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Sample records for acting mu-opioid receptor

  1. Methylnaltrexone, a new peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist being evaluated for the treatment of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Michael D

    2008-09-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI), a transient impairment of bowel function, is considered an inevitable response after open abdominal surgery. It leads to significant patient morbidity and increased hospital costs and length of stay. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, involving neurogenic, hormonal, inflammatory and pharmacologic mediators. Several treatments have been shown to reduce the duration of POI, and a multimodal approach combining several of these interventions seems to be the most effective treatment option. Various drug therapies have been evaluated for the treatment of POI, although most have not shown any benefit. Peripherally active mu-opioid receptor antagonists are a new class of compounds that selectively block the peripheral (i.e., gastrointestinal [GI]) effects of opioids while preserving centrally mediated analgesia. Recently, alvimopan was approved in the US for the treatment of POI after abdominal surgery with bowel resection. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally active mu-opioid receptor antagonist that has been shown to antagonize the inhibitory effects of opioids on GI transit without impairing analgesia. Phase II data indicated that methylnaltrexone was effective for improving GI recovery, reducing POI and shortening the time to discharge readiness in patients who underwent segmental colectomy. Two Phase III trials have been completed, and one is underway at present. Preliminary results from the two completed trials indicate that methylnaltrexone was not better than placebo for the primary or secondary outcomes. Further analyses of these data, clinical trial designs and the various dosage forms are necessary to determine the potential role of methylnaltrexone in the treatment of POI.

  2. Orvinols with Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [35S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile. PMID:23438330

  3. Orvinols with mixed kappa/mu opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Greedy, Benjamin M; Bradbury, Faye; Thomas, Mark P; Grivas, Konstantinos; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Archambeau, Ashley; Bosse, Kelly; Clark, Mary J; Aceto, Mario; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2013-04-25

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile.

  4. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas.

  5. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Elyssa B.; Fields, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  6. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Elyssa B; Fields, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  7. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) whose products were then sequenced. Results Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T > C and 877G > A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G > C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant. Discussion It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T > C, 877G > A and 1043G > C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population. PMID:25436079

  8. Splice variation of the mu-opioid receptor and its effect on the action of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Droney, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary points An individual’s response to opioids is influenced by a complex combination of genetic, molecular and phenotypic factors. Intra- and inter-individual variations in response to mu opioids have led to the suggestion that mu-opioid receptor subtypes exist. Scientists have now proven that mu-opioid receptor subtypes exist and that they occur through a mechanism promoting protein diversity, called alternative splicing. The ability of mu opioids to differentially activate splice variants may explain some of the clinical differences observed between mu opioids. This article examines how differential activation of splice variants by mu opioids occurs through alternative mu-opioid receptor binding, through differential receptor activation, and as a result of the distinct distribution of variants located regionally and at the cellular level. PMID:26516547

  9. Mu opioid receptor polymorphism, early social adversity, and social traits.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Kim, Youngmee

    2016-10-01

    A polymorphism in the mu opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971) has been investigated for its role in sensitivity to social contexts. Evidence suggests that the G allele of this polymorphism is associated with higher levels of sensitivity. This study tested for main effects of the polymorphism and its interaction with a self-report measure of childhood adversity as an index of negative environment. Outcomes were several personality measures relevant to social connection. Significant interactions were obtained, such that the negative impact of childhood adversity on personality was greater among G carriers than among A homozygotes on measures of agreeableness, interdependence, anger proneness, hostility, authentic pride, life engagement, and an index of (mostly negative) feelings coloring one's world view. Findings support the role of OPRM1 in sensitivity to negative environments. Limitations are noted, including the lack of a measure of advantageous social environment to assess sensitivity to positive social contexts.

  10. Ligand-Specific Regulation of the Endogenous Mu-Opioid Receptor by Chronic Treatment with Mu-Opioid Peptide Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Murányi, Marianna; Cinar, Resat; Kékesi, Orsolya; Birkás, Erika; Fábián, Gabriella; Bozó, Beáta; Zentai, András; Tóth, Géza; Kicsi, Emese Gabriella; Mácsai, Mónika; Szabó, Gyula; Szücs, Mária

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endomorphins (EM), the postulated endogenous peptide agonists of the mu-opioid receptors, several analogues have been synthesized to improve their binding and pharmacological profiles. We have shown previously that a new analogue, cis-1S,2R-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid2-endomorphin-2 (ACHC-EM2), had elevated mu-receptor affinity, selectivity, and proteolytic stability over the parent compound. In the present work, we have studied its antinociceptive effects and receptor regulatory processes. ACHC-EM2 displayed a somewhat higher (60%) acute antinociceptive response than the parent peptide, EM2 (45%), which peaked at 10 min after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration in the rat tail-flick test. Analgesic tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of ACHC-EM2 upon its repeated icv injection that was complete by a 10-day treatment. This was accompanied by attenuated coupling of mu-sites to G-proteins in subcellular fractions of rat brain. Also, the density of mu-receptors was upregulated by about 40% in the light membrane fraction, with no detectable changes in surface binding. Distinct receptor regulatory processes were noted in subcellular fractions of rat brains made tolerant by the prototypic full mu-agonist peptide, DAMGO, and its chloromethyl ketone derivative, DAMCK. These results are discussed in light of the recently discovered phenomenon, that is, the “so-called biased agonism” or “functional selectivity”. PMID:24350273

  11. Prolonged central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after single and repeated nalmefene dosing.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Kimmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Någren, Kjell; Juhakoski, Auni; Karhuvaara, Sakari; Kallio, Antero; Oikonen, Vesa; Hietala, Jarmo; Scheinin, Harry

    2005-12-01

    The opioid antagonist nalmefene offers an alternative to traditional pharmacological treatments for alcoholism. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between nalmefene plasma concentration and central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after a clinically effective dose (20 mg, orally). Pharmacokinetics and mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene after single and repeated dosing over 7 days was studied in 12 healthy subjects. Serial blood samples were obtained after both dosings, and pharmacokinetic parameters for nalmefene and main metabolites were determined. Central mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]carfentanil at four time points (3, 26, 50, 74 h) after both dosings. Nalmefene was rapidly absorbed in all subjects. The mean t(1/2) of nalmefene was 13.4 h after single and repeated dosing. The accumulation of nalmefene and its main metabolites in plasma during the repeated dosing period was as expected for a drug with linear pharmacokinetics, and steady-state was reached for all analytes. Both nalmefene dosings resulted in a very high occupancy at mu-opioid receptors (87-100%), and the decline in the occupancy was similar after both dosings but clearly slower than the decline in the plasma concentration of nalmefene or metabolites. High nalmefene occupancy (83-100%) persisted at 26 h after the dosings. The prolonged mu-opioid receptor occupancy by nalmefene indicates slow dissociation of the drug from mu-opioid receptors. These results support the rational of administering nalmefene when needed before alcohol drinking, and they additionally suggest that a high mu-opioid receptor occupancy can be maintained when nalmefene is taken once daily.

  12. Opioid agonist and antagonist treatment differentially regulates immunoreactive mu-opioid receptors and dynamin-2 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yoburn, Byron C; Purohit, Vishal; Patel, Kaushal; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2004-09-13

    Opioid agonists and antagonists can regulate the density of mu-opioid receptors in whole animal and in cell culture. High intrinsic efficacy agonists (e.g., etorphine), but not lower intrinsic efficacy agonists (e.g., morphine), produce mu-opioid receptor down-regulation and can alter the abundance of mu-opioid receptor mRNA. Conversely, opioid antagonists substantially increase the density of mu-opioid receptors without changing its mRNA. Mu-opioid receptor up-regulation has been associated with decreases in the trafficking protein dynamin-2, whereas mu-opioid receptor down-regulation produces an increase in dynamin-2 abundance. To probe the differences between opioid agonist and antagonist-induced mu-opioid receptor regulation, the current study determined changes in mu-opioid receptor density using a combined radioligand binding ([3H] DAMGO) and quantitative Western blotting approach in mouse spinal cord. Furthermore, the differences between intermittent and continuous dosing protocols were evaluated. Continuous (7-8 days) s.c. infusions of naloxone (5 mg/kg/day) or naltrexone (15 mg s.c. implant pellet) increased mu-opioid receptor density in radioligand binding assays (approximately +80%) in mouse spinal cord and down-regulated dynamin-2 abundance (approximately -30%), but had no effect on the abundance of immunoreactive mu-opioid receptor. Continuous (7 days) s.c. infusion of etorphine (200 microg/kg/day) decreased immunoreactive mu-opioid receptor (approximately -35%) and [3H] DAMGO binding (approximately -30%), and concurrently increased dynamin-2 abundance (approximately +40%). Continuous (7 days) morphine infusion (40 mg/kg/day plus 25 mg s.c. implant pellet) had no effect on any outcome measure. Delivery of the same daily dose of etorphine or naloxone using intermittent (every 24 h for 7 days) s.c. administration had no effect on immunoreactive mu-opioid receptor, [3H] DAMGO binding or dynamin-2 abundance. These data indicate that mu-opioid receptor

  13. The presence of the mu-opioid receptor in the isthmus of mare oviduct.

    PubMed

    Desantis, S; Albrizio, M; Ventriglia, G; Deflorio, M; Guaricci, A C; Minoia, R; De Metrio, G

    2008-05-01

    The presence of the mu-opioid receptor and the type of glycosylation in the third extra-cellular loop of this receptor was investigated in the isthmus of mare oviduct during oestrus by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry combined with enzymatic (N-glycosidase F and O-glycosidase) and chemical (beta-elimination) treatments. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the mu-opioid receptor consists of two peptides with molecular weights of around 65 and 50 kDa. After N-deglycosylation with N-glycosidase F an additional immunoreactive peptide was observed at around 30 KDa. The cleavage of O-glycans by O-glycosidase failed in immunoblotting as well as in immunohistochemistry investigations, revealing that the third extra-cellular loop of the mu-opioid receptor expressed in mare isthmus oviduct contains some modifications of the Galbeta(1-3)GalNAc core binding to serine or threonine. Immunohistochemistry revealed the mu-opioid receptor in the mucosal epithelium, some stromal cells, muscle cells and blood vessels. In ciliated cells the mu-opioid receptor showed N-linked glycans, since the immunoreactivity was abolished after N-glycosidase F treatment, whereas it was preserved in the apical region after beta-elimination. Most non-ciliated cells expressed the mu-opioid receptor with both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, as revealed by the abolition of immunostaining after N-glycosidase F and beta-elimination. Stromal cells, endothelial and muscle cells of blood vessels expressed the mu-opioid receptor containing both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. Myosalpinx myocytes expressed the mu-opioid receptor with O-linked oligosaccharides. The immunopositive myocytes formed a circular coat in the intrinsic musculature, whereas they were arranged in some isolated, oblique bundles in the extrinsic musculature. In conclusion, the mu-opioid receptor could have a role in the production and the movement of isthmus lumen content that contributes to ensuring the effective

  14. The analgesic efficacy of fentanyl: relationship to tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2008-11-01

    This study determined if fentanyl analgesic efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation. To estimate efficacy, mice were injected i.p. with saline or clocinnamox (CCAM), an irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist, (0.32-25.6 mg/kg) and 24 h later fentanyl cumulative dose-response studies were conducted. CCAM dose dependently shifted the fentanyl dose-response function to the right. The apparent efficacy (tau) of fentanyl, based on the operational model of agonism, was estimated as 58, indicating that fentanyl is a high analgesic efficacy agonist. Next, mice were infused with fentanyl (1, 2 or 4 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Controls were implanted with placebo pellets. At the end of 7 days, morphine cumulative dose-response studies or mu-opioid receptor saturation binding studies were conducted. Fentanyl infusions dose dependently decreased morphine potency with the highest fentanyl dose reducing morphine potency by approximately 6 fold. Chronic infusion with fentanyl (4 mg/kg/day) significantly reduced mu-opioid receptor density by 28% without altering affinity, whereas lower infusion doses had no effect. Taken together, the present results strengthen the proposal that opioid analgesic efficacy predicts mu-opioid receptor regulation and the magnitude of tolerance.

  15. Hydromorphone efficacy and treatment protocol impact on tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Priyank; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2008-11-12

    This study examined the antinociceptive (analgesic) efficacy of hydromorphone and hydromorphone-induced tolerance and regulation of mu-opioid receptor density. Initially s.c. hydromorphone's time of peak analgesic (tail-flick) effect (45 min) and ED50 using standard and cumulative dosing protocols (0.22 mg/kg, 0.37 mg/kg, respectively) were determined. The apparent analgesic efficacy (tau) of hydromorphone was then estimated using the operational model of agonism and the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox. Mice were injected with clocinnamox (0.32-25.6 mg/kg, i.p.) and 24 h later, the analgesic potency of hydromorphone was determined. The tau value for hydromorphone was 35, which suggested that hydromorphone is a lower analgesic efficacy opioid agonist. To examine hydromorphone-induced tolerance, mice were continuously infused s.c. with hydromorphone (2.1-31.5 mg/kg/day) for 7 days and then morphine cumulative dose response studies were performed. Other groups of mice were injected with hydromorphone (2.2-22 mg/kg/day) once, or intermittently every 24 h for 7 days. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, mice were tested using morphine cumulative dosing studies. There was more tolerance with infusion treatments compared to intermittent treatment. When compared to higher analgesic efficacy opioids, hydromorphone infusions induced substantially more tolerance. Finally, the effect of chronic infusion (31.5 mg/kg/day) and 7 day intermittent (22 mg/kg/day) hydromorphone treatment on spinal cord mu-opioid receptor density was determined. Hydromorphone did not produce any change in mu-opioid receptor density following either treatment. These results support suggestions that analgesic efficacy is correlated with tolerance magnitude and regulation of mu-opioid receptors when opioid agonists are continuously administered. Taken together, these studies indicate that analgesic efficacy and treatment protocol are important in determining tolerance and

  16. Shadows across mu-Star? Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors revisited.

    PubMed

    Connor, Mark

    2009-04-01

    Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors (mu* receptors) are reported to be formed following prolonged agonist treatment of cells or whole animals. mu* receptors signal in the absence of activating ligand and a blockade of mu* activation of G-proteins by naloxone and naltrexone has been suggested to underlie the profound withdrawal syndrome precipitated by these antagonists in vivo. In this issue of the Journal, Divin et al. examined whether treatment of C6 glioma cells with mu-opioid receptor agonists produced constitutively active mu-opioid receptors or other commonly reported adaptations to prolonged agonist treatment. Adenylyl cyclase superactivation was readily apparent following agonist treatment but there was no evidence of the formation of constitutively active mu-opioid receptors. This result challenges the notion that prolonged agonist exposure inevitably produces mu* receptors, and is consistent with many studies of adaptations in neurons produced by chronic agonist treatment. The investigators provide no explanation of their failure to see mu* receptors in C6 cells, but this is perhaps understandable because the molecular nature of mu* receptors remains elusive, and the precise mechanisms that lead to their formation are unknown. Without knowing exactly what mu* receptors are, how they are formed and how they signal, understanding their role in cellular adaptations to prolonged opioid treatment will remain impossible. Studies such as this should refocus attention on establishing the molecular mechanisms that underlie that phenomenon of mu* receptors. PMID:19368530

  17. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the human mu opioid receptor (hMOR) gene: evidence of positive and negative cis-acting elements in the proximal promoter and presence of a distal promoter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Carr, L G

    2001-07-01

    The mu opioid receptor (MOR), the primary binding site for morphine, is an important target for treating pain and drug addiction. The MOR gene is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, and potential polymorphisms in its 5' regulatory region can cause individual variation in MOR gene expression, nociception, and opiate responses. To study the 5' regulatory region of the human MOR gene (hMOR), we further investigated our previous finding of two regulatory regions and have localized a 40-bp positive cis-acting element and a 35-bp negative cis-acting element that regulate hMOR transcription in SK-N-SH cells. Electromobility shift assays and methylation interference assay with the 40-bp probe suggested that protein contacts were made with the core recognition sequence GCC (-510 to -508). The 35-bp sequence (-694 to -660) was the hMOR homolog of the mMOR negative regulatory element, and it suppressed proximal promoter activity of the hMOR gene. Additionally, the presence of an hMOR distal promoter was confirmed using RT-PCR. However, the activity of the distal promoter construct (-2325 to -777) was weak compared with the activity of the proximal promoter construct (-776 to -212).

  19. Potent Dmt-Tic pharmacophoric delta- and mu-opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingyou; Fujita, Yoshio; Shiotani, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Anna; Tsuda, Yuko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa; Bryant, Sharon D; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Okada, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    A series of dimeric Dmt-Tic (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) analogues (8-14, 18-22) were covalently linked through diaminoalkane and symmetric or asymmetric 3,6-diaminoalkyl-2(1H)-pyrazinone moieties. All the compounds exhibited high affinity for both delta-opioid receptors [Ki(delta) = 0.06-1.53 nM] and mu-opioid receptors [Ki(mu) = 1.37-5.72 nM], resulting in moderate delta-receptor selectivity [Ki(mu)/Ki(delta) = 3-46]. Regardless of the type of linker between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophores, delta-opioid-mediated antagonism was extraordinarily high in all analogues (pA2 = 10.42-11.28), while in vitro agonism (MVD and GPI bioassays) was essentially absent (ca. 3 to >10 microM). While an unmodified N-terminus (9, 13, 18) revealed weak mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 6.78-6.99), N,N'-dimethylation (21, 22), which negatively impacts on mu-opioid-associated agonism (Balboni et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2003, 11, 5435-5441), markedly enhanced mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 8.34 and 7.71 for 21 and 22, respectively) without affecting delta-opioid activity. These data are the first evidence that a single dimeric opioid ligand containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore exhibits highly potent delta- and mu-opioid antagonist activities.

  20. Redoubling the ring size of an endomorphin-2 analog transforms a centrally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist into a pure peripheral analgesic.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; De Marco, Rossella; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tömböly, Csaba; Artali, Roberto; Janecka, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The study reports the synthesis and biological evaluation of two opioid analogs, a monomer and a dimer, obtained as products of the solid-phase, side-chain to side-chain cyclization of the pentapeptide Tyr-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-AspNH2 . The binding affinities to the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, as well as results obtained in a calcium mobilization functional assay are reported. Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 1 was a potent and selective full agonist of mu with sub-nanomolar affinity, while the dimer (Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 )2 2 showed a significant mixed mu/kappa affinity, acting as an agonist at the mu. Molecular docking computations were utilized to explain the ability of the dimeric cyclopeptide 2 to interact with the receptor. Interestingly, in spite of the increased ring size, the higher flexibility allowed 2 to fold and fit into the mu receptor binding pocket. Both cyclopeptides were shown to elicit strong antinociceptive activity after intraventricular injection but only cyclomonomer 1 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, the cyclodimer 2 displayed a potent peripheral antinociceptive activity in a mouse model of visceral inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 309-317, 2016. PMID:27038094

  1. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  2. mu-Opioid receptor downregulation contributes to opioid tolerance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stafford, K; Gomes, A B; Shen, J; Yoburn, B C

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the contribution of downregulation of mu-opioid receptors to opioid tolerance in an intact animal model. Mice were implanted subcutaneously with osmotic minipumps that infused etorphine (50-250 microg/kg/day) for 7 days. Other mice were implanted subcutaneously with a morphine pellet (25 mg) or a morphine pellet plus an osmotic minipump that infused morphine (5-40 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Controls were implanted with an inert placebo pellet. At the end of treatment, pumps and pellets were removed, and saturation binding studies were conducted in whole brain ([3H]DAMGO) or morphine and etorphine analgesic ED(50)s were determined (tail-flick). Morphine tolerance increased linearly with the infusion dose of morphine (ED(50) shift at highest infusion dose, 4.76). No significant downregulation of mu-receptors in whole brain was observed at the highest morphine treatment dose. Etorphine produced dose-dependent downregulation of mu-opioid receptor density and tolerance (ED(50) shift at highest infusion dose, 6.97). Downregulation of mu-receptors only occurred at the higher etorphine infusion doses (> or =150 microg/kg/day). Unlike morphine tolerance, the magnitude of etorphine tolerance was a nonlinear function of the dose and increased markedly at infusion doses that produced downregulation. These results suggest that mu-opioid receptor downregulation contributes to opioid tolerance in vivo. Therefore, opioid tolerance appears to rely upon both "receptor density-dependent" and " receptor density-independent" mechanisms.

  3. Specific activation of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) by endomorphin 1 and endomorphin 2.

    PubMed

    Monory, K; Bourin, M C; Spetea, M; Tömböly, C; Tóth, G; Matthes, H W; Kieffer, B L; Hanoune, J; Borsodi, A

    2000-02-01

    The recently discovered endomorphin 1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2) and endomorphin 2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) were investigated with respect to their direct receptor-binding properties, and to their ability to activate G proteins and to inhibit adenylyl cyclase in both cellular and animal models. Both tetrapeptides activated G proteins and inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity in membrane preparations from cells stably expressing the mu opioid receptor, an effect reversed by the mu receptor antagonist CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), but they had no influence on cells stably expressing the delta opioid receptor. To further establish the selectivity of these peptides for the mu opioid receptor, brain preparations of mice lacking the mu opioid receptor gene were used to study their binding and signalling properties. Endomorphin 2, tritiated by a dehalotritiation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 1.98 TBq/mmol (53.4 Ci/mmol), labelled the brain membranes of wild-type mice with a Kd value of 1.77 nM and a Bmax of 63.33 fmol/mg protein. In membranes of mice lacking the mu receptor gene, no binding was observed, and both endomorphins failed to stimulate [35S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding and to inhibit adenylyl cyclase. These data show that endomorphins are capable of activating G proteins and inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity, and all these effects are mediated by the mu opioid receptors.

  4. Increased gabaergic input to ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons associated with decreased cocaine reinforcement in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mathon, D S; Lesscher, H M B; Gerrits, M A F M; Kamal, A; Pintar, J E; Schuller, A G P; Spruijt, B M; Burbach, J P H; Smidt, M P; van Ree, J M; Ramakers, G M J

    2005-01-01

    There is general agreement that dopaminergic neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex play a key role in drug reinforcement. The activity of these neurons is strongly modulated by the inhibitory and excitatory input they receive. Activation of mu-opioid receptors, located on GABAergic neurons in the VTA, causes hyperpolarization of these GABAergic neurons, thereby causing a disinhibition of VTA dopaminergic neurons. This effect of mu-opioid receptors upon GABA neurotransmission is a likely mechanism for mu-opioid receptor modulation of drug reinforcement. We studied mu-opioid receptor signaling in relation to cocaine reinforcement in wild-type and mu-opioid receptor knockout mice using a cocaine self-administration paradigm and in vitro electrophysiology. Cocaine self-administration was reduced in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, suggesting a critical role of mu-opioid receptors in cocaine reinforcement. The frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents onto dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area was increased in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice compared with wild-type controls, while the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents was unaltered. The reduced cocaine self-administration and increased GABAergic input to VTA dopaminergic neurons in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice supports the notion that suppression of GABAergic input onto dopaminergic neurons in the VTA contributes to mu-opioid receptor modulation of cocaine reinforcement. PMID:15664692

  5. Mu Opioids and Their Receptors: Evolution of a Concept

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are among the oldest medications available to manage a number of medical problems. Although pain is the current focus, early use initially focused upon the treatment of dysentery. Opium contains high concentrations of both morphine and codeine, along with thebaine, which is used in the synthesis of a number of semisynthetic opioid analgesics. Thus, it is not surprising that new agents were initially based upon the morphine scaffold. The concept of multiple opioid receptors was first suggested almost 50 years ago (Martin, 1967), opening the possibility of new classes of drugs, but the morphine-like agents have remained the mainstay in the medical management of pain. Termed mu, our understanding of these morphine-like agents and their receptors has undergone an evolution in thinking over the past 35 years. Early pharmacological studies identified three major classes of receptors, helped by the discovery of endogenous opioid peptides and receptor subtypes—primarily through the synthesis of novel agents. These chemical biologic approaches were then eclipsed by the molecular biology revolution, which now reveals a complexity of the morphine-like agents and their receptors that had not been previously appreciated. PMID:24076545

  6. Mu Opioid Receptors on Primary Afferent Nav1.8 Neurons Contribute to Opiate-Induced Analgesia: Insight from Conditional Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Wood, John N.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain. PMID:24069332

  7. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  8. Partial purification of the mu opioid receptor irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)b-funaltrexamine

    SciTech Connect

    Liu-Chen, L.Y.; Phillips, C.A.; Tam, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    The mu opioid receptor in bovine striatal membranes was specifically and irreversibly labeled by incubation with 5 nM (/sup 3/H)..beta..-funaltrexamine (approx.-FNA) at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min in the presence of 100 mM NaCl. The specific and irreversible binding of (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA as defined by that blocked by 1 /sup +/M naloxone was about 60% of total irreversible binding. The specific irreversible binding was saturable, stereospecific, time-, temperature, and tissue-dependent. Mu opioid ligands were much more potent than delta or kappa ligands in inhibiting the specific irreversible labeling. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized membranes in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol yielded a major radiolabeled broad band of MW 68-97K daltons, characteristic of a glycoprotein band. This band was not observed in membranes labeled in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The glycoprotein nature of the (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA-labeled opioid receptor was confirmed by its binding to a wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose column and its elution with N-acetylglucosamine.

  9. Curvilinear relationships between mu-opioid receptor labeling and undirected song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Riters, Lauren V.

    2013-01-01

    Female-directed communication in male songbirds has been reasonably well studied; yet, relatively little is known about communication in other social contexts. Songbirds also produce song that is not clearly directed towards another individual (undirected song) when alone or in flocks. Although the precise functions of undirected song may differ across species, this type of song is considered important for flock maintenance, song learning or practice. Past studies show that undirected song is tightly coupled to analgesia and positive affective state, which are both mediated by opioid activity. Furthermore, labeling for the opioid met-enkephalin in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) correlates positively with undirected song production. We propose that undirected song is facilitated and maintained by opioid receptor activity in the POM and other brain regions involved in affective state, analgesia, and social behavior. To provide insight into this hypothesis, we used immunohistochemistry to examine relationships between undirected song and mu-opioid receptors in male starlings. Polynomial regression analyses revealed significant inverted-U shaped relationships between measures of undirected song and mu-opioid receptor labeling in the POM, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), and periaqueductal gray (PAG). These results suggest that low rates of undirected song may stimulate and/or be maintained by mu-opioid receptor activity; however, it may be that sustained levels of mu-opioid receptor activity associated with high rates of undirected song cause mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. The results indicate that mu-opioid receptor activity in POM, BSTm, and PAG may underlie previous links identified between undirected song, analgesia, and affective state. PMID:23774651

  10. Curvilinear relationships between mu-opioid receptor labeling and undirected song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Riters, Lauren V

    2013-08-21

    Female-directed communication in male songbirds has been reasonably well studied; yet, relatively little is known about communication in other social contexts. Songbirds also produce song that is not clearly directed towards another individual (undirected song) when alone or in flocks. Although the precise functions of undirected song may differ across species, this type of song is considered important for flock maintenance, song learning or practice. Past studies show that undirected song is tightly coupled to analgesia and positive affective state, which are both mediated by opioid activity. Furthermore, labeling for the opioid met-enkephalin in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) correlates positively with undirected song production. We propose that undirected song is facilitated and maintained by opioid receptor activity in the POM and other brain regions involved in affective state, analgesia, and social behavior. To provide insight into this hypothesis, we used immunohistochemistry to examine relationships between undirected song and mu-opioid receptors in male starlings. Polynomial regression analyses revealed significant inverted-U shaped relationships between measures of undirected song and mu-opioid receptor labeling in the POM, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), and periaqueductal gray (PAG). These results suggest that low rates of undirected song may stimulate and/or be maintained by mu-opioid receptor activity; however, it may be that sustained levels of mu-opioid receptor activity associated with high rates of undirected song cause mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. The results indicate that mu-opioid receptor activity in POM, BSTm, and PAG may underlie previous links identified between undirected song, analgesia, and affective state. PMID:23774651

  11. Mu-opioid receptor down-regulation and tolerance are not equally dependent upon G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Benedict A; Shen, Ji; Stafford, Kristi; Patel, Minesh; Yoburn, Byron C

    2002-05-01

    In the present study, the contribution of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G(i/o)-proteins to opioid tolerance and mu-opioid receptor down-regulation in the mouse were examined. Mice were injected once intracerebroventricularly and intrathecally with PTX (0.1 microg/site). Controls were treated with saline. On the 10th day following PTX treatment, continuous subcutaneous infusion of etorphine (150 or 200 microg/kg/day) or morphine (40 mg/kg/day+25 mg slow-release pellet) was begun. Control mice were implanted with inert placebo pellets. Pumps and pellets were removed 3 days later, and mice were tested for morphine analgesia or mu-opioid receptor density was determined in the whole brain, spinal cord, and midbrain. Both infusion doses of etorphine produced significant tolerance (ED50 shift=approximately 4-6-fold) and down-regulation of mu-opioid receptors (approximately 20-35%). Morphine treatment also produced significant tolerance (ED50 shift= approximately 5-8-fold), but no mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. PTX dramatically reduced the acute potency of morphine and blocked the further development of tolerance by both etorphine and morphine treatments. However, PTX had no effect on etorphine-induced mu-opioid receptor down-regulation in brain, cord, or midbrain. These results suggest that PTX-sensitive G-proteins have a minimal role in agonist-induced mu-opioid receptor density regulation in vivo, but are critical in mediating acute and chronic functional effects of opioids such as analgesia and tolerance.

  12. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding to mu opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, K.N.; Knapp, R.J.; Gehlert, D.R.; Lui, G.K.; Yamamura, M.S.; Roeske, L.C.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 ((/sup 3/H)CTOP), a potent and highly selective mu opioid antagonist, was used to localize the mu receptors in rat brain by light microscopic autoradiography. Radioligand binding studies with (/sup 3/H)CTOP using slide-mounted tissue sections of rat brain produced a Kd value of 1.1 nM with a Bmax value of 79.1 fmol/mg protein. Mu opioid agonists and antagonists inhibited (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding with high affinity (IC50 values of 0.2-2.4nM), while the delta agonist DPDPE, delta antagonist ICI 174,864, and kappa agonist U 69,593 were very weak inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding. Light microscopic autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding sites revealed regions of high density and regions of moderate labeling. The cerebral cortex showed a low density of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding.

  13. Nitric oxide and zinc-mediated protein assemblies involved in mu opioid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics in controlling the perception of intense pain, although their continuous use decreases their potency due to the development of tolerance. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system is currently considered to be the most relevant functional antagonist of morphine analgesia. In the postsynapse of different brain regions the C terminus of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) associates with NR1 subunits of NMDARs, as well as with a series of signaling proteins, such as neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), protein kinase C (PKC), calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). NO is implicated in redox signaling and PKC falls under the regulation of zinc metabolism, suggesting that these signaling elements might participate in the regulation of MOR activity by the NMDAR. In this review, we discuss the influence of redox signaling in the mechanisms whose plasticity triggers opioid tolerance. Thus, the MOR C terminus assembles a series of signaling proteins around the homodimeric histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). The NMDAR NR1 subunit and the regulator of G protein signaling RGSZ2 bind HINT1 in a zinc-independent manner, with RGSZ2 associating with nNOS and regulating MOR-induced production of NO. This NO acts on the RGSZ2 zinc finger, providing the zinc ions that are required for PKC/Raf-1 cysteine-rich domains to simultaneously bind to the histidines present in the HINT1 homodimer. The MOR-induced activation of phospholipase β (PLCβ) regulates PKC, which increases the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by acting on NOX/NADPH, consolidating the long-term PKC activation required to regulate the Raf-1/MAPK cascade and enhancing NMDAR function. Thus, RGSZ2 serves as a Redox Zinc Switch that converts NO signals into Zinc signals, thereby modulating Redox Sensor Proteins like PKCγ and Raf-1. Accordingly, redox-dependent and

  14. Fourteen. beta. -(bromoacetamido)morphine irreversibly labels. mu. opioid receptors in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bidlack, J.M.; Frey, D.K.; Seyed-Mozaffari, A.; Archer, S. )

    1989-05-16

    The binding properties of 14{beta}-(bromoacetamido)morphine (BAM) and the ability of BAM to irreversibly inhibit opioid binding to rat brain membranes were examined to characterize the affinity and selectivity of BAM as an irreversible affinity ligand for opioid receptors. BAM had the same receptor selectivity as morphine, with a 3-5-fold decrease in affinity for the different types of opioid receptors. When brain membranes were incubated with BAM, followed by extensive washing, opioid binding was restored to control levels. However, when membranes were incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT), followed by BAM, and subsequently washed, 90% of the 0.25 nM ({sup 3}H)(D-Ala{sup 2},(Me)Phe{sup 4},Gly(ol){sup 5})enkephalin (DAGO) binding was irreversibly inhibited as a result of the specific alkylation of a sulfhydryl group at the {mu} binding site. This inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of both DTT and BAM. The {mu} receptor specificity of BAM alkylation was demonstrated by the ability of BAM alkylated membranes to still bind the {delta}-selective peptide ({sup 3}H)(D-penicillamine{sup 2},D-penicillamine{sup 5})enkephalin (DPDPE) and (-)-({sup 3}H)bremazocine in the presence of {mu} and {delta} blockers, selective for {kappa} binding sites. Morphine and naloxone partially protected the binding site from alkylation with BAM, while ligands that did not bind to the {mu}s site did not afford protection. These studies have demonstrated that when a disulfide bond at or near {mu} opioid binding sites was reduced, BAM could then alkylate this site, resulting in the specific irreversible labeling of {mu} opioid receptors.

  15. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulation of mu (mu) opioid receptors in adult rat sphenopalatine ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurons represent the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system involved in controlling cerebral blood flow. In the present study, we examined the coupling mechanism between mu (mu) opioid receptors (MOR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) with Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated adult rat SPG neurons. Successful MOR activation was recorded in approximately 40-45% of SPG neurons employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. In addition, immunofluorescence assays indicated that MOR are not expressed in all SPG neurons while M(2) mAChR staining was evident in all neurons. The concentration-response relationships generated with morphine and [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) showed IC(50) values of 15.2 and 56.1 nM and maximal Ca(2+) current inhibition of 26.0 and 38.7%, respectively. Activation of MOR or M(2) mAChR with morphine or oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M), respectively, resulted in voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) currents via coupling with Galpha(i/o) protein subunits. The acute prolonged exposure (10 min) of neurons to morphine or Oxo-M led to the homologous desensitization of MOR and M(2) mAChR, respectively. The prolonged stimulation of M(2) mAChR with Oxo-M resulted in heterologous desensitization of morphine-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition, and was sensitive to the M(2) mAChR blocker methoctramine. On the other hand, when the neurons were exposed to morphine or DAMGO for 10 min, heterologous desensitization of M(2) mAChR was not observed. These results suggest that in rat SPG neurons activation of M(2) mAChR likely modulates opioid transmission in the brain vasculature to adequately maintain cerebral blood flow. PMID:19889856

  16. The role of mu opioid receptor desensitization and endocytosis in morphine tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lene; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2007-10-01

    Following activation, most G protein coupled receptors undergo regulation by a cascade of events that promote receptor desensitization and endocytosis. Following endocytosis, receptors can then be recycled to the plasma membrane, retained in an intracellular compartment, or targeted for degradation. For receptors that are recycled, like the mu opioid receptor (MOR), endocytosis serves as the first step toward resensitizing receptors. For receptors that are degraded, endocytosis serves as the first step toward receptor downregulation. Thus, for receptors like the MOR, the desensitization-endocytosis-resensitization cycle serves as a rapid and dynamic means to titrate signaling through the receptor. However, not all agonist ligands at the MOR promote the same degree of receptor desensitization and endocytosis. For example, the endogenous peptide ligands at the MOR induce rapid desensitization, endocytosis, and recycling. By contrast, morphine induces only weak or partial desensitization and little to no endocytosis. As a consequence, signal transduction promoted by morphine is less dynamic than that induced by endogenous ligands as well as other opioid agonists that promote endocytosis. The resulting imbalance of desensitization-endocytosis-resensitization has at least two consequences: (1) in cell types where morphine induces desensitization but not endocytosis and/or resensitization, desensitization is protracted; (2) in cell types where morphine induces neither desensitization nor endocytosis, prolonged signaling through the receptor leads to multiple cellular adaptations downstream of receptor-G protein coupling. Both protracted desensitization and adaptive cellular changes probably contribute to the pronounced in vivo tolerance and dependence that occur with chronic morphine treatment. As a consequence, facilitating receptor endocytosis, using either genetic or pharmacological approaches, can restore the balance of signaling through the receptor and affect the

  17. Opioid agonist efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and the regulation of mu-opioid receptors and dynamin-2.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Mohit; Kumar, Priyank; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2007-06-01

    It has been proposed that opioid agonist efficacy may play a role in tolerance and the regulation of opioid receptor density. To address this issue, the present studies estimated the in vivo efficacy of three opioid agonists and then examined changes in spinal mu-opioid receptor density following chronic treatment in the mouse. In addition, tolerance and regulation of the trafficking protein dynamin-2 were determined. To evaluate efficacy, the method of irreversible receptor alkylation was employed and the efficacy parameter tau estimated. Mice were injected with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox (0.32-25.6 mg/kg, i.p), and 24 h later, the analgesic potency of s.c. morphine, oxycodone and etorphine were determined. Clocinnamox dose-dependently antagonized the analgesic effects of morphine, etorphine and oxycodone. The shift to the right of the dose-response curves was greater for morphine and oxycodone compared to etorphine and the highest dose of clocinnamox reduced the maximal effect of morphine and oxycodone, but not etorphine. The order of efficacy calculated from these results was etorphine>morphine>oxycodone. Other mice were infused for 7 days with oxycodone (10-150 mg/kg/day, s.c.) or etorphine (50-250 microg/kg/day, s.c.) and the analgesic potency of s.c. morphine determined. The low efficacy agonist (oxycodone) produced more tolerance than the high efficacy agonist (etorphine) at equi-effective infusion doses. In saturation binding experiments, the low efficacy opioid agonists (morphine, oxycodone) did not regulate the density of spinal mu-opioid receptors, while etorphine produced approximately 40% reduction in mu-opioid receptor density. Furthermore, etorphine increased spinal dynamin-2 abundance, while oxycodone did not produce any significant change in dynamin-2 abundance. Overall, these data indicate that high efficacy agonists produce less tolerance at equi-effective doses. Furthermore, increased efficacy was associated with

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  19. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  20. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  1. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  2. Remifentanil produces cross-desensitization and tolerance with morphine on the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nowoczyn, M; Marie, N; Coulbault, L; Hervault, M; Davis, A; Hanouz, J L; Allouche, S

    2013-10-01

    Remifentanil is a powerful mu-opioid (MOP) receptor agonist used in anaesthesia with a very short half-life. However, per-operative perfusion of remifentanil was shown to increase morphine consumption during post-operative period to relieve pain. In the present study, we aimed to describe the cellular mechanisms responsible for this apparent reduction of morphine efficacy. For this purpose, we first examined the pharmacological properties of both remifentanil and morphine at the MOP receptor, endogenously expressed in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, to regulate adenylyl cyclase and the MAP kinase ERK1/2 pathway, their potency to promote MOP receptor phosphorylation, arrestin 3-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) recruitment and receptor trafficking during acute and sustained exposure. In the second part of this work, we studied the effects of a prior exposure of remifentanil on morphine-induced inhibition of cAMP accumulation, activation of ERK1/2 and analgesia. We showed that sustained exposure to remifentanil promoted a rapid desensitization of opioid receptors on both signalling pathways and a pretreatment with this agonist reduced signal transduction produced by a second challenge with morphine. While both opioid agonists promoted Ser(375) phosphorylation on MOP receptor, remifentanil induced a rapid internalization of opioid receptors compared to morphine but without detectable arrestin 3-CFP translocation to the plasma membrane in our experimental conditions. Lastly, a cross-tolerance between remifentanil and morphine was observed in mice using the hot plate test. Our in vitro and in vivo data thus demonstrated that remifentanil produced a rapid desensitization and internalization of the MOP receptor that would reduce the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine. PMID:23792280

  3. Genetic variation of the human mu-opioid receptor and susceptibility to idiopathic absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sander, T; Berlin, W; Gscheidel, N; Wendel, B; Janz, D; Hoehe, M R

    2000-03-01

    Pharmacological and autoradiological studies suggest that mu-opioid receptor (OPRM) mediated neurotransmission is involved in the generation of absence seizures. Mutation screening of the human OPRM gene identified a common amino acid substitution polymorphism (Asn40Asp) that differentially modulates the binding affinity of beta-endorphin and signal transduction of the receptor. The present association study tested the candidate gene hypothesis that the Asn40Asp substitution polymorphism in the N-terminal OPRM domain confers genetic susceptibility to idiopathic absence epilepsy (IAE). The genotypes of the Asn40Asp polymorphism were assessed by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction in 72 German IAE patients and in 340 ethnically matched control subjects. The frequency of the Asp40 allele was significantly increased in the IAE patients [f(Asp40) = 0.139] compared to the controls [f(Asp40) = 0.078; chi2 = 5.467, df = 1, P = 0.019; OR = 2.03; 95%-CI: 1.12-3.68]. This allelic association suggests that the functional Asp40 variant of OPRM modulates neuronal excitability underlying the epileptogenesis of IAE.

  4. Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) expression in the human spiral ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kimanh D.; Mowlds, Donald; Lopez, Ivan A.; Hosokawa, Seiji; Ishiyama, Akira; Ishiyama, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their receptors have been localized to the inner ear of the rat and guinea pig mammalian models. The expression of mu opioid receptor (MOR) in the human and mouse cochlea is not yet known. We present MOR protein localization by immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression by in situ hybridization in the human and mouse spiral ganglia (SG) and organ of Corti. In the human most of the (SG) neurons were immunoreactive; a subset was non-immunoreactive. In situ hybridization revealed a similar labeling pattern across the neurons of the SG. A similar distribution MOR pattern was demonstrated in the mouse SG. In the mouse organ of Corti MOR was expressed in inner and outer hair cells. Fibers underneath the inner hair cells were also MOR immunoreactive. These results are consistent with a role of MOR in neuro-modulation of the auditory periphery. The present results show that the expression of MORs is well-conserved across multiple mammalian species, indicative of an important role in auditory processing. PMID:25278190

  5. Mu Opioid Receptor Binding Correlates with Nicotine Dependence and Reward in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Brasic, James R.; Contoreggi, Carlo; Cascella, Nicola; Mackowick, Kristen M.; Taylor, Richard; Rousset, Olivier; Willis, William; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Concheiro, Marta; Wand, Gary; Wong, Dean F.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    The rewarding effects of nicotine are associated with activation of nicotine receptors. However, there is increasing evidence that the endogenous opioid system is involved in nicotine's rewarding effects. We employed PET imaging with [11C]carfentanil to test the hypotheses that acute cigarette smoking increases release of endogenous opioids in the human brain and that smokers have an upregulation of mu opioid receptors (MORs) when compared to nonsmokers. We found no significant changes in binding potential (BPND) of [11C]carfentanil between the placebo and the active cigarette sessions, nor did we observe differences in MOR binding between smokers and nonsmokers. Interestingly, we showed that in smokers MOR availability in bilateral superior temporal cortices during the placebo condition was negatively correlated with scores on the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Also in smokers, smoking-induced decreases in [11C]carfentanil binding in frontal cortical regions were associated with self-reports of cigarette liking and wanting. Although we did not show differences between smokers and nonsmokers, the negative correlation with FTND corroborates the role of MORs in superior temporal cortices in nicotine addiction and provides preliminary evidence of a role of endogenous opioid signaling in frontal cortex in nicotine reward. PMID:25493427

  6. Inflammation enhances mu-opioid receptor transcription and expression in mice intestine.

    PubMed

    Pol, O; Alameda, F; Puig, M M

    2001-11-01

    Opioid receptors (ORs) and their mRNA are present in the central and peripheral nervous systems of mammals and in different peripheral tissues, including the gut. Using a model of croton oil-induced (CO) intestinal inflammation in mice, we have shown a 6-fold increase in the potency of the antitransit and antisecretory effects of mu-OR agonists, mediated by peripheral ORs. We postulate that the enhanced effects are mediated by an increase in the expression of intestinal OR. We used jejunum (stripped of the mucosal layer) from mice with CO-induced intestinal inflammation and, as control subjects, saline-treated animals (SS). We evaluated the quantity of mu-OR mRNA determined by a competitive reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; the levels of mu-OR protein by Western blot immunoassay, and the localization and number of cells expressing mu-OR using immunohistochemistry. The results show a significant increase of mu-OR mRNA (7.7-fold) and receptor protein (3-fold) during intestinal inflammation. Inflammation also induced a 64.3% increase in the number of neurons expressing mu-OR immunoreactivity in the myenteric plexus but not in the submucosal plexus. Our results show that intestinal inflammation enhances the transcription and translation of mu-OR mRNA, thus explaining the increased potency of mu-opioids during inflammation.

  7. Designing bifunctional NOP receptor-mu opioid receptor ligands from NOP-receptor selective scaffolds. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Journigan, V. Blair; Polgar, Willma; Khroyan, Taline V.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2014-01-01

    The nociceptin opioid receptor (NOP) and its endogenous peptide ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ have been shown to modulate the pharmacological effects of the classical opioid receptor system. Suppression of opioid-induced reward associated with mu-opioid receptor (MOP)-mediated analgesia, without decreasing anti-nociceptive efficacy, can potentially be achieved with NOP agonists having bifunctional agonist activity at MOP, to afford ‘non-addicting’ analgesics. In Part II of this series, we describe a continuing structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of the NOP-selective piperidin-4-yl-1,3-dihydroindol-2-one scaffold, to obtain bifunctional activity at MOP, and a suitable ratio of NOP/MOP agonist activity that produces a non-addicting analgesic profile. The SAR reported here is focused on the influence of various piperidine nitrogen aromatic substituents on the ratio of binding affinity and intrinsic activity at both the NOP and MOP receptors. PMID:24657054

  8. A topographical model of mu-opioid and brain somatostatin receptor selective ligands. NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, W M; Ferguson, R D; Lipkowski, A W; Hruby, V J

    1995-01-01

    We have refined the 1H NMR-based conformations of the mu-opioid receptor selective peptides related to somatostatin of general formula Xxx-Yyy1-Cys-Zzz-D-Trp-Lys(Orn)5-Thr-Pen-Thr8- NH2, where Xxx, Yyy, Zzz are 0, D-Phe and Tyr for 1; 0, D-Tic and Tyr for 2; Gly, D-Tic and Tyr for 3; and 0, D-Phe and Tic for 4, respectively, (Kazmierski et al., J. Am. Chem. 113, 2275-2283), using a molecular-dynamics approach. We present evidence that the NMR data are compatible with beta II'-, gamma- and gamma'-turns for the central tetrapeptide Tyr-D-Trp-Lys/Orn-Thr. Based on detailed structural and topographical considerations, we suggest that the mu-opioid receptor selectivity of 2 is due to a particular spatial arrangement of aromatic side chains of D-Tic1 and Tyr3 (7.5 A), and that the opioid receptor recognition domain is located in the N-terminal part of the peptide while the somatostatin receptor recognition domain is determined by the central, turn forming part of this class of cyclic peptides. A model for a mu-opioid selective ligand has emerged from these studies that shows excellent structural similarities to rigid opioid alkaloids. PMID:8537180

  9. Morphine-induced mu opioid receptor trafficking enhances reward yet prevents compulsive drug use.

    PubMed

    Berger, Amy Chang; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2011-07-01

    Morphine, heroin and other commonly abused opioids induce little mu opioid receptor (MOR) trafficking compared to endogenous opioids. We utilized knock-in mice expressing a mutant recycling MOR (RMOR) that desensitizes and is internalized in response to morphine to show that facilitating MOR trafficking not only enhances morphine reward but, despite this, reduces the development of addiction-like behaviours. To demonstrate this, we developed a novel model of the transition from controlled to compulsive drug use that recapitulates many features of human addiction, including persistent drug seeking despite adverse consequences and a decreased preference for alternative rewards. These behaviours emerged spontaneously in wild-type but not RMOR mice, and their intensity predicted the reinstatement of morphine seeking after extended abstinence, while prior morphine intake did not. These results confirm previous findings in the rat that addiction can be dissociated from both reward and consumption. Most importantly, these results demonstrate that one can simultaneously reduce the 'addictiveness' of morphine and enhance its desirable effects by promoting agonist-induced MOR trafficking.

  10. Graphene decorated with mu-opioid receptor: the ionic screening effect and detection of enkephalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinglei; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Liu, Renyu; A. T. Charlie Johnson Team; Renyu Liu Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the properties of graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) decorated with a computaionally redesigned, water-soluble variant of the human mu-opioid receptor (wsMOR) in physiological buffer solution. The shift of the Fermi level in the GFETs is quantitatively described by chemical-gating effect of charges on the wsMOR that are screened by the ionic solution. Our results suggest that sensitivity to the molecular target is lost when the Debye screening length of the solution is shorter than the distance from the graphene to the wsMOR; thus de-salting may be necessary when wsMOR decorated GFETs are used as biosensors in solution. We used this insight to detect DAMGO, a synthetic analog to the endogenous opioid peptide encephalin, at a concentration of 10 pM (5.1 pg/mL) in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) diluted to 5% of its normal salt concentration. When the sensors were measured in a dry state, the limit of detection for DAGMO was 1 pM (0.5 pg/mL), one-third of the baseline in human body.Funding for this work was provided by DARPA.

  11. Mu opioid receptor modulation of somatodendritic dopamine overflow: GABA and glutamatergic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, V.I.; Denoroy, L.; Zapata, A.; Shippenberg, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor (MOR) regulation of somatodendritic dopamine neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) was investigated using conventional microdialysis in freely moving rats and mice. Reverse dialysis of the MOR agonist, DAMGO (50, 100 μM), into the VTA of rats produced a concentration-dependent increase in dialysate DA concentrations. Basal dopamine overflow in the VTA was unaltered in mice lacking the MOR gene. However, basal GABA overflow in these animals was significantly increased, while glutamate overflow was decreased. Intra-VTA perfusion of DAMGO to wildtype (WT) mice increased dopamine overflow. GABA concentrations were decreased whereas glutamate concentrations in the VTA were unaltered. Consistent with the loss of MOR, no effect of DAMGO was observed in MOR knockout (KO) mice. These data provide the first direct demonstration of tonically active MOR systems in the VTA that regulate basal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in this region. We hypothesize that increased GABAergic neurotransmission following constitutive deletion of MOR is due to the elimination of a tonic inhibitory influence of MOR on GABA neurons in the VTA, whereas decreased glutamatergic neurotransmission in MOR KO mice is a consequence of intensified GABA tone on glutamatergic neurons and/or terminals. As a consequence, somatodendritic dopamine release is unaltered. Furthermore, MOR KO exhibit no positive correlation between basal dopamine levels and the glutamate/GABA ratio observed in WT animals. Together our findings indicate a critical role of VTA MOR in maintaining an intricate balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs to dopaminergic neurons. PMID:19614973

  12. Association of mu-opioid receptor expression with lymph node metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-F; Xu, Q-X; Liao, L-D; Xu, X-E; Wu, J-Y; Wu, Z-Y; Shen, J-H; Li, E-M; Xu, L-Y

    2015-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (MOR), a membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor, is the main target for opioids in the nervous system. MOR1 has been found in several types of cancer cells and reported to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the expression and clinical significance of MOR1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unclear. In our study, the expression of MOR1 was confirmed in ESCC cell lines (KYSE180, KYSE150, and EC109) by Western blot. MOR1 was also detected on tissue microarrays of ESCC samples in 239 cases using immunohistochemical staining. We found that MOR1 was mainly located in the cytoplasm and occasionally occurred in the membrane or nucleus of ESCC cells. Moreover, results indicated that MOR1 expression in the cytoplasm was associated with lymph node metastasis (R = 0.164, P = 0.008, Kendall's tau-b-test). No more associations were found between MOR1 expression status and other clinical parameters. However, no statistical significant differences were found between MOR1 expression in the cytoplasm, nucleus/membrane, and the overall survival of ESCC patients (P = 0.848; P = 0.167; P = 0.428, respectively, log-rank test). Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic MOR1 may be a high-risk factor for lymph node metastasis of ESCC patients. We also hypothesize that MOR1 agonists used in ESCC patients should be prudent, and opioid receptor antagonists may be novel therapeutic drugs for ESCC patients.

  13. Mu opioid receptor localization in the basolateral amygdala: An ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Muller, J F; McDonald, A J

    2015-09-10

    Receptor binding studies have shown that the density of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the basolateral amygdala is among the highest in the brain. Activation of these receptors in the basolateral amygdala is critical for stress-induced analgesia, memory consolidation of aversive events, and stress adaptation. Despite the importance of MORs in these stress-related functions, little is known about the neural circuits that are modulated by amygdalar MORs. In the present investigation light and electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of MORs in the anterior basolateral nucleus (BLa). At the light microscopic level, light to moderate MOR-immunoreactivity (MOR-ir) was observed in a small number of cell bodies of nonpyramidal interneurons and in a small number of processes and puncta in the neuropil. At the electron microscopic level most MOR-ir was observed in dendritic shafts, dendritic spines, and axon terminals. MOR-ir was also observed in the Golgi apparatus of the cell bodies of pyramidal neurons (PNs) and interneurons. Some of the MOR-positive (MOR+) dendrites were spiny, suggesting that they belonged to PNs, while others received multiple asymmetrical synapses typical of interneurons. The great majority of MOR+ axon terminals (80%) that formed synapses made asymmetrical (excitatory) synapses; their main targets were spines, including some that were MOR+. The main targets of symmetrical (inhibitory and/or neuromodulatory) synapses were dendritic shafts, many of which were MOR+, but some of these terminals formed synapses with somata or spines. All of our observations were consistent with the few electrophysiological studies which have been performed on MOR activation in the basolateral amygdala. Collectively, these findings suggest that MORs may be important for filtering out weak excitatory inputs to PNs, allowing only strong inputs or synchronous inputs to influence pyramidal neuronal firing. PMID:26164501

  14. Mu-opioid receptors are not necessary for nortriptyline treatment of neuropathic allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Luc-Henri; Yalcin, Ipek; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are among the first line treatments clinically recommended against neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism by which they alleviate pain is still unclear. Pharmacological and genetic approaches evidenced a critical role of delta-opioid receptors (DORs) in the therapeutic action of chronic TCA treatment. It is however unclear whether mu-opioid receptors (MORs) are also necessary to the pain-relieving action of TCAs. The lack of highly selective MOR antagonists makes difficult to conclude based on pharmacological studies. In the present work, we thus used a genetic approach and compared mutant mice lacking MORs and their wild-type littermates. The neuropathy was induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. The threshold for mechanical response was evaluated using von Frey filaments. MOR-deficient mice displayed the same baseline for mechanical sensitivity as their wild-type littermates. After sciatic nerve cuffing, both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice displayed an ipsilateral mechanical allodynia. After about 10 days of treatment, nortriptyline suppressed this allodynia in both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice. MORs are thus not critical for nortriptyline action against neuropathic pain. An acute injection of the DOR antagonist naltrindole induced a relapse of neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice, thus confirming the critical role of DORs in nortriptyline action. Moreover, morphine induced an acute analgesia in control and in neuropathic wild-type mice, but was without effect in MOR-deficient mice. While MORs are crucial for morphine action, they are not critical for nortriptyline action. Our results highlight the functional difference between DORs and MORs in mechanisms of pain relief. PMID:20056557

  15. Mu opioid receptor modulation in the nucleus accumbens lowers voluntary wheel running in rats bred for high running motivation.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Will, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2015-10-01

    The exact role of opioid receptor signaling in mediating voluntary wheel running is unclear. To provide additional understanding, female rats selectively bred for motivation of low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviors were used. Aims of this study were 1) to identify intrinsic differences in nucleus accumbens (NAc) mRNA expression of opioid-related transcripts and 2) to determine if nightly wheel running is differently influenced by bilateral NAc injections of either the mu-opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo5-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25, 2.5 μg/side), or its antagonist, naltrexone (5, 10, 20 μg/side). In Experiment 1, intrinsic expression of Oprm1 and Pdyn mRNAs were higher in HVR compared to LVR. Thus, the data imply that line differences in opioidergic mRNA in the NAc could partially contribute to differences in wheel running behavior. In Experiment 2, a significant decrease in running distance was present in HVR rats treated with 2.5 μg DAMGO, or with 10 μg and 20 μg naltrexone between hours 0-1 of the dark cycle. Neither DAMGO nor naltrexone had a significant effect on running distance in LVR rats. Taken together, the data suggest that the high nightly voluntary running distance expressed by HVR rats is mediated by increased endogenous mu-opioid receptor signaling in the NAc, that is disturbed by either agonism or antagonism. In summary, our findings on NAc opioidergic mRNA expression and mu-opioid receptor modulations suggest HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, express higher running levels mediated by an increase in motivation driven, in part, by elevated NAc opioidergic signaling.

  16. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release.

  17. The effect of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on extinction of conditioned fear in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Richardson, Rick

    2009-03-01

    Several recent studies report that neurotransmitters that are critically involved in extinction in adult rats are not important for extinction in young rats. Specifically, pretest injection of the gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor inverse agonist FG7142 has no effect on extinction in postnatal day (P)17 rats, although it reverses extinction in P24 rats as reported by Kim and Richardson in an earlier paper. Further, pre-extinction injection of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 has no effect on extinction in P17 rats, whereas it impairs long-term extinction in P24 rats as per Langton and colleagues in an earlier work. These findings indicate that extinction in P17 rats is qualitatively different from extinction in older rats. The present study examines the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in extinction in the developing rat using systemic injections of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Experiment 1 showed that injection of naloxone before extinction training disrupted the acquisition of extinction in both P17 and P24 rats. This effect was dependent on central rather than peripheral mu-opioid receptors (Experiment 2), and neither pre-test nor post-extinction injection of naloxone had effects on extinction (Experiments 3 and 4). Taken together, these findings indicate that opioid neurotransmission, in contrast to GABA and NMDA activity, is critical for extinction acquisition across development.

  18. Distribution of CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Relationship with Mu-Opioid Receptors in the Rat Periaqueductal Gray

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Poe, A.R.; Morgan, M.M.; Aicher, S.A.; Hegarty, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is part of a descending pain modulatory system that, when activated, produces widespread and profound antinociception. Microinjection of either opioids or cannabinoids into the PAG elicits antinociception. Moreover, microinjection of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor agonist HU-210 into the PAG enhances the antinociceptive effect of subsequent morphine injections, indicating a direct relationship between these two systems. The objective of this study was to characterize the distribution of CB1 receptors in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral PAG in relationship to mu-opioid peptide (MOP) receptors. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed extensive and diffuse CB1 receptor labeling in the PAG, 60% of which was found in somatodendritic profiles. CB1 and MOP receptor immunolabeling were co-localized in 32% of fluorescent Nissl-stained cells that were analyzed. Eight percent (8%) of PAG neurons that were MOP receptor-immunoreactive received CB1 receptor-immunoreactive appositions. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence CB1 receptor-immunoreactive somata, dendrites and axon terminals in the PAG. These results indicate that behavioral interactions between cannabinoids and opioids may be the result of cellular adaptations within PAG neurons co-expressing CB1 and MOP receptors. PMID:22521830

  19. Pain hypersensitivity induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation is not due to altered binding to brain mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Danielle C; Andersen, Monica L; Hipólide, Débora Cristina; Nobrega, José N; Tufik, Sergio

    2007-03-28

    Previous studies have established a relationship between sleep disruption and pain, and it has been suggested that hyperalgesia induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) could be due to a reduction of opioidergic neurotransmission in the brain. In the present study rats deprived of sleep for 96 h as well as rats allowed to recover for 24h after PSD and normal controls received vehicle or morphine (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) and were tested on a hot plate 1h later. Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to map alterations in binding to brain mu-opioid receptors in separate groups. Results demonstrated that PSD induced a significant reduction in thermal pain threshold, as measured by paw withdrawal latencies. This effect did not return to baseline control values after 24h of sleep recovery. The usual analgesic effect of morphine was observed in the control group but not in PSD or rebound groups except at the highest dose (10 mg/kg). Binding of [3H]DAMGO to mu sites did not differ significantly among the three groups in any of the 33 brain regions examined. These results do not exclude the participation of the opioid system in PSD-induced pain hypersensitivity since sleep-deprived rats were clearly resistant to morphine. However, the fact no changes were seen in [3H]DAMGO binding indicates that mechanisms other than altered mu-opioid binding must be sought to explain the phenomenon.

  20. Autistic-Like Syndrome in Mu Opioid Receptor Null Mice is Relieved by Facilitated mGluR4 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jérôme AJ; Clesse, Daniel; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Schwab, Yannick; Le Merrer, Julie; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) remains largely unknown. Identifying vulnerability genes for autism represents a major challenge in the field and allows the development of animal models for translational research. Mice lacking the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm1−/−) were recently proposed as a monogenic mouse model of autism, based on severe deficits in social behavior and communication skills. We confirm this hypothesis by showing that adult Oprm1−/− animals recapitulate core and multiple comorbid behavioral symptoms of autism and also display anatomical, neurochemical, and genetic landmarks of the disease. Chronic facilitation of mGluR4 signaling, which we identified as a novel pharmacological target in ASDs in these mice, was more efficient in alleviating behavioral deficits than the reference molecule risperidone. Altogether, our data provide first evidence that disrupted mu opioid receptor signaling is sufficient to trigger a comprehensive autistic syndrome, maybe through blunted social reward processes, and this mouse model opens promising avenues for therapeutic innovation. PMID:24619243

  1. Interaction among mu-opioid receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lameh, J; Eiger, S; Sadée, W

    1992-09-01

    The clonal human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH-SY5Y was previously shown to express mu-opioid and alpha 2-adrenoceptors which are both negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Because of the potential use of alpha 2-agonists in the treatment of narcotic dependence, we tested the interactions among he alpha 2-agonists, clonidine and norepinephrine, and morphine on AC in SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with retinoic acid resulting in partial neuronal differentiation greatly enhanced the cells' sensitivity towards adenylyl cyclase stimulation by prostaglandin E1, and its inhibition by morphine and alpha 2-agonists. Norepinephrine (EC50 = 69 nM) maximally inhibited prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation (by approximately 83%), and the alpha 2-agonist yohimbine reversed these effects. Clonidine (EC50 = 32 nM) was a partial agonist, with 50 to 60% maximal inhibition. The combined effects of morphine (maximum approximately 70% inhibition) and norepinephrine exceeded the effect of either agent alone, yielding more than 90% inhibition of prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation. As previously reported for morphine, only a partial tolerance was observed for adenylyl cyclase inhibition by norepinephrine. Further, no cross-tolerance was observed between clonidine and morphine. The combined results indicate that mu-opioid receptors and an alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype are colocalized on the same cells in SH-SY5Y culture, which hence serves as a model to study opioid-alpha 2-adrenergic interactions.

  2. Design, Syntheses, and Biological Evaluation of 14-Heteroaromatic Substituted Naltrexone Derivatives: Pharmacological Profile Switch from Mu Opioid Receptor Selectivity to Mu/Kappa Opioid Receptor Dual Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yunyun; Zaidi, Saheem A.; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Aschenbach, Lindsey C. K.; Li, Guo; Stevens, David L.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.; Selley, Dana E.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Based on a mu opioid receptor (MOR) homology model and the “isosterism” concept, three generations of 14-heteroaromatically substituted naltrexone derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential MOR selective ligands. The first generation ligands appeared to be MOR selective, whereas the second and the third generation ones showed MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) dual selectivity. Docking of ligands 2 (MOR selective) and 10 (MOR/KOR dual selective) to the three opioid receptor crystal structures revealed a non-conserved residue facilitated “hydrogen bonding network” that could be responsible for their distinctive selectivity profiles. The MOR/KOR dual selective ligand 10 showed no agonism and acted as a potent antagonist in the tail flick assay. It also produced less severe opioid withdrawal symptoms than naloxone in morphine dependent mice. In conclusion, ligand 10 may serve as a novel lead compound to develop MOR/KOR dual selective ligands, which might possess unique therapeutic value for opioid addiction treatment. PMID:24144240

  3. Mu-opioid receptor activation in the medial shell of nucleus accumbens promotes alcohol consumption, self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jocelyn M; Fields, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Endogenous opioid signaling in ventral cortico-striatal-pallidal circuitry is implicated in elevated alcohol consumption and relapse to alcohol seeking. Mu-opioid receptor activation in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region implicated in multiple aspects of reward processing, elevates alcohol consumption while NAc opioid antagonists reduce it. However, the precise nature of the increases in alcohol consumption, and the effects of mu-opioid agonists on alcohol seeking and relapse are not clear. Here, we tested the effects of the mu-opioid agonist [D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) in rat NAc shell on lick microstructure in a free-drinking test, alcohol seeking during operant self-administration, extinction learning and expression, and cue-reinforced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. DAMGO enhanced the number, but not the size of drinking bouts. DAMGO also enhanced operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement, but did not affect extinction learning or elicit reinstatement in the absence of cues. Our results suggest that mu-opioid agonism in NAc shell elevates alcohol consumption, seeking and conditioned reinforcement primarily by enhancing the incentive motivational properties of alcohol and alcohol-paired cues, rather than by modulating palatability, satiety, or reinforcement. PMID:27089981

  4. Biomarkers of morphine tolerance and dependence are prevented by morphine-induced endocytosis of a mutant mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Kim, Joseph A; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2009-12-01

    Growing evidence shows that trafficking of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) is a critical process in functional recovery from desensitization following activation and plays important roles in morphine tolerance and dependence largely because of the failure of morphine to promote such trafficking. However, morphine tolerance and dependence are believed to be mediated by multiple mechanisms, including well-documented biochemical changes in cAMP activity, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), and c-fos. Here, we assess the consequences of promoting morphine-induced endocytosis on these biochemical changes utilizing a knock-in mouse model, RMOR, in which MORs undergo morphine-induced endocytosis. Chronic morphine treatment of wild-type (WT) mice promoted superactivation of adenylyl cyclase, alterations in NMDARs, and up-regulation of GR and c-fos in distinct brain regions. Notably, none of these biochemical changes occurred in the RMOR-knock-in mice. Together, these data demonstrate that morphine tolerance and dependence are mediated by multiple biochemical mechanisms and that MOR endocytosis plays a critical role in each of these mechanisms.

  5. Abolished thermal and mechanical antinociception but retained visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Ishihara, Kumatoshi; Uhl, George R; Satoh, Masamichi; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2008-06-01

    Butorphanol is hypothesized to induce analgesia via opioid pathways, although the precise mechanisms for its effects remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the mu-opioid receptor (MOP) in thermal, mechanical, and visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol using MOP knockout (KO) mice. Butorphanol-induced thermal antinociception, assessed by the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, was significantly reduced in heterozygous and abolished in homozygous MOP-KO mice compared with wildtype mice. The results obtained from our butorphanol-induced mechanical antinociception experiments, assessed by the Randall-Selitto test, were similar to the results obtained from the thermal antinociception experiments in these mice. Interestingly, however, butorphanol retained its ability to induce significant visceral chemical antinociception, assessed by the writhing test, in homozygous MOP-KO mice. The butorphanol-induced visceral chemical antinociception that was retained in homozygous MOP-KO mice was completely blocked by pretreatment with nor-binaltorphimine, a kappa-opioid receptor (KOP) antagonist. In vitro binding and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays also showed that butorphanol possessed higher affinity for KOPs and MOPs than for delta-opioid receptors. These results molecular pharmacologically confirmed previous studies implicating MOPs, and partially KOPs, in mediating butorphanol-induced analgesia. PMID:18417173

  6. INHIBITION OF INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROPATHIC PAIN BY TARGETING A MU OPIOID RECEPTOR/CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR5 HETEROMER (MOR-CCR5)

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I.; Lunzer, Mary M.; Powers, Michael D.; Sham, Yuk Y.; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine release promotes crosstalk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. Based on the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such crosstalk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14–24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was >2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26451468

  7. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain by Targeting a Mu Opioid Receptor/Chemokine Receptor5 Heteromer (MOR-CCR5).

    PubMed

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Michael D; Sham, Yuk Y; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S

    2015-11-12

    Chemokine release promotes cross-talk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. On the basis of the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such cross-talk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14-24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was 2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for the treatment of chronic pain.

  8. Subchronic nicotine exposure in adolescence induces long-term effects on hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid-CB1 and mu-opioid receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Marco, Eva M; Granstrem, Oleg; Moreno, Enrique; Llorente, Ricardo; Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2007-02-14

    There is evidence for the existence of functional interactions between nicotine and cannabinoids and opioid compounds in adult experimental animals. However, there is scarce information about these relationships in young animals. In the present study we evaluated short and long-term effects of a subchronic nicotine treatment [0.4 mg/kg daily i.p. injections from postnatal day (PND) 34 to PND 43], upon hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid-CB(1) and mu-opioid receptors in Wistar rats of both genders. Rats were sacrificed 2 h after the last nicotine injection (short-term effects, PND 43) or one month later (long-term effects, PND 75). Hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid CB(1) and mu-opioid receptors were quantified by Western blotting. The subchronic nicotine treatment induced a region-dependent long-lasting effect in cannabinoid CB(1) receptor: a significant increase in hippocampal cannabinoid CB(1) receptors and a significant decrease in striatal cannabinoid CB(1) receptors, with these effects being similar in males and females. With respect to mu-opioid receptors, subchronic nicotine induced a significant down-regulation in hippocampal and striatal mu-opioid receptors in the long-term, and within the striatum the effects were more marked in adult males than in females. The present results indicate that juvenile nicotine taking may have implications for the endocannabinoid and endogenous opioid function and for the behaviors served by those systems, this includes possible modification of the response of adults to different psychotropic drugs, i.e. cannabis and morphine/heroin when taken later in life.

  9. Argon prevents the development of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in mu opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Dhilly, Martine; Poisnel, Géraldine; Degoulet, Mickael; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Lemaire, Marc; Debruyne, Danièle; Abraini, Jacques H

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of γ-amino-butyric acid type A (GABA-A) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists has been reported to block the development of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine. Here, we investigated whether the non-anesthetic noble gas argon, shown to possess agonistic properties at these receptors, may block the acquisition of amphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and mu opioid receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens. Rats were pretreated with saline solution or amphetamine (1 mg/kg) from day 1 to day 3 and then exposed, immediately after injection of amphetamine, to medicinal air or argon at 75 vol% (with the remainder being oxygen). After a 3-day period of withdrawal, rats were challenged with amphetamine on day 7. Rats pretreated with amphetamine and argon had lower locomotor activity (U = 5, P < 0.005) and mu opioid receptor activity in the nucleus accumbens (U = 0, P < 0.001) than rats pretreated with amphetamine and air. In contrast, argon had effect on locomotor and mu receptor activity neither in rats pretreated with saline and challenged with amphetamine (acute amphetamine) nor in rats pretreated and challenged with saline solution (controls). These results indicate that argon inhibits the development of both locomotor sensitization and mu opioid receptor activation induced by repeated administration of amphetamine.

  10. Morphine-induced antinociception and reward in "humanized" mice expressing the mu opioid receptor A118G polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Yuill, Matthew B; Lowe, Tammy E; Kline, Aaron M; Zee, Michael L; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    The rewarding and antinociceptive effects of opioids are mediated through the mu-opioid receptor. The A118G single nucleotide polymorphism in this receptor has been implicated in drug addiction and differences in pain response. Clinical and preclinical studies have found that the G allele is associated with increased heroin reward and self-administration, elevated post-operative pain, and reduced analgesic responsiveness to opioids. Male and female mice homozygous for the "humanized" 118AA or 118GG alleles were evaluated to test the hypothesis that 118GG mice are less sensitive to the rewarding and antinociceptive effects of morphine. We found that 118AA and 118GG mice of both genders developed conditioned place preference for morphine. All mice developed tolerance to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of morphine. However, morphine tolerance was not different between AA and GG mice. We also examined sensitivity to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of cumulative morphine doses. We found that 118GG mice show reduced hypothermic and antinociceptive responses on the hotplate for 10mg/kg morphine. Finally, we examined basal pain response and morphine-induced antinociception in the formalin test for inflammatory pain. We found no gender or genotype differences in either basal pain response or morphine-induced antinociception in the formalin test. Our data suggests that homozygous expression of the GG allele in mice blunts morphine-induced hypothermia and hotplate antinociception but does not alter morphine CPP, morphine tolerance, or basal inflammatory pain response. PMID:26521067

  11. Mu opioid receptor in spermatozoa, eggs and larvae of gilthead sea bream (Sparus Aurata) and its involvement in stress related to aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, Maria; Guaricci, Antonio C; Milano, Serena; Macrì, Francesco; Aiudi, Giulio

    2014-08-01

    In aquaculture, unfavourable conditions experienced during early development may have strong downstream effects on the adult phenotype and fitness. Sensitivity to stress, leading to disease, reduced growth and mortality, is higher in larvae than in adult fish. In this study, conducted on sea bream (Sparus aurata), we evidenced the presence of the mu opioid receptor in gametes and larvae at different developmental stages. Moreover, we evaluated the possibility of reducing the effects of artificially produced stress, altering temperature, salinity and pH, by naloxone (an opioid antagonist) and calcium. Results evidenced that mu opioid receptor is present in larvae and in gametes of both sexes and that, during larval growth, its expression level changes accordingly; furthermore, naloxone/calcium association is efficacious in increasing the survival period of treated larvae compared to controls. We conclude that in sea bream rearing, the use of naloxone/calcium against stress can improve fish farming techniques by reducing larval mortality and consequently increasing productivity.

  12. Targeted Expression of Mu-Opioid Receptors in a Subset of Striatal Direct-Pathway Neurons Restores Opiate Reward

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yijun; Ostlund, Sean B.; James, Alex; Park, Chang Sin; Ge, Weihong; Roberts, Kristofer W.; Mittal, Nitish; Murphy, Niall P.; Cepeda, Carlos; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Levine, Michael S.; Jentsch, J. David; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Sun, Yi E.; Evans, Christopher J.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Yang, X. William

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mu-Opioid Receptors (MOR) are necessary for the analgesic and addictive effects of opioids such as morphine, but the MOR-expressing neuronal populations that mediate the distinct opiate effects remain elusive. Here we devised a novel conditional BAC rescue strategy to show that mice with targeted MOR expression in a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons enriched in the striosome and nucleus accumbens, in an otherwise MOR-null background, restore opiate reward, opiate-induced striatal dopamine release, and partially restore motivation to self-administer opiates. However, they lack opiate analgesia or withdrawal. Importantly, we used Cre-mediated deletion of the rescued MOR transgene to establish that striatal, rather than a few extrastriatal sites of MOR transgene expression, is needed for the restoration of opiate reward. Together, our study demonstrates that a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons is sufficient to support opiate reward-driven behaviors and provides a novel intersectional genetic approach to dissect neurocircuit-specific gene function in vivo. PMID:24413699

  13. Interface of physical and emotional stress regulation through the endogenous opioid system and mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Saulo C; Kennedy, Susan E; Smith, Yolanda R; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2005-12-01

    Unraveling the pathways and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the regulation of physical and emotional stress responses in humans is of critical importance to understand vulnerability and resiliency factors to the development of a number of complex physical and psychopathological states. Dysregulation of central stress response circuits have been implicated in the establishment of conditions as diverse as persistent pain, mood and personality disorders and substance abuse and dependence. The present review examines the contribution of the endogenous opioid system and mu-opioid receptors to the modulation and adaptation of the organism to challenges, such as sustained pain and negative emotional states, which threaten its internal homeostasis. Data accumulated in animal models, and more recently in humans, point to this neurotransmitter system as a critical modulator of the transition from acute (warning signals) to sustained (stressor) environmental adversity. The existence of pathways and regulatory mechanisms common to the regulation of both physical and emotional states transcend classical categorical disease classifications, and point to the need to utilize dimensional, "symptom"-related approximations to their study. Possible future areas of study at the interface of "mind" (cognitive-emotional) and "body" (physical) functions are delineated in this context.

  14. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  15. From the potent and selective mu opioid receptor agonist H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) to the potent delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Cocco, Maria Teresa; Salvadori, Severo; Romagnoli, Romeo; Sasaki, Yusuke; Okada, Yoshio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2005-08-25

    H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) binds with high affinity and selectivity to the mu opioid receptor and is a potent and long-acting analgesic. Substitution of d-Arg in position 2 with Tic and masking of the lysine amine side chain by Z protection and of the C-terminal carboxylic function instead of the amide function transform a potent and selective mu agonist into a potent and selective delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH. Such a delta antagonist could be used as a pharmacological tool.

  16. It’s MORe exciting than mu: crosstalk between mu opioid receptors and glutamatergic transmission in the mesolimbic dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Chartoff, Elena H.; Connery, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids selective for the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor (MOR) produce potent analgesia and euphoria. Heroin, a synthetic opioid, is considered one of the most addictive substances, and the recent exponential rise in opioid addiction and overdose deaths has made treatment development a national public health priority. Existing medications (methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone), when combined with psychosocial therapies, have proven efficacy in reducing aspects of opioid addiction. Unfortunately, these medications have critical limitations including those associated with opioid agonist therapies (e.g., sustained physiological dependence and opioid withdrawal leading to high relapse rates upon discontinuation), non-adherence to daily dosing, and non-renewal of monthly injection with extended-release naltrexone. Furthermore, current medications fail to ameliorate key aspects of addiction such as powerful conditioned associations that trigger relapse (e.g., cues, stress, the drug itself). Thus, there is a need for developing novel treatments that target neural processes corrupted with chronic opioid use. This requires a basic understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying effects of opioids on synaptic transmission and plasticity within reward-related neural circuits. The focus of this review is to discuss how crosstalk between MOR-associated G protein signaling and glutamatergic neurotransmission leads to immediate and long-term effects on emotional states (e.g., euphoria, depression) and motivated behavior (e.g., drug-seeking, relapse). Our goal is to integrate findings on how opioids modulate synaptic release of glutamate and postsynaptic transmission via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area with the clinical (neurobehavioral) progression of opioid dependence, as well as to identify gaps in knowledge that can be addressed in future studies

  17. Dalargin and [Cys-(O2NH2)]2 analogues of enkephalins and their selectivity for mu opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Ivancheva, C; Dimitrov, E; Bocheva, A; Radomirov, R

    1995-07-01

    1. Effects of the enkephalins Met-enk (M) and Leu-enk (L), of two newly synthesized analogues--[Cys-(O2NH2)]2-Met-enk (CM) and [Cys-(O2NH2)]2-Leu-enk (CL)--and of a hexapeptide--D-Ala2-Leu5-Arg6 (Dalargin; DL) on the spontaneous and electrically stimulated activity were examined with respect to their selectivity for the mu opioid receptors in the longitudinal layer of guinea pig ileum. 2. M and CM exerted relaxing and contractile effects on the spontaneous contractile activity while L, CL and DL produced only relaxation. The order of potency towards the relaxatory phase was DL > M > CM > L > CL and towards the contractile phase CM > M. 3. The effects of enkephalins on the spontaneous activity were naloxone and TTX sensitive except for the contractile phase of M and CM which persisted in the presence of TTX. NO was not involved in the neurotransmission of the relaxatory responses, while the blockade of alpha and beta adrenoceptors showed the participation of adrenergic mechanisms. Relaxation and contraction induced by enkephalins could not be directly attributed to cholinergic neurotransmission. 4. The naloxone-sensitive and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects of enkephalins and their analogues on the electrically stimulated cholinergic contractions were established. The order of the relative potency of opioids was: DL-3.8; M-1.0; L-0.4; CM-0.01; CL-0.005. 5. These data indicated that the D-Ala2 substitution and lengthening of the peptide chain by Arg6 in the molecule of L increased the potency at the mu opiate receptors, while the substitution in position 2 with Cys-(O2NH2) in the molecule of M and L yielded a less potent and selective mu agonists.

  18. Association of Smoking with Mu- Opioid Receptor Availability Before and During Naltrexone Blockade in Alcohol-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Weerts, Elise M.; Wand, Gary S.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Frost, J.James; Wong, Dean F.; McCaul, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Persons with a history of alcohol dependence are more likely to use tobacco and to meet criteria for nicotine dependence compared to social drinkers or nondrinkers. The high levels of comorbidity of nicotine and alcohol use and dependence are thought to be related to interactions between nicotinic, opioid and dopamine receptors in mesolimbic regions. The current study examined whether individual differences in regional mu-opioid receptor (MOR) availability were associated with tobacco use, nicotine dependence, and level of nicotine craving in 25 alcohol dependent (AD) subjects. AD subjects completed an inpatient protocol, which included medically supervised alcohol withdrawal, monitored alcohol abstinence, transdermal nicotine maintenance (21 mg/day), and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using the MOR agonist [11C]-carfentanil (CFN) before (basal scan) and during treatment with 50 mg/day naltrexone (naltrexone scan). Subjects who had higher scores on the Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test had significantly lower basal scan binding potential (BPND) across mesolimbic regions including the amygdala, cingulate, globus pallidus, thalamus and insula. Likewise, the number of cigarettes per day was negatively associated with basal scan BPND in mesolimbic regions Higher nicotine craving was significantly associated with lower BPND in amygdala, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus and ventral striatum. Although blunted during naltrexone treatment, the negative association was maintained for nicotine dependence and cigarettes per day, but not for nicotine craving. These findings suggest that intensity of cigarette smoking and severity of nicotine dependence symptoms are systematically related to reduced BPND across multiple brain regions in AD subjects. PMID:23252742

  19. Mu opioid receptor up-regulation and participation in excitability of hippocampal pyramidal cell electrophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Moudy, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of opiate antagonists to rats results in up-regulation of their brain opioid receptors. Using subcellular fractionation techniques, brain opioid receptors were resolved into two membrane populations, one associated with synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) and the other enriched in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi (microsomes). This study addressed in part the question of whether an antagonist induces up-regulation uniformly in these two populations. Rats were administered naltrexone by subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps. Forebrain mu receptor levels were determined by homologous displacement of ({sup 3}H)D-ala{sup 2}-mePhe{sup 4}-gly-ol{sup 5}-enkephalin (DAGO) followed by computer estimation of binding parameters. Receptor levels in crude membranes rose 77% after treatment. Microsomes displayed a 92% increase, a two-fold greater change than in SPMs (51%). These results establish that naltrexone induces up-regulation of both membrane populations; and that microsomal and SPM receptors represent discrete populations of intracellular and cell surface sites, respectively. Binding experiments on isolated hippocampi also demonstrated up-regulation (71%) of mu receptors. To demonstrate up-regulation of opioid receptors electrophysiologically, hippocampal slices were prepared from rats which had been chronically treated with naltrexone. After superfusion with DAGO, these slices showed a 42% greater population spike output than controls in response to the same EPSP input. Hippocampi from animals treated for two weeks showed an additional increase in sensitivity. The results support a disinhibitory role for opioids in pyramidal cell hyper-excitability. More importantly, they demonstrate a significant physiological correlate to opioid receptor up-regulation.

  20. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. PMID:27511839

  1. Agonist-induced functional desensitization of the mu-opioid receptor is mediated by loss of membrane receptors rather than uncoupling from G protein.

    PubMed

    Pak, Y; Kouvelas, A; Scheideler, M A; Rasmussen, J; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1996-11-01

    The effects of acute exposure of the opioid peptide [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) on the mu-opioid receptor were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K-1 and baby hamster kidney stable transfectants. In the CHO cell line, acute 1-hr treatment with DAMGO decreased the density of receptors without affecting the affinity or proportion of agonist-detected sites and attenuated the ability of the agonist to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. In contrast, similar 1-hr treatment of baby hamster kidney cells did not affect receptor density or agonist ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation, but longer duration of agonist exposure resulted in a reduction in membrane receptor, identical to the CHO cells. These results suggested that for the mu-opioid receptor, alteration in receptor density was the major determinant for the observed agonist-induced desensitization. Consistent with this notion, the ratio of the DAMGO concentration yielding half-maximal occupation of the mu receptor to that yielding half-maximal functional response was < 1. This suggests the necessity for a high mu receptor occupancy rate for maximal functional response, so that any loss of cell surface opioid-binding sites was a critical determinant in reducing the maximal response. This hypothesis was further supported by the observation that irreversible inactivation of fixed proportions of opioid-binding sites with beta-chlorn-altrexamine demonstrated that there were few spare receptors, which is in contrast to what has been reported for other G protein-coupled receptors, including the delta-opioid receptor. Taken together, these data suggest that the opioid agonist DAMGO has a high affinity for the mu receptor but must occupy > 70% of the available receptors to generate the maximal second messenger-linked response.

  2. Nociceptive behaviour upon modulation of mu-opioid receptors in the ventrobasal complex of the thalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Potes, Catarina Soares; Barroso, Patrícia Araújo; Azevedo, Luís; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Neto, Fani Lourença

    2010-03-01

    The role of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) in the inflammatory pain processing mechanisms within the ventrobasal complex of the thalamus (VB) is not well understood. This study investigated the effect of modulating MOR activity upon nociception, by stereotaxically injecting specific ligands in the VB. Nociceptive behaviour was evaluated in two established animal models of inflammatory pain, by using the formalin (acute and tonic pain) and the ankle-bend (chronic monoarthritic pain) tests. Control (saline intra-VB injection) formalin-injected rats showed acute and tonic pain-related behaviours. In contrast, intrathalamic administration of [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin acetate (DAMGO), a MOR-specific agonist, induced a statistically significant decrease of all tonic phase pain-related behaviours assessed until 30-35min after formalin hind paw injection. In the acute phase only the number of paw-jerks was affected. In monoarthritic rats, there was a noticeable antinociceptive effect with approximately 40min of duration, as denoted by the reduced ankle-bend scores observed after DAMGO injection. Intra-VB injection of D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP), a specific MOR antagonist, or of CTOP followed, 10min after, by DAMGO had no effects in either formalin or ankle-bend tests. Data show that DAMGO-induced MOR activation in the VB has an antinociceptive effect in the formalin test as well as in chronic pain observed in MA rats, suggesting an important and specific role for MORs in the VB processing of inflammatory pain.

  3. The mu opioid receptor A118G gene polymorphism moderates effects of trait anger-out on acute pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Burns, John W

    2008-10-15

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested that the effects of anger-out on postoperative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotypexphenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-outxA118G interactions were observed (p's<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p's<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-outxA118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotypexphenotype interactions involving trait anger-out.

  4. The Mu Opioid Receptor A118G Gene Polymorphism Moderates Effects of Trait Anger-Out on Acute Pain Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Burns, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested the effects of anger-out on post-operative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotype X phenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-out X A118G interactions were observed (p’s<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p’s<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-out X A118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotype X phenotype interactions involving trait anger-out. PMID:18579306

  5. The influences of reproductive status and acute stress on the levels of phosphorylated mu opioid receptor immunoreactivity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Keith L; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Pierce, Joseph P; Kelter, David T; Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-08-19

    Opioids play a critical role in hippocampally dependent behavior and plasticity. In the hippocampal formation, mu opioid receptors (MOR) are prominent in parvalbumin (PARV) containing interneurons. Previously we found that gonadal hormones modulate the trafficking of MORs in PARV interneurons. Although sex differences in response to stress are well documented, the point at which opioids, sex and stress interact to influence hippocampal function remains elusive. Thus, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry in combination with light and electron microscopy for the phosphorylated MOR at the SER375 carboxy-terminal residue (pMOR) in male and female rats to assess these interactions. In both sexes, pMOR-immunoreactivity (ir) was prominent in axons and terminals and in a few neuronal somata and dendrites, some of which contained PARV in the mossy fiber pathway region of the dentate gyrus (DG) hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum. In unstressed rats, the levels of pMOR-ir in the DG or CA3 were not affected by sex or estrous cycle stage. However, immediately following 30 minutes of acute immobilization stress (AIS), males had higher levels of pMOR-ir whereas females at proestrus and estrus (high estrogen stages) had lower levels of pMOR-ir within the DG. In contrast, the number and types of neuronal profiles with pMOR-ir were not altered by AIS in either males or proestrus females. These data demonstrate that although gonadal steroids do not affect pMOR levels at resting conditions, they are differentially activated both pre- and post-synaptic MORs following stress. These interactions may contribute to the reported sex differences in hippocampally dependent behaviors in stressed animals. PMID:22468144

  6. Loss of the mu opioid receptor induces strain-specific alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Cominski, T P; Ansonoff, M A; Turchin, C E; Pintar, J E

    2014-10-10

    Alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis affect spatial learning, though, the relative contributions of cell proliferation and cell survival on this process are poorly understood. The current study utilized mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) knockout (KO) mice on two background strains, C57BL/6 and 129S6, to assess cell survival as well as determine the impact on spatial learning using the Morris water maze. These experiments were designed to extend prior work showing that both C57BL/6 and 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice have an increased number of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) when compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The current study indicates that newly born neurons in the DG of C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice exhibit enhanced survival when compared to WT mice, while new neurons in the DG of 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice do not. In addition, C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice have a lower number of apoptotic cells in the DG compared to WT mice while, in contrast, 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice have a higher number of apoptotic cells in this region. These alterations collectively contribute to an increase in the granule cell number in the DG of C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice, while the total number of granule cells in 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice is unchanged. Thus, although C57BL/6 and 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice both exhibit increased cell proliferation in the DG, the impact of the MOR-1 mutation on cell survival differs between strains. Furthermore, the decrease in DG cell survival displayed by 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice is correlated with functional deficits in spatial learning, suggesting that MOR-1-dependent alterations in the survival of new neurons in the DG, and not MOR-1-dependent changes in proliferation of progenitor cells in the DG, is important for spatial learning. PMID:25086317

  7. Neonatal Administration of Thimerosal Causes Persistent Changes in Mu Opioid Receptors in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Bobrowicz, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Thimerosal added to some pediatric vaccines is suspected in pathogenesis of several neurodevelopmental disorders. Our previous study showed that thimerosal administered to suckling rats causes persistent, endogenous opioid-mediated hypoalgesia. Here we examined, using immunohistochemical staining technique, the density of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brains of rats, which in the second postnatal week received four i.m. injections of thimerosal at doses 12, 240, 1,440 or 3,000 μg Hg/kg. The periaqueductal gray, caudate putamen and hippocampus were examined. Thimerosal administration caused dose-dependent statistically significant increase in MOR densities in the periaqueductal gray and caudate putamen, but decrease in the dentate gyrus, where it was accompanied by the presence of degenerating neurons and loss of synaptic vesicle marker (synaptophysin). These data document that exposure to thimerosal during early postnatal life produces lasting alterations in the densities of brain opioid receptors along with other neuropathological changes, which may disturb brain development. PMID:20803069

  8. Mu opioid receptor expression is increased in inflammatory bowel diseases: implications for homeostatic intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, D; Chakass, D; Thuru, X; Zerbib, P; Tsicopoulos, A; Geboes, K; Bulois, P; Breisse, M; Vorng, H; Gay, J; Colombel, J‐F; Desreumaux, P; Chamaillard, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Recent studies with μ opioid receptor (MOR) deficient mice support a physiological anti‐inflammatory effect of MOR at the colon interface. To better understand the potential pharmacological effect of certain opiates in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), we (1) evaluated the regulation in vivo and in vitro of human MOR expression by inflammation; and (2) tested the potential anti‐inflammatory function of a specific opiate (DALDA) in inflamed and resting human mucosa. Patients and methods Expression of MOR mRNA and protein was evaluated in healthy and inflamed small bowel and colonic tissues, isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified monocytes, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from healthy donors and IBD patients. The effect of cytokines and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation on MOR expression in lymphocyte T and monocytic human cell lines was assessed. Finally, DALDA induced anti‐inflammatory effect was investigated in mucosal explants from controls and IBD patients. Results MOR was expressed in ileal and colonic enteric neurones as well as in immunocytes such as myeloid cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Overexpressed in active IBD mucosa, MOR was significantly enhanced by cytokines and repressed by NFκB inhibitor in myeloid and lymphocytic cell lines. Furthermore, ex vivo DALDA treatment dampened tumour necrosis factor α mRNA expression in the colon of active IBD patients. Conclusions Given the increased expression of MOR and the ex vivo beneficial effect of DALDA in active IBD, natural and/or synthetic opioid agonists could help to prevent overt pathological intestinal inflammation. PMID:16299031

  9. Mu Opioid Receptors Mediate the Effects of Chronic Ethanol Binge Drinking on the Hippocampal Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Contet, Candice; Kim, Airee; Le, David; Iyengar, Siddharth; Kotzebue, Roxanne W.; Yuan, Clara J.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol exposure and withdrawal alter the generation of new neurons in the adult hippocampus. The endogenous opioid system, in particular the μ opioid receptor (MOR), can modulate neural progenitors and also plays a critical role in ethanol drinking and dependence. In the present study, we sought to determine whether MOR contributes to the effects of ethanol on the dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenic niche. MOR wild-type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and knockout (KO) littermates were subjected to voluntary ethanol drinking in repeated limited-access two-bottle choice (2BC) sessions. MOR deficiency did not alter progenitor proliferation, neuronal differentiation and maturation, apoptosis or microglia in ethanol-naïve mice. When exposed to five consecutive weeks of 2BC, MOR mutant mice exhibited a gene-dosage dependent reduction of ethanol consumption compared to WT mice. Introducing a week of ethanol deprivation between each week of 2BC increased ethanol consumption in all genotypes and produced equivalent intakes in WT, Het and KO mice. Under the latter paradigm, ethanol drinking decreased progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the DG of WT mice. Interestingly, WT mice exhibited a strong negative correlation between ethanol intake and proliferation, which was disrupted in Het and KO mice. Moreover, MOR deficiency blocked the effect of ethanol on neuronal differentiation. MOR deficiency also protected against the neuroimmune response to ethanol drinking. Finally, chronic binge drinking induced a paradoxical decrease in apoptosis, which was independent of MOR. Altogether our data suggest that MOR is implicated in some of the neuroplastic changes produced by chronic ethanol exposure in the DG. PMID:23461397

  10. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: from a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of "addiction." These fears are not unwarranted. More than 2.5 million people begin abusing opioid painkillers each year, and prescription opioid abuse is now the second most common type of illegal drug use after marijuana. Some abusers become dependent due to recreational use of prescription painkillers. However, many abusers are among the 40 million people suffering from chronic pain, and developed dependence while using the drugs for legitimate purposes. Both of these trends highlight the need to develop opioid therapeutics with a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. Identifying the ideal properties of opioid drugs that would retain analgesia but reduce these side-effects has been a goal of my laboratory for more than a decade. During this time, we have proposed the novel hypothesis that opioid drugs that promote desensitization, endocytosis and recycling of the mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) will retain analgesic efficacy, but will have a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. We have generated substantial data, both pharmacological and genetic to suggest that our hypothesis is a valid one. These data are summarized in this review.

  11. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: from a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of "addiction." These fears are not unwarranted. More than 2.5 million people begin abusing opioid painkillers each year, and prescription opioid abuse is now the second most common type of illegal drug use after marijuana. Some abusers become dependent due to recreational use of prescription painkillers. However, many abusers are among the 40 million people suffering from chronic pain, and developed dependence while using the drugs for legitimate purposes. Both of these trends highlight the need to develop opioid therapeutics with a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. Identifying the ideal properties of opioid drugs that would retain analgesia but reduce these side-effects has been a goal of my laboratory for more than a decade. During this time, we have proposed the novel hypothesis that opioid drugs that promote desensitization, endocytosis and recycling of the mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) will retain analgesic efficacy, but will have a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. We have generated substantial data, both pharmacological and genetic to suggest that our hypothesis is a valid one. These data are summarized in this review. PMID:22226706

  12. Morphine-induced trafficking of a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein in rat locus coeruleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Kellie M.; Thompson, Nicholas L.; Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Jin, Jay; Ebersole, Brittany; Jenney, Christopher B.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Levenson, Robert; Berrettini, Wade H.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Opiate addiction is a devastating health problem, with approximately 2 million people currently addicted to heroin or non-medical prescription opiates in the United States alone. In neurons, adaptations in cell signaling cascades develop following opioid actions at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). A novel putative target for intervention involves interacting proteins that may regulate trafficking of MOR. Morphine has been shown to induce a re-distribution of a MOR-interacting protein Wntless (WLS, a transport molecule necessary for secretion of neurotrophic Wnt proteins), from cytoplasmic to membrane compartments in rat striatal neurons. Given its opiate-sensitivity and its well-characterized molecular and cellular adaptations to morphine exposure, we investigated the anatomical distribution of WLS and MOR in the rat locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system. Dual immunofluorescence microscopy was used to test the hypothesis that WLS is localized to noradrenergic neurons of the LC and that WLS and MOR co-exist in common LC somatodendritic processes, providing an anatomical substrate for their putative interactions. We also hypothesized that morphine would influence WLS distribution in the LC. Rats received saline, morphine or the opiate agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), and tissue sections through the LC were processed for immunogold-silver detection of WLS and MOR. Statistical analysis showed a significant re-distribution of WLS to the plasma membrane following morphine treatment in addition to an increase in the proximity of gold-silver labels for MOR and WLS. Following DAMGO treatment, MOR and WLS were predominantly localized within the cytoplasmic compartment when compared to morphine and control. In a separate cohort of rats, brains were obtained from saline-treated or heroin self-administering male rats for pulldown co-immunoprecipitation studies. Results showed an increased association of WLS and MOR following heroin exposure. As

  13. Mechanisms of the regional hemodynamic effects of a mu-opioid receptor agonist microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Pître, M; Lessard, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the mechanisms of the hemodynamic responses to microinjection of the selective mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, in conscious rats chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes. We found that i.v. pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the tachycardia elicited by DAMGO (1 nmol); however, the pressor response was reversed to a state of hypotension, the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictions were attenuated and the hindquarter vasodilation was potentiated. In the presence of propranolol, the pressor response and renal vasoconstriction were unchanged, whereas the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction was reduced and the hindquarter vasodilation was abolished. Moreover, in those animals we observed bradycardia followed by tachycardia. Combined i.v. pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol abolished the pressor and heart rate responses to DAMGO but had no effect on the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictions, although the hindquarter vasodilation was reduced. Intravenous pretreatment with a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist or captopril had no effect on the cardiovascular responses to DAMGO. Together, these results indicate that the hypertension observed after injection of DAMGO into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus was secondary to alpha adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstrictions in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and to beta adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the hindquarter vascular bed, whereas the involvement of circulating vasopressin or angiotensin seems less obvious from the present findings. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that nonadrenergic, nonvasopressinergic and nonangiotensinergic vasoconstrictor mechanisms were acting in the renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds.

  14. Vimentin interacts with the 5′-untranslated region of mouse mu opioid receptor (MOR) and is required for post-transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyu Young; Choi, Hack Sun; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H.

    2013-01-01

    The opioid receptors are among the most highly studied members of the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. Morphine and endogenous mu opioid peptides exert their pharmacological actions mainly through the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Expression of opioid receptor proteins is controlled by extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional processing. Previously, the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of the mouse MOR was found to be important for post-transcriptional regulation of the MOR gene in neuronal cells. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the role of vimentin as a post-transcriptional repressor in MOR gene regulation. To identify potential regulators of the mouse MOR gene, we performed affinity column chromatography using 5′-UTR-specific RNA oligonucleotides using neuroblastoma NS20Y cells. Chromatography was followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We identified an intermediate filament protein, vimentin, which bound specifically to the region between -175 and -150 (175–150) of the MOR 5′-UTR. Binding was confirmed by western blot analysis and RNA supershift assay. Furthermore, a cotransfection study demonstrated that the presence of vimentin resulted in reduced expression of the mouse MOR. Our data suggest that vimentin functions as a repressor of MOR translation, dependent on 175–150 of the MOR 5′-UTR. PMID:23353576

  15. /sup 125/I-FK 33-824: a selective probe for radioautographic labeling of mu opioid receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Moyse, E.; Pasquini, F.; Quirion, R.; Beaudet, A.

    1986-03-01

    The selectivity of the Met-enkephalin analog FK 33-824 (FK) for mu opioid receptors has been, over the years, a matter of controversy. We report here pharmacological and radioautographic data demonstrating that at nanomolar concentrations. /sup 125/I-FK interacts exclusively with mu sites. (1) Specific binding of /sup 125/I-FK to rat striatal membranes is totally inhibited by mu- and/or delta-preferring ligands according to monovalent, Michaelian kinetics, with a potency proportional to the affinity of competing drugs for mu receptors. (2) Unlabeled FK competes only at high concentration with the delta-selective ligand 3H-DPLPE and according to the same kinetics as the mu-selective agonist DAGO. (3) /sup 125/I-FK generates the same regional radioautographic labeling pattern as 3H-DAGO. We conclude that when used at nanomolar concentrations /sup 125/I-FK constitutes a selective probe for the radioautographic detection of mu opioid receptors at both light and electron microscopic levels.

  16. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence. PMID:26151922

  17. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence. PMID:26151922

  18. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-07-07

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence.

  19. The effects of RB101, a mixed inhibitor of enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes, on carrageenin-induced spinal c-Fos expression are completely blocked by beta-funaltrexamine, a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, S; Honoré, P; Catheline, G; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P; Besson, J M

    1999-07-10

    We have demonstrated that pre-administered RB101 (40 mg/kg, i.v.), a mixed inhibitor of enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes, decreased spinal c-Fos expression induced 1 h and 30 min after intraplantar (i.pl.) carrageenin (41% reduction, p<0.01). These effects were completely blocked by pre-administered beta-funaltrexamine (10 mg/kg, i.v., 24 h prior to stimulation), a selective long-lasting mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, these results clearly demonstrate that the effects of endogenous enkephalins on noxiously evoked spinal c-Fos expression are essentially mediated via mu-opioid receptors.

  20. Dual regulation of mu opioid receptors in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells by morphine and interleukin-1β: evidence for opioid-immune crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shekher; Davis, Randall L; DeSilva, Udaya; Stevens, Craig W

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of SK-N-SH cells with morphine and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) produced dual regulation of the mRNA for the human mu opioid receptor (MOR) protein. Morphine produced a decrease in the MOR mRNA while IL-1β increased it, as assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. These data were consistent with immunocytochemical studies of treated and untreated cells. Morphine-mediated down-regulation of MOR was blocked by naltrexone and IL-1β-induced up-regulation of MOR was blocked by interleukin-1 receptor type 1 antagonist. Immune-opioid crosstalk was examined by IL-1β and morphine co-treatment. These data are the first to show dual regulation of MOR in neuroblastoma cells.

  1. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  2. Mu-opioid receptor densities are depleted in regions implicated in agonistic and sexual behavior in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) defending nest sites and courting females

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Cynthia A.; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M.; Auger, Catherine J.; Riters, Lauren V.

    2010-01-01

    Social status and resource availability can strongly influence individual behavioral responses to conspecifics. In European starlings, males that acquire nest sites sing in response to females and dominate other males. Males without nest sites sing, but not to females, and they do not interact agonistically with other males. Little is known about the neural regulation of status- or resource-appropriate behavioral responses to conspecifics. Opioid neuropeptides are implicated in birdsong and agonistic behavior, suggesting that opioids may underlie differences in the production of these behaviors in males with and without nest sites. Here, we examined densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in groups of male starlings. Males that defended nest boxes dominated other males and sang at higher rates when presented with a female than males without nest boxes, independent of testosterone concentrations. Multiple regression analyses showed nest box ownership (not agonistic behavior or singing) predicted the optical density of receptor labeling in the medial bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, ventral tegmental area and the medial preoptic nucleus. Compared to males without nest boxes, males with nest boxes had lower densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in these regions. Singing additionally predicted the area covered by labeling in the ventral tegmental area. The results suggest that elevated opioid activity in these regions suppresses courtship and agonistic behavioral responses to conspecifics in males without nest boxes. The findings are consistent with a dynamic role for opioid receptors in adjusting social behavior so that it is appropriate given the resources available to an individual. PMID:21147175

  3. Mu-opioid receptor densities are depleted in regions implicated in agonistic and sexual behavior in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) defending nest sites and courting females.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Cynthia A; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Auger, Catherine J; Riters, Lauren V

    2011-05-16

    Social status and resource availability can strongly influence individual behavioral responses to conspecifics. In European starlings, males that acquire nest sites sing in response to females and dominate other males. Males without nest sites sing, but not to females, and they do not interact agonistically with other males. Little is known about the neural regulation of status- or resource-appropriate behavioral responses to conspecifics. Opioid neuropeptides are implicated in birdsong and agonistic behavior, suggesting that opioids may underlie differences in the production of these behaviors in males with and without nest sites. Here, we examined densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in groups of male starlings. Males that defended nest boxes dominated other males and sang at higher rates when presented with a female than males without nest boxes, independent of testosterone concentrations. Multiple regression analyses showed nest box ownership (not agonistic behavior or singing) predicted the optical density of receptor labeling in the medial bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, ventral tegmental area and the medial preoptic nucleus. Compared to males without nest boxes, males with nest boxes had lower densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in these regions. Singing additionally predicted the area covered by labeling in the ventral tegmental area. The results suggest that elevated opioid activity in these regions suppresses courtship and agonistic behavioral responses to conspecifics in males without nest boxes. The findings are consistent with a dynamic role for opioid receptors in adjusting social behavior so that it is appropriate given the resources available to an individual. PMID:21147175

  4. Mu-opioid receptor activation prevents apoptosis following serum withdrawal in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and cortical neurons via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, M; Segura, M F; Comella, J X; Olmos, G

    2003-03-01

    Opioid peptides and alkaloids exert their effects via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). It has been shown that, in addition to trophic factors, some GPCRs are able to activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI 3-K/Akt) signal transduction pathway, thus leading to cell survival. The aim of this study was to test whether activation of mu-opioid receptors has protective effects on serum withdrawal-induced cell death and to study the possible implication of PI 3-K in this process. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells fully differentiated by exposure to retinoic acid for five days, the enkephalin derivative selective mu-agonist DAMGO (0.1-2 microM) and the alkaloid morphine (0.1-10 microM) promoted cell survival after serum deprivation (MTT and trypan blue exclusion assays), without inducing cell proliferation. These effects were fully reversed by naloxone, by the selective mu-antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) and also by the specific PI 3-K inhibitor LY294002. The two agonists stimulated Akt phosphorylation and the effect was also abolished by beta-FNA and by LY294002. In mouse primary cortical neurons, DAMGO reduced the percentage of apoptosis after 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of serum withdrawal; as determined by Hoechst staining. This effect was blocked by beta-FNA, by pre-treatment with pertussis toxin and by LY294002. DAMGO also stimulated Akt phosphorylation via PI 3-K in this primary neuronal culture. Together, these results indicate that stimulation of the mu-opioid receptor promotes neuronal survival in a G(i/o)-linked, PI 3-K-dependent signaling cascade and suggest that Akt may be a key downstream kinase involved in this anti-apoptotic effect. PMID:12646285

  5. The role of the Asn40Asp polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) on alcoholism etiology and treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lara A; Barr, Christina S; Blendy, Julie A; Oslin, David; Goldman, David; Anton, Raymond F

    2012-03-01

    The endogenous opioid system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcoholism as it modulates the neurobehavioral effects of alcohol. A variant in the mu opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), the Asn40Asp polymorphism, has received attention as a functional variant that may influence a host of behavioral phenotypes for alcoholism as well as clinical response to opioid antagonists. This paper will review converging lines of evidence on the effect of the Asn40Asp SNP on alcoholism phenotypes, including: (i) genetic association studies; (ii) behavioral studies of alcoholism; (iii) neuroimaging studies; (iv) pharmacogenetic studies and clinical trials; and (v) preclinical animal studies. Together, these lines of research seek to elucidate the effects of this functional polymorphism on alcoholism etiology and treatment response.

  6. SR 16435 [1-(1-(bicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-yl)piperidin-4-yl)indolin-2-one], a novel mixed nociceptin/orphanin FQ/mu-opioid receptor partial agonist: analgesic and rewarding properties in mice.

    PubMed

    Khroyan, Taline V; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Polgar, Willma E; Orduna, Juan; Olsen, Cris; Jiang, Faming; Toll, Lawrence

    2007-02-01

    We identified a novel nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP)/mu-opioid receptor agonist, SR 16435 [1-(1-(bicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-yl)piperidin-4-yl)indolin-2-one], with high binding affinity and partial agonist activity at both receptors. It was hypothesized that SR 16435 would produce antinociception and yet, unlike morphine, would have diminished rewarding properties and tolerance development. Antinociception was assessed in mice using the tail-flick assay, whereas behavioral and rewarding effects were assessed using the place conditioning (PC) paradigm. PC was established by pairing drug injections with a distinct compartment. Behavioral effects were measured after acute and repeated drug administration, and the test for PC was carried out 24 h after four drug- and vehicle-pairing sessions. SR 16435 produced an increase in tail-flick latency, but SR 16435-induced antinociception was lower than that observed with morphine. Given that naloxone blocked SR 16435-induced antinociception, it is highly likely that this effect was mediated by mu-opioid receptors. Compared with morphine, chronic SR 16435 treatment resulted in reduced development of tolerance to its antinociceptive effects. SR 16435-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was evident, an effect that was probably mediated via mu-opioid receptors, as it was reversed by coadministration of naloxone. NOP agonist activity was also present, given that SR 16435 decreased global activity, and this effect was partially reversed with the selective NOP antagonist, SR 16430 [1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-4-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)piperidin-4-ol]. Naloxone, however, also reversed the SR 16435-induced decrease in activity, indicating that both opioid and NOP receptors mediate this behavior. In summary, the mixed NOP/mu-opioid partial agonist SR 16435 exhibited both NOP and mu-opioid receptor-mediated behaviors. PMID:17132815

  7. Mu-Opioid (MOP) receptor mediated G-protein signaling is impaired in specific brain regions in a rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Edina; Büki, Alexandra; Kékesi, Gabriella; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Benyhe, Sándor

    2016-04-21

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder. Clinical reports suggest that many patients with schizophrenia are less sensitive to pain than other individuals. Animal models do not interpret schizophrenia completely, but they can model a number of symptoms of the disease, including decreased pain sensitivities and increased pain thresholds of various modalities. Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides have a substantial role in analgesia. In this biochemical study we investigated changes in the signaling properties of the mu-opioid (MOP) receptor in different brain regions, which are involved in the pain transmission, i.e., thalamus, olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our goal was to compare the transmembrane signaling mediated by MOP receptors in control rats and in a recently developed rat model of schizophrenia. Regulatory G-protein activation via MOP receptors were measured in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays in the presence of a highly selective MOP receptor peptide agonist, DAMGO. It was found that the MOP receptor mediated activation of G-proteins was substantially lower in membranes prepared from the 'schizophrenic' model rats than in control animals. The potency of DAMGO to activate MOP receptor was also decreased in all brain regions studied. Taken together in our rat model of schizophrenia, MOP receptor mediated G-proteins have a reduced stimulatory activity compared to membrane preparations taken from control animals. The observed distinct changes of opioid receptor functions in different areas of the brain do not explain the augmented nociceptive threshold described in these animals.

  8. Temporal lobe epilepsy causes selective changes in mu opioid and nociceptin receptor binding and functional coupling to G-proteins in human temporal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernandez, Juana; Gaona, Andres; Páldy, Eszter; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna

    2009-09-01

    There is no information concerning signal transduction mechanisms downstream of the opioid/nociceptin receptors in the human epileptic brain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the level of G-proteins activation mediated by DAMGO (a mu receptor selective peptide) and nociceptin, and the binding to mu and nociceptin (NOP) receptors and adenylyl cyclase (AC) in neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE) or secondary to tumor or vascular lesion showed enhanced [3H]DAMGO and [3H]forskolin binding, lower DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding and no significant changes in nociceptin-stimulated G-protein. [3H]Nociceptin binding was lower in patients with MTLE. Age of seizure onset correlated positively with [3H]DAMGO binding and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, whereas epilepsy duration correlated negatively with [3H]DAMGO and [3H]nociceptin binding, and positively with [3H]forskolin binding. In conclusion, our present data obtained from neocortex of epileptic patients provide strong evidence that a) temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with alterations in mu opioid and NOP receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors, and b) clinical aspects may play an important role on these receptor changes.

  9. Enhanced dendritic availability of mu-opioid receptors in inhibitory neurons of the extended amygdala in mice deficient in the corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaferi, Azra; Zhou, Ping; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the corticotropin-releasing factor-1 (CRF-1) receptor in the anterolateral BNST (BSTal), a key subdivision of the extended amygdala, elicits opiate-seeking behavior exacerbated by stress. However, it is unknown whether the presence of CRF-1 affects expression of the mu-opioid receptor (μ-OR) in the many GABAergic BSTal neurons implicated in the stress response. We hypothesized that deletion of the CRF-1 receptor gene would alter the density and/or subcellular distribution of μ-ORs in GABAergic neurons of the BSTal. We used electron microscopy to quantitatively examine μ-OR immunogold and GABA immunoperoxidase labeling in the BSTal of CRFr-1 knockout (KO) compared to wildtype (WT) mice. To assess regional specificity, we examined μ-OR distribution in dorsal striatum. The μ-ORs in each region were predominantly localized in dendrites, many of which were GABA-immunoreactive. Significantly more cytoplasmic μ-OR gold particles per dendritic area were observed selectively in GABA-containing dendrites of the BSTal, but not of the dorsal striatum, in KO compared to WT mice. In both regions, however, significantly fewer GABA-immunoreactive axon terminals were present in KO compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that absence of CRF-1 results in enhanced expression and/or dendritic trafficking of μ-ORs in inhibitory BSTal neurons. They also suggest that expression of CRF-1 is a critical determinant of the availability of GABA in functionally diverse brain regions. These findings underscore the complex interplay between CRF, opioid and GABA systems in limbic and striatal regions, and have implications for the role of CRF-1 in influencing the pharmacological effects of opiates active at μ-ORs. PMID:20506149

  10. MOR Is Not Enough: Identification of Novel mu-Opioid Receptor Interacting Proteins Using Traditional and Modified Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid Screens

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jay; Wong, Victoria; Kittanakom, Saranya; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Stagljar, Igor; Levenson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (MOR) is the G-protein coupled receptor primarily responsible for mediating the analgesic and rewarding properties of opioid agonist drugs such as morphine, fentanyl, and heroin. We have utilized a combination of traditional and modified membrane yeast two-hybrid screening methods to identify a cohort of novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs). The interaction between the MOR and a subset of MORIPs was validated in pulldown, co-immunoprecipitation, and co-localization studies using HEK293 cells stably expressing the MOR as well as rodent brain. Additionally, a subset of MORIPs was found capable of interaction with the delta and kappa opioid receptors, suggesting that they may represent general opioid receptor interacting proteins (ORIPS). Expression of several MORIPs was altered in specific mouse brain regions after chronic treatment with morphine, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in response to opioid agonist drugs. Based on the known function of these newly identified MORIPs, the interactions forming the MOR signalplex are hypothesized to be important for MOR signaling and intracellular trafficking. Understanding the molecular complexity of MOR/MORIP interactions provides a conceptual framework for defining the cellular mechanisms of MOR signaling in brain and may be critical for determining the physiological basis of opioid tolerance and addiction. PMID:23840749

  11. An early granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain through activation of mu opioid receptors on the injured nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yeh, Shin-Rung; Lo, Ai-Lun; Chao, Po-Kuan; Lee, Yun-Lin; Hung, Yu-Hui; Lu, Kwok-Tung; Ro, Long-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) located in the peripheral nerves can be activated after nerve injury and that it attenuates peripheral nociceptive signals to the spinal dorsal horn. Various cytokines and phosphorylated-p38 (p-p38) activation in the dorsal horn also play an important role in neuropathic pain development. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a growth factor that can stimulate granulocyte formation and has been shown to exert an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through recruiting opioid-containing leukocytes to the injured nerve. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Herein, the results of behavior tests in addition to MOR levels in the injured sciatic nerve and the levels of p-p38 and various cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn were studied in vehicle-treated or GCSF-treated chronic constriction injured (CCI) rats at different time points (i.e., 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively) after nerve injury. The results showed that a single early systemic GCSF treatment after nerve injury can up-regulate MORs in the injured nerve, which can decrease peripheral nociceptive signals. Thereafter, those changes suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 but enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, followed by decreases in p-p38 in the dorsal horn, and thus further attenuate neuropathic pain. PMID:27180600

  12. Antinociceptive action of DBO 17 and DBO 11 in mice: two 3,8 diazabicyclo (3.2.1.) octane derivates with selective mu opioid receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Fadda, P; Barlocco, D; Tronci, S; Cignarella, G; Fratta, W

    1997-11-01

    Two 3,8 diazabicyclo (3.2.1.) octane derivates, namely DBO 17 and DBO 11, were studied for the opioid-like activity. In the rat brain membrane preparation binding studies, DBO 17 and DBO 11 showed a high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (Ki's: 5.1 and 25 nM, respectively). DBO 17 and DBO 11 inhibited the nociceptive response in the hot-plate test of mice with ED50 values of 0.16 mg/kg and 0.44 mg/kg, respectively. The antinociceptive action of both DBO 17 and DBO 11 was blocked by naloxone. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of DBO 17 and DBO 11 was present after 13 and 7 days of repeated treatment, respectively. Both DBO 17 and DBO 11 were ineffective in morphine-tolerant mice and vice versa. Chronic treatments (three times daily for seven consecutive days) of DBO 17 and DBO 11 induced a naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome in DBO 17 treated mice similar to that in morphine treated mice, whereas in DBO 11 treated mice abstinence signs were virtually absent. These results indicate an interesting pharmacological profile that suggests these compounds as possible new candidates for the clinical treatment of pain.

  13. Isolating and characterizing three alternatively spliced mu opioid receptor variants: mMOR-1A, mMOR-1O and mMOR-1P

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Bolan, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Annie-Kim; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the mu opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, has demonstrated an array of splice variants in mouse, rat and human. Three classes of splice variants have been identified: full length 7 transmembrane (TM) domain variants with C-terminal splicing, truncated 6TM variants and single TM variants. The current studies isolates and characterizes an additional three full length C-terminal splice variants generated from the mouse OPRM1 gene: mMOR-1A, mMOR-1O and mMOR-1P. Using RT-qPCR, we demonstrated differential expression of these variants' mRNAs among selected brain regions, supporting region-specific alternative splicing. When expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, all the variants displayed high mu binding affinity and selectivity with subtle differences in the affinities toward some agonists. [35S]γGTP binding assays revealed marked differences in agonist-induced G protein activation in both potency and efficacy among the variants. Together with the previous studies of mu agonist-induced phosphorylation and internalization in several carboxyl terminal splice variants, the current studies further suggest the existence of biased signaling of various agonists within each individual variant and/or among different variants. PMID:24375714

  14. The mu-opioid receptor agonist/noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (MOR-NRI) concept in analgesia: the case of tapentadol.

    PubMed

    Tzschentke, Thomas M; Christoph, Thomas; Kögel, Babette Y

    2014-04-01

    Tapentadol is a novel, centrally-acting analgesic drug, with an analgesic efficacy comparable to that of strong opioids such as oxycodone and morphine. Its high efficacy has been demonstrated in a range of animal models of acute and chronic, nociceptive, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain as well as in clinical studies with moderate to severe pain arising from a number of different etiologies. At the same time, a favorable gastrointestinal tolerability has been demonstrated in rodents and humans, and advantages over morphine regarding tolerance development and physical dependence were shown in animal studies. Furthermore, a low level of abuse and diversion is beginning to emerge from first post-marketing data. Tapentadol acts as a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI). Both mechanisms of action have been shown to contribute to the analgesic activity of tapentadol and to produce analgesia in a synergistic manner, such that relatively moderate activity at the two target sites (MOR and noradrenaline reuptake transporter) is sufficient to produce strong analgesic effects. It has been suggested that tapentadol is the first representative of a proposed new class of analgesics, MOR-NRI. This review presents the evidence that has led to this suggestion, and outlines how the pharmacology of tapentadol can explain its broad analgesic activity profile and high analgesic potency as well as its favorable tolerability.

  15. Methamphetamine-induced stereotypy correlates negatively with patch-enhanced prodynorphin and arc mRNA expression in the rat caudate putamen: the role of mu opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Noble, Erika S; Gilbert, Yamiece E

    2010-06-01

    Amphetamines induce stereotypy, which correlates with patch-enhanced c-Fos expression the patch compartment of caudate putamen (CPu). Methamphetamine (METH) treatment also induces patch-enhanced expression of prodynorphin (PD), arc and zif/268 in the CPu. Whether patch-enhanced activation of any of these genes correlates with METH-induced stereotypy is unknown, and the factors that contribute to this pattern of expression are poorly understood. Activation of mu opioid receptors, which are expressed by the neurons of the patch compartment, may underlie METH-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. The current study examined whether striatal mu opioid receptor blockade altered METH-induced stereotypy and patch-enhanced gene expression, and if there was a correlation between the two responses. Animals were intrastriatally infused with the mu antagonist CTAP (10 microg/microl), treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg, s.c.), placed in activity chambers for 3h, and then sacrificed. CTAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced increases in PD, arc and zif/268 mRNA expression and significantly reduced METH-induced stereotypy. Patch-enhanced PD and arc mRNA expression in the dorsolateral CPu correlated negatively with METH-induced stereotypy. These data indicate that mu opioid receptor activation contributes to METH-induced gene expression in the CPu and stereotypy, and that patch-enhanced PD and arc expression may be a homeostatic response to METH treatment.

  16. Type and location of fluorescent probes incorporated into the potent mu-opioid peptide [Dmt]DALDA affect potency, receptor selectivity and intrinsic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Schiller, P W; Berezowska, I; Weltrowska, G; Chen, H; Lemieux, C; Chung, N N

    2005-06-01

    The dermorphin-derived tetrapeptide H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) (Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) is a highly potent and selective mu-opioid agonist capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier and producing a potent, centrally mediated analgesic effect when given systemically. For the purpose of biodistribution studies by fluorescence techniques, [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues containing various fluorescent labels [dansyl, anthraniloyl (atn), fluorescein, or 6-dimethylamino-2'-naphthoyl] in several different locations of the peptide were synthesized and characterized in vitro in the guinea-pig ileum and mouse vas deferens assays, and in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor-binding assays. The analogues showed various degrees of mu receptor-binding selectivity, but all of them were less mu-selective than the [Dmt(1)]DALDA parent peptide. Most analogues retained potent, full mu-agonist activity, except for one with fluorescein attached at the C-terminus (3a) (partial mu-agonist) and one containing beta-(6'-dimethylamino-2'-naphthoyl)alanine (aladan) in place of Phe(3) (4) (mu- and kappa-antagonist). The obtained data indicate that the receptor-binding affinity, receptor selectivity and intrinsic efficacy of the prepared analogues vary very significantly, depending on the type of fluorescent label used and on its location in the peptide. The results suggest that the biological activity profile of fluorescence-labeled peptide analogues should always be carefully determined prior to their use in biodistribution studies or other studies. One of the analogues containing the atn group (2a) proved highly useful in a study of cellular uptake and intracellular distribution by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  17. Calmodulin regulation of basal and agonist-stimulated G protein coupling by the mu-opioid receptor (OP(3)) in morphine-pretreated cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Surratt, C K; Sadée, W

    2000-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to suppress basal G protein coupling and attenuate agonist-stimulated G protein coupling of the mu-opioid receptor (OP(3)) through direct interaction with the third intracellular (i3) loop of the receptor. Here we have investigated the role of CaM in regulating changes in OP(3)-G protein coupling during morphine treatment, shown to result in CaM release from plasma membranes. Basal and agonist-stimulated G protein coupling by OP(3) was measured before and after morphine pretreatment by incorporation of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thiotriphosphate) into membranes, obtained from HEK 293 cells transfected with human OP(3) cDNA. The opioid antagonist beta-chlornaltrexamine fully suppressed basal G protein coupling of OP(3), providing a direct measure of basal signaling. Pretreatment of the cells with morphine enhanced basal G protein coupling (sensitization). In contrast, agonist-stimulated coupling was diminished (desensitization), resulting in a substantially flattened morphine dose-response curve. To test whether CaM is involved in these changes, we constructed OP(3)-i3 loop mutants with reduced affinity for CaM (K273A, R275A, and K273A/R275A). Basal signaling of these mutant OP(3) receptors was higher than that of the wild-type receptor and, moreover, unaffected by morphine pretreatment, whereas desensitization to agonist stimulation was only slightly attenuated. Therefore, CaM-OP(3) interactions appear to play only a minor role in the desensitization of OP(3). In contrast, release of CaM from the plasma membrane appears to enhance the inherent basal G protein coupling of OP(3), thereby resolving the paradox that OP(3) displays both desensitization and sensitization during morphine treatment.

  18. Alteration of the mu opioid receptor: Ca2+ channel signaling pathway in a subset of rat sensory neurons following chronic femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Bassil; Kim, Joyce S; Farrag, Mohamed; Kaufman, Marc P; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2014-12-15

    The exercise pressor reflex, a crucial component of the cardiovascular response under physiological and pathophysiological states, is activated via metabolic and mechanical mediators that originate from contracting muscles and stimulate group III and IV afferents. We reported previously that stimulation of mu opioid receptors (MOR), expressed in both afferents, led to a significant attenuation of the reflex in rats whose femoral arteries had been occluded for 72 h. The present study examined the effect of arterial occlusion on the signaling components involved in the opioid-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating the triceps surae muscles. We focused on neurons that were transfected with cDNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein whose expression is driven by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel 1.8 (Na(V)1.8) promoter region, a channel expressed primarily in nociceptive neurons. With the use of a small interference RNA approach, our results show that the pertussis toxin-sensitive Gα(i3) subunit couples MOR with Ca(2+) channels. We observed a significant leftward shift of the MOR agonist [D-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin concentration-response relationship in neurons isolated from rats with occluded arteries compared with those that were perfused freely. Femoral occlusion did not affect Ca(2+) channel density or the fraction of the main Ca(2+) channel subtype. Furthermore, Western blotting analysis indicated that the leftward shift did not result from either increased Gα(i3) or MOR expression. Finally, all neurons from both groups exhibited an inward current following exposure of the transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist, 8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide. These findings suggest that sensory neurons mediating the exercise pressor reflex express Na(V)1.8 and TRPV1 channels, and femoral occlusion alters the MOR pharmacological profile. PMID:25231620

  19. A role for kappa-, but not mu-opioid, receptor activation in acute food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Sedki, Firas; Eigenmann, Karine; Gelinas, Jessica; Schouela, Nicholas; Courchesne, Shannon; Shalev, Uri

    2015-05-01

    Stress is considered to be one of the major triggers to drug relapse, even after prolonged periods of abstinence. In rats, the activation of stress-related brain systems, including corticotropin-releasing factor and norepinephrine, is critical for stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking, an animal model for drug relapse. In addition, there are strong indications that activation of the endogenous opioid system is important for the effects of stress on drug seeking. More specifically, activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system is critically involved in the reinstatement of cocaine seeking following exposure to stressors, such as footshock, forced swimming or social stress. However, studies on the role of the dynorphin/KOR system in stress-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking are scarce. Here, rats were trained to self-administer heroin (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) for 10 days. Drug seeking was then extinguished and the rats were tested for acute (21 hours) food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. In two separate experiments, rats were injected with the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist, naltrexone (0.0, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg; s.c.) or the KOR antagonist, norBNI (0.0, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg; i.p.) before the reinstatement test. Naltrexone treatment did not affect stress-induced reinstatement. In contrast, treatment with norBNI dose-dependently attenuated food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. These results support the hypothesis that activation of KOR, but not MOR, is critically involved in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking.

  20. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Teresa A.; Burstein, Suzanne R.; Marrone, Gina F.; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Williams, Tanya J.; Schierberl, Kathryn C.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immuno-electron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared to controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males. PMID:23720407

  1. Buprenorphine maintenance and mu-opioid receptor availability in the treatment of opioid use disorder: implications for clinical use and policy

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Mark K.; Comer, Sandra D.; Fiellin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sublingual formulations of buprenorphine (BUP) and BUP/naloxone have well-established pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, and are safe and effective for treating opioid use disorder. Since approvals of these formulations, their clinical use has increased. Yet, questions have arisen as to how BUP binding to mu-opioid receptors (μORs), the neurobiological target for this medication, relate to its clinical application. BUP produces dose- and time-related alterations of μOR availability but some clinicians express concern about whether doses higher than those needed to prevent opioid withdrawal symptoms are warranted, and policymakers consider limiting reimbursement for certain BUP dosing regimens. Methods We review scientific data concerning BUP-induced changes in μOR availability and their relationship to clinical efficacy. Results Withdrawal suppression appears to require ≤50% μOR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ≥1 ng/mL; for most patients, this may require single daily BUP doses of 4-mg to defend against trough levels, or lower divided doses. Blockade of the reinforcing and subjective effects of typical doses of abused opioids require <20% μOR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ≥3 ng/mL; for most individuals, this may require single daily BUP doses >16-mg, or lower divided doses. For individuals attempting to surmount this blockade with higher-than-usual doses of abused opioids, even larger BUP doses and <10% μOR availability would be required. Conclusion For these reasons, and given the complexities of studies on this issue and comorbid problems, we conclude that fixed, arbitrary limits on BUP doses in clinical care or limits on reimbursement for this care are unwarranted. PMID:25179217

  2. Sex and age-dependent effects of a maternal junk food diet on the mu-opioid receptor in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Gugusheff, Jessica R; Bae, Sung Eun; Rao, Alexandra; Clarke, Iain J; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Coen, Clive W; Muhlhausler, Beverly S

    2016-03-15

    Perinatal junk food exposure increases the preference for palatable diets in juvenile and adult rat offspring. Previous studies have implicated reduced sensitivity of the opioid pathway in the programming of food preferences; however it is not known when during development these changes in opioid signalling first emerge. This study aimed to determine the impact of a maternal junk food (JF) diet on mu-opioid receptor (MuR) expression and ligand binding in two key regions of the reward pathway, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in rats during the early suckling (postnatal day (PND) 1 and 7) and late suckling/early post-weaning (PND 21 and 28) periods. Female rats were fed either a JF or a control diet for two weeks prior to mating and throughout pregnancy and lactation. MuR expression in the VTA was significantly reduced in female JF offspring on PND 21 and 28 (by 32% and 57% respectively, P<0.05), but not at earlier time points (PND 1 and 7). MuR ligand binding was also reduced (by 22%, P<0.05) in the VTA of female JF offspring on PND 28. No effects of perinatal junk food exposure on MuR mRNA expression or binding were detected at these time points in male offspring. These findings provide evidence that the opioid signalling system is a target of developmental programming by the end of the third postnatal week in females, but not in males. PMID:26718219

  3. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Milner, Teresa A; Burstein, Suzanne R; Marrone, Gina F; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Williams, Tanya J; Schierberl, Kathryn C; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal-dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immunoelectron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared with controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males. PMID:23720407

  4. Peripherally mediated antinociception of the mu-opioid receptor agonist 2-[(4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6beta-yl)amino]acetic acid (HS-731) after subcutaneous and oral administration in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Spetea, Mariana; Guo, Yan; Schütz, Johannes; Windisch, Petra; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2006-04-01

    Opioids induce analgesia by activating opioid receptors not only within the central nervous system but also on peripheral sensory neurons. This study investigated peripherally mediated antinociception produced by the mu-opioid receptor agonist 2-[(4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6beta-yl)amino]acetic acid (HS-731) after s.c. and oral administration in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation. Antinociceptive effects after s.c. administration were assessed 3 h after intraplantar carrageenan injection and compared with those of centrally acting mu-opioid agonists 14-methoxymetopon and morphine. Opioid agonists caused dose-dependent increases in inflamed paw withdrawal latencies to mechanical and thermal stimulation. The time course of action was different, in that HS-731 (20 microg/kg s.c.) produced significant long-lasting effects up to 4 h after administration, whereas 14-methoxymetopon (20 microg/kg) and morphine (2 mg/kg) reached their peak of action at 10 to 30 min, and their effect declined rapidly thereafter. Subcutaneous administration of the peripherally selective opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide inhibited antinociception elicited by HS-731 (20 microg/kg s.c.), whereas it was ineffective against 14-methoxymetopon (20 microg/kg s.c.). Moreover, the antinociception produced by 100 microg/kg s.c. HS-731 was dose-dependently reversed by s.c. naloxone methiodide. This indicates that HS-731 preferentially activates peripheral opioid receptors, whereas 14-methoxymetopon mediates analgesia via central mechanisms. Orally administered HS-731 significantly reduced hyperalgesia in the inflamed paw induced by carrageenan, which was reversible by s.c. administered naloxone methiodide. These results show that systemic (s.c. and oral) treatment with the mu-opioid agonist HS-731 produces potent and long-lasting antinociception through peripheral mechanisms in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation.

  5. The Effect of the [mu]-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Naloxone on Extinction of Conditioned Fear in the Developing Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Richardson, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies report that neurotransmitters that are critically involved in extinction in adult rats are not important for extinction in young rats. Specifically, pretest injection of the [gamma]-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor inverse agonist FG7142 has no effect on extinction in postnatal day (P)17 rats, although it reverses…

  6. Long-term blockade of mu-opioid receptors suggests a role in control of ingestive behaviour, body weight and core temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Millan, M J; Morris, B J

    1988-05-31

    Chronic subcutaneous infusion with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg/h) of naloxone via minipumps blocked the antinociceptive action of the mu-agonist, morphine, without affecting that of the kappa-agonist, U50488H. This dose resulted in a transient suppression in the rate of body weight gain and a sustained reduction in daily food intake (FI) and water intake (WI): this decrease was seen in both the light and dark phases. Naloxone also resulted in a reduction in resting core temperature (TC) in the light but not the dark phase. It did not affect the weight loss or hypothermia which accompanied 24 h food and water deprivation. Naloxone did, however, suppress FI and WI following deprivation and inhibited the recovery of body weight thereafter. The influence of naloxone upon FI, WI, TC and body weight was dose-dependent over 0.05-0.50 mg/kg/h. Increasing the dose to 3.0 mg/kg/h eliminated the antinociceptive action of U50,488H revealing a blockade of kappa- (in addition to mu-) receptors. This higher dose was not more effective in reducing FI, WI, body weight and TC than 0.5 mg/kg/h. Further, treatment with MR 2266, an antagonist (or weak partial agonist) with a higher activity at kappa-receptors than naloxone, was not more effective than naloxone in reducing FI, WI and body weight: further, it did not affect TC. Moreover, chronic infusion of bremazocine, (a kappa-agonist and mu-antagonist) reduced WI, FI, body weight and TC by a magnitude comparable to that of naloxone. Finally, chronic infusion of the mu-agonist, sufentanyl, led to a sustained rise in TC. It is concluded, that: (1) mu-opioid receptors may play a major role in the modulation of daily FI and WI and of body weight in freely behaving rats: this action is expressed in both the light and dark phases of the cycle and maintained following deprivation. The data provide no evidence for (but do not exclude) a particular role of kappa-receptors. (2) mu-Receptors play a physiological role in the modulation of TC in the

  7. Effects of the Mu opioid receptor polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on pain regulation, placebo effects and associated personality trait measures.

    PubMed

    Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-03-01

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are critically involved in the modulation of pain and analgesia, and represent a candidate mechanism for the development of biomarkers of pain conditions and their responses to treatment. To further understand the human implications of genetic variation within the opioid system in pain and opioid-mediated placebo responses, we investigated the association between the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), A118G, and psychophysical responses, personality traits, and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine (DA), opioid) related to pain and placebo analgesia. OPRM1 G carriers, compared with AA homozygotes, showed an overall reduction of baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in regions implicated in pain and affective regulation. In response to a sustained painful stimulus, we found no effect of A118G on pain-induced endogenous opioid release. Instead, AA homozygotes showed a blunted DA response in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in response to the pain challenge. After placebo administration, G carriers showed more pronounced mood disturbances and lower placebo-induced μ-opioid system activation in the anterior insula (aINS), the amygdala (AMY), the NAc, the thalamus (THA), and the brainstem, as well as lower levels of DA D2/3 activation in the NAc. At a trait level, G carriers reported higher NEO-Neuroticism scores; a personality trait previously associated with increased pain and lower placebo responses, which were negatively correlated with baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in the aINS and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). Our results demonstrate that the A118G OPRM1 polymorphism contributes to interindividual variations in the function of neurotransmitters responsive to pain (endogenous opioid and dopamine), as well as their regulation through cognitive-emotional influences in the context of therapeutic expectations, the so-called placebo effect. These effects are relevant to

  8. Effects of the Mu Opioid Receptor Polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on Pain Regulation, Placebo Effects and Associated Personality Trait Measures

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-01-01

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are critically involved in the modulation of pain and analgesia, and represent a candidate mechanism for the development of biomarkers of pain conditions and their responses to treatment. To further understand the human implications of genetic variation within the opioid system in pain and opioid-mediated placebo responses, we investigated the association between the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), A118G, and psychophysical responses, personality traits, and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine (DA), opioid) related to pain and placebo analgesia. OPRM1 G carriers, compared with AA homozygotes, showed an overall reduction of baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in regions implicated in pain and affective regulation. In response to a sustained painful stimulus, we found no effect of A118G on pain-induced endogenous opioid release. Instead, AA homozygotes showed a blunted DA response in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in response to the pain challenge. After placebo administration, G carriers showed more pronounced mood disturbances and lower placebo-induced μ-opioid system activation in the anterior insula (aINS), the amygdala (AMY), the NAc, the thalamus (THA), and the brainstem, as well as lower levels of DA D2/3 activation in the NAc. At a trait level, G carriers reported higher NEO-Neuroticism scores; a personality trait previously associated with increased pain and lower placebo responses, which were negatively correlated with baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in the aINS and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). Our results demonstrate that the A118G OPRM1 polymorphism contributes to interindividual variations in the function of neurotransmitters responsive to pain (endogenous opioid and dopamine), as well as their regulation through cognitive-emotional influences in the context of therapeutic expectations, the so-called placebo effect. These effects are relevant to

  9. Expression of delta- and mu-opioid receptors in the ventricular and subventricular zones of the developing human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anushree; Khurshid, Nazia; Kumar, Praveen; Iyengar, Soumya

    2008-07-01

    Recent research has documented the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in neural development, including neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. However, the expression of opioid receptors (ORs) in different cell types of the human ventricular and subventricular zones (VZ and SVZ) has not been studied during early gestation. In the present study, we have used immunohistochemistry and quantified the results to demonstrate that the levels of delta- and mu-OR subtypes were high in the VZ and SVZ between 11 and 16 gestation weeks (GW) and decreased by 20GW. These results have also been confirmed by studying OR mRNA expression in the VZ and SVZ. Both delta- and mu-OR subtypes were expressed by multipotential stem cells, newly differentiated neurons and developing glial cells to different extents. However, migrating neurons expressed negligible levels of both OR subtypes. Our results suggest that the opioid system may affect cellular proliferation and/or differentiation of stem cells into neurons and glia during the first and second trimesters of gestation in humans. Since layers II and III of the cerebral cortex are being formed during the second trimester, their development is most likely affected by the opioid system mediated through delta- and mu-ORs.

  10. Mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) as a predictor of treatment outcome in opiate-dependent individuals of Arab descent

    PubMed Central

    AL-Eitan, Laith N; Jaradat, Saied A; Su, Steve YS; Tay, Guan K; Hulse, Gary K

    2012-01-01

    Background: A number of research studies on the genetics of opiate dependence have focused on the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1), which is a primary target for opiates. This study aims to identify genetic polymorphisms within the OPRM1 gene involved in response to the biopsychosocial treatment in opiate-dependent individuals of Arab descent. Methods: Unrelated Jordanian Nationals of Arab descent (N = 183) with opiate dependence were selected for this study. These individuals, all males, met the DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence and were undergoing a voluntary 8-week treatment program at a Jordanian Drug Rehabilitation Centre. All individuals were genotyped for 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the OPRM1 gene using the Sequenom MassARRAY® system (iPLEX GOLD). Statistical analyses were carried out using the R package. Results: Patients receiving biopsychosocial treatment showed that there was a significant difference in their OPRM1 SNPs’ genotyping distribution between good, moderate, and poor responders to the treatment at two sites (rs6912029 [G-172T], and rs12205732 [G-1510A], P < 0.05, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusion: This study is the first report of an association between the OPRM1 G-172T and G-1510A polymorphisms and treatment response for opiate dependence. Specifically, this study demonstrated that the OPRM1 GG-172 and GG-1510 genotypes were more frequent among patients who were nonresponders to the biopsychosocial treatment. However, further pharmacogenetic studies in a larger cohort of opiate-dependent patients of Arab descent are needed to confirm these findings and identify individuals with increased chance of relapse. PMID:23226066

  11. Exposure to morphine-associated cues increases mu opioid receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Torry S; Beck, Kevin D; Cominski, Tara P; Bobzean, Samara A M; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Perrotti, Linda I

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability as it exhibits pronounced behavioral inhibition, passive avoidance, exaggerated startle response, enhanced HPA-axis activation, and active avoidance that is resistant to extinction. Accumulating evidence suggests that WKY rats respond differently to rewarding stimuli when compared to outbred strains of rat. Conditioned responding to drug-associated cues is linked with alterations in the activation of mu opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, alterations in KOR expression/activation in the NAc of WKY rats are implicated in the regulation of some of the components that make up the unique behavioral phenotype of this strain. The purpose of this study was to extend upon previous work from our laboratory by investigating conditioned morphine reward in adult male WKY and SD rats, and to examine levels of KOR mRNA and MOR mRNA in the NAc at baseline and after acquisition of morphine CPP. Our results demonstrate that SD rats displayed morphine-induced CPP to each of the six doses of morphine tested (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10mg/kg). Interestingly, WKY rats demonstrated CPP for only the 1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg doses, yet no preference at the lowest (0.5mg/kg) or highest (7.5 and 10mg/kg) doses. qPCR analysis of MOR and KOR in the NAc revealed no strain differences in basal levels of MOR, but higher levels of KOR in WKY rats compared to those of SD rats. Interestingly, after completion of the CPP task, WKY rats had overall higher levels of NAc MOR mRNA compared to SD rats; the initial basal differences in NAc KOR levels persisted without change due to CPP in either strain. These results demonstrate that the WKY rat exhibits a unique pattern of behavioral responding to morphine and implicates differences in NAc KOR signaling as a potential source of aversion to higher doses of morphine. Additionally, the CPP-induced upregulation of

  12. Exposure to morphine-associated cues increases mu opioid receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Torry S; Beck, Kevin D; Cominski, Tara P; Bobzean, Samara A M; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Perrotti, Linda I

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability as it exhibits pronounced behavioral inhibition, passive avoidance, exaggerated startle response, enhanced HPA-axis activation, and active avoidance that is resistant to extinction. Accumulating evidence suggests that WKY rats respond differently to rewarding stimuli when compared to outbred strains of rat. Conditioned responding to drug-associated cues is linked with alterations in the activation of mu opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, alterations in KOR expression/activation in the NAc of WKY rats are implicated in the regulation of some of the components that make up the unique behavioral phenotype of this strain. The purpose of this study was to extend upon previous work from our laboratory by investigating conditioned morphine reward in adult male WKY and SD rats, and to examine levels of KOR mRNA and MOR mRNA in the NAc at baseline and after acquisition of morphine CPP. Our results demonstrate that SD rats displayed morphine-induced CPP to each of the six doses of morphine tested (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10mg/kg). Interestingly, WKY rats demonstrated CPP for only the 1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg doses, yet no preference at the lowest (0.5mg/kg) or highest (7.5 and 10mg/kg) doses. qPCR analysis of MOR and KOR in the NAc revealed no strain differences in basal levels of MOR, but higher levels of KOR in WKY rats compared to those of SD rats. Interestingly, after completion of the CPP task, WKY rats had overall higher levels of NAc MOR mRNA compared to SD rats; the initial basal differences in NAc KOR levels persisted without change due to CPP in either strain. These results demonstrate that the WKY rat exhibits a unique pattern of behavioral responding to morphine and implicates differences in NAc KOR signaling as a potential source of aversion to higher doses of morphine. Additionally, the CPP-induced upregulation of

  13. The effects of alcohol on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist GSK1521498 in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nathan, Pradeep J; Dodds, Chris; Maltby, Kay; Miller, Sam R; Waterworth, Dawn; Song, Kijoung; Warren, Liling; Hosking, Louise; Zucchetto, Mauro; Bush, Mark; Johnson, Lakshmi Vasist; Sarai, Bhopinder; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P; Richards, Duncan B; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T

    2013-10-01

    The mu-opioid system has a key role in hedonic and motivational processes critical to substance addiction. However, existing mu-opioid antagonists have had limited success as anti-addiction treatments. GSK1521498 is a selective and potent mu-opioid antagonist being developed for the treatment of overeating and substance addictions. In this study, 28 healthy participants were administered single doses of GSK1521498 20 mg, ethanol 0.5 g/kg body weight, or both in combination, in a double blind placebo controlled four-way crossover design. The primary objective was to determine the risk of significant adverse pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions. The effects of GSK1521498 on hedonic and consummatory responses to alcohol and the attentional processing of alcohol-related stimuli, and their modulation by the OPRM1 A118G polymorphism were also explored. GSK1521498 20 mg was well tolerated alone and in combination with ethanol. There were mild transient effects of GSK1521498 on alertness and mood that were greater when it was combined with ethanol. These effects were not of clinical significance. There were no effects of GSK1521498 on reaction time, hedonic or consummatory responses. These findings provide encouraging safety and PK data to support continued development of GSK1521498 for the treatment of alcohol addiction.

  14. Prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) null mice have increased mu opioid receptor levels accompanied by altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Lutfy, K; Parikh, D; Lee, D L; Liu, Y; Ferrini, M G; Hamid, A; Friedman, T C

    2016-08-01

    Chronic morphine treatment increases the levels of prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in brain regions involved in nociception, tolerance and dependence. Thus, we tested if PC2 null mice exhibit altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PC2 null mice and their wild-type controls were tested for baseline hot plate latency, injected with morphine (1.25-10mg/kg) and tested for antinociception 30min later. For tolerance studies, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg) on day 1. Mice then received an additional dose so that the final dose of morphine was 10mg/kg on this day. On days 2-4, mice received additional doses of morphine (20, 40 and 80mg/kg on days 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively). On day 5, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg). For withdrawal studies, mice were treated with the escalating doses of morphine (10, 20, 40 and 80mg/kg) for 4days, implanted with a morphine pellet on day 5 and 3 days later injected with naloxone (1mg/kg) and signs of withdrawal were recorded. Morphine dose-dependently induced antinociception and the magnitude of this response was greater in PC2 null mice. Tolerance to morphine was observed in wild-type mice and this phenomenon was blunted in PC2 null mice. Withdrawal signs were also reduced in PC2 null mice. Immunohistochemical studies showed up-regulation of the mu opioid receptor (MOP) protein expression in the periaqueductal gray area, ventral tegmental area, lateral hypothalamus, medial hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and somatosensory cortex in PC2 null mice. Likewise, naloxone specific binding was increased in the brains of these mice compared to their wild-type controls. The results suggest that the PC2-derived peptides may play a functional role in morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. Alternatively, lack of opioid peptides led to up-regulation of the MOP and altered morphine

  15. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)-based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs.

  16. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)–based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs. PMID:25079691

  17. Synthesis and characterization of potent and selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists, [Dmt(1), D-2-Nal(4)]endomorphin-1 (Antanal-1) and [Dmt(1), D-2-Nal(4)]endomorphin-2 (Antanal-2).

    PubMed

    Fichna, Jakub; do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Schiller, Peter W; Poels, Jeroen; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Costentin, Jean; Janecka, Anna

    2007-02-01

    To synthesize potent antagonists of the mu-opioid receptor, we prepared a series of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 analogues with 3-(1-naphthyl)-d-alanine (d-1-Nal) or 3-(2-naphthyl)-d-alanine (d-2-Nal) in position 4. Some of these analogues displayed weak antagonist properties. We tried to strengthen these properties by introducing the structurally modified tyrosine residue 2,6-dimethyltyrosine (Dmt) in place of Tyr1. Among the synthesized compounds, [Dmt1, d-2-Nal4]endomorphin-1, designated antanal-1, and [Dmt1, d-2-Nal4]endomorphin-2, designated antanal-2, turned out to be highly potent and selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists, as judged on the basis of two functional assays, the receptor binding assay and the hot plate test of analgesia. Interestingly, another analogue of this series, [Dmt1, d-1-Nal4]endomorphin-1, turned out to be a moderately potent mixed mu-agonist/delta-antagonist.

  18. Changes in D1 but not D2 dopamine or mu-opioid receptor expression in limbic and motor structures after lateral hypothalamus electrical self-stimulation: A quantitative autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Maria J; Higuera-Matas, A; Roura-Martinez, D; Ucha, M; Santos-Toscano, R; Garcia-Lecumberri, C; Ambrosio, E; Puerto, A

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) is involved in the activation of neuroanatomical systems that are also associated with the processing of natural and other artificial rewarding stimuli. Specific components of this behavior (hedonic impact, learning, and motor behavior) may involve changes in different neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and opioids. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was used to examine changes in mu-opioid and D1/D2-dopamine receptor expression in various anatomical regions related to the motor and mesolimbic reward systems after intracranial self-stimulation of the LH. Results of the behavioral procedure and subsequent radiochemical assays show selective changes in D1 but not D2 or mu receptors in Accumbens-Shell, Ventral Pallidum, Caudate-Putamen, and Medial Globus Pallidus. These findings are discussed in relation to the different psychobiological components of the appetitive motivational system, identifying some dissociation among them, particularly with respect to the involvement of the D1-dopamine subsystem (but not D2 or mu receptors) in goal-directed behaviors.

  19. Contusive spinal cord injury up regulates mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression in the brain and down regulates its expression in the spinal cord: possible implications in spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Michael, Felicia Mary; Mohapatra, Alok Nath; Venkitasamy, Lavanya; Chandrasekar, Kirubhanand; Seldon, Tenzin; Venkatachalam, Sankar

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the dreaded neurological conditions and finding a cure for it has been a hot area of research. Naloxone - a mu-opiate receptor (mor) antagonist was considered for SCI treatment based on its positive effects under shock conditions. In contrary to animal studies based reports about the potential benefits of naloxone in treating SCI, a large scale clinical trial [National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study II (NASCIS II)] conducted in USA failed to witness any effectiveness. The inconsistency noticed was intriguing. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to re-examine the role of naloxone in treating SCI using a highly standardised Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS) animal model of contusive SCI. Results indicated that naloxone produced negligible and insignificant neuroprotection. In an attempt to understand the cause for the failure, it was found that mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression was upregulated in the brain but was down regulated in the spinal cord after contusive SCI. Given that the beneficial effects of naloxone are through its action on the mor, the results indicate that unlike the brain, spinal cord might not be bracing to utilise the opiate system in the repair process. This could possibly explain the failure of naloxone treatment in NASCIS II. To conclude, opiate antagonists like naloxone may be neuroprotective for treating traumatic brain injuries, but not for traumatic/contusive spinal cord injuries. PMID:26039701

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R.; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-01-01

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogs were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3′ or 4′ position of the phenyl ring and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower delta opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analog, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity. PMID:22734622

  1. [Dmt(1)]DALDA is highly selective and potent at mu opioid receptors, but is not cross-tolerant with systemic morphine.

    PubMed

    Riba, Pal; Ben, Yong; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Furst, Susanna; Schiller, Peter W; Lee, Nancy M

    2002-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of morphine is limited by several side effects, including the development of tolerance and dependence. Most of these side effects are believed to be mediated by central opioid receptors; therefore, hydrophilic opioids, which don't cross the blood-brain barrier, may have advantages over morphine in some clinical applications. We recently synthesized several analogues of DALDA (Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2), a highly hydrophilic peptide derived from the endogenous opioid peptide dermorphin; all of them, particularly [Dmt(1)] DALDA (Dmt - 2',6'-dimethyl tyrosine), had high potency and selectivity at mu receptors, the target of morphine, in activity assays. Here we report the pharmacological characterization of [Dmt(1)] DALDA in the whole animal. [Dmt(1)]DALDA was 40 times more potent than morphine in inducing antinociception in mice when both drugs were given s.c., and 6-14 times more potent than DAMGO, a selective m agonist, when both drugs were given it. However, [Dmt(1)]DALDA showed poor cross-tolerance to morphine; thus chronic morphine treatment of animals increased the antinociceptive AD(50) of systemic [Dmt(1)]DALDA two fold or less, as compared to an 8-9-fold increase for morphine and a 4-5-fold increase for DAMGO. The antinociceptive activity of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (i.t) was blocked by CTAP, a selective mu antagonist, but not by TIPP psi, a selective delta antagonist, nor by nor-BNI, a selective kappa antagonist. [Dmt(1)]DALDA-induced antinociception was also blocked by naloxone methiodide, an antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, when agonist and antagonist were given i.t. or i.c.v., but not when they were given s.c. We conclude that [Dmt(1)] DALDA is a highly potent analgesic acting at mu receptors. Though it appears to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, it exhibits low cross-tolerance to morphine, suggesting that it may have advantages over the latter in certain clinical applications.

  2. Knockdown of ventral tegmental area mu-opioid receptors in rats prevents effects of social defeat stress: implications for amphetamine cross-sensitization, social avoidance, weight regulation and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Caitlin E; Herschel, Daniel J; Lasek, Amy W; Hammer, Ronald P; Nikulina, Ella M

    2015-02-01

    Social defeat stress causes social avoidance and long-lasting cross-sensitization to psychostimulants, both of which are associated with increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, social stress upregulates VTA mu-opioid receptor (MOR) mRNA. In the VTA, MOR activation inhibits GABA neurons to disinhibit VTA dopamine neurons, thus providing a role for VTA MORs in the regulation of psychostimulant sensitization. The present study determined the effect of lentivirus-mediated MOR knockdown in the VTA on the consequences of intermittent social defeat stress, a salient and profound stressor in humans and rodents. Social stress exposure induced social avoidance and attenuated weight gain in animals with non-manipulated VTA MORs, but both these effects were prevented by VTA MOR knockdown. Rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression exhibited cross-sensitization to amphetamine challenge (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), evidenced by a significant augmentation of locomotion. By contrast, knockdown of VTA MORs prevented stress-induced cross-sensitization without blunting the locomotor-activating effects of amphetamine. At the time point corresponding to amphetamine challenge, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the effect of stress on VTA BDNF expression. Prior stress exposure increased VTA BDNF expression in rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression, while VTA MOR knockdown prevented stress-induced expression of VTA BDNF. Taken together, these results suggest that upregulation of VTA MOR is necessary for the behavioral and biochemical changes induced by social defeat stress. Elucidating VTA MOR regulation of stress effects on the mesolimbic system may provide new therapeutic targets for treating stress-induced vulnerability to substance abuse.

  3. Association of time-dependent changes in mu opioid receptor mRNA, but not BDNF, TrkB, or MeCP2 mRNA and protein expression in the rat nucleus accumbens with incubation of heroin craving

    PubMed Central

    Theberge, Florence R. M.; Pickens, Charles L.; Goldart, Evan; Fanous, Sanya; Hope, Bruce T.; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objectives Responding to heroin cues progressively increases after cessation of heroin self-administration (incubation of heroin craving). We investigated whether this incubation is associated with time-dependent changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) signaling and mu opioid receptor (MOR) expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (DS), and medial pre-frontal cortex (mPFC). We also investigated the effect of the preferential MOR antagonist naloxone on cue-induced heroin seeking during abstinence. Methods We trained rats to self-administer heroin or saline for 9–10 days and then dissected the NAc, DS, and mPFC at different abstinence days and measured mRNA and protein levels of BDNF, TrkB, and MeCP2, as well as MOR mRNA (Oprm1). In other groups, we assessed cue-induced heroin seeking in extinction tests after 1, 11, and 30 abstinence days, and naloxone’s (0–1.0 mg/kg) effect on extinction responding after 1 and 15 days. Results Cue-induced heroin seeking progressively increased or incubated during abstinence. This incubation was not associated with changes in BDNF, TrkB, or MeCP2 mRNA or protein levels in NAc, DS, or mPFC; additionally, no molecular changes were observed after extinction tests on day 11. In NAc, but not DS or mPFC, MOR mRNA decreased on abstinence day 1 and returned to basal levels over time. Naloxone significantly decreased cue-induced heroin seeking after 15 abstinence days but not 1 day. Conclusions Results suggest a role of MOR in incubation of heroin craving. As previous studies implicated NAc BDNF in incubation of cocaine craving, our data suggest that different mechanisms contribute to incubation of heroin versus cocaine craving. PMID:22790874

  4. Increased mesolimbic cue-reactivity in carriers of the mu-opioid-receptor gene OPRM1 A118G polymorphism predicts drinking outcome: a functional imaging study in alcohol dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Bach, Patrick; Vollsta Dt-Klein, Sabine; Kirsch, Martina; Hoffmann, Sabine; Jorde, Anne; Frank, Josef; Charlet, Katrin; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Spanagel, Rainer; Rietschel, Marcella; Kiefer, Falk

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous opioid system is involved in the pathophysiology of alcohol-use disorders. Genetic variants of the opioid system alter neural and behavioral responses to alcohol. In particular, a single nucleotide polymorphism rs1799971 (A118G) in the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) is suggested to modulate alcohol-related phenotypes and neural response in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system. Little is known about the clinical implications of these changes. The current study investigated the relationship of genotype effects on subjective and neural responses to alcohol cues and relapse in a sample of abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate alcohol cue-reactivity and drinking outcome of 81 abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. G-allele carriers displayed increased fMRI cue-reactivity in the left dorsal striatum and bilateral insulae. Neural responses to alcohol cues in these brain regions correlated positively with subjective craving for alcohol and positive expectations of alcohol׳s effects. Moreover, alcohol cue-reactivity in the left dorsal striatum predicted time to first severe relapse. Current results show that alcohol-dependent G-allele carriers׳ increased cue-reactivity is associated with an increased relapse risk. This suggests that genotype effects on cue-reactivity might link the OPRM1 A118G risk allele with an increased relapse risk that was reported in earlier studies. From a clinical perspective, risk-allele carriers might benefit from treatments, such as neuro-feedback or extinction-based therapy that are suggested to reduce mesolimbic reactivity.

  5. Knockdown of ventral tegmental area mu-opioid receptors in rats prevents effects of social defeat stress: Implications for amphetamine cross-sensitization, social avoidance, weight regulation and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Caitlin E.; Herschel, Daniel; Lasek, Amy W.; Hammer, Ronald P.; Nikulina, Ella M.

    2014-01-01

    Social defeat stress causes social avoidance and long-lasting cross-sensitization to psychostimulants, both of which are associated with increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, social stress upregulates VTA mu-opioid receptor (MOR) mRNA. In the VTA, MOR activation inhibits GABA neurons to disinhibit VTA dopamine neurons, thus providing a role for VTA MORs in the regulation of psychostimulant sensitization. The present study determined the effect of lentivirus-mediated MOR knockdown in the VTA on the consequences of intermittent social defeat stress, a salient and profound stressor in humans and rodents. Social stress exposure induced social avoidance and attenuated weight gain in animals with non-manipulated VTA MORs, but both these effects were prevented by VTA MOR knockdown. Rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression exhibited cross-sensitization to amphetamine challenge (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), evidenced by a significant augmentation of locomotion. By contrast, knockdown of VTA MORs prevented stress-induced cross-sensitization without blunting the locomotor-activating effects of amphetamine. At the time point corresponding to amphetamine challenge, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the effect of stress on VTA BDNF expression. Prior stress exposure increased VTA BDNF expression in rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression, while VTA MOR knockdown prevented stress-induced expression of VTA BDNF. Taken together, these results suggest that upregulation of VTA MOR is necessary for the behavioral and biochemical changes induced by social defeat stress. Elucidating VTA MOR regulation of stress effects on the mesolimbic system may provide new therapeutic targets for treating stress-induced vulnerability to substance abuse. PMID:25446676

  6. New 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) opioid peptidomimetics based on the Aba-Gly scaffold. Development of unique mu-opioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Ballet, Steven; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Lattanzi, Roberta; Tourwé, Dirk; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2006-06-29

    The Aba-Gly scaffold, incorporated into Dmt-Tic ligands (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH2-Ph, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph, H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH2-Bid), exhibited mixed micro/delta or delta opioid receptor activities with micro agonism. Substitution of Tic by Aba-Gly coupled to -NH-CH2-Ph (1), -NH-Ph (2), or -Bid (Bid=1H-benzimidazole-2-yl) (3) shifted affinity (Ki(micro)=0.46, 1.48, and 19.9 nM, respectively), selectivity, and bioactivity to micro-opioid receptors. These compounds represent templates for a new class of lead opioid agonists that are easily synthesized and suitable for therapeutic pain relief.

  7. Clinically relevant infusion rates of mu-opioid agonist remifentanil cause bradypnea in decerebrate dogs but not via direct effects in the pre-Bötzinger complex region.

    PubMed

    Mustapic, Sanda; Radocaj, Tomislav; Sanchez, Antonio; Dogas, Zoran; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Zuperku, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Systemic administration of mu-opioids at clinical doses for analgesia typically slows respiratory rate. Mu-opioid receptors (MORs) on pre-Bötzinger Complex (pre-BötC) respiratory neurons, the putative kernel of respiratory rhythmogenesis, are potential targets. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of pre-BötC MORs to the bradypnea produced in vivo by intravenous administration of clinically relevant infusion rates of remifentanil (remi), a short-acting, potent mu-opioid analgesic. In decerebrate dogs, multibarrel micropipettes were used to record pre-BötC neuronal activity and to eject the opioid antagonist naloxone (NAL, 0.5 mM), the glutamate agonist D-homocysteic acid (DLH, 20 mM), or the MOR agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO, 100 microM). Inspiratory and expiratory durations (T(I) and T(E)) and peak phrenic nerve activity (PPA) were measured from the phrenic neurogram. The pre-BötC was functionally identified by its rate altering response (typically tachypnea) to DLH microinjection. During intravenous remi-induced bradypnea (approximately 60% decrease in central breathing frequency, f(B)), bilateral injections of NAL in the pre-BötC did not change T(I), T(E), f(B), and PPA. Also, NAL picoejected onto single pre-BötC neurons depressed by intravenous remi had no effect on their discharge. In contrast, approximately 60 microg/kg of intravenous NAL rapidly reversed all remi-induced effects. In a separate group of dogs, microinjections of DAMGO in the pre-BötC increased f(B) by 44%, while subsequent intravenous remi infusion more than offset this DAMGO induced tachypnea. These results indicate that mu-opioids at plasma concentrations that cause profound analgesia produce their bradypneic effect via MORs located outside the pre-BötC region.

  8. Synthesis, modelling, and mu-opioid receptor affinity of N-3(9)-arylpropenyl-N-9(3)-propionyl-3,9-diazabicycl.

    PubMed

    Pinna, G A; Murineddu, G; Curzu, M M; Villa, S; Vianello, P; Borea, P A; Gessi, S; Toma, L; Colombo, D; Cignarella, G

    2000-08-01

    A series of N-3-arylpropenyl-N-9-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes (1a-g) and of reverted N-3-propionyl-N-9-arylpropenyl isomers (2a-g), as homologues of the previously reported analgesic 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octanes (I-II), were synthesized and evaluated for the binding affinity towards opioid receptor subtypes mu, delta and kappa. Compounds 1a-g and 2a-g exhibited a strong selective mu-affinity with Ki values in the nanomolar range, which favourably compared with those of I and II. In addition, contrary to the trend observed for DBO-I, II, the mu-affinity of series 2 is markedly higher than that of the isomeric series 1. This aspect was discussed on the basis of the conformational studies performed on DBN which allowed hypotheses on the mode of interaction of these compounds with the mu receptor.

  9. Mu-opioid and corticotropin-releasing-factor receptors show largely postsynaptic co-expression, and separate presynaptic distributions, in the mouse central amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Jaferi, Azra; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2009-01-01

    The anxiolytic effects of opiates active at the mu-opioid receptor (μ-OR) may be ascribed, in part, to suppression of neurons that are responsive to the stress-associated peptide, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), in the central amygdala (CeA) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). The CRF receptor (CRFr) and μ-OR are expressed in both the CeA and BNST, but their subcellular relationship to each other is not known in either region. To address this question, we used dual electron microscopic immunolabeling of μ-OR and CRFr in the mouse lateral CeA and anterolateral BNST. Immunolabeling for each receptor was detected in the same as well as in separate somatic, dendritic and axonal profiles of neurons in each region. CRFr had a plasmalemmal or cytoplasmic distribution in many dendrites, including those co-expressing μ-OR. The co-expression of CRFr and μ-OR also was seen near excitatory-type synapses on dendritic spines. In both the CeA and BNST, over 50% of the CRFr-labeled dendritic profiles (dendrites and spines) contained immunoreactivity for the μ-OR. However, less than 25% of the dendritic profiles containing the μ-OR were labeled for CRFr in either region, suggesting that opiate activation of the μ-OR affects many neurons in addition to those responsive to CRF. The dendritic profiles containing CRFr and/or μ-OR received asymmetric, excitatory-type synapses from unlabeled or CRFr-labeled axon terminals. In contrast, the μ-OR was identified in terminals forming symmetric, inhibitory-type synapses. Thus, in both the CeA and BNST, μ-OR and CRFr have strategic locations for mediation of CRF and opioid effects on the postsynaptic excitability of single neurons, and on the respective presynaptic release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. The commonalities in the synaptic location of both receptors in the CeA and BNST suggest that this is a fundamental cellular association of relevance to both drug addiction and stress

  10. SEIZURE ACTIVITY INVOLVED IN THE UP-REGULATION OF BDNF mRNA EXPRESSION BY ACTIVATION OF CENTRAL MU OPIOID RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, H. N.; KO, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical-induced seizures up-regulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of endogenous opioids preferentially activating μ opioid receptor (MOR) could also increase BDNF mRNA expression. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent i.c.v. administration of synthetic MOR-selective agonists in rats can modulate both seizure activity and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression. Effects and potencies of i.c.v. administration of morphine and [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), were directly investigated by scoring behavioral seizures and measuring BDNF mRNA expression. In addition, effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and antiepileptic drugs, diazepam, phenobarbital, and valproate, on i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced behavioral seizures and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression were determined. A single i.c.v. administration of morphine (10–100 μg) or DAMGO (0.15–1.5 μg) dose-dependently elicited behavioral seizures and increased BDNF mRNA expression in the widespread brain regions. However, subcutaneous administration of MOR agonists neither produced behavioral seizures nor increased BDNF mRNA expression. Pretreatment with naloxone 1 mg/kg significantly reduced behavioral seizure scores and the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by i.c.v. morphine or DAMGO. Similarly, diazepam 10 mg/kg and phenobarbital 40 mg/kg significantly blocked i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced actions. Pretreatment with valproate 300 mg/kg only attenuated behavioral seizures, but it did not affect morphine-induced increase of BDNF mRNA expression. This study provides supporting evidence that seizure activity plays an important role in the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by central MOR activation and that decreased inhibitory action of GABAergic system through the modulation on GABA receptor synaptic function by central MOR activation is involved in its regulation of BDNF m

  11. Dual growth of adolescent smoking and drinking: evidence for an interaction between the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism and sex.

    PubMed

    Kleinjan, Marloes; Poelen, Evelien A; Engels, Rutger C M E; Verhagen, Maaike

    2013-11-01

    Smoking and alcohol use often co-occur during adolescence, but little is known about the codevelopment of these substances. In the search for etiological factors that help to explain the development of adolescent substance use patterns, studies have revealed substantial heritability for both alcohol use and smoking. In this regard, the µ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1, chromosome 6q24-q25) has been linked to both substances. This study examined the predictive relationships between initial level and growth of smoking and drinking in 311 early adolescents (13-15 years old) over a 4-year period. In addition, the effects of the A118G polymorphism of the OPRM1 gene on the initial values and the development over time of alcohol use and smoking were assessed. Finally, as prevalence and heritability estimates for both alcohol- and smoking-related behaviors differ between males and females, OPRM1 by sex interactions were tested. We found that high initial levels of early adolescent alcohol consumption were related to a stronger increase in smoking levels over time. In contrast, high initial levels of smoking were not related to growth of alcohol use. No main OPRM1 effects were found, but sex-specificity of the gene was found for smoking development. Male A-allele carriers showed a faster development in smoking behavior, whereas in females, the G-allele led to a faster development in smoking. Thus, in addition to high levels of alcohol as a risk factor for the development of smoking behavior, sex-specific effects exist for OPRM1, which may additionally have consequences for the development of adolescent smoking.

  12. Signal transduction efficacy of the highly potent mu opioid agonist 14-methoxymetopon.

    PubMed

    Zernig, G; Saria, A; Krassnig, R; Schmidhammer, H

    2000-03-31

    In search of a truly high-efficacy (i.e., tau > 100) mu opioid analgesic, we determined the efficacy (tau) and apparent in vivo affinity (KA) of the high-potency alkoxymorphinan 14-methoxymetopon. However, in the present study, 14-methoxymetopon's efficacy proved to be only 1.5-fold higher than that of morphine (tau, 19 vs. 12). KA values were 2,900 nmol/kg for 14-methoxymetopon and 46,000 nmol/kg for morphine (Ki for [3H]DAMGO binding, 0.33 vs 3.4 nmol/l). Thus, the 24-fold higher potency of methoxymetopon could be fully accounted for by its 16-fold higher apparent in vivo affinity and its only 1.5-fold higher efficacy. Furthermore, the 10-fold higher affinity of 14-methoxymetopon for the mu opioid receptor - as previously determined in radioligand binding assays - was confirmed in the present behavioral tests of thermal antinociception.

  13. Mu Opioid Mediated Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of Tramadol: An Individual Subjects Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Rush, Craig R.; Stoops, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug discrimination procedures use dose-dependent generalization, substitution, and pretreatment with selective agonists and antagonists to evaluate receptor systems mediating interoceptive effects of drugs. Despite the extensive use of these techniques in the nonhuman animal literature, few studies have used human subjects. Specifically, human studies have not routinely used antagonist administration as a pharmacological tool to elucidate the mechanisms mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs. This study evaluated the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol, an atypical analgesic with monoamine and mu opioid activity. Three human subjects first learned to discriminate 100 mg tramadol from placebo. A range of tramadol doses (25 to 150 mg) and hydromorphone (4 mg) with and without naltrexone pretreatment (50 mg) were then administered to subjects after acquiring the discrimination. Tramadol produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding and hydromorphone partially or fully substituted for tramadol in all subjects. These effects were attenuated by naltrexone. Individual subject records indicated a relationship between mu opioid activity (i.e., miosis) and drug discrimination performance. Our findings indicate that mu opioid activity may mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. The correspondence of generalization, substitution, and pretreatment findings with the animal literature supports the neuropharmacological specificity of the drug discrimination procedure. PMID:25664525

  14. (/sup 3/H)(D-Ala2,NMePhe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin (mu-opioid) binding in beige-J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Raffa, R.B.; Baldy, W.J. Jr.; Shank, R.P.; Mathiasen, J.R.; Vaught, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Tritiated (D-Ala2,NMePhe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin ((3H)DAGO) was used to examine mu-opioid receptor number and mu-ligand binding in brain synaptic membranes (P2 fraction) from C57BL/6J-bgJ/bgJ (beige-J) mice, a strain with combined deficiencies in immunological function (resembling Chediak-Higashi syndrome) and analgesic response to mu-opioid agonists such as morphine and DAGO. As controls, white mice, beige-J littermates (normally responsive to mu-opioid agonists), and a known mu-deficient strain (CXBK) were also examined. Neither the KD (0.47 to 0.49 nM) nor the Bmax (153 to 168 fmol/mg protein) determined for beige-J mice was significantly different from values determined for littermates or white mice. In contrast, the Bmax of CXBK mice (66 fmol/mg protein) was clearly less than that of the other strains. The analgesic defect of beige-J mice, therefore, is not likely due to an insufficient number of mu-opioid receptors, as it presumably is in CXBK mice. Carbachol (200 micrograms/ml), which partly corrects the analgesic defect of beige-J mice, had no effect on (3H)DAGO binding either acutely in vitro or chronically ex vivo after administration to beige-J mice for three weeks. Hence, the analgesic defect of beige-J mice appears to be due to some defect in the mu-opioid receptor-effector coupling mechanism or to some endogenous substance that inhibits binding of mu-opioid ligands to otherwise functional receptors.

  15. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Gina F.; Grinnell, Steven G.; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C.; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3′-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50,488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  16. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Grinnell, Steven G; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-03-29

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50, 488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  17. The competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist (-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959) potentiates the antinociceptive effects of opioids that vary in efficacy at the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard M; Granger, Arthur L; Dykstra, Linda A

    2003-11-01

    (-)-6-Phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959) is a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shown to prevent the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of morphine in rodents. Although administration of LY235959 alone generally does not produce antinociception, LY235959 potentiates the antinociceptive effects of morphine in squirrel monkeys. The present study was designed to determine whether LY235959 would potentiate the acute antinociceptive effects of morphine as well those of the opioid receptor agonists l-methadone, levorphanol, butorphanol, and buprenorphine. A squirrel monkey titration procedure was used in which shock (delivered to the tail) increased in intensity every 15 s (0.01-2.0 mA) in 30 increments. Five lever presses during any given 15-s shock period (fixed ratio 5) produced a 15-s shock-free period after which shock resumed at the next lower intensity. Morphine (0.3-3.0 mg/kg i.m.), l-methadone (0.1-0.56 mg/kg i.m.), levorphanol (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.m.), butorphanol (1.0-10 mg/kg i.m.), and buprenorphine (0.01-0.03 mg/kg i.m.), but not LY235959 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.m.), dose and time dependently increased the intensity below which monkeys maintained shock 50% of the time (median shock level, MSL). LY235959 dose dependently potentiated the effect of each opioid agonist on MSL when concurrently administered to monkeys. Although LY235959 potentiated the antinociceptive effect of each opioid examined in a statistically significant manner, LY235959 seemed more potent and effective when combined with higher efficacy opioids. The present data suggest that the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, LY235959, can potentiate the antinociceptive effects of a range of opioid receptor agonists independently of nonspecific motor effects. PMID:12975489

  18. Chronic exercise decreases sensitivity to mu opioids in female rats: correlation with exercise output.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Lyle, Megan A

    2006-09-01

    Aerobic exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides and increases nociceptive (i.e., pain) threshold in a naloxone-reversible manner. During chronic exercise, sensitivity to the antinociceptive effects of morphine and other mu opioids decreases, leading some investigators to propose that exercise may lead to the development of cross-tolerance to exogenously administered opioid agonists. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of chronic exercise on sensitivity to mu opioids, and to determine if changes in opioid sensitivity during chronic exercise are correlated with exercise output. Eight female rats were obtained at weaning and housed in standard laboratory cages that did not permit any exercise beyond normal cage ambulation. Following 6 weeks under these conditions, opioids possessing a range of relative efficacies at the mu receptor (morphine, levorphanol, buprenorphine, butorphanol) were examined in a warm-water, tail-withdrawal procedure. Under sedentary conditions, all opioids produced dose-dependent increases in tail-withdrawal latencies, and high levels of antinociception were observed for all drugs. Following these tests, rats were reassigned to exercise conditions and transferred to cages equipped with running wheels. Under these conditions, rats ran an average of 7154 rev/day (7869 m/day), with a range across rats from 4501 to 10,164 rev/day (4951-11,180 m/day). Sensitivity to all four opioids decreased significantly during the exercise period, resulting in 2- to 5-fold decreases in the potency of morphine, levorphanol and buprenorphine, and decreases in the effectiveness of buprenorphine and butorphanol. When rats were returned to sedentary conditions, sensitivity to all four opioids increased significantly and returned to that observed prior to the exercise period. For all drugs, there was a positive correlation between exercise output and changes in opioid sensitivity between sedentary and exercise conditions

  19. N-3(9)-arylpropenyl-N-9(3)-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes as mu-opioid receptor agonists. Effects on mu-affinity of arylalkenyl chain modifications.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Gérard A; Cignarella, Giorgio; Loriga, Giovanni; Murineddu, Gabriele; Mussinu, Jean Mario; Ruiu, Stefania; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter

    2002-06-01

    Two series of N-3-arylpropenyl-N-9-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes (1b-j) and of the reverted N-3-propionyl-N-9-arylpropenyl isomers (2b-j) as analogues of the previously reported analgesic N-3(9)-cinnamyl-N-9(3)-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes (DBN) (1a, 2a) were synthesised and their affinity and selectivity towards opioid mu-, delta- and kappa-receptors were evaluated. Several compounds (1e,i,j-2d,e,f,g,j) exhibited a mu-affinity in the low nanomolar range with moderate or negligible affinity towards delta- and kappa-receptors. The representative term N-9-(3,3-diphenylprop-2-enyl)-N-3-propionyl-DBN (2d) displayed in vivo (mouse) a potent analgesic effect (ED(50) 3.88 mg/kg ip) which favourably compared with that of morphine (ED(50) 5 mg/kg ip). In addition, 2d produced in mice tolerance after a period twice as long with morphine.

  20. Repeated Mu-Opioid Exposure Induces a Novel Form of the Hyperalgesic Priming Model for Transition to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2015-09-01

    The primary afferent nociceptor was used as a model system to study mechanisms of pain induced by chronic opioid administration. Repeated intradermal injection of the selective mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO induced mechanical hyperalgesia and marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) hyperalgesia, a key feature of hyperalgesic priming. However, in contrast to prior studies of priming induced by receptor-mediated (i.e., TNFα, NGF, or IL-6 receptor) or direct activation of protein kinase Cε (PKCε), the pronociceptive effects of PGE2 in DAMGO-treated rats demonstrated the following: (1) rapid induction (4 h compared with 3 d); (2) protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε, dependence; (3) prolongation of hyperalgesia induced by an activator of PKA, 8-bromo cAMP; (4) failure to be reversed by a protein translation inhibitor; (5) priming in females as well as in males; and (6) lack of dependence on the isolectin B4-positive nociceptor. These studies demonstrate a novel form of hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at the Gi-protein-coupled MOR to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. Significance statement: The current study demonstrates the molecular mechanisms involved in the sensitization of nociceptors produced by repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors and contributes to our understanding of the painful condition observed in patients submitted to chronic use of opioids. PMID:26354917

  1. Repeated Mu-Opioid Exposure Induces a Novel Form of the Hyperalgesic Priming Model for Transition to Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.

    2015-01-01

    The primary afferent nociceptor was used as a model system to study mechanisms of pain induced by chronic opioid administration. Repeated intradermal injection of the selective mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO induced mechanical hyperalgesia and marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) hyperalgesia, a key feature of hyperalgesic priming. However, in contrast to prior studies of priming induced by receptor-mediated (i.e., TNFα, NGF, or IL-6 receptor) or direct activation of protein kinase Cε (PKCε), the pronociceptive effects of PGE2 in DAMGO-treated rats demonstrated the following: (1) rapid induction (4 h compared with 3 d); (2) protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε, dependence; (3) prolongation of hyperalgesia induced by an activator of PKA, 8-bromo cAMP; (4) failure to be reversed by a protein translation inhibitor; (5) priming in females as well as in males; and (6) lack of dependence on the isolectin B4-positive nociceptor. These studies demonstrate a novel form of hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at the Gi-protein-coupled MOR to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study demonstrates the molecular mechanisms involved in the sensitization of nociceptors produced by repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors and contributes to our understanding of the painful condition observed in patients submitted to chronic use of opioids. PMID:26354917

  2. Central HIV-1 Tat exposure elevates anxiety and fear conditioned responses of male mice concurrent with altered mu-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation and β-arrestin 2 activity in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yun K; Paris, Jason J; Lichtman, Aron H; Hauser, Kurt F; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Selley, Dana E; Knapp, Pamela E

    2016-08-01

    Co-exposure to opiates and HIV/HIV proteins results in enhanced CNS morphological and behavioral deficits in HIV(+) individuals and in animal models. Opiates with abuse liability, such as heroin and morphine, bind preferentially to and have pharmacological actions through μ-opioid-receptors (MORs). The mechanisms underlying opiate-HIV interactions are not understood. Exposure to the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein causes neurodegenerative outcomes that parallel many aspects of the human disease. We have also observed that in vivo exposure to Tat results in apparent changes in morphine efficacy, and thus have hypothesized that HIV proteins might alter MOR activation. To test our hypothesis, MOR-mediated G-protein activation was determined in neuroAIDS-relevant forebrain regions of transgenic mice with inducible CNS expression of HIV-1 Tat. G-protein activation was assessed by MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) autoradiography in brain sections, and in concentration-effect curves of MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in membranes isolated from specific brain regions. Comparative studies were done using the MOR-selective agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin) and a more clinically relevant agonist, morphine. Tat exposure reduced MOR-mediated G-protein activation in an agonist, time, and regionally dependent manner. Levels of the GPCR regulatory protein β-arrestin-2, which is involved in MOR desensitization, were found to be elevated in only one affected brain region, the amygdala; amygdalar β-arrestin-2 also showed a significantly increased association with MOR by co-immunoprecipitation, suggesting decreased availability of MOR. Interestingly, this correlated with changes in anxiety and fear-conditioned extinction, behaviors that have substantial amygdalar input. We propose that HIV-1 Tat alters the intrinsic capacity of MOR to signal in response to agonist binding

  3. Mu-opioids activate phospholipase C in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells via calcium-channel opening.

    PubMed

    Smart, D; Smith, G; Lambert, D G

    1995-01-15

    We have recently reported that, in SH-SY5Y cells, mu-opioid receptor occupancy activates phospholipase C via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein. In the present study we have further characterized the mechanisms involved in this process. Fentanyl (0.1 microM) caused a monophasic increase in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate mass formation, with a peak (20.5 +/- 3.6 pmol/mg of protein) at 15 s. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free buffer abolished this response, while Ca2+ replacement 1 min later restored the stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation (20.1 +/- 0.6 pmol/mg of protein). In addition, nifedipine (1 nM-0.1 mM), an L-type Ca(2+)-channel antagonist, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation, with an IC50 of 60.3 +/- 1.1 nM. Elevation of endogenous beta/gamma subunits by selective activation of delta-opioid and alpha 2 adrenoceptors failed to stimulate phospholipase C. Fentanyl also caused a dose-dependent (EC50 of 16.2 +/- 1.0 nM), additive enhancement of carbachol-induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. In summary, we have demonstrated that in SH-SY5Y cells activation of the mu-opioid receptor allows Ca2+ influx to activate phospholipase C. However, the possible role of this mechanism in the process of analgesia remains to be elucidated. PMID:7832776

  4. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Folabomi A.; Conrad, Matthew S.; O’Buckley, Sandra C.; Rashid, Naim U.; Slade, Gary D.; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Background A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods and Results In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ) exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia. Conclusions These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:26270813

  5. Aminothiazolomorphinans with Mixed Kappa and Mu Opioid Activitya

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tangzhi; Yan, Zhaohua; Sromek, Anna; Knapp, Brian I.; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M.; Neumeyer, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A series of N-substituted and N′-substituted aminothiazole-derived morphinans (5) were synthesized for expanding the structure-activity relationships of aminothiazolo-morphinans. Although their affinities were somewhat lower than their prototype aminothiazolo-N-cyclopropylmorphinan (3), 3-aminothiazole derivatives of cyclorphan (1) containing a primary amino group displayed high affinity and selectivity at the κ and μ opioid receptors. [35S]GTPγS binding assays showed that the aminothiazolomorphinans were κ agonists with mixed agonist and antagonist activity at the μ opioid receptor. These novel N′-monosubstituted aminothiazole-derived morphinans may be valuable for the development of drug abuse medications. PMID:21351746

  6. Pharmacological characterization of the dermorphin analog [Dmt(1)]DALDA, a highly potent and selective mu-opioid peptide.

    PubMed

    Neilan, C L; Nguyen, T M; Schiller, P W; Pasternak, G W

    2001-05-01

    The dermorphin-derived peptide [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2)), labels mu-opioid receptors with high affinity and selectivity in receptor binding assays. In mouse, radiant heat tail-flick assay [Dmt(1)]DALDA produced profound spinal and supraspinal analgesia, being approximately 5000- and 100-fold more potent than morphine on a molar basis, respectively. When administered systemically, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was over 200-fold more potent than morphine. Pharmacologically, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was distinct from morphine. [Dmt(1)]DALDA displayed no cross-tolerance to morphine in the model used and it retained supraspinal analgesic activity in morphine-insensitive CXBK mice. Supraspinally, it also differed from morphine in its lack of sensitivity towards naloxonazine. Finally, in antisense mapping studies, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was insensitive to MOR-1 exon probes that reduced morphine analgesia, implying a distinct receptor mechanism of action. Thus, [Dmt(1)]DALDA is an interesting and extraordinarily potent, systemically active peptide analgesic, raising the possibility of novel approaches in the design of clinically useful drugs.

  7. Intracranial self-stimulation in rats: sensitization to an opioid antagonist following acute or chronic treatment with mu opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Easterling, K W; Holtzman, S G

    1997-04-01

    Acute mu opioid agonist pretreatment (4 hr) dose-dependently sensitizes rats responding for food reinforcement to the rate-decreasing effects of naltrexone (NTX). In the present study, adult rats were trained to respond in an intracranial self-stimulation autotitration procedure in which responding resulted in electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle that decreased in frequency until reset to the initial value. In an acute sensitization experiment, pretreatment (4 hr) doses of 3.0 and 10 mg/kg morphine reduced the ED25 value for the intracranial self-stimulation rate-decreasing effect of NTX from 28.2 mg/kg to 0.29 and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively. All mu-selective opioid agonists tested, fentanyl > levorphanol > methadone > morphine > meperidine (listed in order of decreasing potency), produced similar large increases in sensitivity to NTX. Acute sensitization was not induced by the kappa-selective opioid agonist spiradoline, the dextrorotary enantiomer of levorphanol, dextrorphan, or the nonopioid drugs d-amphetamine and pentobarbital. Pretreatment with morphine for 10 days by continuous subcutaneous infusion (15 mg/kg/day) reduced the ED25 value of NTX from 28.2 to 0.002 +/- 1.48 mg/kg. The correlation of decreases in ED25 values for the rate-decreasing effect of NTX after both acute and chronic morphine administration is consistent with the theory that acute agonist-induced sensitization reflects receptor-mediated changes occurring early in the development of physical dependence.

  8. μ Opioid Receptor Expression after Morphine Administration Is Regulated by miR-212/132 Cluster.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Concejo, Adrian; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Ada; Rodríguez, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, miRNAs have emerged as a promising therapeutical approach in the treatment of several diseases, as demonstrated by miR-212 and its relation to addiction. Here we prove that the miR-212/132 cluster can be regulated by morphine, through the activation of mu opioid receptor (Oprm1). The molecular pathways triggered after morphine administration also induce changes in the levels of expression of oprm1. In addition, miR-212/132 cluster is actively repressing the expression of mu opioid receptor by targeting a sequence in the 3' UTR of its mRNA. These findings suggest that this cluster is closely related to opioid signaling, and function as a post-transcriptional regulator, modulating morphine response in a dose dependent manner. The regulation of miR-212/132 cluster expression is mediated by MAP kinase pathway, CaMKII-CaMKIV and PKA, through the phosphorylation of CREB. Moreover, the regulation of both oprm1 and of the cluster promoter is mediated by MeCP2, acting as a transcriptional repressor on methylated DNA after prolonged morphine administration. This mechanism explains the molecular signaling triggered by morphine as well as the regulation of the expression of the mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine and the implication of miR-212/132 in these processes. PMID:27380026

  9. μ Opioid Receptor Expression after Morphine Administration Is Regulated by miR-212/132 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Concejo, Adrian; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Ada; Rodríguez, Raquel E.

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, miRNAs have emerged as a promising therapeutical approach in the treatment of several diseases, as demonstrated by miR-212 and its relation to addiction. Here we prove that the miR-212/132 cluster can be regulated by morphine, through the activation of mu opioid receptor (Oprm1). The molecular pathways triggered after morphine administration also induce changes in the levels of expression of oprm1. In addition, miR-212/132 cluster is actively repressing the expression of mu opioid receptor by targeting a sequence in the 3’ UTR of its mRNA. These findings suggest that this cluster is closely related to opioid signaling, and function as a post-transcriptional regulator, modulating morphine response in a dose dependent manner. The regulation of miR-212/132 cluster expression is mediated by MAP kinase pathway, CaMKII-CaMKIV and PKA, through the phosphorylation of CREB. Moreover, the regulation of both oprm1 and of the cluster promoter is mediated by MeCP2, acting as a transcriptional repressor on methylated DNA after prolonged morphine administration. This mechanism explains the molecular signaling triggered by morphine as well as the regulation of the expression of the mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine and the implication of miR-212/132 in these processes. PMID:27380026

  10. Acute and chronic mu opioids differentially regulate thrombospondins 1 and 2 isoforms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phamduong, Ellen; Rathore, Maanjot K; Crews, Nicholas R; D'Angelo, Alexander S; Leinweber, Andrew L; Kappera, Pranay; Krenning, Thomas M; Rendell, Victoria R; Belcheva, Mariana M; Coscia, Carmine J

    2014-02-19

    Chronic opioids induce synaptic plasticity, a major neuronal adaptation. Astrocyte activation in synaptogenesis may play a critical role in opioid tolerance, withdrawal, and dependence. Thrombospondins 1 and 2 (TSP1/2) are astrocyte-secreted matricellular glycoproteins that promote neurite outgrowth as well as dendritic spine and synapse formation, all of which are inhibited by chronic μ opioids. In prior studies, we discovered that the mechanism of TSP1 regulation by μ opioids in astrocytes involves crosstalk between three different classes of receptors, μ opioid receptor, EGFR and TGFβR. Moreover, TGFβ1 stimulated TSP1 expression via EGFR and ERK/MAPK activation, indicating that EGFR is a signaling hub for opioid and TGFβ1 actions. Using various selective antagonists, and inhibitors, here we compared the mechanisms of chronic opioid regulation of TSP1/2 isoform expression in vivo and in immortalized rat cortical astrocytes. TSP1/2 release from astrocytes was also monitored. Acute and chronic μ opioids, morphine, and the prototypic μ ligand, DAMGO, modulated TSP2 protein levels. TSP2 but not TSP1 protein content was up-regulated by acute (3 h) morphine or DAMGO by an ERK/MAPK dependent mechanism. Paradoxically, TSP2 protein levels were altered neither by TGFβ1 nor by astrocytic neurotrophic factors, EGF, CNTF, and BMP4. TSP1/2 immunofluorescence was increased in astrocytes subjected to scratch-wounding, suggesting TSPs may be useful markers for the "reactive" state of these cells and potentially for different types of injury. Previously, we determined that chronic morphine attenuated both neurite outgrowth and synapse formation in cocultures of primary astrocytes and neurons under similar temporal conditions that μ opioids reduced TSP1 protein levels in astrocytes. Here we found that, after the same 8 day treatment, morphine or DAMGO diminished TSP2 protein levels in astrocytes. Therefore, μ opioids may deter synaptogenesis via both TSP1/2 isoforms, but

  11. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-05-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) μ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain.

  12. Thienorphine is a potent long-acting partial opioid agonist: a comparative study with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Yue, Yong-Juan; Cui, Meng-Xun; Gong, Ze-Hui

    2006-07-01

    A strategy in the development of new treatment for opioid addiction is to find partial opioid agonists with properties of long duration of action and high oral bioavailability. In a search for such compounds, thienorphine, a novel analog of buprenorphine, was synthesized. Here, we reported that, like buprenorphine, thienorphine bound potently and nonselectively to mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors stably expressed in CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells and behaved as a partial agonist at mu-opioid receptor. However, some differences were observed between the pharmacological profiles of thienorphine and buprenorphine. In vitro, thienorphine was more potent than buprenorphine in inhibiting [3H]diprenorphine and stimulating guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding to rat mu-opioid receptor stably expressed in CHO cells. In vivo, thienorphine exhibited a less potent but more efficacious antinociceptive effect with an ED50 value of 0.25 mg/kg s.c. and more potent antimorphine effect with an ED50 value of 0.64 mg/kg intragastric, compared with buprenorphine. Additionally, the bioavailability of thienorphine was greatly higher than that of buprenorphine after oral administration. Moreover, compared with buprenorphine, thienorphine showed a similar long-lasting antinociceptive effect but a much longer antagonism of morphine-induced lethality (more than 15 days). These results indicate that thienorphine is a potent, long-acting partial opioid agonist with high oral bioavailability and may have possible application in treating addiction. PMID:16569757

  13. Antitussive activity of Withania somnifera and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nosálová, Gabriela; Sivová, Veronika; Ray, Bimalendu; Fraňová, Soňa; Ondrejka, Igor; Flešková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan is a polysaccharide isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera L. It contains 65% arabinose and 18% galactose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan in conscious, healthy adult guinea pigs and the role of the opioid pathway in the antitussive action. A polysaccharide extract was given orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg. Cough was induced by an aerosol of citric acid in a concentration 0.3 mol/L, generated by a jet nebulizer into a plethysmographic chamber. The intensity of cough response was defined as the number of cough efforts counted during a 3-min exposure to the aerosol. The major finding was that arabinogalactan clearly suppressed the cough reflex; the suppression was comparable with that of codeine that was taken as a reference drug. The involvement of the opioid system was tested with the use of a blood-brain barrier penetrable, naloxone hydrochloride, and non-penetrable, naloxone methiodide, to distinguish between the central and peripheral mu-opioid receptor pathways. Both opioid antagonists acted to reverse the arabinogalactan-induced cough suppression; the reversion was total over time with the latter antagonist. We failed to confirm the presence of a bronchodilating effect of the polysaccharide, which could be involved in its antitussive action. We conclude that the polysaccharide arabinogalactan from Withania somnifera has a distinct antitussive activity consisting of cough suppression and that this action involves the mu-opioid receptor pathways.

  14. Alterations in the expression of G-proteins and regulation of adenylate cyclase in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells chronically exposed to low-efficacy mu-opioids.

    PubMed

    Ammer, H; Schulz, R

    1993-10-01

    with low-nanomolar concentrations of guanosine 5'-[beta gamma- imido]triphosphate. Our data demonstrate that chronic treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with low-efficacy mu-opioids increases G-protein abundance, a phenomenon which might contribute to the biochemical mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance/dependence. PMID:8216227

  15. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  16. Determining Pharmacological Selectivity of the Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist LY2456302 Using Pupillometry as a Translational Biomarker in Rat and Human

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Jennifer W.; Lowe, Stephen L.; Gonzales, Celedon R.; Weller, Mary Ann; Bell, Robert L.; Hart, John C.; Need, Anne B.; McKinzie, Jamie H.; Statnick, Michael A.; Suico, Jeffrey G.; McKinzie, David L.; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra; Mitch, Charles H.; Stoltz, Randall R.; Wong, Conrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective kappa opioid receptor antagonism is a promising experimental strategy for the treatment of depression. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist, LY2456302, exhibits ~30-fold higher affinity for kappa opioid receptors over mu opioid receptors, which is the next closest identified pharmacology. Methods: Here, we determined kappa opioid receptor pharmacological selectivity of LY2456302 by assessing mu opioid receptor antagonism using translational pupillometry in rats and humans. Results: In rats, morphine-induced mydriasis was completely blocked by the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (3mg/kg, which produced 90% mu opioid receptor occupancy), while 100 and 300mg/kg LY2456302 (which produced 56% and 87% mu opioid receptor occupancy, respectively) only partially blocked morphine-induced mydriasis. In humans, fentanyl-induced miosis was completely blocked by 50mg naltrexone, and LY2456302 dose-dependently blocked miosis at 25 and 60mg (minimal-to-no blockade at 4–10mg). Conclusions: We demonstrate, for the first time, the use of translational pupillometry in the context of receptor occupancy to identify a clinical dose of LY2456302 achieving maximal kappa opioid receptor occupancy without evidence of significant mu receptor antagonism. PMID:25637376

  17. Morphine withdrawal precipitated by specific mu, delta or kappa opioid receptor antagonists: a c-Fos protein study in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Stéphanie; Gestreau, Christian; Besson, Jean-Marie

    2003-06-01

    We have recently shown concurrent changes in behavioural responses and c-Fos protein expression in the central nervous system in both naive and morphine-dependent rats after systemic administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. However, because naloxone acts on the three major types of opioid receptors, the present study aimed at determining, in the same animals, both changes in behaviour and c-Fos-like immunoreactivity after intravenous injection of selective opioid antagonists, such as mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 10 mg/kg), delta (naltrindole, 4 mg/kg) or kappa (nor-binaltorphimine, 5 mg/kg) opioid receptor antagonists, in naive or morphine-dependent rats. In a first experimental series, only beta-funaltrexamine increased c-Fos expression in the eight central nervous system structures examined, whereas no effect was seen after naltrindole or nor-binaltorphimine administration in naive rats. These results suggest a tonic activity in the endogenous opioid peptides acting on mu opioid receptors in normal rats. A second experimental series in morphine-dependent rats showed that beta-funaltrexamine had the highest potency in the induction of classical signs of morphine withdrawal syndrome, as well as the increase in c-Fos expression in the 22 central nervous system structures studied, suggesting a major role of mu opioid receptors in opioid dependence. However, our results also demonstrated that naltrindole and, to a lesser extent, nor-binaltorphimine were able to induce moderate signs of morphine withdrawal and relatively weak c-Fos protein expression in restricted central nervous system structures. Therefore, delta and kappa opioid receptors may also contribute slightly to opioid dependence.

  18. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids. PMID

  19. Opioids and their receptors: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril

    2014-01-01

    Opioids have an important place in pharmacology. While their clinical use as analgesics is fundamental in medicine, their use is constrained by their side-effects and abuse potential. Pharmacologists have sought analgesics lacking side-effects and the abuse liability of the current agents. The identification of the opioid receptors in 1973 marked the beginning of our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these agents. The isolation of the opioid peptides quickly followed, along with the classification of three families of opioid receptors. Clinicians have long been aware of subtle differences among the mu opioids that were not easily reconciled with a single receptor and selective antagonists implied two subdivisions of mu receptors. However, the cloning of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 has led to the realization of the extensive complexity of the mu opioid receptor gene and its vast array of splice variants. Many of these splice variants are truncated and do not conform to the structure of traditional G-protein coupled receptors. Yet, evidence now shows that they are quite important and may prove valuable targets in the development of potent analgesics lacking the undesirable properties of current opioids. PMID:23624289

  20. Morphine-induced receptor endocytosis in a novel knockin mouse reduces tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joseph A; Bartlett, Selena; He, Li; Nielsen, Carsten K; Chang, Amy M; Kharazia, Viktor; Waldhoer, Maria; Ou, Chrissi J; Taylor, Stacy; Ferwerda, Madeline; Cado, Dragana; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2008-01-22

    Opioid drugs, such as morphine, are among the most effective analgesics available. However, their utility for the treatment of chronic pain is limited by side effects including tolerance and dependence. Morphine acts primarily through the mu-opioid receptor (MOP-R) , which is also a target of endogenous opioids. However, unlike endogenous ligands, morphine fails to promote substantial receptor endocytosis both in vitro, and in vivo. Receptor endocytosis serves at least two important functions in signal transduction. First, desensitization and endocytosis act as an "off" switch by uncoupling receptors from G protein. Second, endocytosis functions as an "on" switch, resensitizing receptors by recycling them to the plasma membrane. Thus, both the off and on function of the MOP-R are altered in response to morphine compared to endogenous ligands. To examine whether the low degree of endocytosis induced by morphine contributes to tolerance and dependence, we generated a knockin mouse that expresses a mutant MOP-R that undergoes morphine-induced endocytosis. Morphine remains an excellent antinociceptive agent in these mice. Importantly, these mice display substantially reduced antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence. These data suggest that opioid drugs with a pharmacological profile similar to morphine but the ability to promote endocytosis could provide analgesia while having a reduced liability for promoting tolerance and dependence.

  1. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  2. Comparison of [Dmt1]DALDA and DAMGO in binding and G protein activation at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-Min; Qian, Xuanxuan; Schiller, Peter W; Szeto, Hazel H

    2003-12-01

    [Dmt1]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) binds with high affinity and selectivity to the mu opioid receptor and is a surprisingly potent and long-acting analgesic, especially after intrathecal administration. In an attempt to better understand the unique pharmacological profile of [Dmt1]DALDA, we have prepared [3H][Dmt1]DALDA and compared its binding properties with that of [3H]DAMGO ([d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin). Kinetic studies revealed rapid association of [3H][Dmt1]DALDA when incubated with mouse brain membranes (K+1 = 0.155 nM(-1) min(-1)). Dissociation of [3H][Dmt1]DALDA was also rapid (K(-1) = 0.032 min(-1)) and indicated binding to a single site. [3H][Dmt1]DALDA binds with very high affinity to human mu opioid receptor (hMOR) (Kd = 0.199 nM), and Kd and Bmax were reduced by sodium but not Gpp(NH)p [guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)triphosphate]. Similar Kd values were obtained in brain and spinal cord tissues and SH-SY5Y cells. The hMOR:hDOR (human delta opioid receptor) selectivity of [Dmt1]DALDA ( approximately 10,000) is 8-fold higher than DAMGO. However, [Dmt1]DALDA is less selective than DAMGO against hKOR (human kappa opioid receptor) (26-versus 180-fold). The Ki values for a number of opioid ligands were generally higher when determined by competitive displacement binding against [3H][Dmt1]DALDA compared with [3H]DAMGO, with the exception of Dmt1-substituted peptide analogs. All Dmt1 analogs showed much higher affinity for the mu receptor than corresponding Tyr1 analogs. [35S]GTPgammaS (guanosine 5'-O -(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate) binding showed that [Dmt1]DALDA and DAMGO are full agonists at hMOR and hDOR but are only partial agonists at hKOR. The very high affinity and selectivity of [3H][Dmt1]DALDA for the mu receptor, together with its very low nonspecific binding (10-15%) and metabolic stability, make [3H][Dmt1]DALDA an ideal radioligand for labeling mu receptors. PMID:14534366

  3. Abuse-related effects of mu opioid analgesics in an assay of intracranial self-stimulation in rats: modulation by chronic morphine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Altarifi, Ahmad A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is an operant procedure in which responding is maintained by electrical brain stimulation. Stimulation frequency can be rapidly varied to maintain a wide range of baseline response rates, and drugs effects can be simultaneously evaluated on both low ICSS rates maintained by low stimulation frequencies and high ICSS rates maintained by high stimulation frequencies. ICSS “facilitation” denotes drug-induced increases in low ICSS rates and is often interpreted as an abuse-related effect, whereas ICSS “depression” denotes decreases in high ICSS rates and may indicate abuse-limiting effects. This study examined the roles of drug efficacy and of prior mu agonist exposure as determinants of mu agonist effects on ICSS in rats with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle. The high-, intermediate- and low-efficacy mu agonists methadone, fentanyl and nalbuphine were tested during escalating regimens of morphine exposure (Vehicle, 3.2, 18 mg/kg/day). During vehicle treatment, methadone and fentanyl primarily depressed ICSS, whereas nalbuphine produced weak facilitation that was not dose-dependent. Chronic morphine produced tolerance to ICSS depression and increased expression of ICSS facilitation. These results suggest that mu agonist exposure increases expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by mu agonists with a broad range of efficacies at mu receptors. PMID:23881045

  4. Agrin acts via a MuSK receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Glass, D J; Bowen, D C; Stitt, T N; Radziejewski, C; Bruno, J; Ryan, T E; Gies, D R; Shah, S; Mattsson, K; Burden, S J; DiStefano, P S; Valenzuela, D M; DeChiara, T M; Yancopoulos, G D

    1996-05-17

    Formation of th neuromuscular junction depends upon reciprocal inductive interactions between the developing nerve and muscle, resulting in the precise juxtaposition of a differentiated nerve terminal with a highly specialized patch on the muscle membrane, termed the motor endplate. Agrin is a nerve-derived factor that can induced molecular reorganizations at the motor endplate, but the mechanism of action of agrin remains poorly understood. MuSK is a receptor tyrosine kinase localized to the motor endplate, seemingly well positioned to receive a key nerve-derived signal. Mice lacking either agrin or MuSK have recently been generated and exhibit similarly profound defects in their neuromuscular junctions. Here we demonstrate that agrin acts via a receptor complex that includes MuSK as well as a myotube-specific accessory component.

  5. Alvimopan

    MedlinePlus

    ... class of medications called peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists. It works by protecting the bowel from ... had a complete bowel obstruction (blockage in your intestine); or kidney or liver disease.tell your doctor ...

  6. Methylnaltrexone

    MedlinePlus

    ... class of medications called peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists. It works by protecting the bowel from ... small pouches in the lining of the large intestine that can become inflamed), or Ogilvie's syndrome (a ...

  7. Design, Syntheses, and Pharmacological Characterization of 17-Cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6α-(isoquinoline-3′-carboxamido)morphinan Analogues as Opioid Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yunyun; Zaidi, Saheem A.; Stevens, David L.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Mosier, Philip D.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Dewey, William L.; Selley, Dana E.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A series of 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6α-(isoquinoline-3′-carboxamido)morphinan (NAQ) analogues were synthesized and pharmacologically characterized to study their structure-activity relationship at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). The competition binding assay showed two-atom spacer and aromatic side chain were optimal for MOR selectivity. Meanwhile, substitutions at the 1′- and/or 4′-position of the isoquinoline ring retained or improved MOR selectivity over the kappa opioid receptor while still possessing above 20-fold MOR selectivity over the delta opioid receptor. In contrast, substitutions at the 6′-and/or 7′-position of the isoquinoline ring reduced MOR selectivity as well as MOR efficacy. Among this series of ligands, compound 11 acted as an antagonist when challenged with morphine in warm-water tail immersion assay and produced less significant withdrawal symptoms compared to naltrexone in morphine-pelleted mice. Compound 11 also antagonized the intracellular Ca2+ increase induced by DAMGO. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of 11 in three opioid receptors indicated orientation of the 6’-nitro group varied significantly in the different “address” domains of the receptors and played a crucial role in the observed binding affinities and selectivity. Collectively, the current findings provide valuable insights for future development of NAQ-based MOR selective ligands. PMID:25783191

  8. Activity profiles of dalargin and its analogues in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor selective bioassays.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Pospisek, J; Hauzerova, L; Barth, T; Milanov, P

    1999-10-01

    1. To elucidate the structural features ensuring action of [D-Ala2, Leu5]-enkephalyl-Arg (dalargin), a series of dalargin analogues were tested for their effectiveness in depressing electrically-evoked contractions of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparations (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors) and the vasa deferentia of the hamster (delta-opioid receptors), mouse (mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors), rat (similar to mu-opioid receptors) and rabbit (kappa-opioid receptors). The naloxone KB values in the myenteric plexus were also obtained. 2. [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 19 times less potent than dalargin, and its pharmacological activity was peptidase-sensitive. The ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity for [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 6.78, and KB was 7.9 nM. This emphasizes the role that D-configuration of Ala2 plays in determining the active folding of dalargin molecule as well as in conferring resistance to peptidases. 3. [Met5]-dalargin was equipotent to dalargin in the myenteric plexus, but was more potent in the vasa deferentia of hamster and mouse (KB=5.5 nM). Leu5 and the interdependence of Leu5 and D-Ala2 are of importance for the selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors. 4. Dalarginamide was more potent and selective for mu-opioid receptors than dalargin, whilst dalarginethylamide, though equipotent to dalarginamide in the myenteric plexus, was more potent at delta-opioid receptors (KB=5.0 nM). [D-Phe4]-dalarginamide and N-Me-[D-Phe4]-dalarginamide were inactive indicating the contribution of L-configuration of Phe4 to the pharmacological potency of dalargin. 5. N-Me-[L-Phe4]-dalarginamide possessed the highest potency and selectivity for mu-opioid receptors (the ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity was 0.00053; KB=2.6 nM). The CONH2 terminus combined with the N-methylation of L-Phe4 increased the potency and selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors.

  9. Kappa opioid receptor/dynorphin system: Genetic and pharmacotherapeutic implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Butelman, Eduardo R.; Yuferov, Vadim; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Addictions to cocaine or heroin/prescription opioids [short-acting mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) agonists] involve relapsing cycles, with experimentation/escalating use, withdrawal/abstinence, and relapse/re-escalation. Kappa-opioid receptors (KOPr; encoded by OPRK1), and their endogenous agonists, the dynorphins (encoded by PDYN) have counter-modulatory effects on reward caused by cocaine or MOPr agonist exposure, and exhibit plasticity in addictive-like states. KOPr/dynorphin activation is implicated in depression/anxiety, often co-morbid with addictions. In this Opinion article, we propose that particular stages of the addiction cycle are differentially affected by KOPr/dynorphin systems. Vulnerability and resilience can be due to pre-existing (e.g., genetic) factors, or epigenetic modifications of the OPRK1 or PDYN genes during the addiction cycle. Pharmacotherapeutic approaches limiting changes in KOPr/dynorphin tone, especially with KOPr partial agonists, may hold potential for the treatment of specific drug addictions and psychiatric co-morbidity. PMID:22709632

  10. Direct influence of C-terminally substituted amino acids in the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore on delta-opioid receptor selectivity and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Guerrini, Remo; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2004-07-29

    A series of 17 analogues were developed on the basis of the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(R)-R' (denotes chirality; R = charged, neutral, or aromatic functional group; R' = -OH or -NH(2)). These compounds were designed to test the following hypothesis: the physicochemical properties of third-residue substitutions C-terminal to Tic in the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore modify delta-opioid receptor selectivity and delta-opioid receptor antagonism through enhanced interactions with the mu-opioid receptor. The data substantiate the following conclusions: (i) all compounds had high receptor affinity [K(i)(delta) = 0.034-1.1 nM], while that for the mu-opioid receptor fluctuated by orders of magnitude [K(i)(mu) = 15.1-3966 nM]; (ii) delta-opioid receptor selectivity [K(i)(mu)/K(i)(delta)] declined 1000-fold from 22,600 to 21; (iii) a C-terminal carboxyl group enhanced selectivity but only as a consequence of the specific residue; (iv) amidated, positive charged residues [Lys-NH(2) (6), Arg-NH(2) (7)], and a negatively charged aromatic residue [Trp-OH (11)] enhanced mu-opioid affinity [K(i)(mu) = 17.0, 15.1, and 15.7 nM, respectively], while Gly-NH(2) (8), Ser-NH(2) (10), and His-OH (12) were nearly one-tenth as active; and (v) D-isomers exhibited mixed effects on mu-opioid receptor affinity (2' < 3' < 4' < 1' < 5') and decreased delta-selectivity in D-Asp-NH(2) (1') and D-Lys(Ac)-OH (5'). The analogues exhibited delta-opioid receptor antagonism (pA(2) = 6.9-10.07) and weak mu-opioid receptor agonism (IC(50) > 1 microM) except H-Dmt-Tic-Glu-NH(2) (3), which was a partial delta-opioid receptor agonist (IC(50) = 2.5 nM). Thus, these C-terminally extended analogues indicated that an amino acid residue containing a single charge, amino or guanidino functionality, or aromatic group substantially altered the delta-opioid receptor activity profile (selectivity and antagonism) of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, which suggests that the C-terminal constituent plays a major role in determining

  11. Opiate Pharmacology and Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of severe pain management in patients with cancer. The hallmark of pain management is individualization of therapy. Although almost all clinically used drugs act through mu opioid receptors, they display subtle but important differences pharmacologically. Furthermore, not all patients respond equally well to all drugs. Evidence suggests that these variable responses among patients have a biologic basis and are likely to involve both biased agonism and the many mu opioid receptor subtypes that have been cloned. PMID:24799496

  12. Changes of epidermal mu-opiate receptor expression and nerve endings in chronic atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Lipp, B; Sumanovski, L T; Buechner, S A; Bigliardi, P L

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that neuropeptides such as a substance P, neurotrophins or beta-endorphin, an endogenous agonist for mu-opioid receptor, are involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in which mental stress and scratching deteriorate the disease. mu-Opioid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor, can be downregulated and internalized by agonists and other factors in vitro. In this study, we investigated the regulation of mu-opioid receptor and nerve endings in atopic dermatitis patients. Skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients revealed a significant downregulation of mu-opiate receptor expression in epidermis of atopic dermatitis. Permeabilization of the skin showed that the receptor in keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis is internalized. The mRNA expression pattern of the mu-opiate receptor is different in epidermis taken from patients with chronic atopic dermatitis compared to normal skin. In atopic dermatitis, the mRNA is concentrated in the subcorneal layers of the epidermis and in normal skin in the suprabasal layers. Staining of the nerve endings using protein gene product 9.5 shows a different pattern of epidermal nerve endings in normal skin compared to atopic dermatitis. In normal skin, the epidermal nerve endings are rather thick. However, in atopic dermatitis, the epidermal nerve endings are thin and run straight through the epidermis. Based on these observations and combining the 'intensity' and 'pattern' hypothesis, we propose a new theory especially for histamine-unrelated, peripheral induction of chronic pruritus. We suggest that 'itch' is elicited in the epidermal unmyelinated nerve C-fibers and 'pain' in the dermal unmyelinated nerve fibers. The downregulation of the opioid receptor in the epidermis contributes to the chronic itching. We call this new hypothesis the 'layer hypothesis'.

  13. Metalloproteolytic receptor shedding…platelets "acting their age".

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert K; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2016-09-01

    Whilst significant effort has been focused on development of tools and approaches to clinically modulate activation processes that consume platelets, the platelet receptors that initiate activation processes remain untargeted. The modulation of receptor levels is also linked to underlying platelet aging processes which influence normal platelet lifespan and also the functionality and survival of stored platelets that are used in transfusion. In this review, we will focus on platelet adhesion receptors initiating thrombus formation, and discuss how regulation of levels of these receptors impact platelet function and platelet survival. PMID:27459696

  14. Mechanism of Positive Allosteric Modulators Acting on AMPA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jin,R.; Clark, S.; Weeks, A.; Dudman, J.; Gouaux, E.; Partin, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1, 3-oxazino benzo-1, 4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the 'hinge' in the ligand-binding core 'clamshell' that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation.

  15. Expression of the micro-opioid receptor on Malassezia pachydermatis and its effect in modulating phospholipase production.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, C; Dell'Aquila, M E; Traversa, D; Albrizio, M; Guaricci, A C; de Santis, T; Otranto, D

    2010-02-01

    Malassezia spp. may act as opportunistic skin pathogens in humans and animals. Malassezia pachydermatis proliferation and phospholipase production may play a pathogenic role in the occurrence of skin lesions in dogs. This study investigates the presence of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in M. pachydermatis strains isolated from healthy dogs and dogs with skin lesions and its effects on phospholipase activity (p.a.). P.a. of 64 M. pachydermatis isolates was evaluated using different concentrations of naloxone (Nx), a MOR antagonist. Isolates were divided into Group A (i.e., 40 isolates from 26 dogs with dermatitis) and Group B (i.e., 24 isolates from 12 healthy dogs). The MOR expression was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. A statistically higher p.a. than that of the controls was found with isolates in Group A at a Nx concentration of 10(-6) M (P<0.05). No isolate in Group B displayed p.a. in either control samples or in the presence of any Nx concentration. Immunoblotting revealed two positive MOR immunoreactive bands of approximately 65 and 98 kDa. MOR expression and localization was also demonstrated by immunofluorescence in isolates from Groups A and B. This study provides the first evidence of MOR expression on M. pachydermatis cell membranes pointing to its possible role in modulating p.a. production in isolates from dogs with skin lesions. PMID:19225979

  16. Tolerance develops to the antiallodynic effects of the peripherally acting opioid loperamide hydrochloride in nerve-injured rats.

    PubMed

    He, Shao-Qiu; Yang, Fei; Perez, Federico M; Xu, Qian; Shechter, Ronen; Cheong, Yong-Kwan; Carteret, Alene F; Dong, Xinzhong; Sweitzer, Sarah M; Raja, Srinivasa N; Guan, Yun

    2013-11-01

    Peripherally acting opioids are potentially attractive drugs for the clinical management of certain chronic pain states due to the lack of centrally mediated adverse effects. However, it remains unclear whether tolerance develops to peripheral opioid analgesic effects under neuropathic pain conditions. We subjected rats to L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) and examined the analgesic effects of repetitive systemic and local administration of loperamide hydrochloride, a peripherally acting opioid agonist. We found that the inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity, an important manifestation of neuropathic pain, by systemic loperamide (1.5mg/kg subcutaneously) decreased after repetitive drug treatment (tolerance-inducing dose: 0.75 to 6.0mg/kg subcutaneously). Similarly, repeated intraplantar injection of loperamide (150 μg/50 μL intraplantarly) and D-Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Glyol(5) enkephalin (300 μg/50 μL), a highly selective mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, also resulted in decreased inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity. Pretreatment with naltrexone hydrochloride (5mg/kg intraperitoneally) and MK-801 (0.2mg/kg intraperitoneally) attenuated systemic loperamide tolerance. Western blot analysis showed that repetitive systemic administration of morphine (3mg/kg subcutaneously), but not loperamide (3mg/kg subcutaneously) or saline, significantly increased MOR phosphorylation in the spinal cord of SNL rats. In cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, loperamide dose-dependently inhibited KCl-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i. However, this drug effect significantly decreased in cells pretreated with loperamide (3 μM, 72 hours). Intriguingly, in loperamide-tolerant cells, the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole restored loperamide's inhibition of KCl-elicited [Ca(2+)]i increase. Our findings indicate that animals with neuropathic pain may develop acute tolerance to the antiallodynic effects of peripherally acting opioids after repetitive systemic and local drug

  17. Involvement of kappa-opioid receptors in visceral nociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M H; Bayati, A; Lindström, E; Larsson, H

    2008-10-01

    It has been shown that the behavioural responses to chemically evoked visceral nociception are increased in transgenic mice lacking the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of KOR in mechanically evoked visceral pain by performing colorectal distension (CRD) and monitoring the subsequent visceromotor response (VMR) in control mice (KOR(+/+)) and in mice lacking KOR (KOR(-/-)). Pseudo-affective visceral pain responses were evoked in conscious mice using increasing (10-80 mmHg) and repeated (12 x 55 mmHg) phasic CRD paradigms. The resulting VMR was determined by monitoring the electromyographic activity of the abdominal muscle. The increasing and repeated CRD paradigms, respectively, evoked similar responses in both KOR(+/+) and KOR(-/-) mice. The selective KOR-agonists U-69593 (5 and 25 mg kg(-1), s.c.) and asimadoline (25 mg kg(-1), s.c.) significantly decreased the VMR in KOR(+/+) mice, while having no effect in KOR(-/-) mice. In contrast, the selective mu-opioid receptor agonist fentanyl significantly reduced the VMR in both types of mice and appeared more efficacious in KOR(-/-) mice. The opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.3-30 mg kg(-1) s.c.) did not affect the response to CRD in C57BL/6 mice at any dose tested. In conclusion, the data confirm that the KOR agonists used in this study inhibit the VMR to CRD in mice by acting via KOR receptors. In addition, the data suggest that the endogenous opioid system is not likely to modulate the VMR to mechanically evoked visceral pain in mice.

  18. Proteoglycans Act as Cellular Hepatitis Delta Virus Attachment Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lamas Longarela, Oscar; Schmidt, Tobias T.; Schöneweis, Katrin; Romeo, Raffaella; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Urban, Stephan; Schulze, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a small, defective RNA virus that requires the presence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) for its life cycle. Worldwide more than 15 million people are co-infected with HBV and HDV. Although much effort has been made, the early steps of the HBV/HDV entry process, including hepatocyte attachment and receptor interaction are still not fully understood. Numerous possible cellular HBV/HDV binding partners have been described over the last years; however, so far only heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been functionally confirmed as cell-associated HBV attachment factors. Recently, it has been suggested that ionotrophic purinergic receptors (P2XR) participate as receptors in HBV/HDV entry. Using the HBV/HDV susceptible HepaRG cell line and primary human hepatocytes (PHH), we here demonstrate that HDV entry into hepatocytes depends on the interaction with the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans. We furthermore provide evidence that P2XR are not involved in HBV/HDV entry and that effects observed with inhibitors for these receptors are a consequence of their negative charge. HDV infection was abrogated by soluble GAGs and other highly sulfated compounds. Enzymatic removal of defined carbohydrate structures from the cell surface using heparinase III or the obstruction of GAG synthesis by sodium chlorate inhibited HDV infection of HepaRG cells. Highly sulfated P2XR antagonists blocked HBV/HDV infection of HepaRG cells and PHH. In contrast, no effect on HBV/HDV infection was found when uncharged P2XR antagonists or agonists were applied. In summary, HDV infection, comparable to HBV infection, requires binding to the carbohydrate side chains of hepatocyte-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as attachment receptors, while P2XR are not actively involved. PMID:23505490

  19. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  20. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia.

  1. Role of Mu and Delta Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens in Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Diana; Self, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that opioid receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a role in relapse to drug-seeking behavior. However, environmental stimuli that elicit relapse also release the endogenous opioid β-endorphin in the NAc. Using a within–session extinction/reinstatement paradigm in rats that self-administer cocaine, we found that NAc infusions of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO moderately reinstated responding on the cocaine-paired lever at low doses (1.0–3.0 ng/side), whereas the delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonist DPDPE induced greater responding at higher doses (300–3000 ng/side) that also enhanced inactive lever responding. Using doses of either agonist that induced responding on only the cocaine-paired lever, we found that DAMGO-induced responding was blocked selectively by pretreatment with the MOR antagonist CTAP, while DPDPE-induced responding was selectively blocked by the DOR antagonist naltrindole. Cocaine-primed reinstatement was blocked by intra-NAc CTAP but not naltrindole, indicating a role for endogenous MOR-acting peptides in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. In this regard, intra-NAc infusions of β-endorphin (100–1000 ng/side) induced marked cocaine-seeking behavior, an effect blocked by intra-NAc pretreatment with the MOR but not DOR antagonist. Conversely, cocaine seeking elicited by the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (1–10 μg/side) was blocked by naltrindole but not CTAP. MOR stimulation in more dorsal caudate-putamen sites was ineffective, while DPDPE infusions induced cocaine seeking. Together, these findings establish distinct roles for MOR and DOR in cocaine relapse, and suggest that NAc MOR could be an important therapeutic target to neutralize the effects of endogenous β-endorphin release on cocaine relapse. PMID:19279569

  2. Pharmacological characterization of an opioid receptor in the ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, R; Silva, W I; Renaud, F L

    1993-01-01

    A pharmacological characterization has been performed of the opioid receptor involved in modulation of phagocytosis in the protozoan ciliate Tetrahymena. Studies on inhibition of phagocytosis by mammalian prototypic opioid agonists revealed that morphine and beta-endorphin have the highest intrinsic activity, whereas all the other opioids tested can only be considered partial agonists. However, morphine (a mu-receptor agonist) is twice as potent as beta-endorphin (a delta-receptor agonist). Furthermore, the sensitivity for the opioid antagonist naloxone, determined in the presence of morphine and beta-endorphin, is very similar to the sensitivity exhibited by mammalian tissues rich in mu-opioid receptors. We suggest that the opioid receptor coupled to phagocytosis in Tetrahymena is mu-like in some of its pharmacological characteristics and may serve as a model system for studies on opioid receptor function and evolution.

  3. G-Protein Coupled Receptor Resensitization – Appreciating the Balancing Act of Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Maradumane L.; Vasudevan, Neelakantan T.; Gupta, Manveen K.; Martelli, Elizabeth E.; Prasad, Sathyamangla V. Naga

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane receptors that are pivotal regulators of cellular responses including vision, cardiac contractility, olfaction, and platelet activation. GPCRs have been a major target for drug discovery due to their role in regulating a broad range of physiological and pathological responses. GPCRs mediate these responses through a cyclical process of receptor activation (initiation of downstream signals), desensitization (inactivation that results in diminution of downstream signals), and resensitization (receptor reactivation for next wave of activation). Although these steps may be of equal importance in regulating receptor function, significant advances have been made in understanding activation and desensitization with limited effort towards resensitization. Inadequate importance has been given to resensitization due to the understanding that resensitization is a homeostasis maintaining process and is not acutely regulated. Evidence indicates that resensitization is a critical step in regulating GPCR function and may contribute towards receptor signaling and cellular responses. In light of these observations, it is imperative to discuss resensitization as a dynamic and mechanistic regulator of GPCR function. In this review we discuss components regulating GPCR function like activation, desensitization, and internalization with special emphasis on resensitization. Although we have used β-adrenergic receptor as a proto-type GPCR to discuss mechanisms regulating receptor function, other GPCRs are also described to put forth a view point on the universality of such mechanisms. PMID:22697395

  4. Morphine-induced desensitization and down-regulation at mu-receptors in 7315C pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Puttfarcken, P.S.; Cox, B.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pituitary 7315c tumor cells maintained in culture were treated with varying concentrations of morphine from 10 nM to 300 {mu}M, for periods of five or forty-eight hours. The ability of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in washed membrane preparations from the treated cells was compared with its activity in membranes from cells incubated in the absence of added morphine. In the same membrane preparations, the number and affinity of mu-opioid receptors was estimated by measurements of ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine binding. After 5 hr of treatment with morphine concentrations of 100 nM or higher, a significant reduction in inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by DAMGO was observed. Little further loss of agonist activity was observed when the incubations were extended to 48 hr. After 5 hr of morphine treatment, there was no change in either the number of receptors, or their affinity for ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine. However after 48 hr of morphine treatment, greater than 25% reductions in receptor number were apparent with morphine pretreatment concentrations of 10 {mu}M or higher. These results suggest that opioid tolerance in this system is primarily associated with a reduced ability of agonist-occupied receptor to activate the effector system. Receptor down-regulation was not necessary for loss of agonist response, although a reduction in receptor number occurred after exposure to high concentrations of morphine for periods longer than 5hr.

  5. Peripheral endothelin B receptor agonist-induced antinociception involves endogenous opioids in mice.

    PubMed

    Quang, Phuong N; Schmidt, Brian L

    2010-05-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) produced by various cancers is known to be responsible for inducing pain. While ET-1 binding to ETAR on peripheral nerves clearly mediates nociception, effects from binding to ETBR are less clear. The present study assessed the effects of ETBR activation and the role of endogenous opioid analgesia in carcinoma pain using an orthotopic cancer pain mouse model. mRNA expression analysis showed that ET-1 was nearly doubled while ETBR was significantly down-regulated in a human oral SCC cell line compared to normal oral keratinocytes (NOK). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell culture treated with an ETBR agonist (10(-4)M, 10(-5)M, and 10(-6) M BQ-3020) significantly increased the production of beta-endorphin without any effects on leu-enkephalin or dynorphin. Cancer inoculated in the hind paw of athymic mice with SCC induced significant pain, as indicated by reduction of paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, compared to sham-injected and NOK-injected groups. Intratumor administration of 3mg/kg BQ-3020 attenuated cancer pain by approximately 50% up to 3h post-injection compared to PBS-vehicle and contralateral injection, while intratumor ETBR antagonist BQ-788 treatment (100 and 300microg/kg and 3mg/kg) had no effects. Local naloxone methiodide (500microg/kg) or selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist (CTOP, 500microg/kg) injection reversed ETBR agonist-induced antinociception in cancer animals. We propose that these results demonstrate that peripheral ETBR agonism attenuates carcinoma pain by modulating beta-endorphins released from the SCC to act on peripheral opioid receptors found in the cancer microenvironment.

  6. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors. PMID:27114912

  7. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors.

  8. Long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists for the treatment of chronic airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palot, Alain; Sofalvi, Tunde; Pahus, Laurie; Gouitaa, Marion; Tummino, Celine; Martinez, Stephanie; Charpin, Denis; Bourdin, Arnaud; Chanez, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine (neuronal and non-neuronal origin) regulates bronchoconstriction, and mucus secretion. It has an inflammatory effect by inducing attraction, survival and cytokine release from inflammatory cells. Muscarinic receptors throughout the bronchial tree are mainly restricted to muscarinic M1, M2 and M3 receptors. Three long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) were approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Europe: once-daily tiotropium bromide; once-daily glycopyrronium bromide; and twice-daily aclidinium bromide. All have higher selectivity for M3 receptors than for M2 receptors, and dissociate more slowly from the M3 receptors than they do from the M2 receptors. Some LAMAs showed anti-inflammatory effects [inhibition of neutrophil chemotactic activity and migration of alveolar neutrophils, decrease of several cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) including interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and leukotriene (LT)B4] and antiremodeling effects (inhibition of mucus gland hypertrophy and decrease in MUC5AC-positive goblet cell number, decrease in MUC5AC overexpression). In the clinic, LAMAs showed a significant improvement of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), quality of life, dyspnea and reduced the number of exacerbations in COPD and more recently in asthma. This review will focus on the three LAMAs approved in Europe in the treatment of chronic airway diseases. PMID:24587893

  9. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  10. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  11. Different characteristics of AMPA receptor agonists acting at AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wahl, P; Madsen, U; Banke, T; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Schousboe, A

    1996-07-18

    A series of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) analogues were evaluated for activity at homo-oligomeric glutamate1-flop (Glu1-flop) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. (RS)-2-Amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) (EC50, 2.4 microM), a homologue of AMPA having a carboxyl group as the terminal acidic functionality, was five times more potent than AMPA (EC50, 12 microM) and 20 times more potent than kainate (EC50, 46 microM). (RS)-2-Amino-3(3-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (Tri-F-AMPA), in which an electronegative trifluoromethyl group is substituted for the methyl group on the isoxazole ring in the AMPA structure, was three times more potent than AMPA, whereas (RS)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid (5-HPCA), a bicyclic analogue of AMPA with highly restricted conformational flexibility was 10 times less potent than AMPA. The limiting slope of log-log plots of Glu1-flop receptor currents versus low agonist concentrations had a value of 1.7 for ACPA and kainate compared to 1.5 for Tri-F-AMPA and 1.3 for 5-HPCA and AMPA. The amplitude of responses evoked by near saturating concentrations of the agonists varied more than 7-fold. The sequence of efficacy was ACPA = kainate > Tri-F-AMPA > AMPA > 5-HPCA. Moreover, when saturating concentrations of Tri-F-AMPA and kainate were co-applied, the response was significantly greater than when each of the agonists was applied separately. The potency of the antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX) (estimated KB, approximately 200 nM), to block currents mediated by Glu1-flop receptors was similar for all of the agonists tested in this study. These results indicate that relatively minor changes in the molecular structure of AMPA are associated with marked effects on potency and efficacy. In particular, it is suggested that the acidity of

  12. Lepidozenolide from the liverwort Lepidozia fauriana acts as a farnesoid X receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Lepidozenolide is a sesquiterpenoid isolated from the liverwort Lepidozia fauriana and its possible bioactivity is unclear. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily that has been widely targeted for developing treatments for chronic liver disease and hyperglycemia. In this study, whether lepidozenolide may act as a FXR agonist was determined. Indeed, in mammalian one-hybrid and transient transfection reporter assays, lepidozenolide transactivated FXR to modulate promoter action including GAL4, CYP7A1, and PLTP promoters in a dose-dependent manner, while it exhibited slightly less agonistic activity than chenodeoxycholic acid, an endogenous FXR agonist. Through the molecular modeling docking studies lepidozenolide was shown to bind to FXR ligand binding pocket fairly well. All these results indicate that lepidozenolide acts as a FXR agonist. PMID:25315435

  13. Pharmacological properties and therapeutic possibilities for drugs acting upon endocannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    Clinical trial data are beginning to emerge with respect to the therapeutic efficacy of cannabis extracts for the treatment of chronic pain. Although there is some evidence of efficacy, a major issue concerns the narrow margin between doses producing therapeutic effects and those producing the "highs" associated with cannabis misuse. In addition, long-term use is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric illness. These negative aspects constrain the doses of cannabis extracts and psychoactive cannabinoids that can be given to patients, and raise the risk that properly conducted clinical trials with too low dosages will impact negatively on subsequent drug development in this field. However, recent research has opened up a number of avenues whereby compounds acting directly upon cannabinoid (CB) receptors may have therapeutic potential. In this review, two such areas are discussed, namely a) the possible use of peripherally acting CB agonists and CB2 receptor-selective agonists for the treatment of pain, and b) the possible utility of CB2 receptor agonists for the prevention of stress-induced exacerbations of skin disorders such as psoriasis. A second area of drug development at present is that of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, spearheaded by rimonabant, for the treatment of obesity and as an aid for smoking cessation. An important aspect of these compounds is their efficacy and selectivity, and this is discussed in detail in the present review.

  14. Activation of delta-opioid receptor contributes to the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pao-Pao; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Xi, Jinghua; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2016-09-01

    Oxycodone has been used clinically for over 90 years. While it is known that it exhibits low affinity for the multiple opioid receptors, whether its pharmacological activities are due to oxycodone activation of the opioid receptor type or due to its active metabolite (oxymorphone) that exhibits high affinity for the mu-opioid receptors remains unresolved. Ross and Smith (1997) reported the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone (171nmol, i.c.v.) are induced by putative kappa-opioid receptors in SD rat while others have reported oxycodone activities are due to activation of mu- and/or delta-opioid receptors. In this study, using male mu-opioid receptor knock-out (MOR-KO) mice, we examined whether delta-opioid receptor was involved in oxycodone antinociception. Systemic subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of oxycodone (above 40mg/kg) could induce a small but significant antinociceptive effect in MOR-KO mice by the tail flick test. Delta-opioid receptor antagonist (naltrindole, 10mg/kg or 20mg/kg, i.p.) could block this effect. When oxycodone was injected directly into the brain of MOR-KO mice by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route, oxycodone at doses of 50nmol or higher could induce similar level of antinociceptive responses to those observed in wild type mice at the same doses by i.c.v. Delta-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole at 10nmol or ICI 154,129 at 20μg) completely blocked the supraspinal antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in MOR-KO mice. Such oxycodone antinociceptive responses were probably not due to its active metabolites oxymorphone because (a) the relative low level of oxymorphone was found in the brain after systemically or centrally oxycodone injection using LC/MS/MS analysis; (b) oxymorphone at a dose that mimics the level detected in the mice brain did not show any significant antinocieption effect; (c) oxycodone exhibits equal potency as oxymorphone albeit being a partial agonist in regulating [Ca(2+)]I transients in a clonal cell line

  15. Auxiliary Subunit GSG1L Acts to Suppress Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Thomas P.; Bats, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors are ligand-gated cation channels responsible for a majority of the fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Their behavior and calcium permeability depends critically on their subunit composition and the identity of associated auxiliary proteins. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) contribute to various forms of synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction underlies a number of serious neurological conditions. For CP-AMPARs, the prototypical transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein stargazin, which acts as an auxiliary subunit, enhances receptor function by increasing single-channel conductance, slowing channel gating, increasing calcium permeability, and relieving the voltage-dependent block by endogenous intracellular polyamines. We find that, in contrast, GSG1L, a transmembrane auxiliary protein identified recently as being part of the AMPAR proteome, acts to reduce the weighted mean single-channel conductance and calcium permeability of recombinant CP-AMPARs, while increasing polyamine-dependent rectification. To examine the effects of GSG1L on native AMPARs, we manipulated its expression in cerebellar and hippocampal neurons. Transfection of GSG1L into mouse cultured cerebellar stellate cells that lack this protein increased the inward rectification of mEPSCs. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous GSG1L in rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons led to an increase in mEPSC amplitude and in the underlying weighted mean single-channel conductance, revealing that GSG1L acts to suppress current flow through native CP-AMPARs. Thus, our data suggest that GSG1L extends the functional repertoire of AMPAR auxiliary subunits, which can act not only to enhance but also diminish current flow through their associated AMPARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) are an important group of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. These receptors contribute to various forms of

  16. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  17. Selective and interactive down-regulation of mu- and delta-opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Baumhaker, Y; Gafni, M; Keren, O; Sarne, Y

    1993-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells, which contain both mu- and delta-opioid receptors, were grown under conditions that provided a mu:delta ratio of 1.5:1. Both receptors were down-regulated after 72 hr of exposure to 100 nM etorphine. Selective down-regulation was demonstrated using selective opioid agonists; the mu agonist Tyr-D-Ala2-Gly-(Me)Phe4-Gly-ol down-regulated mu- but not delta-opioid receptors, whereas prolonged exposure to the selective delta agonist D-Pen2,D-Pen5-enkephalin resulted in delta- but not mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. Morphine, which binds mu- as well as delta-opioid receptors, down-regulated both receptor subtypes. NG108-15 cells, which contain delta receptors exclusively, were also tested. NG108-15 cells did not exhibit delta-opioid receptor down-regulation when exposed to morphine. The discrepancy between the effect of chronic morphine treatment on delta receptors in SK-N-SH cells and in NG108-15 cells raised the question of whether the coexistence of mu receptors in the former allowed morphine to down-regulate delta receptors. The role of mu-opioid receptors in morphine-induced delta receptor down-regulation was studied by using the irreversible mu antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. Pretreatment of SK-N-SH cells with beta-funaltrexamine prevented down-regulation of delta receptors in response to chronic exposure to morphine but did not affect down-regulation of delta receptors in response to D-Pen2,D-Pen5-enkephalin. The experimental data indicate that morphine-induced delta-opioid receptor down-regulation is dependent on the presence of functional mu receptors in the same cell.

  18. Fos-Zippered GH Receptor Cytosolic Tails Act as Jak2 Substrates and Signal Transducers.

    PubMed

    Nespital, Tobias; van der Velden, Lieke M; Mensinga, Anneloes; van der Vaart, Elisabeth D; Strous, Ger J

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Janus kinase (Jak) family initiate the majority of downstream signaling events of the cytokine receptor family. The prevailing principle is that the receptors act in dimers: 2 Jak2 molecules bind to the cytosolic tails of a cytokine receptor family member and initiate Jak-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling upon a conformational change in the receptor complex, induced by the cognate cytokine. Due to the complexity of signaling complexes, there is a strong need for in vitro model systems. To investigate the molecular details of the Jak2 interaction with the GH receptor (GHR), we used cytosolic tails provided with leucine zippers derived from c-Fos to mimic the dimerized state of GHR. Expressed together with Jak2, fos-zippered tails, but not unzippered tails, were stabilized. In addition, the Jak-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway was activated by the fos-zippered tails. The stabilization depended also on α-helix rotation of the zippers. Fos-zippered GHR tails and Jak2, both purified from baculovirus-infected insect cells, interacted via box1 with a binding affinity of approximately 40nM. As expected, the Jak kinase inhibitor Ruxolitinib inhibited the stabilization but did not affect the c-Fos-zippered GHR tail-Jak2 interaction. Analysis by blue-native gel electrophoresis revealed high molecular-weight complexes containing both Jak2 and nonphosphorylated GHR tails, whereas Jak2-dissociated tails were highly phosphorylated and monomeric, implying that Jak2 detaches from its substrate upon phosphorylation. PMID:26859362

  19. Different Wnt signals act through the Frizzled and RYK receptors during Drosophila salivary gland migration.

    PubMed

    Harris, Katherine E; Beckendorf, Steven K

    2007-06-01

    Guided cell migration is necessary for the proper function and development of many tissues, one of which is the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland. Here we show that two distinct Wnt signaling pathways regulate salivary gland migration. Early in migration, the salivary gland responds to a WNT4-Frizzled signal for proper positioning within the embryo. Disruption of this signal, through mutations in Wnt4, frizzled or frizzled 2, results in misguided salivary glands that curve ventrally. Furthermore, disruption of downstream components of the canonical Wnt pathway, such as dishevelled or Tcf, also results in ventrally curved salivary glands. Analysis of a second Wnt signal, which acts through the atypical Wnt receptor Derailed, indicates a requirement for Wnt5 signaling late in salivary gland migration. WNT5 is expressed in the central nervous system and acts as a repulsive signal, needed to keep the migrating salivary gland on course. The receptor for WNT5, Derailed, is expressed in the actively migrating tip of the salivary glands. In embryos mutant for derailed or Wnt5, salivary gland migration is disrupted; the tip of the gland migrates abnormally toward the central nervous system. Our results suggest that both the Wnt4-frizzled pathway and a separate Wnt5-derailed pathway are needed for proper salivary gland migration. PMID:17507403

  20. Pharmacodynamics of long-acting folic acid-receptor targeted ritonavir boosted atazanavir nanoformulations

    PubMed Central

    Puligujja, Pavan; Balkundi, Shantanu; Kendrick, Lindsey; Baldridge, Hannah; Hilaire, James; Bade, Aditya N.; Dash, Prasanta K.; Zhang, Gang; Poluektova, Larisa; Gorantla, Santhi; Liu, Xin-Ming; Ying, Tianlei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Long-acting nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) that target monocyte-macrophage could improve the drug’s half-life and protein binding capacities while facilitating cell and tissue depots. To this end, ART nanoparticles that target the folic acid (FA) receptor and permit cell-based drug depots were examined using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD) tests. FA receptor-targeted poloxamer 407 nanocrystals, containing ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r), significantly affected several therapeutic factors: drug bioavailability increased as much as 5 times and PD activity improved as much as 100 times. Drug particles administered to human peripheral blood lymphocyte reconstituted NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and infected with HIV-1ADA at a tissue culture infective dose50 of 104 infectious viral particles/ml led to ATV/r drug concentrations that paralleled FA receptor beta staining in both the macrophage-rich parafollicular areas of spleen and lymph nodes. Drug levels were higher in these tissues than what could be achieved by either native drug or untargeted nanoART particles. The data also mirrored potent reductions in viral loads, tissue viral RNA and numbers of HIV-1p24+ cells in infected and treated animals. We conclude that FA-P407 coating of ART nanoparticles readily facilitate drug carriage and facilitate antiretroviral responses. PMID:25522973

  1. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein–coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J.; Kiser, Philip D.; Kern, Timothy S.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs that act on different G protein (guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  2. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J; Kiser, Philip D; Kern, Timothy S; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that act on different G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  3. Behavioral effects of a synthetic agonist selective for nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptors in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H; Fantegrossi, William E; Galuska, Chad M; Wichmann, Jürgen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2009-08-01

    Behavioral effects of a nonpeptidic NOP (nociceptin/orphanin FQ Peptide) receptor agonist, Ro 64-6198, have not been studied in primate species. The aim of the study was to verify the receptor mechanism underlying the behavioral effects of Ro 64-6198 and to systematically compare behavioral effects of Ro 64-6198 with those of a mu-opioid receptor agonist, alfentanil, in monkeys. Both Ro 64-6198 (0.001-0.06 mg/kg, s.c.) and alfentanil (0.001-0.06 mg/kg, s.c.) produced antinociception against an acute noxious stimulus (50 degrees C water) and capsaicin-induced allodynia. An NOP receptor antagonist, J-113397 (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, s.c.), dose-dependently produced rightward shifts of the dose-response curve of Ro 64-6198-induced antinociception. The apparent pA(2) value of J-113397 was 8.0. Antagonist studies using J-113397 and naltrexone revealed that Ro 64-6198 produced NOP receptor-mediated antinociception independent of mu-opioid receptors. In addition, alfentanil dose-dependently produced respiratory depression and itch/scratching responses, but antinociceptive doses of Ro 64-6198 did not produce such effects. More important, Ro 64-6198 did not produce reinforcing effects comparable with those of alfentanil, cocaine, or methohexital under self-administration procedures in monkeys. These results provide the first functional evidence that the activation of NOP receptors produces antinociception without reinforcing effects in primates. Non-peptidic NOP receptor agonists may have therapeutic value as novel analgesics without abuse liability in humans. PMID:19279568

  4. Cdon acts as a Hedgehog decoy receptor during proximal-distal patterning of the optic vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Marcos Julián; Sánchez-Arrones, Luisa; Sandonis, África; Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Gestri, Gaia; Wilson, Stephen W.; Guerrero, Isabel; Bovolenta, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Patterning of the vertebrate optic vesicle into proximal/optic stalk and distal/neural retina involves midline-derived Hedgehog (Hh) signalling, which promotes stalk specification. In the absence of Hh signalling, the stalks are not specified, causing cyclopia. Recent studies showed that the cell adhesion molecule Cdon forms a heteromeric complex with the Hh receptor Patched 1 (Ptc1). This receptor complex binds Hh and enhances signalling activation, indicating that Cdon positively regulates the pathway. Here we show that in the developing zebrafish and chick optic vesicle, in which cdon and ptc1 are expressed with a complementary pattern, Cdon acts as a negative Hh signalling regulator. Cdon predominantly localizes to the basolateral side of neuroepithelial cells, promotes the enlargement of the neuroepithelial basal end-foot and traps Hh protein, thereby limiting its dispersion. This Ptc-independent function protects the retinal primordium from Hh activity, defines the stalk/retina boundary and thus the correct proximo-distal patterning of the eye. PMID:25001599

  5. Progesterone acts via progesterone receptors A and B to regulate breast cancer resistance protein expression.

    PubMed

    Vore, Mary; Leggas, Markos

    2008-03-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is an ATP-dependent efflux multidrug transporter that belongs to the G family of half-transporters that consist of six transmembrane-spanning domains and must homodimerize to form the active membrane transporter. It is expressed in the apical plasma membrane domain of the small intestine, endothelium, and liver, where it has been shown to play an important role in limiting drug absorption and distribution and in enhancing drug clearance, respectively. BCRP is also expressed in the apical membrane of mammary alveolar epithelia, where it mediates efflux of substrates into milk, and in the placental syncytiotro-phoblasts, where it reduces fetal exposure to these substrates. BCRP substrates include numerous drugs (topotecan, nitrofurantoin, cimetidine) as well as food carcinogens (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine) and the vitamins riboflavin and folic acid. BCRP expression is regulated by a number of nuclear transcription factors, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and Hif-1. This issue of Molecular Pharmacology includes a study (p. 845) now conclusively demonstrating that progesterone acts via the progesterone A and B receptors to regulate BCRP expression in a placental cell line.

  6. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma} is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPAR{gamma}. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPAR{gamma} in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPAR{gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} for binding to PPAR{gamma}. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPAR{gamma} and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPAR{gamma}-mediated cellular differentiation.

  7. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPARgamma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPARgamma. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPARgamma in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPARgamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha for binding to PPARgamma. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPARgamma target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPARgamma and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPARgamma-mediated cellular differentiation. PMID:18381063

  8. Cucurbitacins are insect steroid hormone antagonists acting at the ecdysteroid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Dinan, L; Whiting, P; Girault, J P; Lafont, R; Dhadialla, T S; Cress, D E; Mugat, B; Antoniewski, C; Lepesant, J A

    1997-01-01

    Two triterpenoids, cucurbitacins B and D, have been isolated from seeds of Iberis umbellata (Cruciferae) and shown to be responsible for the antagonistic activity of a methanolic extract of this species in preventing the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-induced morphological changes in the Drosophila melanogaster BII permanent cell line. With a 20E concentration of 50 nM, cucurbitacins B and D give 50% responses at 1.5 and 10 microM respectively. Both cucurbitacins are able to displace specifically bound radiolabelled 25-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone (ponasterone A) from a cell-free preparation of the BII cells containing ecdysteroid receptors. The Kd values for cucurbitacins B and D (5 and 50 microM respectively) are similar to the concentrations required to antagonize 20E activity with whole cells. Cucurbitacin B (cucB) prevents stimulation by 20E of an ecdysteroid-responsive reporter gene in a transfection assay. CucB also prevents the formation of the Drosophila ecdysteroid receptor/Ultraspiracle/20E complex with the hsp27 ecdysteroid response element as demonstrated by gel-shift assay. This is therefore the first definitive evidence for the existence of antagonists acting at the ecdysteroid receptor. Preliminary structure/activity studies indicate the importance of the Delta23-22-oxo functional grouping in the side chain for antagonistic activity. Hexanorcucurbitacin D, which lacks carbon atoms C-22 to C-27, is found to be a weak agonist rather than an antagonist. Moreover, the side chain analogue 5-methylhex-3-en-2-one possesses weak antagonistic activity. PMID:9581538

  9. Prospective therapeutic agents for obesity: molecular modification approaches of centrally and peripherally acting selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayank Kumar; Murumkar, Prashant R; Kanhed, Ashish M; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2014-05-22

    Presently, obesity is one of the major health problems in the developed as well as developing countries due to lack of physical work and increasing sedentary life style. Endocannabinoid system (ECS) and especially cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor play a key role in energy homeostasis. Food intake and energy storage is enhanced due to the stimulation of ECS hence, inhibition of ECS by blocking CB1 receptors could be a promising approach in the treatment of obesity. Rimonabant, a diaryl pyrazole was the first potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist that was introduced into the market in 2006 but was withdrawn in 2008 due to its psychiatric side effects. Researchers all over the world are interested to develop peripherally acting potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonists having a better pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic index. In this development process, pyrazole ring of rimonabant has been replaced by different bioisosteric scaffolds like pyrrole, imidazole, triazole, pyrazoline, pyridine etc. Variations in substituents around the pyrazole ring have also been done. New strategies were also employed for minimizing the psychiatric side effects by making more polar and less lipophilic antagonists/inverse agonists along with neutral antagonists acting peripherally. It has been observed that some of the peripherally acting compounds do not show adverse effects and could be used as potential leads for the further design of selective CB1 receptor antagonists. Chemical modification strategies used for the development of selective CB1 receptor antagonists are discussed here in this review.

  10. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  11. Histamine influences body temperature by acting at H1 and H3 receptors on distinct populations of preoptic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Ghochani, Yasmin; Klaus, Joseph; Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2010-01-01

    The preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH), a region that contains neurons that control thermoregulation, is the main locus at which histamine affects body temperature. Here we report that histamine reduced the spontaneous firing rate of GABAergic preoptic neurons by activating H3 subtype histamine receptors. This effect involved a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and was not dependent on synaptic activity. Furthermore, a population of nonGABAergic neurons was depolarized and their firing rate was enhanced by histamine acting at H1 subtype receptors. In our experiments, activation of the H1R receptors was linked to the PLC pathway and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This depolarization persisted in TTX or when fast synaptic potentials were blocked indicating that it represents a postsynaptic effect. Single-cell reverse transcription –PCR analysis revealed expression of H3 receptors in a population of GABAergic neurons while H1 receptors were expressed in nonGABAergic cells. Histamine applied in the median preoptic nucleus induced a robust, long lasting hyperthermia effect that was mimicked by either H1 or H3 histamine receptor subtype specific agonists. Our data indicate that histamine modulates the core body temperature by acting at two distinct populations of preoptic neurons which express H1 and H3 receptor subtypes, respectively. PMID:20335473

  12. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  13. Repeated activation of delta opioid receptors counteracts nerve injury-induced TNF-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Nunzio; Parenti, Rosalba; Aricò, Giuseppina; Turnaturi, Rita; Scoto, Giovanna Maria; Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Despite mu opioid receptor agonists are the cornerstones of moderate-to-severe acute pain treatment, their effectiveness in chronic pain conditions is controversial. In contrast to mu opioid receptor agonists, a number of studies have reported the effectiveness of delta opioid receptor agonists on neuropathic pain strengthening the idea that delta opioid receptors gain importance when chronic pain develops. Among other effects, it has been shown that delta opioid receptor activation in optic nerve astrocytes inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in response to severe hypoxia. Considering the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, with this study we sought to correlate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist on the development of mechanical allodynia to tumor necrosis factor-α expression at the site of nerve injury in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. To this aim, we measured the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain after repeated injections with a delta opioid receptor agonist. Results obtained demonstrated that repeated administrations of the delta opioid receptor agonist SNC80 (10 mg/kg, i.p. for seven consecutive days) significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain and that the improvement of neuropathic symptom was timely related to the reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the rat sciatic nerve. We demonstrated also that when treatment with the delta opioid receptor agonist was suspended both allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain were restored. These results show that persistent delta opioid receptor activation significantly attenuates neuropathic pain and negatively regulates sciatic nerve tumor necrosis factor-α expression in chronic constriction injury rats. PMID:27590071

  14. Novel opioid cyclic tetrapeptides: Trp isomers of CJ-15,208 exhibit distinct opioid receptor agonism and short-acting κ opioid receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nicolette C; Reilley, Kate J; Murray, Thomas F; Aldrich, Jane V; McLaughlin, Jay P

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The κ opioid receptor antagonists demonstrate potential for maintaining abstinence from psychostimulant abuse, but existing non-peptide κ-receptor selective antagonists show exceptionally long activity. We hypothesized that the L- and D-Trp isomers of CJ-15,208, a natural cyclic tetrapeptide reported to be a κ-receptor antagonist in vitro, would demonstrate short-acting, dose-dependent antagonism in vivo, preventing reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Affinity, selectivity and efficacy of the L-Trp and D-Trp isomers for opioid receptors were assessed in vitro in radioligand and GTPγS binding assays. Opioid receptor agonist and antagonist activities were characterized in vivo following i.c.v. administration with the 55°C warm water tail-withdrawal assay. The D-Trp isomer, which demonstrated primarily κ-receptor selective antagonist activity, was further evaluated for its prevention of stress- and drug-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP). KEY RESULTS The two isomers showed similar affinity and selectivity for κ receptors (Ki 30–35 nM) as well as κ receptor antagonism in vitro. As expected, the D-Trp cyclic tetrapeptide exhibited minimal agonist activity and induced dose-dependent κ-receptor selective antagonism lasting less than 18 h in vivo. Pretreatment with this peptide prevented stress-, but not cocaine-induced, reinstatement of extinguished cocaine CPP. In contrast, the L-Trp cyclic tetrapeptide unexpectedly demonstrated mixed opioid agonist/antagonist activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The L-Trp and the D-Trp isomers of CJ-15,208 demonstrate stereospecific opioid activity in vivo. The relatively brief κ opioid receptor antagonism, coupled with the prevention of stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behaviour, suggests the D-Trp isomer could be used therapeutically to maintain abstinence from psychostimulant abuse. PMID

  15. Discovery and characterization of ACT-335827, an orally available, brain penetrant orexin receptor type 1 selective antagonist.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Gatfield, John; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Dietrich, Hendrik; Treiber, Alexander; Jenck, Francois; Boss, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Stress relief: Orexin neuropeptides regulate arousal and stress processing through orexin receptor type 1 (OXR-1) and 2 (OXR-2) signaling. A selective OXR-1 antagonist, represented by a phenylglycine-amide substituted tetrahydropapaverine derivative (ACT-335827), is described that is orally available, penetrates the brain, and decreases fear, compulsive behaviors and autonomic stress reactions in rats.

  16. Discovery of Spiro[cyclohexane-dihydropyrano[3,4-b]indole]-amines as Potent NOP and Opioid Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Schunk, Stefan; Linz, Klaus; Frormann, Sven; Hinze, Claudia; Oberbörsch, Stefan; Sundermann, Bernd; Zemolka, Saskia; Englberger, Werner; Germann, Tieno; Christoph, Thomas; Kögel, Babette-Y; Schröder, Wolfgang; Harlfinger, Stephanie; Saunders, Derek; Kless, Achim; Schick, Hans; Sonnenschein, Helmut

    2014-08-14

    We report the discovery of spiro[cyclohexane-pyrano[3,4-b]indole]-amines, as functional nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) and opioid receptor agonists with strong efficacy in preclinical models of acute and neuropathic pain. Utilizing 4-(dimethylamino)-4-phenylcyclo-hexanone 1 and tryptophol in an oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction led to the formation of spiroether 2, representing a novel NOP and opioid peptide receptor agonistic chemotype. This finding initially stems from the systematic derivatization of 1, which resulted in alcohols 3-5, ethers 6 and 7, amines 8-10, 22-24, and 26-28, amides 11 and 25, and urea 12, many with low nanomolar binding affinities at the NOP and mu opioid peptide (MOP) receptors. PMID:25147602

  17. Dynamics of histamine H(3) receptor antagonists on brain histamine metabolism: do all histamine H(3) receptor antagonists act at a single site?

    PubMed

    Barnes, W; Boyd, D; Hough, L

    2001-11-16

    Thioperamide, the prototypical histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, acts at the brain histamine H(3) autoreceptor to promote the release and metabolism of neuronal histamine, resulting in higher brain levels of the metabolite tele-methylhistamine. However, unlike thioperamide, several new histamine H(3) receptor antagonists enter the central nervous system (CNS), block brain histamine H(3) receptors and increase histamine release without increasing brain tele-methylhistamine levels. Experiments were performed presently in an attempt to understand these results. Consistent with previous findings, thioperamide significantly increased the content and synthesis rate of tele-methylhistamine in mouse and rat brain. In contrast, the histamine H(3) receptor antagonists GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and clobenpropit did not affect tele-methylhistamine synthesis rate in mouse whole brain. The histamine H(3) receptor ligand GT-2016 (5-cyclohexyl-1-(4-imidazol-4-ylpiperidyl)pentan-1-one) had no effect on tele-methylhistamine levels in any rat brain region and decreased tele-methylhistamine synthesis rates in the mouse whole brain. To examine the possibility that these histamine H(3) receptor antagonists might prevent the methylation of newly released histamine, they were co-administered with thioperamide to determine their effects on the thioperamide-induced stimulation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis. GT-2016 significantly reduced the thioperamide-induced activation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis in mouse whole brain and in several regions of rat brain. Although further clarification is needed, these results suggest that some histamine H(3) receptor antagonists may promote the release of neuronal histamine, but also act to reduce histamine methylation in vivo by an unknown mechanism.

  18. Synthesis and characterizations of novel quinoline derivatives having mixed ligand activities at the kappa and mu receptors: Potential therapeutic efficacy against morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Deb, Ishani; Paira, Priyankar; Hazra, Abhijit; Banerjee, Sukdeb; Dutta, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Nirup Bikash; Das, Sumantra

    2009-08-15

    Based on an established 3D pharmacophore, a series of quinoline derivatives were synthesized. The opioidergic properties of these compounds were determined by a competitive binding assay using (125)I-Dynorphine, (3)H-DAMGO and (125)I-DADLE for kappa, mu, and delta receptors, respectively. Results showed varying degree of activities of the compounds to kappa and mu opioid receptors with negligible interactions at the delta receptor. The compound, S4 was the most successful in inhibiting the two most prominent quantitative features of naloxone precipitated withdrawal symptoms - stereotyped jumping and body weight loss. Determination of IC(50) of S4 revealed a greater affinity towards mu compared to kappa receptor. In conclusion, quinoline derivatives of S4 like structure offer potential tool for treatment of narcotic addictions.

  19. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-04-12

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  20. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  1. Sweet Taste-Sensing Receptors Expressed in Pancreatic β-Cells: Sweet Molecules Act as Biased Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Medina, Anya; Nagasawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors present in the taste buds are heterodimers comprised of T1R2 and T1R3. This receptor is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells. When the expression of receptor subunits is determined in β-cells by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the mRNA expression level of T1R2 is extremely low compared to that of T1R3. In fact, the expression of T1R2 is undetectable at the protein level. Furthermore, knockdown of T1R2 does not affect the effect of sweet molecules, whereas knockdown of T1R3 markedly attenuates the effect of sweet molecules. Consequently, a homodimer of T1R3 functions as a receptor sensing sweet molecules in β-cells, which we designate as sweet taste-sensing receptors (STSRs). Various sweet molecules activate STSR in β-cells and augment insulin secretion. With regard to intracellular signals, sweet molecules act on STSRs and increase cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or cyclic AMP (cAMP). Specifically, when an STSR is stimulated by one of four different sweet molecules (sucralose, acesulfame potassium, sodium saccharin, or glycyrrhizin), distinct signaling pathways are activated. Patterns of changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or cAMP induced by these sweet molecules are all different from each other. Hence, sweet molecules activate STSRs by acting as biased agonists. PMID:24741449

  2. Geniposide and its iridoid analogs exhibit antinociception by acting at the spinal GLP-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nian; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Xiao, Qi; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    We recently discovered that the activation of the spinal glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) by the peptidic agonist exenatide produced antinociception in chronic pain. We suggested that the spinal GLP-1Rs are a potential target molecule for the management of chronic pain. This study evaluated the antinociceptive activities of geniposide, a presumed small molecule GLP-1R agonist. Geniposide produced concentration-dependent, complete protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in PC12 and HEK293 cells expressing rat and human GLP-1Rs, but not in HEK293T cells that do not express GLP-1Rs. The orthosteric GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) right-shifted the concentration-response curve of geniposide without changing the maximal protection, with identical pA2 values in both cell lines. Subcutaneous and oral geniposide dose-dependently blocked the formalin-induced tonic response but not the acute flinching response. Subcutaneous and oral geniposide had maximum inhibition of 72% and 68%, and ED50s of 13.1 and 52.7 mg/kg, respectively. Seven days of multidaily subcutaneous geniposide and exenatide injections did not induce antinociceptive tolerance. Intrathecal geniposide induced dose-dependent antinociception, which was completely prevented by spinal exendin(9-39), siRNA/GLP-1R and cyclic AMP/PKA pathway inhibitors. The geniposide iridoid analogs geniposidic acid, genipin methyl ether, 1,10-anhydrogenipin, loganin and catalpol effectively inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage and formalin pain in an exendin(9-39)-reversible manner. Our results suggest that geniposide and its iridoid analogs produce antinociception during persistent pain by activating the spinal GLP-1Rs and that the iridoids represented by geniposide are orthosteric agonists of GLP-1Rs that function similarly in humans and rats and presumably act at the same binding site as exendin(9-39).

  3. Unexpected Opioid Activity Profiles of Analogs of the Novel Peptide Kappa Opioid Receptor Ligand CJ-15,208

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Jane V.; Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Senadheera, Sanjeewa N.; Ross, Nicolette C.; Reilley, Kate J.; Eans, Shainnel O.; Ganno, Michelle L.; Murray, Thomas F.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2013-01-01

    An alanine scan was performed on the novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) peptide ligand CJ-15,208 to determine which residues contribute to the potent in vivo agonist activity observed for the parent peptide. These cyclic tetrapeptides were synthesized by a combination of solid phase peptide synthesis of the linear precursors, followed by cyclization in solution. Like the parent peptide, each of the analogs exhibited agonist activity and KOR antagonist activity in an antinociceptive assay in vivo. Unlike the parent peptide, the agonist activity of the potent analogs was mediated predominantly if not exclusively by mu opioid receptors (MOR). Thus analogs 2 and 4, in which one of the phenylalanine residues was replaced by alanine, exhibited both potent MOR agonist activity and KOR antagonist activity in vivo. These peptides represent novel lead compounds for the development of peptide-based opioid analgesics. PMID:21761566

  4. 3-Chlorotyramine Acting as Ligand of the D2 Dopamine Receptor. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis and D2 Receptor Affinity.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio; Andujar, Sebastian; Moreno, Laura; Garibotto, Francisco; Párraga, Javier; Peruchena, Nelida; Cabedo, Nuria; Villecco, Margarita; Cortes, Diego; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine as a ligand of the D2 dopamine receptor. This compound displayed a similar affinity by this receptor to that previously reported for dopamine. In order to understand further the experimental results we performed a molecular modeling study of 3-chlorotyramine and structurally related compounds. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio and density functional theory calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of these ligands interacting with the D2 dopamine receptors is reported here. These results provided a clear picture of the binding interactions of these compounds from both structural and energetic view points. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allowed us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) technique. Molecular aspects of the binding interactions between ligands and the D2 dopamine receptor are discussed in detail. A good correlation between the relative binding energies obtained from theoretical calculations and experimental IC50 values was obtained. These results allowed us to predict that 3-chlorotyramine possesses a significant affinity by the D2 -DR. Our theoretical predictions were experimentally corroborated when we synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine which displayed a similar affinity by the D2 -DR to that reported for DA.

  5. The anti-convulsant stiripentol acts directly on the GABA(A) receptor as a positive allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Janet L

    2009-01-01

    Stiripentol (STP) has been used as co-therapy for treatment of epilepsy for many years. Its mechanism of action has long been considered to be indirect, as it inhibits the enzymes responsible for metabolism of other anti-convulsant agents. However, a recent report suggested that STP might also act at the neuronal level, increasing inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. We examined the effect of STP on the functional properties of recombinant GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) and found that it was a positive allosteric modulator of these ion channels. Its activity showed some dependence on subunit composition, with greater potentiation of alpha3-containing receptors and reduced potentiation when the beta1 or epsilon subunits were present. STP caused a leftward shift in the GABA concentration-response relationship, but did not increase the peak response of the receptors to a maximal GABA concentration. Although STP shares some functional characteristics with the neurosteroids, its activity was not inhibited by a neurosteroid site antagonist and was unaffected by a mutation in the alpha3 subunit that reduced positive modulation by neurosteroids. The differential effect of STP on beta1- and beta2/beta3-containing receptors was not altered by mutations within the second transmembrane domain that affect modulation by loreclezole. These findings suggest that STP acts as a direct allosteric modulator of the GABAR at a site distinct from many commonly used anti-convulsant, sedative and anxiolytic drugs. Its higher activity at alpha3-containing receptors as well as its activity at delta-containing receptors may provide a unique opportunity to target selected populations of GABARs.

  6. Changes in G protein-coupled receptor sorting protein affinity regulate postendocytic targeting of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dawn; Pusch, Margareta; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2007-10-01

    After activation, most G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are regulated by a cascade of events involving desensitization and endocytosis. Internalized receptors can then be recycled to the plasma membrane, retained in an endosomal compartment, or targeted for degradation. The GPCR-associated sorting protein, GASP, has been shown to preferentially sort a number of native GPCRs to the lysosome for degradation after endocytosis. Here we show that a mutant beta(2) adrenergic receptor and a mutant mu opioid receptor that have previously been described as lacking "recycling signals" due to mutations in their C termini in fact bind to GASP and are targeted for degradation. We also show that a mutant dopamine D1 receptor, which has likewise been described as lacking a recycling signal, does not bind to GASP and is therefore not targeted for degradation. Together, these results indicate that alteration of receptors in their C termini can expose determinants with affinity for GASP binding and consequently target receptors for degradation.

  7. The peptide hemopressin acts through CB1 cannabinoid receptors to reduce food intake in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Garron T; Mancini, Giacomo; Lutz, Beat; Luckman, Simon M

    2010-05-26

    Hemopressin is a short, nine amino acid peptide (H-Pro-Val-Asn-Phe-Lys-Leu-Leu-Ser-His-OH) isolated from rat brain that behaves as an inverse agonist at the cannabinoid receptor CB(1), and is shown here to inhibit agonist-induced receptor internalization in a heterologous cell model. Since this peptide occurs naturally in the rodent brain, we determined its effect on appetite, an established central target of cannabinoid signaling. Hemopressin dose-dependently decreases night-time food intake in normal male rats and mice, as well as in obese ob/ob male mice, when administered centrally or systemically, without causing any obvious adverse side effects. The normal, behavioral satiety sequence is maintained in male mice fasted overnight, though refeeding is attenuated. The anorectic effect is absent in CB(1) receptor null mutant male mice, and hemopressin can block CB(1) agonist-induced hyperphagia in male rats, providing strong evidence for antagonism of the CB(1) receptor in vivo. We speculate that hemopressin may act as an endogenous functional antagonist at CB(1) receptors and modulate the activity of appetite pathways in the brain.

  8. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    PubMed

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:23884575

  9. Orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel corepressor of liver X receptor alpha and inhibits hepatic lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Gwang Sik; Hong, Sungpyo; Yoon, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Young Chul; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2010-03-19

    DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that can repress diverse nuclear receptors and has a key role in adreno-gonadal development. Our previous report has demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha transactivity and negatively regulate gluconeogenic gene expression (Nedumaran, B., Hong, S., Xie, Y. B., Kim, Y. H., Seo, W. Y., Lee, M. W., Lee, C. H., Koo, S. H., and Choi, H. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 27511-27523). Here, we further expand the role of DAX-1 in hepatic energy metabolism. Transfection assays have demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptor liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha). Physical interaction between DAX-1 and LXRalpha was confirmed Immunofluorescent staining in mouse liver shows that LXRalpha and DAX-1 are colocalized in the nucleus. Domain mapping analysis shows that the entire region of DAX-1 is involved in the interaction with the ligand binding domain region of LXRalpha. Competition analyses demonstrate that DAX-1 competes with the coactivator SRC-1 for repressing LXRalpha transactivity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that endogenous DAX-1 recruitment on the SREBP-1c gene promoter was decreased in the presence of LXRalpha agonist. Overexpression of DAX-1 inhibits T7-induced LXRalpha target gene expression, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAX-1 significantly increases T7-induced LXRalpha target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Finally, overexpression of DAX-1 in mouse liver decreases T7-induced LXRalpha target gene expression, liver triglyceride level, and lipid accumulation. Overall, this study suggests that DAX-1, a novel corepressor of LXRalpha, functions as a negative regulator of lipogenic enzyme gene expression in liver. PMID:20080977

  10. BA321, a novel carborane analog that binds to androgen and estrogen receptors, acts as a new selective androgen receptor modulator of bone in male mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Endo, Yasuyuki; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2016-09-01

    Carboranes are a class of carbon-containing polyhedral boron cluster compounds with globular geometry and hydrophobic surface that interact with hormone receptors such as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). We have synthesized BA321, a novel carborane compound, which binds to AR. We found here that it also binds to ERs, ERα and ERβ. In orchidectomized (ORX) mice, femoral bone mass was markedly reduced due to androgen deficiency and BA321 restored bone loss in the male, whilst the decreased weight of seminal vesicle in ORX mice was not recovered by administration of BA321. In female mice, BA321 acts as a pure estrogen agonist, and restored both the loss of bone mass and uterine atrophy due to estrogen deficiency in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In bone tissues, the trabecular bone loss occurred in both ORX and OVX mice, and BA321 completely restored the trabecular bone loss in both sexes. Cortical bone loss occurred in ORX mice but not in OVX mice, and BA321 clearly restored cortical bone loss due to androgen deficiency in ORX mice. Therefore, BA321 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that may offer a new therapy option for osteoporosis in the male. PMID:27402268

  11. BOC-CCK-4, CCK(B)receptor agonist, antagonizes anxiolytic-like action of morphine in elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Kõks, S; Soosaar, A; Võikar, V; Bourin, M; Vasar, E

    1999-02-01

    This study investigated a role of cholecystokinin (CCK) in the anxiolytic-like action of morphine, an agonist of mu-opioid receptors, in the rat plus-maze model of anxiety. The acute administration of morphine (1 mg/kg) induced a significant increase of exploratory activity in the plus-maze, but did not affect the locomotor activity in the motility test. The higher dose of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) tended to decrease the locomotor activity and, therefore, did not cause the anxiolytic-like action in the plus-maze. The other drugs (naloxone, BOC-CCK-4, L-365,260) and their combinations with morphine (0.5-1 mg/kg) did not affect the locomotor activity of rats. The opioid antagonist naloxone itself (0.5 mg/kg) did not change the exploratory activity in the plus-maze, but potently antagonized the anxiolytic-like action of morphine (1 mg/kg). An agonist of CCK(B)receptors BOC-CCK-4 (1-50 microgram/kg) induced a dose-dependent anxiogenic-like action in the plus-maze. Nevertheless, only one dose of BOC-CCK-4 (10 microgram/kg) completely reversed the action of morphine. Also, one dose of CCK(B)receptor antagonist L-365,260 (10 microgram/kg) was effective to modify the behaviour of rats in the elevated plus-maze. Namely, this dose of L-365,260 increased the ratio between open and total arm entries, a behavioural measure believed to reflect the anxiolytic-like action in the elevated plus-maze. The combination of L-365,260 (100 microgram/kg) with the sub-effective dose of morphine (0.5 mg/kg) caused the anxiolytic-like action in the plus-maze not seen if the drugs were given alone. In conclusion, morphine induces a potent anxiolytic-like action in the elevated plus-maze and CCK is acting as an endogenous antagonist of this effect of morphine.

  12. Prostanoids regulate angiogenesis acting primarily on IP and EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Khuyen Gia; Allison, Sarah; Murray, Michael; Petrovic, Nenad

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by numerous activators and inhibitors, including prostanoids. Although many studies have identified their roles in inflammation, regulatory functions of prostanoids in angiogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we compared the activation of angiogenesis in vitro by two prostanoids with important vascular roles: prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) - thought to be the most important prostanoid activator of angiogenesis - and prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin or PGI2), whose receptors are predominantly expressed in endothelial cells. Both of these prostanoids activate G-protein coupled receptors: EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4 by PGE2 and IP by prostacyclin. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to characterize two pivotal pro-angiogenic processes in vitro: cell migration (using the matrigel droplet assay developed in our laboratory) and "tube formation" (a widely accepted method of assessing formation of blood vessel precursors). The suppression of cell migration and tube formation by the IP-specific antagonist CAY10441 was more extensive (~80%) than by the EP4-specific antagonist L-161,982 (~20%). AH6809, an antagonist of EP1, EP2 and EP3 receptors did not significantly suppress angiogenesis. Expression of the pro-angiogenic receptors KDR and Tie-2 in HUVECs was preferentially suppressed by antagonism of IP and EP4 receptors, respectively. EP4 and IP receptor agonists elicited biphasic actions on angiogenic processes in which there was activation at low concentration, and rapid desensitization at high concentrations - a characteristic common to many G-protein coupled receptors. Together these findings suggest that the prostacyclin-IP pathway plays a major role in the regulation of pro-angiogenic processes in HUVECs.

  13. Antiandrogens act as selective androgen receptor modulators at the proteome level in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Greg N; Gamble, Simon C; Hough, Michael A; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M; Fioretti, Flavia M; Bryan, Rosie A; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  14. Antiandrogens Act as Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators at the Proteome Level in Prostate Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Greg N.; Gamble, Simon C.; Hough, Michael A.; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D. Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M.; Fioretti, Flavia M.; Bryan, Rosie A.; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  15. Characterization of opioid receptor types modulating acetylcholine release in septal regions of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gazyakan, E; Hennegriff, M; Haaf, A; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Feuerstein, T J; Jackisch, R

    2000-07-01

    antibody-linked enzymatic staining procedure, whereas mRNAs for mu- or delta-opioid receptors were detected with radioactive probes. These experiments revealed that in the septal region mainly mu-opioid receptors were expressed by neurons positive for ChAT mRNA, whereas in the rat striatum the expression of delta-opioid receptors prevailed in those neurons. We conclude that in the septal area of the rat brain, in contrast to the rat striatum and hippocampus, both presynaptic mu- and delta-opioid receptors modulate the evoked release of ACh. Whether presynaptic mu- and delta-opioid receptors occur on the same or on different septal cells or axon terminals remains to be clarified. PMID:10935530

  16. Different Pathways Act Downstream of the CEP Peptide Receptor CRA2 to Regulate Lateral Root and Nodule Development.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Laffont, Carole; Ivanovici, Ariel; Patel, Neha; Reid, Dugald; Stougaard, Jens; Frugier, Florian; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDEs (CEPs) control root system architecture in a non-cell-autonomous manner. In Medicago truncatula, MtCEP1 affects root development by increasing nodule formation and inhibiting lateral root emergence by unknown pathways. Here, we show that the MtCEP1 peptide-dependent increase in nodulation requires the symbiotic signaling pathway and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2)/SICKLE (SKL), but acts independently of SUPER NUMERIC NODULES. MtCEP1-dependent inhibition of lateral root development acts through an EIN2-independent mechanism. MtCEP1 increases nodulation by promoting rhizobial infections, the developmental competency of roots for nodulation, the formation of fused nodules, and an increase in frequency of nodule development that initiates at proto-phloem poles. These phenotypes are similar to those of the ein2/skl mutant and support that MtCEP1 modulates EIN2-dependent symbiotic responses. Accordingly, MtCEP1 counteracts the reduction in nodulation induced by increasing ethylene precursor concentrations, and an ethylene synthesis inhibitor treatment antagonizes MtCEP1 root phenotypes. MtCEP1 also inhibits the development of EIN2-dependent pseudonodule formation. Finally, mutants affecting the COMPACT ROOT ARCHITECTURE2 (CRA2) receptor, which is closely related to the Arabidopsis CEP Receptor1, are unresponsive to MtCEP1 effects on lateral root and nodule formation, suggesting that CRA2 is a CEP peptide receptor mediating both organogenesis programs. In addition, an ethylene inhibitor treatment counteracts the cra2 nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that MtCEP1 and its likely receptor, CRA2, mediate nodulation and lateral root development through different pathways. PMID:27342310

  17. Different Pathways Act Downstream of the CEP Peptide Receptor CRA2 to Regulate Lateral Root and Nodule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A.; Ivanovici, Ariel; Frugier, Florian; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDEs (CEPs) control root system architecture in a non-cell-autonomous manner. In Medicago truncatula, MtCEP1 affects root development by increasing nodule formation and inhibiting lateral root emergence by unknown pathways. Here, we show that the MtCEP1 peptide-dependent increase in nodulation requires the symbiotic signaling pathway and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2)/SICKLE (SKL), but acts independently of SUPER NUMERIC NODULES. MtCEP1-dependent inhibition of lateral root development acts through an EIN2-independent mechanism. MtCEP1 increases nodulation by promoting rhizobial infections, the developmental competency of roots for nodulation, the formation of fused nodules, and an increase in frequency of nodule development that initiates at proto-phloem poles. These phenotypes are similar to those of the ein2/skl mutant and support that MtCEP1 modulates EIN2-dependent symbiotic responses. Accordingly, MtCEP1 counteracts the reduction in nodulation induced by increasing ethylene precursor concentrations, and an ethylene synthesis inhibitor treatment antagonizes MtCEP1 root phenotypes. MtCEP1 also inhibits the development of EIN2-dependent pseudonodule formation. Finally, mutants affecting the COMPACT ROOT ARCHITECTURE2 (CRA2) receptor, which is closely related to the Arabidopsis CEP Receptor1, are unresponsive to MtCEP1 effects on lateral root and nodule formation, suggesting that CRA2 is a CEP peptide receptor mediating both organogenesis programs. In addition, an ethylene inhibitor treatment counteracts the cra2 nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that MtCEP1 and its likely receptor, CRA2, mediate nodulation and lateral root development through different pathways. PMID:27342310

  18. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors.

  19. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors. PMID:27523384

  20. Aldose Reductase acts as a Selective Derepressor of PPARγ and Retinoic Acid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Devi; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Zhang, Jinghua; O’Shea, Karen M.; Quadri, Nosirudeen; Li, Qing; Sas, Kelli; Jing, Xiao; Rosario, Rosa; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Summary Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a chromatin modifying enzyme, requires association with the deacetylase containing domain (DAD) of the nuclear receptor co-repressors NCOR1 and SMRT for its stability and activity. Here we show that aldose reductase (AR), the rate-limiting enzyme of the polyol pathway, competes with HDAC3 to bind the NCOR1/SMRT DAD. Increased AR expression leads to HDAC3 degradation followed by increased PPARγ signaling resulting in lipid accumulation in the heart. AR also downregulates expression of nuclear corepressor complex cofactors including Gps2 and Tblr1, thus affecting activity of the nuclear corepressor complex itself. Though AR reduces HDAC3-corepressor complex formation, it specifically de-represses the retinoic acid receptor (RAR), but not other nuclear receptors such as the thyroid receptor (TR) and liver X receptor (LXR). In summary, this work defines a distinct role for AR in lipid and retinoid metabolism through HDAC3 regulation and consequent de-repression of PPARγ and RAR. PMID:27052179

  1. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  2. Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors and neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Gainetdinov, Raul R; Premont, Richard T; Bohn, Laura M; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Caron, Marc G

    2004-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have proven to be the most highly favorable class of drug targets in modern pharmacology. Over 90% of nonsensory GPCRs are expressed in the brain, where they play important roles in numerous neuronal functions. GPCRs can be desensitized following activation by agonists by becoming phosphorylated by members of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Phosphorylated receptors are then bound by arrestins, which prevent further stimulation of G proteins and downstream signaling pathways. Discussed in this review are recent progress in understanding basics of GPCR desensitization, novel functional roles, patterns of brain expression, and receptor specificity of GRKs and beta arrestins in major brain functions. In particular, screening of genetically modified mice lacking individual GRKs or beta arrestins for alterations in behavioral and biochemical responses to cocaine and morphine has revealed a functional specificity in dopamine and mu-opioid receptor regulation of locomotion and analgesia. An important and specific role of GRKs and beta arrestins in regulating physiological responsiveness to psychostimulants and morphine suggests potential involvement of these molecules in certain brain disorders, such as addiction, Parkinson's disease, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, the utility of a pharmacological strategy aimed at targeting this GPCR desensitization machinery to regulate brain functions can be envisaged. PMID:15217328

  3. Substituted pyrrolidin-2-ones: Centrally acting orexin receptor antagonists promoting sleep. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Sifferlen, Thierry; Boller, Amandine; Chardonneau, Audrey; Cottreel, Emmanuelle; Gatfield, John; Treiber, Alexander; Roch, Catherine; Jenck, Francois; Aissaoui, Hamed; Williams, Jodi T; Brotschi, Christine; Heidmann, Bibia; Siegrist, Romain; Boss, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Starting from advanced pyrrolidin-2-one lead compounds, this novel series of small-molecule orexin receptor antagonists was further optimized by fine-tuning of the C-3 substitution at the γ-lactam ring. We discuss our design to align in vitro potency with metabolic stability and improved physicochemical/pharmacokinetic properties while avoiding P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux. These investigations led to the identification of the orally active 3-hydroxypyrrolidin-2-one 46, a potent and selective orexin-2 receptor antagonist, that achieved good brain exposure and promoted physiological sleep in rats.

  4. l-Isocorypalmine reduces behavioral sensitization and rewarding effects of cocaine in mice by acting on dopamine receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yujun; Ma, Zhongze; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Huang, Peng; Rasakham, Khampaseuth; Unterwald, Ellen; Lee, David Y.-W.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously reported isolation of l-isocorypalmine (l-ICP), a mono-demethylated analog of l-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP), from the plant Corydalis yanhusuo. Here we characterized its in vitro pharmacological properties and examined its effects on cocaine-induced behaviors in mice. Methods Receptor binding, cAMP and [35S]GTPγS assays were used to examine pharmacological actions of l-ICP in vitro. Effects of I-ICP on cocaine-induced locomotor hyperactivity and sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice were investigated. HPLC was employed to analyze metabolites of I-ICP in mouse serum. Results Among more than 40 targets screened, l-ICP and l-THP bound only to dopamine (DA) receptors. l-ICP was a high-affinity partial agonist of D1 and D5 receptors and a moderate-affinity antagonist of D2, D3 and D4 receptors, whereas l-THP bound to only D1 and D5 receptors, with lower affinities than l-ICP. At 10 mg/kg (i.p.), l-ICP inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity for a shorter time than l-THP. Pretreatment with l-ICP reduced cocaine-induced locomotor hyperactivities. Administration of l-ICP before cocaine once a day for 5 days reduced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization on days 5 and 13 after 7 days of withdrawal. Pretreatment with l-ICP before cocaine daily for 6 days blocked cocaine-induced CPP, while l-ICP itself did not cause preference or aversion. HPLC analysis showed that l-ICP was the main compound in mouse serum following i.p. injection of l-ICP. Conclusions l-ICP likely acts as a D1 partial agonist and a D2 antagonist to produce its in vivo effects and may be a promising agent for treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:24080315

  5. GABA acting on GABAB receptors located in a medullary pain facilitatory area enhances nociceptive behaviors evoked by intraplantar formalin injection.

    PubMed

    Martins, Isabel; Carvalho, Paulina; de Vries, Martin G; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Wilson, Steven P; Westerink, Ben H C; Tavares, Isaura

    2015-08-01

    The dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt) plays a key role in facilitation of nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms involved in GABA-mediated control of the DRt focusing on the role of local GABAB receptors. First, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the release of GABA in the DRt during the course of the formalin test. An increase of GABA levels in comparison with baseline values was detected in the second phase of the test. Because we previously showed that GABAB receptors are expressed by opioidergic DRt neurons, which respond to nociceptive stimuli and inhibit spinally projecting DRt neurons involved in descending pronociception, we then interfered with local GABAB receptors using gene transfer and pharmacological approaches. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GABAB1a expression decreased nociceptive responses during the second phase of the test. Local administration of the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 also decreased nociceptive responses in the second phase of the test, whereas the opposite was detected after injection of the GABAB agonist baclofen. Finally, we determined the GABAergic afferents of the DRt, namely those arising from its main brain afferents, which are located at the telencephalon and diencephalon. For that purpose, we combined retrograde tract-tracing from the DRt with immunodetection of glutamate decarboxylase, the GABA-synthesizing enzyme. The higher numbers of retrogradely labelled glutamate decarboxylase-immunoreactive neurons were located at insular, somatosensory, and motor cortices. Collectively, the results suggest that GABA acting on GABAB receptors may enhance pain facilitation from the DRt during inflammatory pain.

  6. Peripherally acting opioids and clinical implications for pain control.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Nalini; Smith, Howard S; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2011-01-01

    Opioid receptors are widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system and in the non-neuronal tissues. Data from animal and human clinical studies support the involvement of peripheral opioid receptors in analgesia, especially in the presence of inflammation. Inflammation has been shown to increase the synthesis of opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglion neurons and enhance transport and accumulation of opioid receptors in the peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. Under the influence of chemokines and adhesion molecules, opioid peptide-containing immune cells extravasate and accumulate in the injured tissues. Stress, chemokines, cytokines, and other releasing factors in inflamed tissues stimulate these granulocytes to release opioid peptides. Once secreted, opioid peptides bind to and activate peripheral opioid receptors on sensory nerve fibers and produce analgesia by decreasing the excitability of sensory nerves and/or inhibiting release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides. Research has revealed that local application of exogenous opioid agonists produces a potent analgesic effect by activating peripheral opioid receptors in inflamed tissues. The analgesic activity occurs without activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS), and therefore centrally mediated side effects, such as respiratory depression, mental clouding, altered consciousness, or addiction, are not associated with peripheral opioid activity. This discovery has stimulated research on developing peripherally restricted opioid agonists that lack CNS effects. In addition, it has been recognized that opioid receptors modulate inflammation, and that opioids have anti-inflammatory effects. The anti-inflammatory actions of opioids are not well known or understood. Conflicting reports on mu-opioids suggest both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory effects. This article will present the basis for peripheral opioid analgesia and describe current research directed at

  7. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABAA receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABAA receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanol were investigated on recombinant human '-aminobutyric acid (GABAA, a1ß2'2s) r...

  8. CTEP: a novel, potent, long-acting, and orally bioavailable metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Lothar; Jaeschke, Georg; Michalon, Aubin; Vieira, Eric; Honer, Michael; Spooren, Will; Porter, Richard; Hartung, Thomas; Kolczewski, Sabine; Büttelmann, Bernd; Flament, Christophe; Diener, Catherine; Fischer, Christophe; Gatti, Silvia; Prinssen, Eric P; Parrott, Neil; Hoffmann, Gerhard; Wettstein, Joseph G

    2011-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a glutamate-activated class C G protein-coupled receptor widely expressed in the central nervous system and clinically investigated as a drug target for a range of indications, including depression, Parkinson's disease, and fragile X syndrome. Here, we present the novel potent, selective, and orally bioavailable mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator with inverse agonist properties 2-chloro-4-((2,5-dimethyl-1-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)-1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine (CTEP). CTEP binds mGlu5 with low nanomolar affinity and shows >1000-fold selectivity when tested against 103 targets, including all known mGlu receptors. CTEP penetrates the brain with a brain/plasma ratio of 2.6 and displaces the tracer [(3)H]3-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-methyl-oxime (ABP688) in vivo in mice from brain regions expressing mGlu5 with an average ED(50) equivalent to a drug concentration of 77.5 ng/g in brain tissue. This novel mGlu5 inhibitor is active in the stress-induced hyperthermia procedure in mice and the Vogel conflict drinking test in rats with minimal effective doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively, reflecting a 30- to 100-fold higher in vivo potency compared with 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) and fenobam. CTEP is the first reported mGlu5 inhibitor with both long half-life of approximately 18 h and high oral bioavailability allowing chronic treatment with continuous receptor blockade with one dose every 48 h in adult and newborn animals. By enabling long-term treatment through a wide age range, CTEP allows the exploration of the full therapeutic potential of mGlu5 inhibitors for indications requiring chronic receptor inhibition. PMID:21849627

  9. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties.

  10. Estradiol acts via estrogen receptors alpha and beta on pathways important for synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampal formation

    PubMed Central

    Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Mattei, Larissa; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Romeo, Russell D.; Milner, Teresa A.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2012-01-01

    Estradiol affects hippocampal-dependent spatial memory and underlying structural and electrical synaptic plasticity in female mice and rats. Using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knockout mice and wild-type littermates, we investigated the role of ERs in estradiol effects on multiple pathways important for hippocampal plasticity and learning. Six hours of estradiol administration increased immunoreactivity for phosphorylated Akt throughout the hippocampal formation, while 48 hours of estradiol increased immunoreactivity for phosphorylated TrkB receptor. Estradiol effects on phosphorylated Akt and TrkB immunoreactivities were abolished in ER alpha and ER beta knockout mice. Estradiol also had distinct effects on immunoreactivity for PSD-95 and BDNF mRNA in ER alpha and beta knockout mice. Thus, estradiol acts through both ERs alpha and beta in several subregions of the hippocampal formation. The different effects of estradiol at 6 and 48 hours indicate that several mechanisms of estrogen receptor signaling contribute to this female hormone’s influence on hippocampal synaptic plasticity. By further delineating these mechanisms, we will better understand and predict the effects of endogenous and exogenous ovarian steroids on mood, cognition, and other hippocampal-dependent behaviors. PMID:22133892

  11. Dopamine D4 Receptor Counteracts Morphine-Induced Changes in μ Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Striosomes of the Rat Caudate Putamen

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Gago, Belén; Valderrama-Carvajal, Alejandra; Roales-Buján, Ruth; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Duchou, Jolien; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Medina-Luque, José; de la Calle, Adelaida; Fuxe, Kjell; Rivera, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The mu opioid receptor (MOR) is critical in mediating morphine analgesia. However, prolonged exposure to morphine induces adaptive changes in this receptor leading to the development of tolerance and addiction. In the present work we have studied whether the continuous administration of morphine induces changes in MOR protein levels, its pharmacological profile, and MOR-mediated G-protein activation in the striosomal compartment of the rat CPu, by using immunohistochemistry and receptor and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS autoradiography. MOR immunoreactivity, agonist binding density and its coupling to G proteins are up-regulated in the striosomes by continuous morphine treatment in the absence of changes in enkephalin and dynorphin mRNA levels. In addition, co-treatment of morphine with the dopamine D4 receptor (D4R) agonist PD168,077 fully counteracts these adaptive changes in MOR, in spite of the fact that continuous PD168,077 treatment increases the [3H]DAMGO Bmax values to the same degree as seen after continuous morphine treatment. Thus, in spite of the fact that both receptors can be coupled to Gi/0 protein, the present results give support for the existence of antagonistic functional D4R-MOR receptor-receptor interactions in the adaptive changes occurring in MOR of striosomes on continuous administration of morphine. PMID:24451133

  12. Ash2 acts as an ecdysone receptor coactivator by stabilizing the histone methyltransferase Trr.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Albert; Mazo, Alexander; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat

    2013-02-01

    The molting hormone ecdysone triggers chromatin changes via histone modifications that are important for gene regulation. On hormone activation, the ecdysone receptor (EcR) binds to the SET domain-containing histone H3 methyltransferase trithorax-related protein (Trr). Methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me), which is associated with transcriptional activation, requires several cofactors, including Ash2. We find that ash2 mutants have severe defects in pupariation and metamorphosis due to a lack of activation of ecdysone-responsive genes. This transcriptional defect is caused by the absence of the H3K4me3 marks set by Trr in these genes. We present evidence that Ash2 interacts with Trr and is required for its stabilization. Thus we propose that Ash2 functions together with Trr as an ecdysone receptor coactivator.

  13. Evaluation of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore: conversion of a potent delta-opioid receptor antagonist into a potent delta agonist and ligands with mixed properties.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Bianchi, Clementina; Rizzi, Daniela; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-31

    Analogues of the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore were prepared to test the hypothesis that a "spacer" and a third aromatic center in opioid peptides are required to convert a delta-antagonist into ligands with delta-agonist or with mixed delta-antagonist/mu-agonist properties. Potent delta-agonists and bifunctional compounds with high delta- and mu-opioid receptor affinities were obtained by varying the spacer length [none, NH-CH(2), NH-CH(2)-CH(2), Gly-NH-CH(2)] and C-terminal aromatic nucleus [1H-benzimidazole-2-yl, phenyl (Ph) and benzyl groups]. C-terminal modification primarily affected mu-opioid receptor affinities, which increased maximally 1700-fold relative to the prototype delta-antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-NH(2) and differentially modified bioactivity. In the absence of a spacer (1), the analogue exhibited dual delta-agonism (pEC(50), 7.28) and delta-antagonism (pA(2), 7.90). H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) (2) became a highly potent delta-agonist (pEC(50), 9.90), slightly greater than deltorphin C (pEC(50), 9.56), with mu-agonism (pE(50), 7.57), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Bid (4) retained potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.0) but with an order of magnitude less mu-agonism. Similarly, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph (5) had nearly equivalent high delta-agonism (pEC(50), 8.52) and mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.59), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Ph (6) whose spacer was longer by a single methylene group exhibited potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.25) and very high mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.57). These data confirm that the distance between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and a third aromatic nucleus is an important criterion in converting Dmt-Tic from a highly potent delta-antagonist into a potent delta-agonist or into ligands with mixed delta- and mu-opioid properties.

  14. The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 acts at multiple levels of the reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, H A; Lala, D S; Ikeda, Y; Luo, X; Shen, W H; Nachtigal, M W; Abbud, R; Nilson, J H; Parker, K L

    1994-10-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), an orphan nuclear receptor, regulates the enzymes that produce sex steroids, and disruption of the Ftz-F1 gene encoding SF-1 precludes adrenal and gonadal development. We now study the role of SF-1 at other levels of the hypothalamic/pituitary/gonadal axis. In Ftz-F1-disrupted mice, immunohistochemical analyses with antibodies against pituitary trophic hormones showed a selective loss of gonadotrope-specific markers, supporting the role of SF-1 in gonadotrope function. In situ hybridization analyses confirmed these results; pituitaries from Ftz-F1-disrupted mice lacked transcripts for three gonadotrope-specific markers (LH beta, FSH beta, and the receptor for gonadotropin-releasing hormone), whereas they exhibited decreased but detectable expression of the alpha-subunit of glycoprotein hormones. SF-1 transcripts in the developing mouse pituitary, which first became detectable at embryonic day 13.5-14.5, preceded the appearance of FSH beta and LH beta transcripts. In adult rat pituitary cells, SF-1 transcripts colocalized with immunoreactivity for the gonadotrope-specific LH. Finally, SF-1 interacted with a previously defined promoter element in the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene, providing a possible mechanism for the impaired gonadotropin expression in Ftz-F1-disrupted mice. These studies establish novel roles of this orphan nuclear receptor in reproductive function.

  15. GRK2 Constitutively Governs Peripheral Delta Opioid Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Allison Doyle; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2016-09-01

    Opioids remain the standard for analgesic care; however, adverse effects of systemic treatments contraindicate long-term administration. While most clinical opioids target mu opioid receptors (MOR), those that target the delta class (DOR) also demonstrate analgesic efficacy. Furthermore, peripherally restrictive opioids represent an attractive direction for analgesia. However, opioid receptors including DOR are analgesically incompetent in the absence of inflammation. Here, we report that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) naively associates with plasma membrane DOR in peripheral sensory neurons to inhibit analgesic agonist efficacy. This interaction prevents optimal Gβ subunit association with the receptor, thereby reducing DOR activity. Importantly, bradykinin stimulates GRK2 movement away from DOR and onto Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP). protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent RKIP phosphorylation induces GRK2 sequestration, restoring DOR functionality in sensory neurons. Together, these results expand the known function of GRK2, identifying a non-internalizing role to maintain peripheral DOR in an analgesically incompetent state. PMID:27568556

  16. Peripheral Administration of a Long-Acting Peptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist Inhibits Fear-Induced Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Meera E.; Majchrzak, Mark J.; Fonseca, Kari R.; Doran, Angela; Osgood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Feyfant, Eric; McInnes, Heather; Darvari, Ramin; Buhl, Derek L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) modulates the expression of social and emotional behaviors and consequently has been proposed as a pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric diseases, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia; however, endogenous OT has a short half-life in plasma and poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel drug delivery methods to enhance brain penetration, but few efforts have aimed at improving its half-life. To explore the behavioral efficacy of an OT analog with enhanced plasma stability, we developed PF-06655075 (PF1), a novel non–brain-penetrant OT receptor agonist with increased selectivity for the OT receptor and significantly increased pharmacokinetic stability. PF-06478939 was generated with only increased stability to disambiguate changes to selectivity versus stability. The efficacy of these compounds in evoking behavioral effects was tested in a conditioned fear paradigm. Both central and peripheral administration of PF1 inhibited freezing in response to a conditioned fear stimulus. Peripheral administration of PF1 resulted in a sustained level of plasma concentrations for greater than 20 hours but no detectable accumulation in brain tissue, suggesting that plasma or cerebrospinal fluid exposure was sufficient to evoke behavioral effects. Behavioral efficacy of peripherally administered OT receptor agonists on conditioned fear response opens the door to potential peripheral mechanisms in other behavioral paradigms, whether they are mediated by direct peripheral activation or feed-forward responses. Compound PF1 is freely available as a tool compound to further explore the role of peripheral OT in behavioral response. PMID:27217590

  17. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  18. Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist acts as a homeostatic regulator of bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Vacek, Antonín; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-07-01

    The present study was performed to define the optimum conditions of the stimulatory action of the adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), on bone marrow hematopoiesis in mice. Effects of 2-day treatment with IB-MECA given at single doses of 200nmol/kg twice daily were investigated in normal mice and in mice whose femoral bone marrow cells were either depleted or regenerating after pretreatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. Morphological criteria were used to determine the proliferation state of the granulocytic and erythroid cell systems. Significant negative correlation between the control proliferation state and the increase of cell proliferation after IB-MECA treatment irrespective of the cell lineage investigated was found. The results suggest the homeostatic character of the induced stimulatory effects and the need to respect the functional state of the target tissue when investigating effects of adenosine receptor agonists under in vivo conditions.

  19. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 can act both as an agonist and an inverse agonist when estrogen receptor α AF-2 is modified

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E.; Farman, Helen H.; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H.; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Andersson, Annica; Stubelius, Alexandra; Carlsten, Hans; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The bone-sparing effect of estrogen is primarily mediated via estrogen receptor (ER) α, which stimulates target gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs), AF-1 in the N-terminal and AF-2 in the ligand-binding domain. It was recently demonstrated that the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) acts as an ER agonist in uterus of mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2. To evaluate the estrogen-like effects of ICI in different tissues, ovariectomized wild-type mice and mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2 (ERαAF-20) were treated with ICI, estradiol, or vehicle for 3 wk. Estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass as well as the uterine weight, whereas it reduced fat mass, thymus weight, and the growth plate height in wild-type but not in ERαAF-20 mice. Although ICI had no effect in wild-type mice, it exerted tissue-specific effects in ERαAF-20 mice. It acted as an ERα agonist on trabecular bone mass and uterine weight, whereas no effect was seen on cortical bone mass, fat mass, or thymus weight. Surprisingly, a pronounced inverse agonistic activity was seen on the growth plate height, resulting in enhanced longitudinal bone growth. In conclusion, ICI uses ERα AF-1 in a tissue-dependent manner in mice lacking ERαAF-2, resulting in no effect, agonistic activity, or inverse agonistic activity. We propose that ERα lacking AF-2 is constitutively active in the absence of ligand in the growth plate, enabling ICI to act as an inverse agonist. PMID:24395795

  20. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 acts in skin cells to promote sensory dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianzhuang; Wang, Xiangming; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    Sensory dendrite morphogenesis is directed by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The extracellular environment plays instructive roles in patterning dendrite growth and branching. However, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the proprioceptive neuron PVD forms highly branched sensory dendrites adjacent to the hypodermis. We report that receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 functions in the hypodermis to pattern the PVD dendritic branches. Mutations in clr-1 lead to loss of quaternary branches, reduced secondary branches and increased ectopic branches. CLR-1 is necessary for the dendrite extension but not for the initial filopodia formation. Its role is dependent on the intracellular phosphatase domain but not the extracellular adhesion domain, indicating that it functions through dephosphorylating downstream factors but not through direct adhesion with neurons. Genetic analysis reveals that clr-1 also functions in parallel with SAX-7/DMA-1 pathway to control PVD primary dendrite development. We provide evidence of a new environmental factor for PVD dendrite morphogenesis. PMID:26968353

  1. Histone H1 proteins act as receptors for the 987P fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoqiang; Chen, Huaiqing; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Del Piero, Fabio; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2005-06-17

    The tip adhesin FasG of the 987P fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli mediates two distinct adhesive interactions with brush border molecules of the intestinal epithelial cells of neonatal piglets. First, FasG attaches strongly to sulfatide with hydroxylated fatty acyl chains. This interaction involves lysine 117 and other lysine residues of FasG. Second, FasG recognizes specific intestinal brush border proteins that migrate on a sodium-dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel like a distinct set of 32-35-kDa proteins, as shown by ligand blotting assays. The protein sequence of high performance liquid chromatography-purified tryptic fragments of the major protein band matched sequences of human and murine histone H1 proteins. Porcine histone H1 proteins isolated from piglet intestinal epithelial cells demonstrated the same SDS-PAGE migration pattern and 987P binding properties as the 987P-specific protein receptors from porcine intestinal brush borders. Binding was dose-dependent and shown to be specific in adhesion inhibition and gel migration shift assays. Moreover, mapping of the histone H1 binding domain suggested that it is located in their lysine-rich C-terminal domains. Histone H1 molecules were visualized on the microvilli of intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Taken together these results indicated that the intestinal protein receptors for 987P are histone H1 proteins. It is suggested that histones are released into the intestinal lumen by the high turnover of the intestinal epithelium. Their strong cationic properties can explain their association with the negatively charged brush border surfaces. There, the histone H1 molecules stabilize the sulfatide-fimbriae interaction by simultaneously binding to the membrane and to 987P.

  2. Nucleotides Acting at P2Y Receptors: Connecting Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Paoletta, Silvia; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Beili; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhao, Qiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kiselev, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    Eight G protein–coupled P2Y receptor (P2YR) subtypes are important physiologic mediators. The human P2YRs are fully activated by ATP (P2Y2 and P2Y11), ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13), UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4), UDP (P2Y6 and P2Y14), and UDP glucose (P2Y14). Their structural elucidation is progressing rapidly. The X-ray structures of three ligand complexes of the Gi-coupled P2Y12R and two of the Gq-coupled P2Y1Rs were recently determined and will be especially useful in structure-based ligand design at two P2YR subfamilies. These high-resolution structures, which display unusual binding site features, complement mutagenesis studies for probing ligand recognition and activation. The structural requirements for nucleotide agonist recognition at P2YRs are relatively permissive with respect to the length of the phosphate moiety, but less so with respect to base recognition. Nucleotide-like antagonists and partial agonists are also known for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y12Rs. Each P2YR subtype has the ability to be activated by structurally bifunctional agonists, such as dinucleotides, typically, dinucleoside triphosphates or tetraphosphates, and nucleoside polyphosphate sugars (e.g., UDP glucose) as well as the more conventional mononucleotide agonists. A range of dinucleoside polyphosphates, from triphosphates to higher homologs, occurs naturally. Earlier modeling predictions of the P2YRs were not very accurate, but recent findings have provided much detailed structural insight into this receptor family to aid in the rational design of new drugs. PMID:25837834

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor acts as a growth regulator in synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, N; Küchler, J; Endl, E; Koch, A; Czerwitzki, J; Wurst, P; Metzger, D; Schulte, J H; Holst, M I; Heukamp, L C; Larsson, O; Tanaka, S; Kawai, A; Wardelmann, E; Buettner, R; Pietsch, T; Hartmann, W

    2008-12-01

    Synovial sarcomas account for 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas and the majority of synovial sarcomas display characteristic t(X;18) translocations that result in enhanced transcription of the insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) gene. IGF-2 is an essential fetal mitogen involved in the pathogenesis of different tumours, leading to cellular proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. Here we asked whether activation of IGF signalling is of functional importance in synovial sarcomas. We screened human synovial sarcomas for expression of IGF-2 and the phosphorylated IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), which mainly mediates the proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of IGF-2. Since both the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway and the MAPK signalling cascade are known to be involved in the transmission of IGF-1R signals, expression of phosphorylated (p)-AKT and p-p44/42 MAPK was additionally assessed. All tumours expressed IGF-2 and 78% showed an activated IGF-1R. All tumours were found to express p-AKT and 92% showed expression of activated p44/42 MAPK. To analyse the functional and potential therapeutic relevance of IGF-1R signalling, synovial sarcoma cell lines were treated with the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541. Growth was impaired by the IGF-1R antagonist, which was consistently accompanied by a dose-dependent reduction of phosphorylation of AKT and p44/42 MAPK. Functionally, inhibition of the receptor led to increased apoptosis and diminished mitotic activity. Concurrent exposure of selected cells to NVP-AEW541 and conventional chemotherapeutic agents resulted in positive interactions. Finally, synovial sarcoma cell migration was found to be dependent on signals transmitted by the IGF-1R. In summary, our data show that the IGF-1R might represent a promising therapeutic target in synovial sarcomas.

  4. 2-Guanidine-4-methylquinazoline acts as a novel competitive antagonist of A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xian; Zhu, Michael X; Xu, Tian-Le

    2013-12-01

    The pentameric A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system and have long been considered as important pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of multiple neurological or psychological disorders. Here, we show that 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), a recently identified acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) modulator, strongly and preferentially inhibits GABAAR among the major neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. GMQ inhibited GABA (1 μM)-induced currents in a competitive manner, with an IC50 (0.39±0.05 μM) comparable to that of bicuculline. Schild analysis revealed a slope of 1.04±0.06 for GMQ on α1β2 GABAARs expressed in HEK293T cells. Single-channel analysis showed that GMQ decreased open probability of GABAARs without affecting conductance. Moreover, GMQ inhibited GABAergic neurotransmission in hippocampal neurons, while having no significant effect on the basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and the intrinsic excitability of neurons. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we further demonstrated that mutations at Glu155 of β2 subunit and Phe64 of α1 subunit, both located inside the GABA binding pocket, profoundly decreased the sensitivity of the receptor to both GABA and GMQ. Interestingly, these mutations did not significantly affect the inhibition by amiloride, a diuretic structurally similar to GMQ and a known GABAAR inhibitor. We conclude that GMQ represents a novel chemical structure that acts, possibly, by competing with GABA binding to GABAARs. It is anticipated that GMQ and its analogs will facilitate the development of new chemical probes for GABAARs.

  5. 2-Guanidine-4-methylquinazoline acts as a novel competitive antagonist of A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xian; Zhu, Michael X; Xu, Tian-Le

    2013-12-01

    The pentameric A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system and have long been considered as important pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of multiple neurological or psychological disorders. Here, we show that 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), a recently identified acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) modulator, strongly and preferentially inhibits GABAAR among the major neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. GMQ inhibited GABA (1 μM)-induced currents in a competitive manner, with an IC50 (0.39±0.05 μM) comparable to that of bicuculline. Schild analysis revealed a slope of 1.04±0.06 for GMQ on α1β2 GABAARs expressed in HEK293T cells. Single-channel analysis showed that GMQ decreased open probability of GABAARs without affecting conductance. Moreover, GMQ inhibited GABAergic neurotransmission in hippocampal neurons, while having no significant effect on the basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and the intrinsic excitability of neurons. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we further demonstrated that mutations at Glu155 of β2 subunit and Phe64 of α1 subunit, both located inside the GABA binding pocket, profoundly decreased the sensitivity of the receptor to both GABA and GMQ. Interestingly, these mutations did not significantly affect the inhibition by amiloride, a diuretic structurally similar to GMQ and a known GABAAR inhibitor. We conclude that GMQ represents a novel chemical structure that acts, possibly, by competing with GABA binding to GABAARs. It is anticipated that GMQ and its analogs will facilitate the development of new chemical probes for GABAARs. PMID:23916476

  6. Erythrocyte gangliosides act as receptors for Neisseria subflava: identification of the Sia-1 adhesin.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, G; Strömberg, N; Jonsson, A; Karlsson, K A; Normark, S

    1990-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae was recently shown to bind to a subset of lactose-containing glycolipids (N. Strömberg, C. Deal, G. Nyberg, S. Normark, M. So, and K.-A. Karlsson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:4902-4906, 1988). A number of commensal Neisseria strains were also shown to be lactose binders. In addition, Neisseria subflava bound to immobilized gangliosides, such as hematoside and sialosyl paragloboside, carrying the NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-4Glc sequence. To a lesser extent, N. gonorrhoeae also bound to this receptor in vitro. In N. subflava GN01, this binding property mediated agglutination of human erythrocytes in a neuraminidase-sensitive fashion. Nitrosoguanidine-induced nonhemagglutinative mutants of N. subflava GN01 had lost the ability to bind hematoside and sialosylparagloboside but remained able to bind lactosylceramide and gangliotetraosylceramide. These mutants fell into three classes with respect to their outer membrane protein profiles in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Class 1 mutants were identical to the parent strain save for the loss of a 27-kilodalton (kDa) protein. Class 2 mutants showed an outer membrane protein profile identical to that of the wild type, whereas mutants belonging to class 3 showed a number of changes, including the apparent absence of the 27-kDa protein. The 27-kDa protein from N. subflava GN01 was purified from the supernatant. A polyclonal antiserum to the purified Sia-1 protein as well as a Sia-1-specific monoclonal antibody inhibited hemagglutination by strain GN01. The purified Sia-1 protein in the presence of diluted anti-Sia-1 antiserum mediated a neuraminidase-sensitive hemagglutination. The purified Sia protein from a class 2 mutant was not able to hemagglutinate when cross-linked with antibodies, suggesting that it is a mutant form of Sia-1 affected in the receptor-binding site. Immunoelectron microscopy with a Sia-1-specific monoclonal antibody revealed that the adhesin was

  7. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Campa, Víctor M; Capilla, Almudena; Varela, María J; de la Rocha, Arlet M Acanda; Fernandez-Troyano, Juan C; Barreiro, R Belén; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP) receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  8. Differential receptor binding characteristics of consecutive phenylalanines in micro-opioid specific peptide ligand endomorphin-2.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takeshi; Shirasu, Naoto; Isozaki, Kaname; Kawano, Michiaki; Shigehiro, Daiki; Chuman, Yoshiro; Fujita, Tsugumi; Nose, Takeru; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides consist of a conserved amino acid residue of Phe(3) and Phe(4), although their binding modes for opioid receptors have not been elucidated in detail. Endomorphin-2, which is highly selective and specific for the mu opioid receptor, possesses two Phe residues at the consecutive positions 3 and 4. In order to clarify the role of Phe(3) and Phe(4) in binding to the mu receptor, we synthesized a series of analogs in which Phe(3) and Phe(4) were replaced by various amino acids. It was found that the aromaticity of the Phe-beta-phenyl groups of Phe(3) and Phe(4) is a principal determinant of how strongly it binds to the receptor, although better molecular hydrophobicity reinforces the activity. The receptor binding subsites of Phe(3) and Phe(4) of endomorphin-2 were found to exhibit different structural requirements. The results suggest that [Trp(3)]endomorphin-2 (native endomorphin-1) and endomorphin-2 bind to different receptor subclasses. PMID:17395470

  9. Kainate receptors act as conditional amplifiers of spike transmission at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses.

    PubMed

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Blanchet, Christophe; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H; Mulle, Christophe

    2009-04-15

    Hippocampal mossy fiber (Mf) synapses are viewed as conditional detonators, assisting CA3 cells in complex network functions. By analyzing mice deficient for GluK2 (GluR6), GluK3 (GluR7) and GluK5 (KA2) genes we show that kainate receptors (KARs) play a crucial role in the control of synaptic integration and spike transmission efficacy at Mf synapses. We dissected out the role of the different KAR functions at Mf synapses and we show that presynaptic and postsynaptic KARs concur to amplify unitary Mf synaptic inputs to trigger spike discharge within a wide range of frequencies (from 1 to 50 Hz). Moreover, KARs strongly favor spike transmission in response to patterns of presynaptic activity mimicking in vivo dentate granule cell activity. By amplifying spike transmission, KARs also facilitate the induction of associative long-term potentiation in CA3. Hence the actions of KARs as amplifiers of spike transmission contribute largely to the "conditional detonator" function of Mf synapses and are likely important for spatial information processing.

  10. GABAA receptor-acting neurosteroids: A role in the development and regulation of the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Benjamin G.; Cunningham, Linda; Mitchell, Scott G.; Swinny, Jerome D.; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Belelli, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity by stress is a fundamental survival mechanism and HPA-dysfunction is implicated in psychiatric disorders. Adverse early life experiences, e.g. poor maternal care, negatively influence brain development and programs an abnormal stress response by encoding long-lasting molecular changes, which may extend to the next generation. How HPA-dysfunction leads to the development of affective disorders is complex, but may involve GABAA receptors (GABAARs), as they curtail stress-induced HPA axis activation. Of particular interest are endogenous neurosteroids that potently modulate the function of GABAARs and exhibit stress-protective properties. Importantly, neurosteroid levels rise rapidly during acute stress, are perturbed in chronic stress and are implicated in the behavioural changes associated with early-life adversity. We will appraise how GABAAR-active neurosteroids may impact on HPA axis development and the orchestration of the stress-evoked response. The significance of these actions will be discussed in the context of stress-associated mood disorders. PMID:24929099

  11. The use of bifunctional NOP/mu and NOP receptor selective compounds for the treatment of pain, drug abuse, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Toll, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The NOP receptor, the fourth receptor in the opioid receptor family, is found throughout the brain and is involved in a variety of CNS systems and pathways. The endogenous ligand for NOP receptors, nociceptin/orphanin FQ (now called N/OFQ), was originally thought to increase a painful stimulus since intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of this heptadecapeptide led to a decrease in tail-flick and hot-plate latency in mice. Further studies suggested that N/OFQ blocks opiate analgesia when administered i.c.v. but potentiates opiate analgesia and has antinociceptive activity when administered intrathecally. I.c.v. administration of N/OFQ has other beneficial actions including inhibition of reward induced by several different abused drugs, as well as anti-anxiety activity. Recent work has demonstrated that individual small molecules that activate both NOP and mu receptors possess mu-mediated antinociceptive activity with reduced reward, as determined by conditioned place preference tests. Furthermore, selective NOP receptor agonists appear to be active in certain chronic pain models and reduce both drug craving and anxiety. NOP receptor antagonists may also have therapeutic benefits since both peptide and small molecule antagonists have anti-depressant activity in two different animal models. Therefore, both selective NOP receptor compounds and non-selective compounds, with both NOP receptor and mu opioid receptor activity, appear to have potential for clinical use for several neurological and psychiatric disorders including acute and chronic pain, drug abuse, anxiety and depression.

  12. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Liu, Chengzhi; Lu, Huizhi; Liu, Mengjia; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998), Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974), NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506), thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531), the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819), PprA (dra0346), and RecN (dr1447), are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways. PMID:27182600

  13. Visualization of opiate receptor upregulation by light microscopy autoradiography.

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, A; Gardner, E L; Zukin, R S

    1984-01-01

    Light microscopy autoradiography has been used to visualize neuroanatomical patterns of brain opiate receptor upregulation in response to chronic naltrexone administration. Slide-mounted brain sections of frozen rat brain were labeled in vitro with dihydro[3H]morphine, a relatively selective mu opioid ligand. The greatest relative increases in opiate receptor density were observed in the nucleus accumbens, the amygdala, striatal patches, nuclei of the thalamus and hypothalamus, layers I and III of neocortex, substantia nigra compacta, midbrain periaqueductal gray regions, and the parabrachial nuclei of the brainstem. The substantia nigra reticulata, surrounding areas of striatal patches, and the locus ceruleus, were not affected by this drug treatment. These findings demonstrate that chronically administered naltrexone differentially regulates opiate receptors throughout the brain. In particular, three brain systems appear to be target areas of receptor upregulation : (i) the dopamine A9/A10 systems, (ii) the limbic system, and (iii) structures that receive input from afferent sensory pathways. Two possible mechanisms to account for this finding are (i) that the drug does not have uniform effects throughout the brain or (ii) that the receptors themselves may be associated with different functional systems. Receptor density changes are paralleled by increases in methionine-enkephalin content in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, periaqueductal gray, and hypothalamic areas of chronic naltrexone-treated rats relative to control rats. Thus opiate receptors and opioid peptides appear to be subject to regulatory mechanisms similar to those that modulate other neurotransmitters and their receptors. These results document in a visual manner brain patterns of opiate receptor upregulation . Images PMID:6328530

  14. THE FUNGICIDE PROCYMIDONE ALTERS SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION IN THE MALE RAT BY ACTING AS AN ANDROGEN-RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fungicide procymidone alters sexual differentiation in the male rat by acting as an androgen-receptor antagonist in vivo and in vitro.

    Ostby J, Kelce WR, Lambright C, Wolf CJ, Mann P, Gray LE Jr.

    Endocrinology Branch, National Health and Environmental Effects Re...

  15. A novel, long-acting glucagon-like peptide receptor-agonist: dulaglutide

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Tara; Shyangdan, Deepson S; O’Hare, Joseph Paul; Waugh, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide is a new, long-acting glucagon-like peptide analogue in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is available in two doses, 0.75 and 1.5 mg, given by injection once weekly. This systematic review reports the effectiveness and safety of dulaglutide in type 2 diabetes in dual and triple therapy. Methods MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, and conference abstracts were searched from 2005 to August 2014, and updated in January 2015. Company websites and references of included studies were checked for potentially relevant studies. European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration websites were searched. Results Four trials were included. All were manufacturer-funded randomized controlled trials from the Assessment of Weekly Administration of Dulaglutide in Diabetes (AWARD) program. AWARD-1 compared dulaglutide 1.5 mg against exenatide 10 µg twice daily and placebo, AWARD-2 compared dulaglutide 0.75 and 1.5 mg against insulin glargine, AWARD-5 compared dulaglutide 0.75 and 1.5 mg against sitagliptin 100 mg and placebo, and AWARD-6 compared dulaglutide 1.5 mg against liraglutide 1.8 mg. The duration of follow-up in the trials ranged from 26 to 104 weeks. The primary outcome of all the included trials was change in HbA1c. At 26 weeks, greater HbA1c reductions were seen with dulaglutide than with twice daily exenatide (dulaglutide 1.5/0.75 mg: −1.5%/−1.3%; exe: 0.99%) and sitagliptin (1.5/0.75 mg −1.22%/−1.01%; sitagliptin: −0.6%). HbA1c change was greater with dulaglutide 1.5 mg (−1.08%) than with glargine (−0.63%), but not with dulaglutide 0.75 mg (−0.76%). Dulaglutide 1.5 mg was found to be noninferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg. More patients treated with dulaglutide achieved HbA1c targets of <7% and ≤6.5%. Reduction in weight was greater with dulaglutide than with sitagliptin and exenatide. Hypoglycemia was infrequent. The main adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Conclusion

  16. RanBPM Protein Acts as a Negative Regulator of BLT2 Receptor to Attenuate BLT2-mediated Cell Motility*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun-Dong; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2013-01-01

    BLT2, a low affinity receptor for leukotriene B4 (LTB4), is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and is involved in many signal transduction pathways associated with various cellular phenotypes, including chemotactic motility. However, the regulatory mechanism for BLT2 has not yet been demonstrated. To understand the regulatory mechanism of BLT2, we screened and identified the proteins that bind to BLT2. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay with the BLT2 C-terminal domain as bait, we found that RanBPM, a previously proposed scaffold protein, interacts with BLT2. We demonstrated the specific interaction between BLT2 and RanBPM by GST pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. To elucidate the biological function of the RanBPM-BLT2 interaction, we evaluated the effects of RanBPM overexpression or knockdown. We found that BLT2-mediated motility was severely attenuated by RanBPM overexpression and that knockdown of endogenous RanBPM by shRNA strongly promoted BLT2-mediated motility, suggesting a negative regulatory function of RanBPM toward BLT2. Furthermore, we observed that the addition of BLT2 ligands caused the dissociation of BLT2 and RanBPM, thus releasing the negative regulatory effect of RanBPM. Finally, we propose that Akt-induced BLT2 phosphorylation at residue Thr355, which occurs after the addition of BLT2 ligands, is a potential mechanism by which BLT2 dissociates from RanBPM, resulting in stimulation of BLT2 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that RanBPM acts as a negative regulator of BLT2 signaling to attenuate BLT2-mediated cell motility. PMID:23928309

  17. Directly acting drugs prostacyclin or nitroglycerine and endothelin receptor blocker bosentan improve cell engraftment in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Bahde, Ralf; Kapoor, Sorabh; Bandi, Sriram; Bhargava, Kuldeep K.; Palestro, Christopher J.; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    To optimize strategies for liver-directed cell therapy prevention of initial transplanted cell losses is particularly important for subsequent liver repopulation. After cell transplantation in hepatic sinusoids, perturbations in hepatic microcirculation along with changes in various liver cell types are among the earliest changes. Therefore, for advancing further concepts in cell engraftment, we studied vascular and related events in the liver after transplanting syngeneic hepatocytes into dipeptidyl peptidase IV-deficient rats. We treated rats with vascular drugs to define whether deleterious cell transplantation-induced events could be controlled followed by improvements in transplanted cell engraftment and proliferation. We found cell transplantation altered liver gene expression related to vessel tone, inflammation, cell adhesion, thrombosis, or tissue damage/remodeling. This was due to hepatic ischemia, endothelial injury and activation of neutrophils, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells. Treatment of rats before cell transplantation with angiotensin converting enzyme blocker, lisinopril, or angiotensin II receptor blocker, losartan, did not improve cell engraftment. By contrast, direct-acting nitroglycerine or prostacyclin improved cell engraftment and also kinetics of liver repopulation. These drugs lowered hepatic ischemia and inflammation. Whereas pretreatment of rats with the dual endothelin-1 receptor blocker, bosentan, improved cell engraftment independently of hepatic ischemia or inflammation, without improving liver repopulation. However, incubation of hepatocytes with bosentan protected cells from cytokine toxicity in vitro and produced superior cell engraftment and proliferation in vivo. We concluded that cell transplantation-induced changes in hepatic microcirculation contributed to transplanted cell clearances from liver. Vascular drugs, such as nitroglycerine, prostacyclin and bosentan, offer opportunities for improving cell therapy results

  18. Facilitation of fear extinction by novelty depends on dopamine acting on D1-subtype dopamine receptors in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Jefferson; Alves, Niége; Borges, Sidnei; Roehrs, Rafael; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Izquierdo, Ivan; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2015-03-31

    Extinction is the learned inhibition of retrieval. Recently it was shown that a brief exposure to a novel environment enhances the extinction of contextual fear in rats, an effect explainable by a synaptic tagging-and-capture process. Here we examine whether this also happens with the extinction of another fear-motivated task, inhibitory avoidance (IA), and whether it depends on dopamine acting on D1 or D5 receptors. Rats were trained first in IA and then in extinction of this task. The retention of extinction was measured 24 h later. A 5-min exposure to a novel environment 30 min before extinction training enhanced its retention. Right after exposure to the novelty, animals were given bilateral intrahippocampal infusions of vehicle (VEH), of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, of the D1/D5 dopaminergic antagonist SCH23390, of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP or of the PKC inhibitor Gö6976, and of the PKA stimulator Sp-cAMP or of the PKC stimulator PMA. The novelty increased hippocampal dopamine levels and facilitated the extinction, which was inhibited by intrahippocampal protein synthesis inhibitor anisomysin, D1/D5 dopaminerdic antagonist SCH23390, or PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP and unaffected by PKC inhibitor Gö6976; additionally, the hippocampal infusion of PKA stimulator Sp-cAMP reverts the effect of D1/D5 dopaminergic antagonist SCH 23390, but the infusion of PKC stimulator PMA does not. The results attest to the generality of the novelty effect on fear extinction, suggest that it relies on synaptic tagging and capture, and show that it depends on hippocampal dopamine D1 but not D5 receptors.

  19. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  20. Peroxiredoxin Ahp1 Acts as a Receptor for Alkylhydroperoxides to Induce Disulfide Bond Formation in the Cad1 Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during cellular metabolism are toxic to cells. As a result, cells must be able to identify ROS as a stress signal and induce stress response pathways that protect cells from ROS toxicity. Recently, peroxiredoxin (Prx)-induced relays of disulfide bond formation have been identified in budding yeast, namely the disulfide bond formation of Yap1, a crucial transcription factor for oxidative stress response, by a specific Prx Gpx3 and by a major Prx Tsa1. Here, we show that an atypical-type Prx Ahp1 can act as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides, resulting in activation of the Cad1 transcription factor that is homologous to Yap1. We demonstrate that Ahp1 is required for the formation of intermolecular Cad1 disulfide bond(s) in both an in vitro redox system and in cells treated with alkylhydroperoxide. Furthermore, we found that Cad1-dependent transcriptional activation of the HSP82 gene is dependent on Ahp1. Our results suggest that, although the Gpx3-Yap1 pathway contributes more strongly to resistance than the Ahp1-Cad1 pathway, the Ahp1-induced activation of Cad1 can function as a defense system against stress induced by alkylhydroperoxides, possibly including lipid peroxides. Thus, the Prx family of proteins have an important role in determining peroxide response signals and in transmitting the signals to specific target proteins by inducing disulfide bond formation. PMID:20145245

  1. Role of the ghrelin system in alcoholism: Acting on the growth hormone secretagogue receptor to treat alcohol-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Leggio, L

    2010-04-01

    There exists a substantial need to identify new neuropharmacological targets to treat alcohol-dependent individuals. Ghrelin represents a gut-brain peptide, initially discovered as the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). The existing literature clearly demonstrates that ghrelin affects appetite and food intake. Both animal and human studies provide evidence that ghrelin not only influences hunger but also has a role in the search for rewarding substances, such as alcohol. Animal studies provide evidence that ghrelin stimulates the reward system, acting on specific brain reward nodes, and that ghrelin signaling is required for stimulation of the reward system by alcohol. Human studies show that ethanol acutely affects ghrelin levels. Interestingly, human studies with alcohol-dependent individuals suggest that higher ghrelin levels are associated with higher self-reported measurements of alcohol craving. Altogether, these findings suggest that the ghrelin system plays a role in alcohol dependence. Ghrelin antagonists (i.e., GHS-R1a antagonists and/or inverse agonists) might affect alcohol-seeking behavior, thus having therapeutic potential in alcohol use disorders. Future laboratory and clinical studies testing this hypothesis are warranted. PMID:20440417

  2. Peroxiredoxin Ahp1 acts as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides to induce disulfide bond formation in the Cad1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2010-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during cellular metabolism are toxic to cells. As a result, cells must be able to identify ROS as a stress signal and induce stress response pathways that protect cells from ROS toxicity. Recently, peroxiredoxin (Prx)-induced relays of disulfide bond formation have been identified in budding yeast, namely the disulfide bond formation of Yap1, a crucial transcription factor for oxidative stress response, by a specific Prx Gpx3 and by a major Prx Tsa1. Here, we show that an atypical-type Prx Ahp1 can act as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides, resulting in activation of the Cad1 transcription factor that is homologous to Yap1. We demonstrate that Ahp1 is required for the formation of intermolecular Cad1 disulfide bond(s) in both an in vitro redox system and in cells treated with alkylhydroperoxide. Furthermore, we found that Cad1-dependent transcriptional activation of the HSP82 gene is dependent on Ahp1. Our results suggest that, although the Gpx3-Yap1 pathway contributes more strongly to resistance than the Ahp1-Cad1 pathway, the Ahp1-induced activation of Cad1 can function as a defense system against stress induced by alkylhydroperoxides, possibly including lipid peroxides. Thus, the Prx family of proteins have an important role in determining peroxide response signals and in transmitting the signals to specific target proteins by inducing disulfide bond formation. PMID:20145245

  3. Retention of heroin and morphine-6 beta-glucuronide analgesia in a new line of mice lacking exon 1 of MOR-1.

    PubMed

    Schuller, A G; King, M A; Zhang, J; Bolan, E; Pan, Y X; Morgan, D J; Chang, A; Czick, M E; Unterwald, E M; Pasternak, G W; Pintar, J E

    1999-02-01

    Morphine produces analgesia by activating mu opioid receptors encoded by the MOR-1 gene. Although morphine-6 beta-glucuronide (M6G), heroin and 6-acetylmorphine also are considered mu opioids, recent evidence suggests that they act through a distinct receptor mechanism. We examined this question in knockout mice containing disruptions of either the first or second coding exon of MOR-1. Mice homozygous for either MOR-1 mutation were insensitive to morphine. Heroin, 6-acetylmorphine and M6G still elicited analgesia in the exon-1 MOR-1 mutant, which also showed specific M6G binding, whereas M6G and 6-acetylmorphine were inactive in the exon-2 MOR-1 mutant. These results provide genetic evidence for a unique receptor site for M6G and heroin analgesia.

  4. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  5. Induction of delta-opioid receptor function in the midbrain after chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Hack, Stephen P; Bagley, Elena E; Chieng, Billy C H; Christie, MacDonald J

    2005-03-23

    Delta-opioid receptor (DOPr) activation fails to produce cellular physiological responses in many brain regions, including the periaqueductal gray (PAG), despite neural expression of high densities of the receptor. Previous histochemical studies have demonstrated that a variety of stimuli, including chronic morphine treatment, induce the translocation of DOPr from intracellular pools to the surface membrane of CNS neurons. PAG neurons in slices taken from untreated mice exhibited mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) but not DOPr-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic currents. In contrast, after 5-6 d of chronic morphine treatment, DOPr stimulation inhibited synaptic GABA release onto most neurons. Shorter exposure to morphine in vitro (upto 4 h) or in vivo (18 h) did not induce functional DOPr responses. DOPr-mediated presynaptic inhibition could not be induced in slices from untreated animals by increasing synaptic activity in vitro using high extracellular potassium concentrations or activation of protein kinase A. Induction of functional DOPr signaling by chronic morphine required MOPr expression, because no DOPr receptor responses were observed in MOPr knock-out mice. DOPr agonists also had no effect on miniature IPSCs in beta-arrestin-2 knock-out mice after chronic morphine. These results suggest that induction of DOPr-mediated actions in PAG by chronic morphine requires prolonged MOPr stimulation and expression of beta-arrestin-2.

  6. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Karyn E.; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Beck, Matthew; Wachtman, Lynn; Hoggatt, Amber; Xia, Dongling; Pearson, Chris; Knight, Heather; O’Connell, Micheal; Miller, Andrew D.; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-01-01

    There are no approved therapies for muscle wasting in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which portends poor disease outcomes. To determine whether a soluble ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein (ActRIIB.Fc), a ligand trap for TGF-β/activin family members including myostatin, can prevent or restore loss of lean body mass and body weight in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Fourteen pair-housed, juvenile male rhesus macaques were inoculated with SIVmac239 and, 4 wk postinoculation (WPI) treated with intramuscular injections of 10 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ wk−1 ActRIIB.Fc or saline placebo. Body weight, lean body mass, SIV titers, and somatometric measurements were assessed monthly for 16 wk. Age-matched SIV-infected rhesus macaques were injected with saline. Intervention groups did not differ at baseline. Gains in lean mass were significantly greater in the ActRIIB.Fc group than in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with greater gains in body weight (P = 0.01) and upper arm circumference than placebo. Serum CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and SIV copy numbers did not differ between groups. Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with higher muscle expression of myostatin than placebo. ActRIIB.Fc effectively blocked and reversed loss of body weight, lean mass, and fat mass in juvenile SIV-infected rhesus macaques.—O’Connell, K. E., Guo, W., Serra, C., Beck, M., Wachtman, L., Hoggatt, A., Xia, D., Pearson, C., Knight, H., O’Connell, M., Miller, A. D., Westmoreland, S. V., Bhasin, S. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:25466897

  7. Novel Nor-Homo- and Spiro-Oxetan- Steroids Target the Human Androgen Receptor and Act as Antiandrogens.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Marie; Rabe, Sebastian; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Roell, Daniela; Bartsch, Sophie; Kraft, Florian; Abraham, Tsion E; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; van Royen, Martin E; Giannis, Athanassios; Baniahmad, Aria

    2014-06-01

    The prostate adenocarcinoma is the cancer with the highest incidence for men in Western countries. Targeting the androgen receptor (AR) by antagonists is used as hormone therapy for prostate cancer (PCa), however, eventually therapy resistance occurs in most patients. In most of these cancer the AR signaling is active and thus AR remains an important drug target. Since many years we are characterizing novel chemical structural platforms to provide a broader possibility for compounds that bind to and act as AR antagonists. Here, we describe the chemical synthesis of a battery of novel steroidal derivatives as nor-homo-, spiro-oxolan- and spiro-oxetan- steroids. They modulate the transcriptional activity of the human AR. As AR antagonists, the spiro-oxetan- steroid derivatives seem to be the most potent steroid derivatives. They inhibit the transcriptional activity of both wild-type AR as well as the AR mutant T877A. In line with this, these compounds bind to the human AR and inhibit the proliferation of the human androgen-dependent growing PCa cell line LNCaP. Interestingly, the castration-resistant AR expressing human PC3-AR cells are also growth inhibited. On mechanistic level, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays with living cells indicate that the androgen-induced N/C terminal interaction of the AR is inhibited by the investigated compounds. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays in living cells suggest a higher mobility of the AR in the cell nuclei in the presence of spiro-oxetan- steroidal antagonists. Together, these findings suggest that spiro-oxetan- steroids are very useful as a chemical platform for novel AR antagonists.

  8. Meta-diamide insecticides acting on distinct sites of RDL GABA receptor from those for conventional noncompetitive antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinich; Nomura, Michikazu; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-04-01

    The RDL GABA receptor is an attractive target of insecticides. Here we demonstrate that meta-diamides [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamides] are a distinct class of RDL GABA receptor antagonists showing high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. We also suggest that the mode of action of the meta-diamides is distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs), such as fipronil, picrotoxin, lindane, dieldrin, and α-endosulfan. Using a membrane potential assay, we examined the effects of the meta-diamide 3-benzamido-N-(2-bromo-4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (meta-diamide 7) and NCAs on mutant Drosophila RDL GABA receptors expressed in Drosophila Mel-2 cells. NCAs had little or no inhibitory activity against at least one of the three mutant receptors (A2'S, A2'G, and A2'N), which were reported to confer resistance to NCAs. In contrast, meta-diamide 7 inhibited all three A2' mutant receptors, at levels comparable to its activity with the wild-type receptor. Furthermore, the A2'S·T6'V mutation almost abolished the inhibitory effects of all NCAs. However, meta-diamide 7 inhibited the A2'S・T6'S mutant receptor at the same level as its activity with the wild-type receptor. In contrast, a G336M mutation in the third transmembrane domain of the RDL GABA receptor abolished the inhibitory activities of meta-diamide 7, although the G336M mutation had little effect on the inhibitory activities of conventional NCAs. Molecular modeling studies also suggested that the binding site of meta-diamides was different from those of NCAs. Meta-diamide insecticides are expected to be prominent insecticides effective against A2' mutant RDL GABA receptors with a different mode of action.

  9. Gender Interacts with Opioid Receptor Polymorphism A118G and Serotonin Receptor Polymorphism -1438 A/G on Speed-Dating Success.

    PubMed

    Wu, Karen; Chen, Chuansheng; Moyzis, Robert K; Greenberger, Ellen; Yu, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    We examined an understudied but potentially important source of romantic attraction-genetics-using a speed-dating paradigm. The mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) polymorphism A118G (rs1799971) and the serotonin receptor (HTR2A) polymorphism -1438 A/G (rs6311) were studied because they have been implicated in social affiliation. Guided by the social role theory of mate selection and prior genetic evidence, we examined these polymorphisms' gender-specific associations with speed-dating success (i.e., date offers, mate desirability). A total of 262 single Asian Americans went on speed-dates with members of the opposite gender and completed interaction questionnaires about their partners. Consistent with our prediction, significant gender-by-genotype interactions were found for speed-dating success. Specifically, the minor variant of A118G (G-allele), which has been linked to submissiveness/social sensitivity, predicted greater speed-dating success for women, whereas the minor variant of -1438 A/G (G-allele), which has been linked to leadership/social dominance, predicted greater speed-dating success for men. For both polymorphisms, reverse "dampening" effects of minor variants were found for opposite-gender counterparts. These results support previous research on the importance of the opioid and serotonergic systems in social affiliation, indicating that their influence extends to dating success, with opposite, yet gender-norm consistent, effects for men and women. PMID:27193909

  10. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain.

  11. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain. PMID:25286119

  12. D1-type dopamine receptors inhibit growth cone motility in cultured retina neurons: evidence that neurotransmitters act as morphogenic growth regulators in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, K L; DeMello, F G; Klein, W L

    1988-01-01

    Precedent exists for the early development and subsequent down-regulation of neurotransmitter receptor systems in the vertebrate central nervous system, but the function of such embryonic receptors has not been established. Here we show that stimulation of early-developing dopamine receptors in avian retina cells greatly inhibits the motility of neuronal growth cones. Neurons from embryonic chicken retinas were cultured in low-density monolayers, and their growth cones were observed with phase-contrast or video-enhanced-contrast-differential-interference-contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. Approximately 25% of the neurons responded to micromolar dopamine with a rapid reduction in filopodial activity followed by a flattening of growth cones and retraction of neurites. The response occurred at all ages examined (embryonic day-8 retinal neurons cultured on polylysine-coated coverslips for 1-7 days), although neurite retraction was greatest in younger cultures. Effects of dopamine on growth cone function could be reversed by haloperidol or (+)-SCH 23390, whereas forskolin elicited a response similar to dopamine; these data show the response was receptor-mediated, acting through a D1-type system, and are consistent with the use of cAMP as a second messenger. The experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that neurotransmitters, besides mediating transynaptic signaling in the adult, may have a role in neuronal differentiation as growth regulators. Images PMID:3380807

  13. D1-type dopamine receptors inhibit growth cone motility in cultured retina neurons: evidence that neurotransmitters act as morphogenic growth regulators in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, K L; DeMello, F G; Klein, W L

    1988-01-01

    Precedent exists for the early development and subsequent down-regulation of neurotransmitter receptor systems in the vertebrate central nervous system, but the function of such embryonic receptors has not been established. Here we show that stimulation of early-developing dopamine receptors in avian retina cells greatly inhibits the motility of neuronal growth cones. Neurons from embryonic chicken retinas were cultured in low-density monolayers, and their growth cones were observed with phase-contrast or video-enhanced-contrast-differential-interference-contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. Approximately 25% of the neurons responded to micromolar dopamine with a rapid reduction in filopodial activity followed by a flattening of growth cones and retraction of neurites. The response occurred at all ages examined (embryonic day-8 retinal neurons cultured on polylysine-coated coverslips for 1-7 days), although neurite retraction was greatest in younger cultures. Effects of dopamine on growth cone function could be reversed by haloperidol or (+)-SCH 23390, whereas forskolin elicited a response similar to dopamine; these data show the response was receptor-mediated, acting through a D1-type system, and are consistent with the use of cAMP as a second messenger. The experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that neurotransmitters, besides mediating transynaptic signaling in the adult, may have a role in neuronal differentiation as growth regulators. Images PMID:3357895

  14. Pharmacological characterization of GSK1004723, a novel, long-acting antagonist at histamine H1 and H3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Slack, RJ; Russell, LJ; Hall, DA; Luttmann, MA; Ford, AJ; Saunders, KA; Hodgson, ST; Connor, HE; Browning, C; Clark, KL

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Preclinical pharmacological characterization of GSK1004723, a novel, dual histamine H1 and H3 receptor antagonist. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH GSK1004723 was characterized in vitro and in vivo using methods that included radioligand binding, intracellular calcium mobilization, cAMP production, GTPγS binding, superfused human bronchus and guinea pig whole body plethysmography. KEY RESULTS In cell membranes over-expressing human recombinant H1 and H3 receptors, GSK1004723 displayed high affinity, competitive binding (H1 pKi = 10.2; H3 pKi = 10.6). In addition, GSK1004723 demonstrated slow dissociation from both receptors with a t1/2 of 1.2 and 1.5 h for H1 and H3 respectively. GSK1004723 specifically antagonized H1 receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium and H3 receptor mediated increases in GTPγS binding. The antagonism exerted was retained after cell washing, consistent with slow dissociation from H1 and H3 receptors. Duration of action was further evaluated using superfused human bronchus preparations. GSK1004723 (100 nmol·L−1) reversed an established contractile response to histamine. When GSK1004723 was removed from the perfusate, only 20% recovery of the histamine response was observed over 10 h. Moreover, 21 h post-exposure to GSK1004723 there remained almost complete antagonism of responses to histamine. In vivo pharmacology was studied in conscious guinea pigs in which nasal congestion induced by intranasal histamine was measured indirectly (plethysmography). GSK1004723 (0.1 and 1 mg·mL−1 intranasal) antagonized the histamine-induced response with a duration of up to 72 h. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS GSK1004723 is a potent and selective histamine H1 and H3 receptor antagonist with a long duration of action and represents a potential novel therapy for allergic rhinitis. PMID:22022805

  15. The selective orexin receptor 1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity associated with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Michel A.; Sciarretta, Carla; Pasquali, Anne; Jenck, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The orexin system regulates feeding, nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. Acute pharmacological blockade of orexin receptor 1 (OXR-1) in rodents induces satiety and reduces normal and palatable food intake. Genetic OXR-1 deletion in mice improves hyperglycemia under high-fat (HF) diet conditions. Here we investigated the effects of chronic treatment with the novel selective OXR-1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rats were fed either standard chow (SC) or a cafeteria (CAF) diet comprised of intermittent human snacks and a constant free choice between a HF/sweet (HF/S) diet and SC for 13 weeks. Thereafter the SC group was treated with vehicle (for 4 weeks) and the CAF group was divided into a vehicle and an ACT-335827 treatment group. Energy and water intake, food preference, and indicators of MetS (abdominal obesity, glucose homeostasis, plasma lipids, and blood pressure) were monitored. Hippocampus-dependent memory, which can be impaired by DIO, was assessed. CAF diet fed rats treated with ACT-335827 consumed less of the HF/S diet and more of the SC, but did not change their snack or total kcal intake compared to vehicle-treated rats. ACT-335827 increased water intake and the high-density lipoprotein associated cholesterol proportion of total circulating cholesterol. ACT-335827 slightly increased body weight gain (4% vs. controls) and feed efficiency in the absence of hyperphagia. These effects were not associated with significant changes in the elevated fasting glucose and triglyceride (TG) plasma levels, glucose intolerance, elevated blood pressure, and adiposity due to CAF diet consumption. Neither CAF diet consumption alone nor ACT-335827 affected memory. In conclusion, the main metabolic characteristics associated with DIO and MetS in rats remained unaffected by chronic ACT-335827 treatment, suggesting that pharmacological OXR-1 blockade has minimal impact in this model. PMID

  16. The selective orexin receptor 1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Sciarretta, Carla; Pasquali, Anne; Jenck, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The orexin system regulates feeding, nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. Acute pharmacological blockade of orexin receptor 1 (OXR-1) in rodents induces satiety and reduces normal and palatable food intake. Genetic OXR-1 deletion in mice improves hyperglycemia under high-fat (HF) diet conditions. Here we investigated the effects of chronic treatment with the novel selective OXR-1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rats were fed either standard chow (SC) or a cafeteria (CAF) diet comprised of intermittent human snacks and a constant free choice between a HF/sweet (HF/S) diet and SC for 13 weeks. Thereafter the SC group was treated with vehicle (for 4 weeks) and the CAF group was divided into a vehicle and an ACT-335827 treatment group. Energy and water intake, food preference, and indicators of MetS (abdominal obesity, glucose homeostasis, plasma lipids, and blood pressure) were monitored. Hippocampus-dependent memory, which can be impaired by DIO, was assessed. CAF diet fed rats treated with ACT-335827 consumed less of the HF/S diet and more of the SC, but did not change their snack or total kcal intake compared to vehicle-treated rats. ACT-335827 increased water intake and the high-density lipoprotein associated cholesterol proportion of total circulating cholesterol. ACT-335827 slightly increased body weight gain (4% vs. controls) and feed efficiency in the absence of hyperphagia. These effects were not associated with significant changes in the elevated fasting glucose and triglyceride (TG) plasma levels, glucose intolerance, elevated blood pressure, and adiposity due to CAF diet consumption. Neither CAF diet consumption alone nor ACT-335827 affected memory. In conclusion, the main metabolic characteristics associated with DIO and MetS in rats remained unaffected by chronic ACT-335827 treatment, suggesting that pharmacological OXR-1 blockade has minimal impact in this model. PMID

  17. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells.

  18. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  19. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  20. Sodium Solute Symporter and Cadherin Proteins Act as Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba Toxin Functional Receptors in Tribolium castaneum*

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Estefanía; Schoppmeier, Michael; Real, M. Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins interact with proteins in the midgut of susceptible coleopteran insects is crucial to fully explain the molecular bases of Bt specificity and insecticidal action. In this work, aminopeptidase N (TcAPN-I), E-cadherin (TcCad1), and sodium solute symporter (TcSSS) have been identified by ligand blot as putative Cry3Ba toxin-binding proteins in Tribolium castaneum (Tc) larvae. RNA interference knockdown of TcCad1 or TcSSS proteins resulted in decreased susceptibility to Cry3Ba toxin, demonstrating the Cry toxin receptor functionality for these proteins. In contrast, TcAPN-I silencing had no effect on Cry3Ba larval toxicity, suggesting that this protein is not relevant in the Cry3Ba toxin mode of action in Tc. Remarkable features of TcSSS protein were the presence of cadherin repeats in its amino acid sequence and that a TcSSS peptide fragment containing a sequence homologous to a binding epitope found in Manduca sexta and Tenebrio molitor Bt cadherin functional receptors enhanced Cry3Ba toxicity. This is the first time that the involvement of a sodium solute symporter protein as a Bt functional receptor has been demonstrated. The role of this novel receptor in Bt toxicity against coleopteran insects together with the lack of receptor functionality of aminopeptidase N proteins might account for some of the differences in toxin specificity between Lepidoptera and Coleoptera insect orders. PMID:23645668

  1. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  2. Distinct mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor mechanisms underlie low sociability and depressive-like behaviors during heroin abstinence.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Ayranci, Gulebru; Chu-Sin-Chung, Paul; Matifas, Audrey; Koebel, Pascale; Filliol, Dominique; Befort, Katia; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-10-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder involving recurring intoxication, withdrawal, and craving episodes. Escaping this vicious cycle requires maintenance of abstinence for extended periods of time and is a true challenge for addicted individuals. The emergence of depressive symptoms, including social withdrawal, is considered a main cause for relapse, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we establish a mouse model of protracted abstinence to heroin, a major abused opiate, where both emotional and working memory deficits unfold. We show that delta and kappa opioid receptor (DOR and KOR, respectively) knockout mice develop either stronger or reduced emotional disruption during heroin abstinence, establishing DOR and KOR activities as protective and vulnerability factors, respectively, that regulate the severity of abstinence. Further, we found that chronic treatment with the antidepressant drug fluoxetine prevents emergence of low sociability, with no impact on the working memory deficit, implicating serotonergic mechanisms predominantly in emotional aspects of abstinence symptoms. Finally, targeting the main serotonergic brain structure, we show that gene knockout of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) before heroin exposure abolishes the development of social withdrawal. This is the first result demonstrating that intermittent chronic MOR activation at the level of DRN represents an essential mechanism contributing to low sociability during protracted heroin abstinence. Altogether, our findings reveal crucial and distinct roles for all three opioid receptors in the development of emotional alterations that follow a history of heroin exposure and open the way towards understanding opioid system-mediated serotonin homeostasis in heroin abuse. PMID:24874714

  3. Sex-related differences in mechanical nociception and antinociception produced by mu- and kappa-opioid receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Andrew C; Smith, Eric S; Picker, Mitchell J

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies indicate that in antinociceptive procedures employing thermal, chemical and electrical stimuli, opioids are generally more potent in male than female rodents. The purpose of the present study was to examine nociception and opioid antinociception in male and female rats using a mechanical nociceptive stimulus. Results indicated that males had a higher threshold for nociception, and in tests in which a constant pressure was applied to the hindpaw, the paw withdrawal latencies were consistently longer in males. Opioids with activity at the mu receptor, including levorphanol, morphine, dezocine, buprenorphine, butorphanol and nalbuphine, were generally more potent and/or effective in males. In contrast, sex differences were not consistently observed with the kappa-opioid receptor agonists spiradoline, (5,7,8b)-N-methyl-N[2-1(1-pyrrolidinyl),1-oxaspiro[4,5]dec-8-yl benzeneacetamide (U69593), trans-(+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide (U50488), enadoline, ethylketocyclazocine, and nalorphine. These findings suggest that males and females differ in their responsiveness to mechanical nociception and that sex differences in sensitivity to kappa-, but not mu-, opioid receptor agonists are specific to certain nociceptive stimulus modalities. PMID:12354566

  4. Distinct Mu, Delta, and Kappa Opioid Receptor Mechanisms Underlie Low Sociability and Depressive-Like Behaviors During Heroin Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Ayranci, Gulebru; Chu-Sin-Chung, Paul; Matifas, Audrey; Koebel, Pascale; Filliol, Dominique; Befort, Katia; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder involving recurring intoxication, withdrawal, and craving episodes. Escaping this vicious cycle requires maintenance of abstinence for extended periods of time and is a true challenge for addicted individuals. The emergence of depressive symptoms, including social withdrawal, is considered a main cause for relapse, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we establish a mouse model of protracted abstinence to heroin, a major abused opiate, where both emotional and working memory deficits unfold. We show that delta and kappa opioid receptor (DOR and KOR, respectively) knockout mice develop either stronger or reduced emotional disruption during heroin abstinence, establishing DOR and KOR activities as protective and vulnerability factors, respectively, that regulate the severity of abstinence. Further, we found that chronic treatment with the antidepressant drug fluoxetine prevents emergence of low sociability, with no impact on the working memory deficit, implicating serotonergic mechanisms predominantly in emotional aspects of abstinence symptoms. Finally, targeting the main serotonergic brain structure, we show that gene knockout of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) before heroin exposure abolishes the development of social withdrawal. This is the first result demonstrating that intermittent chronic MOR activation at the level of DRN represents an essential mechanism contributing to low sociability during protracted heroin abstinence. Altogether, our findings reveal crucial and distinct roles for all three opioid receptors in the development of emotional alterations that follow a history of heroin exposure and open the way towards understanding opioid system-mediated serotonin homeostasis in heroin abuse. PMID:24874714

  5. Adropin acts in brain to inhibit water drinking: potential interaction with the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR19.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lauren M; Yosten, Gina L C; Samson, Willis K

    2016-03-15

    Adropin, a recently described peptide hormone produced in the brain and liver, has been reported to have physiologically relevant actions on glucose homeostasis and lipogenesis, and to exert significant effect on endothelial function. We describe a central nervous system action of adropin to inhibit water drinking and identify a potential adropin receptor, the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR19. Reduction in GPR19 mRNA levels in medial basal hypothalamus of male rats resulted in the loss of the inhibitory effect of adropin on water deprivation-induced thirst. The identification of a novel brain action of adropin and a candidate receptor for the peptide should extend and accelerate the study of the potential therapeutic value of adropin or its mimetics for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:26739651

  6. The Rapidly Acting Antidepressant Ketamine and the mGlu2/3 Receptor Antagonist LY341495 Rapidly Engage Dopaminergic Mood Circuits.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Monn, J A; Schoepp, D D; Li, X; Overshiner, C; Mitchell, S N; Carter, G; Johnson, B; Rasmussen, K; Rorick-Kehn, L M

    2016-07-01

    Ketamine is a rapidly acting antidepressant in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully established, inquiry to date has focused on the triggering of synaptogenesis transduction pathways via glutamatergic mechanisms. Preclinical data suggest that blockade of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors shares many overlapping features and mechanisms with ketamine and may also provide rapid efficacy for TRD patients. Central dopamine circuitry is recognized as an end target for mood regulation and hedonic valuation and yet has been largely neglected in mechanistic studies of antidepressant-relevant effects of ketamine. Herein, we evaluated the changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission after acute administration of ketamine and the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495 [(2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl) propanoic acid ] in preclinical models using electrophysiologic, neurochemical, and behavioral endpoints. When given acutely, both ketamine and LY341495, but not the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, increased the number of spontaneously active dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), increased extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex, and enhanced the locomotor stimulatory effects of the dopamine D2/3 receptor agonist quinpirole. Further, both ketamine and LY341495 reduced immobility time in the tail-suspension assay in CD1 mice, which are relatively resistant to SSRI antidepressants. Both the VTA neuronal activation and the antidepressant phenotype induced by ketamine and LY341495 were attenuated by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo- (9CI)-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide, indicating AMPA-dependent effects. These findings provide another overlapping mechanism of action of ketamine and mGlu2/3 receptor

  7. Host cell heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate attachment and entry of Listeria monocytogenes, and the listerial surface protein ActA is involved in heparan sulfate receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Domínguez, C; Vázquez-Boland, J A; Carrasco-Marín, E; López-Mato, P; Leyva-Cobián, F

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes interacts with the host cell surface remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) in listerial infection. Pretreatment of bacteria with heparin or heparan sulfate (HS), but not with other glycosaminoglycans, inhibited attachment and subsequent uptake by IC-21 murine macrophages and CHO epithelial-like cells. Specific removal of HS from target cells with heparinase III significantly impaired listerial adhesion and invasion. Mutant CHO cells deficient in HS synthesis bound and internalized significantly fewer bacteria than wild-type cells did. Pretreatment of target cells with the HS-binding proteins fibronectin and platelet factor 4, or with heparinase III, impaired listerial infectivity only in those cells expressing HS. Moreover, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HS-binding ligand in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (pepPf1) inhibited listerial attachment to IC-21 and CHO cells. A motif very similar to the HS-binding site of pepPf1 was found in the N-terminal region of ActA, the L. monocytogenes surface protein responsible for actin-based bacterial motility and cell-to-cell spread. In the same region of ActA, several clusters of positively charged amino acids which could function as HS-binding domains were identified. An ActA-deficient mutant was significantly impaired in attachment and entry due to altered HS recognition functions. This work shows that specific interaction with an HSPG receptor present on the surface of both professional and nonprofessional phagocytes is involved in L. monocytogenes cytoadhesion and invasion and strongly suggests that the bacterial surface protein ActA may be a ligand mediating HSPG receptor recognition. PMID:8975895

  8. The terpenoids Myrtenol and Verbenol act on δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors and enhance tonic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    van Brederode, Johannes; Atak, Sinem; Kessler, Artur; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Villmann, Carmen; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-08-15

    Sideritis plants and their extracts have been used in traditional medicine as sedatives, anxiolytics and anticonvulsant agents. Pinenes are the most prevalent of the volatile aroma components in Siderites extracts and the pinene metabolites myrtenol and verbenol have been identified as the most potent positive allosteric modulators of synaptic GABAA receptors composed of α1β2 and α1β2γ2 subunits. In view of their therapeutic spectrum, we wondered whether these two terpenoids would also augment tonic GABA currents mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing the δ subunit. When we expressed α4β2δ receptors in HEK293 cells, we found that co-application of myrtenol or verbenol enhanced whole-cell current responses to GABA by up to 100%. Consistent with their effects on heterologous α1β2γ2 receptors, we found that myrtenol and verbenol, when co-applied with GABA via local perfusion, increased the amplitude and area of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSCs) recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from granule cells in the dentate gyrus of mouse hippocampal brain slices. In addition, co-application of terpenoids with GABA was also able to enhance tonic GABA current, measured from the change in baseline current and current noise, compared to GABA perfusion alone. Our results suggest that myrtenol and verbenol act as positive allosteric modulators at synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, thereby augmenting phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our study reveals an important pharmacological and therapeutic target of bicyclic monoterpenoids.

  9. A liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} alternative splicing variant (LXRBSV) acts as an RNA co-activator of LXR-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koshi; Ishida, Emi; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-12-25

    We report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel transcriptional co-activator, termed LXRBSV. LXRBSV is an alternative splicing variant of liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} LXRBSV has an intronic sequence between exons 2 and 3 in the mouse LXR-{beta} gene. The LXRBSV gene is expressed in various tissues including the liver and brain. We sub-cloned LXRBSV into pSG5, a mammalian expression vector, and LXRBSV in pSG5 augmented human Sterol Response Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c promoter activity in HepG2 cells in a ligand (TO901317) dependent manner. The transactivation mediated by LXRBSV is selective for LXR-{beta}. The LXRBSV protein was deduced to be 64 amino acids in length; however, a GAL4-LXRBSV fusion protein was not able to induce transactivation. Serial deletion constructs of LXRBSV demonstrated that the intronic sequence inserted in LXRBSV is required for its transactivation activity. An ATG mutant of LXRBSV was able to induce transactivation as wild type. Furthermore, LXRBSV functions in the presence of cycloheximide. Taken together, we have concluded that LXRBSV acts as an RNA transcript not as a protein. In the current study, we have demonstrated for the first time that an alternative splicing variant of a nuclear receptor acts as an RNA co-activator.

  10. Early cerebral activities of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A appear to act via the somatostatin receptor subtype sst(2).

    PubMed Central

    Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Madeo, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been aroused by the specific actions of bisphenol A (BPA). The present investigation represents a first study dealing with the interaction of BPA with the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtype (sst(2)) in the rat limbic circuit. After treating pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats with two doses (400 microg/kg/day; 40 microg/kg/day) of BPA, the binding activity of the above receptor subtype was evaluated in some limbic regions of the offspring. The higher dose proved to be the more effective one, as demonstrated by the elevated affinity of sst(2) with its specific radioligand, [(125)I]-Tyr(0)somatostatin-14. The most dramatic effects of BPA on sst(2) levels occurred at the low-affinity states of such a subtype in some telencephalic limbic areas of postnatal rats (10 days of age; postnatal day [PND] 10). These included lower (p < 0.05) sst(2) levels in the gyrus dentate of the hippocampus and basomedial nucleus of the amygdala; significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels were observed only for the high-affinity states of the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. A similar trend was maintained in PND 23 rats with the exception of much lower levels of the high-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in the amygdala nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. However, greater changes produced by this environmental estrogen were reported when the binding activity of sst(2) was checked in the presence of the two more important selective agonists (zolpidem and Ro 15-4513) specific for the alpha-containing Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor complex. In this case, an even greater potentiating effect (p < 0.001) was mainly obtained for the low-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in PND 10 animals, with the exception of the high-affinity type in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and gyrus dentate. These results support the contention that an sst(2) subtype alpha-containing GABA type A receptor system might

  11. Angiotensin II centrally induces frequent detrusor contractility of the bladder by acting on brain angiotensin II type 1 receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Bunya; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Higashi, Youichirou; Honda, Masashi; Sejima, Takehiro; Saito, Motoaki; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays an important role in the brain as a neurotransmitter and is involved in psychological stress reactions, for example through activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. We investigated the effects of centrally administered Ang II on the micturition reflex, which is potentially affected by the sympatho-adrenomedullary system, and brain Ang II receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0 g/kg, intraperitoneally) male rats. Central administration of Ang II (0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 nmol per rat, intracerebroventricularly, icv) but not vehicle rapidly and dose-dependently decreased the urinary bladder intercontraction interval, without altering the bladder detrusor pressure. Central administration of antagonists of Ang II type 1 but not type 2 receptors inhibited the Ang II-induced shortening of intercontraction intervals. Administration of the highest dose of Ang II (0.07 nmol per rat, icv) but not lower doses (0.01 and 0.02 nmol per rat, icv) elevated the plasma concentration of adrenaline. Bilateral adrenalectomy reduced Ang II-induced elevation in adrenaline, but had no effect on the Ang II-induced shortening of the intercontraction interval. These data suggest that central administration of Ang II increases urinary frequency by acting on brain Ang II type 1 receptors, independent of activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. PMID:26908391

  12. Glutamate Receptor Antagonists as Fast-Acting Therapeutic Alternatives for the Treatment of Depression: Ketamine and Other Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Niciu, Mark J.; Henter, Ioline D.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Charney, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid and potent antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder and bipolar depression. These effects are in direct contrast to the more modest effects seen after weeks of treatment with classic monoaminergic antidepressants. Numerous open-label and case studies similarly validate ketamine’s antidepressant properties. These clinical findings have been reverse-translated into preclinical models in an effort to elucidate ketamine’s antidepressant mechanism of action, and three important targets have been identified: mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Current clinical and preclinical research is focused on (a) prolonging/maintaining ketamine’s antidepressant effects, (b) developing more selective NMDA receptor antagonists free of ketamine’s adverse effects, and (c) identifying predictor, mediator/moderator, and treatment response biomarkers of ketamine’s antidepressant effects. PMID:24392693

  13. Human sperm liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) acts as a downstream target of the estrogen signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Daniela; Santoro, Marta; Carpino, Amalia; Perrotta, Ida; De Amicis, Francesca; Sirianni, Rosa; Rago, Vittoria; Gervasi, Serena; Aquila, Saveria

    2015-10-01

    In the last decade, the study of human sperm anatomy, at molecular level, has revealed the presence of several nuclear protein receptors. In this work, we examined the expression profile and the ultrastructural localization of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) in human spermatozoa. We evidenced the presence of the receptor by Western blotting and real time-RT-PCR. Furthermore, we used immunogold electron microscopy to investigate the sperm anatomical regions containing LRH-1. The receptor was mainly located in the sperm head, whereas its expression was reduced in the neck and across the tail. Interestingly, we observed the presence of LRH-1 in different stages of testicular germ cell development by immunohistochemistry. In somatic cells, it has been suggested that the LRH-1 pathway is tightly linked with estrogen signaling and the important role of estradiol has been widely studied in sperm cells. To assess the significance of LRH-1 in male gametes and to deepen understanding of the role of estrogens in these cells, we investigated important sperm features such as motility, survival and capacitation. Spermatozoa were treated with 10 nm estradiol and the inhibition of LRH-1 reversed the estradiol stimulatory action. From our data, we discovered that human spermatozoa can be considered a new site of expression for LRH-1, evidencing its role in sperm motility, survival and cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, we may presume that in spermatozoa the LRH-1 effects are closely integrated with the estrogen signaling, supporting LRH-1 as a downstream effector of the estradiol pathway on some sperm functions.

  14. GGNBP2 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting estrogen receptor α activity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zi-Jian; Hu, YunHui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Xian; Zhou, Huaxin; Ding, Jixiang; Klinge, Carolyn M; Radde, Brandie N; Cooney, Austin J; Zhang, Jin; Lei, Zhenmin

    2016-07-01

    Gametogenetin-binding protein 2 (GGNBP2) is encoded in human chromosome 17q12-q23, a region known as a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility locus. GGNBP2, also referred to ZFP403, has a single C2H2 zinc finger and a consensus LxxLL nuclear receptor-binding motif. Here, we demonstrate that GGNBP2 expression is reduced in primary human breast tumors and in breast cancer cell lines, including T47D, MCF-7, LCC9, LY2, and MDA-MB-231 compared with normal, immortalized estrogen receptor α (ERα) negative MCF-10A and MCF10F breast epithelial cells. Overexpression of GGNBP2 inhibits the proliferation of T47D and MCF-7 ERα positive breast cancer cells without affecting MCF-10A and MCF10F. Stable GGNBP2 overexpression in T47D cells inhibits 17β-estradiol (E2)-stimulated proliferation as well as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and xenograft tumor growth in mice. We further demonstrate that GGNBP2 protein physically interacts with ERα, inhibits E2-induced activation of estrogen response element-driven reporter activity, and attenuates ER target gene expression in T47D cells. In summary, our in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that GGNBP2 is a novel breast cancer tumor suppressor functioning as a nuclear receptor corepressor to inhibit ERα activity and tumorigenesis. PMID:27357812

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Acts Primarily via Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α to Promote Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, Steven; Haddock, Luis J.; Mukai, Shizuo; Kazlauskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a nonneovascular blinding disease and the leading cause for failure in surgical repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. Once formed, PVR is difficult to treat. Hence, there is an acute interest in developing approaches to prevent PVR. Of the many growth factors and cytokines that accumulate in vitreous as PVR develops, neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A has recently been found to prevent PVR in at least one animal model. The goal of this study was to test if Food and Drug Administration–approved agents could protect the eye from PVR in multiple animal models and to further investigate the underlying mechanisms. Neutralizing VEGF with aflibercept (VEGF Trap-Eye) safely and effectively protected rabbits from PVR in multiple models of disease. Furthermore, aflibercept reduced the bioactivity of both experimental and clinical PVR vitreous. Finally, although VEGF could promote some PVR-associated cellular responses via VEGF receptors expressed on the retinal pigment epithelial cells that drive this disease, VEGF's major contribution to vitreal bioactivity occurred via platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Thus, VEGF promotes PVR by a noncanonical ability to engage platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. These findings indicate that VEGF contributes to nonangiogenic diseases and that anti–VEGF-based therapies may be effective on a wider spectrum of diseases than previously appreciated. PMID:25261788

  16. Preliminary investigation into a potential role for myostatin and its receptor (ActRIIB) in lean and obese horses and ponies.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Philippa K; Bing, Chen; Harris, Patricia A; Maltin, Charlotte A; Grove-White, Dai; Argo, Caroline McG

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a widespread problem across the leisure population of horses and ponies in industrialised nations. Skeletal muscle is a major contributor to whole body resting energy requirements and communicates with other tissues through the secretion of myokines into the circulation. Myostatin, a myokine and negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, has been implicated in obesity development in other species. This study evaluated gene and protein expression of myostatin and its receptor, ActRIIB in adipose tissues and skeletal muscles and serum myostatin concentrations in six lean and six obese animals to explore putative associations between these factors and obesity in horses and ponies. Myostatin mRNA expression was increased while ActRIIB mRNA was decreased in skeletal muscles of obese animals but these differences were absent at the protein level. Myostatin mRNA was increased in crest fat of obese animals but neither myostatin nor ActRIIB proteins were detected in this tissue. Mean circulating myostatin concentrations were significantly higher in obese than in lean groups; 4.98 ng/ml (±2.71) and 9.00 ng/ml (±2.04) for the lean and obese groups, respectively. In addition, there was a significant positive association between these levels and myostatin gene expression in skeletal muscles (average R2 = 0.58; p<0.05). Together, these results provide further basis for the speculation that myostatin and its receptor may play a role in obesity in horses and ponies. PMID:25390640

  17. Preliminary Investigation into a Potential Role for Myostatin and Its Receptor (ActRIIB) in Lean and Obese Horses and Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Philippa K.; Bing, Chen; Harris, Patricia A.; Maltin, Charlotte A.; Grove-White, Dai; Argo, Caroline McG.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a widespread problem across the leisure population of horses and ponies in industrialised nations. Skeletal muscle is a major contributor to whole body resting energy requirements and communicates with other tissues through the secretion of myokines into the circulation. Myostatin, a myokine and negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, has been implicated in obesity development in other species. This study evaluated gene and protein expression of myostatin and its receptor, ActRIIB in adipose tissues and skeletal muscles and serum myostatin concentrations in six lean and six obese animals to explore putative associations between these factors and obesity in horses and ponies. Myostatin mRNA expression was increased while ActRIIB mRNA was decreased in skeletal muscles of obese animals but these differences were absent at the protein level. Myostatin mRNA was increased in crest fat of obese animals but neither myostatin nor ActRIIB proteins were detected in this tissue. Mean circulating myostatin concentrations were significantly higher in obese than in lean groups; 4.98 ng/ml (±2.71) and 9.00 ng/ml (±2.04) for the lean and obese groups, respectively. In addition, there was a significant positive association between these levels and myostatin gene expression in skeletal muscles (average R2 = 0.58; p<0.05). Together, these results provide further basis for the speculation that myostatin and its receptor may play a role in obesity in horses and ponies. PMID:25390640

  18. In silico identification and pharmacological evaluation of novel endocrine disrupting chemicals that act via the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    McRobb, Fiona M; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM-3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption.

  19. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders.

  20. In Silico Identification and Pharmacological Evaluation of Novel Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals That Act via the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM–3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption. PMID:24928891

  1. β-arrestin-2 regulates NMDA receptor function in spinal lamina II neurons and duration of persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Xie, Rou-Gang; Gao, Yong-Jing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Zhao, Lin-Xia; Bang, Sangsu; Berta, Temugin; Park, Chul-Kyu; Lay, Mark; Chen, Wei; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of acute pain transition to chronic pain are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate an active role of β-arrestin 2 (Arrb2) in regulating spinal cord NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function and the duration of pain. Intrathecal injection of the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2), NMe-Phe(4), Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin produces paradoxical behavioural responses: early-phase analgesia and late-phase mechanical allodynia which requires NMDAR; both phases are prolonged in Arrb2 knockout (KO) mice. Spinal administration of NMDA induces GluN2B-dependent mechanical allodynia, which is prolonged in Arrb2-KO mice and conditional KO mice lacking Arrb2 in presynaptic terminals expressing Nav1.8. Loss of Arrb2 also results in prolongation of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain and enhancement of GluN2B-mediated NMDA currents in spinal lamina IIo not lamina I neurons. Finally, spinal over-expression of Arrb2 reverses chronic neuropathic pain after nerve injury. Thus, spinal Arrb2 may serve as an intracellular gate for acute to chronic pain transition via desensitization of NMDAR. PMID:27538456

  2. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABA(A) receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam C; Griffith, Theanne N; Tsikolia, Maia; Kotey, Francesca O; Gill, Nikhila; Humbert, Danielle J; Watt, Erin E; Yermolina, Yuliya A; Goel, Shikha; El-Ghendy, Bahaa; Hall, C Dennis

    2011-09-30

    GABA(A) receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanols were investigated on recombinant human γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A), α(1)β(2)γ(2s)) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and compared to the modulatory effects on GABA currents observed with exposures to the intravenous anaesthetic agent, propofol. Submaximal EC(20) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 μM cyclohexanols. For instance, at 30 μM 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol (a novel compound) GABA responses were increased ~3-fold (although similar enhancements were achieved at 3 μM propofol). As regards rank order for modulation by the cyclohexanol analogues at 30 μM, the % enhancements for 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol~2,6-di-sec-butylcyclohexanol ≫2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexanol~4-tert-butylcyclohexanol>cyclohexanol~cyclopentanol~2-methylcyclohexanol. We further tested the potencies of the cyclohexanol analogues as general anaesthetics using a tadpole in vivo assay. Both 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol and 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol were effective as anaesthetics with EC(50)s of 14.0 μM and 13.1 μM respectively, while other cyclohexanols with bulkier side chains were less potent. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyclohexanols are both positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors currents and anaesthetics. The positioning and size of the alkyl groups at the 2 and 6 positions on the cyclohexanol ring were critical determinants of activity.

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) acts as a vasodepressor agent via angiotensin II type 2 receptors in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Pia E; Gaspari, Tracey A; Widdop, Robert E

    2005-05-01

    Given that angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-[1-7]) has been frequently reported to exert direct in vitro vascular effects but less often in vivo, we investigated whether a vasodepressor effect of Ang-(1-7) could be unmasked acutely in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) against a background of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockade. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured over a 5-day protocol in various groups of rats randomized to receive the following drug combinations: saline, AT1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist candesartan (0.01 or 0.1 mg/kg IV) alone, Ang-(1-7) (5 pmol/min) alone, candesartan plus Ang-(1-7), and candesartan plus Ang-(1-7) and angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor (AT2R) antagonist PD123319 (50 microg/kg per minute). In Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, saline, Ang-(1-7), or candesartan alone caused no significant alteration in MAP, whereas Ang-(1-7) coadministered with candesartan caused a marked, sustained reduction in MAP. A similar unmasking of a vasodepressor response to Ang-(1-7) during AT1R blockade was observed in SHR. Moreover, the AT(2)R antagonist PD123319 markedly attenuated the enhanced depressor response evoked by the Ang-(1-7)/candesartan combination in SHR and WKY rats, whereas in other experiments, the putative Ang-(1-7) antagonist A-779 (5 and 50 pmol/min) did not attenuate this vasodepressor effect. In separate experiments, the bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist HOE 140 (100 microg/kg IV) or the NO synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1 mg/kg IV) abolished the depressor effect of Ang-(1-7) in the presence of candesartan. Collectively, these results suggest that Ang-(1-7) evoked a depressor response during AT1R blockade via activation of AT2R, which involves the bradykinin-NO cascade.

  4. Effect of clobenpropit, a centrally acting histamine H3-receptor antagonist, on electroshock- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; van der Goot, H

    1998-01-01

    The anticonvulsant activity of clobenpropit, an isothiourea derivative of histamine and potent H3-receptor antagonist, was investigated in two representative seizure models in mice. In the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test, clobenpropit dose-dependently raised the electroconvulsive threshold for tonic (hindlimb extension) seizures, but a significant increase of about 15% was determined only at the high dose of 40 mg/kg i.p. The protective action of this drug was reduced by immepip and (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, selective H3-receptor agonists. In co-medication with two standard antiepileptics, clobenpropit (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly increased the anticonvulsant effectiveness of carbamazepine and tended to increase the effectiveness of valproate. Additional studies indicated that the high dose of clobenpropit also significantly enhanced the plasma carbamazepine concentration. One the other hand, in the s.c. PTZ seizure threshold test clobenpropit revealed no protective effects. In the rotarod ataxia test, impaired motor function was observed at 80 mg/kg clobenpropit. In conclusion, the present findings indicated no pronounced anticonvulsant effects of clobenpropit against generalized tonic as well as clonic seizures.

  5. Fatigue-induced Orosomucoid 1 Acts on C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 5 to Enhance Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong; Sun, Yang; Luo, Zhumin; Yourek, Gregory; Gui, Huan; Yang, Yili; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing fatigue is a significant challenge in clinic and society. In attempting to explore how the body responds to and regulates fatigue, we found in rodent fatigue models that orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) was significantly increased in multiple tissues, including blood and muscle. Interestingly, administration of exogenous ORM1 increased muscle glycogen and enhanced muscle endurance, whereas ORM1 deficiency resulted in a significant decrease of muscle endurance both in vivo and in vitro, which could largely be restored by exogenous ORM1. Further studies demonstrated that ORM1 can bind to C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) on muscle cells and deletion of the receptor abolished the effect of ORM1. Thus, fatigue upregulates the level of ORM1, which in turn functions as an anti-fatigue protein to enhance muscle endurance via the CCR5 pathway. Modulation of the level of ORM1 and CCR5 signaling could be a novel strategy for the management of fatigue. PMID:26740279

  6. Nonpsychotropic cannabinoids, abnormal cannabidiol and canabigerol-dimethyl heptyl, act at novel cannabinoid receptors to reduce intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Szczesniak, Anna-Maria; Maor, Yehoshua; Robertson, Harold; Hung, Orlando; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2011-10-01

    The objective of our study was to examine the pharmacology of the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering actions of the behaviorally inactive cannabinoids, abnormal cannabidiol (abn-CBD), and a cannabigerol analog, cannabigerol-dimethyl heptyl (CBG-DMH), in comparison to that of the nonselective cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB(1)R) and CB(2)R agonist, WIN55,212-2, in Brown Norway rats. The IOP was measured noninvasively using a hand-held tonometer in nonanesthetized animals. The IOP measurements were taken every 15 min for a period of 2 h after drug administration. All drugs were administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections, and abn-CBD and CBG-DMH were also given topically. Both abn-CBD and CBG-DMH reduced IOP when administrated i.p. at doses of ≥2.5 mg/kg or topically at concentrations of 1%-2%. The IOP-lowering effects of abn-CBD and CBG-DMH were reduced by i.p. administration of O-1918 (2.5 mg/kg), a selective antagonist of the abn-CBD-sensitive cannabinoid-related receptor (CBx), but were unaffected by the CB(1)R antagonist, AM251 (2.5 mg/kg), or the CB(2)R antagonist, AM630 (2.5 mg/kg). In contrast, the IOP-lowering action of WIN55,212-2 was completely blocked by the CB(1)R-selective antagonist, AM251, and was unaffected by the CBx receptor antagonist, O-1918. However, similar to the nonpsychotropic cannabinoids, the ocular hypotensive actions of WIN55,212-2 were also insensitive to block by the CB(2)R antagonist, AM630. Consistent with this, the selective CB(2)R agonist, HU-308 (2 mg/kg) failed to reduce IOP in Brown Norway rats. Concurrent application of a dose of WIN55,212-2 that was subthreshold to reduce IOP (0.25 mg/kg), together with a topical dose of either abn-CBD (0.5%) or CBG-DMH (0.25%), respectively, potentiated the ocular hypotensive effect of either compound applied alone. This study demonstrates that the atypical cannabinoid, abn-CBD, and the cannabigerol analog, CBG-DMH, decrease IOP in the normotensive Brown Norway rat eye independent of CB

  7. Histamine acting on H1 receptor promotes inhibition of proliferation via PLC, RAC, and JNK-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Notcovich, Cintia; Diez, Federico; Tubio, Maria Rosario; Baldi, Alberto; Kazanietz, Marcelo G; Davio, Carlos; Shayo, Carina

    2010-02-01

    It is well established that histamine modulates cell proliferation through the activation of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is known to couple to phospholipase C (PLC) activation via Gq. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether H1R activation modulates Rho GTPases, well-known effectors of Gq/G(11)-coupled receptors, and whether such modulation influences cell proliferation. Experiments were carried out in CHO cells stably expressing H1R (CHO-H1R). By using pull-down assays, we found that both histamine and a selective H1R agonist activated Rac and RhoA in a time- and dose-dependent manner without significant changes in the activation of Cdc42. Histamine response was abolished by the H1R antagonist mepyramine, RGS2 and the PLC inhibitor U73122, suggesting that Rac and RhoA activation is mediated by H1R via Gq coupling to PLC stimulation. Histamine caused a marked activation of serum response factor activity via the H1R, as determined with a serum-responsive element (SRE) luciferase reporter, and this response was inhibited by RhoA inactivation with C3 toxin. Histamine also caused a significant activation of JNK which was inhibited by expression of the Rac-GAP beta2-chimaerin. On the other hand, H1R-induced ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by U73122 but not affected by C3 or beta2-chimaerin, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on PLC and independent of RhoA or Rac. [(3)H]-Thymidine incorporation assays showed that both histamine and the H1R agonist inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and that the effect was independent of RhoA but partially dependent on JNK and Rac. Our results reveal that functional coupling of the H1R to Gq-PLC leads to the activation of RhoA and Rac small GTPases and suggest distinct roles for Rho GTPases in the control of cell proliferation by histamine.

  8. Discovery of naturally occurring splice variants of the rat histamine H3 receptor that act as dominant-negative isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Remko A; Lozada, Adrian Flores; van Marle, André; Shenton, Fiona C; Drutel, Guillaume; Karlstedt, Kaj; Hoffmann, Marcel; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Yamamoto, Yumiko; van Rijn, Richard M; Chazot, Paul L; Panula, Pertti; Leurs, Rob

    2006-04-01

    We described previously the cDNA cloning of three functional rat histamine H3 receptor (rH3R) isoforms as well as the differential brain expression patterns of their corresponding mRNAs and signaling properties of the resulting rH3A, rH3B, and rH3C receptor isoforms (Mol Pharmacol 59:1-8). In the current report, we describe the cDNA cloning, mRNA localization in the rat central nervous system, and pharmacological characterization of three additional rH3R splice variants (rH3D, rH3E, and rH3F) that differ from the previously published isoforms in that they result from an additional alternative-splicing event. These new H3R isoforms lack the seventh transmembrane (TM) helix and contain an alternative, putatively extracellular, C terminus (6TM-rH3 isoforms). After heterologous expression in COS-7 cells, radioligand binding or functional responses upon the application of various H3R ligands could not be detected for the 6TM-rH3 isoforms. In contrast to the rH3A receptor (rH3AR), detection of the rH3D isoform using hemagglutinin antibodies revealed that the rH3D isoform remains mainly intracellular. The expression of the rH3D-F splice variants, however, modulates the cell surface expression-levels and subsequent functional responses of the 7TM H3R isoforms. Coexpression of the rH3AR and the rH3D isoforms resulted in the intracellular retention of the rH3AR and reduced rH3AR functionality. Finally, we show that in rat brain, the H3R mRNA expression levels are modulated upon treatment with the convulsant pentylenetetrazole, suggesting that the rH3R isoforms described herein thus represent a novel physiological mechanism for controlling the activity of the histaminergic system.

  9. Histamine acting on H1 receptor promotes inhibition of proliferation via PLC, RAC, and JNK-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Notcovich, Cintia; Diez, Federico; Tubio, Maria Rosario; Baldi, Alberto; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.; Davio, Carlos; Shayo, Carina

    2010-02-01

    It is well established that histamine modulates cell proliferation through the activation of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is known to couple to phospholipase C (PLC) activation via Gq. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether H1R activation modulates Rho GTPases, well-known effectors of Gq/G{sub 11}-coupled receptors, and whether such modulation influences cell proliferation. Experiments were carried out in CHO cells stably expressing H1R (CHO-H1R). By using pull-down assays, we found that both histamine and a selective H1R agonist activated Rac and RhoA in a time- and dose-dependent manner without significant changes in the activation of Cdc42. Histamine response was abolished by the H1R antagonist mepyramine, RGS2 and the PLC inhibitor U73122, suggesting that Rac and RhoA activation is mediated by H1R via Gq coupling to PLC stimulation. Histamine caused a marked activation of serum response factor activity via the H1R, as determined with a serum-responsive element (SRE) luciferase reporter, and this response was inhibited by RhoA inactivation with C3 toxin. Histamine also caused a significant activation of JNK which was inhibited by expression of the Rac-GAP {beta}2-chimaerin. On the other hand, H1R-induced ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by U73122 but not affected by C3 or {beta}2-chimaerin, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on PLC and independent of RhoA or Rac. [{sup 3}H]-Thymidine incorporation assays showed that both histamine and the H1R agonist inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and that the effect was independent of RhoA but partially dependent on JNK and Rac. Our results reveal that functional coupling of the H1R to Gq-PLC leads to the activation of RhoA and Rac small GTPases and suggest distinct roles for Rho GTPases in the control of cell proliferation by histamine.

  10. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  11. A Compartment Model of VEGF Distribution in Humans in the Presence of Soluble VEGF Receptor-1 Acting as a Ligand Trap

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T. H.; Stefanini, Marianne O.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), through its activation of cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases including VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, is a vital regulator of stimulatory and inhibitory processes that keep angiogenesis – new capillary growth from existing microvasculature – at a dynamic balance in normal physiology. Soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR1) – a naturally-occurring truncated version of VEGFR1 lacking the transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains – has been postulated to exert inhibitory effects on angiogenic signaling via two mechanisms: direct sequestration of angiogenic ligands such as VEGF; or dominant-negative heterodimerization with surface VEGFRs. In pre-clinical studies, sVEGFR1 gene and protein therapy have demonstrated efficacy in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis; while in clinical studies, sVEGFR1 has shown utility as a diagnostic or prognostic marker in a widening array of angiogenesis–dependent diseases. Here we developed a novel computational multi-tissue model for recapitulating the dynamic systemic distributions of VEGF and sVEGFR1. Model features included: physiologically-based multi-scale compartmentalization of the human body; inter-compartmental macromolecular biotransport processes (vascular permeability, lymphatic drainage); and molecularly-detailed binding interactions between the ligand isoforms VEGF121 and VEGF165, signaling receptors VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, non-signaling co-receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP1), as well as sVEGFR1. The model was parameterized to represent a healthy human subject, whereupon we investigated the effects of sVEGFR1 on the distribution and activation of VEGF ligands and receptors. We assessed the healthy baseline stability of circulating VEGF and sVEGFR1 levels in plasma, as well as their reliability in indicating tissue-level angiogenic signaling potential. Unexpectedly, simulated results showed that sVEGFR1 – acting as a diffusible VEGF sink alone, i.e., without sVEGFR1-VEGFR heterodimerization

  12. Indole Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Active in a Model of Dyslipidemia Act via a Unique Association with an Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Luz, John G; Carson, Matthew W; Condon, Bradley; Clawson, David; Pustilnik, Anna; Kohlman, Daniel T; Barr, Robert J; Bean, James S; Dill, M Joelle; Sindelar, Dana K; Maletic, Milan; Coghlan, Michael J

    2015-08-27

    To further elucidate the structural activity correlation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism, the crystal structure of the GR ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complex with a nonsteroidal antagonist, compound 8, was determined. This novel indole sulfonamide shows in vitro activity comparable to known GR antagonists such as mifepristone, and notably, this molecule lowers LDL (-74%) and raises HDL (+73%) in a hamster model of dyslipidemia. This is the first reported crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to a nonsteroidal antagonist, and this article provides additional elements for the design and pharmacology of clinically relevant nonsteroidal GR antagonists that may have greater selectivity and fewer side effects than their steroidal counterparts. PMID:26218343

  13. Recombinant soluble interleukin-4 (IL-4) receptor acts as an antagonist of IL-4 in murine cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, A; Schröppel, K; Will, A; Enssle, K H; Lauffer, L; Röllinghoff, M

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the soluble interleukin-4 receptor (sIL-4R) as a potential antagonist of interleukin-4 (IL-4) in an infectious disease. It is shown that antigen-triggered proliferation and cytokine secretion of Leishmania major-specific, cloned Th2 cells in vitro can be inhibited dose dependently by recombinant murine, but not control human, sIL-4R. In vivo, we found that endogenous synthesis of IL-4 mRNA is upregulated during the first week of infection, while an increase of IL-4R mRNA occurred later after infection of BALB/c mice with L. major. To interfere successfully with the IL-4 ligand-receptor interaction, we therefore chose to treat infected BALB/c mice with recombinant sIL-4R during the onset (e.g., days 0 to 7) of the immune response. Treatment with murine, but not with human, sIL-4R during the first week of infection rendered BALB/c mice clinically resistant to L. major, led to a 7- to 12-fold reduction of the parasite load in spleen and lymph nodes at 7 weeks of infection, shifted the pattern of cytokines towards a Th1 type, and provided durable resistance against reinfection. Thus, it could be demonstrated that the balance among sIL-4R, membrane-bound IL-4R, and their ligand IL-4 can be modulated in vivo, thereby modifying the antiparasitic immune response. These results suggest a therapeutic value of sIL-4R in diseases in which neutralization of IL-4 is desirable. Images PMID:7927664

  14. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function.

  15. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function. PMID:26056314

  16. ( sup 3 H)(D-PEN sup 2 , D-PEN sup 5 ) enkephalin binding to delta opioid receptors on intact neuroblastoma-glioma (NG 108-15) hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.J.; Yamamura, H.I. )

    1990-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)(D-Pen{sup 2}, D-Pen{sup 5})enkephalin binding to intact NG 108-15 cells has been measured under physiological conditions of temperature and medium. The dissociation constant, receptor density, and Hill slope values measured under these conditions are consistent with values obtained by others using membranes prepared from these cells. Kinetic analysis of the radioligand binding to these cells show biphasic association and monophasic dissociation processes suggesting the presence of different receptor affinity states for the agonist. The data show that the binding affinity of ({sup 3}H)(D-Pen{sup 2}, D-Pen{sup 5})enkephalin under physiological conditions is not substantially different to that measured in 50 mM Tris buffer using cell membrane fractions. Unlike DPDPE, the {mu} opioid agonists morphine, normorphine, PL-17, and DAMGO, have much lower affinity for the {delta} receptor measured under these conditions than is observed by studies using 50 mM Tris buffer. The results described here suggest that this assay may serve as a useful model of {delta} opioid receptor binding in vivo.

  17. Effect of β2 -adrenergic receptor gene Arg16Gly polymorphisms on response to long-acting β2-agonist in Chinese Han asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of variation of the Arg16Gly polymorphism of the β2-adrenergic receptor gene on clinical response to salmeterol administered with fluticasone propionate in Chinese Han asthmatic patients. Methods Moderate persistent asthmatic patients (n = 62) currently receiving short-acting β2-agonists were administered twice-daily therapy with salmeterol/fluticasone propionate 50/250 μg in a single inhaler for 12 weeks, followed by a 2-to-4-day run-out period. Using direct DNA sequencing, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter and coding block regions of β2-adrenergic receptor gene were determined in 62 subjects and haplotypes were combined. Results There was sustained and significant improvement (p < 0.001) over baseline in all measures of asthma control in subjects receiving salmeterol and fluticasone, regardless of Arg16Gly genotype. However, there was no significant difference in the improvement among three genotypes (p > 0.05). Responses to salmeterol did not appear to be modified by haplotype pairs (p > 0.05). During the run-out period, all subjects had similar decreases in measures of asthma control, with no differences between genotypes (p > 0.05). Conclusions Response to salmeterol does not vary with Arg16Gly polymorphisms after chronic dosing with inhaled corticosteroids in Chinese Han asthmatic patients. PMID:24721141

  18. Transfer of SAR information from hypotensive indazole to indole derivatives acting at α-adrenergic receptors: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Sączewski, Jaroslaw; Hudson, Alan; Scheinin, Mika; Wasilewska, Aleksandra; Sączewski, Franciszek; Rybczyńska, Apolonia; Ferdousi, Mehnaz; Laurila, Jonne M; Boblewski, Konrad; Lehmann, Artur; Watts, Helena; Ma, Daqing

    2016-06-10

    In a search for novel antihypertensive drugs we applied scaffold hopping from the previously described α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, 1-[(imidazolin-2-yl)methyl]indazoles. The aim was to investigate whether the α-adrenergic properties of the indazole core were transferable to the indole core. The newly obtained 1-[(imidazolin-2-yl)methyl]indole analogues were screened in vitro for their binding affinities for α1-and α2-adrenoceptors, which allowed the identification of the target-based SAR transfer (T_SAR transfer) as well as structure-based SAR transfer (S_SAR transfer) events. However, when screened in vivo with use of anaesthetized male Wistar rats, the new indole ligands showed a different hemodynamic profile than expected. Instead of the immediate hypotensive effect characteristic of peripheral vasodilatator α1 blockers, a biphasic effect was observed, reminiscent of clonidine-like centrally acting antihypertensive agents. This was supported by subsequent in vitro functional studies in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay, where the indole analogues displayed partial agonist properties at α2-adrenergic receptors. Since no correlation was found between the in vitro binding to α-adrenoceptors and the in vivo hemodynamic effects of the two series of indazole and indole bioisosteric compounds, in a search for new imidazoline-containing adrenergic drugs, the structure-based SAR transfer information obtained from in vitro binding studies should be treated with caution.

  19. Juvenile Hormone-Receptor Complex Acts on Mcm4 and Mcm7 to Promote Polyploidy and Vitellogenesis in the Migratory Locust

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiasheng; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Zhiming; Deng, Shun; Walker, Virginia K.; Zhou, Shutang

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH), a sesquiterpenoid produced by the corpora allata, coordinates insect growth, metamorphosis, and reproduction. While JH action for the repression of larval metamorphosis has been well studied, the molecular basis of JH in promoting adult reproduction has not been fully elucidated. Methoprene-tolerant (Met), the JH receptor, has been recently shown to mediate JH action during metamorphosis as well as in vitellogenesis, but again, the precise mechanism underlying the latter has been lacking. We have now demonstrated using Met RNAi to phenocopy a JH-deprived condition in migratory locusts, that JH stimulates DNA replication and increases ploidy in preparation for vitellogenesis. Mcm4 and Mcm7, two genes in the DNA replication pathway were expressed in the presence of JH and Met. Depletion of Mcm4 or Mcm7 inhibited de novo DNA synthesis and polyploidization, and resulted in the substantial reduction of vitellogenin mRNA levels as well as severely impaired oocyte maturation and ovarian growth. By using luciferase reporter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have shown that Met directly regulates the transcription of Mcm4 and Mcm7 by binding to upstream consensus sequences with E-box or E-box-like motifs. Our work suggests that the JH-receptor complex acts on Mcm4 and Mcm7 to regulate DNA replication and polyploidy for vitellogenesis and oocyte maturation. PMID:25340846

  20. NSC23766, a widely used inhibitor of Rac1 activation, additionally acts as a competitive antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Levay, Magdolna; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Wittig, Karola; Voigt, Niels; Bermudez, Marcel; Wolber, Gerhard; Dobrev, Dobromir; Levy, Finn Olav; Wieland, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Small molecules interfering with Rac1 activation are considered as potential drugs and are already studied in animal models. A widely used inhibitor without reported attenuation of RhoA activity is NSC23766 [(N(6)-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl]amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2-methyl-4,6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride]. We found that NSC23766 inhibits the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR)-induced Rac1 activation in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. Surprisingly, NSC27366 concomitantly suppressed the carbachol-induced RhoA activation and a M2 mAChR-induced inotropic response in isolated neonatal rat hearts requiring the activation of Rho-dependent kinases. We therefore aimed to identify the mechanisms by which NSC23766 interferes with the differentially mediated, M2 mAChR-induced responses. Interestingly, NSC23766 caused a rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curve for the positive inotropic response without modifying carbachol efficacy. To analyze the specificity of NSC23766, we compared the carbachol and the similarly Giβγ-mediated, adenosine-induced activation of Gi protein-regulated potassium channel (GIRK) channels in human atrial myocytes. Application of NSC23766 blocked the carbachol-induced K(+) current but had no effect on the adenosine-induced GIRK current. Similarly, an adenosine A1 receptor-induced positive inotropic response in neonatal rat hearts was not attenuated by NSC23766. To investigate its specificity toward the different mAChR types, we studied the carbachol-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells expressing M1, M2, or M3 mAChRs. NSC23766 caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curves at all mAChRs. Thus, NSC23766 is not only an inhibitor of Rac1 activation, but it is within the same concentration range a competitive antagonist at mAChRs. Molecular docking analysis at M2 and M3 mAChR crystal

  1. Differential antagonism of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine-induced seizures by agents acting at NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Velíšková, Jana; Stanton, Patric K.; Velíšek, Libor

    2012-11-15

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TMDT) is a highly lethal neuroactive rodenticide responsible for many accidental and intentional poisonings in mainland China. Ease of synthesis, water solubility, potency, and difficulty to treat make TMDT a potential weapon for terrorist activity. We characterized TMDT-induced convulsions and mortality in male C57BL/6 mice. TMDT (ip) produced a continuum of twitches, clonic, and tonic–clonic seizures decreasing in onset latency and increasing in severity with increasing dose; 0.4 mg/kg was 100% lethal. The NMDA antagonist, ketamine (35 mg/kg) injected ip immediately after the first TMDT-induced seizure, did not change number of tonic–clonic seizures or lethality, but increased the number of clonic seizures. Doubling the ketamine dose decreased tonic–clonic seizures and eliminated lethality through a 60 min observation period. Treating mice with another NMDA antagonist, MK-801, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg ip, showed similar effects as low and high doses of ketamine, respectively, and prevented lethality, converting status epilepticus EEG activity to isolated interictal discharges. Treatment with these agents 15 min prior to TMDT administration did not increase their effectiveness. Post-treatment with the GABA{sub A} receptor allosteric enhancer diazepam (5 mg/kg) greatly reduced seizure manifestations and prevented lethality 60 min post-TMDT, but ictal events were evident in EEG recordings and, hours post-treatment, mice experienced status epilepticus and died. Thus, TMDT is a highly potent and lethal convulsant for which single-dose benzodiazepine treatment is inadequate in managing electrographic seizures or lethality. Repeated benzodiazepine dosing or combined application of benzodiazepines and NMDA receptor antagonists is more likely to be effective in treating TMDT poisoning. -- Highlights: ► TMDT produces convulsions and lethality at low doses in mice. ► Diazepam pre- or post-treatments inhibit TMDT-induced convulsions and death

  2. The brominated flame retardants TBP-AE and TBP-DBPE antagonize the chicken androgen receptor and act as potential endocrine disrupters in chicken LMH cells.

    PubMed

    Asnake, Solomon; Pradhan, Ajay; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-12-01

    Increased exposure of birds to endocrine disrupting compounds has resulted in developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. We have recently identified the flame retardants, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-AE), 2-3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE) and the TBP-DBPE metabolite 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-BAE) as antagonists to both the human androgen receptor (AR) and the zebrafish AR. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether these compounds also interact with the chicken AR. In silico modeling studies showed that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE were able to dock into to the chicken AR ligand-binding pocket. In vitro transfection assays revealed that all three brominated compounds acted as chicken AR antagonists, inhibiting testosterone induced AR activation. In addition, qRT-PCR studies confirmed that they act as AR antagonists and demonstrated that they also alter gene expression patterns of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, drug metabolizing and amino acid transporter genes. These studies, using chicken LMH cells, suggest that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE are potential endocrine disrupters in chicken.

  3. The brominated flame retardants TBP-AE and TBP-DBPE antagonize the chicken androgen receptor and act as potential endocrine disrupters in chicken LMH cells.

    PubMed

    Asnake, Solomon; Pradhan, Ajay; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-12-01

    Increased exposure of birds to endocrine disrupting compounds has resulted in developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. We have recently identified the flame retardants, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-AE), 2-3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE) and the TBP-DBPE metabolite 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-BAE) as antagonists to both the human androgen receptor (AR) and the zebrafish AR. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether these compounds also interact with the chicken AR. In silico modeling studies showed that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE were able to dock into to the chicken AR ligand-binding pocket. In vitro transfection assays revealed that all three brominated compounds acted as chicken AR antagonists, inhibiting testosterone induced AR activation. In addition, qRT-PCR studies confirmed that they act as AR antagonists and demonstrated that they also alter gene expression patterns of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, drug metabolizing and amino acid transporter genes. These studies, using chicken LMH cells, suggest that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE are potential endocrine disrupters in chicken. PMID:26318274

  4. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Giampiero; Serone, Eliseo; De Nardis, Velia; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Marco; Poma, Anna; Ragnini-Wilson, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL) cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s) was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo) agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases. PMID:26658258

  5. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    De Nardis, Velia; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Marco; Poma, Anna; Ragnini-Wilson, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL) cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library® of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s) was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo) agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases. PMID:26658258

  6. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Giampiero; Serone, Eliseo; De Nardis, Velia; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Marco; Poma, Anna; Ragnini-Wilson, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL) cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s) was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo) agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases.

  7. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of beta2-adrenergic agonist enantiomers: zilpaterol.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christopher; Meyer, Thorsten; Droux, Serge; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Miculka, Christian

    2009-03-26

    The beta-adrenergic agonist 1 (zilpaterol) is used as production enhancer in cattle. Binding experiments of separated enantiomers on recombinant human beta(2)-adrenergic and mu-opioid receptors and functional studies showed that the (-)-1 enantiomer accounts for essentially all the beta(2)-adrenergic agonist activity and that it exhibits less affinity toward the mu-opioid receptor than (+)-1, which is a mu-opioid receptor antagonist. X-ray crystallography revealed the absolute configuration of (-)-1 to be 6R,7R.

  8. Novel Toll/IL-1 Receptor Homologous Region Adaptors Act as Negative Regulators in Amphioxus TLR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Tao, Xin; Li, Rui; Hu, Jingru; Ruan, Jie; Wang, Ruihua; Yang, Manyi; Yang, Rirong; Dong, Xiangru; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong; Yuan, Shaochun

    2015-10-01

    Studies have shown that the basal chordate amphioxus possesses an extraordinarily complex TLR system, including 39 TLRs and at least 40 Toll/IL-1R homologous region (TIR) adaptors. Besides homologs to MyD88 and TIR domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM), most amphioxus TIR adaptors exhibit domain architectures that are not observed in other species. To reveal how these novel TIR adaptors function in amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt), four representatives, bbtTIRA, bbtTIRB, bbtTIRC, and bbtTIRD, were selected for functional analyses. We found bbtTIRA to show a unique inhibitory role in amphioxus TICAM-mediated pathway by interacting with bbtTICAM and bbt receptor interacting protein 1b, whereas bbtTIRC specifically inhibits the amphioxus MyD88-dependent pathway by interacting with bbtMyD88 and depressing the polyubiquitination of bbt TNFR-associated factor 6. Although both bbtTIRB and bbtTIRD are located on endosomes, the TIR domain of bbtTIRB can interact with bbtMyD88 in the cytosol, whereas the TIR domain of bbtTIRD is enclosed in endosome, suggesting that bbtTIRD may be a redundant gene in amphioxus. This study indicated that most expanded TIR adaptors play nonredundant regulatory roles in amphioxus TLR signaling, adding a new layer to understanding the diversity and complexity of innate immunity at basal chordate.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes (delta-actA mutant) infection in tumor necrosis factor receptor p55-deficient neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Sonje, Marina Bubonja; Abram, Maja; Stenzel, Werner; Deckert, Martina

    2010-10-01

    Using TNF receptor 1 knock out (TNFR1KO) mice, we investigated the role played by TNFR1 in immune regulation during neonatal listeriosis. Induction of protective immune response in wild type pups resulted in the prompt control of infection with an attenuated DeltaactA mutant Listeria monocytogenes, accompanied by enhanced hepatic expression of mRNA for IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-10. Conversely, the lack of TNFR1 signalling in TNFR1KO neonatal mice resulted in substantial changes in the profile of inflammatory mediators and ultimately fatal outcome of the infected pups. Despite remarkable increase in indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA detected in the liver of TNFR1KO mice, bacterial proliferation was unrestrained. Increased mRNA expression of IDO, iNOS, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha was found in the spleens of infected KO mice, and in the brains mRNA encoding iNOS, IDO, IFN-gamma, IL-12p40, IL-10, and RANTES was also upregulated. Large necrotic lesions consisting of granulocytes and macrophages were scattered throughout the liver of these mice. TNFR1KO neonates were unable to clear neutrophils and switch from the innate immune response to a specific reaction mediated by T cells. These results prove that TNF-alpha signalling is crucial and irreplaceable in antilisterial protection during the neonatal period. PMID:20685289

  10. Novel Toll/IL-1 Receptor Homologous Region Adaptors Act as Negative Regulators in Amphioxus TLR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Tao, Xin; Li, Rui; Hu, Jingru; Ruan, Jie; Wang, Ruihua; Yang, Manyi; Yang, Rirong; Dong, Xiangru; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong; Yuan, Shaochun

    2015-10-01

    Studies have shown that the basal chordate amphioxus possesses an extraordinarily complex TLR system, including 39 TLRs and at least 40 Toll/IL-1R homologous region (TIR) adaptors. Besides homologs to MyD88 and TIR domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM), most amphioxus TIR adaptors exhibit domain architectures that are not observed in other species. To reveal how these novel TIR adaptors function in amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt), four representatives, bbtTIRA, bbtTIRB, bbtTIRC, and bbtTIRD, were selected for functional analyses. We found bbtTIRA to show a unique inhibitory role in amphioxus TICAM-mediated pathway by interacting with bbtTICAM and bbt receptor interacting protein 1b, whereas bbtTIRC specifically inhibits the amphioxus MyD88-dependent pathway by interacting with bbtMyD88 and depressing the polyubiquitination of bbt TNFR-associated factor 6. Although both bbtTIRB and bbtTIRD are located on endosomes, the TIR domain of bbtTIRB can interact with bbtMyD88 in the cytosol, whereas the TIR domain of bbtTIRD is enclosed in endosome, suggesting that bbtTIRD may be a redundant gene in amphioxus. This study indicated that most expanded TIR adaptors play nonredundant regulatory roles in amphioxus TLR signaling, adding a new layer to understanding the diversity and complexity of innate immunity at basal chordate. PMID:26324776

  11. Pindolol does not act only on 5-HT1A receptors in augmenting antidepressant activity in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Redrobe, J P; Baker, G B

    1998-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify the receptor subtypes involved in (+/-) pindolol's ability to enhance the effects of antidepressant drugs in the mouse forced swimming test. Interaction studies were performed with S 15535 (presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor agonist) and methiothepin (5-HT1B autoreceptor antagonist) in an attempt to attenuate or potentiate antidepressant-like activity. (+/-) Pindolol was tested in combination with selective agonists and antagonists at 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptor subtypes. Pretreatment with S 15535 and methiothepin attenuated the activity of paroxetine, fluvoxamine and citalopram (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.01). (+/-) Pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.) induced significant anti-immobility effects when tested in combination with 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969) (1 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05), 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[-(2-phthalimido) butyl]piperazine) (NAN 190) (0.5 mg/kg; P < 0.05) and ondansetron (0.00001 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.01). Pretreatment with NAN 190 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effects of RU 24969 (1 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05) and (+/-) pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05) in the forced swimming test, as did ondansetron (0.00001 mg/kg, i.p.). Significant additive effects were induced when RU 24969 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was tested in combination with NAN 190 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05), (+/-) pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05) and ondansetron (0.0000 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05). 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or ketanserin (8 mg/kg, i.p.) did not induce significant antidepressant-like effects with any of the agonists/antagonists tested. The results of the present study suggest that pindolol is acting at presynaptic 5-HT1B serotonergic receptors, in addition to the 5-HT1A subtype, in augmenting the activity of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  12. Delta-opioid receptor blockade in the ventral pallidum increases perceived palatability and consumption of saccharin solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Inui, Tadashi; Shimura, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is involved in ingestive behaviour. It receives dense GABAergic projections from the nucleus accumbens. GABAergic terminals in the VP co-express enkephalin, an endogenous ligand of delta-opioid receptors. The role of the delta-opioid receptors in the VP in the context of ingestive behaviour remains unclear, in contrast to the well-understood involvement of the mu-opioid receptors. We used the single-bottle test to examine the effects of VP microinjections of the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole on consumption of a saccharin solution. Naltrindole injections significantly increased the intake of saccharin, but not water, during a 2-h test session. We also investigated perceived palatability of saccharin using a taste reactivity test. The drug treatments increased ingestive responses to intraorally infused saccharin. Further experimentation explored the role of VP delta-opioid receptors in behavioural responses to saccharin that were previously paired with malaise upon the retrieval of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Naltrindole-injected rats exhibited longer latency for the first occurrence of aversive responses than vehicle-injected control rats. However, there was no between-group difference in total aversive responses. These results suggest that naltrindole injections into the VP induce an enhancement of perceived palatability of a normally preferred saccharin solution, and thereby facilitate consumption of the solution. On the other hand, delayed aversive responses to the conditioned aversive saccharin suggest that the delta-opioid receptors in the VP mediate the initiation of aversive taste reactivity responses to the conditioned stimulus upon CTA retrieval.

  13. Characterization of V0162, a new long-acting antagonist at human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Cussac, Didier; Naline, Emmanuel; Tardif, Stéphanie; Clerc, Thierry; Devillier, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The anticholinergic properties of the mequitazine enantiomer V0162 make it a drug candidate for the treatment of chronic obstructive airway diseases. Here, we compared V0162's in vitro pharmacological activity at recombinant human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (hM3Rs) with that of other anticholinergics, using (i) a radioligand binding assay, (ii) a functional reporter gene assay and (iii) a bronchoconstriction inhibition assay on human bronchial preparations. V0162 had high affinity for hM3Rs, with a pKi varying from 9.01 after a 2 h incubation to 9.21 after 23 h. The other mequitazine enantiomer (V0114) was less potent. V0162 displayed rapid off-kinetics and a biphasic time course of binding. V0162 was found to be an antagonist behaving as an inverse agonist for hM3R-mediated reporter gene activation, with much the same efficacy as atropine, ipratropium and tiotropium. However, in contrast to ipratropium and atropine, V0162's inhibitory potency was only slightly affected by compound washout. V0162 antagonized acetylcholine-mediated contractions in a human bronchial preparation; the pA2 values increased with the incubation time (up to 2 h). Moreover, there was a progressive increase in V0162's ability to inhibit electrically-induced contractions, which persisted after compound washout. In conclusion, V0162 is the most active mequitazine enantiomer at hM3Rs and shows a complex pattern of binding to the membrane compartment. These particular features may be of therapeutic value when persistent antagonism at hM3Rs is required. PMID:26241178

  14. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Buscariollo, Daniela L; Fang, Xiefan; Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  15. Calcium sensing receptor function supports osteoblast survival and acts as a co-factor in PTH anabolic actions in bone

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dujaili, Saja A.; Koh, Amy J.; Dang, Ming; Mi, Xue; Chang, Wenhan; Ma, Peter X.; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic actions of PTH in bone involve increased deposition of mineralizing matrix. Regulatory feedback of the process may be important to maintain calcium homeostasis and, in turn, calcium may inform the process. This investigation clarified the role of calcium availability and the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in the anabolic actions of PTH. CaSR function promoted osteoblastic cell numbers, with lower cell numbers in post-confluent cultures of primary calvarial cells from Col1-CaSR knock-out (KO) mice, and for calvarial cells from wild-type (WT) mice treated with a calcilytic. Increased apoptosis of calvarial cells with calcilytic treatment suggested CaSR is critical for protection against stage-dependent cell death. Whole and cortical, but not trabecular, bone parameters were significantly lower in Col1-CaSR KO mice versus WT littermates. Intact Col1-CaSR KO mice had lower serum P1NP levels relative to WT. PTH treatment displayed anabolic actions in WT and, to a lesser degree, KO mice, and rescued the lower P1NP levels in KO mice. Furthermore, PTH effects on whole tibiae were inhibited by osteoblast-specific CaSR ablation. Vertebral body implants (vossicles) from untreated Col1-CaSR KO and WT mice had similar bone volumes after 4 weeks of implantation in athymic mice. These findings suggest that trabecular bone formation can occur independently of the CaSR, and that the CaSR plays a collaborative role in the PTH anabolic effects on bone. PMID:26579618

  16. Characterization of V0162, a new long-acting antagonist at human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Cussac, Didier; Naline, Emmanuel; Tardif, Stéphanie; Clerc, Thierry; Devillier, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The anticholinergic properties of the mequitazine enantiomer V0162 make it a drug candidate for the treatment of chronic obstructive airway diseases. Here, we compared V0162's in vitro pharmacological activity at recombinant human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (hM3Rs) with that of other anticholinergics, using (i) a radioligand binding assay, (ii) a functional reporter gene assay and (iii) a bronchoconstriction inhibition assay on human bronchial preparations. V0162 had high affinity for hM3Rs, with a pKi varying from 9.01 after a 2 h incubation to 9.21 after 23 h. The other mequitazine enantiomer (V0114) was less potent. V0162 displayed rapid off-kinetics and a biphasic time course of binding. V0162 was found to be an antagonist behaving as an inverse agonist for hM3R-mediated reporter gene activation, with much the same efficacy as atropine, ipratropium and tiotropium. However, in contrast to ipratropium and atropine, V0162's inhibitory potency was only slightly affected by compound washout. V0162 antagonized acetylcholine-mediated contractions in a human bronchial preparation; the pA2 values increased with the incubation time (up to 2 h). Moreover, there was a progressive increase in V0162's ability to inhibit electrically-induced contractions, which persisted after compound washout. In conclusion, V0162 is the most active mequitazine enantiomer at hM3Rs and shows a complex pattern of binding to the membrane compartment. These particular features may be of therapeutic value when persistent antagonism at hM3Rs is required.

  17. Calcium Sensing Receptor Function Supports Osteoblast Survival and Acts as a Co-Factor in PTH Anabolic Actions in Bone.

    PubMed

    Al-Dujaili, Saja A; Koh, Amy J; Dang, Ming; Mi, Xue; Chang, Wenhan; Ma, Peter X; McCauley, Laurie K

    2016-07-01

    Anabolic actions of PTH in bone involve increased deposition of mineralizing matrix. Regulatory feedback of the process may be important to maintain calcium homeostasis and, in turn, calcium may inform the process. This investigation clarified the role of calcium availability and the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in the anabolic actions of PTH. CaSR function promoted osteoblastic cell numbers, with lower cell numbers in post-confluent cultures of primary calvarial cells from Col1-CaSR knock-out (KO) mice, and for calvarial cells from wild-type (WT) mice treated with a calcilytic. Increased apoptosis of calvarial cells with calcilytic treatment suggested CaSR is critical for protection against stage-dependent cell death. Whole and cortical, but not trabecular, bone parameters were significantly lower in Col1-CaSR KO mice versus WT littermates. Intact Col1-CaSR KO mice had lower serum P1NP levels relative to WT. PTH treatment displayed anabolic actions in WT and, to a lesser degree, KO mice, and rescued the lower P1NP levels in KO mice. Furthermore, PTH effects on whole tibiae were inhibited by osteoblast-specific CaSR ablation. Vertebral body implants (vossicles) from untreated Col1-CaSR KO and WT mice had similar bone volumes after 4 weeks of implantation in athymic mice. These findings suggest that trabecular bone formation can occur independently of the CaSR, and that the CaSR plays a collaborative role in the PTH anabolic effects on bone. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1556-1567, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The antiallodynic action of nortriptyline and terbutaline is mediated by β(2) adrenoceptors and δ opioid receptors in the ob/ob model of diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Choucair-Jaafar, Nada; Salvat, Eric; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2014-02-10

    Peripheral polyneuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes. One of its consequences is neuropathic pain which is often chronic and difficult to treat. This pain management classically involves anticonvulsant drugs or tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCA). We have previously shown that β2 adrenoceptors and δ opioid receptors are critical for TCA action in a traumatic model of neuropathic pain. In the present work, we used the obese leptin deficient mice (ob/ob) which are a genetic model of type 2 diabetes in order to study the treatment of diabetic polyneuropathy. ob/ob mice with hyperglycemia develop tactile bilateral allodynia. We investigated the action of the TCA nortriptyline and the β2 adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline on this neuropathic allodynia. The consequences of acute and chronic treatments were tested, and mechanical allodynia was assessed by using von Frey hairs. Chronic but not acute treatment with nortriptyline alleviates allodynia caused by the diabetic neuropathy. This effect depends on β2 adrenoceptors but not on α2 adrenoceptors, as shown by the blockade with repeated co-administration of the β2 adrenoceptor antagonist ICI118551 but not with repeated co-administration of the α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. Direct stimulation of β2 adrenoceptors appears sufficient to relieve allodynia, as shown with chronic terbutaline treatment. δ but not mu opioid receptors seem important to these action since acute naltrindole, but not acute naloxonazine, reverses the effect of chronic nortriptyline or terbutaline treatment.

  19. The σ1 Receptor Engages the Redox-Regulated HINT1 Protein to Bring Opioid Analgesia Under NMDA Receptor Negative Control

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Herrero-Labrador, Raquel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Merlos, Manuel; Vela, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The in vivo pharmacology of the sigma 1 receptor (σ1R) is certainly complex; however, σ1R antagonists are of therapeutic interest, because they enhance mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated antinociception and reduce neuropathic pain. Thus, we investigated whether the σ1R is involved in the negative control that glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate acid receptors (NMDARs) exert on opioid antinociception. Results: The MOR C terminus carries the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) coupled to the regulator of G-protein signaling RGSZ2-neural nitric oxide synthase assembly. Activated MORs stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the redox zinc switch RGSZ2 converts this signal into free zinc ions that are required to recruit the redox sensor PKCγ to HINT1 proteins. Then, PKCγ impairs HINT1-RGSZ2 association and enables σ1R-NR1 interaction with MOR-HINT1 complexes to restrain opioid signaling. The inhibition of NOS or the absence of σ1Rs prevents HINT1-PKCγ interaction, and MOR-NMDAR cross-regulation fails. The σ1R antagonists transitorily remove the binding of σ1Rs to NR1 subunits, facilitate the entrance of negative regulators of NMDARs, likely Ca2+-CaM, and prevent NR1 interaction with HINT1, thereby impairing the negative feedback of glutamate on opioid analgesia. Innovation: A redox-regulated process situates MOR signaling under NMDAR control, and in this context, the σ1R binds to the cytosolic C terminal region of the NMDAR NR1 subunit. Conclusion: The σ1R antagonists enhance opioid analgesia in naïve mice by releasing MORs from the negative influence of NMDARs, and they also reset antinociception in morphine tolerant animals. Moreover, σ1R antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain, probably by driving the inhibition of up-regulated NMDARs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 799–818. PMID:25557043

  20. A novel C1qDC protein acting as pattern recognition receptor in scallop Argopecten irradians.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Kong, Pengfei; Yang, Jialong; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Mengqiang; Zhou, Zhi; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2012-08-01

    The C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins refer to a family of proteins containing the versatile charge pattern recognition globular C1q domain in the C-terminus, which could bind various ligands including PAMPs and trigger a serial of immune response. In this study, a novel C1qDC protein was identified from Argopecten irradians (designated as AiC1qDC-2). Its full-length cDNA was of 1062 bp with an open reading frame of 720 bp encoding a polypeptide of 240 amino acids containing a typical gC1q domain. This gC1q domain possessed the typical 10-stranded β-sandwich fold with a jelly-roll topology common to all C1q family members, and shared high homology with most of the other identified gC1q domains. The mRNA transcripts of AiC1qDC-2 were mainly detected in hepatopancreas, and also marginally detectable in mantle, gonad, adductor, gill and hemocytes. Its relative expression level in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated after challenges of fungi Pichia pastoris GS115 (P < 0.05), Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus (P < 0.05) and Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio anguillarum (P < 0.05). The recombinant protein of AiC1qDC-2 (rAiC1qDC-2) could bind various PAMPs, including LPS, PGN, polyI:C, mannan, β-1,3-glucan as well as Yeast-glucan, and displayed agglutinating activity to fungi P. pastoris GS115, Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli TOP10F' as well as V. anguillarum. All these results indicated that AiC1qDC-2 could function as a pattern recognition receptor to recognize various PAMPs on different pathogens in the innate immune responses of scallop, and provided new clues to understand the role of invertebrate C1qDC proteins in the ancient complement system.

  1. Anti-analgesic effect of the mu/delta opioid receptor heteromer revealed by ligand-biased antagonism.

    PubMed

    Milan-Lobo, Laura; Enquist, Johan; van Rijn, Richard M; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Delta (DOR) and mu opioid receptors (MOR) can complex as heteromers, conferring functional properties in agonist binding, signaling and trafficking that can differ markedly from their homomeric counterparts. Because of these differences, DOR/MOR heteromers may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of pain. However, there are currently no ligands selective for DOR/MOR heteromers, and, consequently, their role in nociception remains unknown. In this study, we used a pharmacological opioid cocktail that selectively activates and stabilizes the DOR/MOR heteromer at the cell surface by blocking its endocytosis to assess its role in antinociception. We found that mice treated chronically with this drug cocktail showed a significant right shift in the ED50 for opioid-mediated analgesia, while mice treated with a drug that promotes degradation of the heteromer did not. Furthermore, promoting degradation of the DOR/MOR heteromer after the right shift in the ED50 had occurred, or blocking signal transduction from the stabilized DOR/MOR heteromer, shifted the ED50 for analgesia back to the left. Taken together, these data suggest an anti-analgesic role for the DOR/MOR heteromer in pain. In conclusion, antagonists selective for DOR/MOR heteromer could provide an avenue for alleviating reduced analgesic response during chronic pain treatment.

  2. HDL-bound sphingosine 1-phosphate acts as a biased agonist for the endothelial cell receptor S1P1 to limit vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Sylvain; Sanson, Marie; Blaho, Victoria A.; Swendeman, Steven L.; Obinata, Hideru; Conger, Heather; Dahlbäck, Björn; Kono, Mari; Proia, Richard L.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hla, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is abundant in endothelial cells, where it regulates vascular development and microvascular barrier function. In investigating the role of endothelial cell S1P1 in adult mice, we found that the endothelial S1P1 signal was enhanced in regions of the arterial vasculature experiencing inflammation. The abundance of proinflammatory adhesion proteins, such as ICAM-1, was enhanced in mice with endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 and suppressed in mice with endothelial cell–specific overexpression of S1pr1, suggesting a protective function of S1P1 in vascular disease. The chaperones ApoM+HDL (HDL) or albumin bind to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in the circulation; therefore, we tested the effects of S1P bound to each chaperone on S1P1 signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to ApoM+HDL-S1P, but not to albumin-S1P, promoted the formation of a cell surface S1P1–β-arrestin 2 complex and attenuated the ability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα to activate NF-κB and increase ICAM-1 abundance. Although S1P bound to either chaperone induced MAPK activation, albumin-S1P triggered greater Gi activation and receptor endocytosis. Endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 in the hypercholesterolemic Apoe−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in the descending aorta. We propose that the ability of ApoM+HDL to act as a biased agonist on S1P1 inhibits vascular inflammation, which may partially explain the cardiovascular protective functions of HDL. PMID:26268607

  3. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. PMID:23537664

  4. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs.

  5. Synthesis, molecular modeling, and opioid receptor affinity of 9, 10-diazatricyclo[4.2.1.1(2,5)]decanes and 2,7-diazatricyclo[4.4.0. 0(3,8)]decanes structurally related to 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2. 1]octanes.

    PubMed

    Vianello, P; Albinati, A; Pinna, G A; Lavecchia, A; Marinelli, L; Borea, P A; Gessi, S; Fadda, P; Tronci, S; Cignarella, G

    2000-06-01

    Various lines of evidence, including molecular modeling studies, imply that the endoethylenic bridge of 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2. 1]octanes (DBO, 1) plays an essential role in modulating affinity toward mu opioid receptors. This hypothesis, together with the remarkable analgesic properties observed for N(3) propionyl, N(8) arylpropenyl derivatives (2) and of the reverted isomers (3), has prompted us to insert an additional endoethylenic bridge on the piperazine moiety in order to identify derivatives with increased potency toward this receptor class. In the present report, we describe the synthesis of the novel compounds 9,10-diazatricyclo[4.2. 1.1(2,5)]decane (4) and 2,7-diazatricyclo[4.4.0.0(3,8)]decane (5), as well as the representative derivatives functionalized at the two nitrogen atoms by propionyl and arylpropenyl groups (6a-e, 7a-d). Opioid receptor binding assays revealed that, among the compounds tested, the N-propionyl-N-cinnamyl derivatives 6a and 7a exhibited the highest mu-receptor affinity, and remarkably, compound 7a displayed in vivo (mice) an analgesic potency 6-fold that of morphine.

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 acts as a critical determinant of AKT-dependent proliferation and regulates differential gene expression by the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Julia; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Torvaldson, Elin; Malinen, Marjo; Remes, Mika; Örn, Fanny; Palvimo, Jorma J; Eriksson, John E

    2015-06-01

    Contrary to cell cycle-associated cyclin-dependent kinases, CDK5 is best known for its regulation of signaling processes in differentiated cells and its destructive activation in Alzheimer's disease. Recently, CDK5 has been implicated in a number of different cancers, but how it is able to stimulate cancer-related signaling pathways remains enigmatic. Our goal was to study the cancer-promoting mechanisms of CDK5 in prostate cancer. We observed that CDK5 is necessary for proliferation of several prostate cancer cell lines. Correspondingly, there was considerable growth promotion when CDK5 was overexpressed. When examining the reasons for the altered proliferation effects, we observed that CDK5 phosphorylates S308 on the androgen receptor (AR), resulting in its stabilization and differential expression of AR target genes including several growth-priming transcription factors. However, the amplified cell growth was found to be separated from AR signaling, further corroborated by CDK5-dependent proliferation of AR null cells. Instead, we found that the key growth-promoting effect was due to specific CDK5-mediated AKT activation. Down-regulation of CDK5 repressed AKT phosphorylation by altering its intracellular localization, immediately followed by prominent cell cycle inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK5 acts as a crucial signaling hub in prostate cancer cells by controlling androgen responses through AR, maintaining and accelerating cell proliferation through AKT activation, and releasing cell cycle breaks. PMID:25851605

  7. NDRG2 acts as a negative regulator downstream of androgen receptor and inhibits the growth of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuigong; Wu, Guojun; Li, Ruixiao; Gao, Lei; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Yao, Libo; Yuan, Jianlin; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Castration resistance is a major issue during castration therapy for prostate cancer and thus more effective treatment are needed for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). NDRG2 (N-Myc downstream regulated gene 2), a recently identified tumor suppressor, was previously shown to inhibit the proliferation and invasion of prostate cancer, but whether NDRG2 is involved in CRPC remains to be known. Because androgen receptor (AR) axis plays an important role in castration resistance, we evaluate the role of NDRG2 in AR signaling and CRPC. Immunohistochemistry examination of prostate cancer tissues demonstrated that the expression of NDRG2 is negatively correlated with that of AR and c-Myc. Furthermore, AR negatively regulates NDRG2, as well as alters levels of c-Myc and prostate specific antigen (PSA). Forced expression of NDRG2 significantly inhibits the in vitro growth of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells; this was accompanied by alterations in PSA, but not by those of AR and c-Myc. Finally, by mimicking castration therapy in a xenograft mouse model, we showed that lentivirus-mediated NDRG2 overexpression efficiently overcomes castration resistance. Thus, by acting as a negative regulator downstream of AR, NDRG2 may emerge as a potential therapy molecule for CRPC.

  8. Identification of PAN2 by quantitative proteomics as a leucine-rich repeat-receptor-like kinase acting upstream of PAN1 to polarize cell division in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoguo; Facette, Michelle; Humphries, John A; Shen, Zhouxin; Park, Yeri; Sutimantanapi, Dena; Sylvester, Anne W; Briggs, Steven P; Smith, Laurie G

    2012-11-01

    Mechanisms governing the polarization of plant cell division are poorly understood. Previously, we identified pangloss1 (PAN1) as a leucine-rich repeat-receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK) that promotes the polarization of subsidiary mother cell (SMC) divisions toward the adjacent guard mother cell (GMC) during stomatal development in maize (Zea mays). Here, we identify pangloss2 (PAN2) as a second LRR-RLK promoting SMC polarization. Quantitative proteomic analysis identified a PAN2 candidate by its depletion from membranes of pan2 single and pan1;pan2 double mutants. Genetic mapping and sequencing of mutant alleles confirmed the identity of this protein as PAN2. Like PAN1, PAN2 has a catalytically inactive kinase domain and accumulates in SMCs at sites of GMC contact before nuclear polarization. The timing of polarized PAN1 and PAN2 localization is very similar, but PAN2 acts upstream because it is required for polarized accumulation of PAN1 but is independent of PAN1 for its own localization. We find no evidence that PAN2 recruits PAN1 to the GMC contact site via a direct or indirect physical interaction, but PAN2 interacts with itself. Together, these results place PAN2 at the top of a cascade of events promoting the polarization of SMC divisions, potentially functioning to perceive or amplify GMC-derived polarizing cues.

  9. β-arrestin-2-biased agonism of delta opioid receptors sensitizes transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew P; Szteyn, Kalina; Doyle, Allison P; Gomez, Ruben; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of chronic pain, the pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain has seen little advancement. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOPr) continue to be vital in the treatment of many forms of chronic pain, but side-effects limit their clinical utility and range from relatively mild, such as constipation, to major, such as addiction and dependence. Additionally, chronic activation of MOPr results in pain hypersensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), and we have shown recently that recruitment of β-arrestin2 to MOPr, away from transient potential vanilloid eceptor type 1 (TRPV1) in primary sensory neurons contributes to this phenomenon. The delta opioid receptor (DOPr) has become a promising target for the treatment of chronic pain, but little is known about the effects of chronic activation of DOPr on nociceptor sensitivity and OIH. Here we report that chronic activation of DOPr by the DOPr-selective agonist, SNC80, results in the sensitization of TRPV1 and behavioral signs of OIH via β-arrestin2 recruitment to DOPr and away from TRPV1. Conversely, chronic treatment with ARM390, a DOPr-selective agonist that does not recruit β-arrestin2, neither sensitized TRPV1 nor produced OIH. Interestingly, the effect of SNC80 to sensitize TRPV1 is species-dependent, as rats developed OIH but mice did not. Taken together, the reported data identify a novel side-effect of chronic administration of β-arrestin2-biased DOPr agonists and highlight the importance of potential species-specific effects of DOPr agonists.

  10. G Protein Beta 5 Is Targeted to D2-Dopamine Receptor-Containing Biochemical Compartments and Blocks Dopamine-Dependent Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Octeau, J. Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M.; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  11. G protein beta 5 is targeted to D2-dopamine receptor-containing biochemical compartments and blocks dopamine-dependent receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Octeau, J Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  12. Intrauterine growth restriction modifies the hedonic response to sweet taste in newborn pups - Role of the accumbal μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Laureano, D P; Dalle Molle, R; Alves, M B; Luft, C; Desai, M; Ross, M G; Silveira, P P

    2016-05-13

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with increased preference for palatable foods. The hedonic response to sweet taste, modulated by the nucleus accumbens μ-opioid-receptors, may be involved. We investigated hedonic responses and receptor levels in IUGR and Control animals. From pregnancy day 10, Sprague-Dawley dams received either an ad libitum (Control), or a 50% food restricted (FR) diet. At birth, pups were cross-fostered, and nursed by Adlib fed dams. The hedonic response was evaluated at 1 day after birth and at 90 days of life, by giving sucrose solution or water and analyzing the hedonic facial responses (within 60s). Control pups exposed either to water or sucrose resolved their hedonic responses after 16 and 18s, respectively, while FR hedonic responses to sucrose persisted over 20s. FR pups had deceased phospho-μ-opioid-receptor (p=0.009) and reduced phosphor:total mu opioid receptor ratio compared to controls pups (p=0.003). In adults, there was an interaction between group and solution at the end of the evaluation (p=0.044): Control decreased the response after sucrose solution, FR did not change over time. There were no differences in phosphorylation of μ-opioid-receptor in adults. These results demonstrate IUGR newborn rats exhibit alterations in hedonic response accompanied by a decrease in μ-opioid-receptor phosphorylation, though these alterations do not persist at 3 months of age. Opioid system alterations in early life may contribute to the development of preference for highly palatable foods and contribute to rapid weight gain and obesity in IUGR offspring.

  13. Phosphorylation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor is increased in the nucleus accumbens during both acute and extended morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ethan M; Reeves, Turi; Kapernaros, Katherine; Neubert, John K; Caudle, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Opioid withdrawal causes a dysphoric state that can lead to complications in pain patients and can propagate use in drug abusers and addicts. Opioid withdrawal changes the activity of neurons in the nucleus accumbens, an area rich in both opioid-binding mu opioid receptors and glutamate-binding NMDA receptors. Because the accumbens is an area important for reward and aversion, plastic changes in this area during withdrawal could alter future behaviors in animals. We discovered an increase in phosphorylation of serine 897 in the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (pNR1) during acute morphine withdrawal. This serine can be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) and dephosphorylated by calcineurin. We next demonstrated that this increased pNR1 change is associated with an increase in NR1 surface expression. NR1 surface expression and pNR1 levels during acute withdrawal were both reduced by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate) and the PKA inhibitor H-89(N-[2-[[3-(4-bromophenyl)-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride hydrate). We also found that pNR1 levels remained high after an extended morphine withdrawal period of 2 months, correlated with reward-seeking behavior for palatable food, and were associated with a decrease in accumbal calcineurin levels. These data suggest that NR1 phosphorylation changes during the acute withdrawal phase can be long lasting and may reflect a permanent change in NMDA receptors in the accumbens. These altered NMDA receptors in the accumbens could play a role in long-lasting behaviors associated with reward and opioid use.

  14. Intrauterine growth restriction modifies the hedonic response to sweet taste in newborn pups - Role of the accumbal μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Laureano, D P; Dalle Molle, R; Alves, M B; Luft, C; Desai, M; Ross, M G; Silveira, P P

    2016-05-13

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with increased preference for palatable foods. The hedonic response to sweet taste, modulated by the nucleus accumbens μ-opioid-receptors, may be involved. We investigated hedonic responses and receptor levels in IUGR and Control animals. From pregnancy day 10, Sprague-Dawley dams received either an ad libitum (Control), or a 50% food restricted (FR) diet. At birth, pups were cross-fostered, and nursed by Adlib fed dams. The hedonic response was evaluated at 1 day after birth and at 90 days of life, by giving sucrose solution or water and analyzing the hedonic facial responses (within 60s). Control pups exposed either to water or sucrose resolved their hedonic responses after 16 and 18s, respectively, while FR hedonic responses to sucrose persisted over 20s. FR pups had deceased phospho-μ-opioid-receptor (p=0.009) and reduced phosphor:total mu opioid receptor ratio compared to controls pups (p=0.003). In adults, there was an interaction between group and solution at the end of the evaluation (p=0.044): Control decreased the response after sucrose solution, FR did not change over time. There were no differences in phosphorylation of μ-opioid-receptor in adults. These results demonstrate IUGR newborn rats exhibit alterations in hedonic response accompanied by a decrease in μ-opioid-receptor phosphorylation, though these alterations do not persist at 3 months of age. Opioid system alterations in early life may contribute to the development of preference for highly palatable foods and contribute to rapid weight gain and obesity in IUGR offspring. PMID:26926962

  15. Administration of mu-, kappa- or delta2-receptor agonists via osmotic minipumps suppresses murine splenic antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Rahim, R T; Meissler, J J; Cowan, A; Rogers, T J; Geller, E B; Gaughan, J; Adler, M W; Eisenstein, T K

    2001-10-01

    Previously, our laboratory has shown that morphine given by implantation of a 75-mg slow-release pellet for 48 h suppresses murine splenic antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) in a plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. However, the use of slow-release pellets for such studies is limited, as these pellets are only available in fixed doses and similar pellets for kappa and delta agonists have not been developed. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of administering opioids via Alzet osmotic minipumps to assess their immunomodulatory effects. Groups of mice received minipumps dispensing morphine sulfate, which has primary activity at the mu opioid receptor; U50,488H, which is a kappa-selective agonist; deltorphin II, which is a delta2-selective agonist; or DPDPE, which has greater selectivity for delta1 than delta, receptors. Morphine, U50,488H and deltorphin II were all immunosuppressive, with biphasic dose-response curves exhibiting maximal (approximately 50%) suppression of the PFC response at doses of 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/day 48 h after pump implantation. Further, immunosuppression by morphine sulfate, U50,488H or deltorphin II was blocked by simultaneous implantation of a minipump administering the opioid receptor-selective antagonists CTAP (1 mg/kg/day), nor-binaltorphimine (5 mg/kg/day), or naltriben (3 mg/kg/day), respectively. DPDPE was inactive at doses lower than 10 mg/kg/day. We conclude that osmotic minipumps are a practical and useful way of administering opioids to study their effects on the immune system, and give further evidence that immunosuppression induced in vivo by opioid agonists is mediated not only via mu, but also via kappa and delta2 opioid receptors. PMID:11606031

  16. Eluxadoline

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a class of medications called mu-opioid receptor agonists. It works by decreasing bowel activity. ... from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine), sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (blockage of bile or ...

  17. Human SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 Proteins Acting on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reduce Proliferation of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HT-29 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shulepko, M A; Bychkov, M L; Shenkarev, Z O; Paramonov, A S; Chugunov, A O; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2014-10-01

    Human secreted Ly-6/uPAR related proteins (SLURP-1 and SLURP-2) are produced by various cells, including the epithelium and immune system. These proteins act as autocrine/paracrine hormones regulating the growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and are also involved in the control of inflammation and malignant cell transformation. These effects are assumed to be mediated by the interactions of SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 with the α7 and α3β2 subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), respectively. Available knowledge about the molecular mechanism underling the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects is very limited. SLURP-2 remains one of the most poorly studied proteins of the Ly-6/uPAR family. In this study, we designed for the first time a bacterial system for SLURP-2 expression and a protocol for refolding of the protein from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-2 and its 13C-15N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant protein was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and a structural model was developed. A comparative study of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects on the epithelial cell growth was conducted using human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells, which express only α7-nAChRs. A pronounced antiproliferative effect of both proteins was observed. Incubation of cells with 1 μM SLURP-1 and 1 μM SLURP-2 during 48 h led to a reduction in the cell number down to ~ 54 and 63% relative to the control, respectively. Fluorescent microscopy did not reveal either apoptotic or necrotic cell death. An analysis of the dose-response curve revealed the concentration-dependent mode of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 action with EC50 ~ 0.1 and 0.2 nM, respectively. These findings suggest that the α7-nAChR is the main receptor responsible for the antiproliferative effect of SLURP proteins in epithelial cells. PMID:25558396

  18. [Preparation and the biological effect of fusion protein GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc) fusion protein as long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-cheng

    2015-12-01

    GLP-1 has a variety of anti-diabetic effects. However, native GLP-1 is not suitable for treatment of diabetes due to its short half-life (t½, 2-5 min). Exendin-4 is a polypeptide isolated from lizard saliva, which can bind to GLP-1 receptor, produce physiological effects similar to GLP-1, t½ up to 2.5 h, therefore, we developed a long-lasting GLP-1 receptor agonists and GLP-1-exendin-4 fusion IgG4 Fc [GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc)]. We constructed the eukaryotic expression vector of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc)-pOptiVEC- TOPO by gene recombination technique and expressed the fusion protein human GLP-1-IgG4 (Fc) in CHO/DG44 cells. The fusion protein stimulated the INS-1 cells secretion of insulin, GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein in CD1 mice pharmacokinetic experiments, as well as GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein did anti-diabetic effect on streptozotocin induced mice. Results demonstrated that the GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) positive CHO/DG44 clones were chosen and the media from these positive clones. Western blotting showed that one protein band was found to match well with the predicted relative molecular mass of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc). Insulin RIA showed that GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) dose-dependently stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in CD1 mice showed that with intraperitoneal injection (ip), the fusion protein peaked at 30 min in circulation and maintained a plateau for 200 h. Natural biological half-life of exendin-4 was (1.39 ± 0.28) h, GLP-1 in vivo t½ 4 min, indicating that fusion protein has long-lasting effects on the modulation of glucose homeostasis. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) was found to be effective in reducing the incidence of diabetes in multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice, longer duration of the biological activity of the fusion protein. The biological activity was significantly higher than that of GLP-1 and exendin-4. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) has good anti-diabetic activity

  19. A Switch of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Binding Preference from Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K)–p85 to Filamin A Negatively Controls the PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Najib, Souad; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Estève, Jean-Pierre; Schulz, Stefan; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Fourmy, Daniel; Lättig, Jens; Mollereau, Catherine; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Susini, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Frequent oncogenic alterations occur in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, urging identification of novel negative controls. We previously reported an original mechanism for restraining PI3K activity, controlled by the somatostatin G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) sst2 and involving a ligand-regulated interaction between sst2 with the PI3K regulatory p85 subunit. We here identify the scaffolding protein filamin A (FLNA) as a critical player regulating the dynamic of this complex. A preexisting sst2-p85 complex, which was shown to account for a significant basal PI3K activity in the absence of ligand, is disrupted upon sst2 activation. FLNA was here identified as a competitor of p85 for direct binding to two juxtaposed sites on sst2. Switching of GPCR binding preference from p85 toward FLNA is determined by changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation of p85- and FLNA-binding sites on sst2 upon activation. It results in the disruption of the sst2-p85 complex and the subsequent inhibition of PI3K. Knocking down FLNA expression, or abrogating FLNA recruitment to sst2, reversed the inhibition of PI3K and of tumor growth induced by sst2. Importantly, we report that this FLNA inhibitory control on PI3K can be generalized to another GPCR, the mu opioid receptor, thereby providing an unprecedented mechanism underlying GPCR-negative control on PI3K. PMID:22203038

  20. μ-Opioid Receptor Gene A118G Variants and Persistent Pain Symptoms among Men and Women Experiencing Motor Vehicle Collision

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Hu, JunMei; Bortsov, Andrey V.; Soward, April C; Swor, Robert; Jones, J; Lee, D; Peak, D; Domeier, R; Rathlev, N; Hendry, P; McLean, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor 1 (OPRM1) binds endogenous opioids. Increasing evidence suggests that endogenous OPRM1 agonists released at the time of trauma may contribute to the development of post-traumatic musculoskeletal pain (MSP). In this prospective observational study we evaluated the hypothesis that individuals with an AG or GG genotype at the OPRM1 A118G allele, which results in a reduced response to opioids, would have less severe MSP six weeks after motor vehicle collision (MVC). Based on previous evidence, we hypothesized that this effect would be sex-dependent and most pronounced among women with substantial peritraumatic distress. European American men and women ≥18 years of age presenting to the emergency department after MVC and discharged to home after evaluation (n=948) were enrolled. Assessments included genotyping and six week evaluation of overall MSP severity (0–10 NRS). In linear regression modeling a significant A118G allele × sex interaction was observed: an AG/GG genotype predicted reduced MSP severity among women with substantial peritraumatic distress (β= −0.925, p=0.014), but not among all women. In contrast, men with an AG/GG genotype experienced increased MSP severity at six weeks (β=0.827, p=0.019). Further studies are needed to understand biologic mechanisms mediating observed sex differences in A118G effects. PMID:25842347

  1. Treatment intensification in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin: rationale and clinical evidence for the use of short‐acting and other glucagon‐like peptide‐1 receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Bonadonna, Riccardo C.; Gentile, Sandro; Vettor, Roberto; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary A substantial proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus do not reach glycemic targets, despite treatment with oral anti‐diabetic drugs and basal insulin therapy. Several options exist for treatment intensification beyond basal insulin, and the treatment paradigm is complex. In this review, the options for treatment intensification will be explored, focusing on drug classes that act via the incretin system and paying particular attention to the short‐acting glucagon‐like peptide‐1 receptor agonists exenatide and lixisenatide. Current treatment guidelines will be summarized and discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26787264

  2. Modulation of silent and constitutively active nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptors by potent receptor antagonists and Na+ ions in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Margas, Wojciech; Trapella, Claudio; Caló, Girolamo; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-05-01

    pharmacology and allosteric regulation by Na(+). Data are also presented demonstrating that heterologously expressed mu opioid receptors in sympathetic neurons are similarly modulated. PMID:20159949

  3. Expression and Characterization of a Potent Long-Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Fang; Wan, Deyou; Liu, Yunhui; Yang, Li; Feng, Hongru; Cui, Xinling; Gao, Xin; Song, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Human GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) can produce a remarkable improvement in glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, its clinical benefits are limited by its short half-life, which is less than 2 min because of its small size and rapid enzymatic inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. We engineered GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc, a 68-kDa fusion protein linking a variant human GLP-1 (A8G/G26E/R36G) to a human IgG2σ constant heavy-chain. A stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell line was obtained using electroporation. Western blotting showed that the expressed protein was immunoreactive to both GLP-1 and IgG antibodies. GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a dose- and glucose-dependent manner and increased insulin mRNA expression. The half-life of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc in cynomolgus monkeys was approximately 57.1 ± 4.5 h. In the KKAy mouse model of diabetes, one intraperitoneal injection of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc (1 mg/kg) reduced blood glucose levels for 5 days. A 4-week repeat-administration study identified sustained effects on blood glucose levels. Oral glucose tolerance tests conducted at the beginning and end of this 4-week period showed that GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc produced a stable glucose lowering effect. In addition, KKAy mice treated with GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc showed statistically significant weight loss from day 23. In conclusion, these properties of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc demonstrated that it represented a potential long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27232339

  4. Full-length membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-α acts through tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 to modify phenotype of sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zetang; Wang, Shiyong; Gruber, Sandy; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J

    2013-09-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from spinal hemisection or selective spinal nerve ligation is characterized by an increase in membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-alpha (mTNFα) in spinal microglia without detectable release of soluble TNFα (sTNFα). In tissue culture, we showed that a full-length transmembrane cleavage-resistant TNFα (CRTNFα) construct can act through cell-cell contact to activate neighboring microglia. We undertook the current study to test the hypothesis that mTNFα expressed in microglia might also affect the phenotype of primary sensory afferents, by determining the effect of CRTNFα expressed from COS-7 cells on gene expression in primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Co-culture of DRG neurons with CRTNFα-expressing COS-7 cells resulted in a significant increase in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.8, and voltage-gated calcium channel subunit CaV3.2 at both mRNA and protein levels, and enhanced CCL2 expression and release from the DRG neurons. Exposure to sTNFα produced an increase only in CCL2 expression and release. Treatment of the cells with an siRNA against tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) significantly reduced CRTNFα-induced gene expression changes in DRG neurons, whereas administration of CCR2 inhibitor had no significant effect on CRTNFα-induced increase in gene expression and CCL2 release in DRG neurons. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that mTNFα expressed in spinal microglia can facilitate pain signaling by up-regulating the expression of cation channels and CCL2 in DRG neurons in a TNFR2-dependent manner. PMID:23711481

  5. Modulation of spontaneous intracellular Ca²⁺ fluctuations and spontaneous cholinergic transmission in rat chromaffin cells in situ by endogenous GABA acting on GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Tzitzitlini, Alejandre-García; Pedro, Segura-Chama; Martha, Pérez-Armendáriz E; Rodolfo, Delgado-Lezama; Arturo, Hernández-Cruz

    2016-02-01

    Using fluorescence [Ca(2+)]i imaging in rat adrenal slices, we characterized the effects of agonists and antagonists of the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) on resting intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i fluctuations (SCFs) in hundreds of individual chromaffin cells (CCs) recorded simultaneously in situ. Muscimol, a GABAA-R agonist (20 μM; 25 s), induced an increase of resting [Ca(2+)]i in 43 ± 3 % of CCs, a decrease in 26 ± 2 %, and no response in 30 ± 5 %. In Ca(2+)-free external medium, SCFs ceased completely and muscimol failed to elicit [Ca(2+)]i rises. All muscimol-induced [Ca(2+)]i changes were blocked by the GABAA-R antagonist bicuculline, suggesting that they result from changes in membrane potential depending on the cell's Cl(-) equilibrium potential. Unexpectedly, bicuculline increased the amplitude and frequency of SCFs in 54 % of CCs, revealing a tonic inhibition of SCFs by ambient GABA acting through GABAA-R. Mecamylamine (a specific nicotinic cholinergic blocker) decreased basal SCF activity in 18 % of CCs and inhibited bicuculline-induced SCF intensification, suggesting that spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release from nerve endings contributes to SCF generation in CCs in situ and that blockade of presynaptic GABAA-Rs intensifies SCFs in part through the disinhibition of spontaneous cholinergic transmission. Electrophysiological experiments confirmed that spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents recorded from CCs in situ were enhanced by bicuculline. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a regulatory effect of endogenous GABA on synaptic currents and SCFs of adrenal CCs. These findings denote a novel GABA-mediated presynaptic and postsynaptic regulatory mechanism of CC activity which may participate in the control of catecholamine secretion.

  6. The long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, indacaterol, enhances glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription in human airway epithelial cells in a gene- and agonist-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, T; Johnson, M; Newton, R; Giembycz, M A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inhaled glucocorticoid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with moderate/severe asthma in whom adequate control cannot be achieved by an ICS alone. Previously, we discovered that LABAs can augment dexamethasone-inducible gene expression and proposed that this effect may explain how these two drugs interact to deliver superior clinical benefit. Herein, we extended that observation by analysing, pharmacodynamically, the effect of the LABA, indacaterol, on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene transcription induced by seven ligands with intrinsic activity values that span the spectrum of full agonism to antagonism. Experimental Approach BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells stably transfected with a 2× glucocorticoid response element luciferase reporter were used to model gene transcription together with an analysis of several glucocorticoid-inducible genes. Key Results Indacaterol augmented glucocorticoid-induced reporter activation in a manner that was positively related to the intrinsic activity of the GR agonist. This effect was demonstrated by an increase in response maxima without a change in GR agonist affinity or efficacy. Indacaterol also enhanced glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression. However, the magnitude of this effect was dependent on both the GR agonist and the gene of interest. Conclusions and Implications These data suggest that indacaterol activates a molecular rheostat, which increases the transcriptional competency of GR in an agonist- and gene-dependent manner without apparently changing the relationship between fractional GR occupancy and response. These findings provide a platform to rationally design ICS/LABA combination therapy that is based on the generation of agonist-dependent gene expression profiles in target and off-target tissues. PMID:25598440

  7. An aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand acts on dendritic cells and T cells to suppress the Th17 response in allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ping; Hu, Guo-Hua; Kang, Hou-Yong; Yao, Hong-Bing; Kou, Wei; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Cheng; Hong, Su-Ling

    2014-05-01

    A predominant Th17 population is a marker of allergic rhinitis (AR). The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exhibits strong immunomodulation potential via regulation of the differentiation of T lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DCs) after activation by its ligand, such as 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of AhR on Th17 differentiation by investigating the action of ITE on DCs and CD4(+) T cells from patients with AR. In all, 26 AR patients and 12 healthy controls were included in this study. The expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17 in the culture supernatant and the presence of Th17 cells in CD4(+) T cells and DC-CD4(+) T-cell co-culture system were measured before and after treatment with ITE. We show that ITE significantly induced cell secretion of IL-10 and inhibited IL-1β and IL-6 production in DCs, and promoted IL-10 production and suppressed IL-17 expression in CD4(+) T cells in vitro. It also suppressed the expansion of Th17 cells in vitro. Our work demonstrates that ITE acts on DCs and CD4(+) T cells to inhibit the Th17 response that suppresses AR; the AhR-DC-Th17 axis may be an important pathway in the treatment of AR. ITE, a nontoxic AhR ligand, attenuated the Th17 response; thus, it appears to be a promising therapeutic candidate for suppressing the inflammatory responses associated with AR.

  8. Dual effect of trimebutine on contractility of the guinea pig ileum via the opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, K; Sano, I; Nakayama, S; Matsuyama, S; Takeda, K; Yoshihara, C; Tanaka, C

    1991-12-01

    Preparations of longitudinal muscle attached to myenteric plexus from guinea pig ileum were used to observe the effect of trimebutine on intestinal motility. Electrical stimulation at 0.2 Hz and 5 Hz produced contraction mediated by the release of acetylcholine in the preparations. The response to low-frequency stimulation (0.2 Hz) was inhibited by trimebutine (10(-8)-10(-5) mol/L), and the response to high-frequency stimulation (5 Hz) was enhanced by the drug at low concentrations (10(-8)-10(-7) mol/L) and inhibited by high concentrations (10(-6)-10(-5) mol/L). This enhancement was mimicked by [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin, and was antagonized by naloxone but not by MR2266. Enhancement by trimebutine was inhibited by yohimbine. Trimebutine (greater than or equal to 10(-8) mol/L) inhibited stimulation (5 Hz)-evoked release of norepinephrine, and the trimebutine effect was antagonized by naloxone but not by MR2266. Low concentrations of trimebutine inhibit norepinephrine release via the mu-opioid receptor and enhance intestinal motility by preventing the adrenergic inhibition of acetylcholine release. Inhibition by trimebutine was antagonized either by naloxone or MR2266. High concentrations of trimebutine may inhibit acetylcholine release via the mu- and kappa-opioid receptors, after which the intestinal motility is inhibited. Trimebutine at further high concentrations (greater than 10(-5) mol/L) contracted single smooth muscle cells from the circular muscle layers but not from the longitudinal muscle layers. The usual dose of trimebutine may exert dual effect on the intestinal motility indirectly through cholinergic and adrenergic neurons without direct effect on the smooth muscle. PMID:1659547

  9. A peripherally administered, centrally acting angiotensin II AT2 antagonist selectively increases brain AT1 receptors and decreases brain tyrosine hydroxylase transcription, pituitary vasopressin and ACTH.

    PubMed

    Macova, Miroslava; Pavel, Jaroslav; Saavedra, Juan M

    2009-01-23

    The physiological actions of brain Angiotensin II AT(2) receptors and their relationship to Angiotensin II AT(1) receptors remain controversial. To further clarify their role, we determined to what extent systemic administration of an AT(2) receptor antagonist affected AT(2) receptor binding within the brain and the expression of AT(1) receptors. For this purpose, we subcutaneously administered the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD123319 (1 mg/kg/day) to adult male rats for two weeks via osmotic minipumps. We also studied the content of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone and vasopressin, representative of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, and the tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in the locus coeruleus as a measure of central norepinephrine function. We found significant decreases in AT(2) receptor binding in brain areas inside the blood brain barrier, the inferior olive and the locus coeruleus. AT(2) receptor blockade increased AT(1) receptor binding and mRNA expression not only in the subfornical organ and the median eminence, situated outside the blood brain barrier, but also in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, located inside the blood brain barrier. These changes paralleled decreased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the locus coeruleus and decreased pituitary adrenocorticotropic and vasopressin content. Our results demonstrate that sustained peripheral administration of an AT(2) antagonist decreases binding to brain AT(2) receptors, indicating that this drug is a useful tool for the study of their central role. AT(2) receptor activity inhibition up-regulates AT(1) receptor expression in specific brain areas. Blockade of brain AT(2) receptors is compatible with enhanced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and decreased central sympathetic system activity.

  10. Alterations in the rostral ventromedial medulla after the selective ablation of μ-opioid receptor expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    Harasawa, Ichiro; Johansen, Joshua P; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank; Meng, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) exerts both inhibitory and excitatory controls over nociceptive neurons in the spinal cord and medullary dorsal horn. Selective ablation of mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-expressing neurons in the RVM using saporin conjugated to the MOR agonist dermorphin-saporin (derm-sap) attenuates stress and injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity, yet the effect of RVM derm-sap on the functional integrity of the descending inhibitory system and the properties of RVM neurons remain unknown. Three classes of RVM neurons (on-cells, off-cells, and neutral cells) have been described with distinct responses to noxious stimuli and MOR agonists. Using single unit recording in lightly anesthetized rats, RVM neurons were characterized after microinjections of derm-sap or saporin. Derm-sap treatment resulted in a reduction in on-cells and off-cells when compared to saporin controls (P < 0.05). The number of neutral cells remained unchanged. After derm-sap treatment, RVM microinjections of the glutamate receptor agonist homocysteic acid increased tail-flick latencies, whereas the MOR agonist DAMGO had no effect. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal gray produced analgesia in both derm-sap and saporin controls with similar thresholds. Microinjection of kynurenic acid, a glutamate receptor antagonist, into the RVM disrupted periaqueductal gray stimulation-produced analgesia in both saporin-treated and derm-sap-treated rats. These results indicate that MOR-expressing neurons in the RVM are not required for analgesia produced by either direct or indirect activation of neurons in the RVM.

  11. Beta-agonist- and prostaglandin E1-induced translocation of the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase: evidence that the kinase may act on multiple adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, R H; Benovic, J L; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1986-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta-AR kinase) is a cytosolic enzyme that phosphorylates the beta-adrenergic receptor only when it is occupied by an agonist [Benovic, J. Strasser, R. H., Caron, M. G. & Lefkowitz, R. J. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2797-2801.] It may be crucially involved in the processes that lead to homologous or agonist-specific desensitization of the receptor. Stimulation of DDT1MF-2 hamster smooth muscle cells or S49 mouse lymphoma cells with a beta-agonist leads to translocation of 80-90% of the beta-AR kinase activity from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. The translocation process is quite rapid, is concurrent with receptor phosphorylation, and precedes receptor desensitization and sequestration. It is also transient, since much of the activity returns to the cytosol as the receptors become sequestered. Stimulation of beta-AR kinase translocation is a receptor-mediated event, since the beta-antagonist propranolol blocks the effect of agonist. In the kin- mutant of the S49 cells (lacks cAMP-dependent protein kinase), prostaglandin E1, which provokes homologous desensitization of its own receptor, is at least as effective as isoproterenol in promoting beta-AR kinase translocation to the plasma membrane. However, in the DDT1MF-2 cells, which contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors coupled to phosphatidylinositol turnover, the alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine is ineffective. These results suggest that the first step in homologous desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptor may be an agonist-promoted translocation of beta-AR kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane and that beta-AR kinase may represent a more general adenylate cyclase-coupled receptor kinase that participates in regulating the function of many such receptors. Images PMID:3018728

  12. A Novel α2/α4 Subtype-selective Positive Allosteric Modulator of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Acting from the C-tail of an α Subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Jin, Zhuang; Norleans, Jack; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-11-27

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are important therapeutic candidates as well as valuable research tools. We identified a novel type II PAM, (R)-7-bromo-N-(piperidin-3-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (Br-PBTC), which both increases activation and reactivates desensitized nAChRs. This compound increases acetylcholine-evoked responses of α2* and α4* nAChRs but is without effect on α3* or α6* nAChRs (* indicates the presence of other nAChR subunits). Br-BPTC acts from the C-terminal extracellular sequences of α4 subunits, which is also a PAM site for steroid hormone estrogens such as 17β-estradiol. Br-PBTC is much more potent than estrogens. Like 17β-estradiol, the non-steroid Br-PBTC only requires one α4 subunit to potentiate nAChR function, and its potentiation is stronger with more α4 subunits. This feature enables Br-BPTC to potentiate activation of (α4β2)(α6β2)β3 but not (α6β2)2β3 nAChRs. Therefore, this compound is potentially useful in vivo for determining functions of different α6* nAChR subtypes. Besides activation, Br-BPTC affects desensitization of nAChRs induced by sustained exposure to agonists. After minutes of exposure to agonists, Br-PBTC reactivated short term desensitized nAChRs that have at least two α4 subunits but not those with only one. Three α4 subunits were required for Br-BPTC to reactivate long term desensitized nAChRs. These data suggest that higher PAM occupancy promotes channel opening more efficiently and overcomes short and long term desensitization. This C-terminal extracellular domain could be a target for developing subtype or state-selective drugs for nAChRs.

  13. A Novel α2/α4 Subtype-selective Positive Allosteric Modulator of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Acting from the C-tail of an α Subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Jin, Zhuang; Norleans, Jack; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-11-27

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are important therapeutic candidates as well as valuable research tools. We identified a novel type II PAM, (R)-7-bromo-N-(piperidin-3-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (Br-PBTC), which both increases activation and reactivates desensitized nAChRs. This compound increases acetylcholine-evoked responses of α2* and α4* nAChRs but is without effect on α3* or α6* nAChRs (* indicates the presence of other nAChR subunits). Br-BPTC acts from the C-terminal extracellular sequences of α4 subunits, which is also a PAM site for steroid hormone estrogens such as 17β-estradiol. Br-PBTC is much more potent than estrogens. Like 17β-estradiol, the non-steroid Br-PBTC only requires one α4 subunit to potentiate nAChR function, and its potentiation is stronger with more α4 subunits. This feature enables Br-BPTC to potentiate activation of (α4β2)(α6β2)β3 but not (α6β2)2β3 nAChRs. Therefore, this compound is potentially useful in vivo for determining functions of different α6* nAChR subtypes. Besides activation, Br-BPTC affects desensitization of nAChRs induced by sustained exposure to agonists. After minutes of exposure to agonists, Br-PBTC reactivated short term desensitized nAChRs that have at least two α4 subunits but not those with only one. Three α4 subunits were required for Br-BPTC to reactivate long term desensitized nAChRs. These data suggest that higher PAM occupancy promotes channel opening more efficiently and overcomes short and long term desensitization. This C-terminal extracellular domain could be a target for developing subtype or state-selective drugs for nAChRs. PMID:26432642

  14. Cytokine-Induced Loss of Glucocorticoid Function: Effect of Kinase Inhibitors, Long-Acting β2-Adrenoceptor Agonist and Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Christopher F.; Shah, Suharsh; Miller-Larsson, Anna; Giembycz, Mark A.; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2×glucocorticoid response element (GRE) reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) or interleukin-1β inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h) was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3 expression by TNF. Finally

  15. Effect of β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) 3′ untranslated region polymorphisms on inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that variation in the length of the poly-C repeat in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) may contribute to interindividual variation in β-agonist response. However, methodology in previous studies limited the assessment of the effect of sequence variation in the context of poly-C repeat length. The objectives of this study were to design a novel genotyping method to fully characterize sequence variation in the ADRB2 3′UTR poly-C repeat in asthma patients treated with inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (ICS/LABA) combination therapy, and to analyze the effect of the poly-C repeat polymorphism on clinical response. Methods In 2,250 asthma patients randomized to treatment with budesonide/formoterol or fluticasone/salmeterol in a six-month study (AstraZeneca study code: SD-039-0735), sequence diversity in the ADRB2 poly-C repeat region was determined using a novel sequencing-based genotyping method. The relationship between the poly-C repeat polymorphism and the incidence of severe asthma exacerbations, and changes in pulmonary function and asthma symptoms from baseline to the average during the treatment period, were analyzed. Results Poly-C repeat genotypes were assigned in 97% (2,192/2,250) of patients. Of the 13 different poly-C repeat alleles identified, six alleles occurred at a frequency of >5% in one or more population in this study. The repeat length of these six common alleles ranged from 10 to 14 nucleotides. Twelve poly-C repeat genotypes were observed at a frequency of >1%. No evidence of an association between poly-C repeat genotype and the incidence of severe asthma exacerbations was observed. Patients’ pulmonary function measurements improved and asthma symptoms declined when treated with ICS/LABA combination therapy regardless of poly-C repeat genotype. Conclusions The extensive sequence diversity present in the poly-C repeat region of the ADRB2

  16. The influence of 5-HT(2A) activity on a 5-HT(2C) specific in vivo assay used for early identification of multiple acting SERT and 5-HT(2C) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Éliás, Olivér; Nógrádi, Katalin; Domány, György; Szakács, Zoltán; Kóti, János; Szántay, Csaba; Tarcsay, Ákos; Keserű, György M; Gere, Anikó; Kiss, Béla; Kurkó, Dalma; Kolok, Sándor; Némethy, Zsolt; Kapui, Zoltán; Hellinger, Éva; Vastag, Mónika; Sághy, Katalin; Kedves, Rita; Gyertyán, István

    2016-02-01

    As a result of our exploratory programme aimed at elaborating dually acting compounds towards the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) and the 5-HT2C receptor a novel series of 3-amino-1-phenylpropoxy substituted diphenylureas was identified. From that collection two promising compounds (2 and 3) exhibiting highest 5-HT2C receptor affinity strongly inhibited the 5-HT2C receptor agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP) induced hypomotility in mice. In further pursuance of that objective (2-aminoethyl)(benzyl)sulfamoyl diphenylureas and diphenylpiperazines have also been elaborated. Herein we report the synthesis of potent multiple-acting compounds from this new class. However, when two optimized representatives (6 and 14) possessing the desired in vitro profile were tested neither reduced the motor activity of mCPP treated animals. Comparative albeit limited in vitro structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and detailed in vivo studies are discussed and explanation for their intricate behaviour is proposed.

  17. Opioid requirement, opioid receptor expression, and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zylla, Dylan; Gourley, Brett L.; Vang, Derek; Jackson, Scott; Boatman, Sonja; Lindgren, Bruce; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Le, Chap; Gupta, Kalpna; Gupta, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Background Preclinical studies show that opioids stimulate angiogenesis and tumor progression through the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Although MOR is over-expressed in several human malignancies, the effect of chronic opioid requirement on cancer progression or survival has not been examined in humans. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on 113 patients identified in the Minneapolis VA Tumor Registry (test cohort) and 480 patients from the national VA Central Cancer Registry (validation cohort) diagnosed with stage IV prostate cancer between 1995 and 2010, to examine whether MOR expression or opioid requirement is associated with disease progression and survival. All opioids were converted to oral morphine equivalents (OME) for comparison. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to analyze MOR-immunoreactivity in prostate cancer biopsies. The effects of variables on outcomes were analyzed in univariable and multivariable models. Results In patients with metastatic prostate cancer, MOR expression and opioid requirement were independently associated with inferior progression-free survival (PFS) (HR 1.65, 1.33–2.07; p<0.001 and HR 1.08, 1.03–1.13; p<0.001, respectively) and overall survival (OS; HR 1.55, 1.20–1.99; p<0.001 and HR 1.05, 1.00–1.10; p=0.031, respectively). The validation cohort confirmed that increasing opioid requirement was associated with worse OS (HR 1.005, 1.002–1.008, p=0.001). Conclusion Higher MOR expression and greater opioid requirement are associated with shorter PFS and OS in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical practice should not be changed until prospective randomized trials show that opioid use is associated with inferior clinical outcomes, and that abrogation of the peripheral activities of opioids ameliorates this effect. PMID:24104703

  18. Autoradiographic comparison of the distribution of the neutral endopeptidase enkephalinase and of. mu. and delta opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, G.; Hamel, E.; Fournie-Zaluski, M.C.; Roques, B.P.

    1986-03-01

    The neutral endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11, also designated enkephalinase, has been visualized by in vitro autoradiography using the tritiated inhibitor (/sup 3/H)-N-((2RS)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-oxopropyl)glycine, ((/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly). Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly corresponding to 85% of the total binding to brain slices was inhibited by 1 ..mu..M thiorphan, a selective inhibitor of enkephalinase, but remained unchanged in the presence of captopril, a selective inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme. Very high levels of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding were found in the choroid plexus and the substantia nigra. High levels were present in the caudate putamen, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord. The distribution of enkephalinase was compared to that of ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors, selectively labeled with (/sup 3/H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-glycinol and (/sup 3/H)Try-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr, respectively. In the caudate putamen, (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding overlapped the clustered ..mu.. sites but appeared more closely related to the diffusely distributed delta sites. The association of enkephalinase with delta and ..mu.. opioid receptors in these areas is consistent with the observed role of the enzyme in regulating the effects of opioid peptides in striatal dopamine release and analgesia, respectively. Except for the choroid plexus and the cerebellum, the close similarity observed in numerous rat brain areas between the distribution of enkephalinase and that of ..mu.. and/ or delta opioid binding sites could account for most of the pharmacological effects elicited by enkephalinase inhibitors.

  19. Activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors attenuates the induction and maintenance of inflammatory pain in the rat.

    PubMed

    Elmes, Steven J R; Winyard, Lisa A; Medhurst, Stephen J; Clayton, Nick M; Wilson, Alex W; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoid agonists on established inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have compared the effects of pre-administration versus post-administration of a potent non-selective cannabinoid agonist HU210 and a selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 on hindpaw weight bearing and paw oedema in the carrageenan model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. For comparative purposes we also determined the effects of the mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine and the COX2 inhibitor rofecoxib in this model. At 3 h following intraplantar injection of carrageenan (2%, 100 microl) there was a significant (P < 0.001) reduction in weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindpaw, compared to vehicle treated rats and a concomitant increase in ipsilateral hindpaw volume (P < 0.001), compared to vehicle treated rats. Systemic administration of HU210 (10 microg/kg) and JWH-133 (10 mg/kg) at 3 h following injection of carrageenan, significantly attenuated decreases in ipsilateral hindpaw weight bearing (P < 0.05 for both) and paw volume (P < 0.001 for both). Pre-administration of HU210 and JWH-133 had similar effects on weight bearing in this model. Pre-administered HU210 also significantly decreased carrageenan-induced changes in paw volume (P < 0.001), this was not the case for JWH-133. Effects of post-administered HU210 and JWH-133 on ipsilateral hindpaw weight bearing and paw volume were comparable to the effect of systemic post-administration of morphine and rofecoxib (3 mg/kg for both). In summary, both HU210 and JWH-133 attenuated established inflammatory hypersensitivity and swelling, suggesting that cannabinoid-based drugs have clinical potential for the treatment of established inflammatory pain responses.

  20. Berberine induces pacemaker potential inhibition via cGMP-dependent ATP-sensitive K+ channels by stimulating mu/delta opioid receptors in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    Berberine is traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which are responsible for the production of gut movements. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine on pacemaker potentials (PPs) in cultured ICC clusters from the mouse small intestine, and sought to identify the receptors involved and the underlying mechanisms of action. All experiments were performed on cultured ICCs, and a whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record PPs from ICC clusters (current clamp mode). Under current clamp mode, berberine was shown to decrease the amplitude and frequency of PPs. However, these effects were suppressed by treatment with glibenclamide, a specific ATP‑sensitive K+ channel blocker. Nor‑binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (a kappa opioid receptor antagonist) did not suppress berberine‑induced PP inhibition, whereas ICI 174,864 (a delta opioid receptor antagonist) and CTOP (a mu opioid receptor antagonist) did suppress the inhibitory effects of berberine. Pretreatment with SQ‑22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) or with KT‑5720 (a protein kinase A inhibitor) did not suppress the effects of berberine; however, pretreatment with 1H‑[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3‑a] quinoxalin‑1‑one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) or KT‑5823 [a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor] did. In addition, berberine stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in ICCs. These observations indicate that berberine may inhibit the pacemaker activity of ICC clusters via ATP‑sensitive K+ channels and the cGMP‑PKG‑dependent pathway by stimulating mu and delta opioid receptors. Therefore, berberine may provide a basis for the development of novel agents for the treatment of GI motility dysfunction. PMID:27601272

  1. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions.

  2. Activin Decoy Receptor ActRIIB:Fc Lowers FSH and Therapeutically Restores Oocyte Yield, Prevents Oocyte Chromosome Misalignments and Spindle Aberrations, and Increases Fertility in Midlife Female SAMP8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Lori R; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Lee, Se-Jin; Chaffin, Charles L; Merchenthaler, István

    2016-03-01

    Women of advanced maternal age (AMA) (age ≥ 35) have increased rates of infertility, miscarriages, and trisomic pregnancies. Collectively these conditions are called "egg infertility." A root cause of egg infertility is increased rates of oocyte aneuploidy with age. AMA women often have elevated endogenous FSH. Female senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) has increased rates of oocyte spindle aberrations, diminished fertility, and rising endogenous FSH with age. We hypothesize that elevated FSH during the oocyte's FSH-responsive growth period is a cause of abnormalities in the meiotic spindle. We report that eggs from SAMP8 mice treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) for the period of oocyte growth have increased chromosome and spindle misalignments. Activin is a molecule that raises FSH, and ActRIIB:Fc is an activin decoy receptor that binds and sequesters activin. We report that ActRIIB:Fc treatment of midlife SAMP8 mice for the duration of oocyte growth lowers FSH, prevents egg chromosome and spindle misalignments, and increases litter sizes. AMA patients can also have poor responsiveness to FSH stimulation. We report that although eCG lowers yields of viable oocytes, ActRIIB:Fc increases yields of viable oocytes. ActRIIB:Fc and eCG cotreatment markedly reduces yields of viable oocytes. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated FSH contributes to egg aneuploidy, declining fertility, and poor ovarian response and that ActRIIB:Fc can prevent egg aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve ovarian response. Future studies will continue to examine whether ActRIIB:Fc works via FSH and/or other pathways and whether ActRIIB:Fc can prevent aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve stimulation responsiveness in AMA women. PMID:26713784

  3. Activin Decoy Receptor ActRIIB:Fc Lowers FSH and Therapeutically Restores Oocyte Yield, Prevents Oocyte Chromosome Misalignments and Spindle Aberrations, and Increases Fertility in Midlife Female SAMP8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Lori R; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Lee, Se-Jin; Chaffin, Charles L; Merchenthaler, István

    2016-03-01

    Women of advanced maternal age (AMA) (age ≥ 35) have increased rates of infertility, miscarriages, and trisomic pregnancies. Collectively these conditions are called "egg infertility." A root cause of egg infertility is increased rates of oocyte aneuploidy with age. AMA women often have elevated endogenous FSH. Female senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) has increased rates of oocyte spindle aberrations, diminished fertility, and rising endogenous FSH with age. We hypothesize that elevated FSH during the oocyte's FSH-responsive growth period is a cause of abnormalities in the meiotic spindle. We report that eggs from SAMP8 mice treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) for the period of oocyte growth have increased chromosome and spindle misalignments. Activin is a molecule that raises FSH, and ActRIIB:Fc is an activin decoy receptor that binds and sequesters activin. We report that ActRIIB:Fc treatment of midlife SAMP8 mice for the duration of oocyte growth lowers FSH, prevents egg chromosome and spindle misalignments, and increases litter sizes. AMA patients can also have poor responsiveness to FSH stimulation. We report that although eCG lowers yields of viable oocytes, ActRIIB:Fc increases yields of viable oocytes. ActRIIB:Fc and eCG cotreatment markedly reduces yields of viable oocytes. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated FSH contributes to egg aneuploidy, declining fertility, and poor ovarian response and that ActRIIB:Fc can prevent egg aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve ovarian response. Future studies will continue to examine whether ActRIIB:Fc works via FSH and/or other pathways and whether ActRIIB:Fc can prevent aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve stimulation responsiveness in AMA women.

  4. Autoradiographic evidence for two classes of mu opioid binding sites in rat brain using (/sup 125/I)FK33824

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.B.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C.; Herkenham, M.

    1987-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that pretreatment of brain membranes with the irreversible mu antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), partially eliminated mu binding sites (25,35), consistent with the existence of two mu binding sites distinguished by beta-FNA. This paper tests the hypothesis that the FNA-sensitive and FNA-insensitive mu binding sites have different anatomical distributions in rat brain. Prior to autoradiographic visualization of mu binding sites, (/sup 3/H)oxymorphone, (/sup 3/H)D-ala2-MePhe4, Gly-ol5-enkephalin (DAGO), and (/sup 125/I)D-ala2-Me-Phe4-met(o)-ol)enkephalin (FK33824) were shown to selectively label mu binding sites using slide mounted sections of molded minced rat brain. As found using membranes, beta-FNA eliminated only a portion of mu binding sites. Autoradiographic visualization of mu binding sites using the mu-selective ligand (/sup 125/I)FK33824 in control and FNA-treated sections of rat brain demonstrated that the proportion of mu binding sites sensitive to beta-FNA varied across regions of the brain, particularly the dorsal thalamus, ventrobasal complex and the hypothalamus, providing anatomical data supporting the existence of two classes of mu binding sites in rat brain.

  5. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  6. NK cell cytotoxicity mediated by 2B4 and NTB-A is dependent on SAP acting downstream of receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Stephan; Watzl, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    2B4 (CD244) and NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A, CD352) are activating receptors on human natural killer (NK) cells and belong to the family of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-related receptors (SRR). Engagement of these receptors leads to phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and recruitment of the adapter proteins SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and Ewing's sarcoma-activated transcript-2 (EAT-2). X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) is a severe immunodeficiency that results from mutations in the SAP gene. 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity are abrogated in XLP NK cells. To elucidate the molecular basis for this defect we analyzed early signaling events in SAP knockdown cells. Similar to XLP NK cells, knockdown of SAP in primary human NK cells leads to a reduction of 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that early signaling events such as raft recruitment and receptor phosphorylation are not affected by the absence of SAP, indicating the defect in the absence of SAP is downstream of these events. In addition, knockdown of EAT-2 does not impair 2B4 or NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. Surprisingly, EAT-2 recruitment to both receptors is abrogated in the absence of SAP, revealing a novel cooperativity between these adapters.

  7. Dopamine D2 receptors act upstream of AVP in the latero-anterior hypothalamus to modulate adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2015-04-01

    In pubertal male Syrian hamsters, exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence facilitates a high level of offensive aggression modulated by the enhanced development and activity of the vasopressin (AVP) and dopamine (DA) neural systems within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH), that is, a brain region implicated in the control of aggression. The present studies provide a detailed report of the pharmacologic interactions between AVP and DA D2 receptor signaling within the LAH in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Male Syrian hamsters were treated with AAS throughout adolescence and tested for aggression after local infusion of the DA D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride (ETIC) alone, or in combination with AVP in the LAH in an effort to determine the influence of DA D2 receptors relative to AVP-receptor mediated aggression mechanisms. As previously shown, ETIC infusion into the LAH suppressed adolescent AAS-induced aggressive responding; however, the AAS-induced aggressive phenotype was rescued by the coinfusion of AVP into the LAH. These behavioral data indicate that interactions between AVP and DA neural systems within the LAH modulate the control of aggression following adolescent exposure to AAS and that DA D2 receptor signaling functions upstream of AVP in the LAH to control this behavioral response.

  8. Pharmacology and anti-addiction effects of the novel κ opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Sal B, a potent and long-acting analogue of salvinorin A

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, B; Morani, A S; Ewald, A W M; Walker, L; Kumar, N; Simpson, D; Miller, J H; Prisinzano, T E; Kivell, B M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Acute activation of κ opioid (KOP) receptors results in anticocaine-like effects, but adverse effects, such as dysphoria, aversion, sedation and depression, limit their clinical development. Salvinorin A, isolated from the plant Salvia divinorum, and its semi-synthetic analogues have been shown to have potent KOP receptor agonist activity and may induce a unique response with similar anticocaine addiction effects as the classic KOP receptor agonists, but with a different side effect profile. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the duration of effects of Mesyl Sal B in vivo utilizing antinociception assays and screened for cocaine-prime induced cocaine-seeking behaviour in self-administering rats to predict anti-addiction effects. Cellular transporter uptake assays and in vitro voltammetry were used to assess modulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) function and to investigate transporter trafficking and kinase signalling pathways modulated by KOP receptor agonists. KEY RESULTS Mesyl Sal B had a longer duration of action than SalA, had anti-addiction properties and increased DAT function in vitro in a KOP receptor-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. These effects on DAT function required ERK1/2 activation. We identified differences between Mesyl Sal B and SalA, with Mesyl Sal B increasing the Vmax of dopamine uptake without altering cell-surface expression of DAT. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS SalA analogues, such as Mesyl Sal B, have potential for development as anticocaine agents. Further tests are warranted to elucidate the mechanisms by which the novel salvinorin-based neoclerodane diterpene KOP receptor ligands produce both anti-addiction and adverse side effects. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641310

  9. Effects of stress and. beta. -funal trexamine pretreatment on morphine analgesia and opioid binding in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.U.; Andrews, J.S.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Holtzman, S.G.

    1987-12-28

    This study was essentially an in vivo protection experiment designed to test further the hypothesis that stress induces release of endogenous opiods which then act at opioid receptors. Rats that were either subjected to restraint stress for 1 yr or unstressed were injected ICV with either saline or 2.5 ..mu..g of ..beta..-funaltrexamine (..beta..-FNA), an irreversible opioid antagonist that alkylates the mu-opioid receptor. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested unstressed for morphine analgesia or were sacrificed and opioid binding in brain was determined. (/sup 3/H)D-Ala/sup 2/NMePhe/sup 4/-Gly/sup 5/(ol)enkephalin (DAGO) served as a specific ligand for mu-opioid receptors, and (/sup 3/H)-bremazocine as a general ligand for all opioid receptors. Rats injected with saline while stressed were significantly less sensitive to the analgesic action of morphine 24 hr later than were their unstressed counterparts. ..beta..-FNA pretreatment attenuated morphine analgesia in an insurmountable manner. Animals pretreated with ..beta..-FNA while stressed were significantly more sensitive to the analgesic effect of morphine than were animals that received ..beta..-FNA while unstressed. ..beta..-FNA caused small and similar decreases in (/sup 3/H)-DAGO binding in brain of both stressed and unstressed animals. 35 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Gastrin-releasing peptide acts via postsynaptic BB2 receptors to modulate inward rectifier K+ and TRPV1-like conductances in rat paraventricular thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hermes, M L H J; Kolaj, M; Coderre, E M; Renaud, L P

    2013-04-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a bombesin-like peptide with a widespread distribution in mammalian CNS, where it has a role in food intake, circadian rhythm generation, fear memory, itch sensation and sexual behaviour. While it has been established that GRP predominantly excites neurons, details of the membrane mechanism involved in this action remain largely undefined. We used perforated patch clamp recording in acute brain slice preparations to investigate GRP-affected receptors and ionic conductances in neurons of the rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT). PVT is a component of the midline and intralaminar thalamus that participates in arousal, motivational drives and stress responses, and exhibits a prominence of GRP-like immunoreactive fibres. Exposure of PVT neurons to low nanomolar concentrations of GRP induced sustained TTX-resistant membrane depolarizations that could trigger rhythmic burst discharges or tonic firing. Membrane current analyses in voltage clamp revealed an underlying postsynaptic bombesin type 2 receptor-mediated inward current that resulted from the simultaneous suppression of a Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) conductance and activation of a non-selective cation conductance with biophysical and pharmacological properties reminiscent of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1. A role for a TRPV1-like conductance was further implied by a significant suppressant influence of a TRPV1 antagonist on GRP-induced membrane depolarization and rhythmic burst or tonic firing. The results provide a detailed picture of the receptor and ionic conductances that are involved in GRP's excitatory action in midline thalamus.

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F6 acts as an essential gatekeeper of Th17 CD4+ T cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Members of the evolutionarily conserved family of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor NR2F/COUP-TF orphan receptors have been implicated in lymphocyte biology, ranging from activation to differentiation and elicitation of immune effector functions. In particular, a CD4+ T cell intrinsic and non-redundant function of NR2F6 as a potent and selective repressor of the transcription of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (Il) 2, interferon y (ifng) and consequently of T helper (Th)17 CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders has been discovered. NR2F6 serves as an antigen receptor signaling threshold-regulated barrier against autoimmunity where NR2F6 is part of a negative feedback loop that limits inflammatory tissue damage induced by weakly immunogenic antigens such as self-antigens. Under such low affinity antigen receptor stimulation, NR2F6 appears as a prototypical repressor that functions to “lock out” harmful Th17 lineage effector transcription. Mechanistically, only sustained high affinity antigen receptor-induced protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation has been shown to inactivate NR2F6, thereby displacing pre-bound NR2F6 from the DNA and, subsequently, allowing for robust NFAT/AP-1- and RORγt-mediated cytokine transcription. The NR2F6 target gene repertoire thus identifies a general anti-inflammatory gatekeeper role for this orphan receptor. Investigating these signaling pathway(s) will enable a greater knowledge of the genetic, immune, and environmental mechanisms that lead to chronic inflammation and of certain autoimmune disorders in a given individual. PMID:24919548

  12. mu and delta opioid agonists at low concentrations decrease voltage-dependent K+ currents in F11 neuroblastoma x DRG neuron hybrid cells via cholera toxin-sensitive receptors.

    PubMed

    Fan, S F; Shen, K F; Crain, S M

    1993-03-12

    In a previous study, we showed that microM concentrations of mu or delta opioid agonists increase voltage-dependent outward K+ currents in neuroblastoma x DRG neuron hybrid F11 cells via pertussis toxin-sensitive receptors. The present study demonstrates that much lower concentrations (fM to nM) of these opioids (DAGO and DPDPE) decreased voltage-dependent outward K+ currents during step depolarization. The opioid antagonist, naloxone (3 nM) prevented these decreases in K+ current as did the cholera toxin subunits A or B (ca. 1 nM). Furthermore, the specific mu opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (5 nM) blocked the decrease by DAGO and the specific delta antagonist, naltrindole (1 nM) blocked that by DPDPE. Acute GM1 ganglioside (1 microM) treatment markedly enhanced the efficacy of opioid-induced decrease in K+ current. After treating the cells with pertussis toxin (1 microgram/ml) for 2 days or more, these opioids decreased the K+ current even when tested at concentrations as high as 1 microM. These results indicate that the decrease in K+ current elicited in F11 cells by low concentrations of mu and delta opioid agonists resembles the opioid-induced prolongation of the action potential duration and decrease in voltage-dependent K+ conductance that occur in DRG neurons in primary cultures. The F11 cell line provides therefore a valuable model system for correlative pharmacologic, electrophysiologic and biochemical analyses of Gs-coupled, GM1 ganglioside-regulated excitatory opioid receptor functions, in addition to G(i)/G(o)-coupled inhibitory receptor functions, in sensory neurons.

  13. A radio-ligand receptor assay for the long-acting thyroid stimulator. Inhibition by the long-acting thyroid stimulator of the binding of radioiodinated thyroid-stimulating hormone to human thyroid membranes.