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Sample records for acting opioid receptor

  1. Naloxegol: First oral peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists for opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    Anantharamu, Tejus; Sharma, Sushil; Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Dahiya, Navdeep; Singh Brashier, Dick B.; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of the most troublesome and the most common effects of opioid use leading to deterioration in quality of life of the patients and also has potentially deleterious repercussions on adherence and compliance to opioid therapy. With the current guidelines advocating liberal use of opioids by physicians even for non-cancer chronic pain, the situation is further complicated as these individuals are not undergoing palliative care and hence there cannot be any justification to subject these patients to the severe constipation brought on by opioid therapy which is no less debilitating than the chronic pain. The aim in these patients is to prevent the opioid-induced constipation but at the same time allow the analgesic activity of opioids. Many drugs have been used with limited success but the most specific among them were the peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA). Methylnaltrexone and alvimopan were the early drugs in this group but were not approved for oral use in OIC. However naloxegol, the latest PAMORA has been very recently approved as the first oral drug for OIC. This article gives an overview of OIC, its current management and more specifically the development and approval of naloxegol, including pharmacokinetics, details of various clinical trials, adverse effects and its current status for the management of OIC. PMID:26312011

  2. Alvimopan: a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Leslie, John B

    2007-09-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI), a transient cessation of coordinated bowel motility after surgery, is an important factor in extending the length of hospital stay. The etiology of POI is multifactorial, and related to both the surgical and anesthetic pathways chosen. Additionally, opioids used to manage non-cancer-related and cancer-related chronic pain may also decrease gastrointestinal (GI) motility resulting in opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD). Postoperative ileus has been associated with prolonged hospital stay and readmission, and thus may increase the overall hospital costs per patient with POI. Alvimopan, a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist, accelerated time to GI recovery and reduced postoperative hospital length of stay in phase III POI clinical trials and improved symptoms of OBD compared with placebo in phase II/III clinical trials. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently evaluating alvimopan for the management of POI after bowel resection. Alvimopan may provide clinically meaningful benefits to patients and may lower the economic burden of POI to the healthcare system.

  3. Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  4. Peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists as treatment options for constipation in noncancer pain patients on chronic opioid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B; Pappagallo, Marco; Fleischer, Charles; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Duval, Elizabeth; Hishmeh, Janan; LeQuang, Jo Ann; Taylor, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC), a prevalent and distressing side effect of opioid therapy, does not reliably respond to treatment with conventional laxatives. OIC can be a treatment-limiting adverse event. Recent advances in medications with peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists, such as methylnaltrexone, naloxegol, and alvimopan, hold promise for treating OIC and thus extending the benefits of opioid analgesia to more chronic pain patients. Peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists have been clinically tested to improve bowel symptoms without compromise to pain relief, although there are associated side effects, including abdominal pain. Other treatment options include fixed-dose combination products of oxycodone analgesic together with naloxone. PMID:28176913

  5. Naloxegol: the first orally administered, peripherally acting, mu opioid receptor antagonist, approved for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, M; Tack, J

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is becoming a relevant clinical challenge as most of the treatments demonstrated to be more effective than placebo in treating OIC have safety issues limiting a broad clinical application. Naloxegol is the first orally administered, peripherally acting, µ opioid receptor antagonist approved by the FDA and EMA specifically for the treatment of noncancer patients with OIC. This review summarizes the results of the studies regarding the effects of naloxegol in OIC. Pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated that naloxegol was able to inhibit gastrointestinal opioid effects while preserving central analgesic actions. Phase II and phase III studies in patients with noncancer OIC have confirmed the efficacy of naloxegol to inhibit OIC, and the most consistent efficacy was seen with the 25-mg dose once daily. Side effects were mainly gastrointestinal in origin (and usually transient and mild) and there were no signs of opioid withdrawal in the studies. Safety and tolerability were shown in a long-term safety study. Considering its efficacy, safety, route of administration and the limitations of most of the other available treatments, naloxegol has the potential to become the first-line treatment for noncancer patients with OIC.

  6. AM-251 and rimonabant act as direct antagonists at mu-opioid receptors: implications for opioid/cannabinoid interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Fantegrossi, William E; Prather, Paul L

    2012-10-01

    Mu-opioid and CB1-cannabinoid agonists produce analgesia; however, adverse effects limit use of drugs in both classes. Additive or synergistic effects resulting from concurrent administration of low doses of mu- and CB1-agonists may produce analgesia with fewer side effects. Synergism potentially results from interaction between mu-opioid receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). AM-251 and rimonabant are CB1R antagonist/inverse agonists employed to validate opioid-cannabinoid interactions, presumed to act selectively at CB1Rs. Therefore, the potential for direct action of these antagonists at MORs is rarely considered. This study determined if AM-251 and/or rimonabant directly bind and modulate the function of MORs. Surprisingly, AM-251 and rimonabant, but not a third CB1R inverse agonist AM-281, bind with mid-nanomolar affinity to human MORs with a rank order of affinity (K(i)) of AM-251 (251 nM) > rimonabant (652 nM) > AM281 (2135 nM). AM-251 and rimonabant, but not AM-281, also competitively antagonize morphine induced G-protein activation in CHO-hMOR cell homogenates (K(b) = 719 or 1310 nM, respectively). AM-251 and rimonabant block morphine inhibition of cAMP production, while only AM-251 elicits cAMP rebound in CHO-hMOR cells chronically exposed to morphine. AM-251 and rimonabant (10 mg/kg) attenuate morphine analgesia, whereas the same dose of AM-281 produces little effect. Therefore, in addition to high CB1R affinity, AM-251 and rimonabant bind to MORs with mid-nanomolar affinity and at higher doses may affect morphine analgesia via direct antagonism at MORs. Such CB1-independent of these antagonists effects may contribute to reported inconsistencies when CB1/MOR interactions are examined via pharmacological methods in CB1-knockout versus wild-type mice.

  7. Opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Opium is arguably one of the oldest herbal medicines, being used as analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal drug for thousands of years. These effects mirror the actions of the endogenous opioid system and are mediated by the principal μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. In the gut, met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin occur in both neurons and endocrine cells. When released, opioid peptides activate opioid receptors on the enteric circuitry controlling motility and secretion. As a result, inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, induction of stationary motor patterns and blockade of peristalsis ensue. Together with inhibition of ion and fluid secretion, these effects cause constipation, one of the most frequent and troublesome adverse reactions of opioid analgesic therapy. Although laxatives are most frequently used to ameliorate opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, their efficacy is unsatisfactory. Specific antagonism of peripheral opioid receptors is a more rational approach. This goal is addressed by the use of opioid receptor antagonists with limited absorption such as oral prolonged-release naloxone and opioid receptor antagonists that do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier such as methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. Preliminary evidence indicates that peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists may act as prokinetic drugs in their own right. PMID:19345246

  8. Alvimopan: an oral, peripherally acting, mu-opioid receptor antagonist for the treatment of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction--a 21-day treatment-randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Daniel M; Kennedy, Daniel T; Donovick, Roger A; Carpenter, Randall L; Cherubini, Maryann; Techner, Lee; Du, Wei; Ma, Yuju; Schmidt, William K; Wallin, Bruce; Jackson, David

    2005-03-01

    Alvimopan has been shown to reverse the inhibitory effect of opioids on gastrointestinal transit without affecting analgesia. We evaluated oral alvimopan, 0.5 or 1 mg, versus placebo, once daily for 21 days, in 168 patients with opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD) who were receiving chronic opioid therapy (minimum, 1 month) for nonmalignant pain (n = 148) or opioid dependence (n = 20). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients having at least one bowel movement (BM) within 8 hours of study drug on each day during the 21-day treatment period. Averaged over the 21-day treatment period, 54%, 43%, and 29% of patients had a BM within 8 hours after alvimopan 1 mg, 0.5 mg, or placebo, respectively (P < .001). Secondary outcomes of median times to first BM were 3, 7, and 21 hours after initial doses of 1 mg, 0.5 mg, and placebo, respectively (P < .001; 1 mg vs placebo). Weekly BMs and overall patient satisfaction were increased after the 1-mg dose (P < .001 at weeks 1 and 2 vs placebo, and P = .046, respectively). Treatment-emergent adverse events were primarily bowel-related, occurred during the first week of treatment, and were of mild to moderate severity. Alvimopan was generally well tolerated and did not antagonize opioid analgesia. Patients treated with chronic opioid therapy often experience opioid-induced bowel dysfunction as a result of undesirable effects on peripheral opioid receptors located in the gastrointestinal tract. Alvimopan, a novel peripheral opioid mu-receptor antagonist, has demonstrated significant efficacy for the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction without compromise of centrally mediated opioid-induced analgesia.

  9. Immunocytochemical characterization of Delta-opioid and Mu-opioid receptor protein in the bovine pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Ebadi, Manuchair; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2006-01-01

    Opioidergic innervation has been identified in the mammalian pineal gland. Recently, opioid receptors in bovine pineal glands have been characterized; the activation of these receptors leads to the stimulation of melatonin synthesis. In this study, the precise localization of opioid receptors in bovine pineal glands was determined by an immunohistochemical technique using antibodies raised against delta-opioid and mu-opioid receptors. Immunoreactivity of these two receptors was present at a moderate level in pinealocytes. A double-labeling study has shown that delta-opioid receptors are localized predominantly with mu-opioid receptors in the same pinealocytes. These immunopositive pinealocytes are often located in a group; however, some of them are dispersed individually. In addition, both types of receptors were found in glial cells and processes. A small number of delta-receptor-immunoreactive nerve fibers were observed in the perivascular space and intraparenchyma of the pineal gland. Mu-opioid receptor immunoreactivity was found in a number of nerve fibers throughout the gland, and in terminal-like dots on pinealocytes. There was immunocolocalization between delta-opioid receptors or mu-opioid receptors and leu-enkephalin in some nerve fibers. The results of this study indicate that the modulatory effect of the opioid system on melatonin secretion in pineal glands might act via opioid receptors on pinealocytes, whereas receptors located on nerve fibers might modulate the release of opioid peptides.

  10. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  11. Leukocyte opioid receptors mediate analgesia via Ca(2+)-regulated release of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Celik, Melih Ö; Labuz, Dominika; Henning, Karen; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-01

    Opioids are the most powerful analgesics. As pain is driven by sensory transmission and opioid receptors couple to inhibitory G proteins, according to the classical concept, opioids alleviate pain by activating receptors on neurons and blocking the release of excitatory mediators (e.g., substance P). Here we show that analgesia can be mediated by opioid receptors in immune cells. We propose that activation of leukocyte opioid receptors leads to the secretion of opioid peptides Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin A (1-17), which subsequently act at local neuronal receptors, to relieve pain. In a mouse model of neuropathic pain induced by a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, exogenous agonists of δ-, μ- and κ-opioid receptors injected at the damaged nerve infiltrated by opioid peptide- and receptor-expressing leukocytes, produced analgesia, as assessed with von Frey filaments. The analgesia was attenuated by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of opioid peptides, and by leukocyte depletion. This decrease in analgesia was restored by the transfer of wild-type, but not opioid receptor-lacking leukocytes. Ex vivo, exogenous opioids triggered secretion of opioid peptides from wild-type immune cells isolated from damaged nerves, which was diminished by blockade of Gαi/o or Gβγ (but not Gαs) proteins, by chelator of intracellular (but not extracellular) Ca(2+), by blockers of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and was partially attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitor. Similarly, the leukocyte depletion-induced decrease in exogenous opioid analgesia was re-established by transfer of immune cells ex vivo pretreated with extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, but was unaltered by leukocytes pretreated with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator or blockers of Gαi/o and Gβγ proteins. Thus, both ex vivo opioid peptide release and in vivo analgesia were mediated by leukocyte opioid receptors coupled to the G

  12. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, the nociceptin or orphanin FQ receptor (ORL), is not as clear as hyperalgesia, analgesia, and no effect was reported after administration of ORL agonists. There are now cDNA sequences for all four types of opioid receptors that are expressed in the brain of six species from three different classes of vertebrates. This review presents a comparative analysis of vertebrate opioid receptors using bioinformatics and data from recent human genome studies. Results indicate that opioid receptors arose by gene duplication, that there is a vector of opioid receptor divergence, and that MOR shows evidence of rapid evolution. PMID:19273128

  13. Constitutive opioid receptor activation: a prerequisite mechanism involved in acute opioid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Freye, E; Levy, Jv

    2005-06-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone, which is used in detoxification and rehabilitation programmes in opioid addicts, can precipitate opioid withdrawal symptoms even in patients who have no opioid present. We tested the hypothesis that in order to precipitate withdrawal, opioids need to convert the inactive opioid receptor site via protein kinase C into a constitutively active form on which the antagonist precipitates withdrawal. Acute microg/kg), given for 6 days, which was followed by the antagonist naltrexone (20 microg/kg i.v.) in the awake trained canine (n = 10). Abrupt displacement of opioid binding resulted in acute withdrawal symptoms: increase in blood pressure, heart rate, increase in amplitude height of somatosensory evoked potential, reduced tolerance to colon distention and a significant increase in grading of vegetative variables (restlessness, panting, thrashing of the head, whining, yawning, gnawing, salivation and/or rhinorrhoea, mydriasis, stepping of extremities and vomiting). Following a washout period of 14 days, the same animals were given the highly specific protein kinase C inhibitor H7 (250 microg/kg) prior to the same dosages of sufentanil and naltrexone. Such pretreatment was able to either attenuate or completely abolish the acute withdrawal symptoms. The data suggest that for precipitation of withdrawal, intracellular phosphorylation is a prerequisite in order to activate the opioid mu-receptor. In such a setting, naltrexone acts like an 'inverse agonist' relative to the action of the antagonist on a non-preoccupied receptor site not being exposed previously to a potent opioid agonist.

  14. Redoubling the ring size of an endomorphin-2 analog transforms a centrally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist into a pure peripheral analgesic.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; De Marco, Rossella; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tömböly, Csaba; Artali, Roberto; Janecka, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The study reports the synthesis and biological evaluation of two opioid analogs, a monomer and a dimer, obtained as products of the solid-phase, side-chain to side-chain cyclization of the pentapeptide Tyr-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-AspNH2 . The binding affinities to the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, as well as results obtained in a calcium mobilization functional assay are reported. Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 1 was a potent and selective full agonist of mu with sub-nanomolar affinity, while the dimer (Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 )2 2 showed a significant mixed mu/kappa affinity, acting as an agonist at the mu. Molecular docking computations were utilized to explain the ability of the dimeric cyclopeptide 2 to interact with the receptor. Interestingly, in spite of the increased ring size, the higher flexibility allowed 2 to fold and fit into the mu receptor binding pocket. Both cyclopeptides were shown to elicit strong antinociceptive activity after intraventricular injection but only cyclomonomer 1 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, the cyclodimer 2 displayed a potent peripheral antinociceptive activity in a mouse model of visceral inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 309-317, 2016.

  15. New technologies for elucidating opioid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in technology, including high resolution crystal structures of opioid receptors, novel chemical tools, and new genetic approaches have provided an unparalleled pallette of tools for deconstructing opioid receptor actions in vitro and in vivo. Here we provide a brief description of our understanding of opioid receptor function from both molecular and atomic perspectives, as well as their role in neural circuits in vivo. We then show how insights into the molecular details of opioid actions can facilitate the creation of functionally-selective (biased) and photoswitchable opioid ligands. Finally, we describe how newly engineered opioid receptor-based chemo- and optogenetic tools, and new mouse lines are expanding and transforming our understanding of opioid function and, perhaps, paving the way for new therapeutics. PMID:26833118

  16. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10(-5) M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10(-4) M and 9 × 10(-6) M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol.

  17. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E.; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10−5 M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10−4 M and 9 × 10−6 M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol. PMID:28167903

  18. Endomorphins fully activate a cloned human mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gong, J; Strong, J A; Zhang, S; Yue, X; DeHaven, R N; Daubert, J D; Cassel, J A; Yu, G; Mansson, E; Yu, L

    1998-11-13

    Endomorphins were recently identified as endogenous ligands with high selectivity for mu opioid receptors. We have characterized the ability of endomorphins to bind to and functionally activate the cloned human mu opioid receptor. Both endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 exhibited binding selectivity for the mu opioid receptor over the delta and kappa opioid receptors. Both agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated increase of cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. When the mu opioid receptor was coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with G protein-activated K+ channels, application of either endomorphin activated an inward K+ current. This activation was dose-dependent and blocked by naloxone. Both endomorphins acted as full agonists with efficacy similar to that of [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO). These data indicate that endomorphins act as full agonists at the human mu opioid receptor, capable of stimulating the receptor to inhibit the cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway and activate G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels.

  19. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  20. Differential opioid agonist regulation of the mouse mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Blake, A D; Bot, G; Freeman, J C; Reisine, T

    1997-01-10

    Mu opioid receptors mediate the analgesia induced by morphine. Prolonged use of morphine causes tolerance development and dependence. To investigate the molecular basis of tolerance and dependence, the cloned mouse mu opioid receptor with an amino-terminal epitope tag was stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, and the effects of prolonged opioid agonist treatment on receptor regulation were examined. In HEK 293 cells the expressed mu receptor showed high affinity, specific, saturable binding of radioligands and a pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. Pretreatment (1 h, 3 h, or overnight) of cells with 1 microM morphine or [D-Ala2MePhe4,Gly(ol)5]enkephalin (DAMGO) resulted in no apparent receptor desensitization, as assessed by opioid inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels. In contrast, the morphine and DAMGO pretreatments (3 h) resulted in a 3-4-fold compensatory increase in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The opioid agonists methadone and buprenorphine are used in the treatment of addiction because of a markedly lower abuse potential. Pretreatment of mu receptor-expressing HEK 293 cells with methadone or buprenorphine abolished the ability of opioids to inhibit adenylyl cyclase. No compensatory increase in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation was found with methadone or buprenorphine; these opioids blocked the compensatory effects observed with morphine and DAMGO. Taken together, these results indicate that methadone and buprenorphine interact differently with the mouse mu receptor than either morphine or DAMGO. The ability of methadone and buprenorphine to desensitize the mu receptor and block the compensatory rise in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation may be an underlying mechanism by which these agents are effective in the treatment of morphine addiction.

  1. Current Research on Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuan; He, Xiaozhou; Yang, Yilin; Chao, Dongman; Lazarus, Lawrence H.; Xia, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics has a long history in clinical settings, although the comprehensive action of opioid receptors is still less understood. Nonetheless, recent studies have generated fresh insights into opioid receptor-mediated functions and their underlying mechanisms. Three major opioid receptors (μ-opioid receptor, MOR; δ-opioid receptor, DOR; and κ-opioid receptor, KOR) have been cloned in many species. Each opioid receptor is functionally sub-classified into several pharmacological subtypes, although, specific gene corresponding each of these receptor subtypes is still unidentified as only a single gene has been isolated for each opioid receptor. In addition to pain modulation and addiction, opioid receptors are widely involved in various physiological and pathophysiological activities, including the regulation of membrane ionic homeostasis, cell proliferation, emotional response, epileptic seizures, immune function, feeding, obesity, respiratory and cardiovascular control as well as some neurodegenerative disorders. In some species, they play an essential role in hibernation. One of the most exciting findings of the past decade is the opioid-receptor, especially DOR, mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection. The up-regulation of DOR expression and DOR activation increase the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic/ischemic stress. The DOR signal triggers (depending on stress duration and severity) different mechanisms at multiple levels to preserve neuronal survival, including the stabilization of homeostasis and increased pro-survival signaling (e.g., PKC-ERK-Bcl 2) and anti-oxidative capacity. In the heart, PKC and KATP channels are involved in the opioid receptor-mediated cardioprotection. The DOR-mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection have the potential to significantly alter the clinical pharmacology in terms of prevention and treatment of life-threatening conditions like stroke and myocardial infarction. The main purpose of this article

  2. The delta opioid receptor tool box.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Pradhan, Amynah A

    2016-12-03

    In recent years, the delta opioid receptor has attracted increasing interest as a target for the treatment of chronic pain and emotional disorders. Due to their therapeutic potential, numerous tools have been developed to study the delta opioid receptor from both a molecular and a functional perspective. This review summarizes the most commonly available tools, with an emphasis on their use and limitations. Here, we describe (1) the cell-based assays used to study the delta opioid receptor. (2) The features of several delta opioid receptor ligands, including peptide and non-peptide drugs. (3) The existing approaches to detect delta opioid receptors in fixed tissue, and debates that surround these techniques. (4) Behavioral assays used to study the in vivo effects of delta opioid receptor agonists; including locomotor stimulation and convulsions that are induced by some ligands, but not others. (5) The characterization of genetically modified mice used specifically to study the delta opioid receptor. Overall, this review aims to provide a guideline for the use of these tools with the final goal of increasing our understanding of delta opioid receptor physiology.

  3. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators. PMID:24010861

  4. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2013-09-08

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators.

  5. Opioid research in amphibians: an alternative pain model yielding insights on the evolution of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Craig W

    2004-10-01

    This review summarizes the work from our laboratory investigating mechanisms of opioid analgesia using the Northern grass frog, Rana pipiens. Over the last dozen years, we have accumulated data on the characterization of behavioral effects after opioid administration on radioligand binding by using opioid agonist and antagonist ligands in amphibian brain and spinal cord homogenates, and by cloning and sequencing opioid-like receptor cDNA from amphibian central nervous system (CNS) tissues. The relative analgesic potency of mu, delta, and kappa opioids is highly correlated between frogs and other mammals, including humans. Radioligand binding studies using selective opioid agonists show a similar selectivity profile in amphibians and mammals. In contrast, opioid antagonists that are highly selective for mammalian mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors were not selective in behavioral and binding studies in amphibians. Three opioid-like receptor cDNAs were cloned and sequenced from amphibian brain tissues and are orthologs to mammalian mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Bioinformatics analysis of the three types of opioid receptor cDNAs from all vertebrate species with full datasets gave a pattern of the molecular evolution of opioid receptors marked by the divergence of mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor sequences during vertebrate evolution. This divergence in receptor amino acid sequence in later-evolved vertebrates underlies the hypothesis that opioid receptors are more type-selective in mammals than in nonmammalian vertebrates. The apparent order of receptor type evolution is kappa, then delta, and, most recently, the mu opioid receptor. Finally, novel bioinformatics analyses suggest that conserved extracellular receptor domains determine the type selectivity of vertebrate opioid receptors.

  6. Alvimopan, a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor (PAM-OR) antagonist for the treatment of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction: results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study in subjects taking opioids for chronic non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn; Jansen, Jan Peter; Peppin, John; Lasko, Ben; Irving, Gordon; Morlion, Bart; Snidow, Jerry; Pierce, Amy; Mortensen, Eric; Kleoudis, Christi; Carter, Eric

    2008-07-15

    Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of alvimopan, a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor (PAM-OR) antagonist, in subjects with non-cancer pain and opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD), and to identify at least one treatment regimen that improves OBD. Following a 2-week baseline period, 522 subjects reporting <3 spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs)/week (with >or=25% accompanied by a sensation of incomplete evacuation, straining, or lumpy hard stools), requiring analgesia equivalent to >or=30 mg oral morphine/day were randomized to alvimopan 0.5mg twice daily (BID), 1mg once daily (QD), 1mg BID, or placebo for 6 weeks. Compared with placebo, there was a statistically and clinically significant increase in mean weekly SBM frequency over the initial 3 weeks of treatment (primary endpoint) with alvimopan 0.5mg BID (+1.71 mean SBMs/week), alvimopan 1mg QD (+1.64) and alvimopan 1mg BID (+2.52); P<0.001 for all comparisons. Increased SBM frequency and additional treatment effects, including improvements in symptoms such as straining, stool consistency, incomplete evacuation, abdominal bloating/discomfort, and decreased appetite, were sustained over 6 weeks. The most frequently reported adverse events were abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea, occurring more frequently in the higher dosage groups. The alvimopan 0.5mg BID regimen demonstrated the best benefit-to-risk profile for managing OBD with alvimopan in this study population, with a side effect profile similar to that of placebo. There was no evidence of opioid analgesia antagonism. Competitive peripheral antagonism of opioids with alvimopan can restore GI function and relieve OBD without compromising analgesia.

  7. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: management of opioid-induced constipation by peripheral opioid receptor antagonists: prevention or withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic action of opioid analgesics is compromised by peripheral adverse effects among which opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most disabling, with a prevalence reported to vary between 15 and 90 %. Although OIC is usually treated with laxatives, there is insufficient clinical evidence that laxatives are efficacious in this indication. In contrast, there is ample evidence from double- blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trials that peripheral opioid receptor antagonists (PORAs) counteract OIC. This specific treatment modality is currently based on subcutaneous methylnaltrexone for the interruption of OIC in patients with advanced illness, and a fixed combination of oral prolonged-release naloxone with prolonged-release oxycodone for the prevention of OIC in the treatment of non-cancer and cancer pain. Both drugs counteract OIC while the analgesic effect of opioids remains unabated. The clinical studies show that more than 50 % of the patients with constipation under opioid therapy may benefit from the use of PORAs, while PORA-resistant patients are likely to suffer from non-opioid-induced constipation, the prevalence of which increases with age. While the addition of naloxone to oxycodone seems to act by preventing OIC, the intermittent dosing of methylnaltrexone every other day seems to stimulate defaecation by provoking an intestinal withdrawal response. The availability of PORAs provides a novel opportunity to specifically control OIC and other peripheral adverse effects of opioid analgesics (e.g., urinary retention and pruritus). The continuous dosing of a PORA has the advantage of few adverse effects, while intermittent dosing of a PORA can be associated with abdominal cramp-like pain.

  8. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery. PMID:25981301

  9. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-09-15

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery.

  10. Dark chocolate receptors: epicatechin-induced cardiac protection is dependent on δ-opioid receptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, Mathivadhani; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M.; Bonds, Jacqueline A.; Horikawa, Yousuke T.; Saldana, Michelle; Dalton, Nancy D.; Head, Brian P.; Patel, Piyush M.; Roth, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Epicatechin, a flavonoid, is a well-known antioxidant linked to a variety of protective effects in both humans and animals. In particular, its role in protection against cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated by epidemiologic studies. Low-dose epicatechin, which does not have significant antioxidant activity, is also protective; however, the mechanism by which low-dose epicatechin induces this effect is unknown. Our laboratory tested the hypothesis that low-dose epicatechin mediates cardiac protection via opioid receptor activation. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to 1 of 10 groups: control, epicatechin, naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + naloxone, naltrindole (δ-specific opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + naltrindole, norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, κ-specific opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + nor-BNI, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid [5-HD, ATP-sensitive potassium channel antagonist], and epicatechin + 5-HD. Epicatechin (1 mg/kg) or other inhibitors (5 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage or intraperitoneal injection, respectively, daily for 10 days. Mice were subjected to 30 min coronary artery occlusion followed by 2 h of reperfusion, and infarct size was determined via planimetry. Whole heart homogenates were assayed for downstream opioid receptor signaling targets. Infarct size was significantly reduced in epicatechin- and epicatechin + nor-BNI-treated mice compared with control mice. This protection was blocked by naloxone, naltrindole, and 5-HD. Epicatechin and epicatechin + nor-BNI increased the phosphorylation of Src, Akt, and IκBα, while simultaneously decreasing the expression of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and caspase-activated DNase. All signaling effects are consistent with opioid receptor stimulation and subsequent cardiac protection. Naloxone, naltrindole, and 5-HD attenuated these effects. In conclusion, epicatechin acts via opioid receptors and more specifically through the δ-opioid receptor to

  11. Splice variation of the mu-opioid receptor and its effect on the action of opioids.

    PubMed

    Gretton, Sophy K; Droney, Joanne

    2014-11-01

    An individual's response to opioids is influenced by a complex combination of genetic, molecular and phenotypic factors.Intra- and inter-individual variations in response to mu opioids have led to the suggestion that mu-opioid receptor subtypes exist.Scientists have now proven that mu-opioid receptor subtypes exist and that they occur through a mechanism promoting protein diversity, called alternative splicing.The ability of mu opioids to differentially activate splice variants may explain some of the clinical differences observed between mu opioids.This article examines how differential activation of splice variants by mu opioids occurs through alternative mu-opioid receptor binding, through differential receptor activation, and as a result of the distinct distribution of variants located regionally and at the cellular level.

  12. Antitussive activity of Withania somnifera and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nosálová, Gabriela; Sivová, Veronika; Ray, Bimalendu; Fraňová, Soňa; Ondrejka, Igor; Flešková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan is a polysaccharide isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera L. It contains 65% arabinose and 18% galactose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan in conscious, healthy adult guinea pigs and the role of the opioid pathway in the antitussive action. A polysaccharide extract was given orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg. Cough was induced by an aerosol of citric acid in a concentration 0.3 mol/L, generated by a jet nebulizer into a plethysmographic chamber. The intensity of cough response was defined as the number of cough efforts counted during a 3-min exposure to the aerosol. The major finding was that arabinogalactan clearly suppressed the cough reflex; the suppression was comparable with that of codeine that was taken as a reference drug. The involvement of the opioid system was tested with the use of a blood-brain barrier penetrable, naloxone hydrochloride, and non-penetrable, naloxone methiodide, to distinguish between the central and peripheral mu-opioid receptor pathways. Both opioid antagonists acted to reverse the arabinogalactan-induced cough suppression; the reversion was total over time with the latter antagonist. We failed to confirm the presence of a bronchodilating effect of the polysaccharide, which could be involved in its antitussive action. We conclude that the polysaccharide arabinogalactan from Withania somnifera has a distinct antitussive activity consisting of cough suppression and that this action involves the mu-opioid receptor pathways.

  13. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  14. Opioid receptors: toward separation of analgesic from undesirable effects.

    PubMed

    Law, Ping-Yee; Reggio, Patricia H; Loh, Horace H

    2013-06-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor hetero-oligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics.

  15. Role of the mu opioid receptor in opioid modulation of immune function

    PubMed Central

    Ninković, Jana; Roy, Sabita

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Endogenous opioids are synthesized in vivo in order to modulate pain mechanisms and inflammatory pathways. Endogenous and exogenous opioids mediate analgesia in response to painful stimuli by binding to opioid receptors on neuronal cells. However, wide distribution of opioid receptors on tissues and organ systems outside the CNS, such as the cells of the immune system, indicate that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in the periphery, such as immunomodulation. The increased prevalence of infections in opioid abusers based epidemiological studies further highlights the immunosuppressive effects of opioids. In spite of their many debilitating side effects, prescription opioids remain a gold standard for treatment of chronic pain. Therefore, given the prevalence of opioid use and abuse, opioid mediated immune suppression presents a serious concern in our society today. It is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which exogenous opioids modulate immune processes. In this review we will discuss the role of opioid receptors and their ligands in mediating immune suppressive functions. We will summarize recent studies on direct and indirect opioid modulation of the cells of the immune system as well as the role of opioids in exacerbation of certain disease states. PMID:22170499

  16. Protein kinase C mediates the synergistic interaction between agonists acting at alpha2-adrenergic and delta-opioid receptors in spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Overland, Aaron C; Kitto, Kelley F; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Rothwell, Patrick E; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Stone, Laura S; Wilcox, George L

    2009-10-21

    Coactivation of spinal alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors (ARs) and opioid receptors produces antinociceptive synergy. Antinociceptive synergy between intrathecally administered alpha(2)AR and opioid agonists is well documented, but the mechanism underlying this synergy remains unclear. The delta-opioid receptor (DOP) and the alpha(2A)ARs are coexpressed on the terminals of primary afferent fibers in the spinal cord where they may mediate this phenomenon. We evaluated the ability of the DOP-selective agonist deltorphin II (DELT), the alpha(2)AR agonist clonidine (CLON) or their combination to inhibit calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from spinal cord slices. We then examined the possible underlying signaling mechanisms involved through coadministration of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) or protein kinase A (PKA). Potassium-evoked depolarization of spinal cord slices caused concentration-dependent release of CGRP. Coadministration of DELT and CLON inhibited the release of CGRP in a synergistic manner as confirmed statistically by isobolograpic analysis. Synergy was dependent on the activation of PLC and PKC, but not PKA, whereas the effect of agonist administration alone was only dependent on PLC. The importance of these findings was confirmed in vivo, using a thermal nociceptive test, demonstrating the PKC dependence of CLON-DELT antinociceptive synergy in mice. That inhibition of CGRP release by the combination was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin in spinal cord slices suggests that synergy does not rely on interneuronal signaling and may occur within single subcellular compartments. The present study reveals a novel signaling pathway underlying the synergistic analgesic interaction between DOP and alpha(2)AR agonists in the spinal cord.

  17. Pharmacology and anti-addiction effects of the novel κ opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Sal B, a potent and long-acting analogue of salvinorin A

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, B; Morani, A S; Ewald, A W M; Walker, L; Kumar, N; Simpson, D; Miller, J H; Prisinzano, T E; Kivell, B M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Acute activation of κ opioid (KOP) receptors results in anticocaine-like effects, but adverse effects, such as dysphoria, aversion, sedation and depression, limit their clinical development. Salvinorin A, isolated from the plant Salvia divinorum, and its semi-synthetic analogues have been shown to have potent KOP receptor agonist activity and may induce a unique response with similar anticocaine addiction effects as the classic KOP receptor agonists, but with a different side effect profile. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the duration of effects of Mesyl Sal B in vivo utilizing antinociception assays and screened for cocaine-prime induced cocaine-seeking behaviour in self-administering rats to predict anti-addiction effects. Cellular transporter uptake assays and in vitro voltammetry were used to assess modulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) function and to investigate transporter trafficking and kinase signalling pathways modulated by KOP receptor agonists. KEY RESULTS Mesyl Sal B had a longer duration of action than SalA, had anti-addiction properties and increased DAT function in vitro in a KOP receptor-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. These effects on DAT function required ERK1/2 activation. We identified differences between Mesyl Sal B and SalA, with Mesyl Sal B increasing the Vmax of dopamine uptake without altering cell-surface expression of DAT. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS SalA analogues, such as Mesyl Sal B, have potential for development as anticocaine agents. Further tests are warranted to elucidate the mechanisms by which the novel salvinorin-based neoclerodane diterpene KOP receptor ligands produce both anti-addiction and adverse side effects. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641310

  18. Pharmacological characterization of an opioid receptor in the ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, R; Silva, W I; Renaud, F L

    1993-01-01

    A pharmacological characterization has been performed of the opioid receptor involved in modulation of phagocytosis in the protozoan ciliate Tetrahymena. Studies on inhibition of phagocytosis by mammalian prototypic opioid agonists revealed that morphine and beta-endorphin have the highest intrinsic activity, whereas all the other opioids tested can only be considered partial agonists. However, morphine (a mu-receptor agonist) is twice as potent as beta-endorphin (a delta-receptor agonist). Furthermore, the sensitivity for the opioid antagonist naloxone, determined in the presence of morphine and beta-endorphin, is very similar to the sensitivity exhibited by mammalian tissues rich in mu-opioid receptors. We suggest that the opioid receptor coupled to phagocytosis in Tetrahymena is mu-like in some of its pharmacological characteristics and may serve as a model system for studies on opioid receptor function and evolution.

  19. Opioid receptors: distinct roles in mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of opioid receptors in pain and addiction have been extensively studied, but their function in mood disorders has received less attention. Accumulating evidence from animal research reveal that mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors (MORs, DORs and KORs, respectively) exert highly distinct controls over mood-related processes. DOR agonists and KOR antagonists have promising antidepressant potential, whereas the risk-benefit ratio of currently available MOR agonists as antidepressants remain difficult to evaluate, in addition to their inherent abuse liability. At present, both human and animal studies have mainly examined MORs in the etiology of depressive disorders, and future studies will address delta and kappa receptor function in established and emerging neurobiological aspects of depression, including neurogenesis, neurodevelopment and social behaviors. PMID:23219016

  20. BU74, a complex oripavine derivative with potent kappa opioid receptor agonism and delayed opioid antagonism.

    PubMed

    Husbands, Stephen M; Neilan, Claire L; Broadbear, Jillian; Grundt, Peter; Breeden, Simon; Aceto, Mario D; Woods, James H; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R

    2005-02-21

    In the search for opioid agonists with delayed antagonist actions as potential treatments for substance abuse, the bridged morphinan BU74 (17-cyclopropylmethyl-3-hydroxy-[5beta,7beta,3',5']-pyrrolidino-2'[S]-phenyl-7alpha-methyl-6,14-endoetheno morphinan) (3f) was synthesized. In isolated tissue and [35S]GTPgammaS opioid receptor functional assays BU74 was shown to be a potent long-lasting kappa opioid receptor agonist, delta opioid receptor partial agonist and mu opioid receptor antagonist. In antinociceptive tests in the mouse, BU74 showed high efficacy and potent kappa opioid receptor agonism. When its agonist action had waned BU74 became an antagonist of kappa and mu opioid receptor agonists in the tail flick assay and of delta, kappa and mu opioid receptor agonists in the acetic acid writhing assay. The slow onset, long-duration kappa opioid receptor agonist effects of BU74 suggests that it could be a lead compound for the discovery of a treatment for cocaine abuse.

  1. Development of Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) belong to the G-protein coupled class of receptors (GPCRs). They are activated by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin (DYN) and expressed at particularly high levels within brain areas implicated in modulation of motivation, emotion, and cognitive function. Chronic activation of KORs in animal models has maladaptive effects including increases in behaviors that reflect depression, the propensity to engage in drug-seeking behavior, and drug craving. The fact that KOR activation has such a profound influence on behaviors often triggered by stress has led to interest in selective KOR antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. This perspective provides a description of preclinical research conducted in the development of several different classes of selective KOR antagonists, a summary of the clinical studies conducted thus far, and recommendations for the type of work needed in the future to determine if these agents would be useful as pharmacotherapies for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:23360448

  2. Protein Kinase C Mediates the Synergistic Interaction Between Agonists Acting at Alpha-2-Adrenergic and Delta-Opioid Receptors in Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Overland, Aaron C.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Rothwell, Patrick E.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Stone, Laura S.; Wilcox, George L.

    2009-01-01

    Co-activation of spinal α2-adrenergic receptors (AR) and opioid receptors (OR) produces antinociceptive synergy. Antinociceptive synergy between intrathecally (i.t.) administered α2AR and OR agonists is well documented, but the mechanism underlying this synergy remains unclear. The delta-opioid receptor (DOP) and the α2AAR are co-expressed on the terminals of primary afferent fibers in the spinal cord where they may mediate this phenomenon. We evaluated the ability of the DOP-selective agonist deltorphin II (DELT), the α2AR agonist clonidine (CLON) or their combination to inhibit calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from spinal cord slices. We then examined the possible underlying signaling mechanisms involved through co-administration of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) or protein kinase A (PKA). Potassium-evoked depolarization of spinal cord slices caused concentration-dependent release of CGRP. Co-administration of DELT and CLON inhibited the release of CGRP in a synergistic manner as confirmed statistically by isobolograpic analysis. Synergy was dependent on the activation of PLC and PKC, but not PKA, while the effect of agonist administration alone was only dependent on PLC. The importance of these findings was confirmed in vivo, demonstrating the PKC-dependence on CLON-DELT antinociceptive synergy in mice. That inhibition of CGRP release by the combination was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin in spinal cord slices suggests that synergy does not rely on interneuronal signaling and may occur within single subcellular compartments. The present study reveals a novel signaling pathway underlying the synergistic analgesic interaction between DOP and α2AR agonists in the spinal cord. PMID:19846714

  3. Methylnaltrexone, a novel peripheral opioid receptor antagonist for the treatment of opioid side effects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Su; Israel, Robert J

    2006-05-01

    Methylnaltrexone is an investigational peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, a quaternary derivative of naltrexone. Methylnaltrexone has greater polarity and lower lipid solubility, thus it does not cross the blood-brain barrier in humans. Methylnaltrexone offers the therapeutic potential to block or reverse the undesired side effects of opioids that are mediated by receptors located in the periphery (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract), without affecting analgesia or precipitating the opioid withdrawal symptoms that are predominantly mediated by receptors in the CNS. This article reviews preclinical studies and clinical opioid bowel dysfunction trial data, and briefly discusses other potential roles of this compound in clinical practice.

  4. The mu opioid receptor: A new target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Moss, Jonathan; Karp, Daniel D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2015-08-15

    Mu opioids are among the most widely used drugs for patients with cancer with both acute and chronic pain as well as in the perioperative period. Several retrospective studies have suggested that opioid use might promote tumor progression and as a result negatively impact survival in patients with advanced cancer; however, in the absence of appropriate prospective validation, any changes in recommendations for opioid use are not warranted. In this review, the authors present preclinical and clinical data that support their hypothesis that the mu opioid receptor is a potential target for cancer therapy because of its plausible role in tumor progression. The authors also propose the hypothesis that peripheral opioid antagonists such as methylnaltrexone, which reverses the peripheral effects of mu opioids but maintains centrally mediated analgesia and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, can be used to target the mu opioid receptor.

  5. Discovery of Novel Triazole-Based Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Keenan, Susan M.; Peng, Youyi; Nair, Anil C.; Yu, Seong Jae; Howells, Richard D.; Welsh, William J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the computer-aided design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel family of δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonists containing a 1,2,4-triazole core structure that are structurally distinct from other known opioid receptor active ligands. Among those δ antagonists sharing this core structure, 8 exhibited strong binding affinity (Ki = 50 nM) for the DOR and appreciable selectivity for δ over μ and opioid receptors (δ/μ = 80; δ/κ > 200). PMID:16821764

  6. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    PubMed

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  7. Recent developments in the study of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Brian M

    2013-04-01

    It is now about 40 years since Avram Goldstein proposed the use of the stereoselectivity of opioid receptors to identify these receptors in neural membranes. In 2012, the crystal structures of the four members of the opioid receptor family were reported, providing a structural basis for understanding of critical features affecting the actions of opiate drugs. This minireview summarizes these recent developments in our understanding of opiate receptors. Receptor function is also influenced by amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. Among opioid receptor genes, one polymorphism is much more frequent in human populations than the many others that have been found, but the functional significance of this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been unclear. Recent studies have shed new light on how this SNP might influence opioid receptor function. In this minireview, the functional significance of the most prevalent genetic polymorphism among the opioid receptor genes is also considered.

  8. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory.

  9. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  10. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Elyssa B.; Fields, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  11. The opioid receptors as targets for drug abuse medication.

    PubMed

    Noble, Florence; Lenoir, Magalie; Marie, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous opioid system is largely expressed in the brain, and both endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are present in areas associated with reward and motivation. It is well known that this endogenous system plays a key role in many aspects of addictive behaviours. The present review summarizes the modifications of the opioid system induced by chronic treatment with drugs of abuse reported in preclinical and clinical studies, as well as the action of opioid antagonists and agonists on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, with therapeutic perspectives. We have focused on the effects of chronic psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine exposure. Taken together, the changes in both opioid peptides and opioid receptors in different brain structures following acute or chronic exposure to these drugs of abuse clearly identify the opioid system as a potential target for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addiction and the prevention of relapse.

  12. The opioid receptors as targets for drug abuse medication

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Florence; Lenoir, Magalie; Marie, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system is largely expressed in the brain, and both endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are present in areas associated with reward and motivation. It is well known that this endogenous system plays a key role in many aspects of addictive behaviours. The present review summarizes the modifications of the opioid system induced by chronic treatment with drugs of abuse reported in preclinical and clinical studies, as well as the action of opioid antagonists and agonists on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, with therapeutic perspectives. We have focused on the effects of chronic psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine exposure. Taken together, the changes in both opioid peptides and opioid receptors in different brain structures following acute or chronic exposure to these drugs of abuse clearly identify the opioid system as a potential target for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:25988826

  13. Salvinorin A: allosteric interactions at the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Murphy, Daniel L; Xu, Heng; Godin, Jonathan A; Dersch, Christina M; Partilla, John S; Tidgewell, Kevin; Schmidt, Matthew; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2007-02-01

    Salvinorin A [(2S,4aR,6aR,7R,9S,10aS,10bR)-9-(acetyloxy)-2-(3-furanyl)-dodecahydro-6a,10b-dimethyl-4,10-dioxo-2h-naphtho[2,1-c]pyran-7-carboxylic acid methyl ester] is a hallucinogenic kappa-opioid receptor agonist that lacks the usual basic nitrogen atom present in other known opioid ligands. Our first published studies indicated that Salvinorin A weakly inhibited mu-receptor binding, and subsequent experiments revealed that Salvinorin A partially inhibited mu-receptor binding. Therefore, we hypothesized that Salvinorin A allosterically modulates mu-receptor binding. To test this hypothesis, we used Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned human opioid receptor. Salvinorin A partially inhibited [(3)H]Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-Me-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) (0.5, 2.0, and 8.0 nM) binding with E(MAX) values of 78.6, 72.1, and 45.7%, respectively, and EC(50) values of 955, 1124, and 4527 nM, respectively. Salvinorin A also partially inhibited [(3)H]diprenorphine (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 nM) binding with E(MAX) values of 86.2, 64, and 33.6%, respectively, and EC(50) values of 1231, 866, and 3078 nM, respectively. Saturation binding studies with [(3)H]DAMGO showed that Salvinorin A (10 and 30 microM) decreased the mu-receptor B(max) and increased the K(d) in a dose-dependent nonlinear manner. Saturation binding studies with [(3)H]diprenorphine showed that Salvinorin A (10 and 40 microM) decreased the mu-receptor B(max) and increased the K(d) in a dose-dependent nonlinear manner. Similar findings were observed in rat brain with [(3)H]DAMGO. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Salvinorin A altered the dissociation kinetics of both [(3)H]DAMGO and [(3)H]diprenorphine binding to mu receptors. Furthermore, Salvinorin A acted as an uncompetitive inhibitor of DAMGO-stimulated guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate binding. Viewed collectively, these data support the hypothesis that Salvinorin A allosterically modulates the mu-opioid receptor.

  14. Characterization of the complex morphinan derivative BU72 as a high efficacy, long-lasting mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Neilan, Claire L; Husbands, Stephen M; Breeden, Simon; Ko, M C Holden; Aceto, Mario D; Lewis, John W; Woods, James H; Traynor, John R

    2004-09-19

    The development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate abuse and dependence has drawn attention to opioid ligands that have agonist actions followed by long-lasting antagonist actions. In a search for alternatives to buprenorphine, we discovered a bridged pyrrolidinomorphinan (BU72). In vitro, BU72 displayed high affinity and efficacy for mu-opioid receptors, but was also a partial delta-opioid receptor agonist and a full kappa-opioid receptor agonist. BU72 was a highly potent and long-lasting antinociceptive agent against both thermal and chemical nociception in the mouse and against thermal nociception in the monkey. These effects were prevented by mu-, but not kappa- or delta-, opioid receptor antagonists. Once the agonist effects of BU72 had subsided, the compound acted to attenuate the antinociceptive action of morphine. BU72 is too efficacious for human use but manipulation to reduce efficacy could provide a lead to the development of a treatment for opioid dependence.

  15. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  16. Nicotinic and opioid receptor regulation of striatal dopamine D2-receptor mediated transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mamaligas, Aphroditi A.; Cai, Yuan; Ford, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to dopamine neuron firing, cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) regulate dopamine release in the striatum via presynaptic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on dopamine axon terminals. Synchronous activity of ChIs is necessary to evoke dopamine release through this pathway. The frequency-dependence of disynaptic nicotinic modulation has led to the hypothesis that nAChRs act as a high-pass filter in the dopaminergic microcircuit. Here, we used optogenetics to selectively stimulate either ChIs or dopamine terminals directly in the striatum. To measure the functional consequence of dopamine release, D2-receptor synaptic activity was assessed via virally overexpressed potassium channels (GIRK2) in medium spiny neurons (MSNs). We found that nicotinic-mediated dopamine release was blunted at higher frequencies because nAChRs exhibit prolonged desensitization after a single pulse of synchronous ChI activity. However, when dopamine neurons alone were stimulated, nAChRs had no effect at any frequency. We further assessed how opioid receptors modulate these two mechanisms of release. Bath application of the κ opioid receptor agonist U69593 decreased D2-receptor activation through both pathways, whereas the μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO decreased D2-receptor activity only as a result of cholinergic-mediated dopamine release. Thus the release of dopamine can be independently modulated when driven by either dopamine neurons or cholinergic interneurons. PMID:27886263

  17. Overview of genetic analysis of human opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, Santi M

    2015-01-01

    The human μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), due to its genetic and structural variation, has been a target of interest in several pharmacogenetic studies. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR), encoded by OPRM1, contributes to regulate the analgesic response to pain and also controls the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse, including opioids, nicotine, and alcohol. Genetic polymorphisms of opioid receptors are candidates for the variability of clinical opioid effects. The non-synonymous polymorphism A118G of the OPRM1 has been repeatedly associated with the efficacy of opioid treatments for pain and various types of dependence. Genetic analysis of human opioid receptors has evidenced the presence of numerous polymorphisms either in exonic or in intronic sequences as well as the presence of synonymous coding variants that may have important effects on transcription, mRNA stability, and splicing, thus affecting gene function despite not directly disrupting any specific residue. Genotyping of opioid receptors is still in its infancy and a relevant progress in this field can be achieved by using advanced gene sequencing techniques described in this review that allow the researchers to obtain vast quantities of data on human genomes and transcriptomes in a brief period of time and with affordable costs.

  18. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  19. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  20. Opioid receptors and legal highs: Salvia divinorum and Kratom.

    PubMed

    Babu, Kavita M; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2008-02-01

    Salvia divinorum and Mitragyna speciosa ("Kratom"), two unscheduled dietary supplements whose active agents are opioid receptor agonists, have discrete psychoactive effects that have contributed to their increasing popularity. Salvia divinorum contains the highly selective kappa- opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A; this compound produces visual hallucinations and synesthesia. Mitragynine, the major alkaloid identified from Kratom, has been reported as a partial opioid agonist producing similar effects to morphine. An interesting minor alkaloid of Kratom, 7-hydroxymitragynine, has been reported to be more potent than morphine. Both Kratom alkaloids are reported to activate supraspinal mu- and delta- opioid receptors, explaining their use by chronic narcotics users to ameliorate opioid withdrawal symptoms. Despite their widespread Internet availability, use of Salvia divinorum and Kratom represents an emerging trend that escapes traditional methods of toxicologic monitoring. The purpose of this article is to familiarize toxicologists and poison control specialists with these emerging psychoactive dietary supplements.

  1. Using opioid receptors to expand the chemogenetic and optogenetic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Damez-Werno, Diane M; Kenny, Paul J

    2015-05-20

    In this issue of Neuron, innovative new modifications to opioid receptors are used to expand the tools available to modulate neuronal activity. Vardy et al. (2015) describe a new "DREADD" chemogenetic tool based on the inhibitory κ opioid receptor (KORD) that can be used in conjunction with already-available DREADDs. Siuda et al. (2015) report the development of "opto-MOR," a light-activatable μ opioid receptor (MOR) chimera that can be used to better understand the complexities of MOR signaling.

  2. Endothelin-converting enzyme 2 differentially regulates opioid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Fujita, W; Gomes, I; Bobeck, E; Devi, L A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opioid receptor function is modulated by post-activation events such as receptor endocytosis, recycling and/or degradation. While it is generally understood that the peptide ligand gets co-endocytosed with the receptor, relatively few studies have investigated the role of the endocytosed peptide and peptide processing enzymes in regulating receptor function. In this study, we focused on endothelin-converting enzyme 2 (ECE2), a member of the neprilysin family of metallopeptidases that exhibits an acidic pH optimum, localizes to an intracellular compartment and selectively processes neuropeptides including opioid peptides in vitro, and examined its role in modulating μ receptor recycling and resensitization. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effect of ECE2 inhibition on hydrolysis of the endocytosed peptide was examined using thin-layer chromatography and on μ opioid receptor trafficking using either elisa or microscopy. The effect of ECE2 inhibition on receptor signalling was measured using a cAMP assay and, in vivo, on antinociception induced by intrathecally administered opioids by the tail-flick assay. KEY RESULTS The highly selective ECE2 inhibitor, S136492, significantly impaired μ receptor recycling and signalling by only those ligands that are ECE2 substrates and this was seen both in heterologous cells and in cells endogenously co-expressing μ receptors with ECE2. We also found that ECE2 inhibition attenuated antinociception mediated only by opioid peptides that are ECE2 substrates. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that ECE2, by selectively processing endogenous opioid peptides in the endocytic compartment, plays a role in modulating opioid receptor activity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24990314

  3. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  4. Imaging of opioid receptors in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Gjermund

    2008-01-01

    In vivo functional imaging by means of positron emission tomography (PET) is the sole method for providing a quantitative measurement of μ-, κ and δ-opioid receptor-mediated signalling in the central nervous system. During the last two decades, measurements of changes to the regional brain opioidergic neuronal activation—mediated by endogenously produced opioid peptides, or exogenously administered opioid drugs—have been conducted in numerous chronic pain conditions, in epilepsy, as well as by stimulant- and opioidergic drugs. Although several PET-tracers have been used clinically for depiction and quantification of the opioid receptors changes, the underlying mechanisms for regulation of changes to the availability of opioid receptors are still unclear. After a presentation of the general signalling mechanisms of the opioid receptor system relevant for PET, a critical survey of the pharmacological properties of some currently available PET-tracers is presented. Clinical studies performed with different PET ligands are also reviewed and the compound-dependent findings are summarized. An outlook is given concluding with the tailoring of tracer properties, in order to facilitate for a selective addressment of dynamic changes to the availability of a single subclass, in combination with an optimization of the quantification framework are essentials for further progress in the field of in vivo opioid receptor imaging. PMID:18048446

  5. Opioid receptors on guinea-pig intestinal crypt epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, M E; Davison, J S; Bates, S L; Meddings, J B

    1996-01-01

    1. Opioid peptides promote net intestinal absorption via two mechanisms: stimulation of Na+ and Cl- absorption and inhibition of Cl- secretion. Although these transport changes are predominantly mediated by submucosal neurones, it is currently unclear whether opioid peptides can regulate enterocyte function directly. We therefore tested the hypothesis that enterocytes have specific opioid receptors. 2. Villus and crypt jejunal epithelial cells were isolated by the distended sac method from anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Flow cytometry was used to resolve enterocytes from other cell types and to determine whether binding of a fluorescently labelled opioid antagonist, naltrexone-FITC, could be prevented by unlabelled mu- and delta-opioid receptor agonists. A population of crypt enterocytes (approximately 21%) exhibited high-affinity naltrexone-FITC binding to both mu- and delta-type binding sites that was stereoselective and sodium dependent. Villus enterocytes did not exhibit any of these characteristics. 3. Basal cAMP production was elevated in both villus and crypt cells treated with IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine). Villus cells did not respond to 100 nM vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), nor were they affected by opioid peptides. In contrast, 100 nM VIP significantly increased cAMP production in crypt epithelial cells, which was significantly reduced by both morphiceptin and D-Ser2-Leu-Enk-Thr. This opioid-mediated effect was stereoselective and blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. 4. These experiments suggest that enterocytes isolated from the crypt epithelium of guineapigs have both mu- and delta-types of opioid receptors. It is possible that these cells participate in opioid-mediated regulation of intestinal secretion. Images Figure 12 PMID:8951719

  6. Clinically employed opioid analgesics produce antinociception via μ-δ opioid receptor heteromers in Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Banks, Matthew L; Lunzer, Mary M; Negus, Stevens S; Rice, Kenner C; Portoghese, Philip S

    2012-09-19

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans.

  7. Opioid receptors and cardioprotection - 'opioidergic conditioning' of the heart.

    PubMed

    Headrick, John P; See Hoe, Louise E; Du Toit, Eugene F; Peart, Jason N

    2015-04-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) remains a major cause of morbidity/mortality globally, firmly established in Westernized or 'developed' countries and rising in prevalence in developing nations. Thus, cardioprotective therapies to limit myocardial damage with associated ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R), during infarction or surgical ischaemia, is a very important, although still elusive, clinical goal. The opioid receptor system, encompassing the δ (vas deferens), κ (ketocyclazocine) and μ (morphine) opioid receptors and their endogenous opioid ligands (endorphins, dynorphins, enkephalins), appears as a logical candidate for such exploitation. This regulatory system may orchestrate organism and organ responses to stress, induces mammalian hibernation and associated metabolic protection, triggers powerful adaptive stress resistance in response to ischaemia/hypoxia (preconditioning), and mediates cardiac benefit stemming from physical activity. In addition to direct myocardial actions, central opioid receptor signalling may also enhance the ability of the heart to withstand I-R injury. The δ- and κ-opioid receptors are strongly implicated in cardioprotection across models and species (including anti-infarct and anti-arrhythmic actions), with mixed evidence for μ opioid receptor-dependent protection in animal and human tissues. A small number of clinical trials have provided evidence of cardiac benefit from morphine or remifentanil in cardiopulmonary bypass or coronary angioplasty patients, although further trials of subtype-specific opioid receptor agonists are needed. The precise roles and utility of this GPCR family in healthy and diseased human myocardium, and in mediating central and peripheral survival responses, warrant further investigation, as do the putative negative influences of ageing, IHD co-morbidities, and relevant drugs on opioid receptor signalling and protective responses.

  8. Delta Opioid Receptor and Its Peptide: A Receptor-Ligand Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Meaghan; Acosta, Sandra; Tajiri, Naoki; Pabon, Mibel; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    In pursuit of neurological therapies, the opioid system, specifically delta opioid receptors and delta opioid peptides, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential for stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and other degenerative neurological conditions. Recent studies offer strong evidence in support of the therapeutic use of delta opioid receptors, and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of action. Delta opioid receptors have been shown to confer protective effects by mediating ionic homeostasis and activating endogenous neuroprotective pathways. Additionally, delta opioid agonists such as (D-Ala 2, D-Leu 5) enkephalin (DADLE) have been shown to decrease apoptosis and promote neuronal survival. In its entirety, the delta opioid system represents a promising target for neural therapies. PMID:23979422

  9. Biased Agonism of Endogenous Opioid Peptides at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Georgina L; Lane, J Robert; Coudrat, Thomas; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-08-01

    Biased agonism is having a major impact on modern drug discovery, and describes the ability of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands to activate different cell signaling pathways, and to result in different physiologic outcomes. To date, most studies of biased agonism have focused on synthetic molecules targeting various GPCRs; however, many of these receptors have multiple endogenous ligands, suggesting that "natural" bias may be an unappreciated feature of these GPCRs. The μ-opioid receptor (MOP) is activated by numerous endogenous opioid peptides, remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain, and exhibits biased agonism in response to synthetic opiates. The aim of this study was to rigorously assess the potential for biased agonism in the actions of endogenous opioids at the MOP in a common cellular background, and compare these to the effects of the agonist d-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly-ol enkephalin (DAMGO). We investigated activation of G proteins, inhibition of cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation, β-arrestin 1/2 recruitment, and MOP trafficking, and applied a novel analytical method to quantify biased agonism. Although many endogenous opioids displayed signaling profiles similar to that of DAMGO, α-neoendorphin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and the putatively endogenous peptide endomorphin-1 displayed particularly distinct bias profiles. These may represent examples of natural bias if it can be shown that they have different signaling properties and physiologic effects in vivo compared with other endogenous opioids. Understanding how endogenous opioids control physiologic processes through biased agonism can reveal vital information required to enable the design of biased opioids with improved pharmacological profiles and treat diseases involving dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system.

  10. Proposed Mode of Binding and Action of Positive Allosteric Modulators at Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Available crystal structures of opioid receptors provide a high-resolution picture of ligand binding at the primary (“orthosteric”) site, that is, the site targeted by endogenous ligands. Recently, positive allosteric modulators of opioid receptors have also been discovered, but their modes of binding and action remain unknown. Here, we use a metadynamics-based strategy to efficiently sample the binding process of a recently discovered positive allosteric modulator of the δ-opioid receptor, BMS-986187, in the presence of the orthosteric agonist SNC-80, and with the receptor embedded in an explicit lipid–water environment. The dynamics of BMS-986187 were enhanced by biasing the potential acting on the ligand–receptor distance and ligand–receptor interaction contacts. Representative lowest-energy structures from the reconstructed free-energy landscape revealed two alternative ligand binding poses at an allosteric site delineated by transmembrane (TM) helices TM1, TM2, and TM7, with some participation of TM6. Mutations of amino acid residues at these proposed allosteric sites were found to either affect the binding of BMS-986187 or its ability to modulate the affinity and/or efficacy of SNC-80. Taken together, these combined experimental and computational studies provide the first atomic-level insight into the modulation of opioid receptor binding and signaling by allosteric modulators. PMID:26841170

  11. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  12. β-arrestins: regulatory role and therapeutic potential in opioid and cannabinoid receptor-mediated analgesia.

    PubMed

    Raehal, Kirsten M; Bohn, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a complex disorder with neurochemical and psychological components contributing to the severity, the persistence, and the difficulty in adequately treating the condition. Opioid and cannabinoids are two classes of analgesics that have been used to treat pain for centuries and are arguably the oldest of "pharmacological" interventions used by man. Unfortunately, they also produce several adverse side effects that can complicate pain management. Opioids and cannabinoids act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and much of their effects are mediated by the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R), respectively. These receptors couple to intracellular second messengers and regulatory proteins to impart their biological effects. In this chapter, we review the role of the intracellular regulatory proteins, β-arrestins, in modulating MOR and CB1R and how they influence the analgesic and side-effect profiles of opioid and cannabinoid drugs in vivo. This review of the literature suggests that the development of opioid and cannabinoid agonists that bias MOR and CB1R toward G protein signaling cascades and away from β-arrestin interactions may provide a novel mechanism by which to produce analgesia with less severe adverse effects.

  13. β-Arrestins: Regulatory Role and Therapeutic Potential in Opioid and Cannabinoid Receptor-Mediated Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex disorder with neurochemical and psychological components contributing to the severity, the persistence, and the difficulty in adequately treating the condition. Opioid and cannabinoids are two classes of analgesics that have been used to treat pain for centuries and are arguably the oldest of “pharmacological” interventions used by man. Unfortunately, they also produce several adverse side effects that can complicate pain management. Opioids and cannabinoids act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and much of their effects are mediated by the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R), respectively. These receptors couple to intracellular second messengers and regulatory proteins to impart their biological effects. In this chapter, we review the role of the intracellular regulatory proteins, β-arrestins, in modulating MOR and CB1R and how they influence the analgesic and side-effect profiles of opioid and cannabinoid drugs in vivo. This review of the literature suggests that the development of opioid and cannabinoid agonists that bias MOR and CB1R toward G protein signaling cascades and away from β-arrestin interactions may provide a novel mechanism by which to produce analgesia with less severe adverse effects. PMID:24292843

  14. [Endomorphins--endogenous ligands of the mu-opioid receptor].

    PubMed

    Perlikowska, Renata; Fichna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Two endogenous opioid peptides with extremely high mu-opioid receptor affinity and selectivity, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, were: discovered and isolated from the mammalian brain in 1997. Endomorphins are amidated tetrapeptides, structurally different from so called typical opioids: enkephalins, dynorphins and endorphins. A protein precursor of endomorphins and a gene encoding their sequence remain unknown. Endomorphins are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier because of their low hydrophobicity. In animal models, these peptides turned out to be very potent in relieving neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In comparison with morphine, a prototype opioid receptor ligand, endomorphins produces less undesired side effects. In this article we describe the discovery of endomorphins, their cellular localization and functions in the organism, as well as their structure-activity relationships and biodegradation pathways.

  15. Synergy between mu opioid ligands: evidence for functional interactions among mu opioid receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bolan, Elizabeth A; Tallarida, Ronald J; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2002-11-01

    Pharmacological differences among mu opioid drugs have been observed in in vitro and in vivo preclinical models, as well as clinically, implying that all mu opioids may not be working through the same mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate analgesic synergy between L-methadone and several mu opioid ligands. Of the compounds examined, L-methadone selectively synergizes with morphine, morphine-6beta-glucuronide, codeine, and the active metabolite of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine. Morphine synergizes only with L-methadone. In analgesic assays, D-methadone was inactive alone and did not enhance morphine analgesia when the two were given together, confirming that L-methadone was not acting through N-methyl-D-aspartate mechanisms. Both L-methadone and morphine displayed only additive effects when paired with oxymorphone, oxycodone, fentanyl, alfentanyl, or meperidine. Although it displays synergy in analgesic assays, the L-methadone/morphine combination does not exhibit synergy in the gastrointestinal transit assay. This analgesic synergy of L-methadone with selective mu opioid drugs and the differences in opioid-mediated actions suggest that these drugs may be acting via different mechanisms. These findings provide further evidence for the complexity of the pharmacology of mu opioids.

  16. Cannabinoid-induced stimulation of motor activity in planaria through an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Buttarelli, Francesca R; Pontieri, Francesco E; Margotta, Vito; Palladini, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Planaria, the most primitive example of centralization and cephalization of the nervous system along phylogeny, shows specific stereotyped behavioral patterns following exposure to drugs acting on neural transmission. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of exposure to the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist WTN55212.2 on motor activity in planaria. WTN55212.2 produced dose-dependent stimulation of motor behavior. High doses of the drug caused stereotyped activities identical to those seen previously with opioid agonists. These effects were antagonized by coexposure to cannabinoid or opioid receptor antagonists. The results indicate that functional interactions between cannabinoid and opioid systems are highly conserved along phylogeny, at least at the behavioral level.

  17. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    PubMed

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  18. Opioid receptor agonists reduce brain edema in stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Hezhen; Shah, Kaushik; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2011-04-06

    Cerebral edema is a leading cause of mortality in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to assess a non-selective opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, in decreasing reducing brain edema formation using both in vitro and in vivo models of stroke. For the in situ model of ischemia, hippocampal slices were exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions and we observed that hippocampal water content was increased, compared to normoxia. Treatment with the mu agonist, Tyr-D-Ala', N-CH, -Phe4, Glyol-Enkephalin (DAMGO), delta opioid agonists, D-pen(2), D-phe(5) enkephalin (DPDPE), and kappa agonist, U50 488, all significantly decreased brain slice water gain. Interestingly, the non-selective agonist, biphalin, exhibited a statistically significant (P<0.01) greater effect in decreasing water content in OGD-exposed hippocampal slices, compared with mu, delta, and kappa selective opioid agonists. Moreover, biphalin exhibited anti-edematous effects in a dose responsive manner. The non-selective opioid antagonist, naloxone, returned the water content nearly back to original OGD values for all opioid agonist treatments, supporting that these effects were mediated by an opioid receptor pathway. Furthermore, biphalin significantly decreased edema (53%) and infarct (48%) ratios, and neuronal recovery from stroke, compared with the vehicle-treated groups in a 12h permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of focal ischemia. Biphalin also significantly decreased the cell volume increase in primary neuronal cells exposed to OGD condition. These data suggest that opioid receptor activation may provide neuroprotection during stroke and further investigations are needed in the development of novel opioid agonist as efficacious treatments for brain ischemia.

  19. Actions of tilidine and nortilidine on cloned opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Christophe; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Paolo, Meoni

    2005-01-04

    Tilidine, alone or combined with naloxone to prevent drug abuse, is used as an oral opioid analgesic. Although the analgesic action of tilidine and its active metabolite nortilidine is reversed by naloxone and therefore believed to involve the activation of the Mu opioid (MOP, OP3, mu) receptor, this has never been studied in recombinant systems. We have measured the selectivity of tilidine and nortilidine for human opioid and opioid-like receptors stably expressed in CHO-K1 cells, using the inhibition of the forskolin (FK)-induced accumulation of cAMP as endpoint. In cells expressing the MOP receptor, tilidine and nortilidine inhibited cAMP accumulation with IC50 of 11 microM and 110 nM, respectively. The agonist effects of nortilidine and [D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) on the MOP receptor were reversed by naloxone with very similar IC50 (1.2 versus 1.8 nM). At concentrations up to 100 microM, tilidine and nortilidine had no agonist effect on the DOP, KOP and NOP receptors. In conclusion, this study on cloned human receptors demonstrates that nortilidine is a selective agonist of the MOP receptor.

  20. Opioid receptors regulate the extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    McNally, Gavan P; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2003-12-01

    Rats received a single pairing of an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) with a footshock unconditioned stimulus (US). The fear (freezing) that had accrued to the CS was then extinguished. Injection of naloxone prior to this extinction significantly impaired the development of extinction. This impairment was mediated by opioid receptors in the brain and was not observed when naloxone was injected after extinction training. Finally, an injection of naloxone on test failed to reinstate extinguished responding that had already accrued to the CS. These experiments show that opioid receptors regulate the development, but not the expression, of fear extinction and are discussed with reference to the roles of opioid receptors in US processing, memory, and appetitive motivation.

  1. Role of opioid receptors in the reinstatement of opioid-seeking behavior: an overview.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Antinori, Silvia; Fratta, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Opioid abuse in humans is characterized by discontinuous periods of drug use and abstinence. With time, the probability of falling into renewed drug consumption becomes particularly high and constitutes a considerable problem in the management of heroin addicts. The major problem in the treatment of opioid dependence still remains the occurrence of relapse, to which stressful life events, renewed use of heroin, and exposure to drug-associated environmental cues are all positively correlated. To study the neurobiology of relapse, many research groups currently use the reinstatement animal model, which greatly contributed to disentangle the mechanisms underlying relapse to drug-seeking in laboratory animals. The use of this model is becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and new versions have been recently developed to better appreciate the differential contribution of each opioid receptor subtype to the relapse phenomenon. In this chapter we review the state of the art of our knowledge on the specific role of the opioid receptors as unrevealed by the reinstatement animal model of opioid-seeking behavior.

  2. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-15

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in "ligated" rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex.

  3. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in “ligated” rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:23934854

  4. Opioid receptor internalization contributes to dermorphin-mediated antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Tara A.; Ingram, Susan L.; Bobeck, Erin N.; Hegarty, Deborah M.; Aicher, Sue A.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Morgan, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Microinjection of opioids into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) produces antinociception in part by binding to mu-opioid receptors (MOPrs). Although both high and low efficacy agonists produce antinociception, low efficacy agonists such as morphine produce limited MOPr internalization suggesting that MOPr internalization and signaling leading to antinociception are independent. This hypothesis was tested in awake, behaving rats using DERM-A594, a fluorescently labeled dermorphin analog, and internalization blockers. Microinjection of DERM-A594 into the vlPAG produced both antinociception and internalization of DERM-A594. Administration of the irreversible opioid receptor antagonist beta-CNA prior to DERM-A594 microinjection reduced both the antinociceptive effect and the number of DERM-A594 labeled cells demonstrating that both effects are opioid receptor-mediated. Pretreatment with the internalization blockers dynamin dominant-negative inhibitory peptide (dynamin-DN) and concanavalinA (ConA) attenuated both DERM-A594 internalization and antinociception. Microinjection of dynamin-DN and ConA also decreased the antinociceptive potency of the unlabeled opioid agonist dermorphin when microinjected into the vlPAG as demonstrated by rightward shifts in the dose-response curves. In contrast, administration of dynamin-DN had no effect on the antinociceptive effect of microinjecting the GABAA antagonist bicuculline into the vlPAG. The finding that dermorphin-induced antinociception is attenuated by blocking receptor internalization indicates that key parts of opioid receptor-mediated signaling depend on internalization. PMID:20394808

  5. Ignavine: a novel allosteric modulator of the μ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Miyagi, Chika; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Keita; Omiya, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Warabi, Eiji; Sudo, Yuka; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Miyano, Kanako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Processed Aconiti tuber (PAT) is used to treat pain associated with various disorders. Although it has been demonstrated that the κ opioid receptor (KOR) signaling pathway is a mediator of the analgesic effect of PAT, active components affecting opioid signaling have not yet been identified. In this study, we explored candidate components of PAT by pharmacokinetic analysis and identified ignavine, which is a different structure from aconitine alkaloids. A receptor binding assay of opioid receptors showed that ignavine specifically binds the μ opioid receptor (MOR), not the KOR. Receptor internalization assay in MOR-expressing cell lines revealed that ignavine augmented the responses produced by D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4)-Gly-ol(5)-enkephalin (DAMGO), a representative MOR agonist, at a low concentration and inhibited it at a higher concentration. Ignavine also exerted positive modulatory activity for DAMGO, endomorphin-1 and morphine in cAMP assay. Additionally, ignavine alone showed an analgesic effect in vivo. In silico simulation analysis suggested that ignavine would induce a unique structural change distinguished from those induced by a representative MOR agonist and antagonist. These data collectively suggest the possibility that ignavine could be a novel allosteric modulator of the MOR. The present results may open the way for the development of a novel pain management strategy. PMID:27530869

  6. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  7. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-05

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

  8. Non-opioid actions of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wollemann, Mária; Benyhe, Sándor

    2004-06-04

    Beside the well known actions of opioid peptides on mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors, increasing amount of pharmacological and biochemical evidence has recently been published about non-opioid actions of various opioid peptides. These effects are not abolished by naloxone treatments. Such non-opioid effects are observed both in nervous tissues and in the cellular elements of the immune system. Peptides exhibiting non-opioid effects include beta-endorphin, dynorphin A, nociceptin/OFQ, endomorphins, hemorphins and a number of Proenkephalin A derived peptides, such as Met-enkephalin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe (MERF) and bovine adrenal medullary peptide (BAM22). Non-opioid actions are exerted through different neuronal receptors, e.g., dynorphin hyperalgesia through NMDA receptor, Met-enkephalin induced regulation of cell growth through zeta receptors, pain modulation by nociceptin through ORL-1 or NOP receptors, while BAM22 acts through sensory neuron specific G protein-coupled receptors (SNSR). We have investigated Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe (MERF) and its analogues by the means of direct and indirect radioligand binding assays. It has been found that in addition to kappa(2) and delta-opioid receptors, MERF can act also through sigma(2)- or probably via FMRF-NH(2) receptors in rat cerebellum. A role of functionally assembling heterodimer receptors in mediating the non-conventional actions of these peptide ligands can not be excluded as well.

  9. The opioid peptide dynorphin directly blocks NMDA receptor channels in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Gu, Y; Huang, L Y

    1995-01-01

    1. The actions of dynorphin on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were examined in acutely dissociated trigeminal neurons in rat. Whole-cell and single-channel currents were recorded using the patch clamp technique. 2. Dynorphins reduced NMDA-activated currents (INMDA). The IC50 was 0.25 microM for dynorphin (1-32), 1.65 microM for dynorphin (1-17) and 1.8 microM for dynorphin (1-13). 3. The blocking action of dynorphin is voltage independent. 4. The inhibitory action of dynorphin cannot be blocked by high concentration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, nor by the specific kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). 5. Single-channel analyses indicate that dynorphin reduces the fraction of time the channel is open without altering the channel conductance. 6. We propose that dynorphin acts directly on NMDA receptors. PMID:7537820

  10. Targeting peripheral opioid receptors to promote analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions

    PubMed Central

    Iwaszkiewicz, Katerina S.; Schneider, Jennifer J.; Hua, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of endogenous pain control are significant. Increasing studies have clearly produced evidence for the clinical usefulness of opioids in peripheral analgesia. The immune system uses mechanisms of cell migration not only to fight pathogens but also to control pain and inflammation within injured tissue. It has been demonstrated that peripheral inflammatory pain can be effectively controlled by an interaction of immune cell-derived opioid peptides with opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerve terminals. Experimental and clinical studies have clearly shown that activation of peripheral opioid receptors with exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides are able to produce significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, without central opioid mediated side effects (e.g., respiratory depression, sedation, tolerance, dependence). This article will focus on the role of opioids in peripheral inflammatory conditions and the clinical implications of targeting peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:24167491

  11. Lobeline, a potential pharmacotherapy for drug addiction, binds to mu opioid receptors and diminishes the effects of opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Lever, John R; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Baskett, James A; Will, Matthew J; Kracke, George R

    2007-07-10

    Lobeline diminishes the behavioral and neurochemical effects of nicotine and amphetamines, and is considered a potential pharmacotherapy for drug abuse and addiction. Lobeline has high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibits the function of vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporters. The present study investigated the less-explored interaction of lobeline and the endogenous opioid system. In guinea pig brain homogenates, lobeline displaced (K(i)=0.74 microM) the binding of [(3)H]DAMGO [(D-Ala(2), N-ME-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin]. In a functional assay system comprised of MOR-1 mu opioid receptors and GIRK2 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, lobeline had no effect on the resting current, but maximally inhibited (IC(50)=1.1 microM) morphine- and DAMGO-activated potassium current in a concentration-dependent manner. In a second functional assay, lobeline-evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was not blocked by naltrexone. Importantly, concentrations of lobeline (0.1-0.3 microM) that did not have intrinsic activity attenuated ( approximately 50%) morphine-evoked [(3)H]overflow. Overall, the results suggest that lobeline functions as a mu opioid receptor antagonist. The ability of lobeline to block psychostimulant effects may be mediated by opioid receptor antagonism, and lobeline could be investigated as a treatment for opiate addiction.

  12. Long-acting opioid-agonists in the treatment of heroin addiction: why should we call them "substitution"?

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Maremmani, I; Capovani, B; Somaini, L; Berterame, S; Tomas-Rossello, J; Saenz, E; Busse, A; Kleber, H

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have documented the safety, efficacy, and effectiveness of long-acting opioids (L-AOs), such as methadone and buprenorphine, in the treatment of heroin addiction. This article reviews the pharmacological differences between L-AO medications and short-acting opioids (heroin) in terms of reinforcing properties, pharmacokinetics, effects on the endocrine and immune systems. Given their specific pharmacological profile, L-AOs contribute to control addictive behavior, reduce craving, and restore the balance of disrupted endocrine function. The use of the term "substitution," referring to the fact that methadone or buprenorphine replace heroin in binding to brain opioid receptors, has been generalized to consider L-AOs as simple replacement of street drugs, thus contributing to the widespread misunderstanding of this treatment approach.

  13. Delta opioid receptors in brain function and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Paul Chu Sin; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that the delta opioid receptor (DOR) is an attractive target for the treatment of brain disorders has strengthened in recent years. This receptor is broadly expressed in the brain, binds endogenous opioid peptides, and shows as functional profile highly distinct from those of mu and kappa opioid receptors. Our knowledge of DOR function has enormously progressed from in vivo studies using pharmacological tools and genetic approaches. The important role of this receptor in reducing chronic pain has been extensively overviewed; therefore this review focuses on facets of delta receptor activity relevant to psychiatric and other neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of DOR agonists are now well established in the context of emotional responses and mood disorders. DOR activation also regulates drug reward, inhibitory controls and learning processes, but whether delta compounds may represent useful drugs in the treatment of drug abuse remains open. Epileptogenic and locomotor-stimulating effects of delta agonists appear drug-dependent, and the possibility of biased agonism at DOR for these effects is worthwhile further investigations to increase benefit/risk ratio of delta therapies. Neuroprotective effects of DOR activity represent a forthcoming research area. Future developments in DOR research will benefit from in-depth investigations of DOR function at cellular and circuit levels. PMID:23764370

  14. Mu Opioids and Their Receptors: Evolution of a Concept

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are among the oldest medications available to manage a number of medical problems. Although pain is the current focus, early use initially focused upon the treatment of dysentery. Opium contains high concentrations of both morphine and codeine, along with thebaine, which is used in the synthesis of a number of semisynthetic opioid analgesics. Thus, it is not surprising that new agents were initially based upon the morphine scaffold. The concept of multiple opioid receptors was first suggested almost 50 years ago (Martin, 1967), opening the possibility of new classes of drugs, but the morphine-like agents have remained the mainstay in the medical management of pain. Termed mu, our understanding of these morphine-like agents and their receptors has undergone an evolution in thinking over the past 35 years. Early pharmacological studies identified three major classes of receptors, helped by the discovery of endogenous opioid peptides and receptor subtypes—primarily through the synthesis of novel agents. These chemical biologic approaches were then eclipsed by the molecular biology revolution, which now reveals a complexity of the morphine-like agents and their receptors that had not been previously appreciated. PMID:24076545

  15. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  16. New opioids.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2014-06-01

    Despite the skilled use of opioid analgesics, which is crucial to the relief of cancer pain, there is a lack of evidence to support many aspects of current clinical practice. Therefore, there is a significant need for more effective treatment options. New opioids have been marketed in the past years, including hydrocodone and oxymorphone. Moreover, mixed opioids with combined mechanisms of action have been developed; one such agent, tapentadol, is a centrally acting oral analgesic that possesses a combined mechanism of action: μ-opioid receptor activation with norepinephrine reuptake inhibition. Drug development strategies involving naloxone have been initiated to reduce peripheral opioid-related adverse effects. The rationale is based on the local antagonist activity of naloxone in intestinal opioid receptors and the negligible oral bioavailability of naloxone, particularly in a prolonged-release formulation. New delivery systems have been developed to provide rapid analgesia with potent opioid drugs such as fentanyl. Despite the upcoming availability of these new drugs and technologies that will add to existing types of opioid medication, their benefits and liabilities will ultimately need to be determined by the individual physician and individual patient experiencing pain.

  17. Involvement of peripheral mu opioid receptors in scratching behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-15

    Pruritus is a common adverse effect of opioid treatment. However, the mechanism by which pruritus is induced by opioid administration is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of the intradermal injection of loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid receptor agonist, on the itch sensation. When injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back in mice, loperamide elicited scratching behavior. We also examined the effects of the selective mu opioid receptor agonist [d-Ala², N-Me-Phe⁴, Gly⁵-ol]-enkephalin acetate (DAMGO), the selective delta opioid receptor agonist [d-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE), and the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488H on scratching behavior in mice in order to determine which subtype is involved in opioid-induced pruritus. Following intradermal injection into the rostral part of the back in mice, DAMGO elicited scratching behavior, while DPDPE and U-50488H did not. This suggests that peripheral mu opioid activation elicits the itch sensation. Next, we focused on the treatment of opioid-induced itch sensation without central adverse effects. Naloxone methiodide is a peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonist. In the present study, naloxone methiodide significantly suppressed scratching behavior induced by loperamide and DAMGO. These findings suggest that mu opioid receptors play a primary role in peripheral pruritus and that naloxone methiodide may represent a possible remedy for opioid-induced itching.

  18. Antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of Salvinorin A are abolished in a novel strain of kappa-opioid receptor-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ansonoff, Michael A; Zhang, Jiwen; Czyzyk, Traci; Rothman, Richard B; Stewart, Jeremy; Xu, Heng; Zjwiony, Jordan; Siebert, Daniel J; Yang, Feng; Roth, Bryan L; Pintar, John E

    2006-08-01

    Salvia divinorum is a natural occurring hallucinogen that is traditionally used by the Mazatec Indians of central Mexico. The diterpene salvinorin A was identified as an active component of S. divinorum over 20 years ago, but only recently has biochemical screening indicated that a molecular target of salvinorin A in vitro is the kappa-opioid receptor. We have examined whether salvinorin A, the C2-substituted derivative salvinorinyl-2-propionate, and salvinorin B can act as kappa-opioid receptor agonists in vivo. We found that following intracerebroventricular injection over a dose range of 1 to 30 microg of both salvinorin A and salvinorinyl-2-propionate produces antinociception in wild-type mice but not in a novel strain of kappa-opioid receptor knockout mice. Moreover, both salvinorin A and salvinorinyl-2-propionate reduce rectal body temperature, similar to conventional kappa-opioid receptor agonists, in a genotype-dependent manner. In addition, we determined that salvinorin A has high affinity for kappa 1- but not kappa 2-opioid receptors, demonstrating selectivity for this receptor subclass. Finally, treatment over the same dose range with salvinorin B, which is inactive in vitro, produced neither antinociceptive nor hypothermic effects in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that salvinorin A is the active component of S. divinorum, selective for kappa(1)-opioid receptors, and that salvinorin A and specific structurally related analogs produce behavioral effects that require the kappa-opioid receptor.

  19. Effect of prenatal methadone and ethanol on opioid receptor development in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.A.; Braun, R.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The current literature shows that the offspring of female rats exposed to methadone or ethanol display similar neurochemical and neurobehavioral alterations, and suggests that these drugs may be operating through a common mechanism. If this hypothesis is true, their effect on the endogenous opioid systems should be qualitatively similar. In this study virgin females were treated with methadone or 10% ethanol oral solution starting prior to conception and continued throughout gestation. When the offspring had reached 15 or 30 days of age they were sacrificed, the brain was removed and prepared for opioid receptor binding studies. ({sup 3}H)DAGO and ({sup 3}H)DADLE were used as ligands for the mu and delta receptors, respectively. These studies show significant treatment-related differences in both the number of mu and delta binding sites as well as in apparent receptor affinity. Significant sex- and age-related differences between treatments were also observed. These data show that methadone and ethanol, while manifesting some similar neurochemical and behavioral effects, have unique effects on opioid receptor binding, suggesting that they may be acting by different mechanisms.

  20. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  1. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

  2. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  3. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed

    Cahill, Catherine M; Taylor, Anna M W; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A; Evans, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain.

  4. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Taylor, Anna M. W.; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:25452729

  5. Antidepressant-like Effects of δ Opioid Receptor Agonists in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Recently, δ opioid receptor agonists have been proposed to be attractive targets for the development of novel antidepressants. Several studies revealed that single treatment of δ opioid receptor agonists produce antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test, which is one of the most popular animal models for screening antidepressants. In addition, subchronic treatment with δ opioid receptor agonists has been shown to completely attenuate the hyperemotional responses found in olfactory bulbectomized rats. This animal model exhibits hyperemotional behavior that may mimic the anxiety, aggression, and irritability found in depressed patients, suggesting that δ opioid receptor agonists could be effective in the treatment of these symptoms in depression. On the other hand, prototype δ opioid receptor agonists produce convulsive effects, which limit their therapeutic potential and clinical development. In this review, we presented the current knowledge regarding the antidepressant-like effects of δ opioid receptor agonists, which include some recently developed drugs lacking convulsive effects. PMID:23449756

  6. The Effect of CRH, Dexamethasone and Naltrexone on the Mu, Delta and Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist Binding in Lamb Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis.

    PubMed

    Pierzchała-Koziec, Krystyna; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta; Oeltgen, Peter; Zubel-Łojek, Joanna; Latacz, Anna; Ocłon, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in the opioid receptor binding (mu, delta and kappa) in the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary and adrenal cortex (HPA) of lambs treated in vivo with corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH), naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist (NAL), and dexamethasone, a potent cortisol analog (DEX). Experiment was carried out on 3 months old female lambs of polish mountain strain. Lambs received a single i.v. injection of NaCl (control), CRH (alone or in combination with naltrexone), naltrexone or dexamethasone. One hour later animals were decapitated under anaesthesia, tissues were dissected out and receptor binding assays were performed with radioligands for each type of opioid receptors--3H-DAGO, 3H-DPDPE and 3H-EKC for mu, delta and kappa receptor, respectively. Coexistence of specific binding sites for each type of opioid receptor was demonstrated in all levels of HPA axis of control lambs, however their distribution was uneven. Acute treatment with CRH, DEX and NAL caused downregulation or upregulation of mu, delta, kappa receptor binding in each level of HPA axis. CRH effects on mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor binding varied within the HPA axis and were modulated by naltrexone. Treatment with naltrexone increased in vitro mu, delta and kappa receptor binding in most tested structures except delta receptor binding in adrenal (decrease by 52%) and kappa receptor binding in pituitary (decrease by 41%). Dexamethasone significantly decreased the mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor binding in adrenal cortex but differentially affected opioid receptor binding in hypothalamus and pituitary. It seems probable that endogenous opioid peptides acting through mu, delta and kappa receptors interact with the hormones released from the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in physiological and pathophysiological situations.

  7. Enkephalins modulate inhibitory neuromuscular transmission in circular muscle of human colon via delta-opioid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, C H; Kamm, M A; Burnstock, G; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1990-01-01

    1. A sucrose-gap technique was used to investigate the neuromodulatory actions of enkephalins on non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) in the circular muscle of the human large intestine. 2. The native enkephalins, [Leu5]enkephalin (LENK) and [Met5]enkephalin (MENK) caused a concentration-dependent reduction in amplitude of IJPs without a significant effect on the smooth muscle membrane. 3. The actions of LENK and MENK were mimicked by the delta-selective opioid receptor agonists [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE) and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin (DADLE). 4. The actions of LENK, MENK and DPDPE were antagonized to similar extents by the delta-selective opioid receptor antagonist ICI 174,864. 5. The mu-selective opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, Me Phe, Gly-ol5]enkephalin was approximately 100-fold less potent than any of the native or synthetic enkephalins at reducing the amplitude of the IJP. Dynorphin A and beta-endorphin both had very weak activity. 6. Responses to all of the agonists were inhibited by naloxone. The degree of antagonism of DPDPE or DADLE by naloxone (1 microM) was the same as that of LENK or MENK. 7. Neither MENK nor LENK affected hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle membrane induced by ATP or 5-hydroxytryptamine. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (1 pM-1 microM) did not produce any observable responses and this lack of reactivity was not affected by the enkephalins. 8. It is concluded that in the circular muscle of the human colon, LENK and MENK can act on prejunctional delta-opioid receptors to produce inhibition of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory neuromuscular transmission. Possible physiological significance of this prejunctional receptor is discussed. PMID:1966052

  8. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2016-01-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  9. Studies Toward the Pharmacophore of Salvinorin A, a Potent Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Thomas A.; Rizzacasa, Mark A.; Roth, Bryan L.; Toth, Beth A.; Yan, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A (1), from the sage Salvia divinorum, is a potent and selective kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist. We screened other salvinorins and derivatives for binding affinity and functional activity at opioid receptors. Our results suggest that the methyl ester and furan ring are required for activity, but that the lactone and ketone functionalities are not. Other salvinorins showed negligible binding affinity at the KOR. None of the compounds bound to mu or delta opioid receptors. PMID:15658846

  10. Studies toward the pharmacophore of salvinorin A, a potent kappa opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Munro, Thomas A; Rizzacasa, Mark A; Roth, Bryan L; Toth, Beth A; Yan, Feng

    2005-01-27

    Salvinorin A (1), from the sage Salvia divinorum, is a potent and selective kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist. We screened other salvinorins and derivatives for binding affinity and functional activity at opioid receptors. Our results suggest that the methyl ester and furan ring are required for activity but that the lactone and ketone functionalities are not. Other salvinorins showed negligible binding affinity at the KOR. None of the compounds bound to mu or delta opioid receptors.

  11. Opioid mediated activity and expression of mu and delta opioid receptors in isolated human term non-labouring myometrium.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Rebecca A; McMorrow, Jason P; Campion, Deirdre P; Carey, Michael F; O'Connor, John J

    2013-01-05

    The existence of opioid receptors in mammalian myometrial tissue is now widely accepted. Previously enkephalin degrading enzymes have been shown to be elevated in pregnant rat uterus and a met-enkephalin analogue has been shown to alter spontaneous contractility of rat myometrium. Here we have undertaken studies to determine the effects of met-enkephalin on in vitro human myometrial contractility and investigate the expression of opioid receptors in pregnant myometrium. Myometrial biopsies were taken from women undergoing elective caesarean delivery at term. Organ bath experiments were used to investigate the effect of the met-enkephalin analogue [d-Ala 2, d-met 5] enkephalin (DAMEA) on spontaneous contractility. A confocal immunofluorescent technique and real time PCR were used to determine the expression of protein and mRNA, respectively for two opioid receptor subtypes, mu and delta. DAMEA had a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on contractile activity (1 × 10(-7)M-1 × 10(-4)M; 54% reduction in contractile activity, P<0.001 at 1 × 10(-4)M concentration). Mu and delta opioid receptor protein sub-types and their respective mRNA were identified in all tissues sampled. This is the first report of opioid receptor expression and of an opioid mediated uterorelaxant action in term human non-labouring myometrium in vitro.

  12. Nanoconjugated NAP as a Potent and Periphery Selective Mu Opioid Receptor Modulator To Treat Opioid-Induced Constipation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zolotarskaya, Olga Yu; Williams, Dwight A; Yuan, Yunyun; Selley, Dana E; Dewey, William L; Akbarali, Hamid I; Yang, Hu; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-12

    Opioids are the mainstay for cancer and noncancer pain management. However, their use is often associated with multiple adverse effects. Among them, the most common and persistent one is probably opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Periphery selective opioid antagonists may alleviate the symptoms of OIC without compromising the analgesic effects of opioids. Recently our laboratories have identified one novel lead compound, 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6β-[(4'-pyridyl)acetamido]morphinan (NAP), as a peripherally selective mu opioid receptor ligand carrying subnanomolar affinity to the mu opioid receptor and over 100-folds of selectivity over both the delta and kappa opioid receptors, with reasonable oral availability and half-life, and potential to treat OIC. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems are now widely considered due to their technological advantages such as good stability, high carrier capacity, low therapeutic side effects, etc. Herein we report nanoparticle supported NAP as a potential candidate for OIC treatment with improved peripheral selectivity over the original lead compound NAP.

  13. Opioid neurotransmission in the post-ictal analgesia: involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Freitas, R L; Savoldi, M; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Kishi, R; Weltson, A; Resende, G C

    2001-06-08

    Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a non-competitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux, was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significative increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), for at least 120 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naltrexone (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated with peripheral administration of naloxonazine (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg), a mu(1)-opioid blocker, in the same doses used for non-specific antagonist. These results indicate that endogenous opioids may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia. The involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor was also considered.

  14. Impact of efficacy at the μ-opioid receptor on antinociceptive effects of combinations of μ-opioid receptor agonists and cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2014-11-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, Δ(9)-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of Δ(9)-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. Δ(9)-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither Δ(9)-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain.

  15. Fluoxetine alters mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, María P; Zumalabe, José María; Macarulla, María T; Sáenz Del Burgo, Laura; Zarate, Jon; Echevarría, Enrique

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the effects of chronic fluoxetine on mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. Brain regional immunostaining for mu opioid receptor was carried out. An increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for mu opioid receptor in caudatus-putamen, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, amygdala, and frontal, parietal, and piriform cortices was observed. Increased mu opioid receptor expression in the central amygdaloid nuclei suggests a decreased opioidergic tone at this level that could be involved in fluoxetine anorectic action.

  16. Development of concepts on the interaction of drugs with opioid receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmina, N. E.; Kuzmin, V. S.

    2011-02-01

    The development of concepts on the molecular mechanisms of the action of medicinal drugs on the opioid receptors is briefly surveyed. The modern point of view on the mechanism of activation of opioid receptors is given based on the data from chimeric and site-directed mutagenesis of the cloned opioid receptors and the computer-aided simulations of the reception zone and ligand-receptor complexes. Three-dimensional models of the opioid pharmacophore derived by both conventional methods and a comparative analysis of molecular fields are described in detail.

  17. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  18. Abuse Potential and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of Oral and Intranasal Eluxadoline, a Mixed μ- and κ-Opioid Receptor Agonist and δ-Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, G.; Bonifacio, L.; McDonnell, M.; Davenport, J. M.; Covington, P. S.; Dove, L. S.; Sellers, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs with μ-opioid receptor (OR) activity can be associated with abuse and misuse. The peripherally acting mixed μ-OR and κ-OR agonist and δ-OR antagonist eluxadoline is approved in the United States for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea. In two separate crossover studies, we evaluated the oral and intranasal abuse potential of eluxadoline versus placebo and the active control oxycodone. Healthy recreational opioid users received eluxadoline 100, 300, and 1000 mg, oxycodone 30 and 60 mg, and placebo (oral study), or eluxadoline 100 and 200 mg, oxycodone 15 and 30 mg, and placebos matched to eluxadoline and oxycodone (intranasal study). In the oral study, Drug Liking Visual Analog Scale (VAS) peak (maximum) effect (Emax) score (primary endpoint) was significantly greater with eluxadoline 300 and 1000 mg versus placebo, but scores were significantly lower versus oxycodone. Following intranasal insufflation of eluxadoline, Drug Liking VAS Emax scores were not statistically different versus placebo, and were significantly lower versus oxycodone. Across other subjective measures, eluxadoline was generally similar to or disliked versus placebo. Pupillometry indicated no or minimal central effects with oral and intranasal eluxadoline, respectively. Adverse events of euphoric mood were reported with oral and intranasal eluxadoline but at a far lower frequency versus oxycodone. These data demonstrate that eluxadoline has less abuse potential than oxycodone in recreational opioid users. PMID:27647873

  19. Molecular mechanism for opioid dichotomy: bidirectional effect of μ-opioid receptors on P2X₃ receptor currents in rat sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Chizhmakov, Igor; Kulyk, Vyacheslav; Khasabova, Iryna; Khasabov, Sergey; Simone, Donald; Bakalkin, Georgy; Gordienko, Dmitri; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe a molecular switch associated with opioid receptors-linked signalling cascades that provides a dual opioid control over P2X3 purinoceptor in sensory neurones. Leu-enkephalin inhibited P2X3-mediated currents with IC50 ~10 nM in ~25% of small nociceptive rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. In contrast, in neurones pretreated with pertussis toxin leu-enkephalin produced stable and significant increase of P2X3 currents. All effects of opioid were abolished by selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), nonselective inhibitor naloxone, and by PLC inhibitor U73122. Thus, we discovered a dual link between purinoceptors and μ-opioid receptors: the latter exert both inhibitory (pertussis toxin-sensitive) and stimulatory (pertussis toxin-insensitive) actions on P2X3 receptors through phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent pathways. This dual opioid control of P2X3 receptors may provide a molecular explanation for dichotomy of opioid therapy. Pharmacological control of this newly identified facilitation/inhibition switch may open new perspectives for the adequate medical use of opioids, the most powerful pain-killing agents known today.

  20. High-affinity carbamate analogues of morphinan at opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2007-03-15

    A series of carbamate analogues were synthesized from levorphanol (1a), cyclorphan (2a) or butorphan (3a) and evaluated in vitro for their binding affinity at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Functional activities of these compounds were measured in the [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay. Phenyl carbamate derivatives 2d and 3d showed the highest binding affinity for kappa receptor (K(i)=0.046 and 0.051 nM) and for mu receptor (K(i)=0.11 and 0.12 nM). Compound 1c showed the highest mu selectivity. The preliminary assay for agonist and antagonist properties of these ligands in stimulating [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding mediated by the kappa opioid receptor illustrated that all of these ligands were kappa agonists. At the mu receptor, compounds 1b, 1c, 2b, and 3b were agonists, while compounds 2c-e and 3c-e were mu agonists/antagonists.

  1. Synaptic localization of. kappa. opioid receptors in guinea pig neostriatum

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Beaudet, A. ); Gairin, J.E. )

    1992-01-15

    Distribution of {kappa} opioid receptors was examined by EM radioautography in sections of guinea pig neostriatum with the selective {sup 125}I-labeled dynorphin analog (D-Pro{sup 10})dynorphin-(1-11). Most specifically labeled binding sites were found by probability circle analysis to be associated with neuronal membrane appositions. Because of limitations in resolution of the method, the radioactive sources could not be ascribed directly to either one of the apposed plasma membranes. Nevertheless, three lines of evidence favored a predominant association of ligand with dendrites of intrinsic striatal neurons: (1) the high frequency with which labeled interfaces implicated a dendrite, (2) the enrichment of dendrodendritic interfaces, and (3) the occurrence of dendritic profiles labeled at several contact points along their plasma membranes. A small proportion of labeled sites was associated with axo-axonic interfaces, which may subserve the {kappa} opioid-induced regulation of presynaptic dopamine and acetylcholine release documented in guinea pig neostriatum. These results support the hypothesis that in mammalian brain {kappa} opioid receptors are conformationally and functionally distinct from {mu} and {delta} types.

  2. Synaptic localization of kappa opioid receptors in guinea pig neostriatum.

    PubMed Central

    Jomary, C; Gairin, J E; Beaudet, A

    1992-01-01

    Distribution of kappa opioid receptors was examined by EM radioautography in sections of guinea pig neostriatum with the selective 125I-labeled dynorphin analog [D-Pro10]dynorphin-(1-11). Most specifically labeled binding sites were found by probability circle analysis to be associated with neuronal membrane appositions. Because of limitations in resolution of the method, the radioactive sources could not be ascribed directly to either one of the apposed plasma membranes. Nevertheless, three lines of evidence favored a predominant association of ligand with dendrites of intrinsic striatal neurons: (i) the high frequency with which labeled interfaces implicated a dendrite, (ii) the enrichment of dendro-dendritic interfaces, and (iii) the occurrence of dendritic profiles labeled at several contact points along their plasma membranes. A small proportion of labeled sites was associated with axo-axonic interfaces, which may subserve the kappa opioid-induced regulation of presynaptic dopamine and acetylcholine release documented in guinea pig neostriatum. Although most membrane-associated kappa sites were found at extrasynaptic locations, approximately 23% were associated with synaptic specializations. This proportion is markedly higher than that previously reported for either mu or delta sites in rat neostriatum. Whether labeled synapses represent preferential sites of action for kappa ligands remains to be established. In any event, these results support the hypothesis that in mammalian brain kappa opioid receptors are conformationally and functionally distinct from mu and delta types. Images PMID:1346233

  3. Pharmacological traits of delta opioid receptors: pitfalls or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    van Rijn, Richard M.; DeFriel, Julia N.; Whistler, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors (DORs) have been considered as a potential target to relieve pain as well as treat depression and anxiety disorders, and are known to modulate other physiological responses, including ethanol and food consumption. A small number of DOR selective drugs are in clinical trials, but no DOR selective drugs have been approved by the Federal Drug Administration and some candidates have failed in phase II clinical trials, highlighting current difficulties producing effective delta opioid based therapies. Recent studies have provided new insights into the pharmacology of the DOR, which is often complex and at times paradoxical. This review will discuss the existing literature focusing on four aspects: 1) Two DOR subtypes have been postulated based on differences in pharmacological effects of existing DOR-selective ligands 2) DORs are expressed ubiquitously throughout the body and central nervous system and are, thus, positioned to play a role in a multitude of diseases. 3) DOR expression is often dynamic, with many reports of increased expression during exposure to chronic stimuli, such as stress, inflammation, neuropathy, morphine, or changes in endogenous opioid tone. 4) A large structural variety in DOR ligands implies potential different mechanisms of activating the receptor. These combined features of DOR pharmacology illustrate the potential benefit of designing tailored or biased DOR ligands. PMID:23649885

  4. Modulation of peripheral μ-opioid analgesia by σ1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Montilla-García, Ángeles; González-Cano, Rafael; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Romero, Lucía; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Montes, Rosa; Fernández-Pastor, Begoña; Merlos, Manuel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of σ1-receptor inhibition on μ-opioid-induced mechanical antinociception and constipation. σ1-Knockout mice exhibited marked mechanical antinociception in response to several μ-opioid analgesics (fentanyl, oxycodone, morphine, buprenorphine, and tramadol) at systemic (subcutaneous) doses that were inactive in wild-type mice and even unmasked the antinociceptive effects of the peripheral μ-opioid agonist loperamide. Likewise, systemic (subcutaneous) or local (intraplantar) treatment of wild-type mice with the selective σ1 antagonists BD-1063 [1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride] or S1RA [4-[2-[[5-methyl-1-(2-naphthalenyl)1H-pyrazol-3-yl]oxy]ethyl] morpholine hydrochloride] potentiated μ-opioid antinociception; these effects were fully reversed by the σ1 agonist PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate) hydrochloride], showing the selectivity of the pharmacological approach. The μ-opioid antinociception potentiated by σ1 inhibition (by σ1-receptor knockout or σ1-pharmacological antagonism) was more sensitive to the peripherally restricted opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide than opioid antinociception under normal conditions, indicating a key role for peripheral opioid receptors in the enhanced antinociception. Direct interaction between the opioid drugs and σ1 receptor cannot account for our results, since the former lacked affinity for σ1 receptors (labeled with [(3)H](+)-pentazocine). A peripheral role for σ1 receptors was also supported by their higher density (Western blot results) in peripheral nervous tissue (dorsal root ganglia) than in several central areas involved in opioid antinociception (dorsal spinal cord, basolateral amygdala, periaqueductal gray, and rostroventral medulla). In contrast to its effects on nociception, σ1-receptor inhibition did not alter fentanyl- or loperamide-induced constipation, a peripherally mediated nonanalgesic opioid effect. Therefore

  5. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling.

    PubMed

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Schmidt, Brian L; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-12-11

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy.

  6. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  7. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  8. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  9. Toll like receptor (TLR)-4 as a regulator of peripheral endogenous opioid-mediated analgesia in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leukocytes containing opioid peptides locally control inflammatory pain. In the early phase of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced hind paw inflammation, formyl peptides (derived e.g. from Mycobacterium butyricum) trigger the release of opioid peptides from neutrophils contributing to tonic basal antinociception. In the later phase we hypothesized that toll-like-receptor-(TLR)-4 activation of monocytes/macrophages triggers opioid peptide release and thereby stimulates peripheral opioid-dependent antinociception. Results In Wistar rats with CFA hind paw inflammation in the later inflammatory phase (48–96 h) systemic leukocyte depletion by cyclophosphamide (CTX) or locally injected naloxone (NLX) further decreased mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. In vitro β-endorphin (β-END) content increased during human monocyte differentiation as well as in anti-inflammatory CD14+CD16- or non-classical M2 macrophages. Monocytes expressing TLR4 dose-dependently released β-END after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dependent on intracellular calcium. Despite TLR4 expression proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages only secreted opioid peptides in response to ionomycin, a calcium ionophore. Intraplantar injection of LPS as a TLR4 agonist into the inflamed paw elicited an immediate opioid- and dose-dependent antinociception, which was blocked by TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of TLR4, or by peripheral applied NLX. In the later phase LPS lowered mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Furthermore, local peripheral TLR4 blockade worsened thermal and mechanical nociceptive pain thresholds in CFA inflammation. Conclusion Endogenous opioids from monocytes/macrophages mediate endogenous antinociception in the late phase of inflammation. Peripheral TLR4 stimulation acts as a transient counter-regulatory mechanism for inflammatory pain in vivo, and increases the release of opioid peptides from monocytes in vitro. TLR4

  10. Modulation of Opioid Receptor Ligand Affinity and Efficacy Using Active and Inactive State Receptor Models

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Jessica P.; Purington, Lauren C.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2012-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists are widely used for the treatment of pain; however chronic use results in the development of tolerance and dependence. It has been demonstrated that co-administration of a MOR agonist with a delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist maintains the analgesia associated with MOR agonists, but with reduced negative side effects. Using our newly refined opioid receptor models for structure-based ligand design, we have synthesized several pentapeptides with tailored affinity and efficacy profiles. In particular, we have obtained pentapeptides 8, Tyr-c(S-S)[DCys-1Nal-Nle-Cys]NH2, and 12, Tyr-c(S-S)[DCys-1Nal-Nle-Cys]OH, which demonstrates high affinity and full agonist behavior at MOR, high affinity but very low efficacy for DOR, and minimal affinity for the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). Functional properties of these peptides as MOR agonists/DOR antagonists lacking undesired KOR activity make them promising candidates for future in vivo studies of MOR/DOR interactions. Subtle structural variation of 12, by substituting D-Cys5 for L-Cys5, generated analog 13 which maintains low nanomolar MOR and DOR affinity, but which displays no efficacy at either receptor. These results demonstrate the power and utility of accurate receptor models for structure-based ligand design, as well as the profound sensitivity of ligand function on its structure. PMID:22882801

  11. Kappa opioid receptor/dynorphin system: Genetic and pharmacotherapeutic implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Butelman, Eduardo R.; Yuferov, Vadim; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Addictions to cocaine or heroin/prescription opioids [short-acting mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) agonists] involve relapsing cycles, with experimentation/escalating use, withdrawal/abstinence, and relapse/re-escalation. Kappa-opioid receptors (KOPr; encoded by OPRK1), and their endogenous agonists, the dynorphins (encoded by PDYN) have counter-modulatory effects on reward caused by cocaine or MOPr agonist exposure, and exhibit plasticity in addictive-like states. KOPr/dynorphin activation is implicated in depression/anxiety, often co-morbid with addictions. In this Opinion article, we propose that particular stages of the addiction cycle are differentially affected by KOPr/dynorphin systems. Vulnerability and resilience can be due to pre-existing (e.g., genetic) factors, or epigenetic modifications of the OPRK1 or PDYN genes during the addiction cycle. Pharmacotherapeutic approaches limiting changes in KOPr/dynorphin tone, especially with KOPr partial agonists, may hold potential for the treatment of specific drug addictions and psychiatric co-morbidity. PMID:22709632

  12. κ-opioid receptor/dynorphin system: genetic and pharmacotherapeutic implications for addiction.

    PubMed

    Butelman, Eduardo R; Yuferov, Vadim; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2012-10-01

    Addictions to cocaine or heroin/prescription opioids [short-acting μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) agonists] involve relapsing cycles, with experimentation/escalating use, withdrawal/abstinence, and relapse/re-escalation. κ-Opioid receptors (KOPr; encoded by OPRK1), and their endogenous agonists, the dynorphins (encoded by PDYN), have counter-modulatory effects on reward caused by cocaine or MOPr agonist exposure, and exhibit plasticity in addictive-like states. KOPr/dynorphin activation is implicated in depression/anxiety, often comorbid with addictions. In this opinion article we propose that particular stages of the addiction cycle are differentially affected by KOPr/dynorphin systems. Vulnerability and resilience can be due to pre-existing (e.g., genetic) factors, or epigenetic modifications of the OPRK1 or PDYN genes during the addiction cycle. Pharmacotherapeutic approaches limiting changes in KOPr/dynorphin tone, especially with KOPr partial agonists, may hold potential for the treatment of specific drug addictions and psychiatric comorbidity.

  13. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  14. Binding-site analysis of opioid receptors using monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Structural relatedness between the variable region of anti-ligand antibodies and opioid binding sites allowed the generation of anti-idiotypic antibodies which recognized opioid receptors. The IgG{sub 3}k antibodies which bound to opioid receptors were obtained when an anti-morphine antiserum was the idiotype. Both antibodies bound to opioid receptors, but only one of these blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone. The antibody which did not inhibit the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone was itself displaced from the receptor by opioid ligands. The unique binding properties displayed by this antibody indicated that anti-idiotypic antibodies are not always a perfect image of the original ligand, and therefore may be more useful than typical ligands as probes for the receptor. An auto-anti-idiotypic technique was successfully used to obtain anti-opioid receptor antibodies. Another IgG{sub 3}k antibody that blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone to rat brain opioid receptors was obtained when a mouse was immunized with naloxone conjugated to bovine serum albumin. These data confirmed that an idiotype-anti-idiotype network which can generate an anti-receptor antibody normally functions when an opioid ligand is introduced into an animal in an immunogenic form.

  15. Impact of opioid rescue medication for breakthrough pain on the efficacy and tolerability of long-acting opioids in patients with chronic non-malignant pain

    PubMed Central

    Devulder, J.; Jacobs, A.; Richarz, U.; Wiggett, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little evidence that short-acting opioids as rescue medication for breakthrough pain is an optimal long-term treatment strategy in chronic non-malignant pain. We compared clinical studies of long-acting opioids that allowed short-acting opioid rescue medication with those that did not, to determine the impact of opioid rescue medication use on the analgesic efficacy and tolerability of chronic opioid therapy in patients with chronic non-malignant pain. Methods We searched MEDLINE (1950 to July 2006) and EMBASE (1974 to July 2006) using terms for chronic non-malignant pain and long-acting opioids. Independent review of the search results identified 48 studies that met the study selection criteria. The effect of opioid rescue medication on analgesic efficacy and the incidence of common opioid-related side-effects were analysed using meta-regression. Results After adjusting for potentially confounding variables (study design and type of opioid), the difference in analgesic efficacy between the ‘rescue’ and the ‘no rescue’ studies was not significant, with regression coefficients close to 0 and 95% confidence intervals that excluded an effect of more than 18 points on a 0–100 scale in each case. There was also no significant difference between the ‘rescue’ and the ‘no rescue’ studies for the incidence of nausea, constipation, or somnolence in both the unadjusted and the adjusted analyses. Conclusions We found no evidence that rescue medication with short-acting opioids for breakthrough pain affects analgesic efficacy of long-acting opioids or the incidence of common opioid-related side-effects among chronic non-malignant pain patients. PMID:19736216

  16. Kappa-opioid receptor-selective dicarboxylic ester-derived salvinorin A ligands.

    PubMed

    Polepally, Prabhakar R; White, Kate; Vardy, Eyal; Roth, Bryan L; Ferreira, Daneel; Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2013-05-15

    Salvinorin A, the active ingredient of the hallucinogenic plant Salvia divinorum is the most potent known naturally occurring hallucinogen and is a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist. To better understand the ligand-receptor interactions, a series of dicarboxylic ester-type of salvinorin A derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their binding affinity at κ-, δ- and μ-opioid receptors. Most of the analogues show high affinity to the κ-opioid receptor. Methyl malonyl derivative 4 shows the highest binding affinity (Ki=2nM), analogues 5, 7, and 14 exhibit significant affinity for the κ-receptor (Ki=21, 36 and 39nM).

  17. Kappa-Opioid Receptor-Selective Dicarboxylic Ester-Derived Salvinorin A Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Polepally, Prabhakar R.; White, Kate; Vardy, Eyal; Roth, Bryan L.; Ferreira, Daneel; Zjawiony, Jordan K.

    2013-01-01

    Salvinorin A, the active ingredient of the hallucinogenic plant Salvia divinorum is the most potent known naturally occurring hallucinogen and is a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist. To better understand the ligand-receptor interactions, a series of dicarboxylic ester-type of salvinorin A derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their binding affinity at κ, δ, and μ-opioid receptors. Most of the analogues show high affinity to the κ-opioid receptor. Methyl malonyl derivative 4 shows the highest binding affinity (Ki = 2 nM), analogues 5, 7, and 14 exhibit significant affinity for the κ-receptor (Ki = 21, 36 and 39 nM). PMID:23587424

  18. Ligand requirements for involvement of PKCε in synergistic analgesic interactions between spinal μ and δ opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, D J; Metcalf, M D; Kitto, K F; Messing, R O; Fairbanks, C A; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We recently found that PKCε was required for spinal analgesic synergy between two GPCRs, δ opioid receptors and α2A adrenoceptors, co-located in the same cellular subpopulation. We sought to determine if co-delivery of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists would similarly result in synergy requiring PKCε. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Combinations of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists were co-administered intrathecally by direct lumbar puncture to PKCε-wild-type (PKCε-WT) and -knockout (PKCε-KO) mice. Antinociception was assessed using the hot-water tail-flick assay. Drug interactions were evaluated by isobolographic analysis. KEY RESULTS All agonists produced comparable antinociception in both PKCε-WT and PKCε-KO mice. Of 19 agonist combinations that produced analgesic synergy, only 3 required PKCε for a synergistic interaction. In these three combinations, one of the agonists was morphine, although not all combinations involving morphine required PKCε. Morphine + deltorphin II and morphine + deltorphin I required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + deltorphin, did not. Additionally, morphine + oxymorphindole required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + oxycodindole, did not. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We discovered biased agonism for a specific signalling pathway at the level of spinally co-delivered opioid agonists. As the bias is only revealed by an appropriate ligand combination and cannot be accounted for by a single drug, it is likely that the receptors these agonists act on are interacting with each other. Our results support the existence of μ and δ opioid receptor heteromers at the spinal level in vivo. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24827408

  19. The delta-opioid receptor is sufficient, but not necessary, for spinal opioid-adrenergic analgesic synergy.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Millecamps, Magali; Stone, Laura S

    2013-12-01

    Spinal administration of opioid and α2-adrenergic receptor (α2AR) agonists produces analgesia, and agonists interact synergistically when coadministered. The molecular mechanism underlying this synergy is largely unknown. Pharmacological studies have identified both the delta and the mu-opioid receptors (DOR and MOR) as candidate receptors capable of interacting synergistically with α2AR agonists. However, recent studies attribute the antinociceptive effect of DOR agonists to actions at the MOR, calling the role of DOR in opioid-adrenergic synergy into question. Other studies suggesting that DOR is implicated in morphine antinociception raise the possibility that DOR is nonetheless required for morphine synergy with α2AR agonists. This study aimed to determine whether DOR activation is sufficient and necessary to mediate opioid-adrenergic synergistic interactions in the spinal cord. The antinociceptive effects of clonidine, [D-Ala(2)]-deltorphin II (DeltII), morphine, and [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO) were evaluated using the substance P (SP) behavioral assay in wild type (WT) and DOR-knockout (KO) mice. Opioid-adrenergic drug interactions were evaluated after spinal coadministration of clonidine with DeltII, morphine, or DAMGO. Isobolographic analyses of dose-response curves determined whether interactions were synergistic or additive. The absence of DeltII antinociceptive efficacy in DOR-KO confirmed its selectivity in the SP assay. Although DeltII+clonidine interacted synergistically in WT mice, no interaction with clonidine was observed in DOR-KO mice. Clonidine was synergistic with morphine in both mouse strains. DAMGO did not synergize with clonidine in either strain. These findings confirm that although other opioid receptors can interact synergistically with α2AR agonists, DOR is sufficient for spinal opioid-adrenergic interactions.

  20. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    pain ; however, morphine for 7 d post-SCI has little effect on chronic thermal nociceptive thresholds in this model. Establishing effects of post-SCI...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0277 TITLE: A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain , Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid...SCI Pain , Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  1. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  2. Zyklophin, a short-acting kappa opioid antagonist, induces scratching in mice.

    PubMed

    Dimattio, K M; Yakovleva, T V; Aldrich, J V; Cowan, A; Liu-Chen, L Y

    2014-03-20

    It has been shown previously that norbinaltorphimine (norBNI) and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (5'-GNTI), long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists, cause frenzied scratching in mice [1,2]. In the current study, we examined if zyklophin, a short-acting cyclic peptide KOPR antagonist, also elicited scratching behavior. When injected s.c. in the nape of the neck of male Swiss-Webster mice, zyklophin at doses of 0.1, 0.3 and 1mg/kg induced dose-related hindleg scratching of the neck between 3 and 15 min after injection. Pretreating mice with norBNI (20mg/kg, i.p.) at 18-20 h before challenge with zyklophin (0.3mg/kg) did not markedly affect scratching. Additionally, KOPR-/- mice given 0.3mg/kg of zyklophin displayed similar levels of scratching as wild-type animals. The absence of KOPR in KOPR-/- mice was confirmed with ex vivo radioligand binding using [(3)H]U69,593. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of kappa receptors is not required for the excessive scratching caused by zyklophin. Thus, zyklophin, similar to the structurally different KOPR antagonist 5'-GNTI, appears to act at other targets to elicit scratching and potentially the sensation of itch.

  3. Kappa opioid receptor signaling protects cartilage tissue against posttraumatic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Shkhyan, Ruzanna; Lee, Siyoung; Gullo, Francesca; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Ba, Kai; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, and pain relief with opioid-like drugs is a commonly used therapeutic for osteoarthritic patients. Recent studies published by our group showed that the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is highly expressed during human development in joint-forming cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the skeletal system remains elusive. The main aim of the current study was to investigate the role of KOR signaling in synovial and cartilaginous tissues in pathological conditions. Our data demonstrate that KOR null mice exhibit accelerated cartilage degeneration after injury when compared with WT mice. Activation of KOR signaling increased the expression of anabolic enzymes and inhibited cartilage catabolism and degeneration in response to proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α. In addition, selective KOR agonists increased joint lubrication via the activation of cAMP/CREB signaling in chondrocytes and synovial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate direct effects of KOR agonists on cartilage and synovial cells and reveals a protective effect of KOR signaling against cartilage degeneration after injury. In addition to pain control, local administration of dynorphin or other KOR agonist represents an attractive therapeutic approach in patients with early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:28097228

  4. The mu (μ) and delta (δ) opioid receptors modulate boar sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Heriberto

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous and exogenous opioids modulate reproductive functions in target cells via opioid receptors (μ, δ, and κ). Sperm motility is a metric of gamete functionality, and serves as a suitable parameter for in vitro drug-induced toxicity assays. This study identifies the presence and location of opioid receptors in pig spermatozoa as well as their functional response after in vitro challenge with known agonists (morphine [μ]; [D-Pen 2,5]-enkephanile [δ]; and U 50488 [κ]) and antagonists (naloxone [μ]; naltrindole [δ]; and nor-binaltrorphimine [κ]). Only the μ- and δ-opioid receptors were present in the boar sperm plasma membrane, overlying the acrosome, neck, and principal piece. Challenge experiments with agonists and antagonists identified both μ- and δ-opioid receptors as regulators of sperm kinematics, wherein μ maintains or increases sperm movement whereas δ decreases sperm motility over time. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 724-734, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Species differences in the effects of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist zyklophin

    PubMed Central

    Sirohi, Sunil; Aldrich, Jane V.; Walker, Brendan M.

    2016-01-01

    We have shown that dysregulation of the dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (DYN/KOR) system contributes to escalated alcohol self-administration in alcohol dependence and that KOR antagonists with extended durations of action selectively reduce escalated alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent animals. As KOR antagonism has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat alcoholism and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, we tested the effect of zyklophin (a short-acting KOR antagonist) on escalated alcohol self-administration in rats made alcohol-dependent using intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Following dependence induction, zyklophin was infused centrally prior to alcohol self-administration sessions and locomotor activity tests during acute withdrawal. Zyklophin did not impact alcohol self-administration or locomotor activity in either exposure condition. To investigate the neurobiological basis of this atypical effect for a KOR antagonist, we utilized a κ-, μ-, and δ-opioid receptor agonist-stimulated GTPyS coupling assay to examine the opioid receptor specificity of zyklophin in the rat brain and mouse brain. In rats, zyklophin did not affect U50488-, DAMGO-, or DADLE-stimulated GTPyS coupling, whereas the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI) attenuated U50488-induced stimulation in the rat brain tissue at concentrations that did not impact μ- and δ-receptor function. To reconcile the discrepancy between the present rat data and published mouse data, comparable GTPyS assays were conducted using mouse brain tissue; zyklophin effects were consistent with KOR antagonism in mice. Moreover, at higher concentrations, zyklophin exhibited agonist properties in rat and mouse brains. These results identify species differences in zyklophin efficacy that, given the rising interest in the development of short-duration KOR antagonists, should provide valuable information for therapeutic development efforts. PMID:26992699

  6. Unexpected Opioid Activity Profiles of Analogs of the Novel Peptide Kappa Opioid Receptor Ligand CJ-15,208

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Jane V.; Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Senadheera, Sanjeewa N.; Ross, Nicolette C.; Reilley, Kate J.; Eans, Shainnel O.; Ganno, Michelle L.; Murray, Thomas F.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2013-01-01

    An alanine scan was performed on the novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) peptide ligand CJ-15,208 to determine which residues contribute to the potent in vivo agonist activity observed for the parent peptide. These cyclic tetrapeptides were synthesized by a combination of solid phase peptide synthesis of the linear precursors, followed by cyclization in solution. Like the parent peptide, each of the analogs exhibited agonist activity and KOR antagonist activity in an antinociceptive assay in vivo. Unlike the parent peptide, the agonist activity of the potent analogs was mediated predominantly if not exclusively by mu opioid receptors (MOR). Thus analogs 2 and 4, in which one of the phenylalanine residues was replaced by alanine, exhibited both potent MOR agonist activity and KOR antagonist activity in vivo. These peptides represent novel lead compounds for the development of peptide-based opioid analgesics. PMID:21761566

  7. Differential Effect of Membrane Cholesterol Removal on μ- and δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Erica S.; Clark, Mary J.; Jenkins, Paul M.; Martens, Jeffrey R.; Traynor, John R.

    2009-01-01

    According to the lipid raft theory, the plasma membrane contains small domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipid, which may serve as platforms to organize membrane proteins. Using methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) to deplete membrane cholesterol, many G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to depend on putative lipid rafts for proper signaling. Here we examine the hypothesis that treatment of HEK293 cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged μ-opioid receptors (HEK FLAG-μ) or δ-opioid receptors (HEK FLAG-δ) with MβCD will reduce opioid receptor signaling to adenylyl cyclase. The ability of the μ-opioid agonist [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin to acutely inhibit adenylyl cyclase or to cause sensitization of adenylyl cyclase following chronic treatment was attenuated with MβCD. These effects were due to removal of cholesterol, because replenishment of cholesterol restored [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin responses back to control values, and were confirmed in SH-SY5Y cells endogenously expressing μ-opioid receptors. The effects of MβCD may be due to uncoupling of the μ receptor from G proteins but were not because of decreases in receptor number and were not mimicked by cytoskeleton disruption. In contrast to the results in HEK FLAG-μ cells, MβCD treatment of HEK FLAG-δ cells had no effect on acute inhibition or sensitization of adenylyl cyclase by δ-opioid agonists. The differential responses of μ- and δ-opioid agonists to cholesterol depletion suggest that μ-opioid receptors are more dependent on cholesterol for efficient signaling than δ receptors and can be partly explained by localization of μ- but not δ-opioid receptors in cholesterol- and caveolin-enriched membrane domains. PMID:19520863

  8. Nicotine enhancement and reinforcer devaluation: Interaction with opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, Ari P; Suhaka, Jesse A; Phillips, Jessie L; Voltolini de Souza Pinto, Maiary

    In rats, nicotine enhances responding maintained by non-pharmacological reinforcers, and discontinuation of nicotine devalues those same reinforcers. The goal of this study was to assess the interaction of nicotine and opioid receptors and to evaluate the degree to which nicotine enhancement and nicotine-induced devaluation are related to opioid activation. Nicotine (0.4mg/kg), or nicotine plus naloxone (0.3 or 3.0mg/kg), was delivered to rats prior to progressive ratio (PR) schedule sessions in which sucrose was used as a reinforcer. PR-schedule responding was assessed during ten daily sessions of drug delivery, and for three post-dosing days/sessions. Control groups for this investigation included a saline-only condition, and naloxone-only (0.3 or 3.0mg/kg) conditions. When administered in conjunction with nicotine, both naloxone doses attenuated nicotine enhancement of the sucrose reinforcer, and the combination of the larger dose of naloxone (3.0mg/kg) with nicotine produced significant impairments in sucrose reinforced responding. When administered alone, neither dose of naloxone (0.3 & 3.0mg/kg) significantly altered responding in comparison to saline. Furthermore, when dosing was discontinued after ten once-daily doses, all nicotine groups (nicotine-only and nicotine+naloxone combination) demonstrated significant decreases in sucrose reinforcement compared to the saline group. Although opioid antagonism attenuated reinforcement enhancement by nicotine, it did not prevent reinforcer devaluation upon discontinuation of nicotine dosing, and the higher dose of naloxone (3.0mg/kg) produced decrements upon discontinuation on its own in the absence of nicotine.

  9. A6V polymorphism of the human μ-opioid receptor decreases signalling of morphine and endogenous opioids in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Knapman, Alisa; Santiago, Marina; Connor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Polymorphisms of the μ opioid receptor (MOPr) may contribute to the variation in responses to opioid drugs in clinical and unregulated situations. The A6V variant of MOPr (MOPr-A6V) is present in up to 20% of individuals in some populations, and may be associated with heightened susceptibility to drug abuse. There are no functional studies examining the acute signalling of MOPr-A6V in vitro, so we investigated potential functional differences between MOPr and MOPr-A6V at several signalling pathways using structurally distinct opioid ligands. Experimental Approach CHO and AtT-20 cells stably expressing MOPr and MOPr-A6V were used. AC inhibition and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were assayed in CHO cells; K channel activation was assayed in AtT-20 cells. Key Results Buprenorphine did not inhibit AC or stimulate ERK1/2 phosphorylation in CHO cells expressing MOPr-A6V, but buprenorphine activation of K channels in AtT-20 cells was preserved. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin, morphine and β-endorphin inhibition of AC was significantly reduced via MOPr-A6V, as was signalling of all opioids to ERK1/2. However, there was little effect of the A6V variant on K channel activation. Conclusions and Implications Signalling to AC and ERK via the mutant MOPr-A6V was decreased for many opioids, including the clinically significant drugs morphine, buprenorphine and fentanyl, as well endogenous opioids. The MOPr-A6V variant is common and this compromised signalling may affect individual responses to opioid therapy, while the possible disruption of the endogenous opioid system may contribute to susceptibility to substance abuse. PMID:25521224

  10. T394A Mutation at the μ Opioid Receptor Blocks Opioid Tolerance and Increases Vulnerability to Heroin Self-Administration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Barbier, Elisabeth; Chiu, Yi-Ting; He, Yi; Zhan, Jia; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Feng, Bo; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Wang, Jia Bei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2016-10-05

    The etiology and pathophysiology underlying opioid tolerance and dependence are still unknown. Because mu opioid receptor (MOR) plays an essential role in opioid action, many vulnerability-related studies have focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms of MOR, particularly on A118G. In this study, we found that a single-point mutation at the MOR T394 phosphorylation site could be another important susceptive factor in the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in mice. T394A mutation, in which a threonine at 394 was replaced by an alanine, did not alter agonist binding to MOR and opioid analgesia, but resulted in loss of etorphine-induced MOR internalization in spinal dorsal horn neurons and opioid analgesic tolerance induced by either morphine or etorphine. In addition, this mutation also caused an increase in intravenous heroin self-administration and in nucleus accumbens dopamine response to heroin. These findings suggest that T394 phosphorylation following MOR activation causes MOR internalization and desensitization, which subsequently contributes to the development of tolerance in both opioid analgesia and opioid reward. Accordingly, T394A mutation blocks opioid tolerance and leads to an increase in brain dopamine response to opioids and in opioid-taking behavior. Thus, the T394 may serve as a new drug target for modulating opioid tolerance and the development of opioid abuse and addiction.

  11. Inhibition of opioid release in the rat spinal cord by α2C adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors that control the release of opioid peptides in the spinal cord may play an important role in pain modulation. Norepinephrine, released by a descending pathway originating in the brainstem, is a powerful inducer of analgesia in the spinal cord. Adrenergic α2C receptors are present in opioid-containing terminals in the dorsal horn, where they could modulate opioid release. The goal of this study was to investigate this possibility. Opioid release was evoked from rat spinal cord slices by incubating them with the sodium channel opener veratridine in the presence of peptidase inhibitors (actinonin, captopril and thiorphan), and was measured in situ through the internalization of μ-opioid receptors in dorsal horn neurons. Veratridine produced internalization in 70% of these neurons. The α2 receptor agonists clonidine, guanfacine, medetomidine and UK-14304 inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization with IC50s of 1.7 μM, 248 nM, 0.3 nM and 22 nM, respectively. However, inhibition by medetomidine was only partial, and inhibition by UK-14304 reversed itself at concentrations higher than 50 nM. None of these agonists inhibited μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by endomorphin-2, showing that they inhibited opioid release and not the internalization itself. The inhibition produced by clonidine, guanfacine or UK-14304 was completely reversed by the selective α2C antagonist JP-1203. In contrast, inhibition by guanfacine was not prevented by the α2A antagonist BRL-44408. These results show that α2C receptors inhibit the release of opioids in the dorsal horn. This action may serve to shut down the opioid system when the adrenergic system is active. PMID:18343461

  12. Opioid Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Serecigni, Josep Guardia

    2015-09-29

    Objetivos: A partir de los recientes progresos en la farmacoterapia del alcoholismo, hemos efectuado una revisión sobre los fármacos antagonistas de los receptores opioides, que tienen aprobada la indicación para el tratamiento del alcoholismo, como son naltrexona y nalmefeno. Metodología: Hemos revisado más de 100 publicaciones sobre péptidos y receptores opioides, el efecto de los fármacos antagonistas de los receptores opioides sobre el consumo de alcohol, tanto en animales como en humanos, tanto en el laboratorio como para el tratamiento del alcoholismo. También se describen las características farmacológicas de naltrexona y de nalmefeno y su utilidad en la práctica clínica. Resultados: Múltiples evidencias han demostrado la eficacia de naltrexona y nalmefeno para reducir el consumo de alcohol, tanto en animales de laboratorio como también en personas estudiadas en situación de bar experimental, aunque debido al diferente perfil receptorial, nalmefeno ha sido relacionado con una mayor eficacia para la reducción del consumo de alcohol, en ratas que presentan dependencia del alcohol. Además, un gran número de ensayos clínicos controlados han demostrado la eficacia de naltrexona para la prevención de recaídas, en personas que presentan un trastorno por dependencia del alcohol. Ensayos clínicos controlados recientes han demostrado la eficacia de nalmefeno “a demanda” para reducir el consumo de alcohol, en personas que presentan un trastorno por dependencia del alcohol de baja gravedad. Conclusiones: Tanto naltrexona como nalmefeno han demostrado ser fármacos seguros, bien tolerados, de manejo sencillo, y eficaces para el tratamiento del trastorno por dependencia del alcohol, (actualmente llamado trastorno por consumo de alcohol). A partir de recientes ensayos clínicos controlados se ha comprobado que nalmefeno produce una reducción significativa del consumo de alcohol, lo cual supone un nuevo objetivo que amplía las posibilidades de

  13. Mu opioid receptors are in discrete hippocampal interneuron subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Drake, Carrie T; Milner, Teresa A

    2002-01-01

    In the rat hippocampal formation, application of mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists disinhibits principal cells, promoting excitation-dependent processes such as epileptogenesis and long-term potentiation. However, the precise location of MORs in particular inhibitory circuits, has not been determined, and the roles of MORs in endogenous functioning are unclear. To address these issues, the distribution of MOR-like immunoreactivity (-li) was examined in several populations of inhibitory hippocampal neurons in the CA1 region using light and electron microscopy. We found that MOR-li was present in many parvalbumin-containing basket cells, but absent from cholecystokinin-labeled basket cells. MOR-li was also commonly in interneurons containing somatostatin-li or neuropeptide Y-li that resembled the "oriens-lacunosum-moleculare" (O-LM) interneurons innervating pyramidal cell distal dendrites. Finally, MOR-li was in some vasoactive intestinal peptide- or calretinin-containing profiles resembling interneurons that primarily innervate other interneurons. These findings indicate that MOR-containing neurons form a neurochemically and functionally heterogeneous subset of hippocampal GABAergic neurons. MORs are most frequently on interneurons that are specialized to inhibit pyramidal cells, and are on a limited number of interneurons that target other interneurons. Moreover, the distribution of MORs to different neuronal types in several laminae, some relatively far from endogenous opioids, suggests normal functional roles that are different from the actions seen with exogenous agonists such as morphine.

  14. Quantitative encoding of a partial agonist effect on individual opioid receptors by multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Elaine K.; Trester-Zedlitz, Michelle; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Kotowski, Sarah J.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Burlingame, Alma L.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs act as partial agonists of seven-transmembrane signaling receptors when compared to endogenous ligands. Partial agonism is well described as a 'macroscopic' property manifest at the level of physiological systems or cell populations, but it is not known whether partial agonists encode discrete regulatory information at the 'microscopic' level of individual receptors. We addressed this question by focusing on morphine, a partial agonist drug for µ-type opioid peptide receptors, and combining quantitative mass spectrometry with cell biological analysis to investigate morphine's reduced efficacy for promoting receptor endocytosis when compared to a peptide full agonist. We show that these chemically distinct ligands produce a complex, and qualitatively similar mixture of phosphorylated opioid receptor forms in intact cells. Quantitatively, however, the agonists promote markedly disproportional production of multi-site phosphorylation involving a specific Ser/Thr motif, whose modification at more than one residue is essential for efficient recruitment of the adaptor protein β-arrestin to clathrin-coated pits that mediate subsequent endocytosis of MORs. These results reveal quantitative encoding of agonist-selective endocytosis at the level of individual opioid receptors, based on the conserved biochemical principles of multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection. PMID:21868358

  15. Structural insights into µ-opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N; Sanborn, Adrian L; Kato, Hideaki E; Livingston, Kathryn E; Thorsen, Thor S; Kling, Ralf C; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M; Traynor, John R; Weis, William I; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O; Kobilka, Brian K

    2015-08-20

    Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To shed light on the structural basis for μOR activation, here we report a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the murine μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and a G protein mimetic camelid antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor. Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three G-protein-coupled receptors.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of a dual kappa-delta opioid receptor agonist analgesic blocking cocaine reward behavior.

    PubMed

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Subrath, Joan J; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-11-18

    3-Iodobenzoyl naltrexamine (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic belonging to the pharmacologically diverse 6β-amidoepoxymorphinan group of opioids. We present the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of five analogs of IBNtxA. The scaffold of IBNtxA was modified by removing the 14-hydroxy group, incorporating a 7,8 double bond and various N-17 alkyl substituents. The structural modifications resulted in analogs with picomolar affinities for opioid receptors. The lead compound (MP1104) was found to exhibit approximately 15-fold greater antinociceptive potency (ED50 = 0.33 mg/kg) compared with morphine, mediated through the activation of kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. Despite its kappa agonism, this lead derivative did not cause place aversion or preference in mice in a place-conditioning assay, even at doses 3 times the analgesic ED50. However, pretreatment with the lead compound prevented the reward behavior associated with cocaine in a conditioned place preference assay. Together, these results suggest the promise of dual acting kappa- and delta-opioid receptor agonists as analgesics and treatments for cocaine addiction.

  17. Direct association of Mu-opioid and NMDA glutamate receptors supports their cross-regulation: molecular implications for opioid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Javier; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar

    2012-09-01

    In the nervous system, the interaction of opioids like morphine and its derivatives, with the G protein-coupled Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) provokes the development of analgesic tolerance, as well as physical dependence. Tolerance implies that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the same effect, a phenomenon that contributes significantly to the social problems surrounding recreational opioid abuse. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms that control MOR function in the nervous system, and that eventually produce opioid tolerance, has increased greatly. Pharmacological studies have identified a number of signaling proteins involved in morphine-induced tolerance, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate acid glutamate receptor (NMDAR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), calcium (Ca²⁺)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and the regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins. There is general agreement on the critical role of the NMDAR/nNOS/CaMKII pathway in this process, which is supported by the recent demonstration of a physical association between MORs and NMDARs in post-synaptic structures. Indeed, it is feasible that treatments that diminish morphine tolerance may target distinct elements within the same regulatory MOR-NMDAR pathway. Accordingly, we propose a model that incorporates the most relevant signaling components implicated in opioid tolerance in which, certain signals originating from the activated MOR are perceived by the associated NMDAR, which in turn exerts a negative feedback effect on MOR signaling. MOR- and NMDAR-mediated signals work together in a sequential and interconnected manner to ultimately induce MOR desensitization. Future studies of these phenomena should focus on adding further components to this signaling pathway in order to better define the mechanism underlying MOR desensitization in neural cells.

  18. Neuropathic Pain Activates the Endogenous κ Opioid System in Mouse Spinal Cord and Induces Opioid Receptor Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei; Petraschka, Michael; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Caron, Marc G.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Pintar, John E.; Terman, Gregory W.; Chavkin, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Release of endogenous dynorphin opioids within the spinal cord after partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) is known to contribute to the neuropathic pain processes. Using a phosphoselective antibody [κ opioid receptor (KOR-P)] able to detect the serine 369 phosphorylated form of the KOR, we determined possible sites of dynorphin action within the spinal cord after pSNL. KOR-P immunoreactivity (IR) was markedly increased in the L4 –L5 spinal dorsal horn of wild-type C57BL/6 mice (7–21 d) after lesion, but not in mice pretreated with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI). In addition, knock-out mice lacking prodynorphin, KOR, or G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) did not show significant increases in KOR-P IR after pSNL. KOR-P IR was colocalized in both GABAergic neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes in both ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horn. Consistent with sustained opioid release, KOR knock-out mice developed significantly increased tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both the early (first week) and late (third week) interval after lesion. Similarly, mice pretreated with norBNI showed enhanced hyperalgesia and allodynia during the 3 weeks after pSNL. Because sustained activation of opioid receptors might induce tolerance, we measured the antinociceptive effect of the κ agonist U50,488 using radiant heat applied to the ipsilateral hindpaw, and we found that agonist potency was significantly decreased 7 d after pSNL. In contrast, neither prodynorphin nor GRK3 knock-out mice showed U50,488 tolerance after pSNL. These findings suggest that pSNL induced a sustained release of endogenous prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides that activated an anti-nociceptive KOR system in mouse spinal cord. Thus, endogenous dynorphin had both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions after nerve injury and induced GRK3-mediated opioid tolerance. PMID:15140929

  19. The role of the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hang, Ai; Wang, Yu-jun; He, Ling; Liu, Jing-gen

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common and prevalent forms of psychiatric disease, although the biological basis of anxiety is not well understood. The dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system is widely distributed in the central nervous system and has been shown to play a critical role in modulating mood and emotional behaviors. In the present review, we summarize current literature relating to the role played by the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety and κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  20. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenoids from Salvia splendens and evaluation of Opioid Receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianfranco; Savona, Giuseppe; Rodríguez, Benjamín; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2008-12-20

    Salvinorin A (1), a neoclerodane diterpene from the hallucinogenic mint Salvia divinorum, is the only known non-nitrogenous and specific kappa-opioid agonist. Several structural congeners of 1 isolated from Salvia splendens (2 - 8) together with a series of semisynthetic derivatives (9 - 24), some of which possess a pyrazoline structural moiety (9, 19 - 22), have been tested for affinity at human mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. None of these compounds showed high affinity binding to these receptors. However, 10 showed modest affinity for kappa receptors suggesting other naturally neoclerodanes from different Salvia species may possess opioid affinity.

  1. The role of the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ai; Wang, Yu-jun; He, Ling; Liu, Jing-gen

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common and prevalent forms of psychiatric disease, although the biological basis of anxiety is not well understood. The dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system is widely distributed in the central nervous system and has been shown to play a critical role in modulating mood and emotional behaviors. In the present review, we summarize current literature relating to the role played by the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety and κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:25982631

  2. A new splice of life for the μ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Iadarola, Michael J; Sapio, Matthew R; Mannes, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    μ-Opioid agonists mediate their analgesic effect through GPCRs that are generated via alternate splicing of the Oprm1 transcript. While the majority of μ-opioids interact with receptors comprising the canonical 7 transmembrane (7TM) domain, a recently identified class of μ-opioids appears to require a 6TM domain variant. In this issue of the JCI, Lu and colleagues provide an in vivo proof-of-concept demonstration that a 6TM isoform of the μ-opioid receptor can support functional analgesia in Oprm1-deficent animals. The 6TM isoform was pharmacologically distinct from the canonical 7TM μ-opioid receptor, and 6TM agonists had a reduced side effect profile, which confers a strong therapeutic advantage over standard opioid analgesics. The observations of Lu et al. extend the reach of opioid-receptor neurobiology and pharmacology into a new era of analgesic discovery. This advance emerges from a series of fundamental research analyses in which elements of the endogenous opioid system were frequently in the vanguard.

  3. Contributions of peripheral and central opioid receptors to antinociception in rat muscle pain models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Eva Ma; Bagües, Ana; Martín, Ma Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Administration of hypertonic saline (HS) is an accepted model to study muscular pain. HS-induced nociceptive responses were tested in masseter, already described, and in two new pain models of spinally innervated muscles (gastrocnemius and triceps) developed in rats at our laboratory. HS administration in the masseter induced vigorous hindpaw shaking and in the gastrocnemius or triceps, paw withdrawal or flexing. Participation of the central and peripheral opioid receptors in HS-induced pain is compared in these muscles: masseter, innervated by trigeminal nerve, and gastrocnemius and triceps by spinal nerves. Morphine and loperamide were used to reveal peripheral and central components of opioid analgesia. Both agonists reduced HS-induced nociceptive behaviours in the masseter and were antagonised by the opioid antagonist naloxone and by naloxone methiodide, an opioid receptor antagonist that poorly penetrates the blood-brain barrier. Unexpectedly, in the gastrocnemius and triceps, morphine, but not loperamide, decreased the nociceptive behaviour and this effect was only reversed by naloxone. So, peripheral opioid receptors seem to participate in HS-induced masseter pain, whereas only central opioid receptors reduced the nociception in gastrocnemius and triceps. Our results suggest that the use of peripheral opioids can be more advantageous than central opioids for treatment of orofacial muscular pain.

  4. Neurokinin 1 and opioid receptors: relationships and interactions in nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jie; Zeng, Si; Wang, Xiangrui; Babazada, Hasan; Li, Zhanchun; Liu, Renyu; Yu, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    Opioid receptors and neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) are found highly expressed in the central nervous system. The co-localization of these two kinds of receptors suggests that they might interact with each other in both the transmission and modulation of the pain signal. In this review, we explore the relationships between opioid receptors and NK1R. Substance P (SP) plays a modulatory role in the pain transmission by activating the NK1R. Opioid receptor activation can inhibit SP release. NK1R is found participating in the mechanisms of the side effects of the opioids, including opioid analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, anxiety behaviors of morphine reward and opioids related respiratory depression. A series of compounds such as NK1R antagonists and ligands works on both mu/delta opioid receptor (MOR/DOR) and NK1R were synthesized as novel analgesics that enhance the clinical pain management efficacy and reduce the dosage and side effects. The current status of these novel ligands and the limitations are discussed in this review. Although the working mechanisms of these ligands remained unclear, they could be used as research tool for developing novel analgesic drugs in the future.

  5. Revolution in GPCR signalling: opioid receptor heteromers as novel therapeutic targets: IUPHAR review 10.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2014-09-01

    GPCRs can interact with each other to form homomers or heteromers. Homomers involve interactions with the same receptor type while heteromers involve interactions between two different GPCRs. These receptor-receptor interactions modulate not only the binding but also the signalling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Opioid receptor heteromerization has been extensively investigated with the objective of identifying novel therapeutic targets that are as potent as morphine but without the side effects associated with chronic morphine use. In this context, studies have described heteromerization between the different types of opioid receptors and between opioid receptors and a wide range of GPCRs including adrenoceptors, cannabinoid, 5-HT, metabotropic glutamate and sensory neuron-specific receptors. Recent advances in the field involving the generation of heteromer-specific reagents (antibodies or ligands) or of membrane-permeable peptides that disrupt the heteromer interaction are helping to elucidate the physiological role of opioid receptor heteromers and the contribution of the partner receptor to the side effects associated with opioid use. For example, studies using membrane-permeable peptides targeting the heteromer interface have implicated μ and δ receptor heteromers in the development of tolerance to morphine, and heteromers of μ and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors in morphine-induced itch. In addition, a number of ligands that selectively target opioid receptor heteromers exhibit potent antinociception with a decrease in the side effects commonly associated with morphine use. In this review, we summarize the latest findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of opioid receptor heteromers both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Broad-spectrum analgesic efficacy of IBNtxA is mediated by exon 11-associated splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Pan, Ying-Xian; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H; Majumdar, Susruta; Pidakala, John; Pasternak, Gavril W; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    μ-Opioids remain vastly important for the treatment of pain, and would represent ideal analgesics if their analgesic effects could be separated from their many side effects. A recently synthesized compound, iodobenzoylnaltrexamide (IBNtxA), acting at 6-transmembrane (6-TM) splice variants of the μ-opioid receptor gene, was shown to have potent analgesic actions against acute, thermal pain accompanied by a vastly improved side-effect profile compared to 7-TM-acting drugs such as morphine. Whether such analgesia can be seen in longer-lasting and nonthermal algesiometric assays is not known. The current study demonstrates potent and efficacious IBNtxA inhibition of a wide variety of assays, including inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. We further demonstrate the dependence of such analgesia on 6-TM μ-opioid receptor variants using isobolographic analysis and the testing of Oprm1 (the μ-opioid receptor gene) exon 11 null mutant mice. Finally, the effect of nerve damage (spared nerve injury) and inflammatory injury (complete Freund's adjuvant) on expression of μ-opioid receptor variant genes in pain-relevant central nervous system loci was examined, revealing a downregulation of the mMOR-1D splice variant in the dorsal root ganglion after spared nerve injury. These findings are supportive of the potential value of 6-TM-acting drugs as novel analgesics.

  7. Broad spectrum analgesic efficacy of IBNtxA is mediated by exon 11-associated splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Pan, Ying-Xian; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pidakala, John

    2014-01-01

    Mu-opioids remain vastly important for the treatment of pain, and would represent ideal analgesics if their analgesic effects could be separated from their many side effects. A recently synthesized compound, iodobenzoylnaltrexamide (IBNtxA), acting at 6-transmembrane (6-TM) splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene, was shown to have potent analgesic actions against acute, thermal pain accompanied by a vastly improved side-effect profile compared to 7-TM-acting drugs such as morphine. Whether such analgesia can be seen in longer-lasting and non-thermal algesiometric assays is not known. The current study demonstrates potent and efficacious IBNtxA inhibition of a wide variety of assays, including inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. We further demonstrate the dependence of such analgesia on 6-TM mu-opioid receptor variants using isobolographic analysis and the testing of Oprm1 (the mu-opioid receptor gene) exon 11 null mutant mice. Finally, the effect of nerve damage (spared nerve injury) and inflammatory injury (complete Freund’s adjuvant) on expression of mu-opioid receptor variant genes in pain-relevant central nervous system loci was examined, revealing a downregulation of the mMOR-1D splice variant in the dorsal root ganglion after spared nerve injury. These findings are supportive of the potential value of 6-TM-acting drugs as novel analgesics. PMID:25093831

  8. Metamizol, a non-opioid analgesic, acts via endocannabinoids in the PAG-RVM axis during inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Escobar, W; Ramirez, K; Avila, C; Limongi, R; Vanegas, H; Vazquez, E

    2012-05-01

    The most commonly used drugs against pain act by inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COXs). Metamizol (dipyrone) inhibits the COXs and is widely used in Europe and Latin America as a non-opioid analgesic. One target of metamizol and other non-opioid analgesics is the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), where they trigger descending inhibition of spinal nociceptive transmission. Also, cannabinoids exert an analgesic action at several structures in the peripheral and central nervous system, including the PAG. The present study investigates whether the antinociceptive action of metamizol in the lateral-ventrolateral (LVL) PAG during inflammation is related to endocannabinoids. In anaesthetized rats, unitary action potentials were recorded from spinal nociceptive neurons with receptive fields in the ipsilateral hind paw. Inflammation of the paw induced neuronal hyperexcitability, which was attenuated by intra-LVL-PAG microinjection of metamizol either at the beginning of inflammation or when hyperexcitability was fully established. In both cases, the antinociceptive effect of metamizol was reduced by a microinjection of AM251, an antagonist at the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, either into the LVL-PAG or into the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). The RVM is a downstream structure that funnels PAG-derived descending inhibition into the spinal cord. These results show that endocannabinoids and their CB1 receptor (1) contribute at the LVL-PAG to the antinociceptive effects of metamizol, and possibly other non-opioid analgesics; and (2) participate in the PAG-derived activation of RVM descending antinociceptive influences.

  9. The use of long-acting opioids in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Vallerand, April Hazard

    2003-09-01

    The consensus statement from the American Pain Society and American Academy of Pain Medicine states that the undertreatment of pain is unjustified [6]. It has been suggested that opioid therapy can be used effectively to treat noncancer pain in a subset of patients [26], and this is becoming more acceptable [3]. Providing sustained analgesia is an important aspect of therapy, and medications should be administered on an around-the-clock basis, because regular administration of doses maintains a constant level of drug in the body and helps prevent recurrence of pain. Ideal treatment for persistent pain is a long-acting opioid administered around the clock to prevent baseline pain, with the use of short-acting opioids as supplemental agents for breakthrough pain. Controlled-release formulations can lessen the inconvenience associated with around-the-clock administration of short-acting opioids. Sustained analgesia also can be achieved with transdermal fentanyl, which combines a strong opioid with a 72-hour release profile and the benefits of a parenteral route, avoiding first-pass metabolism. Controlled-release formulations of morphine and oxycodone are available in the United States, and hydromorphone preparations are being reviewed for approval. Clinical experience with these formulations and transdermal fentanyl indicates that these agents are equally effective in controlling pain. Studies have demonstrated improved quality of life with the transdermal route and with controlled-release morphine and oxycodone. Because of patch reapplication every 72 hours, the transdermal route also enhances compliance. Use of an opioid without the need for oral or intravenous administration and the opportunity to improve compliance are among the advantages of the transdermal route in clinical practice. The nurse has an important role in the management of patients receiving long-acting opioids for chronic noncancer pain, Facilitation of the conversion from short-acting to long-acting

  10. An Opioid Agonist that Does Not Induce μ-Opioid Receptor—Arrestin Interactions or Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Groer, C. E.; Tidgewell, K.; Moyer, R. A.; Harding, W. W.; Rothman, R. B.; Prisinzano, T. E.; Bohn, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor desensitization and trafficking are important regulators of opioid receptor signaling that can dictate overall drug responsiveness in vivo. Furthermore, different μ-opioid receptor (μOR) ligands can lead to varying degrees of receptor regulation, presumably because of distinct structural conformations conferred by agonist binding. For example, morphine binding produces a μOR with low affinity for β-arrestin proteins and limited receptor internalization, whereas enkephalin analogs promote robust trafficking of both β-arrestins and the receptors. Here, we evaluate μOR trafficking in response to activation by a novel μ-selective agonist derived from the naturally occurring plant product, salvinorin A. It is interesting that this compound, termed herkinorin, does not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin-2 to the μOR and does not lead to receptor internalization. Moreover, whereas G protein-coupled receptor kinase overexpression can promote morphine-induced β-arrestin interactions and μOR internalization, such manipulations do not promote herkinorin-induced trafficking. Studies in mice have shown that β-arrestin-2 plays an important role in the development of morphine-induced tolerance, constipation, and respiratory depression. Therefore, drugs that can activate the receptor without recruiting the arrestins may be a promising step in the development of opiate analgesics that distinguish between agonist activity and receptor regulation and may ultimately lead to therapeutics designed to provide pain relief without the adverse side effects normally associated with the opiate narcotics. PMID:17090705

  11. The endogenous opioid system in cocaine addiction: what lessons have opioid peptide and receptor knockout mice taught us?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction has become a major concern in the UK as Britain tops the European ‘league table’ for cocaine abuse. Despite its devastating health and socio-economic consequences, no effective pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine addiction is available. Identifying neurochemical changes induced by repeated drug exposure is critical not only for understanding the transition from recreational drug use towards compulsive drug abuse but also for the development of novel targets for the treatment of the disease and especially for relapse prevention. This article focuses on the effects of chronic cocaine exposure and withdrawal on each of the endogenous opioid peptides and receptors in rodent models. In addition, we review the studies that utilized opioid peptide or receptor knockout mice in order to identify and/or clarify the role of different components of the opioid system in cocaine-addictive behaviours and in cocaine-induced alterations of brain neurochemistry. The review of these studies indicates a region-specific activation of the µ-opioid receptor system following chronic cocaine exposure, which may contribute towards the rewarding effect of the drug and possibly towards cocaine craving during withdrawal followed by relapse. Cocaine also causes a region-specific activation of the κ-opioid receptor/dynorphin system, which may antagonize the rewarding effect of the drug, and at the same time, contribute to the stress-inducing properties of the drug and the triggering of relapse. These conclusions have important implications for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of cocaine addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:22428846

  12. Characterization of methadone as a β-arrestin-biased μ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Seira; Mori, Tomohisa; Uzawa, Naoki; Arima, Takamichi; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Yawata, Ayaka; Narita, Michiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone is a unique µ-opioid receptor agonist. Although several researchers have insisted that the pharmacological effects of methadone are mediated through the blockade of NMDA receptor, the underlying mechanism by which methadone exerts its distinct pharmacological effects compared to those of other µ-opioid receptor agonists is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the pharmacological profile of methadone compared to those of fentanyl and morphine as measured mainly by the discriminative stimulus effect and in vitro assays for NMDA receptor binding, µ-opioid receptor-internalization, and µ-opioid receptor-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Results We found that fentanyl substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone, whereas a relatively high dose of morphine was required to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone in rats. Under these conditions, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone. In association with its discriminative stimulus effect, methadone failed to displace the receptor binding of MK801 using mouse brain membrane. Methadone and fentanyl, but not morphine, induced potent µ-opioid receptor internalization accompanied by the strong recruitment of β-arrestin-2 in µ-opioid receptor-overexpressing cells. Conclusions These results suggest that methadone may, at least partly, produce its pharmacological effect as a β-arrestin-biased µ-opioid receptor agonist, similar to fentanyl, and NMDA receptor blockade is not the main contributor to the pharmacological profile of methadone. PMID:27317580

  13. INTERACTION BETWEEN DELTA OPIOID RECEPTORS AND BENZODIAZEPINES IN CO2- INDUCED RESPIRATORY RESPONSES IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Anne H.; Barnes, Dylan C.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Klein, Donald F.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The false-suffocation hypothesis of panic disorder (Klein, 1993) suggested δ-opioid receptors as a possible source of the respiratory dysfunction manifested in panic attacks occurring in panic disorder (Preter and Klein, 2008). This study sought to determine if a lack of δ-opioid receptors in a mouse model affects respiratory response to elevated CO2, and whether the response is modulated by benzodiazepines, which are widely used to treat panic disorder. In a whole-body plethysmograph, respiratory responses to 5% CO2 were compared between δ-opioid receptor knockout mice and wild-type mice after saline, diazepam (1 mg/kg), and alprazolam (0.3 mg/kg) injection. The results show that lack of δ-opioid receptors does not affect normal response to elevated CO2, but does prevent benzodiazepines from modulating that response. Thus, in the presence of benzodiazepine agonists, respiratory responses to elevated CO2 were enhanced in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. This suggests an interplay between benzodiazepine receptors and δ-opioid receptors in regulating the respiratory effects of elevated CO2, which might be related to CO2 induced panic. PMID:21561601

  14. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphins are micro-opioid receptor antagonists lacking inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Li, Tingyou; Bryant, Sharon D; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2007-10-01

    [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphin-1 and -2 ([N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2) are new selective micro-opioid receptor antagonists obtained by N-alkylation with an allyl group on the amino terminus of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) derivatives. To further characterize properties of these compounds, their intrinsic activities were assessed by functional guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) binding assays and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cell membranes obtained from vehicle, morphine, and ethanol-treated SK-N-SH cells and brain membranes isolated from naive and morphine-dependent mice; their mode of action was compared with naloxone or naltrexone, which both are standard nonspecific opioid-receptor antagonists. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2 were neutral antagonists under all of the experimental conditions examined, in contrast to naloxone and naltrexone, which behave as neutral antagonists only in membranes from vehicle-treated cells and mice but act as inverse agonists in membranes from morphine- and ethanol-treated cells as well as morphine-treated mice. Both endomorphin analogs inhibited the naloxone- and naltrexone-elicited withdrawal syndromes from acute morphine dependence in mice. This suggests their potential therapeutic application in the treatment of drug addiction and alcohol abuse without the adverse effects observed with inverse agonist alkaloid-derived compounds that produce severe withdrawal symptoms.

  15. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity.

  16. In-vitro investigation of oxazol and urea analogues of morphinan at opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2007-06-15

    A series of 2-amino-oxazole (7 and 8) analogs and 2-one-oxazole analogs (9 and 10) were synthesized from cyclorphan (1) or butorphan (2) and evaluated in-vitro by their binding affinity at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors and compared with their 2-aminothiozole analogs 5 and 6. Ligands 7-10 showed decreased affinities at kappa and mu receptors. Urea analogs (11-14) were also prepared from 2-aminocyclorphan (3) or 2-aminobutorphan (4) and evaluated in-vitro by their binding affinity at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. The urea derived opioids retained their affinities at mu receptors while showing increased affinities at delta receptors and decreased affinities at kappa receptors. Functional activities of these compounds were measured in the [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay, illustrating that all of these ligands were kappa agonists. At the mu receptor, compounds 11 and 12 were mu agonist/antagonists.

  17. Activation of μ opioid receptors in the LPBN facilitates sodium intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Carolina G; Roncari, Camila F; Barbosa, Silas P; De Paula, Patrícia M; Colombari, Débora S A; De Luca, Laurival A; Colombari, Eduardo; Menani, José V

    2015-07-15

    Important inhibitory mechanisms for the control of water and sodium intake are present in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN). Opioid receptors are expressed by LPBN neurons and injections of β-endorphin (nonspecific opioid receptor agonist) in this area induce 0.3M NaCl and water intake in satiated rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the injections of endomorphin-1 (μ opioid receptor agonist) alone or combined with the blockade of μ, κ or δ opioid receptors into the LPBN on 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by subcutaneous injections of the diuretic furosemide (FURO) combined with low dose of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (CAP). Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally in the LPBN were used. Bilateral injections of endomorphin-1 (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN increased 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by FURO+CAP. The previous blockade of μ opioid receptor with CTAP (1.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN reduced the effect of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. GNTI (κ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) and naltrindole (δ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) injected into the LPBN did not change the effects of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. The results suggest that μ opioid receptors in the LPBN are involved in the control of sodium intake.

  18. The mu-opioid receptor gene-dose dependent reductions in G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and antinociception induced by endomorphins in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Narita, M; Oji, D E; Suganuma, C; Nagase, H; Sora, I; Uhl, G R; Cheng, E Y; Tseng, L F

    1999-01-01

    There appear to be different relationships between mu-opioid receptor densities and the acute and neuroadaptive mu-opioid agonist-induced responses of the multiple opioid neuronal systems, including important pons/medulla circuits. The recent success in creating mu-opioid receptor knockout mice allows studies of mu-opioid agonist-induced pharmacological and physiological effects in animals that express no, one or two copies of the mu-opioid receptor gene. We now report that the binding of mu-opioid receptor ligand, [3H][D-Ala2,NHPhe4,Gly-ol]enkephalin to membrane preparations of the pons/medulla was reduced by half in heterozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and eliminated in homozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The endogenous mu-opioid agonist peptides endomorphin-1 and -2 activate G-proteins in the pons/medulla from wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent fashion, as assessed using [35S]guanosine-5'-o-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. This stimulation was reduced to half of the wild-type levels in heterozygous mice and eliminated in homozygous knockout mice. The intracerebroventricular injection of either endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 produced marked antinociception in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests in wild-type mice. These antinociceptive actions were significantly reduced in heterozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, and virtually abolished in homozygous knockout mice. The mu-opioid receptors are the principal molecular targets for endomorphin-induced G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and the antinociception caused by the intracerebroventricular administration of mu-opioid agonists. These data support the notion that there are limited physiological mu-opioid receptor reserves for inducing G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and for the nociceptive modulation induced by the central administration of endomorphin-1 and -2.

  19. Novel approaches for the treatment of psychostimulant and opioid abuse – focus on opioid receptor-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Chris P.; Husbands, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Psychostimulant and opioid addiction are poorly treated. The majority of abstinent users relapse back to drug-taking within a year of abstinence, making ‘anti-relapse’ therapies the focus of much current research. There are two fundamental challenges to developing novel treatments for drug addiction. Firstly, there are 3 key stimuli that precipitate relapse back to drug-taking: stress, presentation of drug-conditioned cue, taking a small dose of drug. The most successful novel treatment would be effective against all 3 stimuli. Secondly, a large number of drug users are poly-drug users: taking more than one drug of abuse at a time. The ideal anti-addiction treatment would therefore be effective against all classes of drugs of abuse. Areas Covered In this review, the authors discuss the clinical need and animal models used to uncover potential novel treatments. There is a very broad range of potential treatment approaches and targets currently being examined as potential anti-relapse therapies. These broadly fit into 2 categories: ‘memory-based’ and ‘receptor-based’ and the authors discuss the key targets here within. Expert opinion Opioid receptors and ligands have been widely studied, and research into how different opioid subtypes affect behaviours related to addiction (reward, dysphoria, motivation) suggests that they are tractable targets as anti-relapse treatments. Regarding opioid ligands as novel ‘anti-relapse’ medications targets - research suggests that a ‘non-selective’ approach to targeting opioid receptors will be the most effective. PMID:25253272

  20. Cyclic endomorphin analogs in targeting opioid receptors to achieve pain relief.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Gentilucci, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Endomorphins, the endogenous ligands of the µ-opioid receptor, are attractive candidates for opioid-based pain-relieving agents. These tetrapeptides, with their remarkable affinity for the µ-opioid receptor, display favorable antinociceptive activity when injected directly into the brain of experimental animals. However, the application of endomorphins as clinical analgesics has been impeded by their instability in body fluids and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. Among numerous modifications of the endomorphin structure aimed at improving their pharmacological properties, cyclization can be viewed as an interesting option. Here, we have summarized recent advances in obtaining endomorphin-based cyclic peptide analogs.

  1. Effects of morphine on pentobarbital-induced responses in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Ho, I K; Jang, C G; Tanaka, S; Ma, T; Loh, H H; Ko, K H

    2001-03-15

    Effects of morphine on the potentiation of pentobarbital-induced responses were investigated using mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The duration of loss of righting reflex, hypothermia, and loss of motor coordination induced by pentobarbital were measured after pretreatment with either morphine or saline. Morphine pretreatment failed to show potentiation of both pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, while it significantly potentiated these responses in the wild-type controls. For motor incoordination test, morphine potentiated pentobarbital-induced motor incoordination in the wild-type mice. However, morphine may have opposite effects in the mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. These results demonstrate that synergism between morphine and pentobarbital is not detected in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and that potentiation of pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia by morphine is mediated through mu-opioid receptor. It was interesting to note that pentobarbital-induced decrease in body temperature was less severe in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice than in wild-type mice.

  2. Opioid receptors and cardioprotection – ‘opioidergic conditioning’ of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Headrick, John P; See Hoe, Louise E; Du Toit, Eugene F; Peart, Jason N

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) remains a major cause of morbidity/mortality globally, firmly established in Westernized or ‘developed’ countries and rising in prevalence in developing nations. Thus, cardioprotective therapies to limit myocardial damage with associated ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R), during infarction or surgical ischaemia, is a very important, although still elusive, clinical goal. The opioid receptor system, encompassing the δ (vas deferens), κ (ketocyclazocine) and μ (morphine) opioid receptors and their endogenous opioid ligands (endorphins, dynorphins, enkephalins), appears as a logical candidate for such exploitation. This regulatory system may orchestrate organism and organ responses to stress, induces mammalian hibernation and associated metabolic protection, triggers powerful adaptive stress resistance in response to ischaemia/hypoxia (preconditioning), and mediates cardiac benefit stemming from physical activity. In addition to direct myocardial actions, central opioid receptor signalling may also enhance the ability of the heart to withstand I–R injury. The δ- and κ-opioid receptors are strongly implicated in cardioprotection across models and species (including anti-infarct and anti-arrhythmic actions), with mixed evidence for μ opioid receptor-dependent protection in animal and human tissues. A small number of clinical trials have provided evidence of cardiac benefit from morphine or remifentanil in cardiopulmonary bypass or coronary angioplasty patients, although further trials of subtype-specific opioid receptor agonists are needed. The precise roles and utility of this GPCR family in healthy and diseased human myocardium, and in mediating central and peripheral survival responses, warrant further investigation, as do the putative negative influences of ageing, IHD co-morbidities, and relevant drugs on opioid receptor signalling and protective responses. PMID:25521834

  3. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  4. Heterologous desensitization of opioid receptors by chemokines inhibits chemotaxis and enhances the perception of pain.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Imre; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Xin, Li; Adler, Martin W; Howard, O M Z; Oppenheim, Joost J; Rogers, Thomas J

    2002-08-06

    The chemokines use G protein-coupled receptors to regulate the migratory and proadhesive responses of leukocytes. Based on observations that G protein-coupled receptors undergo heterologous desensitization, we have examined the ability of chemokines to also influence the perception of pain by cross-desensitizing opioid G protein-coupled receptors function in vitro and in vivo. We find that the chemotactic activities of both mu- and delta-opioid receptors are desensitized following activation of the chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR2, CCR7, and CXCR4 but not of the CXCR1 or CXCR2 receptors. Furthermore, we also find that pretreatment with RANTES/CCL5, the ligand for CCR1, and CCR5 or SDF-1alpha/CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, followed by opioid administration into the periaqueductal gray matter of the brain results in an increased rat tail flick response to a painful stimulus. Because chemokine administration into the periaqueductal gray matter inhibits opioid-induced analgesia, we propose that the activation of proinflammatory chemokine receptors down-regulates the analgesic functions of opioid receptors, and this enhances the perception of pain at inflammatory sites.

  5. The changing landscape of opioid prescribing: long-acting and extended-release opioid class-wide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gudin, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Prescriptions for opioid analgesics to manage moderate-to-severe chronic noncancer pain have increased markedly over the last decade, as have postmarketing reports of adverse events associated with opioids. As an unintentional consequence of greater prescription opioid utilization, there has been the parallel increase in misuse, abuse, and overdose, which are serious risks associated with all opioid analgesics. In response to these concerns, the Food and Drug Administration announced the requirement for a class-wide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) for long-acting and extended-release (ER) opioid analgesics in April 2011. An understanding of the details of this REMS will be of particular importance to primary care providers. The class-wide REMS is focused on educating health care providers and patients on appropriate prescribing and safe use of ER opioids. Support from primary care will be necessary for the success of this REMS, as these clinicians are the predominant providers of care and the main prescribers of opioid analgesics for patients with chronic pain. Although currently voluntary, future policy will likely dictate that providers undergo mandatory training to continue prescribing medications within this class. This article outlines the elements of the class-wide REMS for ER opioids and clarifies the impact on primary care providers with regard to training, patient education, and clinical practice. PMID:22570553

  6. Delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in the caudal midline medulla mediate haemorrhage-evoked hypotension.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Luke A; Keay, Kevin A; Bandler, Richard

    2002-04-16

    In mammals blood loss can trigger, shock, an abrupt, life-threatening hypotension and bradycardia. In the halothane-anaesthetised rat this response is blocked by inactivation of a discrete, vasodepressor area in the caudal midline medulla (CMM). Haemorrhagic shock is blocked also by systemic or ventricular injections of the opioid antagonist, naloxone. This study investigated, in the halothane anaesthetised rat, the contribution of delta-, kappa- and mu-opioid receptors in the CMM vasodepressor region to haemorrhage-evoked shock (i.e. hypotension and bradycardia) and its recovery. It was found that microinjections into the CMM of the delta-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole delayed and attenuated the hypotension and bradycardia evoked by haemorrhage, but did not promote recompensation. In contrast, CMM microinjections of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphamine, although it did not alter haemorrhage-evoked hypotension and bradycardia, did lead to a rapid restoration of AP, but not HR. CMM microinjections of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, CTAP had no effect on haemorrhage-evoked shock or recompensation. These data indicate that delta- and kappa- (but not mu-) opioid receptor-mediated events within the CMM contribute to the hypotension and bradycardia evoked by haemorrhage and the effectiveness of naloxone in reversing shock.

  7. Inhibition of GABAergic Neurotransmission by HIV-1 Tat and Opioid Treatment in the Striatum Involves μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqing; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Due to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is considered a chronic disease with high prevalence of mild forms of neurocognitive impairments, also referred to as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although opiate drug use can exacerbate HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal damage, it remains unknown how and to what extent opioids interact with Tat on the GABAergic system. We conducted whole-cell recordings in mouse striatal slices and examined the effects of HIV-1 Tat in the presence and absence of morphine (1 μM) and damgo (1 μM) on GABAergic neurotransmission. Results indicated a decrease in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) by Tat (5–50 nM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The significant Tat-induced decrease in IPSCs was abolished when removing extracellular and/or intracellular calcium. Treatment with morphine or damgo alone significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of IPSCs. Interestingly, morphine but not damgo indicated an additional downregulation of the mean frequency of mIPSCs in combination with Tat. Pretreatment with naloxone (1 μM) and CTAP (1 μM) prevented the Tat-induced decrease in sIPSCs frequency but only naloxone prevented the combined Tat and morphine effect on mIPSCs frequency. Results indicate a Tat- or opioid-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission via μ-opioid receptors with combined Tat and morphine effects involving additional opioid receptor-related mechanisms. Exploring the interactions between Tat and opioids on the GABAergic system may help to guide future research on HAND in the context of opiate drug use. PMID:27877102

  8. Synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinities of 2-substituted and 3-aminomorphinans: ligands for mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Si, Yu-Gui; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-01-14

    The phenolic group of the potent mu and kappa opioid morphinan agonist/antagonists cyclorphan and butorphan was replaced by phenylamino and benzylamino groups including compounds with para-substituents in the benzene ring. These compounds are highly potent mu and kappa ligands, e.g., p-methoxyphenylaminocyclorphan showing a K(i) of 0.026 nM at the mu receptor and a K(i) of 0.03 nM at the kappa receptor. Phenyl carbamates and phenylureas were synthesized and investigated. Selective o-formylation of butorphan and levorphanol was achieved. This reaction opened the way to a large set of 2-substituted 3-hydroxymorphinans, including 2-hydroxymethyl-, 2-aminomethyl-, and N-substituted 2-aminomethyl-3-hydroxymorphinans. Bivalent ligands bridged in the 2-position were also synthesized and connected with secondary and tertiary aminomethyl groups, amide bonds, and hydroxymethylene groups, respectively. Although most of the 2-substituted morphinans showed considerably lower affinities compared to their parent compounds, the bivalent ligand approach led to significantly higher affinities compared to the univalent 2-substituted morphinans.

  9. Positive allosteric modulators of the μ-opioid receptor: a novel approach for future pain medications

    PubMed Central

    Burford, N T; Traynor, J R; Alt, A

    2015-01-01

    Morphine and other agonists of the μ-opioid receptor are used clinically for acute and chronic pain relief and are considered to be the gold standard for pain medication. However, these opioids also have significant side effects, which are also mediated via activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Since the latter half of the twentieth century, researchers have sought to tease apart the mechanisms underlying analgesia, tolerance and dependence, with the hope of designing drugs with fewer side effects. These efforts have revolved around the design of orthosteric agonists with differing pharmacokinetic properties and/or selectivity profiles for the different opioid receptor types. Recently, μ-opioid receptor-positive allosteric modulators (μ-PAMs) were identified, which bind to a (allosteric) site on the μ-opioid receptor separate from the orthosteric site that binds an endogenous agonist. These allosteric modulators have little or no detectable functional activity when bound to the receptor in the absence of orthosteric agonist, but can potentiate the activity of bound orthosteric agonist, seen as an increase in apparent potency and/or efficacy of the orthosteric agonist. In this review, we describe the potential advantages that a μ-PAM approach might bring to the design of novel therapeutics for pain that may lack the side effects currently associated with opioid therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24460691

  10. Ca2+ channel inhibition by endomorphins via the cloned mu-opioid receptor expressed in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Mima, H; Morikawa, H; Fukuda, K; Kato, S; Shoda, T; Mori, K

    1997-12-11

    Endomorphin-1 and -2, recently isolated endogenous peptides specific for the mu-opioid receptor, inhibited Ca2+ channel currents with EC50 of 6 and 9 nM, respectively, in NG108-15 cells transformed to express the cloned rat mu-opioid receptor. On the other hand, they elicited no response in nontransfected NG108-15 cells. It is concluded that endomorphin-1 and -2 induce Ca2+ channel inhibition by selectively activating the mu-opioid receptor.

  11. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Leonid N; Oeltgen, Peter R.; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V.; Pei, Jian‐Ming; Brown, Stephen A.; Lishmanov, Yury B.; Downey, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1, δ2, and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct‐reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusion‐induced cardiomyocyte death when ischemic injury of heart has already occurred; that is, opioids can mimic preconditioning and postconditioning phenomena. Furthermore, opioids are also effective in preventing ischemia‐induced arrhythmias. PMID:27197922

  12. Cellular signalling of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the human μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1)

    PubMed Central

    Knapman, Alisa; Connor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    There is significant variability in individual responses to opioid drugs, which is likely to have a significant genetic component. A number of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding regions of the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) have been postulated to contribute to this variability. Although many studies have investigated the clinical influences of these μ-opioid receptor variants, the outcomes are reported in the context of thousands of other genes and environmental factors, and we are no closer to being able to predict individual response to opioids based on genotype. Investigation of how μ-opioid receptor SNPs affect their expression, coupling to second messengers, desensitization and regulation is necessary to understand how subtle changes in receptor structure can impact individual responses to opioids. To date, the few functional studies that have investigated the consequences of SNPs on the signalling profile of the μ-opioid receptor in vitro have shown that the common N40D variant has altered functional responses to some opioids, while other, rarer, variants display altered signalling or agonist-dependent regulation. Here, we review the data available on the effects of μ-opioid receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, expression and regulation in vitro, and discuss the limitations of the studies to date. Whether or not μ-opioid receptor SNPs contribute to individual variability in opioid responses remains an open question, in large part because we have relatively little good data about how the amino acid changes affect μ-opioid receptor function. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24527749

  13. Receptome: Interactions between three pain-related receptors or the "Triumvirate" of cannabinoid, opioid and TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zádor, Ferenc; Wollemann, Maria

    2015-12-01

    A growing amount of data demonstrates the interactions between cannabinoid, opioid and the transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. These interactions can be bidirectional, inhibitory or excitatory, acute or chronic in their nature, and arise both at the molecular level (structurally and functionally) and in physiological processes, such as pain modulation or perception. The interactions of these three pain-related receptors may also reserve important and new therapeutic applications for the treatment of chronic pain or inflammation. In this review, we summarize the main findings on the interactions between the cannabinoid, opioid and the TRPV1 receptor regarding to pain modulation.

  14. The interaction between histamine H1 receptor and μ- opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Tasuku; Sugimoto, Yumi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2016-04-15

    In this study, we examined the interaction between histamine H1 receptor and μ-opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice. Both histamine and morphine caused scratching and simultaneous injection of histamine and morphine had an additive effect. Chlorpheniramine and naloxone inhibited histamine-induced scratching behavior. These two drugs also inhibited morphine-induced scratching behavior. Simultaneous injection of chlorpheniramine and naloxone caused a significant inhibition of histamine-induced scratching compared with separate injections. The same findings were also noted for morphine-induced scratching. These results strongly indicate a close relationship between histamine H1 receptor and μ-opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice.

  15. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  16. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  17. Prefrontal Cortical Kappa Opioid Receptors Attenuate Responses to Amygdala Inputs.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Hanks, Ashley N; Scott, Liam; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Hughes, Zoë A; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2015-12-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) have been implicated in anxiety and stress, conditions that involve activation of projections from the basolateral amygdala (BLA) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Although KORs have been studied in several brain regions, their role on mPFC physiology and on BLA projections to the mPFC remains unclear. Here, we explored whether KORs modify synaptic inputs from the BLA to the mPFC using in vivo electrophysiological recordings with electrical and optogenetic stimulation. Systemic administration of the KOR agonist U69,593 inhibited BLA-evoked synaptic responses in the mPFC without altering hippocampus-evoked responses. Intra-mPFC U69,593 inhibited electrical and optogenetic BLA-evoked synaptic responses, an effect blocked by the KOR antagonist nor-BNI. Bilateral intra-mPFC injection of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI increased center time in the open field test, suggesting an anxiolytic effect. The data demonstrate that mPFC KORs negatively regulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA-mPFC pathway and anxiety-like behavior. These findings provide a framework whereby KOR signaling during stress and anxiety can regulate the flow of emotional state information from the BLA to the mPFC.

  18. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  19. The role of δ-opioid receptors in learning and memory underlying the development of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Klenowski, Paul; Morgan, Michael; Bartlett, Selena E

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are important endogenous ligands that exist in both invertebrates and vertebrates and signal by activation of opioid receptors to produce analgesia and reward or pleasure. The μ-opioid receptor is the best known of the opioid receptors and mediates the acute analgesic effects of opiates, while the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) has been less well studied and has been linked to effects that follow from chronic use of opiates such as stress, inflammation and anxiety. Recently, DORs have been shown to play an essential role in emotions and increasing evidence points to a role in learning actions and outcomes. The process of learning and memory in addiction has been proposed to involve strengthening of specific brain circuits when a drug is paired with a context or environment. The DOR is highly expressed in the hippocampus, amygdala, striatum and other basal ganglia structures known to participate in learning and memory. In this review, we will focus on the role of the DOR and its potential role in learning and memory underlying the development of addiction. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641428

  20. Salvinorin A analogs and other κ-opioid receptor compounds as treatments for cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Kivell, Bronwyn M; Ewald, Amy W M; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Acute activation of kappa-opioid receptors produces anti-addictive effects by regulating dopamine levels in the brain. Unfortunately, classic kappa-opioid agonists have undesired side effects such as sedation, aversion, and depression, which restrict their clinical use. Salvinorin A (Sal A), a novel kappa-opioid receptor agonist extracted from the plant Salvia divinorum, has been identified as a potential therapy for drug abuse and addiction. Here, we review the preclinical effects of Sal A in comparison with traditional kappa-opioid agonists and several new analogs. Sal A retains the anti-addictive properties of traditional kappa-opioid receptor agonists with several improvements including reduced side effects. However, the rapid metabolism of Sal A makes it undesirable for clinical development. In an effort to improve the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of this compound, kappa-opioid receptor agonists based on the structure of Sal A have been synthesized. While work in this field is still in progress, several analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles have been shown to have anti-addictive effects. While in its infancy, it is clear that these compounds hold promise for the future development of anti-addictive therapeutics.

  1. Salvinorin A analogs and other kappa opioid receptor compounds as treatments for cocaine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kivell, Bronwyn M; Ewald, Amy WM; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Acute activation of κ opioid receptors produces anti-addictive effects by regulating dopamine levels in the brain. Unfortunately, classic κ opioid agonists have undesired side effects such as sedation, aversion and depression which restrict their clinical use. Salvinorin A (Sal A), a novel κ opioid receptor agonist extracted from the plant Salvia divinorum, has been identified as a potential therapy for drug abuse and addiction. Here, we review the preclinical effects of Sal A in comparison with traditional κ opioid agonists and several new analogues. Sal A retains the anti-addictive properties of traditional κ opioid receptors agonists with several improvements including reduced side effects. However, the rapid metabolism of Sal A makes it undesirable for clinical development. In an effort to improve the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of this compound, κ opioid receptor agonists based on the structure of Sal A have been synthesized. While work in this field is still in progress, several analogues with improved pharmacokinetic profiles have been shown to have anti-addiction effects. While in its infancy, it is clear that these compounds hold promise for the future development of anti-addiction therapeutics. PMID:24484985

  2. Animal models of motivation for drinking in rodents with a focus on opioid receptor neuropharmacology.

    PubMed

    Koob, George F; Roberts, Amanda J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Heyser, Charles J; Katner, Simon N; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Weiss, Friedbert

    2003-01-01

    Ethanol, like other drugs of abuse, has motivating properties that can be developed as animal models of self-administration. A major strength of the operant approach where an animal must work to obtain ethanol is that it reduces confounds due to palatability and controls for nonspecific malaise-inducing effects. In the domain of opioid peptide systems, limited access paradigms have good predictive validity. In addition, animal models of excessive drinking-either environmentally or genetically induced-also appear sensitive to blockade or inactivation of opioid peptide receptors. Ethanol availability can be predicted by cues associated with positive reinforcement, and these models are sensitive to the administration of opioid antagonists. Perhaps most exciting are the recent results suggesting that the key element in opioid peptide systems that is important for the positive reinforcing effects of ethanol is the mu-opioid receptor. How exactly ethanol modulates mu-receptor function will be a major challenge of future research. Nevertheless, the apparently critical role of the mu receptor in ethanol reinforcement refocuses the neuropharmacology of ethanol reinforcement in the opioid peptide domain and opens a novel avenue for exploring medications for treating alcoholism.

  3. Nalfurafine hydrochloride, a selective κ opioid receptor agonist, has no reinforcing effect on intravenous self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Kaoru; Hirakata, Mikito; Miyamoto, Yohei; Kainoh, Mie; Wakasa, Yoshio; Yanagita, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    Nalfurafine hydrochloride [(E)-N-[17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-4,5α-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxymorphinan-6β-yl]-3-(furan-3-yl)-N-methylprop-2-enamide monohydrochloride; nalfurafine] is used in Japan as an antipruritic for the treatment of intractable pruritus in patients undergoing hemodialysis or with chronic liver disease. It is a potent and selective agonist at the κ opioid receptor, but also has weak and partial agonist activity at μ opioid receptors. Opioids, especially those acting at μ receptors, carry a risk of abuse. This is an important factor in the consideration of therapeutic risk vs. benefit in clinical use and the potential for misuse as a public health problem. It is therefore necessary to carefully evaluate the reinforcing effects of nalfurafine. To this end, we investigated intravenous self-administration of nalfurafine in rhesus monkeys. The number of self-administration of nalfurafine at doses of 0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 μg/kg/infusion was not higher than that of saline in rhesus monkeys that frequently self-administered pentazocine (0.25 mg/kg/infusion). These results indicate that nalfurafine has no reinforcing effect in rhesus monkeys in the intravenous self-administration paradigm.

  4. Discovery of Potent and Selective Agonists of δ Opioid Receptor by Revisiting the "Message-Address" Concept.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing; Qian, Yuanyuan; Huang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Xuejun; Li, Wei; Liu, Jinggen; Fu, Wei

    2016-04-14

    The classic "message-address" concept was proposed to address the binding of endogenous peptides to the opioid receptors and was later successfully applied in the discovery of the first nonpeptide δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole. By revisiting this concept, and based on the structure of tramadol, we designed a series of novel compounds that act as highly potent and selective agonists of DOR among which (-)-6j showed the highest affinity (K i = 2.7 nM), best agonistic activity (EC50 = 2.6 nM), and DOR selectivity (more than 1000-fold over the other two subtype opioid receptors). Molecular docking studies suggest that the "message" part of (-)-6j interacts with residue Asp128(3.32) and a neighboring water molecule, and the "address" part of (-)-6j packs with hydrophobic residues Leu300(7.35), Val281(6.55), and Trp284(6.58), rendering DOR selectivity. The discovery of novel compound (-)-6j, and the obtained insights into DOR-agonist binding will help us design more potent and selective DOR agonists.

  5. Collybolide is a novel biased agonist of κ-opioid receptors with potent antipruritic activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N.; Fakira, Amanda K.; Massaro, Nicholas P.; Sharma, Indrajeet; Cavé, Adrien; Hamm, Heidi E.; Parello, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Among the opioid receptors, the κ-opioid receptor (κOR) has been gaining considerable attention as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of complex CNS disorders including depression, visceral pain, and cocaine addiction. With an interest in discovering novel ligands targeting κOR, we searched natural products for unusual scaffolds and identified collybolide (Colly), a nonnitrogenous sesquiterpene from the mushroom Collybia maculata. This compound has a furyl-δ-lactone core similar to that of Salvinorin A (Sal A), another natural product from the plant Salvia divinorum. Characterization of the molecular pharmacological properties reveals that Colly, like Sal A, is a highly potent and selective κOR agonist. However, the two compounds differ in certain signaling and behavioral properties. Colly exhibits 10- to 50-fold higher potency in activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway compared with Sal A. Taken with the fact that the two compounds are equipotent for inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity, these results suggest that Colly behaves as a biased agonist of κOR. Behavioral studies also support the biased agonistic activity of Colly in that it exhibits ∼10-fold higher potency in blocking non–histamine-mediated itch compared with Sal A, and this difference is not seen in pain attenuation by these two compounds. These results represent a rare example of functional selectivity by two natural products that act on the same receptor. The biased agonistic activity, along with an easily modifiable structure compared with Sal A, makes Colly an ideal candidate for the development of novel therapeutics targeting κOR with reduced side effects. PMID:27162327

  6. Potent Dmt-Tic pharmacophoric delta- and mu-opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingyou; Fujita, Yoshio; Shiotani, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Anna; Tsuda, Yuko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa; Bryant, Sharon D; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Okada, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    A series of dimeric Dmt-Tic (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) analogues (8-14, 18-22) were covalently linked through diaminoalkane and symmetric or asymmetric 3,6-diaminoalkyl-2(1H)-pyrazinone moieties. All the compounds exhibited high affinity for both delta-opioid receptors [Ki(delta) = 0.06-1.53 nM] and mu-opioid receptors [Ki(mu) = 1.37-5.72 nM], resulting in moderate delta-receptor selectivity [Ki(mu)/Ki(delta) = 3-46]. Regardless of the type of linker between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophores, delta-opioid-mediated antagonism was extraordinarily high in all analogues (pA2 = 10.42-11.28), while in vitro agonism (MVD and GPI bioassays) was essentially absent (ca. 3 to >10 microM). While an unmodified N-terminus (9, 13, 18) revealed weak mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 6.78-6.99), N,N'-dimethylation (21, 22), which negatively impacts on mu-opioid-associated agonism (Balboni et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2003, 11, 5435-5441), markedly enhanced mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 8.34 and 7.71 for 21 and 22, respectively) without affecting delta-opioid activity. These data are the first evidence that a single dimeric opioid ligand containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore exhibits highly potent delta- and mu-opioid antagonist activities.

  7. [Development of physical dependence on nicotine and endogenous opioid system--participation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor].

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro; Yamamoto, Chizuko

    2014-10-01

    Nicotine (NIC) regulates various cellular functions acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). And nAChR consists of ligand-gated cation channels with pentameric structure and composed of α and β subunits. In the central nervous system, α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChRs are the most abundantly expressed as nAChR subtypes. There are several lines of evidence indicating that systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids, such as, endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, in the brain. NIC exerts numerous acute effects, for example, antinociceptive effects and the activating effects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In these effects, NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation, was inhibited by opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (NLX), and was also suppressed in morphine tolerated mice, indicating the participation of the endogenous opioid system in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception was antagonized by both α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChR antagonists, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation was antagonized by α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist, but not by α 7 nAChR antagonist. These results suggest that the endogenous opioid system may not be located on the downstream of α 4 β 2 nAChR. On the other hand, NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. NLX elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration evaluated by corticosterone increase as a withdrawal sign, and NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of other opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, indicating the participation of endogenous opioid system in the development of physical dependence on NIC. NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal was also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α 7 nAChR antagonist, but not an α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that the endogenous opioid system may be located on the downstream of α 7

  8. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-06

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile.

  9. Differentiation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptor agonists based on pharmacophore development and computed physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizola, Marta; Villar, Hugo O.; Loew, Gilda H.

    2001-04-01

    Compounds that bind with significant affinity to the opioid receptor types, δ, μ, and κ, with different combinations of activation and inhibition at these three receptors could be promising behaviorally selective agents. Working on this hypothesis, the chemical moieties common to three different sets of opioid receptor agonists with significant affinity for each of the three receptor types δ, μ, or κ were identified. Using a distance analysis approach, common geometric arrangements of these chemical moieties were found for selected δ, μ, or κ opioid agonists. The chemical and geometric commonalities among agonists at each opioid receptor type were then compared with a non-specific opioid recognition pharmacophore recently developed. The comparison provided identification of the additional requirements for activation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptors. The distance analysis approach was able to clearly discriminate κ-agonists, while global molecular properties for all compounds were calculated to identify additional requirements for activation of δ and μ receptors. Comparisons of the combined geometric and physicochemical properties calculated for each of the three sets of agonists allowed the determination of unique requirements for activation of each of the three opioid receptors. These results can be used to improve the activation selectivity of known opioid agonists and as a guide for the identification of novel selective opioid ligands with potential therapeutic usefulness.

  10. Discovery of the first small-molecule opioid pan antagonist with nanomolar affinity at mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Nurulain T; Journigan, V Blair; Polgar, Willma E

    2015-04-15

    The trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine scaffold is a known pharmacophore for mu opioid (MOP), kappa opioid (KOP), and delta opioid (DOP) receptor antagonists; however, it has not been explored in nociceptin opioid (NOP/ORL-1) receptor ligands. We recently found that the selective KOP antagonist JDTic, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-((1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide, containing this opioid antagonist pharmacophore, has significant binding affinity at the NOP receptor (Ki 16.67 ± 0.76 nM), with no intrinsic activity in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay. Since this is the first ligand containing the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonist pharmacophore to have affinity for the NOP receptor, we explored the structural determinants of its NOP binding affinity. When rational chemical modifications of JDTic were carried out, based on our previously established NOP pharmacophoric structure-activity relationship (SAR) model, most modifications led to a significant decrease in NOP and opioid binding affinity compared to JDTic. Interestingly, however, removal of the 3,4-dimethyl groups of the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine antagonist scaffold of JDTic increased the binding affinity at NOP by 10-fold (Ki 1.75 ± 0.74 nM) while maintaining comparable affinity for KOP, MOP, and DOP receptors (Ki 1.14 ± 0.63, 1.67 ± 0.6, and 19.6 ± 1.3 nM, respectively). In vitro functional efficacy studies using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay showed that this compound AT-076 functions as an antagonist at all four opioid receptors. Detailed characterization of the antagonist activity of AT-076 shows that it has a noncompetitive antagonist profile at the NOP and KOP receptors (insurmountable antagonism), but is a potent competitive antagonist at the MOP and DOP receptors, with Ke values 3-6-fold more potent than those of JDTic. AT-076 is the

  11. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  12. Reproductive aging in Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica is associated with changes in central opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, M A; Corbitt, C; Hoffman, R; Thompson, N; Russek-Cohen, E; Deviche, P

    2006-12-18

    Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was used to measure specific mu and delta opioid receptor densities in regions of the Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica, brain that regulates reproductive endocrine and behavioral responses to determine the possible involvement of the opioid system in reproductive decline seen during aging. Densities were measured in selected brain regions of young sexually active (YAM), young photoregressed (YPM), old reproductively senescent (OIM) male, young active (YF), and old senescent female (OF) Japanese quail. Medial and lateral septum (SM, SL), medial preoptic area (POM), and n. intercollicularis (ICo) were of particular interest for reproductive responses. Similar to previous observations, mu and delta opioid receptors showed differential distributions in the areas measured. Some age-related changes were observed, with lower SM mu receptor densities in aged males (OIM) than females or young males (YAM). Densities of mu receptors in the POM and in other areas examined did not vary with sex or age. Similarly, OIM males had lower densities of delta receptors in the SM than young males (YAM and YPM); POM delta receptor densities were also low in OIM males compared to the YPM males, and YAM males were intermediate. Interestingly, photoregressed males (YPM) had higher SL delta receptor densities than any other group. Thus there were age-related differences detected in mu receptor densities among groups in the SM of OIM relative to other groups; and the mu and delta receptor densities did not differ in females with brain region. Additionally for delta receptors specifically, YF and OF did not differ from OIM for any brain region and similarly had lower densities of delta receptors compared to YAM males. These data provide support for regional differences in opioid receptor distribution and for age- and sex-related differences in delta opioid receptor densities. The direction of change presents an interesting dichotomy in that, compared to

  13. Delta opioid receptor analgesia: recent contributions from pharmacology and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte Lina

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors represent a promising target for the development of novel analgesics. A number of tools have been developed recently that have significantly improved our knowledge of delta receptor function in pain control. These include several novel delta agonists with potent analgesic properties, as well as genetic mouse models with targeted mutations in the delta opioid receptor gene. Also, recent findings have further documented the regulation of delta receptor function at cellular level, which impacts on the pain-reducing activity of the receptor. These regulatory mechanisms occur at transcriptional and post-translational levels, along agonist-induced receptor activation, signaling and trafficking, or in interaction with other receptors and neuromodulatory systems. All these tools for in vivo research, as well as proposed mechanisms at molecular level, have tremendously increased our understanding of delta receptor physiology, and contribute to designing innovative strategies for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases such as mood disorders. PMID:21836459

  14. In Vivo Techniques to Investigate the Internalization Profile of Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A.; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Laboy, Alycia F.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate a remarkable diversity of biological functions, and are thus often targeted for drug therapies. Receptor internalization is commonly observed following agonist binding and activation. Receptor trafficking events have been well characterized in cell systems, but the in vivo significance of GPCR internalization is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we have developed an innovative knock-in mouse model, where an opioid receptor is directly visible in vivo. These knockin mice express functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors (DOR-eGFP) in place of the endogenous receptor, and these receptors are expressed at physiological levels within their native environment. DOR-eGFP mice have proven to be an extraordinary tool in studying receptor neuroanatomy, real-time receptor trafficking in live neurons, and in vivo receptor internalization. We have used this animal model to determine the relationship between receptor trafficking in neurons and receptor function at a behavioral level. Here, we describe in detail the construction and characterization of this knockin mouse. We also outline how to use these mice to examine the behavioral consequences of agonist-specific trafficking at the delta opioid receptor. These techniques are potentially applicable to any GPCR, and highlight the powerful nature of this imaging tool. PMID:25293318

  15. Analysis of potassium and calcium imaging to assay the function of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Viola; Nockemann, Dinah; Machelska, Halina

    2015-01-01

    As the activation of opioid receptors leads to the modulation of potassium and calcium channels, the ion imaging represents an attractive method to analyze the function of the receptors. Here, we describe the imaging of potassium using the FluxOR™ potassium ion channel assay, and of calcium using Fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, we (1) characterize the activation of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium 2 channel by agonists of μ- and δ-opioid receptors with the aid of the FluxOR™ assay in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, and (2) describe calcium imaging protocols to measure capsaicin-induced transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel activity during opioid withdrawal in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

  16. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  17. Antinociception induced by acute oral administration of sweet substance in young and adult rodents: the role of endogenous opioid peptides chemical mediators and μ(1)-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Kübler, João Marcus Lopes; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibraim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2012-04-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the effects of acute sucrose treatment on the perception of painful stimuli. Specifically, we sought to determine the involvement of the endogenous opioid peptide-mediated system as well as the role of the μ(1)-opioid receptor in antinociception organisation induced by acute sucrose intake. Nociception was assessed with the tail-flick test in rats (75, 150 and 250 g) of different ages acutely pre-treated with 500 μL of a sucrose solution (25, 50, 150 and 250 g/L) or tap water. Young and Adult rats (250 g) showed antinociception after treatment with 50 g/L (during 5 min) and 150 g/L and 250 g/L (during 20 min) sucrose solutions. Surprisingly, this antinociception was more consistent in mature adult rodents than in pups. To evaluate the role of opioid systems, mature adult rodents were pre-treated with different doses (0.25, 1 or 4 mg/kg) of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, the selective μ(1)-opioid receptor antagonist naloxonazine or vehicle followed by 250 g/L sucrose solution treatment. Sucrose-induced antinociception was reduced by pre-treatment with both naloxone and naloxonazine. The present findings suggest that sweet substance-induced hypo-analgesia is augmented by increasing sucrose concentrations in young and adult rodents. Acute oral sucrose treatment inhibits pain in laboratory animal by mediating endogenous opioid peptide and μ(1)-opioid receptor actions.

  18. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Mohamad Ali; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  19. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. PMID:28280516

  20. Antidepressant-like Effects of Buprenorphine are Mediated by Kappa Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Edgardo; Browne, Caroline A; Leon, Rosa M; Fleites, Vanessa C; Sweeney, Rachel; Kirby, Lynn G; Lucki, Irwin

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have identified potential antidepressant effects of buprenorphine (BPN), a drug with high affinity for mu opioid receptor (MORs) and kappa opioid receptors (KORs) and some affinity at delta opioid receptor (DOR) and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL-1) receptors. Therefore, these studies examined which opioid receptors were involved in BPN's effects on animal behavior tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs. The acute effects of BPN were tested in the forced swim test (FST) using mice with genetic deletion of individual opioid receptors or after pharmacological blockade of receptors. For evaluating the effects of BPN on chronic stress, separate groups of mice were exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) for 3 weeks and treated with BPN for at least 7 days before behavioral assessment and subsequent measurement of Oprk1, Oprm1, and Pdyn mRNA expression in multiple brain regions. BPN did not reduce immobility in mice with KOR deletion or after pretreatment with norbinaltorphimine, even though desipramine remained effective. In contrast, BPN reduced immobility in MOR and DOR knockout mice and in mice pretreated with the ORL-1 antagonist JTC-801. UCMS reduced sucrose preference, decreased time in the light side of the light/dark box, increased immobility in the FST and induced region-specific alterations in Oprk1, Oprm1, and PDYN mRNA expression in the frontal cortex and striatum. All of these changes were normalized following BPN treatment. The KOR was identified as a key player mediating the effects of BPN in tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs in mice. These studies support further development of BPN as a novel antidepressant.

  1. Mouse δ opioid receptors are located on presynaptic afferents to hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Rezaï, Xavier; Faget, Lauren; Bednarek, Ewa; Schwab, Yannick; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2012-05-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate in the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data have also identified their implication in drug-context associations pointing to a modulatory role on hippocampal activity. We used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta opioid receptor fused at its carboxy terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor to investigate the receptor neuroanatomical distribution in this structure. Fine mapping of the pyramidal layer was performed in hippocampal acute brain slices and organotypic cultures using fluorescence confocal imaging, co-localization with pre- and postsynaptic markers and correlative light-electron microscopy. The different approaches concurred to identify delta opioid receptors on presynaptic afferents to glutamatergic principal cells. In the latter, only scarce receptors were detected that were confined within the Golgi or vesicular intracellular compartments with no receptor present at the cell surface. In the mouse hippocampus, expression of functional delta opioid receptors is therefore mostly associated with interneurons emphasizing a presynaptic modulatory effect on the pyramidal cell firing rate.

  2. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function.

  3. Pharmacological characterization of the opioid receptor in the submucous plexus of the guinea-pig oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Y.; Shimo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    1 The cholinergically mediated electrically-induced contractions of the submucous plexus-longitudinal muscularis mucosae preparation of the guinea-pig oesophagus were used to study the actions of opioid peptides and morphine. 2 The twitch contractions of the tissue (0.1 Hz, 0.5 ms, supramaximal voltage) were inhibited by all the opioid peptides and morphine in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potency was dynorphin-(1-13) greater than alpha-neo-endorphin greater than beta-endorphin greater than [D-Ala2]-methionine-enkephalin much greater than alpha-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, leucine-enkephalin and morphine. 3 The inhibitory actions of dynorphin-(1-13) (20 nM), alpha-neo-endorphin (100 nM) and beta-endorphin (3 microM) were completely reversed either by naloxone (1 microM) or by morphine (100 microM). The Ke values of naloxone against dynorphin-(1-13) and alpha-neo-endorphin were 30 and 25 nM, respectively. 4 Increasing the concentration of calcium from 1.8 to 3.6 mM in Tyrode solution decreased the sensitivity of the tissue to dynorphin-(1-13) 7.4 times and to alpha-neo-endorphin 462 times. 5 The inhibitory actions of dynorphin-(1-13) (100 nM) and alpha-neo-endorphin (300 nM) were inversely related to stimulus frequency, being most active at low frequencies (0.1-1 Hz), and least active at high (30 Hz). 6 Exogenously applied acetylcholine produced concentration-dependent contractions of the isolated muscularis mucosae, with an EC50 of 72.6 +/- 4.5 nM. The contractile response of the oesophagus to acetylcholine was not affected by the pretreatment of the tissue with dynorphin-(1-13) (100 nM), alpha-neo-endorphin (300 nM) or beta-endorphin (3 microM). 7 It is concluded that the submucous plexus-longitudinal muscularis mucosae of the guinea-pig oesophagus is inhibited by opioid peptides acting at prejunctional opioid receptors, probably of the kappa-subtype. PMID:6303485

  4. Comparing analgesia and μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by intrathecal enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Lao, Lijun; Pérez, Orlando A.; Kim, Woojae; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Opioid receptors in the spinal cord produce strong analgesia, but the mechanisms controlling their activation by endogenous opioids remain unclear. We have previously shown in spinal cord slices that peptidases preclude μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization by opioids. Our present goals were to investigate whether enkephalin-induced analgesia is also precluded by peptidases, and whether it is mediated by MORs or δ-opioid receptors (DORs). Tail-flick analgesia and MOR internalization were measured in rats injected intrathecally with Leu-enkephalin and peptidase inhibitors. Without peptidase inhibitors, Leu-enkephalin produced neither analgesia nor MOR internalization at doses up to 100 nmol, whereas with peptidase inhibitors it produced analgesia at 0.3 nmol and MOR internalization at 1 nmol. Leu-enkephalin was ten times more potent to produce analgesia than to produce MOR internalization, suggesting that DORs were involved. Selective MOR or DOR antagonists completely blocked the analgesia elicited by 0.3 nmol Leu-enkephalin (a dose that produced little MOR internalization), indicating that it involved these two receptors, possibly by an additive or synergistic interaction. The selective MOR agonist endomorphin-2 produced analgesia even in the presence of a DOR antagonist, but at doses substantially higher than Leu-enkephalin. Unlike Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2 had the same potencies to induce analgesia and MOR internalization. We concluded that low doses of enkephalins produce analgesia by activating both MORs and DORs. Analgesia can also be produced exclusively by MORs at higher agonist doses. Since peptidases prevent the activation of spinal opioid receptors by enkephalins, the coincident release of opioids and endogenous peptidase inhibitors may be required for analgesia. PMID:17845806

  5. Delta Opioid Receptors: The Link between Exercise and Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana P.; Verdoorn, Karine S.; Daliry, Anissa; Powers, Scott K.; Ortenzi, Victor H.; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role of opioid receptor (OR) subtypes as a mechanism by which endurance exercise promotes cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Wistar rats were randomly divided into one of seven experimental groups: 1) control; 2) exercise-trained; 3) exercise-trained plus a non-selective OR antagonist; 4) control sham; 5) exercise-trained plus a kappa OR antagonist; 6) exercise-trained plus a delta OR antagonist; and 7) exercise-trained plus a mu OR antagonist. The exercised animals underwent 4 consecutive days of treadmill training (60 min/day at ∼70% of maximal oxygen consumption). All groups except the sham group were exposed to an in vivo myocardial IR insult, and the myocardial infarct size (IS) was determined histologically. Myocardial capillary density, OR subtype expression, heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity were measured in the hearts of both the exercised and control groups. Exercise training significantly reduced the myocardial IS by approximately 34%. Pharmacological blockade of the kappa or mu OR subtypes did not blunt exercise-induced cardioprotection against IR-mediated infarction, whereas treatment of animals with a non-selective OR antagonist or a delta OR antagonist abolished exercise-induced cardioprotection. Exercise training enhanced the activities of myocardial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase but did not increase the left ventricular capillary density or the mRNA levels of HSP72, SOD, and catalase. In addition, exercise significantly reduced the protein expression of kappa and delta ORs in the heart by 44% and 37%, respectively. Together, these results indicate that ORs contribute to the cardioprotection conferred by endurance exercise, with the delta OR subtype playing a key role in this response. PMID:25415192

  6. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2015-06-03

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype.

  7. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T.; Abbruscato, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10 nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10 nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype. PMID:25801116

  8. Distribution of delta opioid receptor expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eric, ERBS; Lauren, FAGET; Gregory, SCHERRER; Pascal, KESSLER; Didier, HENTSCH; Jean-Luc, VONESCH; Audrey, MATIFAS; Brigitte L., KIEFFER; Dominique, MASSOTTE

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. We examined the distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus using fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxyterminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. Colocalization with markers for different neuronal populations was performed by immunohistochemical detection. Fine mapping in the dorsal hippocampus confirmed that delta opioid receptors are mainly present in GABAergic neurons. Indeed, they are mostly expressed in parvalbumin-immunopositive neurons both in the Ammon’s horn and dentate gyrus. These receptors, therefore, most likely participate to the dynamic regulation of hippocampal activity. PMID:22750239

  9. Distribution of delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Scherrer, G; Kessler, P; Hentsch, D; Vonesch, J-L; Matifas, A; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2012-09-27

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. We examined the distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus using fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxyterminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. Colocalization with markers for different neuronal populations was performed by immunohistochemical detection. Fine mapping in the dorsal hippocampus confirmed that delta opioid receptors are mainly present in GABAergic neurons. Indeed, they are mostly expressed in parvalbumin-immunopositive neurons both in the Ammon's horn and dentate gyrus. These receptors, therefore, most likely participate in the dynamic regulation of hippocampal activity.

  10. [Opioid overdose].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara; Vilcinskaite, Jolita

    2002-01-01

    The dangers of opioid overdose have been recognized for as long as the use of opium itself. When used correctly for medical purposes, opioids are remarkably safe and effective agents. However, excessive dosing, whether with therapeutic, suicidal, or euphoric intent, may results in significant toxicity. In a number of countries the use of heroin and other opioids in nonmedical contexts in associated with on increasing rate of overdose and often of fatal opioid overdose. This review article discusses opioid-receptor pharmacology, which is necessary for understanding of the signs and symptoms of opioid ingestion and management principles, clinical and toxic effects mediated with the opioids, the diagnosis and management guidelines in opioid intoxication, a clinical prediction rule to identify patients who can be safely discharge from hospital, the problems of the significant morbidity and mortality associated with opioid overdose.

  11. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr–/–). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr–/– mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. KEY RESULTS Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr–/– mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on

  12. Molecular switches of the κ opioid receptor triggered by 6'-GNTI and 5'-GNTI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianxin; Sun, Xianqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tu, Yaoquan; Tang, Yun

    2016-01-08

    The κ opioid receptor (κOR) is a member of G-protein-coupled receptors, and is considered as a promising drug target for treating neurological diseases. κOR selective 6'-GNTI was proved to be a G-protein biased agonist, whereas 5'-GNTI acts as an antagonist. To investigate the molecular mechanism of how these two ligands induce different behaviors of the receptor, we built two systems containing the 5'-GNTI-κOR complex and the 6'-GNTI-κOR complex, respectively, and performed molecular dynamics simulations of the two systems. We observe that transmembrane (TM) helix 6 of the κOR rotates about 4.6(o) on average in the κOR-6'-GNTI complex. Detailed analyses of the simulation results indicate that E297(6.58) and I294(6.55) play crucial roles in the rotation of TM6. In the simulation of the κOR-5'-GNTI system, it is revealed that 5'-GNTI can stabilize TM6 in the inactive state form. In addition, the kink of TM7 is stabilized by a hydrogen bond between S324(7.47) and the residue V69(1.42) on TM1.

  13. Variation in the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) is associated with dispositional and neural sensitivity to social rejection.

    PubMed

    Way, Baldwin M; Taylor, Shelley E; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2009-09-01

    Scientific understanding of social pain--the hurt feelings resulting from social rejection, separation, or loss--has been facilitated by the hypothesis that such feelings arise, in part, from some of the same neural and neurochemical systems that generate the unpleasant feelings resulting from physical pain. Accordingly, in animals, the painkiller morphine not only alleviates the distress of physical pain, but also the distress of social separation. Because morphine acts on the mu-opioid receptor, we examined whether variation in the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), as measured by the functional A118G polymorphism, was associated with individual differences in rejection sensitivity. Participants (n = 122) completed a self-report inventory of dispositional sensitivity to social rejection and a subsample (n = 31) completed a functional MRI session in which they were rejected from an online ball-tossing game played with two supposed others. The A118G polymorphism was associated with dispositional sensitivity to rejection in the entire sample and in the fMRI subsample. Consistent with these results, G allele carriers showed greater reactivity to social rejection in neural regions previously shown to be involved in processing social pain as well as the unpleasantness of physical pain, particularly the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and anterior insula. Furthermore, dACC activity mediated the relationship between the A118G polymorphism and dispositional sensitivity to rejection, suggesting that this is a critical site for mu-opioid-related influence on social pain. Taken together, these data suggest that the A118G polymorphism specifically, and the mu-opioid receptor more generally, are involved in social pain in addition to physical pain.

  14. A structural feature of the non-peptide ligand interactions with mice mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Noori, Hamid R; Mucksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-01-01

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide nonendogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified μ-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency.

  15. Pharmacogenomic study of the role of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and opioid receptors in diabetic hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Kris; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Koch, Thomas; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Targeting functionally independent receptors may provide synergistic analgesic effects in neuropathic pain. To examine the interdependency between different opioid receptors (µ-opioid peptide [MOP], δ-opioid peptide [DOP] and κ-opioid peptide [KOP]) and the nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, nocifensive activity was measured using a hot plate test in wild-type and NOP, MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockout mice in response to the selective receptor agonists Ro65-6570, morphine, SNC-80 and U50488H, or vehicle. Nocifensive activity was similar in non-diabetic wild-type and knockout mice at baseline, before agonist or vehicle administration. STZ-induced diabetes significantly increased heat sensitivity in all mouse strains, but MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockouts showed a smaller degree of hyperalgesia than wild-type mice and NOP receptor knockouts. For each agonist, a significant antihyperalgesic effect was observed in wild-type diabetic mice (all P<0.05 versus vehicle); the effect was markedly attenuated in diabetic mice lacking the cognate receptor compared with wild-type diabetic mice. Morphine was the only agonist that demonstrated near-full antihyperalgesic efficacy across all non-cognate receptor knockouts. Partial or near-complete reductions in efficacy were observed with Ro65-6570 in DOP and KOP receptor knockouts, with SNC-80 in NOP, MOP and KOP receptor knockouts, and with U50488H in NOP and DOP receptor knockouts. There was no evidence of NOP and MOP receptor interdependency in response to selective agonists for these receptors. These findings suggest that concurrent activation of NOP and MOP receptors, which showed functional independence, may yield an effective and favorable therapeutic analgesic profile.

  16. Molecular modeling study of the differential ligand-receptor interaction at the μ, δ and κ opioid receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizola, Marta; Carteni-Farina, Maria; Perez, Juan J.

    1999-07-01

    3D models of the opioid receptors μ, δ and κ were constructed using BUNDLE, an in-house program to build de novo models of G-protein coupled receptors at the atomic level. Once the three opioid receptors were constructed and before any energy refinement, models were assessed for their compatibility with the results available from point-site mutations carried out on these receptors. In a subsequent step, three selective antagonists to each of three receptors (naltrindole, naltrexone and nor-binaltorphamine) were docked onto each of the three receptors and subsequently energy minimized. The nine resulting complexes were checked for their ability to explain known results of structure-activity studies. Once the models were validated, analysis of the distances between different residues of the receptors and the ligands were computed. This analysis permitted us to identify key residues tentatively involved in direct interaction with the ligand.

  17. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of aminothiazolomorphinans at the mu and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Provencher, Brian A; Sromek, Anna W; Li, Wei; Russell, Shayla; Chartoff, Elena; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2013-11-14

    Previous studies with aminothiazolomorphinans suggested that this class of opioid ligands may be useful as a potential pharmacotherapeutic to decrease drug abuse. Novel aminothiazole derivatives of cyclorphan were prepared to evaluate a series of aminothiazolomorphinans with varying pharmacological properties at the κ opioid receptor (KOR) and μ opioid receptor (MOR). This study was focused on exploring the regioisomeric analogs with the aminothiazole on the C-ring of the morphinan skeleton. Receptor binding and [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays were used to characterize the affinity and pharmacological properties of the aminothiazolomorphinans. Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) was used to compare the effects of a representative aminothiazolomorphinan with the morphinan mixed-KOR/MOR agonist butorphan (MCL-101) on brain-stimulation reward.

  18. Cannabinoid and heroin activation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission by a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Pontieri, F E; Di Chiara, G

    1997-06-27

    The effects of the active ingredient of Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), and of the highly addictive drug heroin on in vivo dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens were compared in Sprague-Dawley rats by brain microdialysis. Delta9-THC and heroin increased extracellular dopamine concentrations selectively in the shell of the nucleus accumbens; these effects were mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2. SR141716A, an antagonist of central cannabinoid receptors, prevented the effects of Delta9-THC but not those of heroin. Naloxone, a generic opioid antagonist, administered systemically, or naloxonazine, an antagonist of micro1 opioid receptors, infused into the ventral tegmentum, prevented the action of cannabinoids and heroin on dopamine transmission. Thus, Delta9-THC and heroin exert similar effects on mesolimbic dopamine transmission through a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism located in the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum.

  19. Modification of kappa-opioid receptor agonist-induced antinociception by diabetes in the mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Kamei, Junzo

    2005-05-01

    The supraspinal and spinal antinociceptive effects of several kappa-opioid receptor agonists were examined in diabetic and non-diabetic mice using the tail-flick assay. The antinociception induced by intrathecal (i.t.), but not intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.), CI-977, a highly selective kappa(1)-opioid receptor agonist, in diabetic mice was less than that in non-diabetic mice. The antinociceptive effects of ICI-199,441 and R-84760, high potency kappa(1)-opioid receptor agonists, given i.c.v., but not i.t., were attenuated in diabetic mice compared to those in non-diabetic mice. On the other hand, the antinociceptive effects of the new kappa-opioid receptor agonist TRK-820, which has high affinity for kappa(2)- and/or kappa(3)-opioid receptors, injected both i.c.v. and i.t. in diabetic mice were markedly less than those in non-diabetic mice. These results indicate that the antinociceptive effects of those kappa-opioid receptor agonists in diabetic mice are altered in a region-specific manner in the central nervous system (CNS). The dysfunction of kappa-opioid receptor subtypes in diabetic mice may underlie this CNS region-specific variation in the effects of these kappa-opioid receptor agonists.

  20. TGF-β and opioid receptor signaling crosstalk results in improvement of endogenous and exogenous opioid analgesia under pathological pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Lantero, Aquilino; Tramullas, Mónica; Pílar-Cuellar, Fuencisla; Valdizán, Elsa; Santillán, Rosa; Roques, Bernard P; Hurlé, María A

    2014-04-09

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) protects against neuroinflammatory events underlying neuropathic pain. TGF-β signaling enhancement is a phenotypic characteristic of mice lacking the TGF-β pseudoreceptor BAMBI (BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor), which leads to an increased synaptic release of opioid peptides and to a naloxone-reversible hypoalgesic/antiallodynic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the following: (1) the effects of BAMBI deficiency on opioid receptor expression, functional efficacy, and analgesic responses to endogenous and exogenous opioids; and (2) the involvement of the opioid system in the antiallodynic effect of TGF-β1. BAMBI-KO mice were subjected to neuropathic pain by sciatic nerve crash injury (SNI). Gene (PCR) and protein (Western blot) expressions of μ- and δ-opioid receptors were determined in the spinal cord. The inhibitory effects of agonists on the adenylyl cyclase pathway were investigated. Two weeks after SNI, wild-type mice developed mechanical allodynia and the functionality of μ-opioid receptors was reduced. By this time, BAMBI-KO mice were protected against allodynia and exhibited increased expression and function of opioid receptors. Four weeks after SNI, when mice of both genotypes had developed neuropathic pain, the analgesic responses induced by morphine and RB101 (an inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, which increases the synaptic levels of enkephalins) were enhanced in BAMBI-KO mice. Similar results were obtained in the formalin-induced chemical-inflammatory pain model. Subcutaneous TGF-β1 infusion prevented pain development after SNI. The antiallodynic effect of TGF-β1 was naloxone-sensitive. In conclusion, modulation of the endogenous opioid system by TGF-β signaling improves the analgesic effectiveness of exogenous and endogenous opioids under pathological pain conditions.

  1. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eric, Erbs; Lauren, Faget; Alice, Ceredig Rhian; Audrey, Matifas; Jean-Luc, Vonesch; L., Kieffer Brigitte; Dominique, Massotte

    2015-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased delta opioid receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces delta opioid receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:26480813

  2. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; ...

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  3. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C. H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  4. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-Opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C.H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt(1)-Tic(2)-Phe(3)-Phe(4)-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt(1) and Tic(2). The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics. PMID:25686086

  5. Mu receptor binding of some commonly used opioids and their metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhaorong; Irvine, R.J. ); Somogyi, A.A.; Bochner, F. Royal Adelaide Hospital )

    1991-01-01

    The binding affinity to the {mu} receptor of some opioids chemically related to morphine and some of their metabolites was examined in rat brain homogenates with {sup 3}H-DAMGO. The chemical group at position 6 of the molecule had little effect on binding. Decreasing the length of the alkyl group at position 3 decreased the K{sub i} values (morphine < codeine < ethylmorphine < pholcodine). Analgesics with high clinical potency containing a methoxyl group at position 3 had relatively weak receptor binding, while their O-demethylated metabolites had much stronger binding. Many opioids may exert their pharmacological actions predominantly through metabolites.

  6. Deficit in attachment behavior in mice lacking the mu-opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Moles, Anna; Kieffer, Brigitte L; D'Amato, Francesca R

    2004-06-25

    Endogenous opioid binding to micro receptors is hypothesized to mediate natural rewards and has been proposed to be the basis of infant attachment behavior. Here, we report that micro-opioid receptor knockout mouse pups emit fewer ultrasonic vocalizations when removed from their mothers but not when exposed to cold or male mice odors. Moreover these knockout pups do not show a preference toward their mothers' cues and do not show ultrasonic calls potentiation after brief maternal exposure. Results from this study may indicate a molecular mechanism for diseases characterized by deficits in attachment behavior, such as autism or reactive attachment disorder.

  7. Mu opioid receptor up-regulation and participation in excitability of hippocampal pyramidal cell electrophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Moudy, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of opiate antagonists to rats results in up-regulation of their brain opioid receptors. Using subcellular fractionation techniques, brain opioid receptors were resolved into two membrane populations, one associated with synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) and the other enriched in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi (microsomes). This study addressed in part the question of whether an antagonist induces up-regulation uniformly in these two populations. Rats were administered naltrexone by subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps. Forebrain mu receptor levels were determined by homologous displacement of ({sup 3}H)D-ala{sup 2}-mePhe{sup 4}-gly-ol{sup 5}-enkephalin (DAGO) followed by computer estimation of binding parameters. Receptor levels in crude membranes rose 77% after treatment. Microsomes displayed a 92% increase, a two-fold greater change than in SPMs (51%). These results establish that naltrexone induces up-regulation of both membrane populations; and that microsomal and SPM receptors represent discrete populations of intracellular and cell surface sites, respectively. Binding experiments on isolated hippocampi also demonstrated up-regulation (71%) of mu receptors. To demonstrate up-regulation of opioid receptors electrophysiologically, hippocampal slices were prepared from rats which had been chronically treated with naltrexone. After superfusion with DAGO, these slices showed a 42% greater population spike output than controls in response to the same EPSP input. Hippocampi from animals treated for two weeks showed an additional increase in sensitivity. The results support a disinhibitory role for opioids in pyramidal cell hyper-excitability. More importantly, they demonstrate a significant physiological correlate to opioid receptor up-regulation.

  8. Supersensitive Kappa Opioid Receptors Promotes Ethanol Withdrawal-Related Behaviors and Reduce Dopamine Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Chen, Rong; Gioia, Dominic; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Becker, Howard C.; McCool, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic ethanol exposure reduces dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens, which may contribute to the negative affective symptoms associated with ethanol withdrawal. Kappa opioid receptors have been implicated in withdrawal-induced excessive drinking and anxiety-like behaviors and are known to inhibit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. The effects of chronic ethanol exposure on kappa opioid receptor-mediated changes in dopamine transmission at the level of the dopamine terminal and withdrawal-related behaviors were examined. Methods: Five weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in male C57BL/6 mice were used to examine the role of kappa opioid receptors in chronic ethanol-induced increases in ethanol intake and marble burying, a measure of anxiety/compulsive-like behavior. Drinking and marble burying were evaluated before and after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, with and without kappa opioid receptor blockade by nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg i.p.). Functional alterations in kappa opioid receptors were assessed using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens. Results: Chronic intermittent ethanol-exposed mice showed increased ethanol drinking and marble burying compared with controls, which was attenuated with kappa opioid receptor blockade. Chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increases in behavior were replicated with kappa opioid receptor activation in naïve mice. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry revealed that chronic intermittent ethanol reduced accumbal dopamine release and increased uptake rates, promoting a hypodopaminergic state of this region. Kappa opioid receptor activation with U50,488H concentration-dependently decreased dopamine release in both groups; however, this effect was greater in chronic intermittent ethanol-treated mice, indicating kappa opioid receptor supersensitivity in this group. Conclusions: These data suggest that the chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increase

  9. Opioid desensitization: interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors in the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, C D; Williams, J T

    1996-02-15

    In rat locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, alpha 2 adrenoceptors, mu-opioid and somatostatin receptors all activate the same potassium conductance. Chronic treatment with morphine causes a loss of sensitivity that is specific to the mu-opioid response, with no change in the alpha 2 adrenoceptor-mediated response. Acute desensitization induced by opioid, somatostatin, and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists was studied in brain slices of rat LC using intracellular recording. A supramaximal concentration of the opioid agonist Met5-enkephalin induced a profound homologous desensitization but little heterologous desensitization to an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist (UK 14304) or somatostatin. All desensitized currents showed partial recovery. A supramaximal concentration of UK14304 caused a relatively small amount of desensitization. Although little interaction was observed among inhibitory G-protein-coupled receptors, activation of an excitatory receptor had marked effects on inhibitory responses. Muscarinic agonists, which produce an inward current in LC neurons, reduced the magnitude of agonist-induced outward currents and increased both the rate and amount of opioid desensitization. Muscarinic activation did not alter desensitization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor responses. Acute desensitization shares several characteristics with the tolerance induced by chronic morphine treatment of animals.

  10. Regulation of µ-Opioid Receptors: Desensitization, Phosphorylation, Internalization, and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John T.; Ingram, Susan L.; Henderson, Graeme; Chavkin, Charles; von Zastrow, Mark; Schulz, Stefan; Koch, Thomas; Evans, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Morphine and related µ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists remain among the most effective drugs known for acute relief of severe pain. A major problem in treating painful conditions is that tolerance limits the long-term utility of opioid agonists. Considerable effort has been expended on developing an understanding of the molecular and cellular processes that underlie acute MOR signaling, short-term receptor regulation, and the progression of events that lead to tolerance for different MOR agonists. Although great progress has been made in the past decade, many points of contention and controversy cloud the realization of this progress. This review attempts to clarify some confusion by clearly defining terms, such as desensitization and tolerance, and addressing optimal pharmacological analyses for discerning relative importance of these cellular mechanisms. Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating MOR function by phosphorylation relative to receptor desensitization and endocytosis are comprehensively reviewed, with an emphasis on agonist-biased regulation and areas where knowledge is lacking or controversial. The implications of these mechanisms for understanding the substantial contribution of MOR signaling to opioid tolerance are then considered in detail. While some functional MOR regulatory mechanisms contributing to tolerance are clearly understood, there are large gaps in understanding the molecular processes responsible for loss of MOR function after chronic exposure to opioids. Further elucidation of the cellular mechanisms that are regulated by opioids will be necessary for the successful development of MOR-based approaches to new pain therapeutics that limit the development of tolerance. PMID:23321159

  11. Mu opioid receptors on primary afferent nav1.8 neurons contribute to opiate-induced analgesia: insight from conditional knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Raphaël; Reiss, David; Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A J; Wood, John N; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund's Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain.

  12. Buprenorphine for opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Torrington, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist of the µ-receptor, and is used as a daily dose sublingual tablet or filmstrip for managing opioid addiction. In the USA, the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 made buprenorphine the only opioid medication for opioid addiction that can be prescribed in an office-based setting. Owing to its high affinity for the µ-receptor, buprenorphine inhibits the reinforcing effect of exogenous opioids. The ceiling effect of buprenorphine's µ-agonist activity reduces the potential for drug overdose and confers low toxicity even at high doses. Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy has proven to be a treatment approach that supports recovery from addiction while reducing or curtailing the use of opioids. This article examines buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction, focusing on the situation in the USA, and is based on a review of pertinent literature, and the authors’ research and clinical experience. The references in this paper were chosen according to the authors’ judgment of quality and relevance, and with respect to their familiarity and involvement in related research. PMID:24654720

  13. Fourteen. beta. -(bromoacetamido)morphine irreversibly labels. mu. opioid receptors in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bidlack, J.M.; Frey, D.K.; Seyed-Mozaffari, A.; Archer, S. )

    1989-05-16

    The binding properties of 14{beta}-(bromoacetamido)morphine (BAM) and the ability of BAM to irreversibly inhibit opioid binding to rat brain membranes were examined to characterize the affinity and selectivity of BAM as an irreversible affinity ligand for opioid receptors. BAM had the same receptor selectivity as morphine, with a 3-5-fold decrease in affinity for the different types of opioid receptors. When brain membranes were incubated with BAM, followed by extensive washing, opioid binding was restored to control levels. However, when membranes were incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT), followed by BAM, and subsequently washed, 90% of the 0.25 nM ({sup 3}H)(D-Ala{sup 2},(Me)Phe{sup 4},Gly(ol){sup 5})enkephalin (DAGO) binding was irreversibly inhibited as a result of the specific alkylation of a sulfhydryl group at the {mu} binding site. This inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of both DTT and BAM. The {mu} receptor specificity of BAM alkylation was demonstrated by the ability of BAM alkylated membranes to still bind the {delta}-selective peptide ({sup 3}H)(D-penicillamine{sup 2},D-penicillamine{sup 5})enkephalin (DPDPE) and (-)-({sup 3}H)bremazocine in the presence of {mu} and {delta} blockers, selective for {kappa} binding sites. Morphine and naloxone partially protected the binding site from alkylation with BAM, while ligands that did not bind to the {mu}s site did not afford protection. These studies have demonstrated that when a disulfide bond at or near {mu} opioid binding sites was reduced, BAM could then alkylate this site, resulting in the specific irreversible labeling of {mu} opioid receptors.

  14. Desensitization of functional µ-opioid receptors increases agonist off-rate.

    PubMed

    Williams, John T

    2014-07-01

    Desensitization of µ-opioid receptors (MORs) develops over 5-15 minutes after the application of some, but not all, opioid agonists and lasts for tens of minutes after agonist removal. The decrease in function is receptor selective (homologous) and could result from 1) a reduction in receptor number or 2) a decrease in receptor coupling. The present investigation used photolysis of two caged opioid ligands to examine the kinetics of MOR-induced potassium conductance before and after MOR desensitization. Photolysis of a caged antagonist, carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (caged naloxone), blocked the current induced by a series of agonists, and the time constant of decline was significantly decreased after desensitization. The increase in the rate of current decay was not observed after partial blockade of receptors with the irreversible antagonist, β-chlornaltrexamine (β-CNA). The time constant of current decay after desensitization was never more rapid than 1 second, suggesting an increased agonist off-rate rather than an increase in the rate of channel closure downstream of the receptor. The rate of G protein-coupled K(+) channel (GIRK) current activation was examined using photolysis of a caged agonist, carboxynitrobenzyl-tyrosine-[Leu(5)]-enkephalin. After acute desensitization or partial irreversible block of MORs with β-CNA, there was an increase in the time it took to reach a peak current. The decrease in the rate of agonist-induced GIRK conductance was receptor selective and dependent on receptor number. The results indicate that opioid receptor desensitization reduced the number of functional receptor and that the remaining active receptors have a reduced agonist affinity.

  15. Naloxone's pentapeptide binding site on filamin A blocks Mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling and CREB activation of acute morphine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hoau-Yan; Burns, Lindsay H

    2009-01-01

    Chronic morphine causes the mu opioid receptor (MOR) to switch its coupling from Gi/o to Gs, resulting in excitatory signaling via both Galphas and its Gbetagamma dimer. Ultra-low-dose naloxone (NLX) prevents this switch and attenuates opioid tolerance and dependence. This protective effect is mediated via a high-affinity interaction of NLX to a pentapeptide region in c-terminal filamin A (FLNA), a scaffolding protein interacting with MOR. In organotypic striatal slice cultures, we now show that acute morphine induces a dose-dependent Go-to-Gs coupling switch at 5 and 15 min that resolves by 1 hr. The acute Gs coupling induced by 100 microM morphine was completely prevented by co-treatment with 100 pM NLX, (+)NLX, or naltrexone (NTX), or their pentapeptide binding site (FLNA(2561-2565)), which we show can act as a decoy for MOR or bind to FLNA itself. All of these co-treatments presumably prevent the MOR-FLNA interaction. Since ultra-low-dose NTX also attenuates the addictive properties of opioids, we assessed striatal cAMP production and CREB phosphorylation at S(133). Correlating with the Gs coupling, acute morphine induced elevated cAMP levels and a several-fold increase in pS(133)CREB that were also completely blocked by NLX, NTX or the FLNA pentapeptide. We propose that acute, robust stimulation of MOR causes an interaction with FLNA that allows an initially transient MOR-Gs coupling, which recovers with receptor recycling but persists when MOR stimulation is repeated or prolonged. The complete prevention of this acute, morphine-induced MOR-Gs coupling by 100 pM NLX/NTX or 10 microM pentapeptide segment of FLNA further elucidates both MOR signaling and the mechanism of action of ultra-low-dose NLX or NTX in attenuating opioid tolerance, dependence and addictive potential.

  16. Sigma opioid receptor: characterization and co-identity with the phencyclidine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kalra, V.; Johnson, B.G.; Kerchner, G.A.

    1985-06-01

    The properties of the sigma opioid receptor of rat brain cortex have been characterized using the prototypic ligand (+)-(/sup 3/H) SKF 10,047. Binding to this receptor was rapid, and equilibrium was obtained within 30 min at 37 degrees C. Specific binding was linear with protein concentration up to 500 micrograms/2 ml and was dependent upon protein integrity. Denaturation by boiling destroyed over 95% of the specific binding. A high-affinity binding site with a KD of 150 +/- 40 nM and a maximum binding of 2.91 +/- 0.84 pmol/mg of protein was determined from a Scatchard plot of the binding data. The addition of salt, either NaCl or CaCl/sub 2/, to the buffers markedly decreased binding, with CaCl/sub 2/ being more potent than NaCl. A broad pH optimum for specific binding was observed; maximum binding was at pH 9.0. The affinity of a number of ligands for the sigma site and the phencyclidine receptor were compared. The binding (IC50) of 13 ligands to the sigma site showed a correlation of 0.86 (P less than .01) with binding to the phencyclidine site. The data demonstrate that the biochemical properties of the sigma and phencyclidine receptors are similar and support the view that these receptors are one and the same site.

  17. Synthesis and opioid receptor binding of indium (III) and [(111)In]-labeled macrocyclic conjugates of diprenorphine: novel ligands designed for imaging studies of peripheral opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shefali; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Nahas, Roger I; Lever, John R

    2016-10-06

    Radiolabeled diprenorphine (DPN) and analogs are widely used ligands for non-invasive brain imaging of opioid receptors. To develop complementary radioligands optimized for studies of the peripheral opioid receptors, we prepared a pair of hydrophilic DPN derivatives, conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid), for complexation with trivalent metals. The non-radioactive indium (III) complexes, tethered to the C6-oxygen position of the DPN scaffold by 6- to 9-atom spacers, displayed high affinities for binding to μ, δ and κ opioid receptors in vitro. Use of the 9-atom linker conferred picomolar affinities equipotent to those of the parent ligand DPN. The [(111)In]-labeled complexes were prepared in good yield (>70%), with high radiochemical purity (~99%) and high specific radioactivity (>4000 mCi/μmol). Their log D7.4 values were -2.21 to -1.66. In comparison, DPN is lipophilic, with a log D7.4 of +2.25. Further study in vivo is warranted to assess the suitability of these [(111)In]-labeled DPN-DOTA conjugates for imaging trials.

  18. Biased mu-opioid receptor ligands: a promising new generation of pain therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Siuda, Edward R; Carr, Richard; Rominger, David H; Violin, Jonathan D

    2016-12-06

    Opioid chemistry and biology occupy a pivotal place in the history of pharmacology and medicine. Morphine offers unmatched efficacy in alleviating acute pain, but is also associated with a host of adverse side effects. The advent of biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors has expanded our understanding of intracellular signaling and highlighted the concept that certain ligands are able to differentially modulate downstream pathways. The ability to target one pathway over another has allowed for the development of biased ligands with robust clinical efficacy and fewer adverse events. In this review we summarize these concepts with an emphasis on biased mu opioid receptor pharmacology and highlight how far opioid pharmacology has evolved.

  19. Synthesis and κ-Opioid Receptor Activity of Furan-Substituted Salvinorin A Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The neoclerodane diterpene salvinorin A, found in the leaves of Salvia divinorum, is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist, making it an attractive scaffold for development into a treatment for substance abuse. Although several successful semisynthetic studies have been performed to elucidate structure–activity relationships, the lack of analogues with substitutions to the furan ring of salvinorin A has prevented a thorough understanding of its role in binding to the κ-opioid receptor. Herein we report the synthesis of several salvinorin A derivatives with modified furan rings. Evaluation of these compounds in a functional assay indicated that sterically less demanding substitutions are preferred, suggesting the furan ring is bound in a congested portion of the binding pocket. The most potent of the analogues successfully reduced drug-seeking behavior in an animal model of drug-relapse without producing the sedation observed with other κ-opioid agonists. PMID:25426797

  20. Synthesis and κ-opioid receptor activity of furan-substituted salvinorin A analogues.

    PubMed

    Riley, Andrew P; Groer, Chad E; Young, David; Ewald, Amy W; Kivell, Bronwyn M; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2014-12-26

    The neoclerodane diterpene salvinorin A, found in the leaves of Salvia divinorum, is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist, making it an attractive scaffold for development into a treatment for substance abuse. Although several successful semisynthetic studies have been performed to elucidate structure-activity relationships, the lack of analogues with substitutions to the furan ring of salvinorin A has prevented a thorough understanding of its role in binding to the κ-opioid receptor. Herein we report the synthesis of several salvinorin A derivatives with modified furan rings. Evaluation of these compounds in a functional assay indicated that sterically less demanding substitutions are preferred, suggesting the furan ring is bound in a congested portion of the binding pocket. The most potent of the analogues successfully reduced drug-seeking behavior in an animal model of drug-relapse without producing the sedation observed with other κ-opioid agonists.

  1. Cortisol Stress Response in Men and Women Modulated Differentially by the Mu-Opioid Receptor Gene Polymorphism OPRM1 A118G.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, William R; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Acheson, Ashley; Cohoon, Andrew J; Sorocco, Kristen H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Vincent, Andrea S; Glahn, David C; Goldman, David

    2015-10-01

    Differences in stress reactivity may affect long-term health outcomes, but there is little information on how these differences arise. The stress axis is regulated by, in part, the endogenous opioid, beta-endorphin, acting on mu-opioid receptors. Persons carrying one or two copies of the G allele of the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1 A118G) may have higher receptor binding for beta-endorphin compared with AA homozygotes that may contribute to individual differences in cortisol reactivity to stress, leading to a relative blunting of cortisol stress reactivity in G allele genotypes. We measured cortisol in 251 young adults (69 GA/GG vs 182 AA genotypes) exposed to mental arithmetic plus public speaking stress relative to a resting control day. Women had smaller cortisol responses than men (F=10.2, p=0.002), and women with GA or GG genotypes (N=39) had an absence of cortisol response relative to AA carriers (N=110) (F=18.4, p<0.0001). Male genotypes had no such difference in response (F=0.29). Cortisol response following mu-opioid receptor blockade using naltrexone in 119 of these subjects unmasked a greater tonic opioid inhibition of cortisol secretion in women (N=64), consistent with their blunted stress reactivity. Compared with men, women may have cortisol stress responses that are more heavily regulated by endogenous opioid mechanisms, and the OPRM1 GA/GG genotypes may affect females differentially relative to males. Diminished cortisol responses to stress may have consequences for health behaviors in women with GA/GG genotypes.

  2. Effects of continuous opioid receptor blockade on alcohol intake and up-regulation of opioid receptor subtype signalling in a genetic model of high alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    Hyytiä, P; Ingman, K; Soini, S L; Laitinen, J T; Korpi, E R

    1999-10-01

    Effects of a continuous naloxone infusion via osmotic pumps on alcohol drinking and opioid receptor density and function in the high-drinking AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats were examined. AA rats were trained to drink 10% (v/v) ethanol in a 1-h limited access procedure and implanted with subcutaneous osmotic pumps delivering either saline, a low dose (0.3 mg/kg per hour), or a high dose (3.0 mg/kg per hour) of naloxone for 7 days. The pumps were then removed and alcohol, food and water intakes were measured for another 4 days. Compared with saline, both naloxone doses significantly suppressed 1-h alcohol intake during the 7-day infusion. The suppression was smaller than that by a bolus injection of the same daily dose 15 min before the session, although a complete blockade of morphine-induced antinociception was achieved even with the smaller naloxone infusion. Significant decreases were also seen in daily food and water intake during the first days, but they quickly returned to their previous baselines. After pump removal, rats of both naloxone-treated groups rapidly increased their alcohol drinking and reached the pretreatment baseline, while their food and water intakes significantly surpassed their baselines. Naloxone infusion at 3.0 mg/kg per hour for 7 days significantly decreased 24-h alcohol drinking without affecting alcohol preference. Twenty-four hours after pump removal, autoradiography with [3H]DAMGO, [3H]DPDPE and [3H]U-69,543 revealed an up-regulation of mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor binding sites in many brain areas of these animals. This receptor up-regulation was functional, because receptor coupling to G-protein activation was enhanced by agonist ligands, as revealed by [35S]GTPgammaS autoradiography. A good correlation existed between ligand binding densities and G-protein activation for mu- and kappa-receptors in control and naloxone-treated brain sections. Furthermore, morphine-induced analgesia in a hot-plate test showed a leftward shift in

  3. μ and κ Opioid receptor distribution in the monogamous titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus): Implications for social behavior and endocrine functioning

    PubMed Central

    Ragen, Benjamin J.; Freeman, Sara M.; Laredo, Sarah A.; Mendoza, Sally P.; Bales, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    The opioid system is involved in infant-mother bonds and adult-adult bonds in many species. We have previously shown that μ opioid receptors (MOR) and κ opioid receptors (KOR) are involved in regulating the adult attachment of the monogamous titi monkey. The present study sought to determine the distribution of MOR and KOR in the titi monkey brain using receptor autoradiography. We used [3H]DAMGO to label MORs and [3H]U69,593 to label KORs. MOR binding was heterogeneous throughout the titi monkey brain. Specifically, MOR binding was observed in the cingulate gyrus, striatum, septal regions, diagonal band, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and thalamus. Binding was particularly dense in the septum, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, mediodorsal thalamus with moderate binding in the nucleus accumbens. Consistent with other primate species, MOR were also observed in “neurochemically unique domains of the accumbens and putamen” (NUDAPs). In general KOR binding was more homogenous. KORs were primarily found in the cingulate gyrus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus. Dense KOR binding was observed in the claustrum. Relative MOR and KOR binding in the titi monkey striatum was similar to other humans and primates, but was much lower compared to rodents. Relative MOR binding in the titi monkey hypothalamus was much greater than that found in rodents. This study was the first to examine MOR and KOR binding in a monogamous primate. The location of these receptors gives insight into where ligands may be acting to regulate social behavior and endocrine function. PMID:25637809

  4. μ and κ opioid receptor distribution in the monogamous titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus): implications for social behavior and endocrine functioning.

    PubMed

    Ragen, B J; Freeman, S M; Laredo, S A; Mendoza, S P; Bales, K L

    2015-04-02

    The opioid system is involved in infant-mother bonds and adult-adult bonds in many species. We have previously shown that μ opioid receptors (MORs) and κ opioid receptors (KORs) are involved in regulating the adult attachment of the monogamous titi monkey. The present study sought to determine the distribution of MOR and KOR in the titi monkey brain using receptor autoradiography. We used [(3)H][D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) to label MORs and [(3)H]U69,593 to label KORs. MOR binding was heterogeneous throughout the titi monkey brain. Specifically, MOR binding was observed in the cingulate gyrus (CG), striatum, septal regions, diagonal band, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and thalamus. Binding was particularly dense in the septum, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, mediodorsal thalamus with moderate binding in the nucleus accumbens. Consistent with other primate species, MOR were also observed in "neurochemically unique domains of the accumbens and putamen" (NUDAPs). In general KOR binding was more homogenous. KORs were primarily found in the CG, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus. Dense KOR binding was observed in the claustrum. Relative MOR and KOR binding in the titi monkey striatum was similar to other humans and primates, but was much lower compared to rodents. Relative MOR binding in the titi monkey hypothalamus was much greater than that found in rodents. This study was the first to examine MOR and KOR binding in a monogamous primate. The location of these receptors gives insight into where ligands may be acting to regulate social behavior and endocrine function.

  5. The Effects of Opioids and Opioid Analogs on Animal and Human Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cassidy; Van Uum, Stan H. M.; O'Dell, Laura E.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2010-01-01

    Opioid abuse has increased in the last decade, primarily as a result of increased access to prescription opioids. Physicians are also increasingly administering opioid analgesics for noncancer chronic pain. Thus, knowledge of the long-term consequences of opioid use/abuse has important implications for fully evaluating the clinical usefulness of opioid medications. Many studies have examined the effect of opioids on the endocrine system; however, a systematic review of the endocrine actions of opioids in both humans and animals has, to our knowledge, not been published since 1984. Thus, we reviewed the literature on the effect of opioids on the endocrine system. We included both acute and chronic effects of opioids, with the majority of the studies done on the acute effects although chronic effects are more physiologically relevant. In humans and laboratory animals, opioids generally increase GH and prolactin and decrease LH, testosterone, estradiol, and oxytocin. In humans, opioids increase TSH, whereas in rodents, TSH is decreased. In both rodents and humans, the reports of effects of opioids on arginine vasopressin and ACTH are conflicting. Opioids act preferentially at different receptor sites leading to stimulatory or inhibitory effects on hormone release. Increasing opioid abuse primarily leads to hypogonadism but may also affect the secretion of other pituitary hormones. The potential consequences of hypogonadism include decreased libido and erectile dysfunction in men, oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea in women, and bone loss or infertility in both sexes. Opioids may increase or decrease food intake, depending on the type of opioid and the duration of action. Additionally, opioids may act through the sympathetic nervous system to cause hyperglycemia and impaired insulin secretion. In this review, recent information regarding endocrine disorders among opioid abusers is presented. PMID:19903933

  6. Tolerance and Withdrawal From Prolonged Opioid Use in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Willson, Douglas F.; Berger, John; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen L.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Prodhan, Parthak; Dean, J. Michael; Nicholson, Carol

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE After prolonged opioid exposure, children develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and withdrawal. Strategies for prevention and management should be based on the mechanisms of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. PATIENTS AND METHODS Relevant manuscripts published in the English language were searched in Medline by using search terms “opioid,” “opiate,” “sedation,” “analgesia,” “child,” “infant-newborn,” “tolerance,” “dependency,” “withdrawal,” “analgesic,” “receptor,” and “individual opioid drugs.” Clinical and preclinical studies were reviewed for data synthesis. RESULTS Mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance suggest important drug- and patient-related risk factors that lead to tolerance and withdrawal. Opioid tolerance occurs earlier in the younger age groups, develops commonly during critical illness, and results more frequently from prolonged intravenous infusions of short-acting opioids. Treatment options include slowly tapering opioid doses, switching to longer-acting opioids, or specifically treating the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Novel therapies may also include blocking the mechanisms of opioid tolerance, which would enhance the safety and effectiveness of opioid analgesia. CONCLUSIONS Opioid tolerance and withdrawal occur frequently in critically ill children. Novel insights into opioid receptor physiology and cellular biochemical changes will inform scientific approaches for the use of opioid analgesia and the prevention of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. PMID:20403936

  7. Individual differences in orexin-I receptor modulation of motivation for the opioid remifentanil.

    PubMed

    Porter-Stransky, Kirsten A; Bentzley, Brandon S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2017-03-01

    Orexin-1 receptors (Ox1Rs) have been implicated in the motivation for drugs of abuse. Here, we utilized a within-session behavioral-economics threshold procedure to screen for individual differences in economic demand for the ultra-short-acting opioid remifentanil and to test whether antagonism of Ox1Rs reduces remifentanil demand. The behavioral-economics procedure revealed robust individual differences in free consumption of remifentanil (Q0 parameter; hedonic set point). Rats with low baseline Q0 (low takers) displayed high demand elasticity (α parameter; reduced responding as drug price increased indicating low motivation for drug), whereas subjects with a higher Q0 (high takers) exhibit low demand elasticity (low α) by continuing to self-administer remifentanil despite increased cost (reflecting higher motivation for drug). In a punished responding paradigm utilizing footshock, subjects that were classified as high takers at baseline withstood twice as much shock as low takers to continue self-administering remifentanil. Interestingly, Ox1R antagonism with SB-334867 reduced Q0 and increased α in low takers but not in high takers. Similarly, the Ox1R antagonist attenuated cue-induced, but not drug-induced, reinstatement of remifentanil seeking in low takers but had no significant effect on reinstatement of drug seeking in high takers. Together, these data reveal a novel role of orexins in demand for remifentanil: Ox1Rs modulate demand in low takers but not in individuals that exhibit addictive-like behaviors (high takers). Finally, the behavioral assays in this study can serve as a novel laboratory model for studying individual differences in opioid use disorders.

  8. κ-opioid Receptor Gene as a Predictor of Response in a Cocaine Vaccine Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, D.A.; Hamon, S.C.; Kosten, T.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined a pharmacogenetic association between a variant in the κ-opioid receptor (OPRK1) gene and the response to treatment with a cocaine vaccine tested in a recent clinical trial. This gene has a protective allele for opiate addiction that may act by inhibiting dopamine activation associated with reinforcement. Methods Sixty-nine DNA samples were obtained from 114 cocaine and opioid dependent subjects who were enrolled in a 16 week Phase IIb randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial and who received five vaccinations over the first 12 weeks. We genotyped 66 of these subjects for the rs6473797 variant of the OPRK1 gene and we compared vaccine to placebo subjects in terms of cocaine-free urines over time. Results Using repeated measures analysis of variance, corrected for population structure, vaccine pharmacotherapy reduced cocaine positive urines significantly based on OPRK1 genotype. In subjects treated with the cocaine vaccine, those who were homozygous for the protective A allele of rs6473797 had the proportion of positive urines drop from 78% to 51% on vaccine (point-wise P < .0001, experiment-wise P <.005), while the positive urines of those individuals carrying the non-protective, risk G allele dropped from 82% to 77%. Strong interactions of treatment by SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) reflected a lower baseline and significant reduction for placebo subjects with the risk G allele (P <0.00001). Conclusions This study indicates that a patient’s OPRK1 genotype could be used to identify a subset of individuals for which vaccine treatment may be an effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence. PMID:23995774

  9. Morphine Protects against Methylmercury Intoxication: A Role for Opioid Receptors in Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Almeida, Mauro B.; Souza Monteiro, José R.; Macchi, Barbarella de Matos; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Crespo-Lopez, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely dangerous environmental contaminant responsible for episodes of human intoxication throughout the world. Methylmercury, the most toxic compound of this metal, mainly targets the central nervous system, accumulating preferentially in cells of glial origin and causing oxidative stress. Despite studies demonstrating the current exposure of human populations, the consequences of mercury intoxication and concomitant use of drugs targeting the central nervous system (especially drugs used in long-term treatments, such as analgesics) are completely unknown. Morphine is a major option for pain management; its global consumption more than quadrupled in the last decade. Controversially, morphine has been proposed to function in oxidative stress independent of the activation of the opioid receptors. In this work, a therapeutic concentration of morphine partially protected the cellular viability of cells from a C6 glioma cell line exposed to methylmercury. Morphine treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation and totally prevented increases in nitrite levels in those cells. A mechanistic study revealed no alteration in sulfhydryl groups or direct scavenging at this opioid concentration. Interestingly, the opioid antagonist naloxone completely eliminated the protective effect of morphine against methylmercury intoxication, pointing to opioid receptors as the major contributor to this action. Taken together, the experiments in the current study provide the first demonstration that a therapeutic concentration of morphine is able to reduce methylmercury-induced oxidative damage and cell death by activating the opioid receptors. Thus, these receptors may be a promising pharmacological target for modulating the deleterious effects of mercury intoxication. Although additional studies are necessary, our results support the clinical safety of using this opioid in methylmercury-intoxicated patients, suggesting that normal analgesic doses could confer an additional

  10. Herkinorin dilates cerebral vessels via kappa opioid receptor and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Wang, Zhenhong; Ma, Nan; Riley, John; Armstead, William M; Liu, Renyu

    2013-01-15

    Since herkinorin is the first non-opioid mu agonist derived from salvinorin A that has the ability to induce cerebral vascular dilatation, we hypothesized that herkinorin could have similar vascular dilatation effect via the mu and kappa opioid receptors and the cAMP pathway. The binding affinities of herkinorin to kappa and mu opioid receptors were determined by in-vitro competition binding assays. The cerebral arteries were monitored in piglets equipped with a closed cranial window and the artery responses were recorded before and every 30s after injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the presence or absence of the investigated drugs: herkinorion, norbinaltorphimine (NTP), a kappa opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), a mu opioid receptor antagonist, or Rp-8-Br-cAMPS (Rp-cAMPS), an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA). CSF samples were collected before and 10 min after herkinorin and NTP administration for the measurement of cAMP levels. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Our results show that herkinorin binds to both kappa and mu opioid receptors. Its vasodilation effect is totally abolished by NTP, but is not affected by β-FNA. The levels of cAMP in the CSF elevate after herkinorin administration, but are abolished with NTP administration. The cerebral vasodilative effect of herkinorin is also blunted by Rp-cAMPS. In conclusion, as a non-opioid kappa and mu opioid receptor agonist, herkinorin exhibits cerebral vascular dilatation effect. The dilatation is mediated though the kappa opioid receptor rather than the mu opioid receptor. cAMP signaling also plays an important role in this process.

  11. Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate where Fear Is Expressed Following Extinction Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2011-01-01

    Six experiments used a within-subjects renewal design to examine the involvement of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in regulating the expression and recovery of extinguished fear. Rats were trained to fear a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) via pairings with foot shock in a distinctive context (A). This was followed by extinction training of the CS in…

  12. Recent advances on the δ opioid receptor: from trafficking to function

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Louis; Mittal, Nitish; Beaudry, Hélène; Walwyn, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Within the opioid family of receptors, δ (DOPrs) and μ opioid receptors (MOPrs) are typical GPCRs that activate canonical second-messenger signalling cascades to influence diverse cellular functions in neuronal and non-neuronal cell types. These receptors activate well-known pathways to influence ion channel function and pathways such as the map kinase cascade, AC and PI3K. In addition new information regarding opioid receptor-interacting proteins, downstream signalling pathways and resultant functional effects has recently come to light. In this review, we will examine these novel findings focusing on the DOPr and, in doing so, will contrast and compare DOPrs with MOPrs in terms of differences and similarities in function, signalling pathways, distribution and interactions. We will also discuss and clarify issues that have recently surfaced regarding the expression and function of DOPrs in different cell types and analgesia. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24665909

  13. A unique binding epitope for salvinorin A, a non-nitrogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Kane, Brian E; Nieto, Marcelo J; McCurdy, Christopher R; Ferguson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Salvinorin A is a potent kappa opioid receptor (KOP) agonist with unique structural and pharmacological properties. This non-nitrogenous ligand lacks nearly all the structural features commonly associated with opioid ligand binding and selectivity. This study explores the structural basis to salvinorin A binding and selectivity using a combination of chimeric and single-point mutant opioid receptors. The experiments were designed based on previous models of salvinorin A that locate the ligand within a pocket formed by transmembrane (TM) II, VI, and VII. More traditional sites of opioid recognition were also explored, including the highly conserved aspartate in TM III (D138) and the KOP selectivity site E297, to determine the role, if any, that these residues play in binding and selectivity. The results indicate that salvinorin A recognizes a cluster of residues in TM II and VII, including Q115, Y119, Y312, Y313, and Y320. Based on the position of these residues within the receptor, and prior study on salvinorin A, a model is proposed that aligns the ligand vertically, between TM II and VII. In this orientation, the ligand spans residues that are spaced one to two turns down the face of the helices within the receptor cavity. The ligand is also in close proximity to EL-2 which, based on chimeric data, is proposed to play an indirect role in salvinorin A binding and selectivity.

  14. Chronic exposure to morphine decreases the expression of EAAT3 via opioid receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingyan; Cao, Dexiong; Zhu, Siyu; Fu, Ganglan; Wu, Qiang; Liang, Jianjun; Cao, Minghui

    2015-12-02

    Alterations in glutamate transporter expression are closely related to opiate addition behavior, but the role of opioid receptors is unclear. In this study, we used primary cultures of hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats to study the effects of chronic exposure to morphine on excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) expression and the roles of µ opioid receptor (MOR), δ opioid receptor (DOR), and κ opioid receptor (KOR) in the morphine-dependent alterations in EAAT3 expression. The results showed that the EAAT3 protein and mRNA expression levels decreased significantly after chronic exposure to morphine (10μmol/L) for 48h, whereas the concentration of extracellular glutamate increased. In addition, we found that both the MOR inhibitor CTOP and the DOR inhibitor naltrindole could reverse the decreased expression of EAAT3 after exposure to morphine, whereas the MOR activator DAMGO and the DOR activator DPDPE significantly decreased EAAT3 expression. The KOR inhibitor had no effect on the expression of EAAT3, whereas its activator increased EAAT3 expression. These results suggest that the down-regulation of morphine-dependent EAAT3 expression in primary rat hippocampal cultures may be mediated by MOR and DOR and that KOR may not contribute significantly to this effect.

  15. Opioid receptor selectivity profile change via isosterism for 14-O-substitued naltrexone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Yuan, Yunyun; Beletskaya, Irina O.; Selley, Dana E.

    2013-01-01

    Isosterism is commonly used in drug discovery and development to address stability, selectivity, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy issues. A series of 14-O-substituted naltrexone derivatives were identified as potent mu opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists with improved selectivity over the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR), compared to naltrexone. Since esters are not metabolically very stable under typical physiological conditions, their corresponding amide analogs were thus synthesized and biologically evaluated. Unlike their isosteres, most of these novel ligands seem to be dually selective for the MOR and the KOR over the DOR. The restricted flexibility of the amide bond linkage might be responsible for their altered selectivity profile. However, the majority of the 14-N-substituted naltrexone derivatives produced marginal or no MOR stimulation in the 35S-GTP[γS] assay, which resembled their ester analogs. The current study thus indicated that the 14-substituted naltrexone isosteres are not bioisosteres since they have distinctive pharmacological profile with the regard to their opioid receptor binding affinity and selectivity. PMID:23721804

  16. Opioid receptor selectivity profile change via isosterism for 14-O-substituted naltrexone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Yuan, Yunyun; Beletskaya, Irina O; Selley, Dana E

    2013-07-01

    Isosterism is commonly used in drug discovery and development to address stability, selectivity, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy issues. A series of 14-O-substituted naltrexone derivatives were identified as potent mu opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists with improved selectivity over the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR), compared to naltrexone. Since esters are not metabolically very stable under typical physiological conditions, their corresponding amide analogs were thus synthesized and biologically evaluated. Unlike their isosteres, most of these novel ligands seem to be dually selective for the MOR and the KOR over the DOR. The restricted flexibility of the amide bond linkage might be responsible for their altered selectivity profile. However, the majority of the 14-N-substituted naltrexone derivatives produced marginal or no MOR stimulation in the (35)S-GTP[γS] assay, which resembled their ester analogs. The current study thus indicated that the 14-substituted naltrexone isosteres are not bioisosteres since they have distinctive pharmacological profile with the regard to their opioid receptor binding affinity and selectivity.

  17. Regulator of G protein signaling proteins differentially modulate signaling of μ and δ opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihua; Li, Zhisong; Guo, Lei; Ye, Caiying; Li, Juan; Yu, Xiaoli; Yang, Huifen; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Chongguang; Zhang, Dechang; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Effects of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins on μ and δ opioid receptors were investigated in HEK293 cells. Co-expression of RGS1, RGS2, RGS4, RGS9, RGS10 or RGS19 (Gα-interacting protein (GAIP)) significantly reduced [Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO)-induced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC) mediated by μ opioid receptor, but only RGS9 decreased the effects of [Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-p-Chloro-Phe-D-Pen]-Enkephalin (DPDPE) mediated by δ opioid receptor. When C-tails of the receptors were exchanged (μ/δC and δ/μC chimeras), RGS proteins decreased δ/μC-mediated AC inhibition, but none had significant effects on that via μ/δC receptor. Thus, the C-terminal domains of the receptors are critical for the differential effects of RGS proteins, which may be due to differences in receptor - G protein - RGS protein interactions in signaling complexes. PMID:17433292

  18. Synthesis and SAR study of opioid receptor ligands: mono- and bis-indolomorphinans.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuying; Yin, Chenlei; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jinggen; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Ao

    2009-10-01

    Mono- and bis-indolomorphinans were synthesized through a multi-step synthetic approach from the alkaloid, thebaine, to further explore the C-ring SAR (structure-activity relationship) of morphinan scaffold. Both mono-indoles displayed good binding affinity and selectivity for the delta receptor, with compound 6b possessed the highest K(i) value of 1.45 nm at this receptor. Bisindolomorphinans 7a,b did not have appreciable affinity for both delta and kappa receptors, but moderate binding at the mu receptor was observed. Functional assays indicated that the newly synthesized mono-indole 6b was delta-agonist, opposite to the delta-antagonist profile of naltrindole. Bisindoles 7a,b were mu-agonists. This work further confirms that the phenol component in opioids is essential for higher binding to the opioid receptors. The different binding ability, receptor selectivity, and the functional activity profiles of naltrindole 2, monoindole 6b, and bisindole 7b clearly indicated that they interact with the opioid receptors in different modes.

  19. Ligand-Specific Regulation of the Endogenous Mu-Opioid Receptor by Chronic Treatment with Mu-Opioid Peptide Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Murányi, Marianna; Cinar, Resat; Kékesi, Orsolya; Birkás, Erika; Fábián, Gabriella; Bozó, Beáta; Zentai, András; Tóth, Géza; Kicsi, Emese Gabriella; Mácsai, Mónika; Szabó, Gyula; Szücs, Mária

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endomorphins (EM), the postulated endogenous peptide agonists of the mu-opioid receptors, several analogues have been synthesized to improve their binding and pharmacological profiles. We have shown previously that a new analogue, cis-1S,2R-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid2-endomorphin-2 (ACHC-EM2), had elevated mu-receptor affinity, selectivity, and proteolytic stability over the parent compound. In the present work, we have studied its antinociceptive effects and receptor regulatory processes. ACHC-EM2 displayed a somewhat higher (60%) acute antinociceptive response than the parent peptide, EM2 (45%), which peaked at 10 min after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration in the rat tail-flick test. Analgesic tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of ACHC-EM2 upon its repeated icv injection that was complete by a 10-day treatment. This was accompanied by attenuated coupling of mu-sites to G-proteins in subcellular fractions of rat brain. Also, the density of mu-receptors was upregulated by about 40% in the light membrane fraction, with no detectable changes in surface binding. Distinct receptor regulatory processes were noted in subcellular fractions of rat brains made tolerant by the prototypic full mu-agonist peptide, DAMGO, and its chloromethyl ketone derivative, DAMCK. These results are discussed in light of the recently discovered phenomenon, that is, the “so-called biased agonism” or “functional selectivity”. PMID:24350273

  20. Ligand-specific regulation of the endogenous mu-opioid receptor by chronic treatment with mu-opioid peptide agonists.

    PubMed

    Murányi, Marianna; Cinar, Resat; Kékesi, Orsolya; Birkás, Erika; Fábián, Gabriella; Bozó, Beáta; Zentai, András; Tóth, Géza; Kicsi, Emese Gabriella; Mácsai, Mónika; Dochnal, Roberta; Szabó, Gyula; Szücs, Mária

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endomorphins (EM), the postulated endogenous peptide agonists of the mu-opioid receptors, several analogues have been synthesized to improve their binding and pharmacological profiles. We have shown previously that a new analogue, cis-1S,2R-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid(2)-endomorphin-2 (ACHC-EM2), had elevated mu-receptor affinity, selectivity, and proteolytic stability over the parent compound. In the present work, we have studied its antinociceptive effects and receptor regulatory processes. ACHC-EM2 displayed a somewhat higher (60%) acute antinociceptive response than the parent peptide, EM2 (45%), which peaked at 10 min after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration in the rat tail-flick test. Analgesic tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of ACHC-EM2 upon its repeated icv injection that was complete by a 10-day treatment. This was accompanied by attenuated coupling of mu-sites to G-proteins in subcellular fractions of rat brain. Also, the density of mu-receptors was upregulated by about 40% in the light membrane fraction, with no detectable changes in surface binding. Distinct receptor regulatory processes were noted in subcellular fractions of rat brains made tolerant by the prototypic full mu-agonist peptide, DAMGO, and its chloromethyl ketone derivative, DAMCK. These results are discussed in light of the recently discovered phenomenon, that is, the "so-called biased agonism" or "functional selectivity".

  1. Activation of mu-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral orbital cortex inhibits the GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chao-Ling; Huo, Fu-Quan; Huang, Fen-Sheng; Tang, Jing-Shi

    2015-04-10

    Previous studies have indicated that mu-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO) are involved in antinociception in tail flick tests and GABAergic neurons or terminals express mu-opioid receptors in the VLO. The current study examined the effect of selective mu-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO on the GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in the VLO in rats using the whole-cell patch clamp. The results demonstrated that 5 μM DAMGO application into the rat VLO slices significantly reduced the GABAergic mIPSCs frequency, without any effect on its amplitude, and this effect of DAMGO was reversed by pretreatment with selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist 1 μM CTOP. Importantly, application of CTOP alone into the VLO slices did not produce any effect on the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic mIPSCs. These results indicate a presynaptic effect of mu-opioid receptor activation on the GABAergic neurons in the VLO. The current data suggests that a presynaptic inhibition of the GABA release may contribute to the mu-opioid receptor mediated effects in the VLO and provides novel electrophysiological evidence for the underlying mechanisms of mu-opioid receptors in the VLO.

  2. Low doses of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors rapidly evoke opioid receptor-mediated thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice which is converted to prominent analgesia by cotreatment with ultra-low-dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Crain, Stanley M; Shen, Ke-Fei

    2008-09-22

    Systemic (s.c.) injection in naïve mice of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) inhibitors, e.g. 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [(IBMX) or caffeine, 10 mg/kg] or the more specific cAMP-PDE inhibitor, rolipram (1 mug/kg), rapidly evokes thermal hyperalgesia (lasting >5 h). These effects appear to be mediated by enhanced excitatory opioid receptor signaling, as occurs during withdrawal in opioid-dependent mice. Cotreatment of these mice with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX, 0.1 ng/kg-1 pg/kg, s.c.) results in prominent opioid analgesia (lasting >4 h) even when the dose of rolipram is reduced to 1 pg/kg. Cotreatment of these cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice with an ultra-low-dose (0.1 ng/kg) of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) or the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) also results in opioid analgesia. These excitatory effects of cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice may be mediated by enhanced release of small amounts of endogenous bimodally-acting (excitatory/inhibitory) opioid agonists by neurons in nociceptive networks. Ultra-low-dose NTX, nor-BNI or beta-FNA selectively antagonizes high-efficacy excitatory (hyperalgesic) Gs-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling in naïve mice and results in rapid conversion to inhibitory (analgesic) Gi/Go-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling which normally requires activation by much higher doses of opioid agonists. Cotreatment with a low subanalgesic dose of kelatorphan, an inhibitor of multiple endogenous opioid peptide-degrading enzymes, stabilizes endogenous opioid agonists released by cAMP-PDE inhibitors, resulting in conversion of the hyperalgesia to analgesia without requiring selective blockade of excitatory opioid receptor signaling. The present study provides a novel pharmacologic paradigm that may facilitate development of valuable non-narcotic clinical analgesics utilizing cotreatment with ultra-low-dose rolipram plus ultra-low-dose NTX or related

  3. Pharmacological evidence for the mediation of the panicolytic effect of fluoxetine by dorsal periaqueductal gray matter μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila Marroni; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-12-01

    Previously reported results have shown that the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine on escape behavior, interpreted as a panicolytic-like effect, is blocked by pretreatment with either the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) antagonist WAY100635 via injection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG). Additionally, reported evidence indicates that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) interacts with the 5-HT1A-R in the dPAG. In the present work, pretreatment of the dPAG with the selective MOR blocker CTOP antagonized the anti-escape effect of chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 21 days), as measured in the elevated T-maze (ETM) test, indicating mediation of this effect by the MOR. In addition, the combined administration of sub-effective doses of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO (intra-dPAG) and sub-effective doses of chronic as well as subchronic (7 days) fluoxetine increased avoidance and escape latencies, suggesting that the activation of MORs may facilitate and accelerate the effects of fluoxetine. The current observation that MORs located in the dPAG mediate the anti-escape effect of fluoxetine may open new perspectives for the development of more efficient and fast-acting panic-alleviating drugs.

  4. Micro opioid receptor A118G polymorphism and post-operative pain: opioids' effects on heterozygous patients.

    PubMed

    De Capraris, A; Cinnella, G; Marolla, A; Salatto, P; Da Lima, S; Vetuschi, P; Consoletti, L; Gesualdo, L; Dambrosio, M

    2011-01-01

    The single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) 118A>G in the micro-1 opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) is associated with a decrease in the analgesic effects of opioids. The aim of this study is to assess whether 118A >G polymorphism could influence the analgesic response to opioid-based postoperative pain (POP) therapy. The study consisted of two parts: section alpha, observational, included 199 subjects undergoing scheduled surgical procedures with pain management standardized on surgery invasiveness and on expected level of postoperative pain; section beta, randomized, included 41 women undergoing scheduled caesarean delivery with continuous intra-operative epidural anesthesia and post-operative analgesia (CEA). In both sections, POP was measured over 48 h (T6h-T24h-T48h) by the visual analogue scale (VAS). In section beta we also tested the responsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) expressed by cortisol levels. In section alpha, with cluster analysis, subjects were analyzed according to their genotype: a group (no. 1) of 34 patients reporting VAS score >3 at every time lapse was identified and included only A118G carriers, while wild-type (A118A - absence of 118A>G polymorphism) patients were unevenly distributed between those with cluster no. 2 (VAS score <3 at every study steps) and those with cluster no. 3 (VAS score progressively reducing from T6h). In section beta, A118G carriers receiving epidural sufentanil had the lowest VAS scores at T24h; also in these patients, cortisol levels remained more stable, with a mild decrease at T6h. This study shows that the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism affects postoperative pain response in heterozygous patients: they have a different postoperative pain response than patients with wild-type genes, which may affect the efficacy of the analgesic therapy.

  5. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome.

  6. The in vitro pharmacology of the peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists, alvimopan, ADL 08-0011 and methylnaltrexone.

    PubMed

    Beattie, D T; Cheruvu, M; Mai, N; O'Keefe, M; Johnson-Rabidoux, S; Peterson, C; Kaufman, E; Vickery, R

    2007-05-01

    This study characterized the pharmacology of the peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists, alvimopan, its metabolite, ADL 08-0011, and methylnaltrexone. The activities of the compounds were investigated with respect to human or guinea pig opioid receptor binding and function in recombinant cell lines and mechanical responsiveness of the guinea pig ileum. Alvimopan and ADL 08-0011 had higher binding affinity than methylnaltrexone at human mu opioid receptors (pK (i) values of 9.6, 9.6, and 8.0, respectively). The compounds had different selectivities for the mu receptor over human delta and guinea pig kappa opioid receptors. ADL 08-0011 had the highest mu receptor selectivity. With respect to their mu opioid receptor functional activity ([(35)S]GTPgammaS incorporation), methylnaltrexone had a positive intrinsic activity, consistent with partial agonism, unlike alvimopan and ADL 08-0011, which had negative intrinsic activities. Alvimopan, ADL 08-0011, and methylnaltrexone antagonized inhibitory responses mediated by the mu opioid agonist, endomorphin-1 (pA (2) values of 9.6, 9.4, and 7.6, respectively) and by U69593, a kappa opioid agonist (pA (2) values of 8.4, 7.2, and 6.7, respectively). In morphine-naive guinea pig ileum, methylnaltrexone reduced, while alvimopan and ADL 08-0011 increased, the amplitude of electrically evoked contractions and spontaneous mechanical activity. In tissue from morphine-dependent animals, alvimopan and ADL 08-0011 increased spontaneous activity to a greater degree than methylnaltrexone. The data suggested that alvimopan-induced contractions resulted predominantly from an interaction with kappa opioid receptors. It is concluded that alvimopan, ADL 08-0011, and methylnaltrexone differ in their in vitro pharmacological properties, particularly with respect to opioid receptor subtype selectivity and intrinsic activity. The clinical significance of the data from this study remains to be determined.

  7. Remifentanil produces cross-desensitization and tolerance with morphine on the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nowoczyn, M; Marie, N; Coulbault, L; Hervault, M; Davis, A; Hanouz, J L; Allouche, S

    2013-10-01

    Remifentanil is a powerful mu-opioid (MOP) receptor agonist used in anaesthesia with a very short half-life. However, per-operative perfusion of remifentanil was shown to increase morphine consumption during post-operative period to relieve pain. In the present study, we aimed to describe the cellular mechanisms responsible for this apparent reduction of morphine efficacy. For this purpose, we first examined the pharmacological properties of both remifentanil and morphine at the MOP receptor, endogenously expressed in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, to regulate adenylyl cyclase and the MAP kinase ERK1/2 pathway, their potency to promote MOP receptor phosphorylation, arrestin 3-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) recruitment and receptor trafficking during acute and sustained exposure. In the second part of this work, we studied the effects of a prior exposure of remifentanil on morphine-induced inhibition of cAMP accumulation, activation of ERK1/2 and analgesia. We showed that sustained exposure to remifentanil promoted a rapid desensitization of opioid receptors on both signalling pathways and a pretreatment with this agonist reduced signal transduction produced by a second challenge with morphine. While both opioid agonists promoted Ser(375) phosphorylation on MOP receptor, remifentanil induced a rapid internalization of opioid receptors compared to morphine but without detectable arrestin 3-CFP translocation to the plasma membrane in our experimental conditions. Lastly, a cross-tolerance between remifentanil and morphine was observed in mice using the hot plate test. Our in vitro and in vivo data thus demonstrated that remifentanil produced a rapid desensitization and internalization of the MOP receptor that would reduce the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine.

  8. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  9. Bioorthogonal click chemistry to assay mu-opioid receptor palmitoylation using 15-hexadecynoic acid and immunoprecipitation

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Brittany; Petko, Jessica; Levenson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a modification of bioorthogonal click chemistry to assay the palmitoylation of cellular proteins. This assay utilizes 15-hexadecynoic acid (15-HDYA) as a chemical probe in combination with protein immunoprecipitation using magnetic beads in order to detect S-palmitoylation of proteins of interest. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach for the mu-opioid receptor (MOR), a GPCR responsible for mediating the analgesic and addictive properties of most clinically relevant opioid agonist drugs. This technique provides a rapid, non-isotopic, and efficient method to assay the palmitoylation status of a variety of cellular proteins including most GPCRs. PMID:24463015

  10. Involvement of Mu Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Protective Effect of Opioid against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar-Vaghefi, Shahrzad; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Elyasi, Leila; Abbasnejad, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The neuroprotective role of opioid morphine against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death has been demonstrated. However, the exact mechanism(s) underlying such neuroprotection, especially the role of subtype receptors, has not yet been fully clarified. Methods: Here, we investigated the effects of different opioid agonists on 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of Parkinson’s disease. Cell damage was induced by 150 μM 6-OHDA and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Immunoblot technique was used to evaluate cytochrome-c and activated caspase-3 as biochemical markers of apoptosis induction. Results: The data showed that 6-OHDA caused significant cell damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium levels as well as activated caspase-3 and cytochrome-c release. Incubation of SH-SY5Y cells with μ-opioid agonists, morphine and DAMGO, but not with δ-opioid agonist, DADLE, elicited protective effect and reduced biochemical markers of cell damage and death. Discussion: The results suggest that μ-opioid receptors signaling participate in the opioid neuroprotective effects against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26904174

  11. A mu-delta opioid receptor brain atlas reveals neuronal co-occurrence in subcortical networks.

    PubMed

    Erbs, Eric; Faget, Lauren; Scherrer, Gregory; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Koch, Marc; Kessler, Pascal; Hentsch, Didier; Birling, Marie-Christine; Koutsourakis, Manoussos; Vasseur, Laurent; Veinante, Pierre; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Opioid receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration, including autonomic, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. Mu (MOR) and delta (DOR) opioid receptors functionally interact in vivo, but whether interactions occur at circuitry, cellular or molecular levels remains unsolved. To challenge the hypothesis of MOR/DOR heteromerization in the brain, we generated redMOR/greenDOR double knock-in mice and report dual receptor mapping throughout the nervous system. Data are organized as an interactive database offering an opioid receptor atlas with concomitant MOR/DOR visualization at subcellular resolution, accessible online. We also provide co-immunoprecipitation-based evidence for receptor heteromerization in these mice. In the forebrain, MOR and DOR are mainly detected in separate neurons, suggesting system-level interactions in high-order processing. In contrast, neuronal co-localization is detected in subcortical networks essential for survival involved in eating and sexual behaviors or perception and response to aversive stimuli. In addition, potential MOR/DOR intracellular interactions within the nociceptive pathway offer novel therapeutic perspectives.

  12. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: role of the furan in affinity for opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Denise S; Lovell, Kimberly M; Lozama, Anthony; Han, Nina; Day, Victor W; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2009-09-21

    Further synthetic modification of the furan ring of salvinorin A (1), the major active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. A computational study has predicted 1 to be a reproductive toxicant in mammals and is suggestive that use of 1 may be associated with adverse effects. We report in this study that piperidine 21 and thiomorpholine 23 have been identified as selective partial agonists at kappa opioid receptors. This indicates that additional structural modifications of 1 may provide ligands with good selectivity for opioid receptors but with reduced potential for toxicity.

  13. Exploration of Bivalent Ligands Targeting Putative Mu Opioid Receptor and Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher K.; Falls, Bethany A.; Yuan, Yunyun; Raborg, Thomas J.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Selley, Dana E.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapies have provided HIV-1 infected patients longer lifespans and better quality of life. However, several neurological complications are now being seen in these patients due to HIV-1 associated injury of neurons by infected microglia and astrocytes. In addition, these effects can be further exacerbated with opiate use and abuse. One possible mechanism for such potentiation effects of opiates is the interaction of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) with the chemokine receptor CCR5 (CCR5), a known HIV-1 co-receptor, to form MOR-CCR5 heterodimer. In an attempt to understand this putative interaction and its relevance to neuroAIDS, we designed and synthesized a series of bivalent ligands targeting the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer. To understand how these bivalent ligands may interact with the heterodimer, biological studies including calcium mobilization inhibition, binding affinity, HIV-1 invasion, and cell fusion assays were applied. In particular, HIV-1 infection assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and astrocytes revealed a notable synergy in activity for one particular bivalent ligand. Further, a molecular model of the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer was constructed, docked with the bivalent ligand, and molecular dynamics simulations of the complex was performed in a membrane-water system to help understand the biological observation. PMID:27720326

  14. Molecular signatures of mu opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor 2 in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jorand, Raphael; Biswas, Sunetra; Wakefield, Devin L.; Tobin, Steven J.; Golfetto, Ottavia; Hilton, Kelsey; Ko, Michelle; Ramos, Joe W.; Small, Alexander R.; Chu, Peiguo; Singh, Gagandeep; Jovanovic-Talisman, Tijana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a particularly aggressive malignancy, has been linked to atypical levels, certain mutations, and aberrant signaling of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs have been challenging to target in cancer because they organize into complex networks in tumor cells. To dissect such networks with nanometer-scale precision, here we combine traditional biochemical approaches with superresolution microscopy methods. A novel interaction specific to PDAC is identified between mu opioid receptor (MOR) and somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2). Although MOR and SSTR2 did not colocalize in healthy pancreatic cells or matching healthy patient tissues, the pair did significantly colocalize in pancreatic cancer cells, multicellular tumor spheroids, and cancerous patient tissues. Moreover, this association in pancreatic cancer cells correlated with functional cross-talk and increased metastatic potential of cells. Coactivation of MOR and SSTR2 in PDAC cells led to increased expression of mesenchymal markers and decreased expression of an epithelial marker. Together these results suggest that the MOR-SSTR2 heteromer may constitute a novel therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:27682590

  15. Molecular signatures of mu opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor 2 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jorand, Raphael; Biswas, Sunetra; Wakefield, Devin L; Tobin, Steven J; Golfetto, Ottavia; Hilton, Kelsey; Ko, Michelle; Ramos, Joe W; Small, Alexander R; Chu, Peiguo; Singh, Gagandeep; Jovanovic-Talisman, Tijana

    2016-11-07

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a particularly aggressive malignancy, has been linked to atypical levels, certain mutations, and aberrant signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs have been challenging to target in cancer because they organize into complex networks in tumor cells. To dissect such networks with nanometer-scale precision, here we combine traditional biochemical approaches with superresolution microscopy methods. A novel interaction specific to PDAC is identified between mu opioid receptor (MOR) and somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2). Although MOR and SSTR2 did not colocalize in healthy pancreatic cells or matching healthy patient tissues, the pair did significantly colocalize in pancreatic cancer cells, multicellular tumor spheroids, and cancerous patient tissues. Moreover, this association in pancreatic cancer cells correlated with functional cross-talk and increased metastatic potential of cells. Coactivation of MOR and SSTR2 in PDAC cells led to increased expression of mesenchymal markers and decreased expression of an epithelial marker. Together these results suggest that the MOR-SSTR2 heteromer may constitute a novel therapeutic target for PDAC.

  16. Synthesis of iboga-like isoquinuclidines: Dual opioid receptors agonists having antinociceptive properties.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tuhin Suvro; Paul, Sibasish; Sinha, Surajit; Das, Sumantra

    2014-11-01

    Some novel iboga-analogues consisting of benzofuran moiety and dehydroisoquinuclidine ring connected by -CH2-, (CH2)2 and (CH2)3 linkers have been synthesized with the view to develop potential antinociceptive drugs. The compounds 14 and 21 showed binding at the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), while the compound 11a exhibited dual affinities at both MOR and κ-opioid receptor (KOR). MAP kinase activation indicated all three compounds have opioid agonistic properties. The presence of a double bond and endo-methylcarboxylate group in the dehydroisoquinuclidine ring and the benzofuran and methylene spacer appeared to be essential for opioid receptor binding. Further studies demonstrated 11a caused significant antinociception in mice in the hot-plate test which was comparable to that produced by morphine. The compound 11a was also found to be nontremorigenic unlike various iboga congeners. This study identifies a new pharmacophore which may lead to the development of suitable substitute of morphine in the treatment of pain.

  17. PET imaging reveals sex differences in kappa opioid receptor availability in humans, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Wang, Shuo; Worhunsky, Patrick; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Ropchan, Jim; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Huang, Yiyun; Morris, Evan D

    2016-01-01

    Opioid receptors may play critical roles in alcoholism and other addictions, addiction withdrawal, and depression and are considered pharmacological targets for treatment of these conditions. Sex differences have been demonstrated in mu (MOR) and delta (DOR) opioid receptors in humans, in vivo. In addition, sex differences have been observed in efficacy of treatment targeting kappa opioid receptors (KOR). Our goal in the present study was to compare the availability of KOR (1) between healthy control (HC) men and women. Twenty-seven subjects-18 males (M) and 9 females (F)-underwent PET scans with [(11)C] LY2795050, a selective kappa antagonist tracer. Partial volume correction was applied to all PET data. Volume of distribution (V T) of the tracer was estimated regionally as well as at the voxel level. V T values of males versus females were compared for 19 defined ROIs. Results at the regional and voxel levels were consistent. Males had significantly higher V T and thus a higher KOR availability than women in multiple brain regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of sex differences in the KOR system in humans, in vivo. These findings could have implications for the treatment of pain with kappa opioid analgesics. The results may also have an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of addictive and other disorders.

  18. PET imaging reveals sex differences in kappa opioid receptor availability in humans, in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Wang, Shuo; Worhunsky, Patrick; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Ropchan, Jim; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Huang, Yiyun; Morris, Evan D

    2016-01-01

    Opioid receptors may play critical roles in alcoholism and other addictions, addiction withdrawal, and depression and are considered pharmacological targets for treatment of these conditions. Sex differences have been demonstrated in mu (MOR) and delta (DOR) opioid receptors in humans, in vivo. In addition, sex differences have been observed in efficacy of treatment targeting kappa opioid receptors (KOR). Our goal in the present study was to compare the availability of KOR (1) between healthy control (HC) men and women. Twenty-seven subjects-18 males (M) and 9 females (F)-underwent PET scans with [11C] LY2795050, a selective kappa antagonist tracer. Partial volume correction was applied to all PET data. Volume of distribution (V T) of the tracer was estimated regionally as well as at the voxel level. V T values of males versus females were compared for 19 defined ROIs. Results at the regional and voxel levels were consistent. Males had significantly higher V T and thus a higher KOR availability than women in multiple brain regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of sex differences in the KOR system in humans, in vivo. These findings could have implications for the treatment of pain with kappa opioid analgesics. The results may also have an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of addictive and other disorders. PMID:27648372

  19. Differential migratory properties of mouse, fish, and frog leukocytes treated with agonists of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chadzinska, Magdalena; Plytycz, Barbara

    2004-07-01

    Zymosan-induced peritoneal inflammation was inhibited by morphine co-injection in mice and fish but not in anuran amphibians. In present experiments, an in vitro migration of mouse, goldfish, and frog leukocytes to L15 medium, control serum (S) or zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) was recorded following cell preincubation with L15 or with agonists of mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors (morphine, deltorphine, or U-50,488H, respectively). In all species, migration of control leukocytes was in the order ZAS > S > L15. Pretreatment with morphine or deltorphine (but not with U-50,488H) enhanced leukocyte migration to L15 and S in each species, while it inhibited migration of mouse and fish (but not frog) leukocytes to ZAS, phenomena reversed by specific antagonists of mu and delta opioid receptors (CTOP or naltrindole, respectively). It seems that final effects of opioids on cell migration are dependent on a species-specific balance between up- and down-regulation of leukocyte migration resulted from interplay between receptors for opioids and chemotactic factors.

  20. µ-opioid Receptor Availability in the Amygdala is Associated with Smoking for Negative Affect Relief

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Mary; Gold, Allison B.; Wileyto, E. Paul; Ray, Riju; Ruparel, Kosha; Newberg, Andrew; Dubroff, Jacob; Logan, Jean; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Blendy, Julie A.; Lerman, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The perception that smoking relieves negative affect contributes to smoking persistence. Endogenous opioid neurotransmission, and the µ-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, plays a role in affective regulation and is modulated by nicotine. Objectives We examined the relationship of µ-opioid receptor binding availability in the amygdala to the motivation to smoke for negative affect relief and to the acute effects of smoking on affective responses. Methods Twenty-two smokers were scanned on two separate occasions after overnight abstinence using [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography imaging: after smoking a nicotine-containing cigarette and after smoking a denicotinized cigarette. Self-reports of smoking motives were collected at baseline, and measures of positive and negative affect were collected pre- and post- cigarette smoking. Results Higher MOR availability in the amygdala was associated with motivation to smoke to relieve negative affect. However, MOR availability was unrelated to changes in affect after smoking either cigarette. Conclusions Increased MOR availability in amygdala may underlie the motivation to smoke for negative affective relief. These results are consistent with previous data highlighting the role of µ-opioid receptor neurotransmission in smoking behavior. PMID:22389047

  1. Anatomical and functional correlation of the endomorphins with mu opioid receptor splice variants.

    PubMed

    Abbadie, C; Rossi, G C; Orciuolo, A; Zadina, J E; Pasternak, G W

    2002-09-01

    The present study characterizes the relationship between the endogenous mu opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and several splice variants of the cloned mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) encoded by the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm). Confocal laser microscopy revealed that fibers containing EM-2-like immunoreactivity (-LI) were distributed in close apposition to fibers showing MOR-1-LI (exon 4-LI) and to MOR-1C-LI (exons 7/8/9-LI) in the superficial laminae of the lumbar spinal cord. We also observed colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1-LI in a few fibers of lamina II, and colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1C-LI in laminae I-II, and V-VI. To assess the functional relevance of the MOR-1 variants in endomorphin analgesia, we examined the effects of antisense treatments that targeted individual exons within the Oprm1 gene on EM-1 and EM-2 analgesia in the tail flick test. This antisense mapping study implied mu opioid receptor mechanisms for the endomorphins are distinct from those of morphine or morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G).

  2. Kinase Cascades and Ligand-Directed Signaling at the Kappa Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Chavkin, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale The dynorphin / kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) system has been implicated as a critical component of the stress response. Stress-induced activation of dynorphin-KOR is well-known to produce analgesia, and more recently it has been implicated as a mediator of stress-induced responses including anxiety, depression, and reinstatement of drug seeking. Objective Drugs selectively targeting specific KOR signaling pathways may prove potentially useful as therapeutic treatments for mood and addiction disorders. Results KOR is a member of the seven transmembrane spanning (7TM) G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. KOR activation of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins leads to Gαi/o inhibition of adenylyl cyclase production of cAMP and releases Gβγ, which modulates the conductances of Ca+2 and K+ channels. In addition, KOR agonists activate kinase cascades including G-protein coupled Receptor Kinases (GRK) and members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family: ERK1/2, p38 and JNK. Recent pharmacological data suggests that GPCRs exist as dynamic, multi-conformational protein complexes that can be directed by specific ligands towards distinct signaling pathways. Ligand-induced conformations of KOR that evoke β–arrestin-dependent p38 MAPK activation result in aversion; whereas ligand-induced conformations that activate JNK without activating arrestin produce long-lasting inactivation of KOR signaling. Conclusions In this review, we discuss the current status of KOR signal transduction research and the data that support two novel hypotheses: 1) KOR selective partial agonists that do not efficiently activate p38 MAPK may be useful analgesics without producing the dysphoric or hallucinogenic effects of selective, highly efficacious KOR agonists and 2) KOR antagonists that do not activate JNK may be effective short-acting drugs that may promote stress-resilience. PMID:20401607

  3. Pharmacological studies on the NOP and opioid receptor agonist PWT2-[Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13).

    PubMed

    Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Ding, Huiping; Bird, Mark F; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ferrari, Federica; Malfacini, Davide; Rizzi, Anna; Ruzza, Chiara; Lambert, David G; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Calo, Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo

    2017-01-05

    An innovative chemical strategy named peptide welding technology (PWT) has been developed for the facile synthesis of tetrabranched peptides. [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 acts as a universal agonist for nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) and classical opioid receptors. The present study investigated the pharmacological profile of the PWT derivative of [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 (PWT2-[Dmt(1)]) in several assays in vitro and in vivo after spinal administration in monkeys subjected to the tail withdrawal assay. PWT2-[Dmt(1)] mimicked the effects of [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 displaying full agonist activity, similar affinity/potency and selectivity at human recombinant N/OFQ (NOP) and opioid receptors in receptor binding, stimulation of [(35)S]GTPγS binding, calcium mobilization in cells expressing chimeric G proteins, and BRET studies for measuring receptor/G-protein and receptor/β-arrestin 2 interaction. In vivo in monkeys PWT2-[Dmt(1)] elicited dose-dependent and robust antinociceptive effects being more potent and longer lasting than [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2. The analgesic action of PWT2-[Dmt(1)] was sensitive to the NOP receptor antagonist J-113397, but not naltrexone. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the tetrabranched derivative of [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 obtained with the PWT technology maintains the in vitro pharmacological profile of the parent peptide but displays higher potency and longer lasting action in vivo.

  4. Optimisation of in silico derived 2-aminobenzimidazole hits as unprecedented selective kappa opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Pradip K; Krishna, C Vamsee; Adabala, S Sudheerkumar; Roshaiah, M; Rawoof, Khaji Abdul; Thadi, Emima; Sukumar, K Pavan; Cheera, Srisailam; Abbineni, Chandrasekhar; Rao, K V L Narasimha; Prasanthi, A; Nijhawan, Kamal; Jaleel, Mahaboobi; Iyer, Lakshmi Ramachandran; Chaitanya, T Krishna; Tiwari, Nirbhay Kumar; Krishna, N Lavanya; Potluri, Vijay; Khanna, Ish; Frimurer, Thomas M; Lückmann, Michael; Rist, Øystein; Elster, Lisbeth; Högberg, Thomas

    2015-02-15

    Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is an important mediator of pain signaling and it is targeted for the treatment of various pains. Pharmacophore based mining of databases led to the identification of 2-aminobenzimidazole derivative as KOR agonists with selectivity over the other opioid receptors DOR and MOR. A short SAR exploration with the objective of identifying more polar and hence less brain penetrant agonists is described herewith. Modeling studies of the recently published structures of KOR, DOR and MOR are used to explain the receptor selectivity. The synthesis, biological evaluation and SAR of novel benzimidazole derivatives as KOR agonists are described. The in vivo proof of principle for anti-nociceptive effect with a lead compound from this series is exemplified.

  5. Tuned-Affinity Bivalent Ligands for the Characterization of Opioid Receptor Heteromers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors, including the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR), are important targets for the treatment of pain. Although there is mounting evidence that these receptors form heteromers, the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer remains unresolved. We have designed and synthesized bivalent ligands as tools to elucidate the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer. Our ligands (L2 and L4) are comprised of a compound with low affinity at the DOR tethered to a compound with high affinity at the MOR, with the goal of producing ligands with “tuned affinity” at MOR/DOR heteromers as compared to DOR homomers. Here, we show that both L2 and L4 demonstrate enhanced affinity at MOR/DOR heteromers as compared to DOR homomers, thereby providing unique pharmacological tools to dissect the role of the MOR/DOR heteromer in pain. PMID:23585918

  6. Low-dose naltrexone targets the opioid growth factor-opioid growth factor receptor pathway to inhibit cell proliferation: mechanistic evidence from a tissue culture model.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-09-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid antagonist that inhibits or accelerates cell proliferation in vivo when utilized in a low (LDN) or high (HDN) dose, respectively. The mechanism of opioid antagonist action on growth is not well understood. We established a tissue culture model of LDN and HDN using short-term and continuous opioid receptor blockade, respectively, in human ovarian cancer cells, and found that the duration of opioid receptor blockade determines cell proliferative response. The alteration of growth by NTX also was detected in cells representative of pancreatic, colorectal and squamous cell carcinomas. The opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor (OGFr) were responsible for mediating the action of NTX on cell proliferation. NTX upregulated OGF and OGFr at the translational but not at the transcriptional level. The mechanism of inhibition by short-term NTX required p16 and/or p21 cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinases, but was not dependent on cell survival (necrosis, apoptosis). Sequential administration of short-term NTX and OGF had a greater inhibitory effect on cell proliferation than either agent alone. Given the parallels between short-term NTX in vitro and LDN in vivo, we now demonstrate at the molecular level that the OGF-OGFr axis is a common pathway that is essential for the regulation of cell proliferation by NTX.

  7. Dietary peptides induce satiety via cholecystokinin-A and peripheral opioid receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Jelena; Anderson, G Harvey

    2002-09-01

    We hypothesized that the digestion of proteins gives rise to peptides that initiate several satiety signals from the gut, and that the signals arising will be dependent on the protein source. The role of peripheral opioid and cholecystokinin (CCK)-A receptors was investigated. Casein, soy protein, and casein and soy hydrolysates were administered to rats by gavage (0.5 g protein/4 mL water). Food intake was measured over 2 h. The opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide (1.0 mg/kg) given intraperitoneally (i.p.), increased food intake when given at the same time as the hydrolysate preloads, 25 min after the casein preloads and 55 min after the soy protein preloads. The CCK-A receptor antagonist, devazepide (which reverses protein-induced food intake suppression), when given at 0.25 mg/kg, i.p., 60 min before preloads of each of three soy hydrolysates, also blocked suppression of food intake, but the strength and duration of the interaction depended on the preparation. When the two receptor antagonists were both administered with soy or casein preloads, their effects were additive. We conclude that peptides arising from digestion contribute to satiety by independent activation of both opioid and CCK-A receptors.

  8. Buprenorphine is a weak partial agonist that inhibits opioid receptor desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Michael S.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Birdsong, William T.; Williams, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a weak partial agonist at mu-opioid receptors that is used for treatment of pain and addiction. Intracellular and whole cell recordings were made from locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in rat brain slices to characterize the actions of buprenorphine. Acute application of buprenorphine caused a hyperpolarization that was prevented by previous treatment of slices with the irreversible opioid antagonist, β-chlornaltrexamine (β-CNA), but was not reversed by a saturating concentration of naloxone. As expected for a partial agonist, sub-saturating concentrations of buprenorphine decreased the [Met]5 enkephalin (ME) induced hyperpolarization or outward current. When the ME induced current was decreased below a critical value, desensitization and internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MOR) was eliminated. The inhibition of desensitization by buprenorphine was not the result of prior desensitization, slow dissociation from the receptor, or elimination of receptor reserve. Treatment of slices with sub-saturating concentrations of etorphine, methadone, oxymorphone or β-CNA also reduced the current induced by ME but did not block ME-induced desensitization. Treatment of animals with buprenorphine for a week resulted in the inhibition of the current induced by ME and a block of desensitization that was not different from the acute application of buprenorphine to brain slices. These observations show the unique characteristics of buprenorphine and further demonstrate the range of agonist selective actions that are possible through G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:19494155

  9. Heteromers of μ-δ opioid receptors: new pharmacology and novel therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that heteromerization between μ (MOP) and δ (DOP) opioid receptors modulates the signalling properties of the individual receptors. For example, whereas activation of MOP receptors by an agonist induces G protein-mediated signalling, the same agonist induces β-arrestin-mediated signalling in the context of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer. Moreover, heteromer-mediated signalling is allosterically modulated by a combination of MOP and DOP receptor ligands. This has implications in analgesia given that morphine-induced antinociception can be potentiated by DOP receptor ligands. Recently reagents selectively targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer such as bivalent ligands, antibodies or membrane permeable peptides have been generated; these reagents are enabling studies to elucidate the contribution of endogenously expressed heteromers to analgesia as well as to the development of side-effects associated with chronic opioid use. Recent advances in drug screening technology have led to the identification of a MOP-DOP receptor heteromer-biased agonist that activates both G protein-mediated and β-arrestin-mediated signalling. Moreover, this heteromer-biased agonist exhibits potent antinociceptive activity but with reduced side-effects, suggesting that ligands targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer form a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. In this review, we summarize findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer and the in vitro and in vivo properties of heteromer-selective ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24571499

  10. In vivo neuronal co-expression of mu and delta opioid receptors uncovers new therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Erbs, Eric; Faget, Lauren; Veinante, Pierre; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors belong to the G protein coupled receptor family. They modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration and therefore impact on autonomous, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. In vivo functional interaction between mu and delta opioid receptors are known to take place though it is still debated whether interactions occur at circuitry, cellular or molecular level. Also, the notion of receptor crosstalk via mu-delta heteromers is well documented in vitro but in vivo evidence remains scarce. To identify neurons in which receptor interactions could take place, we designed a unique double mutant knock-in mouse line that expresses functional red-fluorescent mu receptors and green-fluorescent delta receptors. We mapped mu and delta receptor distribution and co-localization throughout the nervous system and created the first interactive brain atlas with concomitant mu-delta visualization at subcellular resolution (http://mordor.ics-mci.fr/). Mu and delta receptors co-localize in neurons from subcortical networks but are mainly detected in separate neurons in the forebrain. Also, co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated physical proximity in the hippocampus, a prerequisite to mu-delta heteromerization. Altogether, data suggest that mu-delta functional interactions take place at systems level for high-order emotional and cognitive processing whereas mu-delta may interact at cellular level in brain networks essential for survival, which has potential implications for innovative drug design in pain control, drug addiction and eating disorders. PMID:25938125

  11. In vivo neuronal co-expression of mu and delta opioid receptors uncovers new therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Erbs, Eric; Faget, Lauren; Veinante, Pierre; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2014-09-01

    Opioid receptors belong to the G protein coupled receptor family. They modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration and therefore impact on autonomous, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. In vivo functional interaction between mu and delta opioid receptors are known to take place though it is still debated whether interactions occur at circuitry, cellular or molecular level. Also, the notion of receptor crosstalk via mu-delta heteromers is well documented in vitro but in vivo evidence remains scarce. To identify neurons in which receptor interactions could take place, we designed a unique double mutant knock-in mouse line that expresses functional red-fluorescent mu receptors and green-fluorescent delta receptors. We mapped mu and delta receptor distribution and co-localization throughout the nervous system and created the first interactive brain atlas with concomitant mu-delta visualization at subcellular resolution (http://mordor.ics-mci.fr/). Mu and delta receptors co-localize in neurons from subcortical networks but are mainly detected in separate neurons in the forebrain. Also, co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated physical proximity in the hippocampus, a prerequisite to mu-delta heteromerization. Altogether, data suggest that mu-delta functional interactions take place at systems level for high-order emotional and cognitive processing whereas mu-delta may interact at cellular level in brain networks essential for survival, which has potential implications for innovative drug design in pain control, drug addiction and eating disorders.

  12. Opioid receptor agonists may favorably affect bone mechanical properties in rats with estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Janas, Aleksandra; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The results of epidemiological, clinical, and in vivo and in vitro experimental studies on the effect of opioid analgesics on bone are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of morphine (an agonist of opioid receptors), buprenorphine (a partial μ opioid receptor agonist and κ opioid receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an antagonist of opioid receptors) on the skeletal system of female rats in vivo. The experiments were carried out on 3-month-old Wistar rats, divided into two groups: nonovariectomized (intact; NOVX) rats and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The bilateral ovariectomy was performed 7 days before the start of drug administration. Morphine hydrochloride (20 mg/kg/day s.c.), buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg/day s.c.), or naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate (2 mg/kg/day s.c.) were administered for 4 weeks to NOVX and OVX rats. In OVX rats, the use of morphine and buprenorphine counteracted the development of osteoporotic changes in the skeletal system induced by estrogen deficiency. Morphine and buprenorphine beneficially affected also the skeletal system of NOVX rats, but the effects were much weaker than those in OVX rats. Naloxone generally did not affect the rat skeletal system. The results confirmed the role of opioid receptors in the regulation of bone remodeling processes and demonstrated, in experimental conditions, that the use of opioid analgesics at moderate doses may exert beneficial effects on the skeletal system, especially in estrogen deficiency.

  13. Recovery from Mu-opioid Receptor Desensitization following Chronic Treatment with Morphine and Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Quillinan, Nidia; Lau, Elaine; Virk, Michael; von Zastrow, Mark; Williams, John T

    2011-01-01

    Chronic treatment with morphine results in a decrease in mu-opioid receptor sensitivity, an increase in acute desensitization and a reduction in the recovery from acute desensitization in locus coeruleus neurons. With acute administration, morphine is unlike many other opioid agonists in that it does not mediate robust acute desensitization or induce receptor trafficking. This study compares mu-opioid receptor desensitization and trafficking in brain slices taken from rats treated for 6–7 days with a range of doses of morphine (60, 30, 15 mg/kg/day) and methadone (60, 30, 5 mg/kg/day) applied by subcutaneous implantation of osmotic mini pumps. Mice were treated with 45 mg/kg/day. In morphine treated animals, recovery from acute [Met]5enkephalin-induced desensitization and receptor recycling was diminished. In contrast, recovery and recycling were unchanged in slices from methadone treated animals. Remarkably the reduced recovery from desensitization and receptor recycling found in slices from morphine treated animals were not observed in animals lacking β-arrestin2. Further, pharmacological inhibition of GRK2, while not affecting the ability of [Met]5enkephalin to induce desensitization, acutely reversed the delay in recovery from desensitization produced by chronic morphine treatment. These results characterize a previously unidentified function of the GRK/arrestin system in mediating opioid regulation in response to chronic morphine administration. They also suggest that the GRK/arrestin system, rather then serving as a primary mediator of acute desensitization, controls recovery from desensitization by regulating receptor reinsertion to the plasma membrane after chronic treatment with morphine. The sustained GRK/arrestin dependent desensitization is another way in which morphine and methadone are distinguished. PMID:21430144

  14. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine, but not by δ- and κ-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment.

  15. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  16. Nociceptin effect on intestinal motility depends on opioid-receptor like-1 receptors and nitric oxide synthase co-localization

    PubMed Central

    Sibaev, Andrei; Fichna, Jakub; Saur, Dieter; Yuece, Birol; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of the opioid-receptor like-1 (ORL1) agonist nociceptin on gastrointestinal (GI) myenteric neurotransmission and motility. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to localize nociceptin and ORL1 in mouse tissues. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials (EJP, IJP) were made in a chambered organ bath. Intestinal motility was measured in vivo. RESULTS: Nociceptin accelerated whole and upper GI transit, but slowed colonic expulsion in vivo in an ORL1-dependent manner, as shown using [Nphe1]NOC and AS ODN pretreatment. ORL1 and nociceptin immunoreactivity were found on enteric neurons. Nociceptin reduced the EJP and the nitric oxide-sensitive slow IJP in an ORL1-dependent manner, whereas the fast IJP was unchanged. Nociceptin further reduced the spatial spreading of the EJP up to 2 cm. CONCLUSION: Compounds acting at ORL1 are good candidates for the future treatment of disorders associated with increased colonic transit, such as diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26261735

  17. Characterization of delta-opioid receptors and effect of enkephalins on IRD 98 rat epithelial intestinal cell line.

    PubMed

    Nano, J L; Fournel, S; Rampal, P

    2000-03-01

    Using 3H-Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-Phe-D-Leu-OH (3H-DADLE) as a radioligand, delta-opioid binding sites on the IRD 98 rat epithelial cell line were identified. These sites were found to be reversible, saturable, specific and displayed high affinity for DADLE. Scatchard analysis revealed a dissociation constant (Kd) of 4.9+/-0.5 nmol/l, a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 1.7 pmol/mg protein, and 5x10(5) binding sites per cell. The presence of opioid receptors suggests the possibility that enkephalins directly control ion transport in enterocytes. In order to verify this hypothesis, investigations were designed to determine whether these receptors are functional and whether enkephalins can inhibit the stimulation of adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis induced by cholera toxin. The increase in cAMP synthesis induced by cholera toxin was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr-OH (DSLET), a delta-agonist. The enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan potentiated this effect on IRD 98 cells, which contain enkephalinase. The action of DSLET was increased by 40% in the presence of this inhibitor. This effect was reversed by naltrindole, a potent delta-antagonist. Enkephalins can regulate intestinal secretion by acting directly on enterocytes: they thus have an antidiarrheal role, especially in the presence of an enkephalinase inhibitor.

  18. Major Depressive Disorder and Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Huijiao; Chen, Hao; Yang, Xicheng; Xiao, Li; Liu, Renyu; Shao, Liming; Qiu, Zhuibai

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disease worldwide. The clinical use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) for this condition have been widely accepted, but they were challenged by unacceptable side-effects, potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) or slow onset/lack of efficacy. The endogenous opioid system is involved in stress and emotion regulatory processes and its role in MDD has been implicated. Although several KOR antagonists including JDTic and PF-04455242 were discontinued in early clinical trials, ALKS 5461 and CERC-501(LY-2456302) survived and entered into Phase-III and Phase-II trials, respectively. Considering the efficacy and safety of early off-label use of buprenorphine in the management of the treatment-resistant depression (TRD), it will be not surprising to predict the potential success of ALKS 5461 (a combination of buprenorphine and ALKS-33) in the near future. Moreover, CERC-501 will be expected to be available as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy with other first-line antidepressants in the treatment of TRD, if ongoing clinical trials continue to provide positive benefit-risk profiles. Emerging new researches might bring more drug candidates targeting the endogenous opioid system to clinical trials to address current challenges in MDD treatment in clinical practice. PMID:27213169

  19. New 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) opioid peptidomimetics based on the Aba-Gly scaffold. Development of unique mu-opioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Ballet, Steven; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Lattanzi, Roberta; Tourwé, Dirk; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2006-06-29

    The Aba-Gly scaffold, incorporated into Dmt-Tic ligands (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH2-Ph, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph, H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH2-Bid), exhibited mixed micro/delta or delta opioid receptor activities with micro agonism. Substitution of Tic by Aba-Gly coupled to -NH-CH2-Ph (1), -NH-Ph (2), or -Bid (Bid=1H-benzimidazole-2-yl) (3) shifted affinity (Ki(micro)=0.46, 1.48, and 19.9 nM, respectively), selectivity, and bioactivity to micro-opioid receptors. These compounds represent templates for a new class of lead opioid agonists that are easily synthesized and suitable for therapeutic pain relief.

  20. Antagonism of κ opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens prevents the depressive-like behaviors following prolonged morphine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Zan, Gui-Ying; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Yao; Hang, Ai; Shu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Jing-Gen

    2015-09-15

    The association between morphine withdrawal and depressive-like symptoms is well documented, however, the role of dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system and the underlying neural substrates have not been fully understood. In the present study, we found that four weeks morphine abstinence after a chronic escalating morphine regimen significantly induced depressive-like behaviors in mice. Prodynorphin mRNA and protein levels were increased in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) after four weeks of morphine withdrawal. Local injection of κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (norBNI) in the NAc significantly blocked the expression of depressive-like behaviors without influencing general locomotor activity. Thus, the present study extends previous findings by showing that prolonged morphine withdrawal-induced depressive-like behaviors are regulated by dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system, and shed light on the κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of depressive-like behaviors induced by opiate withdrawal.

  1. The Effect of Opioid Receptor Blockade on the Neural Processing of Thermal Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Schoell, Eszter D.; Bingel, Ulrike; Eippert, Falk; Yacubian, Juliana; Christiansen, Kerrin; Andresen, Hilke; May, Arne; Buechel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system represents one of the principal systems in the modulation of pain. This has been demonstrated in studies of placebo analgesia and stress-induced analgesia, where anti-nociceptive activity triggered by pain itself or by cognitive states is blocked by opioid antagonists. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of opioid receptor blockade on the physiological processing of painful thermal stimulation in the absence of cognitive manipulation. We therefore measured BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) signal responses and intensity ratings to non-painful and painful thermal stimuli in a double-blind, cross-over design using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. On the behavioral level, we observed an increase in intensity ratings under naloxone due mainly to a difference in the non-painful stimuli. On the neural level, painful thermal stimulation was associated with a negative BOLD signal within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and this deactivation was abolished by naloxone. PMID:20811582

  2. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play

    PubMed Central

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors. PMID:27899885

  3. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play.

    PubMed

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J J

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors.

  4. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1 A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu-opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Riju; Ruparel, Kosha; Newberg, Andrew; Wileyto, E. Paul; Loughead, James W.; Divgi, Chaitanya; Blendy, Julie A.; Logan, Jean; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Lerman, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BPND or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BPND than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BPND difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21576462

  5. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  6. mu-Opioid receptor-independent fashion of the suppression of sodium currents by mu-opioid analgesics in thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Keisuke; Amano, Taku; Kasakura, Akiko; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro; Sakai, Norio; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2009-03-27

    Most reports in the literature have shown that the effects of opioid analgesics are primarily mediated by mu-opioid receptor (MOR), whereas other potential targets of opioid analgesics have not been thoroughly characterized. In this study, we found that extracellular application of morphine, fentanyl or oxycodone, which are all considered to be MOR agonists, at relatively high concentrations, but not endogenous mu-opioid peptides, produced a concentration-dependent suppression of sodium currents in cultured thalamic neurons. These effects of opioids were not affected by either a MOR antagonist naloxone or a deletion of MOR gene. Among these opioids, fentanyl strongly suppressed sodium currents to the same degree as lidocaine, and both morphine and oxycodone slightly but significantly reduced sodium currents when they were present extracellularly. In contrast, the intracellular application of morphine, but not oxycodone, fentanyl or lidocaine, reduced sodium currents. These results suggest that morphine, fentanyl and oxycodone each produce the MOR-independent suppression of sodium currents by distinct mechanisms in thalamic neurons.

  7. Ligands Raise the Constraint That Limits Constitutive Activation in G Protein-coupled Opioid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Vezzi, Vanessa; Onaran, H. Ongun; Molinari, Paola; Guerrini, Remo; Balboni, Gianfranco; Calò, Girolamo; Costa, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Using a cell-free bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy we compared the levels of spontaneous and ligand-induced receptor-G protein coupling in δ (DOP) and μ (MOP) opioid receptors. In this assay GDP can suppress spontaneous coupling, thus allowing its quantification. The level of constitutive activity was 4–5 times greater at the DOP than at the MOP receptor. A series of opioid analogues with a common peptidomimetic scaffold displayed remarkable inversions of efficacy in the two receptors. Agonists that enhanced coupling above the low intrinsic level of the MOP receptor were inverse agonists in reducing the greater level of constitutive coupling of the DOP receptor. Yet the intrinsic activities of such ligands are identical when scaled over the GDP base line of both receptors. This pattern is in conflict with the predictions of the ternary complex model and the “two state” extensions. According to this theory, the order of spontaneous and ligand-induced coupling cannot be reversed if a shift of the equilibrium between active and inactive forms raises constitutive activation in one receptor type. We propose that constitutive activation results from a lessened intrinsic barrier that restrains spontaneous coupling. Any ligand, regardless of its efficacy, must enhance this constraint to stabilize the ligand-bound complexed form. PMID:23836900

  8. Ligands raise the constraint that limits constitutive activation in G protein-coupled opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vezzi, Vanessa; Onaran, H Ongun; Molinari, Paola; Guerrini, Remo; Balboni, Gianfranco; Calò, Girolamo; Costa, Tommaso

    2013-08-16

    Using a cell-free bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy we compared the levels of spontaneous and ligand-induced receptor-G protein coupling in δ (DOP) and μ (MOP) opioid receptors. In this assay GDP can suppress spontaneous coupling, thus allowing its quantification. The level of constitutive activity was 4-5 times greater at the DOP than at the MOP receptor. A series of opioid analogues with a common peptidomimetic scaffold displayed remarkable inversions of efficacy in the two receptors. Agonists that enhanced coupling above the low intrinsic level of the MOP receptor were inverse agonists in reducing the greater level of constitutive coupling of the DOP receptor. Yet the intrinsic activities of such ligands are identical when scaled over the GDP base line of both receptors. This pattern is in conflict with the predictions of the ternary complex model and the "two state" extensions. According to this theory, the order of spontaneous and ligand-induced coupling cannot be reversed if a shift of the equilibrium between active and inactive forms raises constitutive activation in one receptor type. We propose that constitutive activation results from a lessened intrinsic barrier that restrains spontaneous coupling. Any ligand, regardless of its efficacy, must enhance this constraint to stabilize the ligand-bound complexed form.

  9. δ-Opioid receptors in the accumbens shell mediate the influence of both excitatory and inhibitory predictions on choice

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Vincent; Wong, Felix L; Balleine, Bernard W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Stimuli that predict rewarding events can control choice between future actions, and this control could be mediated by δ-opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAc-S). Stimuli predicting the absence of important events can also guide choice, although it remains unknown whether they do so via changes in an accumbal δ-opioid receptor-related process. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH δ-opioid receptor-eGFP mice were trained to perform two instrumental actions that delivered different food outcomes. Choice between the two actions was then tested in the presence of stimuli paired with either the delivery or the non-delivery of each of the two outcomes. Bilateral infusions of the δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole into the NAc-S were used to determine the role of these receptors at the time of choice and δ-opioid receptor expression in the NAc-S used to assess functional activity. KEY RESULTS A stimulus predicting a specific outcome biased choice performance towards the action previously earning that same outcome. In contrast, a stimulus signalling the absence of that outcome biased performance away from the action that delivered that outcome towards actions associated with the absence of that outcome. Both effects were associated with increased δ-opioid receptor expression on the membrane of cholinergic interneurons within the NAc-S. Furthermore, both effects were blocked by naltrindole infused into the NAc-S. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest that δ-opioid receptors in the NAc-S were involved in the effects of predictive learning on choice between actions, whether those predictions involve the presence or absence of specific rewarding events. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24758591

  10. Coupling of human delta-opioid receptor to retinal rod transducin in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, E V; Stropova, D; Kim, T; Wang, M; Roeske, W R; Yamamura, H I

    2000-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the pertussis toxin (Ptx)-sensitive G protein alpha-subunit pool in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse fibroblast (B82) cells. We detected the presence of mRNA for G(ialpha2), G(ialpha3), and G(oalpha) in both cell lines. G(ialpha1) and G(alphaz) mRNAs were not detected. We also found a homolog of the retinal rod transducin (G(talpha1)) in CHO, and the mouse cone transducin (G(talpha2)) in B82 cells. The presence of the transducin alpha-subunit proteins in CHO and B82 cells was confirmed by immunoprecipitation with specific antibodies. To test the interaction of heterologously expressed receptors with transducin in CHO cells, a Ptx-insensitive (C347S) rod transducin mutant was transfected into a CHO cell line stably expressing the human delta-opioid receptor (hDOR/CHO). (+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,2R)-4-allyl-2, 5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide, a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist, stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding by 293 +/- 36% after Ptx pretreatment in the mutant cell line with an EC(50) value of 54 +/- 32 nM, showing that transducin can functionally couple to the human delta-opioid receptors in these cells.

  11. Ligand/kappa-Opioid Receptor Interactions: Insights from the X-Ray Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Mayorga, Karina; Byler, Kendall G.; Yongye, Austin B.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Dooley, Colette T.; Houghten, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    During the past five years, the three-dimensional structures of 14 different G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been resolved by X-ray crystallography. The most recently published structures, those of the opioid receptors (ORs), are remarkably important in pain modulation, drug addiction, and mood disorders. These structures, confirmed previously proposed key interactions conferring potency and antagonistic properties, including the well-known interaction with Asp138, conserved in all aminergic GPCRs. In addition, crystallization of the opioid receptors highlighted the potential function of the ECL2 and ICL2 loops. We have previously reported a set of potent and selective kappa opioid receptor peptide agonists, of which ff(D-nle)r-NH2 is among the most potent and selective ones. These peptides were identified from the deconvolution of a 6,250,000 tetrapeptide combinatorial library. A derivative of this set is currently the subject of a phase 2 clinical trial in the United States. In this work, we describe comparative molecular modeling studies of kappa-OR peptide agonists with the co-crystallized antagonist, JDTic, and also report structure-activity relationships of 23 tetrapeptides. The overall binding and contact interactions are sound and interactions known to favor selectivity and potency were observed. Additional modeling studies will reveal conformational changes that the kappa-OR undergoes upon binding to these peptide agonists. PMID:23792349

  12. In vivo receptor binding of opioid drugs at the mu site

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, J.S.; Holford, N.H.; Sadee, W.

    1985-06-01

    The in vivo receptor binding of a series of opioid drugs was investigated in intact rats after s.c. administration of (/sup 3/H)etorphine tracer, which selectively binds to mu sites in vivo. Receptor binding was determined by a membrane filtration assay immediately after sacrifice of the animals and brain homogenization. Coadministration of unlabeled opioid drugs together with tracer led to a dose-dependent decrease of in vivo tracer binding. Estimates of the doses required to occupy 50% of the mu sites in vivo established the following potency rank order: diprenorphine, naloxone, buprenorphine, etorphine, levallorphan, cyclazocine, sufentanil, nalorphine, ethylketocyclazocine, ketocyclazocine, pentazocine, morphine. In vivo-in vitro differences among the relative receptor binding potencies were only partially accounted for by differences in their access to the brain and the regulatory effects of Na+ and GTP, which are expected to reduce agonist affinities in vivo. The relationship among mu receptor occupancy in vivo and pharmacological effects of the opioid drugs is described.

  13. Naltrexone: Not Just for Opioids Anymore.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Naltrexone is a semi-synthetic opioid with competitive antagonist activity at mu opioid receptors. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence, but adherence to daily dosing has been recognized as a factor limiting long-term effectiveness. Recently, a long-acting injectable formulation of naltrexone has received FDA-approval for treating alcohol and opioid dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of naltrexone, the current evidence supporting the use of extended-release naltrexone, and the clinical challenges in the induction of patients to this medication.

  14. Specific binding of a ligand of sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) - with liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Samovilova, N.N.; Yarygin, K.N.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    A ligand of the sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) -binds specifically and reversible with rat liver membranes. In relation to a number of properties, the sites binding SKF 10047 in the liver are similar to the sigma-opioid receptors of the central nervous system. They do not interact with classical opiates (morphine, naloxone) and with opioid peptides, but bind well benzomorphans (bremazocine, SKF 10047) and a number of compounds of different chemical structures with a pronounced psychtropic action (haloperidol, imipramine, phencyclidine, etc.).

  15. Hop Extract Produces Antinociception by Acting on Opioid System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-jin; Seo, Jee-Young; Lim, Su-Min

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the antinociceptive profiles of hop extract were characterized in ICR mice. Hop extract administered orally (from 25 to 100 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner as measured in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Antinociceptive action of hop extract was maintained at least for 60 min. Moreover, cumulative response time of nociceptive behaviors induced with intraplantar formalin injection was reduced by hop extract treatment during the 2nd phases. Furthermore, the cumulative nociceptive response time for intrathecal injection of substance P (0.7 µg) or glutamate (20 µg) was diminished by hop extract. Intraperitoneal pretreatment with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) attenuated antinociceptive effect induced by hop extract in the writhing test. However, methysergide (a 5-HT serotonergic receptor antagonist) or yohimbine (an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) did not affect antinociception induced by hop extract in the writhing test. Our results suggest that hop extract shows an antinociceptive property in various pain models. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of hop extract may be mediated by opioidergic receptors, but not serotonergic and α2-adrenergic receptors. PMID:22802700

  16. Targeting Itch with Ligands Selective for κ Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Alan; Kehner, George B; Inan, Saadet

    2015-01-01

    Several chemically diverse pruritogens, including bombesin, compound 48/80, norbinaltorphimine, and 5'-GNTI, cause rodents to scratch excessively in a stable, uniform manner and consequently provide convenient animal models of itch against which potential antipruritics may be evaluated, structure-activity relationships established, and the nature of spontaneous, repetitive behavior itself analyzed. Decreasing the number of scratching bouts in these apparently simple models has been the requisite first step in the progress of kappa opioid agonists such as nalbuphine, asimadoline, and CR845 toward clinical testing as antipruritics. Nalfurafine is the prime example of a kappa agonist spanning the developmental divide between scratching mice models and commercialization within 10 years. Patients undergoing hemodialysis and suffering from the itching associated with uremic pruritus, and potentially those inflicted with atopic dermatitis, are the beneficiaries.

  17. Periaqueductal gray μ and κ opioid receptors determine behavioral selection from maternal to predatory behavior in lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marianne Orlandini; Cruz, Aline de Mello; Machado, Franciele Corrêa; Picolo, Gisele; Canteras, Newton Sabino; Felicio, Luciano Freitas

    2014-11-01

    Every mother must optimize her time between caring for her young and her subsistence. The rostro lateral portion of the periaqueductal grey (rlPAG) is a critical site that modulates the switch between maternal and predatory behavior. Opioids play multiple roles in both maternal behavior and this switching process. The present study used a pharmacological approach to evaluate the functional role of rlPAG μ and κ opioid receptors in behavioral selection. Rat dams were implanted with a guide cannula in the rlPAG and divided into three experiments in which we tested the role of opioid agonists (Experiment 1), the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade in the presence of morphine (Experiment 2), and the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade (Experiment 3). After behavioral test, in Experiment 4, we evaluated rlPAG μ and κ receptor activation in all Experiments 1-3. The results showed that massive opioidergic activation induced by morphine in the rlPAG inhibited maternal behavior without interfering with predatory hunting. No behavioral changes and no receptor activation were promoted by the specific agonist alone. However, κ receptor blockade increased hunting behavior and increased the level of μ receptor activation in the rlPAG. Thus, endogenous opioidergic tone might be modulated by a functional interaction between opioid receptor subtypes. Such a compensatory receptor interaction appears to be relevant for behavioral selection among motivated behaviors. These findings indicate a role for multiple opioid receptor interactions in the modulation of behavioral selection between maternal and predatory behaviors in the PAG.

  18. 2012 David W. Robertson Award for Excellence in Medicinal Chemistry: Neoclerodanes as Atypical Opioid Receptor Ligands⊥

    PubMed Central

    Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The neoclerodane diterpene salvinorin A is the major active component of the hallucinogenic mint plant Salvia divinorum Epling & Játiva (Lamiaceae). Since the finding that salvinorin A exerts its potent psychotropic actions through the activation of opioid receptors, the site of action of morphine and related analogues, there has been much interest in elucidating the underlying mechanisms behind its effects. These effects are particularly remarkable, because (1) salvinorin A is the first reported non-nitrogenous opioid receptor agonist, and (2) its effects are not mediated through the previously investigated targets of psychotomimetics. This perspective outlines our research program, illustrating a new direction to the development of tools to further elucidate the biological mechanisms of drug tolerance and dependence. The information gained from these efforts is expected to facilitate the design of novel agents to treat pain, drug abuse, and other CNS disorders. PMID:23548164

  19. Endomorphins 1 and 2, endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists, impair passive avoidance learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Ukai, M; Watanabe, Y; Kameyama, T

    2001-06-08

    The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists, on passive avoidance learning associated with long-term memory were investigated in mice. Endomorphin-1 (10 and 17.5 microg) and endomorphin-2 (17.5 microg) produced a significant decrease in step-down latency in a passive avoidance learning task. beta-Funaltrexamine (5 microg) almost completely reversed the endomorphin-1 (17.5 microg)- and endomorphin-2 (17.5 microg)-induced shortening of step-down latency, although neither naltrindole (4 ng) nor nor-binaltorphimine (4 microg) produced any significant effects on the effects of endomorphins 1 and 2. These results suggest that endomorphins 1 and 2 impair long-term memory through the mediation of mu-opioid receptors in the brain.

  20. Synthesis of quinolinomorphinan-4-ol derivatives as δ opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Ida, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Toru; Hirayama, Shigeto; Fujii, Hideaki; Osa, Yumiko; Imai, Masayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki; Kato, Akira; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2012-01-15

    The previously reported morphinan derivative SN-28 showed high selectivity and agonist activity for the δ opioid receptor. In the course of examining the structure-activity relationship of SN-28 derivatives, the derivatives with the 4-hydroxy group (SN-24, 26, 27) showed higher selectivities for the δ receptor over the μ receptor than the corresponding SN-28 derivatives with the 3-hydroxy group (SN-11, 23, 28). Derivatives with the 4-hydroxy group showed potent agonist activities for the δ receptor in the [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay. Although the 17-cyclopropylmethyl derivative (SN-11) with a 3-hydroxy group showed the lowest selectivity for the δ receptor among the morphinan derivatives, the agonist activity toward the δ receptor was the most potent for candidates with the 3-hydroxy group.

  1. Photoaffinity labeling of opioid receptor with morphine-7,8-oxide (morphine epoxide)

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, I.; Shibata, R.; Miyata, N.; Hirobe, M.

    1982-05-01

    The opioid receptor mediating inhibitory action of morphine in the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum was irreversibly photoinactivated by morphine epoxide (3 X 10(-6) M). Morphine epoxide (up to 3 X 10(-5) M) did not influence the responses of rat vas deferens (epsilon-receptor) or rabbit vas deferens (kappa-receptor) to electrical stimulation. Effective concentrations of morphine epoxide were much lower in the guinea pig ileum (mu-receptor) than in the mouse vas deference (delta-receptor). The inhibitory action of (Met)-enkephalin on the twitch responses of the rat vas deferens and mouse vas deferens to electrical stimulation were not influenced after irradiation in the presence of morphine epoxide (3 X 10(-6) M). Therefore, morphine epoxide is probably a useful probe for photoaffinity labeling of the mu-receptor in vitro.

  2. In vivo visualization of delta opioid receptors upon physiological activation uncovers a distinct internalization profile

    PubMed Central

    FAGET, Lauren; ERBS, Eric; LE MERRER, Julie; SCHERRER, Gregory; MATIFAS, Audrey; BENTURQUIA, Nadia; NOBLE, Florence; DECOSSAS, Marion; KOCH, Marc; KESSLER, Pascal; VONESCH, Jean-Luc; SCHWAB, Yannick; KIEFFER, Brigitte L.; MASSOTTE, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate numerous physiological functions and represent prime therapeutic targets. Receptor trafficking upon agonist stimulation is critical for GPCR function, but examining this process in vivo remains a true challenge. Using knock-in mice expressing functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors under the control of the endogenous promoter, we visualized in vivo internalization of this native GPCR upon physiological stimulation. We developed a paradigm in which animals were made dependent to morphine in a drug-paired context. When re-exposed to this context in a drug-free state, mice showed context-dependent withdrawal signs and activation of the hippocampus. Receptor internalization was transiently detected in a subset of CA1 neurons, uncovering regionally restricted opioid peptide release. Importantly, a pool of surface receptors always remained, which contrasts with the in vivo profile previously established for exogenous drug-induced internalization. Therefore, a distinct response is observed at the receptor level upon a physiological or pharmacological stimulation. Altogether, direct in vivo GPCR visualization enables mapping receptor stimulation promoted by a behavioral challenge, and represents a powerful approach to study endogenous GPCR physiology. PMID:22623675

  3. In vivo visualization of delta opioid receptors upon physiological activation uncovers a distinct internalization profile.

    PubMed

    Faget, Lauren; Erbs, Eric; Le Merrer, Julie; Scherrer, Gregory; Matifas, Audrey; Benturquia, Nadia; Noble, Florence; Decossas, Marion; Koch, Marc; Kessler, Pascal; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Schwab, Yannick; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2012-05-23

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate numerous physiological functions and represent prime therapeutic targets. Receptor trafficking upon agonist stimulation is critical for GPCR function, but examining this process in vivo remains a true challenge. Using knock-in mice expressing functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors under the control of the endogenous promoter, we visualized in vivo internalization of this native GPCR upon physiological stimulation. We developed a paradigm in which animals were made dependent on morphine in a drug-paired context. When re-exposed to this context in a drug-free state, mice showed context-dependent withdrawal signs and activation of the hippocampus. Receptor internalization was transiently detected in a subset of CA1 neurons, uncovering regionally restricted opioid peptide release. Importantly, a pool of surface receptors always remained, which contrasts with the in vivo profile previously established for exogenous drug-induced internalization. Therefore, a distinct response is observed at the receptor level upon a physiological or pharmacological stimulation. Altogether, direct in vivo GPCR visualization enables mapping receptor stimulation promoted by a behavioral challenge and represents a powerful approach to study endogenous GPCR physiology.

  4. It's MORe exciting than mu: crosstalk between mu opioid receptors and glutamatergic transmission in the mesolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Chartoff, Elena H; Connery, Hilary S

    2014-01-01

    Opioids selective for the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor (MOR) produce potent analgesia and euphoria. Heroin, a synthetic opioid, is considered one of the most addictive substances, and the recent exponential rise in opioid addiction and overdose deaths has made treatment development a national public health priority. Existing medications (methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone), when combined with psychosocial therapies, have proven efficacy in reducing aspects of opioid addiction. Unfortunately, these medications have critical limitations including those associated with opioid agonist therapies (e.g., sustained physiological dependence and opioid withdrawal leading to high relapse rates upon discontinuation), non-adherence to daily dosing, and non-renewal of monthly injection with extended-release naltrexone. Furthermore, current medications fail to ameliorate key aspects of addiction such as powerful conditioned associations that trigger relapse (e.g., cues, stress, the drug itself). Thus, there is a need for developing novel treatments that target neural processes corrupted with chronic opioid use. This requires a basic understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying effects of opioids on synaptic transmission and plasticity within reward-related neural circuits. The focus of this review is to discuss how crosstalk between MOR-associated G protein signaling and glutamatergic neurotransmission leads to immediate and long-term effects on emotional states (e.g., euphoria, depression) and motivated behavior (e.g., drug-seeking, relapse). Our goal is to integrate findings on how opioids modulate synaptic release of glutamate and postsynaptic transmission via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area with the clinical (neurobehavioral) progression of opioid dependence, as well as to identify gaps in knowledge that can be addressed in future studies.

  5. μ-Opioid Receptor Gene A118G Polymorphism Predicts Survival in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bortsov, Andrey V.; Millikan, Robert C.; Belfer, Inna; Boortz-Marx, Richard L.; Arora, Harendra; McLean, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Preclinical studies suggest that opioids may promote tumor growth. Genetic polymorphisms have been shown to affect opioid receptor function and to modify the clinical effects of morphine. In this study we assessed the association between six common polymorphisms in the μ-opioid receptor gene, including the well known A118G polymorphism, and breast cancer survival. Methods A total of 2,039 women ages 23–74 yr (38% African American, 62% European American, 55% postmenopausal) diagnosed with breast cancer between 1993 – 2001 were followed through 2006. Genotyping was performed using the TaqMan platform (Applied Biosystems Inc., Foster City, CA). Kaplan-Meyer curves, log-rank tests, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between each genotype and survival. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing, patient genotype at A118G was associated with breast cancer-specific mortality at 10 yr. Women with one or more copies of the G allele had decreased breast cancer-specific mortality (p < .001). This association was limited to invasive cases only; effect size appeared to increase with clinical stage. Cox regression model adjusted for age and ethnicity also showed decreased mortality in A/G and G/G genotypes compared to A/A genotype (hazard ratio = 0.57 [0.38, 0.85] and 0.32 [0.22, 0.49], respectively; p = .006). Conclusions These results suggest that opioid pathways may be involved in tumor growth. Further studies examining the association between genetic variants influencing opioid system function and cancer survival are warranted. PMID:22433205

  6. Early role of the κ opioid receptor in ethanol-induced reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Acevedo, Ma Belén; Spear, Norman E

    2012-03-20

    Effects of early ethanol exposure on later ethanol intake emphasize the importance of understanding the neurobiology of ethanol-induced reinforcement early in life. Infant rats exhibit ethanol-induced appetitive conditioning and ethanol-induced locomotor activation, which have been linked in theory and may have mechanisms in common. The appetitive effects of ethanol are significantly modulated by μ and δ opioid receptors, whereas μ but not δ receptors are involved in the motor stimulant effects of ethanol during early development. The involvement of the κ opioid receptor (KOR) system in the motivational effects of ethanol has been much less explored. The present study assessed, in preweanling (infant) rats, the modulatory role of the KOR system in several paradigms sensitive to ethanol-induced reinforcement. Kappa opioid activation and blockade were examined in second-order conditioned place preference with varied timing before conditioning and with varied ethanol doses. The role of KOR on ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol-induced taste conditioning was also explored. The experiments were based on the assumption that ethanol concurrently induces appetitive and aversive effects and that the latter may be mediated by activation of kappa receptors. The main result was that blockade of kappa function facilitated the expression of appetitive ethanol reinforcement in terms of tactile and taste conditioning. The effects of kappa activation on ethanol conditioning seemed to be independent from ethanol's stimulant effects. Kappa opioid activation potentiated the motor depressing effects of ethanol but enhanced motor activity in control subjects. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that a reduced function of the KOR system in nondependent subjects should attenuate the aversive consequences of ethanol.

  7. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: preparation and opioid receptor activity of salvinicin analogues.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Denise S; Katavic, Peter L; Lozama, Anthony; Harding, Wayne W; Parrish, Damon; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Dersch, Christina M; Partilla, John S; Rothman, Richard B; Navarro, Hernan; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2007-07-26

    Further modification of salvinorin A (1a), the major active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in the synthesis of novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. We report in this study that oxadiazole 11a and salvidivin A (12a), a photooxygenation product of 1a, have been identified as the first neoclerodane diterpenes with kappa antagonist activity. This indicates that additional structural modifications of 1a may lead to analogues with higher potency and utility as drug abuse medications.

  8. Early role of the κ opioid receptor in ethanol-induced reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Acevedo, Ma. Belén; Spear, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of early ethanol exposure on later ethanol intake emphasize the importance of understanding the neurobiology of ethanol-induced reinforcement early in life. Infant rats exhibit ethanol-induced appetitive conditioning and ethanol-induced locomotor activation, which have been linked in theory and may have mechanisms in common. The appetitive effects of ethanol are significantly modulated by μ and δ opioid receptors, whereas μ but not δ receptors are involved in the motor stimulant effects of ethanol during early development. The involvement of the κ opioid receptor (KOR) system in the motivational effects of ethanol has been much less explored. The present study assessed, in preweanling (infant) rats, the modulatory role of the KOR system in several paradigms sensitive to ethanol-induced reinforcement. Kappa opioid activation and blockade was examined in second-order conditioned place preference with varied timing before conditioning and with varied ethanol doses. The role of KOR on ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol-induced taste conditioning was also explored. The experiments were based on the assumption that ethanol concurrently induces appetitive and aversive effects and that the latter may be mediated by activation of kappa receptors. The main result was that blockade of kappa function facilitated the expression of appetitive ethanol reinforcement in terms of tactile and taste conditioning. The effects of kappa activation on ethanol conditioning seemed to be independent from ethanol's stimulant effects. Kappa opioid activation potentiated the motor depressing effects of ethanol but enhanced motor activity in control subjects. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that a reduced function of the KOR system in nondependent subjects should attenuate the aversive consequences of ethanol. PMID:22261437

  9. Antinociceptive effects of the 6-O-sulfate ester of morphine in normal and diabetic rats: Comparative role of mu- and delta-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Yadlapalli, Jai Shankar K; Ford, Benjamin M; Ketkar, Amit; Wan, Anqi; Penthala, Narasimha R; Eoff, Robert L; Prather, Paul L; Dobretsov, Maxim; Crooks, Peter A

    2016-11-01

    This study determined the antinociceptive effects of morphine and morphine-6-O-sulfate (M6S) in both normal and diabetic rats, and evaluated the comparative role of mu-opioid receptors (mu-ORs) and delta-opioid receptors (delta-ORs) in the antinociceptive action of these opioids. In vitro characterization of mu-OR and delta-OR-mediated signaling by M6S and morphine in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells showed that M6S exhibited a 6-fold higher affinity for delta-ORs and modulated G-protein and adenylyl cyclase activity via delta-ORs more potently than morphine. Interestingly, while morphine acted as a full agonist at delta-ORs in both functional assays examined, M6S exhibited either partial or full agonist activity for modulation of G-protein or adenylyl cyclase activity, respectively. Molecular docking studies indicated that M6S but not morphine binds equally well at the ligand binding site of both mu- and delta-ORs. In vivo analgesic effects of M6S and morphine in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats utilizing the hot water tail flick latency test showed that M6S produced more potent antinociception than morphine in both normal rats and diabetic rats. This difference in potency was abrogated following antagonism of delta- but not mu- or kappa (kappa-ORs) opioid receptors. During 9days of chronic treatment, tolerance developed to morphine-treated but not to M6S-treated rats. Rats that developed tolerance to morphine still remained responsive to M6S. Collectively, this study demonstrates that M6S is a potent and efficacious mu/delta opioid analgesic with a delayed tolerance profile when compared to morphine in both normal and diabetic rats.

  10. Activation of Peripheral Mu-Opioid Receptors by Dermorphin [D-Arg2, Lys4] (1-4) amide Leads to Modality-preferred Inhibition of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vinod; Yang, Fei; He, Shao-Qiu; Shechter, Ronen; Zhang, Chen; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Tong; Tiwari, Vineeta; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Guan, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids have long been regarded as the most effective drugs for treatment of severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, their therapeutic efficacy and clinical utility has been limited because of central and peripheral side effects. Methods To determine the therapeutic value of peripheral mu-opioid receptors as a target for neuropathic pain treatment, we examined the effects of DALDA, a hydrophilic, peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist, in male and female rats with spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain. We also utilized behavioral, pharmacologic, electrophysiologic, and molecular biologic tools to characterize DALDA's possible mechanisms of action in male rats. Results DALDA, administered subcutaneously, had 70 times greater efficacy for inhibiting thermal (n=8–11/group) than mechanical hypersensitivity (n=6–8/group) in male rats. The pain inhibitory effects of DALDA on mechanical and heat hypersensitivity were abolished in animals pretreated with systemic methylnaltrexone (n=7–9/group), a peripheral mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In spinal wide-dynamic range neurons, systemic DALDA inhibited C-fiber–mediated, but not A-fiber–mediated, response in neuropathic male rats (n=13). In primary sensory neurons, DALDA inhibited the capsaicin-induced [Ca2+] increase more than the β-alanine–induced [Ca2+] increase (n=300); capsaicin and β-alanine activate subpopulations of neurons involved in the signaling of heat and mechanical pain, respectively. DALDA-treated rats (n=5–8/group) did not exhibit motor deficits and locomotor impairment suggesting that it does not induce central side effects. Conclusion These findings suggest that DALDA may represent a potential alternative to current opioid therapy for the treatment of neuropathic pain and is likely to be associated with minimal adverse effects. PMID:26756519

  11. Intact brain cells: a novel model system for studying opioid receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, N.F.; El-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-07-29

    The use of a novel tissue preparation to study opioid receptor binding in viable, intact cells derived from whole brains of adult rats is presented. Mechanically dissociated and sieved cells, which were not homogenized at any stage of the experimental protocol, and iso-osmotic physiological buffer were used in these experiments. This system was adapted in order to avoid mechanical and chemical disruption of cell membranes, cytoskeletal ultrastructure or receptor topography by homogenization or by the use of nonphysiological buffers, and to mimic in vivo binding conditions as much as possible. Using (/sup 3/H)naloxone as the radioligand, the studies showed saturable and stereospecific high-affinity binding of this opioid antagonist in intact cells, which in turn showed consistently high viability. (/sup 3/H)Naloxone binding was also linear over a wide range of tissue concentrations. This technique provides a very promising model for future studies of the binding of opioids and of many other classes of drugs to brain tissue receptors in a more physiologically relevant system than those commonly used to date.

  12. Crystal structure of the µ-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist.

    PubMed

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Sunahara, Roger K; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I; Kobilka, Brian K; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-03-21

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled µ-opioid receptor (µ-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 Å crystal structure of the mouse µ-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the µ-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  13. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  14. Intracerebroventricular administration of morphine confers remote cardioprotection--role of opioid receptors and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Irwin, Michael G; Lu, Yao; Mei, Bin; Zuo, You-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Wu; Wong, Tak-Ming

    2011-04-10

    The current study aimed to delineate the mechanism of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine (RMPC) against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intracerebroventricular morphine injection before myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was achieved by 30min of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 120min of reperfusion. The effects of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine preconditioning were also determined upon selective blockade of the δ, κ or μ-opioid receptors, or calmodulin (CaM). The infarct size, as a percentage of the area at risk, was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium staining. Remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine reduced infarct size in the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, and the effect was abolished by the selective blockade of any one of the three δ, κ and μ opioid receptors or CaM. Furthermore, remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine increased the expression of CaM in the hippocampus and the plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The results of the present study provide evidence that the cardioprotection of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine involves not only all three types of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, but also CaM, which releases CGRP, one of the mediators of remote preconditioning.

  15. Opioid/NMDA receptors blockade reverses the depressant-like behavior of foot shock stress in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2014-07-15

    Opioid and glutamatergic receptors have a key role in depression following stress. In this study, we assessed opioid and glutamatergic receptors interaction with the depressant-like behavior of acute foot-shock stress in the mouse forced swimming test. Stress was induced by intermittent foot shock stimulation during 30min and swim periods were afterwards conducted by placing mice in separated glass cylinders filled with water for 6min. The immobility time during the last 4min of the test was considered. Acute foot-shock stress significantly increased the immobility time of mice compared to non-stressed control group (P≤0.01). Administration of non-selective opioid receptors antagonist, naltrexone (1 and 2mg/kg, i.p.), and the selective non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.), and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5mg/kg), significantly reduced the immobility time in stressed animals (P≤0.01). Lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg), naltrexone (0.3mg/kg), NMDA (75mg/kg) and morphine(5mg/kg) had no effect on foot-shock stressed mice. Combined treatment of sub-effective doses of naltrexone and MK-801 significantly showed an antidepressant-like effect (P≤0.001). On the other hand, co-administration of non-effective doses of NMDA and morphine with effective doses of naltrexone and MK-801 reversed the anti-immobility effect of these drugs. Taken together, we have for the first time demonstrated the possible role of opioid/NMDA receptors signaling in the depressant-like effect of foot-shock stress, and proposed the use of drugs that act like standard anti-depressants in stress-induced depression.

  16. Chronic Morphine Reduces Surface Expression of δ-Opioid Receptors in Subregions of Rostral Striatum.

    PubMed

    Leah, Paul M; Heath, Emily M L; Balleine, Bernard W; Christie, Macdonald J

    2016-03-01

    The delta opioid receptor (DOPr), whilst not the primary target of clinically used opioids, is involved in development of opioid tolerance and addiction. There is growing evidence that DOPr trafficking is involved in drug addiction, e.g., a range of studies have shown increased plasma membrane DOPr insertion during chronic treatment with opioids. The present study used a transgenic mouse model in which the C-terminal of the DOPr is tagged with enhanced-green fluorescence protein to examine the effects of chronic morphine treatment on surface membrane expression in striatal cholinergic interneurons that are implicated in motivated learning following both chronic morphine and morphine sensitization treatment schedules in male mice. A sex difference was noted throughout the anterior striatum, which was most prominent in the nucleus accumbens core region. Incontrast with previous studies in other neurons, chronic exposure to a high dose of morphine for 6 days had no effect, or slightly decreased (anterior dorsolateral striatum) surface DOPr expression. A morphine sensitization schedule produced similar results with a significant decrease in surface DOPr expression in nucleus accumbens shell. These results suggest that chronic morphine and morphine sensitisation treatment may have effects on instrumental reward-seeking behaviours and learning processes related to drug addiction, via effects on striatal DOPr function.

  17. Novel endomorphin analogues with antagonist activity at the mu-opioid receptor in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Jakub; Gach, Katarzyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Cravezic, Aurore; Bonnet, Jean Jacques; do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Janecka, Anna; Storr, Martin A

    2010-06-08

    Opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) summarizes common adverse side effects of opiate-based management of pain. A promising therapeutic approach to prevent OBD and other opioid-related disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the co-administration of opiates with peripherally-restricted mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective antagonists. The aim of this study was to investigate the selectivity and efficacy of three novel peptide antagonists: antanal-1, antanal-2, and antanal-2A at MOR in the GI tract in vitro and in vivo. The effects of the antanals on GI motility were studied in vitro, using isolated preparations of mouse ileum and colon and in vivo, by measuring colonic propulsion in mice. Additionally, in vitro stability against enzymatic degradation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability using the hot plate test in mice were examined. The antanals significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of the MOR agonists endomorphin-2, morphine, and loperamide on mouse ileum and colon contractions in vitro and blocked morphine-induced decrease of colonic bead expulsion in vivo. The hot plate test in mice showed that the antagonist activity of all antanals was restricted to the periphery. Antanal-1, antanal-2, and antanal-2A are promising MOR antagonists with limited BBB permeability, which may be developed into future therapeutics of opioid-related GI dysfunction.

  18. Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors dilates retinal arterioles by neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Someya, Eriko; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio; Nakahara, Tsutomu

    2017-03-21

    Opioids contribute to the regulation of cerebral vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of herkinorin, a non-opioid μ-opioid receptor agonist derived from salvinorin A, on blood vessels in the rat retina and to investigate the mechanism underlying the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilatory response. Ocular fundus images were captured using an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring the diameter of retinal arterioles in the fundus images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. Herkinorin increased the retinal arteriolar diameter without significantly changing mean blood pressure and heart rate. The retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin was almost completely prevented following treatment with naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist and H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist. N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonselective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. In addition, N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, diminished the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Seven days after an intravitreal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid, loss of inner retinal neurons and abolishment of the retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin were observed. These results suggest that herkinorin dilates rat retinal arterioles through stimulation of retinal μ-opioid receptors. The μ-opioid receptor-mediated retinal vasodilator response is likely mediated by NO generated by neuronal NO synthase. Retinal neurons play an important role in the retinal vasodilator mechanism involving μ-opioid receptors in rats.

  19. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SPECIFIC OPIOID RECEPTOR AGONISTS IN A RODENT MODEL OF SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Aceves, Miriam; Mathai, Babetta B.; Hook, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The current study aimed to evaluate the contribution(s) of specific opioid receptor systems to the analgesic and detrimental effects of morphine, observed after spinal cord injury in prior studies. Study Design We used specific opioid receptor agonists to assess the effects of µ- (DAMGO), δ- (DPDPE), and κ- (GR89696) opioid receptor activation on locomotor (BBB, tapered beam, ladder tests) and sensory (girdle, tactile, and tail-flick tests) recovery in a rodent contusion model (T12). We also tested the contribution of non-classic opioid binding using [+]- morphine. Methods First, a dose-response curve for analgesic efficacy was generated for each opioid agonist. Baseline locomotor and sensory reactivity was assessed 24 h after injury. Subjects were then treated with an intrathecal dose of a specific agonist and re-tested after 30 min. To evaluate effects on recovery, subjects were treated with a single dose of an agonist and both locomotor and sensory function were monitored for 21 d. Results All agonists for the classic opioid receptors, but not the [+]- morphine enantiomer, produced antinociception at a concentration equivalent to a dose of morphine previously shown to produce strong analgesic effects (0.32 μmol). DAMGO and [+]- morphine did not affect long-term recovery. GR89696, however, significantly undermined recovery of locomotor function at all doses tested. Conclusions Based on these data, we hypothesize that the analgesic efficacy of morphine is primarily mediated by binding to the classic μ-opioid receptor. Conversely, the adverse effects of morphine may be linked to activation of the κ-opioid receptor. Ultimately, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of morphine is imperative in order to develop safe and effective pharmacological interventions in a clinical setting. Setting USA PMID:26927293

  20. Morphine and DAMGO produce an opposite effect on presynaptic glutamate release via different downstream pathways of μ opioid receptors in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinhui; Yang, Hualan; Du, Xiaowei; Ma, Qianqian; Song, Jiaojiao; Chen, Ming; Dong, Yi; Ma, Lan; Zheng, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that different opioids, while acting μ opioid receptors, can activate distinct downstream responses, a phenomenon termed functional selectivity or biased agonism. The present study designed experiments to test whether the μ receptor agonist morphine and D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO) had a different effect on presynaptic glutamate release in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and whether this difference was due to their biased agonism at μ receptors. The results showed that DAMGO markedly decreased the frequency of sEPSCs in pyramidal cells of BLA. The concentration-dependence experiment showed that DAMGO dose-dependently decreased the frequency of sEPSCs. Morphine markedly increased the frequency of sEPSCs in pyramidal cells of BLA. The concentration-dependence experiment showed that morphine dose-dependently increased the frequency of sEPSCs. We also used PPF of EPSC as another indicator of presynaptic glutamate release to confirm the opposite effect of morphine and DAMGO on the glutamate release. Further mechanism studies showed that the opposite effect of morphine and DAMGO on the glutamate release was via the activation of μ receptors, but the downstream signaling pathways of μ receptors were different: DAMGO inhibited the glutamate release via μ receptor-Gi protein- PLA2-AA signaling pathway, whereas morphine promoted the glutamate release via μ receptor-Gi protein-PKC-ERK1/2-synapsin I signaling pathway.

  1. Effect of sodium ion on the affinity of naloxone for the kappa opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, B.V.; Lahti, R.A.

    1987-03-16

    Several investigators have observed that sodium ion enhances the binding of naloxone to opioid receptors. This effect has generally been attributed to allosteric modulation of the state of the mu receptor. However, a recent claim has been made that the enhancement does not involve a change in the mu receptor, but instead occurs because naloxone becomes a more kappa-specific drug when sodium ion is present in high concentration. Since the claim was not based on experimental evidence from binding studies involving known high-affinity kappa ligands, the authors have investigated the competition of naloxone for the kappa site using (/sup 3/H)U-69593 as the marker for receptor binding. Assays were carried out in the presence and absence of 100 mM NaCl. The results of the study indicate that sodium ion does not increase the affinity of naloxone or U-69593 for the kappa receptor. 9 references, 1 figure.

  2. Kappa Opioid Receptor-Induced Aversion Requires p38 MAPK Activation in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Jonathan M.; Messinger, Daniel I.; Knakal, Cerise R.; Kuhar, Jamie R.; Schattauer, Selena S.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Phillips, Paul E.M.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous dynorphin-κ opioid receptor (KOR) system encodes the dysphoric component of the stress response and controls the risk of depression-like and addiction behaviors; however, the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we report that KOR activation of p38α MAPK in ventral tegmental (VTA) dopaminergic neurons was required for conditioned place aversion (CPA) in mice. Conditional genetic deletion of floxed KOR or floxed p38α MAPK by Cre recombinase expression in dopaminergic neurons blocked place aversion to the KOR agonist U50,488. Selective viral rescue by wild-type KOR expression in dopaminergic neurons of KOR−/− mice restored U50,488-CPA, whereas expression of a mutated form of KOR that could not initiate p38α MAPK activation did not. Surprisingly, while p38α MAPK inactivation blocked U50,488-CPA, p38α MAPK was not required for KOR inhibition of evoked dopamine release measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens. In contrast, KOR activation acutely inhibited VTA dopaminergic neuron firing, and repeated exposure attenuated the opioid response. This adaptation to repeated exposure was blocked by conditional deletion of p38α MAPK, which also blocked KOR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) subunit Kir3.1 in VTA dopaminergic neurons. Consistent with the reduced response, GIRK phosphorylation at this amino terminal tyrosine residue (Y12) enhances channel deactivation. Thus, contrary to prevailing expectations, these results suggest that κ opioid-induced aversion requires regulation of VTA dopaminergic neuron somatic excitability through a p38α MAPK effect on GIRK deactivation kinetics rather than by presynaptically inhibiting dopamine release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists have the potential to be effective, nonaddictive analgesics, but their therapeutic utility is greatly limited by adverse effects on mood

  3. A novel, potent, oral active and safe antinociceptive pyrazole targeting kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Rossato, Mateus F; Walker, Cristiani I B; Oliveira, Sara M; Rosa, Fernanda; Tonello, Raquel; Silva, Cássia R; Machado, Pablo; Boligon, Aline A; Martins, Marcos A P; Zanatta, Nilo; Bonacorso, Hélio G; Athayde, Margareth L; Rubin, Maribel A; Calixto, João B; Ferreira, Juliano

    2013-10-01

    Pyrazole compounds are an intriguing class of compounds with potential analgesic activity; however, their mechanism of action remains unknown. Thus, the goal of this study was to explore the antinociceptive potential, safety and mechanism of action of novel 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives, which were designed by molecular simplification, using in vivo and in vitro methods in mice. First, tree 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives (DMPE, MPFE, and MPCIE) were tested in the capsaicin test and all presented antinociceptive effect; however the MPClE (methyl 5-trichloromethyl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxylate) was the most effective. Thus, we selected this compound to assess the effects and mechanisms in subsequent pain models. MPCIE produced antinociception when administered by oral, intraperitoneal, intrathecal and intraplantar routes and was effective in the capsaicin and the acetic acid-induced nociception tests. Moreover, this compound reduced the hyperalgesia in diverse clinically-relevant pain models, including postoperative, inflammatory, and neuropathic nociception in mice. The antinociception produced by orally administered MPClE was mediated by κ-opioid receptors, since these effects were prevented by systemically pre-treatment with naloxone and the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Moreover, MPCIE prevented binding of the κ-opioid ligand [(3)H]-CI-977 in vitro (IC₅₀ of 0.68 (0.32-1.4) μM), but not the TRPV1 ([(3)H]-resiniferatoxin) or the α₂-adrenoreceptor ([(3)H]-idazoxan) binding. Regarding the drug-induced side effects, oral administration of MPClE did not produce sedation, constipation or motor impairment at its active dose. In addition, MPCIE was readily absorbed after oral administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPClE is a novel, potent, orally active and safe analgesic drug that targets κ-opioid receptors.

  4. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  5. Activation of μ-opioid receptor and Toll-like receptor 4 by plasma from morphine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nan; Gomes, Fabio P; Deora, Vandana; Gregory, Kye; Vithanage, Tharindu; Nassar, Zeyad D; Cabot, Peter J; Sturgess, David; Shaw, Paul N; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we quantified the ability of opioids present in biological samples to activate the μ-opioid receptor and TLR4 using cell-based assays. Each assay was standardised, in the presence of plasma, using morphine, its μ receptor-active metabolite morphine-6 glucuronide (M6G) and its μ receptor-inactive, but TLR4-active metabolite morphine-3 glucuronide (M3G). Specificity was verified using antagonists. Morphine- and M6G-spiked plasma samples exhibited μ receptor activation, which M3G-spiked plasma lacked. In contrast, M3G showed moderate but consistent activation of TLR-4. Plasma samples were collected at a number of time points from mice administered morphine (1 or 10mg/kg every 12h for 3days) or saline. Morphine administration led to intermittent μ receptor activation, reversed by μ receptor antagonists, and to TRL4 activation at time points where M3G is measured in plasma. Interestingly, this protocol of morphine administration also led to TLR4-independent NF-κB activation, at time points where M3G was not detected, presumably via elevation of circulating cytokines including, but not limited to, TNFα. Circulating TNFα was increased after three days of morphine administration, and TNFα mRNA elevated in the spleen of morphine-treated mice.

  6. Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. 5. Opioid receptor binding properties of N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl) analogues of 8-CAC.

    PubMed

    VanAlstine, Melissa A; Wentland, Mark P; Cohen, Dana J; Bidlack, Jean M

    2007-12-01

    A series of aryl-containing N-monosubstituted analogues of the lead compound 8-[N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl)]-carboxamidocyclazocine were synthesized and evaluated to probe a putative hydrophobic binding pocket of opioid receptors. Very high binding affinity to the mu opioid receptor was achieved though the N-(2-(4'-methoxybiphenyl-4-yl)ethyl) analogue of 8-CAC. High binding affinity to mu and very high binding affinity to kappa opioid receptors was observed for the N-(3-bromophenethyl) analogue of 8-CAC. High binding affinity to all three opioid receptors were observed for the N-(2-naphthylethyl) analogue of 8-CAC.

  7. Endogenous opioids regulate moment-to-moment neuronal communication and excitability

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bryony L.; Gregoriou, Gabrielle C.; Kissiwaa, Sarah A.; Wells, Oliver A.; Medagoda, Danashi I.; Hermes, Sam M.; Burford, Neil T.; Alt, Andrew; Aicher, Sue A.; Bagley, Elena E.

    2017-01-01

    Fear and emotional learning are modulated by endogenous opioids but the cellular basis for this is unknown. The intercalated cells (ITCs) gate amygdala output and thus regulate the fear response. Here we find endogenous opioids are released by synaptic stimulation to act via two distinct mechanisms within the main ITC cluster. Endogenously released opioids inhibit glutamate release through the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), an effect potentiated by a DOR-positive allosteric modulator. Postsynaptically, the opioids activate a potassium conductance through the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), suggesting for the first time that endogenously released opioids directly regulate neuronal excitability. Ultrastructural localization of endogenous ligands support these functional findings. This study demonstrates a new role for endogenously released opioids as neuromodulators engaged by synaptic activity to regulate moment-to-moment neuronal communication and excitability. These distinct actions through MOR and DOR may underlie the opposing effect of these receptor systems on anxiety and fear. PMID:28327612

  8. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: From a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Whistler, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of “addiction.” These fears are not unwarranted. More than 2.5 million people begin abusing opioid painkillers each year, and prescription opioid abuse is now the second most common type of illegal drug use after marijuana. Some abusers become dependent due to recreational use of prescription painkillers. However, many abusers are among the 40 million people suffering from chronic pain, and developed dependence while using the drugs for legitimate purposes. Both of these trends highlight the need to develop opioid therapeutics with a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. Identifying the ideal properties of opioid drugs that would retain analgesia but reduce these side-effects has been a goal of my laboratory for more than a decade. During this time, we have proposed the novel hypothesis that opioid drugs that promote desensitization, endocytosis and recycling of the mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) will retain analgesic efficacy, but will have a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. We have generated substantial data, both pharmacological and genetic to suggest that our hypothesis is a valid one. These data are summarized in this review. PMID:22226706

  9. Differential signaling properties at the kappa opioid receptor of 12-epi-salvinorin A and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Béguin, Cécile; Potuzak, Justin; Xu, Wei; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Streicher, John M; Groer, Chad E; Bohn, Laura M; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

    2012-01-15

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) has been identified as a potential drug target to prevent or alter the course of mood, anxiety and addictive disorders or reduce response to stress. In a search for highly potent and selective KOPR partial agonists as pharmacological tools, we have modified 12-epi-salvinorin A, a compound which we have previously observed to be a KOPR partial agonist. Five analogues of 12-epi-salvinorin A were synthesized and their effects on G protein activation as well as β-arrestin2 recruitment were evaluated. Only 12-epi-salvinorin A (1) partially activated signaling through G proteins, yet acted as a full agonist in the β-arrestin 2 DiscoveRx assay. Other salvinorin analogues tested in these functional assays were full agonists in both assays of KOPR activation. By comparison, the non-selective opioid ligand nalbuphine, known to be a partial agonist for G-protein activation, was also a partial agonist for the β-arrestin mediated signaling pathway activated through KOPR.

  10. Antinociceptive role of oxytocin in the nucleus raphe magnus of rats, an involvement of mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Wen; Lundeberg, Thomas; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2003-10-15

    Recent studies showed that oxytocin plays an important role in nociceptive modulation in the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of oxytocin in antinociception in the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) of rats and the possible interaction between oxytocin and the opioid systems. Intra-NRM injection of oxytocin induced dose-dependent increases in hindpaw withdrawal latencies (HWLs) to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation in rats. The antinociceptive effect of oxytocin was significantly attenuated by subsequent intra-NRM injection of the oxytocin antagonist 1-deamino-2-D-Tyr-(Oet)-4-Thr-8-Orn-oxytocin. Intra-NRM injection of naloxone dose-dependently antagonized the increased HWLs induced by preceding intra-NRM injection of oxytocin, indicating an involvement of opioid receptors in oxytocin-induced antinociception in the NRM of rats. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of oxytocin was dose-dependently attenuated by subsequent intra-NRM injection of the mu-opioid antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), but not by the kappa-opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) or the delta-opioid antagonist naltrindole. The results demonstrated that oxytocin plays an antinociceptive role in the NRM of rats through activating the oxytocin receptor. Moreover, mu-opioid receptors, not kappa and delta receptors, are involved in the oxytocin-induced antinociception in the NRM of rats.

  11. In Vitro Opioid Receptor Affinity and in Vivo Behavioral Studies of Nelumbo nucifera Flower

    PubMed Central

    Kumarihamy, Mallika; León, Francisco; Pettaway, Sara; Wilson, Lisa; Lambert, Janet A.; Wang, Mei; Hill, Christopher; McCurdy, Christopher R.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Cutler, Stephen J.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Nelumbo nucifera Geartn., known as sacred lotus, has been used traditionally in South East Asia as a traditional medicine for various CNS disorders including stress, fever, depression, insomnia, and cognitive conditions. Aim of the study To investigate the in vitro cannabinoid and opioid receptor binding affinities, and in vivo behavioral actions of Nelumbo flower extracts and to isolate the potential compounds to treat CNS associated disorders. Materials and methods The white and pink flowers of N. nucifera were extracted with 95% EtOH, followed by acid-base partitioning using CHCl3 to give acidic and basic partitions. These partitions were subjected to Centrifugal Preparative TLC (CPTLC) to yield benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline (BTIQ) alkaloids and long chain fatty acids, identified by physical and spectroscopic methods. In addition, EtOH extracts and partitions were analyzed for chemical markers by UHPLC/MS and GC/MS. In vitro neuropharmacological effects were evaluated by cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) and opioid [delta (δ), kappa (κ), and mu (μ)] competitive radioligand binding and GTPγS functional assays. The in vivo behavioral effect was studied through the use of the mouse tetrad assay at 10, 30, 75 and 100 mg/kg/ip doses that revealed the effect on locomotion, catalepsy, body temperature, and nociception of acidic and basic CHCl3 partitions, fractions, and compounds. Results Three aporphines, nuciferine (1), N-nor-nuciferine (2), asimilobine (3), and five BTIQs, armepavine (4), O-methylcoclaurine (5), N-methylcoclaurine (6), coclaurine (7), neferine (10), and a mixture of linoleic and palmitic acids (LA and PA), were identified and evaluated for cannabinoid and opioid receptor displacement activities. Compounds 5–7 showed binding affinities for the κ opioid receptor with equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) values of 3.5±0.3, 0.9±0.1, 2.2±0.2 µM, respectively. Compound 10 displayed affinities for δ-and μ- opioid

  12. Considerations for the use of short-acting opioids in general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jeff E

    2014-02-01

    Anesthesiologists play a critical role in facilitating a positive perioperative experience and early recovery for patients. Depending on the kind of procedure or surgery, a wide variety of agents and techniques are currently available to anesthesiologists to administer safe and efficacious anesthesia. Notably, the fast-track or ambulatory surgery environment requires the use of agents that enable rapid induction, maintenance, and emergence combined with minimal adverse effects. Short-acting opioids demonstrate a safe and rapid onset/offset of effect; that short effect is both predictable and precise. It also ensures easier titration and reduced or rapidly reversed side effects. Due to their distinct pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and, in one case, rapid extra-hepatic clearance of remifentanil, these agents have several applications in general anesthesia.

  13. Delta-Opioid Receptor Analgesia Is Independent of Microglial Activation in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR) ligands in neuropathic pain is not diminished in contrast to other opioid receptor ligands, which lose their effectiveness as analgesics. In this study, we examine whether this effect is related to nerve injury-induced microglial activation. We therefore investigated the influence of minocycline-induced inhibition of microglial activation on the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists: morphine, DAMGO, U50,488H, DPDPE, Deltorphin II and SNC80 after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Pre-emptive and repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p.) over 7 days significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia as measured on day 7 after CCI. The antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered morphine (10–20 µg), DAMGO (1–2 µg) and U50,488H (25–50 µg) were significantly potentiated in rats after minocycline, but no such changes were observed after DPDPE (10–20 µg), deltorphin II (1.5–15 µg) and SNC80 (10–20 µg) administration. Additionally, nerve injury-induced down-regulation of all types of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia was not influenced by minocycline, which indicates that the effects of opioid ligands are dependent on other changes, presumably neuroimmune interactions. Our study of rat primary microglial cell culture using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of mu-opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa-opioid receptors (KOR), further we provide the first evidence for the lack of DOR on microglial cells. In summary, DOR analgesia is different from analgesia induced by MOR and KOR receptors because it does not dependent on injury-induced microglial activation. DOR agonists appear to be the best candidates for new drugs to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25105291

  14. Delta-opioid receptor analgesia is independent of microglial activation in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mika, Joanna; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR) ligands in neuropathic pain is not diminished in contrast to other opioid receptor ligands, which lose their effectiveness as analgesics. In this study, we examine whether this effect is related to nerve injury-induced microglial activation. We therefore investigated the influence of minocycline-induced inhibition of microglial activation on the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists: morphine, DAMGO, U50,488H, DPDPE, Deltorphin II and SNC80 after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Pre-emptive and repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p.) over 7 days significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia as measured on day 7 after CCI. The antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered morphine (10-20 µg), DAMGO (1-2 µg) and U50,488H (25-50 µg) were significantly potentiated in rats after minocycline, but no such changes were observed after DPDPE (10-20 µg), deltorphin II (1.5-15 µg) and SNC80 (10-20 µg) administration. Additionally, nerve injury-induced down-regulation of all types of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia was not influenced by minocycline, which indicates that the effects of opioid ligands are dependent on other changes, presumably neuroimmune interactions. Our study of rat primary microglial cell culture using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of mu-opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa-opioid receptors (KOR), further we provide the first evidence for the lack of DOR on microglial cells. In summary, DOR analgesia is different from analgesia induced by MOR and KOR receptors because it does not dependent on injury-induced microglial activation. DOR agonists appear to be the best candidates for new drugs to treat neuropathic pain.

  15. New approaches to the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Opiates are indispensable for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The gastrointestinal tract is one of the major victims of the undesired effects of opiates, because the enteric nervous system expresses all major subtypes of opioid receptors. As a result, propulsive motility and secretory processes in the gut are inhibited by opioid analgesics, and the ensuing constipation is one of the most frequent and troublesome adverse reactions. Many treatments involving laxatives, prokinetic drugs and opioid-sparing regimens have been explored to circumvent opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, but the outcome has in general been unsatisfactory. Specific antagonism of peripheral opioid receptors offers a more rational approach to the management of the adverse actions of opioid analgesics in the gut. This goal is currently addressed by the use of opioid receptor antagonists with limited absorption such as oral naloxone and by the development of peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists such as methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. These investigational drugs hold considerable promise in preventing constipation due to opiate treatment, whereas the analgesic action of opiates remains unabated. Postoperative ileus associated with opioid-induced postsurgical pain control is likewise ameliorated by the compounds. With this proof of concept, several phase III studies are under way to define optimal dosage, dosing regimen as well as long-term efficacy and safety of methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. In addition, there is preliminary evidence that these peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists may act as prokinetic drugs in their own right. PMID:18924451

  16. A role for the mu opioid receptor in the antidepressant effects of buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Shivon A; Erickson, Rebecca L; Browne, Caroline A; Lucki, Irwin

    2017-02-15

    Buprenorphine (BPN), a mixed opioid drug with high affinity for mu (MOR) and kappa (KOR) opioid receptors, has been shown to produce behavioral responses in rodents that are similar to those of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs. Although recent studies have identified KORs as a primary mediator of BPN's effects in rodent models of depressive-like behavior, the role of MORs in BPN's behavioral effects has not been as well explored. The current studies investigated the role of MORs in mediating conditioned approach behavior in the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) test, a behavioral measure previously shown to be sensitive to chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs. The effects of BPN were evaluated in the NIH test 24h post-administration in mice with genetic deletion of the MOR (Oprm1(-/-)) or KOR (Oprk1(-/-)), or after pharmacological blockade with the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and selective MOR antagonist cyprodime. We found that behavioral responses to BPN in the NIH test were blocked in Oprm1(-/-) mice, but not in Oprk1(-/-) mice. Both cyprodime and naltrexone significantly reduced approach latency at doses experimentally proven to antagonize the MOR. In contrast the selective MOR agonist morphine and the selective KOR antagonist nor-BNI were both ineffective. Moreover, antinociceptive studies revealed persistence of the MOR antagonist properties of BPN at 24h post-administration, the period of behavioral reactivity. These data support modulation of MOR activity as a key component of BPN's antidepressant-like effects in the NIH paradigm.

  17. Structure of the human κ-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F Ivy; Mascarella, S Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B; Mosier, Philip D; Roth, Bryan L; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-21

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and--in the case of κ-opioid receptor (κ-OR)--dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human κ-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human κ-OR. Modelling of other important κ-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for κ-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human κ-OR.

  18. Ionic storm in hypoxic/ischemic stress: Can opioid receptors subside it?

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dongman; Xia, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are extremely vulnerable to oxygen deprivation and blood supply insufficiency. Indeed, hypoxic/ischemic stress triggers multiple pathophysiological changes in the brain, forming the basis of hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy. One of the initial and crucial events induced by hypoxia/ischemia is the disruption of ionic homeostasis characterized by enhanced K+ efflux and Na+-, Ca2+- and Cl− influx, which causes neuronal injury or even death. Recent data from our laboratory and those of others have shown that activation of opioid receptors, particularly δ-opioid receptors (DOR), is neuroprotective against hypoxic/ischemic insult. This protective mechanism may be one of the key factors that determine neuronal survival under hypoxic/ischemic condition. An important aspect of the DOR-mediated neuroprotection is its action against hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis. Specially, DOR signal inhibits Na+ influx through the membrane and reduces the increase in intracellular Ca2+, thus decreasing the excessive leakage of intracellular K+. Such protection is dependent on a PKC-dependent and PKA-independent signaling pathway. Furthermore, our novel exploration shows that DOR attenuates hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis through the inhibitory regulation of Na+ channels. In this review, we will first update current information regarding the process and features of hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis and then discuss the opioid-mediated regulation of ionic homeostasis, especially in hypoxic/ischemic condition, and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:20036308

  19. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  20. Neonatal administration of thimerosal causes persistent changes in mu opioid receptors in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Bobrowicz, Teresa; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2010-11-01

    Thimerosal added to some pediatric vaccines is suspected in pathogenesis of several neurodevelopmental disorders. Our previous study showed that thimerosal administered to suckling rats causes persistent, endogenous opioid-mediated hypoalgesia. Here we examined, using immunohistochemical staining technique, the density of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brains of rats, which in the second postnatal week received four i.m. injections of thimerosal at doses 12, 240, 1,440 or 3,000 μg Hg/kg. The periaqueductal gray, caudate putamen and hippocampus were examined. Thimerosal administration caused dose-dependent statistically significant increase in MOR densities in the periaqueductal gray and caudate putamen, but decrease in the dentate gyrus, where it was accompanied by the presence of degenerating neurons and loss of synaptic vesicle marker (synaptophysin). These data document that exposure to thimerosal during early postnatal life produces lasting alterations in the densities of brain opioid receptors along with other neuropathological changes, which may disturb brain development.

  1. Partial purification of the mu opioid receptor irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)b-funaltrexamine

    SciTech Connect

    Liu-Chen, L.Y.; Phillips, C.A.; Tam, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    The mu opioid receptor in bovine striatal membranes was specifically and irreversibly labeled by incubation with 5 nM (/sup 3/H)..beta..-funaltrexamine (approx.-FNA) at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min in the presence of 100 mM NaCl. The specific and irreversible binding of (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA as defined by that blocked by 1 /sup +/M naloxone was about 60% of total irreversible binding. The specific irreversible binding was saturable, stereospecific, time-, temperature, and tissue-dependent. Mu opioid ligands were much more potent than delta or kappa ligands in inhibiting the specific irreversible labeling. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized membranes in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol yielded a major radiolabeled broad band of MW 68-97K daltons, characteristic of a glycoprotein band. This band was not observed in membranes labeled in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The glycoprotein nature of the (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA-labeled opioid receptor was confirmed by its binding to a wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose column and its elution with N-acetylglucosamine.

  2. Crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Summary Opium is one of the world’s oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many of their undesirable side effects (sedation, apnea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled μ-opioid receptor (μOR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 Å crystal structure of the μOR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most GPCRs published to date, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the μOR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetric dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction. PMID:22437502

  3. Effect of Iboga Alkaloids on µ-Opioid Receptor-Coupled G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Tamara; Childers, Steven R.; Rothman, Richard B.; Dersch, Christina M.; King, Christine; Kuehne, Martin; Bornmann, William G.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Janowsky, Aaron; Simon, Eric R.; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Alper, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Objective The iboga alkaloids are a class of small molecules defined structurally on the basis of a common ibogamine skeleton, some of which modify opioid withdrawal and drug self-administration in humans and preclinical models. These compounds may represent an innovative approach to neurobiological investigation and development of addiction pharmacotherapy. In particular, the use of the prototypic iboga alkaloid ibogaine for opioid detoxification in humans raises the question of whether its effect is mediated by an opioid agonist action, or if it represents alternative and possibly novel mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to independently replicate and extend evidence regarding the activation of μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-related G proteins by iboga alkaloids. Methods Ibogaine, its major metabolite noribogaine, and 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), a synthetic congener, were evaluated by agonist-stimulated guanosine-5´-O-(γ-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding in cells overexpressing the recombinant MOR, in rat thalamic membranes, and autoradiography in rat brain slices. Results And Significance In rat thalamic membranes ibogaine, noribogaine and 18-MC were MOR antagonists with functional Ke values ranging from 3 uM (ibogaine) to 13 uM (noribogaine and 18MC). Noribogaine and 18-MC did not stimulate [35S]GTPγS binding in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human or rat MORs, and had only limited partial agonist effects in human embryonic kidney cells expressing mouse MORs. Ibogaine did not did not stimulate [35S]GTPγS binding in any MOR expressing cells. Noribogaine did not stimulate [35S]GTPγS binding in brain slices using autoradiography. An MOR agonist action does not appear to account for the effect of these iboga alkaloids on opioid withdrawal. Taken together with existing evidence that their mechanism of action also differs from that of other non-opioids with clinical effects on opioid tolerance and withdrawal, these findings suggest a

  4. Bi-Directional Heterologous Desensitization Between the Major HIV-1 Co-Receptor CXCR4 and the κ-Opioid Receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Matthew J.; Chen, Xiaohong; Bardi, Guiseppe; Davey, Penny; Geller, Ellen B.; Zhang, Lily; Adler, Martin W.; Rogers, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We previously characterized multiple interactions between chemokine and opioid G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and we found both µ and δ-opioid receptors cross-desensitize CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, but not CXCR4. Here we report that the κ-opioid receptor (KOR) is able to cross-desensitize CXCR4, and this phenomenon is bi-directional. Chemotactic responses by KOR activation are diminished with prior activation of CXCR4. Additionally, calcium mobilization assays show these cross-desensitization processes occur within seconds of receptor activation, and target receptor internalization is not responsible for desensitization between these receptors. These results have implications for several essential processes including neuronal and lymphocyte development, inflammatory responses, and pain/sensitivity. PMID:18533278

  5. A PTEN-regulated checkpoint regulates surface delivery of delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Shiwarski, Daniel J; Tipton, Alycia; Giraldo, Melissa D; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Gold, Michael S; Pradhan, Amynah A; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2017-03-06

    The delta opioid receptor (δR) is a promising alternate target for pain management, because δR agonists show decreased abuse potential compared to current opioid analgesics that target the mu opioid receptor. A critical limitation in developing δR as an analgesic target, however, is that δR agonists show relatively low efficacy in vivo, requiring the use of high doses that often cause adverse effects such as convulsions. Here we tested whether intracellular retention of δR in sensory neurons contributes to this low δR agonist efficacy in vivo by limiting surface δR expression. Using direct visualization of δR trafficking and localization, we define a phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-regulated checkpoint that retains δR in the Golgi and decreases surface delivery in rat and mice sensory neurons. PTEN inhibition releases δR from this checkpoint and stimulates delivery of exogenous and endogenous δR to the neuronal surface both in vitro and in vivo PTEN inhibition in vivo increases the percentage of TG neurons expressing δR on the surface, and allows efficient δR-mediated antihyperalgesia in mice. Together, we define a critical role for PTEN in regulating the surface delivery and bioavailability of the δR, explain the low efficacy of δR agonists in vivo, and provide evidence that active δR relocation is a viable strategy to increase δR antinociception.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTOpioid analgesics like morphine, which target the mu opioid receptor (μR), have been the mainstay of pain management, but their use is highly limited by adverse effects and their variable efficacy in chronic pain. Identifying alternate analgesic targets is therefore of great significance. While the delta opioid receptor (δR) is an attractive option, a critical limiting factor in developing δR as a target has been the low efficacy of δR agonists. Why δR agonists show low efficacy is still under debate. This study provides mechanistic and functional data that intracellular

  6. Differential involvement of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone in motivational and hedonic aspects of reward.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Miriam; Heise, Verena; Spanagel, Rainer

    2010-04-02

    In the present study dose-dependent effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were investigated on the rewarding effects of sweetened condensed milk (SCM) in four behavioral paradigms addressing hedonic, consummatory as well as motivational aspects of a reward: odour-conditioned pleasure attenuation of the acoustic startle response (PAS), conditioned place preference (CPP), voluntary consumption in a limited access paradigm, as well as break point determination in a progressive ratio (PR) task. A dose-dependent reduction in reward-related behavior was observed in all paradigms, with exception of the break point in the PR task, which was not affected by naloxone at all. CPP for SCM was only affected by the highest dose of naloxone. The present results indicate that naloxone is more effective in suppressing the hedonic than motivational aspects of reward, further supporting the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the mediation of hedonic properties of food reward.

  7. The crystal structure of a bimorphinan with highly selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Etter, Margaret C.; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Portoghese, Philip S.

    1987-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dihydrobromide heptahydrate of nor-binaltorphimine (17, 17'-bis(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,6',7,7'-tetrahydro-4,5α: 4',5'α-diepoxy-6,6'-imino[7,7' bimorphinan]-3,3',14,14'-tetraol)is presented. This structure is the first reported structure of a rigid bivalent opioid ligand. Two morphinan pharmacophores are connected by a rigid spacer, the pyrrole ring. The nor-binaltorphimine structure itself shows unique, high selectivity as a kappa opioid receptor antagonist. Crystal data: P3 2, Z = 3, a = b = 20.223 (4), c = 9.541(7) Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°; R = 0.079 (1765 reflections, Fobs > 1σ( F)).

  8. An opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, does not alter taste and smell responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Scińska, A; Koroś, E; Polanowska, E; Kukwa, A; Bogucka-Bonikowska, A; Kostowski, W; Habrat, B; Bieńkowski, P

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have shown that an opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, decreases palatable food consumption. Naltrexone has also been reported to reduce ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring rodents and human alcoholics. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of naltrexone on taste and smell responses in healthy male volunteers. Naltrexone did not alter intensity and pleasantness of sucrose, quinine, citric acid, sodium chloride, and ethanol taste. Similarly, ratings of olfactory stimuli (orange extract and ethanol) and Coca-Cola flavor were not influenced by the opioid antagonist. Our findings may indicate that: (i) naltrexone exerts marginal, if any, effects on gustatory and olfactory responses in humans; (ii) the drug does not alter orosensory responses to ethanol.

  9. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  10. Interaction between μ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors in the regulation of panic-related defensive responses in the rat dorsal periaqueductal grey.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Marcel P; Zangrossi, Hélio; Roncon, Camila M; Graeff, Frederico G; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2014-12-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates that the activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG) inhibits escape, a panic-related defensive behaviour. Results that were previously obtained with the elevated T-maze test of anxiety/panic suggest that 5-HT1A and μ-opioid receptors in this midbrain area work together to regulate this response. To investigate the generality of this finding, we assessed whether the same cooperative mechanism is engaged when escape is evoked by a different aversive stimulus electrical stimulation of the dPAG. Administration of the μ-receptor blocker CTOP into the dPAG did not change the escape threshold, but microinjection of the μ-receptor agonist DAMGO (0.3 and 0.5 nmol) or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OHDPAT (1.6 nmol) increased this index, indicating a panicolytic-like effect. Pretreatment with CTOP antagonised the anti-escape effect of 8-OHDPAT. Additionally, combined administration of subeffective doses of DAMGO and 8-OHDPAT increased the escape threshold, indicating drug synergism. Therefore, regardless of the aversive nature of the stimulus, μ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors cooperatively act to regulate escape behaviour. A better comprehension of this mechanism might allow for new therapeutic strategies for panic disorder.

  11. THE ROLE OF AMYGDALAR MU OPIOID RECEPTORS IN ANXIETY-RELATED RESPONSES IN TWO RAT MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Marlene A.; Junor, Lorain

    2009-01-01

    Amygdala opioids such as enkephalin appear to play some role in the control of anxiety and the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines, although the opioid receptor subtypes mediating such effects are unclear. This study compared the influences of mu opioid receptor (MOR) activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) on unconditioned fear or anxiety-like responses in two models, the elevated plus maze and the defensive burying test. The role of MOR in the anxiolytic actions of the benzodiazepine agonist diazepam was also examined using both models. Either the MOR agonist [D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) or the MOR antagonists Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP) or β-funaltrexamine (FNA) were bilaterally infused into the CEA of rats prior to testing. The results show that microinjection of DAMGO in the CEA decreased open arm time in the plus maze, while CTAP increased open arm behaviors. In contrast, DAMGO injections in the CEA reduced burying behaviors and increased rearing following exposure to a predator odor, suggesting a shift in the behavioral response in this context. Amygdala injections of the MOR agonist DAMGO or the MOR antagonist CTAP failed to change the anxiolytic effects of diazepam in either test. Our results demonstrate that MOR activation in the central amygdala exerts distinctive effects in two different models of unconditioned fear or anxiety-like responses, and suggest that opioids may exert context-specific regulation of amygdala output circuits and behavioral responses during exposure to potential threats (open arms of the maze) versus discrete threats (predator odor). PMID:18216773

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of opioid growth factor and its receptor in tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Ruth, Torre B; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions of the opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met(5)]-enkephalin, and opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) in the epithelium of the rat tongue were determined in order to reveal structure-function relationships. Laser scanning confocal microscopic analysis showed that both OGF and OGFr were colocalized in the paranuclear cytoplasm and in the nuclei of keratinocytes in the stratum basale. Using immunoelectron microscopy and postembedding techniques, double labeling experiments disclosed that complexes of OGF-OGFr were colocalized on the outer nuclear envelope, in the paranuclear cytoplasm, perpendicular to the nuclear envelope in a putative nuclear pore complex, and in the nucleus adjacent to heterochromatin. Anti-OGF IgG alone was detected in the cytoplasm, and anti-OGFr IgG alone was associated with the outer nuclear envelope. Study of chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), which blocks opioid-receptor binding, revealed the presence of OGFr immunoreactivity alone in the cytoplasm and the nucleus; some OGF-OGFr complexes were also observed. Colocalization of OGFr and karyopherin (importin) beta was recorded in the cytoplasm and nucleus. These results in tongue epithelium are the first to suggest that OGFr resides on the outer nuclear envelope, where OGF interacts with OGFr; that the OGF-OGFr complex translocates between cytoplasm and nucleus at the nuclear pore; and that the nuclear localization signal of OGFr interacts with karyopherin beta for nuclear transport. These novel data also indicate that signal transduction for cell proliferation appears to involve an OGF-OGFr complex that interfaces with chromatin in the nucleus. Moreover, the unique finding that OGFr was found in the cytoplasm and nucleus in NTX-treated specimens may suggest that NTX-OGFr complexes have the same pathway as OGF-OGFr.

  13. Presence in neuroblastoma cells of a mu 3 receptor with selectivity for opiate alkaloids but without affinity for opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, R A; Dvorkin, B; Klinger, H P; Makman, M H

    1994-12-26

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of a unique opiate alkaloid-selective, opioid peptide-insensitive binding site in N18TG2 mouse neuroblastoma cells and in late passage hybrid F-11 cells, derived from N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells and rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Those cells lacked classical opioid peptide-sensitive receptor subtypes, but contained [3H]morphine and [3H]diprenorphine binding sites with affinity for certain opiate alkaloids but not for any endogenously occurring opioid peptide or peptide analog tested, including D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin (DADLE), D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol (DAGO) and dynorphin A(1-17). The binding site differed from hitherto described mu, delta and kappa neuronal opioid receptors not only on the basis of peptide insensitivity, but also on the basis of selectivity and affinities of alkaloids. Saturation experiments with [3H]morphine indicated the presence of a single site with Kd = 49 nM and Bmax = 1510 fmol/mg protein. This novel binding site was not present in F-11 hybrid cells at early passage. Instead the hybrid cells contained conventional opioid receptors (predominantly delta and also mu) capable of binding DADLE and other peptides as well as opiate alkaloids. With additional passage (cell divisions) of the hybrid cells, during which a limited change occurred in mouse chromosome number, the peptide-insensitive binding appeared and the opioid peptide-binding (delta and mu) receptors were lost reciprocally. Thus, expression of the peptide-insensitive binding normally may be repressed when conventional opioid receptors are expressed. The peptide-insensitive opiate binding site described here appears to correspond to the mu 3 receptor subtype, recently identified pharmacologically and functionally in several cell types of the immune system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Effects of peripheral and spinal κ-opioid receptor stimulation on the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex is greater in rats with ligated femoral arteries than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The exaggerated reflex in rats with ligated arteries is attenuated by stimulation of μ-opioid and δ-opioid receptors on the peripheral endings of thin-fiber muscle afferents. The effect of stimulation of κ-opioid receptors on the exercise pressor reflex is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of κ-opioid receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated, but not freely perfused, femoral arteries. The pressor responses to static contraction were compared before and after femoral arterial or intrathecal injection of the κ-opioid receptor agonist U62066 (1, 10, and 100 μg). Femoral arterial injection of U62066 did not attenuate the pressor responses to contraction in either group of rats. Likewise, intrathecal injection of U62066 did not attenuate the pressor response to contraction in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. In contrast, intrathecal injection of 10 and 100 μg of U62066 attenuated the pressor response to contraction in rats with ligated femoral arteries, an effect that was blocked by prior intrathecal injection of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the pressor response to stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors by sodium cyanide was not changed by intrathecal U62066 injections, indicating that these injections had no direct effect on the sympathetic outflow. We conclude that stimulation of spinal, but not peripheral, κ-opioid receptors attenuates the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:24920732

  15. Identification of a signaling cascade that maintains constitutive delta opioid receptor incompetence in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Allison Doyle; Sarrami, Shayda; Gomez, Ruben; Guerrero, Kristi A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2017-04-05

    Mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists are often used to treat severe pain, but can result in adverse side effects. To circumvent systemic side effects, targeting peripheral opioid receptors is an attractive alternative treatment for severe pain. Activation of the delta opioid receptor (DOR) produces similar analgesia with reduced side effects. However, until primed by inflammation, peripheral DOR is analgesically incompetent, raising interest in the mechanism. We recently identified a novel role for G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) that renders DOR analgesically incompetent at the plasma membrane. However, the mechanism that maintains constitutive GRK2 association with DOR is unknown. Protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of GRK2 at Ser685 targets it to the plasma membrane. A-kinase anchoring protein 79/150 (AKAP), residing at the plasma membrane in neurons, scaffolds PKA to target proteins to mediate downstream signal. Therefore, we sought to determine whether GRK2-mediated DOR desensitization is directed by PKA via AKAP scaffolding. Membrane fractions from cultured rat sensory neurons following AKAP siRNA-transfection and from AKAP-knockout mice, had less PKA activity, GRK2 Ser685 phosphorylation, and GRK2 plasma membrane targeting than controls. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that GRK2 Ser685 phosphorylation drives GRK2s association with plasma membrane-associated DOR. Moreover, overexpression studies with AKAP mutants indicated that impaired AKAP-mediated PKA scaffolding significantly reduces DOR-GRK2 association at the plasma membrane and consequently increases DOR activity in sensory neurons without a priming event. These findings suggest that AKAP scaffolds PKA to increase plasma membrane targeting and phosphorylation of GRK2 to maintain DOR analgesic incompetence in peripheral sensory neurons.

  16. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; James, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM (/sup 3/H)naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-(/sup 3/H)-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM (/sup 3/H)-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1.

  17. ‘Carba’-carfentanil (trans isomer): a μ opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist with a distinct binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Lemieux, Carole; Chung, Nga N.; Guo, Jason J.; Wilkes, Brian C.; Schiller, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence to indicate that a positively charged nitrogen of endogenous and exogenous opioid ligands forms a salt bridge with the Asp residue in the third transmembrane helix of opioid receptors. To further examine the role of this electrostatic interaction in opioid receptor binding and activation, we synthesized ‘carba’-analogues of the highly potent μ opioid analgesic carfentanil (3), in which the piperidine nitrogen was replaced with a carbon. The resulting trans isomer (8b) showed reduced, but still significant MOR binding affinity (Kiμ = 95.2 nM) with no MOR versus DOR binding selectivity and was a MOR partial agonist. The cis isomer (8a) was essentially inactive. A MOR docking study indicated that 8b bound to the same binding pocket as parent 3, but its binding mode was somewhat different. A reevaluation of the uncharged morphine derivative N-formylnormorphine (9) indicated that it was a weak MOR antagonist showing no preference for MOR over KOR. Taken together, the results indicate that deletion of the positively charged nitrogen in μ opioid analgesics reduces MOR binding affinity by 2–3 orders of magnitude and may have pronounced effects on the intrinsic efficacy and on the opioid receptor selectivity profile. PMID:25129170

  18. Synthesis and opioid receptor affinity of morphinan and benzomorphan derivatives: mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Bidlack, J M; Zong, R; Bakthavachalam, V; Gao, P; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K

    2000-01-13

    This report concerns the synthesis and preliminary pharmacological evaluation of a novel series of kappa agonists related to the morphinan (-)-cyclorphan (3a) and the benzomorphan (-)-cyclazocine (2) as potential agents for the pharmacotherapy of cocaine abuse. Recent evidence suggests that agonists acting at kappa opioid receptors may modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons and alter the neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine. We describe the synthesis and chemical characterization of a series of morphinans 3a-c, structural analogues of cyclorphan [(-)-3-hydroxy-N-cyclopropylmethylmorphinan S(+)-mandelate, 3a], the 10-ketomorphinans 4a,b, and the 8-ketobenzomorphan 1b. Binding experiments demonstrated that the cyclobutyl analogue 3b [(-)-3-hydroxy-N-cyclobutylmethylmorphinan S(+)-mandelate, 3b, MCL-101] of cyclorphan (3a) had a high affinity for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors in guinea pig brain membranes. Both 3a,b were approximately 2-fold more selective for the kappa receptor than for the mu receptor. However 3b (the cyclobutyl analogue) was 18-fold more selective for the kappa receptor in comparison to the delta receptor, while cyclorphan (3a) had only 4-fold greater affinity for the kappa receptor in comparison to the delta receptor. These findings were confirmed in the antinociceptive tests (tail-flick and acetic acid writhing) in mice, which demonstrated that cyclorphan (3a) produced antinociception that was mediated by the delta receptor while 3b did not produce agonist or antagonist effects at the delta receptor. Both 3a,b had comparable kappa agonist properties. 3a,b had opposing effects at the mu receptor: 3b was a mu agonist whereas 3a was a mu antagonist.

  19. No tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia in presence of opioid expression in inflamed synovia.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, C; Pflüger, M; Yassouridis, A; Hoelzl, J; Lehrberger, K; Welte, C; Hassan, A H

    1996-01-01

    Pain treatment with centrally acting opiates is limited by tolerance. Tolerance is a decreasing effect of a drug with prolonged administration of that drug or of a related (e.g., endogenous) compound acting at the same receptor. This is often associated with a downregulation of receptors. In peripheral inflamed tissue, both locally expressed opioid peptides and morphine can produce powerful analgesia mediated by similar populations of opioid receptors. We hypothesized that the chronic presence of endogenous opioids in inflamed joints might convey downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors and tolerance to the analgesic effects of intraarticular morphine. We assessed these effects after arthroscopic surgery in patients with and without histologically verified synovial cellular infiltration, and we examined synovial opioid peptides and opioid receptors by immunocytochemistry and autoradiography, respectively. We found that, despite an abundance of opioid-containing cells in pronounced synovitis, morphine is at least as effective as in patients without such cellular infiltrations, and there is no major downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors. Thus, opioids expressed in inflamed tissue do not produce tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia. Tolerance may be less pronounced for peripherally than for centrally acting opioids, which provides a promising perspective for the treatment of chronic pain in arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:8698872

  20. Nucleus accumbens mu opioid receptors mediate immediate postictal decrease in locomotion after an amygdaloid kindled seizure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Boyce, Richard; Leung, L Stan

    2010-02-01

    Postictal movement dysfunction is a common symptom in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the involvement of opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAC) in amygdaloid kindling-induced postictal decrease in locomotion (PDL) in rats. Seizures were induced by daily electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala until four consecutive stage 5 seizures were elicited. Locomotion was quantified before and after infusion of an opioid receptor antagonist or saline into the NAC. Whereas PDL was induced after a stage 5 seizure in saline-infused rats, pre-infusion of the mu opioid receptor antagonist H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP, 5 microg/1 microL/side) into the NAC prevented PDL. Pre-infusion of delta (naltrindole, 30 microg/1 microL/side), kappa (nor-binaltorphimine, 1.8 microg/1 microL/side), or nonselective (naloxone, 10 microg/1 microL/side) opioid receptor antagonists did not block PDL, but late postictal hyperactivity was blocked by naltrindole. None of the antagonists affected amygdaloid evoked afterdischarge duration. It is suggested that mu opioid receptors in the NAC participate in amygdaloid seizure-induced PDL without affecting seizure duration.

  1. Activation of mu opioid receptors in the striatum differentially augments methamphetamine-induced gene expression and enhances stereotypic behavior.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Hebbard, John C; Logan, Anna S; Vanchipurakel, Golda A; Gilbert, Yamiece E

    2012-03-01

    Mu opioid receptors are densely expressed in the patch compartment of striatum and contribute to methamphetamine-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. To further elucidate the role of mu opioid receptor activation in these phenomena, we examined whether activation of mu opioid receptors would enhance methamphetamine-induced stereotypy and prodynorphin, c-fos, arc and zif/268 expression in the patch and/or matrix compartments of striatum, as well as the impact of mu opioid receptor activation on the relationship between patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intrastriatally infused with d-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO; 1 μg/μL), treated with methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) and killed at 45 min or 2 h later. DAMGO augmented methamphetamine-induced zif/268 mRNA expression in the patch and matrix compartments, while prodynorphin expression was increased in the dorsolateral patch compartment. DAMGO pre-treatment did not affect methamphetamine-induced arc and c-fos expression. DAMGO enhanced methamphetamine-induced stereotypy and resulted in greater patch versus matrix expression of prodynorphin in the dorsolateral striatum, leading to a negative correlation between the two. These findings indicate that mu opioid receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced stereotypy, but can differentially influence the genomic responses to methamphetamine. These data also suggest that prodynorphin may offset the overstimulation of striatal neurons by methamphetamine.

  2. Chronic heroin self-administration desensitizes mu opioid receptor-activated G-proteins in specific regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sim-Selley, L J; Selley, D E; Vogt, L J; Childers, S R; Martin, T J

    2000-06-15

    In previous studies from our laboratory, chronic noncontingent morphine administration decreased mu opioid receptor-activated G-proteins in specific brainstem nuclei. In the present study, mu opioid receptor binding and receptor-activated G-proteins were examined after chronic heroin self-administration. Rats were trained to self-administer intravenous heroin for up to 39 d, achieving heroin intake up to 366 mg. kg(-1). d(-1). mu opioid-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS and [(3)H]naloxone autoradiography were performed in adjacent brain sections. Agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS autoradiography also examined other G-protein-coupled receptors, including delta opioid, ORL-1, GABA(B), adenosine A(1), cannabinoid, and 5-HT(1A). In brains from heroin self-administering rats, decreased mu opioid-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was observed in periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, and commissural nucleus tractus solitarius, as previously observed in chronic morphine-treated animals. In addition, decreased mu opioid-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was found in thalamus and amygdala after heroin self-administration. Despite this decrease in mu-activated G-proteins, [(3)H]naloxone binding demonstrated increased mu opioid receptor binding in several brain regions after heroin self-administration, and there was a significant decrease in mu receptor G-protein efficiency as expressed as a ratio between agonist-activated G-proteins and mu receptor binding. No effects on agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were found for any other receptor examined. The effect of chronic heroin self-administration to decrease mu-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding varied between regions and was highest in brainstem and lowest in the cortex and striatum. These results not only provide potential neuronal mechanisms that may contribute to opioid tolerance and dependence, but also may explain why various chronic effects of opioids develop to different degrees.

  3. Asymmetric synthesis and in vitro and in vivo activity of tetrahydroquinolines featuring a diverse set of polar substitutions at the 6 position as mixed-efficacy μ opioid receptoropioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Bender, Aaron M; Griggs, Nicholas W; Anand, Jessica P; Traynor, John R; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Mosberg, Henry I

    2015-08-19

    We previously reported a small series of mixed-efficacy μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist/δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist peptidomimetics featuring a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and showed the promise of this series as effective analgesics after intraperitoneal administration in mice. We report here an expanded structure-activity relationship study of the pendant region of these compounds and focus in particular on the incorporation of heteroatoms into this side chain. These analogues provide new insight into the binding requirements for this scaffold at MOR, DOR, and the κ opioid receptor (KOR), and several of them (10j, 10k, 10m, and 10n) significantly improve upon the overall MOR agonist/DOR antagonist profile of our previous compounds. In vivo data for 10j, 10k, 10m, and 10n are also reported and show the antinociceptive potency and duration of action of compounds 10j and 10m to be comparable to those of morphine.

  4. Studies of the Mu-Opioid Receptor/G-protein Complex Affinity Co-Purified and Membrane Preparations from 7315c Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-09

    population of mu-opioid receptors. Morphine, an opioid agonist, inhibits prolactin secretion, in part, by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity via...interaction with multiple G-proteins in the 7315c cell membrane is that mu-opioid agonists inhibit prolactin secretion from this cell via the generation of...secretion. The receptor mediated activation of either Gil or Gi2 and subsequent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity would inhibit prolactin secretion

  5. Noxious mechanical stimulation evokes the segmental release of opioid peptides that induce μ-opioid receptor internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Lijun; Song, Bingbing; Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides an ideal way to locate areas of opioid peptide release. We used this method to study opioid release in the spinal cord evoked by noxious stimuli in anesthetized rats. Previous studies have shown that opioids released in the spinal cord produce MOR internalization only when they are protected from peptidase degradation. Accordingly, rats were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters that were used to inject a mixture of peptidase inhibitors (amastatin, captopril and phosphoramidon) onto the lumbar spinal cord. Five minutes later, a noxious stimulus was delivered to the paw. Lumbar spinal segments were double-stained with antibodies against MORs and neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) using immunofluorescence. Mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw consisted of repeated 10 sec clamps with a hemostat for 10 min. In the ipsilateral dorsal horn, the stimulus produced abundant NK1R internalization in segments L3–L6, and a more modest but significant MOR internalization in segments L5 and L6. In the contralateral dorsal horn, NK1R was substantially lower and MOR internalization was negligible. The same mechanical stimulus applied to a forepaw did not produce NK1R or MOR internalization in the lumbar spinal cord. Thermal stimulation consisted of immersing a hindpaw in water at 52 °C for 2 min. It produced substantial NK1R internalization ipsilaterally in segment L6, but no MOR internalization. These results show that mechanical stimulation induces segmental opioid release, i.e., in the dorsal horn receiving the noxious signals and not in other spinal segments. PMID:18207137

  6. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain by Targeting a Mu Opioid Receptor/Chemokine Receptor5 Heteromer (MOR-CCR5).

    PubMed

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Michael D; Sham, Yuk Y; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S

    2015-11-12

    Chemokine release promotes cross-talk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. On the basis of the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such cross-talk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14-24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was 2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for the treatment of chronic pain.

  7. Molecular switches of the κ opioid receptor triggered by 6′-GNTI and 5′-GNTI

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianxin; Sun, Xianqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tu, Yaoquan; Tang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The κ opioid receptor (κOR) is a member of G-protein-coupled receptors, and is considered as a promising drug target for treating neurological diseases. κOR selective 6′-GNTI was proved to be a G-protein biased agonist, whereas 5′-GNTI acts as an antagonist. To investigate the molecular mechanism of how these two ligands induce different behaviors of the receptor, we built two systems containing the 5′-GNTI-κOR complex and the 6′-GNTI-κOR complex, respectively, and performed molecular dynamics simulations of the two systems. We observe that transmembrane (TM) helix 6 of the κOR rotates about 4.6o on average in the κOR-6′-GNTI complex. Detailed analyses of the simulation results indicate that E2976.58 and I2946.55 play crucial roles in the rotation of TM6. In the simulation of the κOR-5′-GNTI system, it is revealed that 5′-GNTI can stabilize TM6 in the inactive state form. In addition, the kink of TM7 is stabilized by a hydrogen bond between S3247.47 and the residue V691.42 on TM1. PMID:26742690

  8. Autoradiographic localization of delta opioid receptors within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system using radioiodinated (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin ( sup 125 I-DPDPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P.; Kalivas, P.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The enkephalin analog (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin was radioiodinated (125I-DPDPE) and shown to retain a pharmacological selectivity characteristic of the delta opioid receptor in in vitro binding studies. The distributions of 125I-DPDPE binding, using in vitro autoradiographic techniques, were similar to those previously reported for the delta opioid receptor. The nucleus accumbens, striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex contain dense gradients of 125I-DPDPE binding in regions known to receive dopaminergic afferents emanating from the mesencephalic tegmentum. Selective chemical lesions of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra were employed to deduce the location of the 125I-DPDPE binding within particular regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Unilateral lesions of dopamine perikarya (A9 and A10) within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra produced by mesencephalic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in significant (20-30%) increases in 125I-DPDPE binding contralateral to the lesion within the striatum and nucleus accumbens. Lesions of the perikarya (dopaminergic and nondopaminergic) of the ventral tegmental area, induced by quinolinic acid injections, caused increases of less magnitude within these same nuclei. No significant alterations in 125I-DPDPE binding were observed within the mesencephalon as a result of either treatment. The specificity of the lesions was confirmed by immunocytochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase. These results suggest that the enkephalins and opioid agonists acting through delta opioid receptors do not directly modulate dopaminergic afferents but do regulate postsynaptic targets of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

  9. Buprenorphine signalling is compromised at the N40D polymorphism of the human μ opioid receptor in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Knapman, Alisa; Santiago, Marina; Connor, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is significant variation in individual response to opioid drugs, which may result in inappropriate opioid therapy. Polymorphisms of the μ opioid receptor (MOP receptor) may contribute to individual variation in opioid response by affecting receptor function, and the effect may be ligand-specific. We sought to determine functional differences in MOP receptor signalling at several signalling pathways using a range of structurally distinct opioid ligands in cells expressing wild-type MOP receptors (MOPr-WT) and the commonly occurring MOP receptor variant, N40D. Experimental Approach MOPr-WT and MOPr-N40D were stably expressed in CHO cells and in AtT-20 cells. Assays of AC inhibition and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were performed on CHO cells, and assays of K activation were performed on AtT-20 cells. Signalling profiles for each ligand were compared between variants. Key Results Buprenorphine efficacy was reduced by over 50% at MOPr-N40D for AC inhibition and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Buprenorphine potency was reduced threefold at MOPr-N40D for K channel activation. Pentazocine efficacy was reduced by 50% for G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K channel activation at MOPr-N40D. No other differences were observed for any other ligands tested. Conclusions and Implications The N40D variant is present in 10–50% of the population. Buprenorphine is a commonly prescribed opioid analgesic, and many individuals do not respond to buprenorphine therapy. This study demonstrates that buprenorphine signalling to several effectors via the N40D variant of MOP receptors is impaired, and this may have important consequences in a clinical setting for individuals carrying the N40D allele. PMID:24846673

  10. Error correction in latent inhibition and its disruption by opioid receptor blockade with naloxone.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hiu T; Killcross, A S; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2013-11-01

    Latent inhibition refers to the retardation in the development of conditioned responding when a pre-exposed stimulus is used to signal an unconditioned stimulus. This effect is described by error-correction models as an attentional deficit and is commonly used as an animal model of schizophrenia. A series of experiments studied the role of error-correction mechanism in latent inhibition and its interaction with the endogenous opioid system. Systemic administration of the competitive opioid receptor antagonist naloxone before rats were pre-exposed to a target stimulus prevented latent inhibition of its subsequent fear conditioning; it was without effect on a non-pre-exposed stimulus and did not produce state-dependent learning (Experiments 1a and 1b). Naloxone did not reverse the latent inhibitory effect already accrued to a pre-exposed target. However, it did prevent the enhancement of latent inhibition by a long retention interval interpolated between its initial exposure and re-exposure (Experiment 2) or by a novel stimulus compounded with the pre-exposed target during re-exposure (Experiment 3). These results provide evidence that attentional loss in latent inhibition is instructed by an opioid-mediated error signal which diminishes with repeated stimulus exposures but recovers with the passage of time or reintroduction of novelty.

  11. Morphine withdrawal enhances constitutive μ-opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Meye, Frank J; van Zessen, Ruud; Smidt, Marten P; Adan, Roger A H; Ramakers, Geert M J

    2012-11-14

    μ-Opioid receptors (MORs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are pivotally involved in addictive behavior. While MORs are typically activated by opioids, they can also become constitutively active in the absence of any agonist. In the current study, we present evidence that MOR constitutive activity is highly relevant in the mouse VTA, as it regulates GABAergic input to dopamine neurons. Specifically, suppression of MOR constitutive activity with the inverse agonist KC-2-009 enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission onto VTA dopamine neurons. This inverse agonistic effect was fully blocked by the specific MOR neutral antagonist CTOP, which had no effect on GABAergic transmission itself. We next show that withdrawal from chronic morphine further increases the magnitude of inverse agonistic effects at the MOR, suggesting enhanced MOR constitutive activity. We demonstrate that this increase can be an adaptive response to the detrimental elevation in cAMP levels known to occur during morphine withdrawal. These findings offer important insights in the physiological occurrence and function of MOR constitutive activity, and have important implications for therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing MOR signaling during addiction and opioid overdose.

  12. kappa opioid receptors in human microglia downregulate human immunodeficiency virus 1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Sheng, W S; Shark, K B; Bu, D F; Archer, S; Bidlack, J M; Peterson, P K

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the brain, play an important role in the neuropathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and recent studies suggest that opioid peptides regulate the function of macrophages from somatic tissues. We report herein the presence of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in human fetal microglia and inhibition of HIV-1 expression in acutely infected microglial cell cultures treated with KOR ligands. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analyses, we found that mRNA for the KOR was constitutively expressed in microglia and determined that the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame was identical to that of the human brain KOR gene. The expression of KOR in microglial cells was confirmed by membrane binding of [3H]U69,593, a kappa-selective ligand, and by indirect immunofluorescence. Treatment of microglial cell cultures with U50,488 or U69,593 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the monocytotropic HIV-1 SF162 strain. This antiviral effect of the kappa ligands was blocked by the specific KOR antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine. These findings suggest that kappa opioid agonists have immunomodulatory activity in the brain, and that these compounds could have potential in the treatment of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8755601

  13. Monoglyceride lipase deficiency causes desensitization of intestinal cannabinoid receptor type 1 and increased colonic μ-opioid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Taschler, U; Eichmann, T O; Radner, F P W; Grabner, G F; Wolinski, H; Storr, M; Lass, A; Schicho, R; Zimmermann, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) degrades 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors (CB1/2). Because the CB1 receptor is involved in the control of gut function, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of MGL on intestinal motility. Furthermore, we determined whether defective 2-AG degradation affects μ-opioid receptorreceptor) signalling, a parallel pathway regulating gut motility. Experimental Approach Gut motility was investigated by monitoring Evans Blue transit and colonic bead propulsion in response to MGL inhibition and CB1 receptor or μ receptor stimulation. Ileal contractility was investigated by electrical field stimulation. CB1 receptor expression in ileum and colon was assessed by immunohistochemical analyses. Key Results Pharmacological inhibition of MGL slowed down whole gut transit in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. Conversely, genetic deletion of MGL did not affect gut transit despite increased 2-AG levels. Notably, MGL deficiency caused complete insensitivity to CB1 receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of whole gut transit and ileal contractility suggesting local desensitization of CB1 receptors. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses of myenteric ganglia of MGL-deficient mice revealed that CB1 receptors were trapped in endocytic vesicles. Finally, MGL-deficient mice displayed accelerated colonic propulsion and were hypersensitive to μ receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. This phenotype was reproduced by chronic pharmacological inhibition of MGL. Conclusion and Implications Constantly elevated 2-AG levels induce severe desensitization of intestinal CB1 receptors and increased sensitivity to μ receptor-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. These changes should be considered when cannabinoid-based drugs are used in the therapy of gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26075589

  14. Effects of synthetic analogues of human opiorphin on rat brain opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Benyhe, Z; Toth, G; Wollemann, M; Borsodi, A; Helyes, Z; Rougeot, C; Benyhe, S

    2014-08-01

    Human opiorphin (Gln-Arg-Phe-Ser-Arg; QRFSR-peptide) is a physiological inhibitor of enkephalin-inactivating peptidases. We previously demonstrated that opiorphin can substitute for the classic mixture of peptidase inhibitors and greatly improves the specific binding and affinity of the enkephalin-related peptide [(3)H]MERF (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe; YGGFMRF) for rat brain opioid receptors. To extend the metabolic stability of opiorphin in human plasma two functional derivatives were designed, i.e., Cys-[(CH(2))(6)]-QRF-[Ser-O-octanoyl]-R peptide (monomeric CC6-opiorphin) and its cystine-dipeptide (dimeric CC6-opiorphin) derivative. We found that, in homologous competition experiments, the affinity of [(3)H]MERF for rat brain opioid receptors was significantly increased in the presence of monomeric and dimeric CC6-opiorphin, compared to control-Tris buffer. In addition ten times lower concentrations (5 μM) than those required for native opiorphin (50 μM) were sufficient. In heterologous competition experiments, using unlabeled dynorphin(1-10), affinity increases were also observed: increases in binding were similar with either monomeric or dimeric CC6-opiorphin. Surprisingly, these opiorphin analogues displayed weak competitive effects on [(3)H]MERF binding to rat brain opioid receptors in the absence of unlabeled MERF, effects never observed for the native opiorphin. In conclusion, CC6-opiorphin compounds are certainly more potent than the native opiorphin in increasing the binding and the affinity of homologous and heterologous competition, but the binding enhancement occurs only at temperatures much higher than 0°C, specifically at 24°C.

  15. Hormonal responses to opioid receptor blockade: during rest and exercise in cold and hot environments.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David W; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2006-05-01

    Opioid receptors appear to modulate a variety of physiological and metabolic homeostatic responses to stressors such as exercise and thermally extreme environments. To more accurately determine the role of the naloxone (NAL) sensitive opioid receptor system during rest and exercise, subjects were subjected to concomitant environmental thermal stress. Fifteen untrained men rested or performed low intensity (60% VO2peak) or high intensity (80% VO2peak) exercise on a cycle ergometer for 60 min in an environmental chamber during cold (0 degrees C) hot (35 degrees C) air exposure while receiving an infusion of normal saline (SAL) or NAL (0.1 mg kg(-1)). Plasma adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), immunoreactive beta-endorphin (IBE), cortisol and growth hormone were measured at baseline and every 15 min while in the chamber. Time to exhaustion was significantly reduced during high intensity exercise in the heat (P<0.0001). NAL significantly (P=0.0004) reduced the time to exhaustion (38.3+/-2.1 min) during high intensity exercise in the heat compared to SAL (49.4+/-2.1 min). ACTH and IBE increased during hot conditions and cold attenuated this response. Plasma concentrations of IBE, ACTH, and growth hormone increased significantly with NAL during high intensity exercise in the heat compared to SAL. Cold attenuated the response of ACTH, IBE and cortisol to NAL. NAL administration exaggerates plasma hormone concentration during high intensity exercise in the heat, but not cold. These results support a regulatory effect of the opioid receptor system on physiological responses during exercise in thermally stressful environments. Future research should be directed to more clearly defining the effect of environmental temperature on the mechanism of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal release during exercise and hot environmental temperatures.

  16. Gender, variation in opioid receptor genes and sensitivity to experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain tolerance is subject to considerable inter-individual variation, which may be influenced by a number of genetic and non-genetic factors. The mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors play a role in pain perception and are thought to mediate different pain modalities. The aim of this study was to explore associations between pain thresholds and gender and genetic variants in the three opioid receptor genes (OPRM, OPRD and OPRK). Experimental multi-modal pain data from previously published studies carried out in healthy Caucasian volunteers were used in order to limit the number of confounders to the study outcome. Data on thermal skin pain (n=36), muscle pressure pain (n=31) and mechanical visceral pain (n=50)) tolerance thresholds were included. Results Nineteen genetic polymorphisms were included in linear regression modeling. Males were found to tolerate higher thermal and muscle pressure pain than females (p=0.003 and 0.02). Thirty four percent of variability in thermal skin pain was accounted for by a model consisting of OPRK rs6473799 and gender. This finding was just outside significance when correction for multiple testing was applied. Variability in muscle pressure pain tolerance was associated with OPRK rs7016778 and rs7824175. These SNPs accounted for 43% of variability in muscle pressure pain sensitivity and these findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. No association was found with mechanical visceral pain. Conclusion This is a preliminary and hypothesis generating study due to the relatively small study size. However, significant association between the opioid receptor genes and experimental pain sensitivity supports the influence of genetic variability in pain perception. These findings may be used to generate hypotheses for testing in larger clinical trials of patients with painful conditions. PMID:23570317

  17. The atypical antidepressant and neurorestorative agent tianeptine is a μ-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Gassaway, M M; Rives, M-L; Kruegel, A C; Javitch, J A; Sames, D

    2014-07-15

    Current pharmacological treatments of depression and related disorders suffer from major problems, such as a low rate of response, slow onset of therapeutic effects, loss of efficacy over time and serious side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore new therapeutic approaches that address these issues. Interestingly, the atypical antidepressant tianeptine already meets in part these clinical goals. However, in spite of three decades of basic and clinical investigations, the molecular target of tianeptine, as well as its mechanism of action, remains elusive. Herein, we report the characterization of tianeptine as a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist. Using radioligand binding and cell-based functional assays, including bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assays for G-protein activation and cAMP accumulation, we identified tianeptine as an efficacious MOR agonist (K(i Human) of 383±183 nM and EC(50 Human) of 194±70 nM  and EC(50 Mouse) of 641±120 nM for G-protein activation). Tianeptine was also a full δ-opioid receptor (DOR) agonist, although with much lower potency (EC(50 Human) of 37.4±11.2 μM and EC(50 Mouse) of 14.5±6.6  μM for G-protein activation). In contrast, tianeptine was inactive at the κ-opioid receptor (KOR, both human and rat). On the basis of these pharmacological data, we propose that activation of MOR (or dual activation of MOR and DOR) could be the initial molecular event responsible for triggering many of the known acute and chronic effects of this agent, including its antidepressant and anxiolytic actions.

  18. The atypical antidepressant and neurorestorative agent tianeptine is a μ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gassaway, M M; Rives, M-L; Kruegel, A C; Javitch, J A; Sames, D

    2014-01-01

    Current pharmacological treatments of depression and related disorders suffer from major problems, such as a low rate of response, slow onset of therapeutic effects, loss of efficacy over time and serious side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore new therapeutic approaches that address these issues. Interestingly, the atypical antidepressant tianeptine already meets in part these clinical goals. However, in spite of three decades of basic and clinical investigations, the molecular target of tianeptine, as well as its mechanism of action, remains elusive. Herein, we report the characterization of tianeptine as a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist. Using radioligand binding and cell-based functional assays, including bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assays for G-protein activation and cAMP accumulation, we identified tianeptine as an efficacious MOR agonist (Ki Human of 383±183 nM and EC50 Human of 194±70 nM  and EC50 Mouse of 641±120 nM for G-protein activation). Tianeptine was also a full δ-opioid receptor (DOR) agonist, although with much lower potency (EC50 Human of 37.4±11.2 μM and EC50 Mouse of 14.5±6.6  μM for G-protein activation). In contrast, tianeptine was inactive at the κ-opioid receptor (KOR, both human and rat). On the basis of these pharmacological data, we propose that activation of MOR (or dual activation of MOR and DOR) could be the initial molecular event responsible for triggering many of the known acute and chronic effects of this agent, including its antidepressant and anxiolytic actions. PMID:25026323

  19. MicroRNA 339 down-regulates μ-opioid receptor at the post-transcriptional level in response to opioid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qifang; Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Zheng, Hui; Wagley, Yadav; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Kim, Do Kyung; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H.; Wei, Li-Na

    2013-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptor (MOR) level is directly related to the function of opioid drugs, such as morphine and fentanyl. Although agonist treatment generally does not affect transcription of mor, previous studies suggest that morphine can affect the translation efficiency of MOR transcript via microRNAs (miRNAs). On the basis of miRNA microarray analyses of the hippocampal total RNA isolated from mice chronically treated with μ-opioid agonists, we found a miRNA (miR-339-3p) that was consistently and specifically increased by morphine (2-fold) and by fentanyl (3.8-fold). miR-339-3p bound to the MOR 3′-UTR and specifically suppressed reporter activity. Suppression was blunted by adding miR-339-3p inhibitor or mutating the miR-339-3p target site. In cells endogenously expressing MOR, miR-339-3p inhibited the production of MOR protein by destabilizing MOR mRNA. Up-regulation of miR-339-3p by fentanyl (EC50=0.75 nM) resulted from an increase in primary miRNA transcript. Mapping of the miR-339-3p primary RNA and its promoter revealed that the primary miR-339-3p was embedded in a noncoding 3′-UTR region of an unknown host gene and was coregulated by the host promoter. The identified promoter was activated by opioid agonist treatment (10 nM fentanyl or 10 μM morphine), a specific effect blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone (10 μM). Taken together, these results suggest that miR-339-3p may serve as a negative feedback modulator of MOR signals by regulating intracellular MOR biosynthesis.—Wu, Q., Hwang, C. K., Zheng, H., Wagley, Y., Lin, H.-Y., Kim, D. K., Law, P.-Y., Loh, H. H., Wei, L.-N. MicroRNA 339 downregulates mu opioid receptor at the post-transcriptional level in response to opioid treatment. PMID:23085997

  20. Biased agonists of the kappa opioid receptor suppress pain and itch without causing sedation or dysphoria

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Tarsis F.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Kim, Susy A.; Rose, Jamie H.; Locke, Jason L.; Schmid, Cullen L.; Zhou, Lei; Stahl, Edward L.; Cameron, Michael D.; Scarry, Sarah M.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Jones, Sara R.; Martin, Thomas J.; Bohn, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Agonists targeting the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) have been promising therapeutic candidates because of their efficacy for treating intractable itch and relieving pain. Unlike typical opioid narcotics, KOR agonists do not produce euphoria or lead to respiratory suppression or overdose. However, they do produce dysphoria and sedation, side effects that have precluded their clinical development as therapeutics. KOR signaling can be fine-tuned to preferentially activate certain pathways over others, such that agonists can bias signaling so that the receptor signals through G proteins rather than other effectors such as βarrestin2. We evaluated a newly developed G protein signaling–biased KOR agonist in preclinical models of pain, pruritis, sedation, dopamine regulation, and dysphoria. We found that triazole 1.1 retained the antinociceptive and antipruritic efficacies of a conventional KOR agonist, yet it did not induce sedation or reductions in dopamine release in mice, nor did it produce dysphoria as determined by intracranial self-stimulation in rats. These data demonstrated that biased agonists may be used to segregate physiological responses downstream of the receptor. Moreover, the findings suggest that biased KOR agonists may present a means to treat pain and intractable itch without the side effects of dysphoria and sedation and with reduced abuse potential. PMID:27899527

  1. Methylphenidate and μ opioid receptor interactions: a pharmacological target for prevention of stimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinmin; Spencer, Thomas J; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2011-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is one of the most commonly used and highly effective treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. As the therapeutic use of MPH has increased, so has its abuse and illicit street-use. Yet, the mechanisms associated with development of MPH-associated abuse and dependence are not well understood making it difficult to develop methods to help its mitigation. As a result, many ADHD patients especially children and youth, that could benefit from MPH treatment do not receive it and risk lifelong disabilities associated with untreated ADHD. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms associated with development of MPH addiction and designing methods to prevent it assume high public health significance. Using a mouse model we show that supra-therapeutic doses of MPH produce rewarding effects (surrogate measure for addiction in humans) in a conditioned place preference paradigm and upregulate μ opioid receptor (MOPR) activity in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, brain regions associated with reward circuitry. Co-administration of naltrexone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, prevents MPH-induced MOPR activation and the rewarding effects. The MPH-induced MOPR activation and rewarding effect require activation of the dopamine D1 but not the D2-receptor. These findings identify the MOPR as a potential target for attenuating rewarding effects of MPH and suggest that a formulation that combines naltrexone with MPH could be a useful pharmaceutical approach to alleviate abuse potential of MPH and other stimulants.

  2. [Chronic non-cancer-related pain. Long-term treatment with rapid-release and short-acting opioids in the context of misuse and dependency].

    PubMed

    Scharnagel, R; Kaiser, U; Schütze, A; Heineck, R; Gossrau, G; Sabatowski, R

    2013-02-01

    Annually published data show a continual increase in the volume of opioid prescriptions in Germany, thus indicating an intensification of opioid therapy. The majority of opioids are prescribed to treat chronic non-cancer-related pain. On the basis of current guidelines, as well as in terms of the lack of data regarding long-term use of opioids and their effectiveness beyond a period of 3 months, this development must be viewed critically. With reference to four case reports, we discuss and evaluate opioid therapy in relation to medication misuse and the development of drug dependency. Particular emphasis is placed on the administration of rapid-release and short-acting opioid preparations, which we consider to be particularly problematic.

  3. Analysis of central opioid receptor subtype antagonism of hypotonic and hypertonic saline intake in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, R J; Glass, M J; Koch, J E

    1995-01-01

    Intake of either hypotonic or hypertonic saline solutions is modulated in part by the endogenous opioid system. Morphine and selective mu and delta opioid agonists increase saline intake, while general opioid antagonists reduce saline intake in rats. The present study evaluated whether intracerebroventricular administration of general (naltrexone) and selective mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 5-20 micrograms), mu, (naloxonazine, 50 micrograms), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine, 5-20 micrograms), delta (naltrindole, 20 micrograms), or delta 1 (DALCE, 40 micrograms) opioid receptor subtype antagonists altered water intake and either hypotonic (0.6%) or hypertonic (1.7%) saline intake in water-deprived (24 h) rats over a 3-h time course in a two-bottle choice test. Whereas peripheral naltrexone (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced water intake and hypertonic saline intake, central naltrexone (1-50 micrograms) significantly reduced water intake and hypotonic saline intake. Water intake was significantly reduced following mu and kappa receptor antagonism, but not following mu 1, delta, or delta 1 receptor antagonism. In contrast, neither hypotonic nor hypertonic saline intake was significantly altered by any selective antagonist. These data are discussed in terms of opioid receptor subtype control over saline intake relative to the animal's hydrational state and the roles of palatability and/or salt appetite.

  4. Morphinans and isoquinolines: acetylcholinesterase inhibition, pharmacophore modeling, and interaction with opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniela; Spetea, Mariana; Music, Melisa; Rief, Silvia; Fink, Monika; Kirchmair, Johannes; Schütz, Johannes; Wolber, Gerhard; Langer, Thierry; Stuppner, Hermann; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Rollinger, Judith M

    2010-07-15

    Following indications from pharmacophore-based virtual screening of natural product databases, morphinan and isoquinoline compounds were tested in vitro for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. After the first screen, active and inactive compounds were used to build a ligand-based pharmacophore model in order to prioritize compounds for biological testing. Among the virtual hits tested, the enrichment of actives was significantly higher than in a random selection of test compounds. The most active compounds were biochemically tested for their activity on mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.

  5. The impact of op