vesicular secretion of various virus- and host-derived products (miRNAs, RNAs, and proteins) and non-infectious viral particles. In this review, we focus on these newly-described modes of cell-to-cell communications and their impact on neighboring cell functions. The reception of these signals can have anti- and pro-viral impacts, as well as more complex effects in the host such as oncogenesis and inflammation. Therefore, these “broadcasting” functions, which might be tuned by an arms race involving selective evolution driven by either the host or the virus, constitute novel and original regulations of viral infection, either highly localized or systemic. PMID:26295405

  15. Antiviral mechanism of polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vacas-Córdoba, Enrique; Maly, Marek; De la Mata, Francisco J; Gómez, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology-derived platforms, such as dendrimers, are very attractive in several biological applications. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers have shown great potential as antiviral agents in the development of novel microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1. In this work, we studied the mechanism of two sulfated and naphthylsulfonated functionalized carbosilane dendrimers, G3-S16 and G2-NF16. They are able to inhibit viral infection at fusion and thus at the entry step. Both compounds impede the binding of viral particles to target cell surface and membrane fusion through the blockage of gp120-CD4 interaction. In addition, and for the first time, we demonstrate that dendrimers can inhibit cell-to-cell HIV transmission and difficult infectious synapse formation. Thus, carbosilane dendrimers' mode of action is a multifactorial process targeting several proteins from viral envelope and from host cells that could block HIV infection at different stages during the first step of infection. PMID:27103798

  16. Current approaches in antiviral drug discovery against the Flaviviridae family.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Aida; Hassan, Asfarina Amir; Sheng, Gan Chye; Nasir, Shah Bakhtiar; Othman, Shatrah; Yusof, Rohana; Othman, Rozana; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Viruses belonging to the Flaviviridae family primarily spread through arthropod vectors, and are the major causes of illness and death around the globe. The Flaviviridae family consists of 3 genera which include the Flavivirus genus (type species, yellow fever virus) as the largest genus, the Hepacivirus (type species, hepatitis C virus) and the Pestivirus (type species, bovine virus diarrhea). The flaviviruses (Flavivirus genus) are small RNA viruses transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks that take over host cell machinery in order to propagate. However, hepaciviruses and pestiviruses are not antropod-borne. Despite the extensive research and public health concern associated with flavivirus diseases, to date, there is no specific treatment available for any flavivirus infections, though commercially available vaccines for yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-born encephalitis exist. Due to the global threat of viral pandemics, there is an urgent need for new drugs. In many countries, patients with severe cases of flavivirus infections are treated only by supportive care, which includes intravenous fluids, hospitalization, respiratory support, and prevention of secondary infections. This review discusses the strategies used towards the discovery of antiviral drugs, focusing on rational drug design against Dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), Yellow Fever virus (YFV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Only modified peptidic, nonpeptidic, natural compounds and fragment-based inhibitors (typically of mass less than 300 Da) against structural and non-structural proteins are discussed. PMID:24001228

  17. Antiviral effects of an iminosugar derivative on flavivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Liao, Ching-Len; Dwek, Raymond A; Zitzmann, Nicole; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2002-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, which block the trimming step of N-linked glycosylation, have been shown to eliminate the production of several ER-budding viruses. Here we investigated the effects of one such inhibitor, N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin (NN-DNJ), a 9-carbon alkyl iminosugar derivative, on infection by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and dengue virus serotype 2 (DEN-2). In the presence of NN-DNJ, JEV and DEN-2 infections were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect appeared to influence DEN-2 infection more than JEV infection, since lower concentrations of NN-DNJ substantially blocked DEN-2 replication. Secretion of the flaviviral glycoproteins E and NS1 was greatly reduced, and levels of DEN-2 viral RNA replication measured by fluorogenic reverse transcription-PCR were also decreased, by NN-DNJ. Notably, the viral glycoproteins, prM, E, and NS1 were found to associate transiently with the ER chaperone calnexin, and this interaction was affected by NN-DNJ, suggesting a potential role of calnexin in the folding of flaviviral glycoproteins. Additionally, in a mouse model of lethal challenge by JEV infection, oral delivery of NN-DNJ reduced the mortality rate. These findings show that NN-DNJ has an antiviral effect on flavivirus infection, likely through interference with virus replication at the posttranslational modification level, occurring mainly in the ER. PMID:11907199

  18. Novel antiviral activity of bromocriptine against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumihiro; Ishida, Yuki; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Youichi; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yoshii, Kentaro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infectious disease is a major public health problem worldwide; however, licensed vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against this infection are not available. To identify novel anti-DENV compounds, we screened 1280 pharmacologically active compounds using focus reduction assay. Bromocriptine (BRC) was found to have potent anti-DENV activity and low cytotoxicity (half maximal effective concentration [EC50], 0.8-1.6 μM; and half maximal cytotoxicity concentration [CC50], 53.6 μM). Time-of-drug-addition and time-of-drug-elimination assays suggested that BRC inhibits translation and/or replication steps in the DENV life cycle. A subgenomic replicon system was used to verify that BRC restricts RNA replication step. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution (N374H) was detected in the NS3 protein that conferred resistance to BRC. In summary, BRC was found to be a novel DENV inhibitor and a potential candidate for the treatment of DENV infectious disease. PMID:27181378

  19. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9’s role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR. PMID:26284919

  20. Chemical diversity and antiviral potential in the pantropical Diospyros genus.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, Laure-Anne; Eparvier, Véronique; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Stien, Didier; Litaudon, Marc

    2016-07-01

    A screening using a dengue replicon virus-cell-based assay was performed on 3563 ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts from different parts of 1500 plants. The screening led to the selection of species from the genus Diospyros (Ebenaceae), among which 25 species distributed in tropical areas showed significant inhibitory activity on dengue virus replication. A metabolic analysis was conducted from the UPLC-HRMS profiles of 33 biologically active and inactive plant extracts, and their metabolic proximity is presented in the form of a dendrogram. The results of the study showed that chemical similarity is not related to plant species or organ. Overall, metabolomic profiling allowed us to define large groups of extracts, comprising both active and inactive ones. Closely related profiles from active extracts might indicate that the common major components of these extracts were responsible for the antiviral activity, while the comparison of chemically similar active and inactive extracts, will permit to find compounds of interest. Eventually, the phytochemical investigation of Diospyros glans bark EtOAc extract afforded usnic acid and 7 known ursane- and lupane-type triterpenoids, among which 5 were found significantly active against dengue virus replication. The inhibitory potency of these compounds was also evaluated on a DENV-NS5 RNA-dependant RNA polymerase assay. PMID:27126897

  1. Evaluation of Ag nanoparticle coated air filter against aerosolized virus: Anti-viral efficiency with dust loading.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yun Haeng; Park, Dae Hoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the effect of dust loading on the anti-viral ability of an anti-viral air filter was investigated. Silver nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in diameter were synthesized via a spark discharge generation system and were used as anti-viral agents coated onto a medium air filter. The pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and anti-viral ability of the filter against aerosolized bacteriophage MS2 virus particles were tested with dust loading. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop increased with dust loading, while the anti-viral ability decreased. Theoretical analysis of anti-viral ability with dust loading was carried out using a mathematical model based on that presented by Joe et al. (J. Hazard. Mater.; 280: 356-363, 2014). Our model can be used to compare anti-viral abilities of various anti-viral agents, determine appropriate coating areal density of anti-viral agent on a filter, and predict the life cycle of an anti-viral filter. PMID:26434534

  2. Defective antiviral CD8 T-cell response and viral clearance in the absence of c-Jun N-terminal kinases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Qin; Ma, Xi; Lu, Lingling; Zhao, Limei; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Qingyu; Wang, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling pathway appears to act as a critical intermediate in the regulation of lymphocyte activation and proliferation. The majority of studies on the importance of JNK are focused on its role in T helper responses, with very few reports addressing the mechanisms of JNK in governing CD8 T-cell-mediated immunity. By using a well-defined mousepox model, we demonstrate that JNK is involved in CD8(+) T-cell-mediated antiviral responses. Deficiency of either JNK1 or JNK2 impaired viral clearance, subsequently resulting in an increased susceptibility to ectromelia virus in resistant mice. The impairment of CD8 responses in JNK-deficient mice was not directly due to an inhibition of effector T-cell expansion, as both JNK1 and JNK2 had limited effect on the activation-induced cell death of CD8(+) T cells, and only JNK2-deficient mice exhibited a significant change in CD8(+) T-cell proliferation after acute ectromelia virus infection. However, optimal activation of CD8(+) T cells and their effector functions require signals from both JNK1 and JNK2. Our results suggest that the JNK pathway acts as a critical intermediate in antiviral immunity through regulation of the activation and effector function of CD8(+) T cells rather than by altering their expansion. PMID:24673683

  3. Antiviral activity of extracts from Morinda citrifolia leaves and chlorophyll catabolites, pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Ratnoglik, Suratno Lulut; Aoki, Chie; Sudarmono, Pratiwi; Komoto, Mari; Deng, Lin; Shoji, Ikuo; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Hotta, Hak

    2014-03-01

    The development of complementary and/or alternative drugs for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still needed. Antiviral compounds in medicinal plants are potentially good targets to study. Morinda citrifolia is a common plant distributed widely in Indo-Pacific region; its fruits and leaves are food sources and are also used as a treatment in traditional medicine. In this study, using a HCV cell culture system, it was demonstrated that a methanol extract, its n-hexane, and ethyl acetate fractions from M. citrifolia leaves possess anti-HCV activities with 50%-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 20.6, 6.1, and 6.6 μg/mL, respectively. Bioactivity-guided purification and structural analysis led to isolation and identification of pheophorbide a, the major catabolite of chlorophyll a, as an anti-HCV compound present in the extracts (IC(50) = 0.3 μg/mL). It was also found that pyropheophorbide a possesses anti-HCV activity (IC(50) = 0.2 μg/mL). The 50%-cytotoxic concentrations (CC(50)) of pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a were 10.0 and 7.2 μg/mL, respectively, their selectivity indexes being 33 and 36, respectively. On the other hand, chlorophyll a, sodium copper chlorophyllin, and pheophytin a barely, or only marginally, exhibited anti-HCV activities. Time-of-addition analysis revealed that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a act at both entry and the post-entry steps. The present results suggest that pheophorbide a and its related compounds would be good candidates for seed compounds for developing antivirals against HCV. PMID:24438164

  4. Antiviral activity of trappin-2 and elafin in vitro and in vivo against genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Drannik, Anna G; Nag, Kakon; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2013-07-01

    Serine protease inhibitor elafin (E) and its precursor, trappin-2 (Tr), have been associated with mucosal resistance to HIV-1 infection. We recently showed that Tr/E are among principal anti-HIV-1 molecules in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) fluid, that E is ∼130 times more potent than Tr against HIV-1, and that Tr/E inhibited HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis across human genital epithelial cells (ECs). Since herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a major sexually transmitted infection and risk factor for HIV-1 infection and transmission, we assessed Tr/E contribution to defense against HSV-2. Our in vitro studies demonstrated that pretreatment of endometrial (HEC-1A) and endocervical (End1/E6E7) ECs with human Tr-expressing adenovirus (Ad/Tr) or recombinant Tr/E proteins before or after HSV-2 infection resulted in significantly reduced virus titers compared to those of controls. Interestingly, E was ∼7 times more potent against HSV-2 infection than Tr. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous Tr/E by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly increased HSV-2 replication in genital ECs. Recombinant Tr and E reduced viral attachment to genital ECs by acting indirectly on cells. Further, lower viral replication was associated with reduced secretion of proinflammatory interleukin 8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and decreased NF-κB nuclear translocation. Additionally, protected Ad/Tr-treated ECs demonstrated enhanced interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) nuclear translocation and increased antiviral IFN-β in response to HSV-2. Lastly, in vivo studies of intravaginal HSV-2 infection in Tr-transgenic mice (Etg) showed that despite similar virus replication in the genital tract, Etg mice had reduced viral load and TNF-α in the central nervous system compared to controls. Collectively, this is the first experimental evidence highlighting anti-HSV-2 activity of Tr/E in female genital mucosa. PMID:23637403

  5. Antiviral Activity of Trappin-2 and Elafin In Vitro and In Vivo against Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Drannik, Anna G.; Nag, Kakon; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitor elafin (E) and its precursor, trappin-2 (Tr), have been associated with mucosal resistance to HIV-1 infection. We recently showed that Tr/E are among principal anti-HIV-1 molecules in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) fluid, that E is ∼130 times more potent than Tr against HIV-1, and that Tr/E inhibited HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis across human genital epithelial cells (ECs). Since herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a major sexually transmitted infection and risk factor for HIV-1 infection and transmission, we assessed Tr/E contribution to defense against HSV-2. Our in vitro studies demonstrated that pretreatment of endometrial (HEC-1A) and endocervical (End1/E6E7) ECs with human Tr-expressing adenovirus (Ad/Tr) or recombinant Tr/E proteins before or after HSV-2 infection resulted in significantly reduced virus titers compared to those of controls. Interestingly, E was ∼7 times more potent against HSV-2 infection than Tr. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous Tr/E by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly increased HSV-2 replication in genital ECs. Recombinant Tr and E reduced viral attachment to genital ECs by acting indirectly on cells. Further, lower viral replication was associated with reduced secretion of proinflammatory interleukin 8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and decreased NF-κB nuclear translocation. Additionally, protected Ad/Tr-treated ECs demonstrated enhanced interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) nuclear translocation and increased antiviral IFN-β in response to HSV-2. Lastly, in vivo studies of intravaginal HSV-2 infection in Tr-transgenic mice (Etg) showed that despite similar virus replication in the genital tract, Etg mice had reduced viral load and TNF-α in the central nervous system compared to controls. Collectively, this is the first experimental evidence highlighting anti-HSV-2 activity of Tr/E in female genital mucosa. PMID:23637403

  6. Antiviral activity of platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes of pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Varadinova, T; Kovala-Demertzi, D; Rupelieva, M; Demertzis, M; Genova, P

    2001-04-01

    A heterocyclic compound, pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (HFoTsc), and its six metal coordinated bound complexes, three with platinum (II) and three with palladium (II), were studied for their activity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in cultured cells. According to their cytotoxicity the compounds were divided into two groups. Group I (cytotoxic compounds) included all three palladium complexes and [Pt(HFoTsc)2] Cl2, with maximum non-toxic concentration (MNC) of 1-10 micromol/l and a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 20-100 micromol/l. Group 2 (low cytotoxic compounds) with MNC of 100 micromol/l and CC50 of 548-5820 micromol/l included compounds in the following order: [Pt(HFoTsc)2] Cl2antiviral activity. IC50 and SI values of HFoTsc increased in parallel with the duration of action in HSV-1-infected cells. All three platinum complexes as well as [Pd(HFoTsc)2]Cl2 and [Pd(FoTsc)2] inhibited HSV- I infection following a structure-activity relationship but only [Pt(HFoTsc)2]Cl2 expressed a significant selectivity comparable to that of HFoTsc. However, [PdCl(FoTsc)] acting 48 hrs gave a higher infectious HSV-1 titer (170%) compared to control (100%, no compound). PMID:11719987

  7. Antiviral Combination Approach as a Perspective to Combat Enterovirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Galabov, Angel S; Nikolova, Ivanka; Vassileva-Pencheva, Ralitsa; Stoyanova, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Human enteroviruses distributed worldwide are causative agents of a broad spectrum of diseases with extremely high morbidity, including a series of severe illnesses of the central nervous system, heart, endocrine pancreas, skeleton muscles, etc., as well as the common cold contributing to the development of chronic respiratory diseases, including the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The above mentioned diseases along with the significantly high morbidity and mortality in children, as well as in the high-risk populations (immunodeficiencies, neonates) definitely formulate the chemotherapy as the main tool for the control of enterovirus infections. At present, clinically effective antivirals for use in the treatment of enteroviral infection do not exist, in spite of the large amount of work carried out in this field. The main reason for this is the development of drug resistance. We studied the process of development of resistance to the strongest inhibitors of enteroviruses, WIN compounds (VP1 protein hydrophobic pocket blockers), especially in the models in vivo, Coxsackievirus B (CV-B) infections in mice. We introduced the tracing of a panel of phenotypic markers (MIC50 value, plaque shape and size, stability at 50℃, pathogenicity in mice) for characterization of the drug-mutants (resistant and dependent) as a very important stage in the study of enterovirus inhibitors. Moreover, as a result of VP1 RNA sequence analysis performed on the model of disoxaril mutants of CVB1, we determined the molecular basis of the drug-resistance. The monotherapy courses were the only approach used till now. For the first time in the research for anti-enterovirus antivirals our team introduced the testing of combination effect of the selective inhibitors of enterovirus replication with different mode of action. This study resulted in the selection of a number of very effective in vitro double combinations with synergistic effect and a broad spectrum of sensitive

  8. Chemically sulfated natural galactomannans with specific antiviral and anticoagulant activities.

    PubMed

    Muschin, Tegshi; Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shuqin, Han; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring galactomannans were sulfated to give sulfated galactomannans with degrees of substitution of 0.7-1.4 per sugar unit and molecular weights of M¯n=0.6×10(4)-2.4×10(4). Sulfated galactomannans were found to have specific biological activities in vitro such as anticoagulant, anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities. The biological activities were compared with those of standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, which are polysaccharides with potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity. It was found that sulfated galactomannans had moderate to high anticoagulant activity, 13.4-36.6unit/mg, compared to that of dextran and curdlan sulfates, 22.7 and 10.0unit/mg, and high anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities, 0.04-0.8μg/mL and 0.2-1.1μg/mL, compared to those curdlan sulfates, 0.1μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity on MT-4 and LCC-MK2 cells was low. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of sulfated galactomannans revealed strong interaction with poly-l-lysine as a model compound of virus proteins, and suggested that the specific biological activities might originate in the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged sulfate groups of sulfated galactomannans and positively charged amino groups of surface proteins of viruses. These results suggest that sulfated galactomannans effectively prevented the infection of cells by viruses and the degree of substitution and molecular weights played important roles in the biological activities. PMID:27154517

  9. Carbohydrate recognition by the antiviral lectin cyanovirin-N.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yukiji K; Green, David F

    2012-12-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CVN) is a cyanobacterial lectin with potent antiviral activity and has been the focus of extensive preclinical investigation as a potential prophylactic for the prevention of the sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here we present a detailed analysis of carbohydrate recognition by this important protein, using a combination of computational methods, including extensive molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) energetic analysis. The simulation results strongly suggest that the observed tendency of wild-type CVN to form domain-swapped dimers is the result of a previously unidentified cis-peptide bond present in the monomeric state. The energetic analysis additionally indicates that the highest-affinity ligand for CVN characterized to date (α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man) is recognized asymmetrically by the two binding sites. Finally, we are able to provide a detailed map of the role of all binding site functional groups (both backbone and side chain) to various aspects of molecular recognition: general affinity for cognate ligands, specificity for distinct oligosaccharide targets, and the asymmetric recognition of α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man. Taken as a whole, these results complement past experimental characterization (both structural and thermodynamic) to provide the most complete understanding of carbohydrate recognition by CVN to date. The results also provide strong support for the application of similar approaches to the understanding of other protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:23057413

  10. Host-Targeting Agents to Prevent and Cure Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Crouchet, Emilie; Baumert, Thomas F.; Schuster, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which are leading indications of liver transplantation (LT). To date, there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection and LT is invariably followed by infection of the liver graft. Within the past years, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have had a major impact on the management of chronic hepatitis C, which has become a curable disease in the majority of DAA-treated patients. In contrast to DAAs that target viral proteins, host-targeting agents (HTAs) interfere with cellular factors involved in the viral life cycle. By acting through a complementary mechanism of action and by exhibiting a generally higher barrier to resistance, HTAs offer a prospective option to prevent and treat viral resistance. Indeed, given their complementary mechanism of action, HTAs and DAAs can act in a synergistic manner to reduce viral loads. This review summarizes the different classes of HTAs against HCV infection that are in preclinical or clinical development and highlights their potential to prevent HCV infection, e.g., following LT, and to tailor combination treatments to cure chronic HCV infection. PMID:26540069

  11. Host-Targeting Agents to Prevent and Cure Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Mirjam B; Crouchet, Emilie; Baumert, Thomas F; Schuster, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which are leading indications of liver transplantation (LT). To date, there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection and LT is invariably followed by infection of the liver graft. Within the past years, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have had a major impact on the management of chronic hepatitis C, which has become a curable disease in the majority of DAA-treated patients. In contrast to DAAs that target viral proteins, host-targeting agents (HTAs) interfere with cellular factors involved in the viral life cycle. By acting through a complementary mechanism of action and by exhibiting a generally higher barrier to resistance, HTAs offer a prospective option to prevent and treat viral resistance. Indeed, given their complementary mechanism of action, HTAs and DAAs can act in a synergistic manner to reduce viral loads. This review summarizes the different classes of HTAs against HCV infection that are in preclinical or clinical development and highlights their potential to prevent HCV infection, e.g., following LT, and to tailor combination treatments to cure chronic HCV infection. PMID:26540069

  12. Fibrosing Cholestatic Hepatitis in a Complicated Case of an Adult Recipient After Liver Transplantation: Diagnostic Findings and Therapeutic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Onishi, Yasuharu; Kamei, Hideya; Kurata, Nobuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Ogura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis Symptoms: Prolonged jaundice and intractable ascites Medication: Steroid pulse therapy and direct-acting antivirals Clinical Procedure: Liver transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Hepatitis C recurrence is a serious matter after liver transplantation (LT). Approximately 10% of hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive recipients develop fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis (FCH). FCH rapidly results in graft loss. Currently, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective and safe for hepatitis C, even after LT. However, only a few cases of successfully treated FCH after LT have been reported. We present FCH in a complicated case with sepsis and portal flow obstruction after LT. Case Report: A 66-year-old man underwent cadaveric LT. Liver function disorders were observed from post-operative day (POD) 22. Sepsis repeated on POD 38, 74, and 101. Steroid pulse therapy was given from POD 40 to 54. The infectious focus was surgically removed on POD 89. Interventional radiology for portal venous obstruction was completed on POD 96. To make a real-time diagnosis and to investigate the graft condition, repeat liver needle biopsies (LNBs) were taken. Although there was a combined impact of sepsis, portal flow decrease, and recurrent hepatitis C on graft failure, it was interesting that recurrent hepatitis C was consistently detectable from the first LNB. HCV-ribonucleic acid increased on POD 68. Liver function disorders peaked on POD 71 and 72. Jaundice peaked on POD 82. DAA induction was regrettably delayed because of a reluctance to introduce DAAs under conditions of graft dysfunction. DAAs were administered after hospital discharge. Conclusions: A real-time and precise diagnosis based on histopathological examination and viral measurement is important for FCH treatment. Well-considered therapy with DAAs should be aggressively introduced for potentially fatal

  13. In vitro antiviral activity of plant extracts from Asteraceae medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the high prevalence of viral infections having no specific treatment and the constant appearance of resistant viral strains, the development of novel antiviral agents is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), poliovirus type 2 (PV-2) and vesicular stomatitis virus of organic (OE) and aqueous extracts (AE) from: Baccharis gaudichaudiana, B. spicata, Bidens subalternans, Pluchea sagittalis, Tagetes minuta and Tessaria absinthioides. A characterization of the antiviral activity of B. gaudichaudiana OE and AE and the bioassay-guided fractionation of the former and isolation of one active compound is also reported. Methods The antiviral activity of the OE and AE of the selected plants was evaluated by reduction of the viral cytopathic effect. Active extracts were then assessed by plaque reduction assays. The antiviral activity of the most active extracts was characterized by evaluating their effect on the pretreatment, the virucidal activity and the effect on the adsorption or post-adsorption period of the viral cycle. The bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE was carried out by column chromatography followed by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography fractionation of the most active fraction and isolation of an active compound. The antiviral activity of this compound was also evaluated by plaque assay. Results B. gaudichaudiana and B. spicata OE were active against PV-2 and VSV. T. absinthioides OE was only active against PV-2. The corresponding three AE were active against HSV-1. B. gaudichaudiana extracts (OE and AE) were the most selective ones with selectivity index (SI) values of 10.9 (PV-2) and >117 (HSV-1). For this reason, both extracts of B. gaudichaudiana were selected to characterize their antiviral effects. Further bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE led to an active fraction, FC (EC50

  14. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Mirazo, Santiago; Dutra, Carmelo; Pérez, Andrés; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Frabasile, Sandra; Koncke, Elina; Davyt, Danilo; Cavallaro, Lucía; Heinzen, Horacio; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI) obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1. PMID:22619617

  15. Natural variation in Fc glycosylation of HIV-specific antibodies impacts antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Crispin, Max; Yu, Xiaojie; Baruah, Kavitha; Boesch, Austin W.; Harvey, David J.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Heizen, Erin L.; Ercan, Altan; Choi, Ickwon; Streeck, Hendrik; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Scanlan, Chris; Alter, Galit

    2013-01-01

    While the induction of a neutralizing antibody response against HIV remains a daunting goal, data from both natural infection and vaccine-induced immune responses suggest that it may be possible to induce antibodies with enhanced Fc effector activity and improved antiviral control via vaccination. However, the specific features of naturally induced HIV-specific antibodies that allow for the potent recruitment of antiviral activity and the means by which these functions are regulated are poorly defined. Because antibody effector functions are critically dependent on antibody Fc domain glycosylation, we aimed to define the natural glycoforms associated with robust Fc-mediated antiviral activity. We demonstrate that spontaneous control of HIV and improved antiviral activity are associated with a dramatic shift in the global antibody-glycosylation profile toward agalactosylated glycoforms. HIV-specific antibodies exhibited an even greater frequency of agalactosylated, afucosylated, and asialylated glycans. These glycoforms were associated with enhanced Fc-mediated reduction of viral replication and enhanced Fc receptor binding and were consistent with transcriptional profiling of glycosyltransferases in peripheral B cells. These data suggest that B cell programs tune antibody glycosylation actively in an antigen-specific manner, potentially contributing to antiviral control during HIV infection. PMID:23563315

  16. Synthesis and antiviral properties of novel indole-based thiosemicarbazides and 4-thiazolidinones.

    PubMed

    Cihan-Üstündağ, Gökçe; Gürsoy, Elif; Naesens, Lieve; Ulusoy-Güzeldemirci, Nuray; Çapan, Gültaze

    2016-01-15

    A novel series of indolylthiosemicarbazides (6a-6g) and their cyclization products, 4-thiazolidinones (7a-7g), have been designed, synthesized and evaluated, in vitro, for their antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. Compounds 6a, 6b, 6c and 6d exhibited notable antiviral activity against Coxsackie B4 virus, at EC50 values ranging from 0.4 to 2.1 μg/mL. The selectivity index (ratio of cytotoxic to antivirally effective concentration) values of these compounds were between 9 and 56. Besides, 6b, 6c and 6d also inhibited the replication of two other RNA viruses, Sindbis virus and respiratory syncytial virus, although these EC50 values were higher compared to those noted for Coxsackie B4 virus. The SAR analysis indicated that keeping the free thiosemicarbazide moiety is crucial to obtain this antiviral activity, since the cyclization products (7a-7g) did not produce any antiviral effect. PMID:26707844

  17. Clinical application of transient elastography in patients with chronic viral hepatitis receiving antiviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hyung; Kim, Mi Na; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-04-01

    Accurate evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) is crucial, as liver fibrosis is important in determining the prognosis of liver diseases. Currently, liver biopsy (LB) is considered the gold standard for staging liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. However, utilization of LB in clinical practice is often limited because of its invasive nature, sampling error and interobserver variability. Recently, transient elastography (TE) was introduced as a noninvasive, highly reproducible technique for assessing the degree of liver fibrosis. After extensive studies, TE is now regarded as a reliable surrogate marker for grading the severity of liver fibrosis in patients with CLD. In the past few years, the role of TE in monitoring liver stiffness and determining prognosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) or chronic hepatitis C (CHC) who are undergoing antiviral treatment has been investigated. In patients with CHB, liver stiffness values decrease with antiviral treatment. TE can also be used to predict the incidence of liver-related events during antiviral treatment. In patients with CHC, TE can be used to monitor potential regression of liver fibrosis after antiviral treatment and may predict the treatment outcome of CHC. In addition, TE is an adjunct tool for distinguishing inactive hepatitis B virus carriers from patients with chronic active hepatitis. This review article discusses the important findings from recent studies focusing on the clinical application of TE in patients with chronic viral hepatitis who are undergoing antiviral treatments. PMID:24976523

  18. A new antiviral screening method that simultaneously detects viral replication, cell viability, and cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Matza-Porges, Sigal; Eisen, Kobi; Ibrahim, Hadeel; Haberman, Adva; Fridlender, Bertold; Joseph, Gili

    2014-11-01

    Viruses cause a variety of illnesses in humans, yet only a few antiviral drugs have been developed; thus, new antiviral drugs are urgently needed. Plants could be a good source of antiviral drugs, they do not have mobility and can only defend themselves by producing compounds against pathogens such as viruses in their own fix environment. These compounds may have the potential to inhibit animal and human viruses as well. In this study, a fast and reliable method for screening plant extracts for specific antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) was developed. This method distinguishes between host cell death due to infectivity and multiplicity of the virus versus toxicity of the plant extract. Extracts from 80 plant and plant organs were screened using this approach. Six plant extracts showed potential to exert specific HSV-1 growth inhibition activity. In two cases, different organs from the same plant showed similar active results. With this method it is possible to screen a large number of extracts in a rapid and accurate way to detect antiviral substances against HSV-I and other viruses. PMID:25152527

  19. Antiviral activity of Acacia nilotica against Hepatitis C Virus in liver infected cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) belonging to the family Flaviviridae has infected 3% of the population worldwide and 6% of the population in Pakistan. The only recommended standard treatment is pegylated INF-α plus ribavirin. Due to less compatibility of the standard treatment, thirteen medicinal plants were collected from different areas of Pakistan on the basis of undocumented antiviral reports against different viral infections. Medicinal plants were air dried, extracted and screened out against HCV by infecting HCV inoculums of 3a genotype in liver cells. RT-PCR results demonstrate that acetonic and methanolic extract of Acacia nilotica (AN) showed more than 50% reduction at non toxic concentration. From the above results, it can be concluded that by selecting different molecular targets, specific structure-activity relationship can be achieved by doing mechanistic analysis. So, additional studies are required for the isolation and recognition of antiviral compound in AN to establish its importance as antiviral drug against HCV. For further research, we will scrutinize the synergistic effect of active antiviral compound in combination with standard PEG INF-α and ribavirin which may be helpful in exploring further gateways for antiviral therapy against HCV. PMID:21569385

  20. Therapeutic antiviral T cells noncytopathically clear persistently infected microglia after conversion into antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Jasmin; Johnson, Kory R.

    2015-01-01

    Several viruses can infect the mammalian nervous system and induce neurological dysfunction. Adoptive immunotherapy is an approach that involves administration of antiviral T cells and has shown promise in clinical studies for the treatment of peripheral virus infections in humans such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus, among others. In contrast, clearance of neurotropic infections is particularly challenging because the central nervous system (CNS) is relatively intolerant of immunopathological reactions. Therefore, it is essential to develop and mechanistically understand therapies that noncytopathically eradicate pathogens from the CNS. Here, we used mice persistently infected from birth with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to demonstrate that therapeutic antiviral T cells can completely purge the persistently infected brain without causing blood–brain barrier breakdown or tissue damage. Mechanistically, this is accomplished through a tailored release of chemoattractants that recruit antiviral T cells, but few pathogenic innate immune cells such as neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Upon arrival, T cells enlisted the support of nearly all brain-resident myeloid cells (microglia) by inducing proliferation and converting them into CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Two-photon imaging experiments revealed that antiviral CD8+ and CD4+ T cells interacted directly with CD11c+ microglia and induced STAT1 signaling but did not initiate programmed cell death. We propose that noncytopathic CNS viral clearance can be achieved by therapeutic antiviral T cells reliant on restricted chemoattractant production and interactions with apoptosis-resistant microglia. PMID:26122661