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Sample records for acting somatostatin analogue

  1. Effects of long-acting somatostatin analogues on redox systems in rat lens in experimental diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kunjara, Sirilaksana; Greenbaum, A Leslie; Sochor, Milena; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Grønbaek, Henning; McLean, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The effects of long-acting somatostatin analogues, angiopeptin (AGP) and Sandostatin (SMS), on the early decline in the lens content of glutathione (GSH), ATP and NADPH and increase in sorbitol were studied in STZ diabetic rats, and comparison was made with the effect of insulin. Three factors prompted this study: (i) the known increase in IGF-1 in ocular tissue in diabetes and antagonistic effect of somatostatins, (ii) the known effect of IGF-1 in increasing lens aldose reductase and (iii) the lack of effect of somatostatins on diabetic hyperglycaemia, the latter enabling a differentiation to be made between effects of hyperglycaemia per se and site(s) of IGF-1/somatostatins. All four metabolites studied showed a significant restoration towards the normal control level after 7 days of treatment with AGP and SMS, and AGP was more effective on levels of GSH and ATP. A significant correlation was found between GSH and ATP across all groups at 7 days treatment. The redox state changes in diabetes include both NADP+/NADPH and NAD+/NADH in the conversion of glucose to sorbitol and via sorbitol dehydrogenase to fructose with a linked decrease in ATP formation via NAD+/NADH regulation of the glycolytic pathway. The interlinked network of change includes the requirement for ATP in the synthesis of GSH. The present study points to possible loci of action of somatostatins in improving metabolic parameters in the diabetic rat lens via effects on aldose reductase and/or glucose transport at GLUT 3. PMID:24602114

  2. The future of somatostatin analogue therapy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P M; James, R A

    1999-10-01

    Since its discovery almost 30 years ago, the mode of action and therapeutic applications of somatostatin have been defined. In particular the cloning and characterization of somatostatin receptor subtypes has facilitated the development of high affinity analogues. In the context of pituitary disease, long-acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide) have been used to treat a variety of pituitary tumours but are most efficacious for the treatment of GH and TSH-secreting adenomas. In patients with acromegaly, depot preparations of these analogues are administered intramuscularly every 10-28 days and provide consistent suppression of GH levels to < 5 mU/l in approximately 50-65% of all cases. Even more specific somatostatin receptor analogues are under development. Finally, radiolabelled somatostatin analogue scintigraphy and, in larger doses, therapy, are now established tools in the evaluation and treatment of neuroendocrine tumours.

  3. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  4. Active postoperative acromegaly: sustained remission after discontinuation of somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Salas, Jersy

    2016-01-01

    Summary In patients with active acromegaly after pituitary surgery, somatostatin analogues are effective in controlling the disease and can even be curative in some cases. After treatment discontinuation, the likelihood of disease recurrence is high. However, a small subset of patients remains symptom-free after discontinuation, with normalized growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) levels. The characteristics of patients most likely to achieve sustained remission after treatment discontinuation are not well understood, although limited evidence suggests that sustained remission is more likely in patients with lower GH and IGF1 levels before treatment withdrawal, in those who respond well to low-dose treatment, in those without evidence of adenoma on an MRI scan and/or in patients who receive long-term treatment. In this report, we describe the case of a 56-year-old female patient treated with lanreotide Autogel for 11 years. Treatment was successfully discontinued, and the patient is currently disease-free on all relevant parameters (clinical, biochemical and tumour status). The successful outcome in this case adds to the small body of literature suggesting that some well-selected patients who receive long-term treatment with somatostatin analogues may achieve sustained remission. Learning points: The probability of disease recurrence is high after discontinuation of treatment with somatostatin analogues. Current data indicate that remission after treatment discontinuation may be more likely in patients with low GH and IGF1 levels before treatment withdrawal, in those who respond well to low-dose treatment, in those without evidence of adenoma on MRI, and/or in patients receiving prolonged treatment. This case report suggests that prolonged treatment with somatostatin analogues can be curative in carefully selected patients. PMID:27933171

  5. Bilateral Choroidal Metastases from Endobronchial Carcinoid Treated with Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyn, Deborah; Lamont, Jan; Vanderstraeten, Erik; Van Belle, Simon; Platteau, Elise; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Hoornaert, Kristien P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with bilateral multifocal choroidal metastases from an endobronchial carcinoid treated with a somatostatin analogue. Method: A 60-year-old woman presenting with photopsia in the left eye underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including fluorescein angiography, OCT and ultrasound. Results: Fundoscopy revealed a small retinal tear in the left eye, for which she received laser treatment. In addition, choroidal masses were detected in both eyes. Her medical history of a pneumectomy for a bronchial carcinoid six years earlier together with recent elevated chromogranin A blood levels prompted a diagnosis of choroidal metastases. Subsequently, a Gallium-68 DOTANOC positron emitting tomography/computer tomography scan revealed a spinal cord metastasis and mediastinal as well as mesenterial lymph node invasion. Systemic treatment with Sandostatin®, a somatostatin analogue was started. Up until two years after the initial presentation and treatment, these choroidal lesions remained stable without any signs of growth. Conclusion: Endobronchial carcinoid tumors have an indolent nature and long-term follow-up is recommended for early detection of metastases. Although treatment with somatostatin analogues rarely induces complete tumor regression, tumor stabilization and prevention of symptoms related to hormone secretion is achieved. This well-tolerated systemic treatment provides a worthy alternative treatment for choroidal metastasis compared to classic radiotherapy without any risk of radiation or laser-related visual loss. PMID:27843513

  6. [Use of somatostatin analogue for intestinal and pancreatic fistulas].

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Neufeld, D; Epstein, T; Bendahan, J; Freund, U

    1991-02-15

    The hormone somatostatin, a tetra-deca-peptide, was discovered in 1972. It inhibits the central nervous system and the endocrine and exocrine secretions of the gastrointestinal tract. The first clinical use of the hormone was to inhibit hormone-secreting tumors of the CNS. It has also been used to treat hormone-secreting tumors of the pancreas and GI tract. Treatment of small bowel and pancreatic fistulas has also been attempted. A new synthetic analogue of the hormone, SMS 210-995, (Sandostatin) has a long half-life and is highly effective after subcutaneous injection. It was used in the treatment of 3 patients with fistulas of the small bowel and pancreas. In all impressive reduction of fistula secretion was achieved within 24 hours. In 2 there was complete, spontaneous closure of the fistula: in 1 after 10 days and in the other after 15 days of treatment. In the 3rd, there was significant reduction of fistula output. There were no side-effects except for mild pain at the injection site in 1 patient. Previous reports and our own results indicate that this somatostatin analogue may be very useful in the nonsurgical treatment of GI tract fistulas.

  7. Iodination and stability of somatostatin analogues: comparison of iodination techniques. A practical overview.

    PubMed

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2012-01-01

    For iodination ((125/127)I) of tyrosine-containing peptides, chloramin-T, Pre-Coated Iodo-Gen(®) tubes and Iodo-Beads(®) (Pierce) are commonly used for in vitro radioligand investigations and there have been reliant vendors hereof for decades. However, commercial availability of these radio-iodinated peptides is decreasing. For continuation of our research in this field we investigated and optimized (radio-)iodination of somatostatin analogues. In literature, radioiodination using here described somatostatin analogues and iodination techniques are described separately. Here we present an overview, including High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) separation and characterisation by mass spectrometry, to obtain mono- and di-iodinated analogues. Reaction kinetics of (125/127)I iodinated somatostatin analogues were investigated as function of reaction time and concentration of reactants, including somatostatin analogues, iodine and oxidizing agent. To our knowledge, for the here described somatostatin analogues, no (127)I iodination and optimization are described. (Radio-)iodinated somatostatin analogues could be preserved with a >90% radiochemical purity for 1 month after reversed phase HPLC-purification.

  8. In vivo use of a radioiodinated somatostatin analogue: dynamics, metabolism, and binding to somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in man

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Breeman, W.A.; Kooij, P.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Koper, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Lameris, J.S.; Visser, T.J.; Lamberts, S.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues, labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides, are of potential value in the localization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors with gamma camera imaging. We investigated the application in man of a radioiodinated analogue of somatostatin, 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide, which has similar biologic characteristics as the native peptide. The radiopharmaceutical is cleared rapidly from the circulation (up to 85% of the dose after 10 min) mainly by the liver. Liver radioactivity is rapidly excreted into the biliary system. Until 3 hr after injection, radioactivity in the circulation is mainly in the form of 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide. Thereafter, plasma samples contain increasing proportions of free iodide. Similarly, during the first hours after injection, radioactivity in the urine exists mainly in the form of the unchanged peptide. Thereafter, a progressive increase in radioiodide excretion is observed, indicating degradation of the radiopharmaceutical in vivo. Fecal excretion of radioactivity amounts to only a few percent of the dose. The calculated median effective dose equivalent is comparable with values for applications of other 123I-radiopharmaceuticals (0.019 mSv/MBq).

  9. Experimental and clinical studies with somatostatin analogue octreotide in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, V. M.; Smith, I. E.; Everard, M. J.; Teale, J. D.; Reubi, J. C.; Millar, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    We have detected somatostatin receptors (SSR) by autoradiography in 3/4 established small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines but not in two non-SCLC cell lines. The growth of 1/3 SSR positive SCLC cell lines was significantly inhibited by the long-acting somatostatin analogue octreotide (SMS 201-995, Sandostatin) 10(-9) M. We treated 20 SCLC patients with octreotide 250 micrograms three times daily for 1 week prechemotherapy (six patients) or at relapse after chemotherapy (14). Octreotide was well tolerated, and serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels were suppressed to 62 +/- 7% of pre-treatment levels. However there was no evidence of anti-tumour activity measured by tumour bulk or serum levels of neuron-specific enolase. In one patient metastatic skin nodules were shown to be SSR positive before and at the end of 2 weeks octreotide. Despite this the patient had progressive disease, and tumour cells obtained by fine needle aspirate before and after treatment showed no growth inhibition when cultured with octreotide immediately or following establishment as a cell line. In summary we saw little correlation between SSR expression and growth inhibition by octreotide, either in vitro or clinically. Images Figure 4 PMID:1654981

  10. Unresectable Recurrent Multiple Meningioma: A Case Report with Radiological Response to Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Ortolá Buigues, Ana; Crespo Hernández, Irene; Jorquera Moya, Manuela; Díaz Pérez, Jose Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Medical treatment of meningiomas is reserved for cases in which surgery and radiotherapy have failed. Given that a high percentage of meningiomas express somatostatin receptors, treatment with somatostatin analogues has been proposed. In addition, these medications have been shown to have an antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effect in vitro. To date, very few cases with clinical response and none with radiological response have been described. The case described here is the first to report a radiological response. A 76-year-old Caucasian male was first diagnosed with unresectable meningioma at age 47. The patient experienced multiple recurrences and underwent three surgeries and radiotherapy over the years from the initial diagnosis. Despite treatment, the disease continued its progression. Based on an Octreoscan positive for tumour uptake, therapy with extended-release somatostatin analogues was started. Although no clinical neurological improvement was observed, magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a discreet but continuous radiological response over time. After >2 years of continuous administration of lanreotide, the patient remains progression free. In highly selected cases, somatostatin analogue treatment for meningioma may be beneficial. Based on our findings, treatment with somatostatin analogues should be maintained longer than previously described before evaluating treatment response. PMID:27721778

  11. Amino acid infusion blocks renal tubular uptake of an indium-labelled somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, P. J.; Wade, A. F.; Gwilliam, M. E.; Peters, A. M.; Myers, M. J.; Gilbey, S. G.; Bloom, S. R.; Calam, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Indium-labelled somatostatin analogue pentetreotide has been successfully developed for imaging of somatostatin receptor positive tumours. However there is significant renal tubular uptake of the radiolabelled peptide, which can obscure upper abdominal tumours and would preclude its use for targeted radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether amino acid infusion, which has been shown to block renal tubular peptide reabsorption, diminishes renal parenchymal uptake of this radiolabelled analogue. Eight patients being scanned with the 111In-labelled somatostatin analogue, pentetreotide, for localisation of gastroenteropancreatic tumours received an infusion of synthetic amino acids. The ratio of isotope uptake in kidney to that in spleen was assessed, and compared to the ratio for matched control patients, to determine if amino acid infusion reduced renal parenchymal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical. The amount of isotope in the urine was determined to ensure that any effect of the amino acid infusion was unrelated to changes in clearance. Infusion of amino acids significantly reduced renal parenchymal uptake of isotope at 4 h. There was a non-significant increase in urinary clearance of isotope over the 4 h, consistent with reduced reuptake and a lack of effect on glomerular filtration rate. This technique, by preventing renal damage, may allow the use of this somatostatin analogue for local radiotherapy, and could be of wider value in blocking tubular re-uptake of potentially nephrotoxic agents, such as radiolabelled Fab fragments. Images Figure 1 PMID:8099808

  12. The Somatostatin Analogue Octreotide Inhibits Growth of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Martijn, Cécile; Cui, Tao; Essaghir, Ahmed; Luque, Raúl M.; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Castaño, Justo P.; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Octreotide is a widely used synthetic somatostatin analogue that significantly improves the management of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Octreotide acts through somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). However, the molecular mechanisms leading to successful disease control or symptom management, especially when SSTRs levels are low, are largely unknown. We provide novel insights into how octreotide controls NET cells. CNDT2.5 cells were treated from 1 day up to 16 months with octreotide and then were profiled using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analyses were used to validate microarray profiling in silico data. WST-1 cell proliferation assay was applied to evaluate cell growth of CNDT2.5 cells in the presence or absence of 1 µM octreotide at different time points. Moreover, laser capture microdissected tumour cells and paraffin embedded tissue slides from SI-NETs at different stages of disease were used to identify transcriptional and translational expression. Microarrays analyses did not reveal relevant changes in SSTR expression levels. Unexpectedly, six novel genes were found to be upregulated by octreotide: annexin A1 (ANXA1), rho GTPase-activating protein 18 (ARHGAP18), epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1), growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), TGF-beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) and tumour necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 15 (TNFSF15). Furthermore, these novel genes were expressed in tumour tissues at transcript and protein levels. We suggest that octreotide may use a potential novel framework to exert its beneficial effect as a drug and to convey its action on neuroendocrine cells. Thus, six novel genes may regulate cell growth and differentiation in normal and tumour neuroendocrine cells and have a role in a novel octreotide mechanism system. PMID:23119007

  13. Expression of Somatostatin Receptor 2 in Somatotropinoma Correlated with the Short-Term Efficacy of Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjuan; Xie, Lina; He, Min; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Jingjing; Yang, Yeping; Wang, Meng; Hu, Ji; Ye, Hongying; Li, Yiming; Zhao, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTRs) in pituitary growth hormone- (GH-) secreting adenomas may predict the response to somatostatin analogues (SSA). Our aim was to evaluate the value of the immunohistochemical (IHC) scores of 2 subtypes, SSTR2 and SSTR5, in predicting the short-term efficacy of SSA therapy in patients with active acromegaly. Ninety-three newly diagnosed acromegalic patients were included in our study. These patients were categorized into either a SSA-pretreated group (SA, n = 63) or a direct-surgery group (DS, n = 30), depending on whether or not presurgical SSA treatment was received. IHC analysis, using a 12-grade scoring system, with rabbit monoclonal antibodies against SSTR2 and SSTR5, was performed on all adenoma tissues. The reduction of GH, IGF-1, and tumor size after treatment with SSA for 3 months was measured. Compared with that in the DS group, SSTR2 expression was lower in the SA group. Additionally, in the SA group, SSTR2 expression was positively correlated with the reduction of IGF-1 and tumor volume. However, there was no correlation between the SSTR5 score and the efficacy of SSA. In conclusion, the protein expression of SSTR2, but not of SSTR5, is a valuable indicator in predicting biochemical and tumor size response to short-term SSA treatment in acromegalic patients.

  14. Role of somatostatin and its analogues in the treatment of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Büchler, M W; Binder, M; Friess, H

    1994-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is caused by the activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas and a possible treatment, therefore, is the inhibition of enzyme secretion. This approach is somewhat controversial, however, as it is not clear whether pancreatic secretion continues to occur during the course of acute pancreatitis. Animal studies show an appreciable reduction of secretion in the inflamed pancreas, but studies in humans are not conclusive. The use of somatostatin or its analogue, octreotide, has been investigated in several clinical studies. A meta analysis of six individual studies in which somatostatin was given for acute pancreatitis showed that somatostatin significantly reduces mortality. A trial in patients with moderate to severe acute pancreatitis showed a lower rate (although not statistically significant) of complications in patients treated with 3 x 200 and 3 x 500 micrograms/day octreotide, compared with controls and patients receiving a lower dose of octreotide. A further study showed a significant reduction in patient controlled analgesics in patients treated with octreotide compared with controls. Pain is the important clinical symptom of chronic pancreatitis, possibly resulting from an increased intraductal pressure during secretion. The effect on pain of the inhibition of pancreatic secretion by octreotide has been investigated in two studies. One showed no significant reduction in pain after treatment with octreotide for three days. In the other, in which octreotide was used for three weeks, significantly less pain and analgesic use was recorded during octreotide treatment than during placebo. The most common complication of chronic pancreatitis is the formation of pseudocysts. There is some evidence that octreotide may be useful in their treatment. PMID:7911442

  15. Successful management of intractable cryptosporidial diarrhea with intravenous octreotide, a somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed

    Kreinik, G; Burstein, O; Landor, M; Bernstein, L; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1991-06-01

    A 38-year-old man with AIDS and intractable large-volume diarrhea due to a cryptosporidial infection was successfully treated with intravenous octreotide, a somatostatin analogue. The volume of diarrhea, 10-12 liters with 8-13 movements per day, was reduced to three to four semi-formed to formed stools per day when the patient was treated with 400 micrograms intravenous octreotide daily. The patient's intravenous hyperalimentation was discontinued and he returned to oral feeding. He quickly regained his normal weight and has now resumed his normal activities. For those patients who cannot tolerate subcutaneous administration, intravenous octreotide therapy may not only be life-saving but may also markedly increase the quality of life. Roxithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, was also administered to this patient with cryptosporidiosis but efficacy was not demonstrated.

  16. Somatostatin analogue (octreotide) inhibits bile duct epithelial cell proliferation and fibrosis after extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, T. F.; Tector, A. J.; Goerke, M. E.; Kitchen, S.; Lagunoff, D.

    1993-01-01

    Extrahepatic biliary obstruction leads to bile duct epithelial cell proliferation. Somatostatin and its analogue, octreotide, have been shown to inhibit DNA synthesis and proliferation in hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of octreotide on the biliary epithelial cell proliferative responses to biliary obstruction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent common bile duct ligation and subcutaneous injection of either saline or octreotide (6 micrograms/kg) twice daily for 7 days. Morphometric analysis of hepatocytes, bile duct epithelial cells, and periportal connective tissue was performed by computerized point counting. Hepatocyte volume was preserved with octreotide treatment, which also significantly decreased bile duct proliferation and periportal extracellular matrix deposition in response to biliary obstruction compared with saline treated, duct-ligated animals. These results indicate that octreotide prevents the morphological changes that accompany extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Images Figure 1 PMID:8256850

  17. PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with 68Gallium-labeled somatostatin analogues: An overview and single institutional experience from India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms characterized by overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Functional imaging plays a crucial role in management of NETs. Recently, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Gallium (68Ga)-labeled somatostatin analogues has shown excellent results for imaging of NETs and better results than conventional SSTR scintigraphy. In this review we have discussed the utility of 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogue PET/CT in NETs for various established and potential indications. In addition we have also shared our own experience from a tertiary care center in India. PMID:24591775

  18. Randomized Clinical Trial of Long-Acting Somatostatin for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masyuk, Tetyana V.; Page, Linda J.; Kubly, Vickie J.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Li, Xujian; Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F.; Glockner, James; Holmes, David R.; Rossetti, Sandro; Harris, Peter C.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2010-01-01

    There are no proven, effective therapies for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) or polycystic liver disease (PLD). We enrolled 42 patients with severe PLD resulting from autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD) or autosomal dominant PLD (ADPLD) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of octreotide, a long-acting somatostatin analogue. We randomly assigned 42 patients in a 2:1 ratio to octreotide LAR depot (up to 40 mg every 28 ± 5 days) or placebo for 1 year. The primary end point was percent change in liver volume from baseline to 1 year, measured by MRI. Secondary end points were changes in total kidney volume, GFR, quality of life, safety, vital signs, and clinical laboratory tests. Thirty-four patients had ADPKD, and eight had ADPLD. Liver volume decreased by 4.95% ± 6.77% in the octreotide group but remained practically unchanged (+0.92% ± 8.33%) in the placebo group (P = 0.048). Among patients with ADPKD, total kidney volume remained practically unchanged (+0.25% ± 7.53%) in the octreotide group but increased by 8.61% ± 10.07% in the placebo group (P = 0.045). Changes in GFR were similar in both groups. Octreotide was well tolerated; treated individuals reported an improved perception of bodily pain and physical activity. In summary, octreotide slowed the progressive increase in liver volume and total kidney volume, improved health perception among patients with PLD, and had an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:20431041

  19. Methods to assess the biodistribution of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and treatment response of neuroendocrine tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    Introduction: During the past decade, proof of the principle that somatostatin receptors can be successfully used for in vivo targeting of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has been provided. These tumours are imaged with 111Indium-pentetreotide and treated with 90Yttrium labeled somatostatin analogues. The aim of this study was to assess (a) the biodistribution and residency of 90Y labelled agents using the brehmsstrahlung imaging technique (b) the tumour response to various treatment modalities using a simplified scintigraphic method [Functional SPECT tumour volume (STV)]. Material and methods: 1) 19 patients with NETs were imaged with 111In-pentetreotide and 14 of them underwent treatment with 90Y-lanreotide. The rest underwent treatment with 90Y-SMT. All the patients were imaged 24 hours post-therapy. Brehmsstrahlung images obtained post therapies were used to assess the 90Y-lanreotide biodistribution in 14 patients and the 5 patients treated with 90Y-SMT, comparing them with 111In-pentetreotide. 2) In 42 patients with NETs a retrospective analysis was performed of the 111In-pentetreotide imaging and CT scan in patients treated with different therapies. A simplified scintigraphic method using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT liver imaging was used to monitor changes in tumour response and to determine how this correlates with CT scan and clinical response. Results: 1) 90Y-lanreotide and 90Y-SMT (with amino acids) have much lower uptake in the kidney (p 0.000 and 0.041 respectively) than 111In-pentetreotide. G Gnanasegaran MD 2 2) 22/42 patients had a good clinical response. A mean fall in total functional STV of 37% was seen in patients with symptomatic relief and a mean increase of 72 % was seen in patients with no symptomatic relief STV predicted the clinical outcome in 34 patients (81%) and CT predicted the outcome in 21 (50%) patients. Conclusion: There was a difference in biodistribution between 111In-pentetreotide and 90Y-lanreotide/ 90Y-SMT, especially in the

  20. Attitudes and preferences in patients with acromegaly on long-term treatment with somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with acromegaly can be treated with surgery, medical therapy and/or radiation therapy. For the patients not being cured with surgery, treatment with somatostatin analogues (SSAs) is the primary therapy. SSA can be taken by self- or partner-administered injections in addition to being given by a nurse at a clinic. The aim was to assess if patients with acromegaly prefer self-injections and to investigate their attitudes towards long-term medical therapy. Method All patients in the southern medical region of Sweden with a diagnosis of acromegaly and treated with SSA were eligible for the study (n = 24). The study is based on a questionnaire asking about the patients’ attitudes and preferences for injections with SSA, including their attitudes towards self-injection with SSA. Results The patients’ (23 included) median age was 68.5 years and the patients had been treated with SSA for 13 (1–38) years. One patient was currently self-injecting. All of the other patients were receiving injections from a nurse at a clinic. Three patients preferred self-injections, one preferred partner injections and 19 patients did not prefer self- or partner injections. The most frequent arguments to not preferring self-injections were ‘feeling more secure with an educated nurse’ and ‘preferring regular contact with a specialised nurse’. Conclusion Patients with acromegaly prefer regular contact with the endocrine team to the independence offered by self-injections. These findings might mirror the patients’ desires for continuity and safety. We need to address patients’ concerns regarding injections with SSA and support them in their choices. PMID:27458240

  1. Somatostatin analogues increase AIP expression in somatotropinomas, irrespective of Gsp mutations.

    PubMed

    Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Rotondi, Sandra; Turchi, Annarita; Occhi, Gianluca; Barlier, Anne; Peverelli, Erika; Rostomyan, Lilya; Defilles, Céline; Angelini, Mariolina; Oliva, Maria-Antonietta; Ceccato, Filippo; Maiorani, Orlando; Daly, Adrian F; Esposito, Vincenzo; Buttarelli, Francesca; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Giangaspero, Felice; Spada, Anna; Scaroni, Carla; Alesse, Edoardo; Beckers, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Germline aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene mutations confer a predisposition to pituitary adenoma (PA), predominantly GH-secreting (GH-PA). As recent data suggest a role for AIP in the pathogenesis of sporadic GH-PA and their response to somatostatin analogues (SSA), the expression of AIP and its partner, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), was determined by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry scoring in 62 sporadic GH-PA (37 treated with SSA preoperatively). The influence of Gsp status was studied in a subset of tumours (n=39, 14 Gsp(+)) and six GH-PA were available for primary cultures. AIP and AHR were detected in most cases, with a positive correlation between AIP and cytoplasmic AHR (P=0.012). Low AIP expression was significantly more frequent in untreated vs SSA-treated tumours (44.0 vs 20.5%, P=0.016). AHR expression or localisation did not differ between the two groups. Similarly, in vitro octreotide induced a median twofold increase in AIP expression (range 1.2-13.9, P=0.027) in GH-PA. In SSA-treated tumours, the AIP score was significantly higher in the presence of preoperative IGF1 decrease or tumour shrinkage (P=0.008 and P=0.014 respectively). In untreated tumours, low AIP expression was significantly associated with invasiveness (P=0.028) and suprasellar extension (P=0.019). The only effect of Gsp status was a significantly lower nuclear AHR score in Gsp(+) vs Gsp(-) tumours (P=0.025), irrespective of SSA. In conclusion, AIP is involved in the aggressiveness of sporadic GH-PA, regardless of Gsp status, and AIP up-regulation in SSA-treated tumours is associated with a better preoperative response, with no clear role for AHR.

  2. The value of an acute octreotide suppression test in predicting short-term efficacy of somatostatin analogues in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Shen, Ming; He, Wenqiang; Yang, Yeping; Liu, Wenjuan; Lu, Yun; Ma, Zengyi; Ye, Zhao; Zhang, Yichao; Zhao, Xiaolong; Lu, Bin; Hu, Ji; Huang, Yun; Shou, Xuefei; Wang, Yongfei; Ye, Hongying; Li, Yiming; Li, Shiqi; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Zhaoyun

    2016-09-30

    Predicting the efficacy of long-acting somatostatin analogues (SSA) remains a challenge. We aim to quantitatively evaluate the predictive value of the octreotide suppression test (OST) in short-term efficacy of SSA in active acromegaly. Sixty-seven newly diagnosed acromegaly patients were assessed with OST. Subsequently, all patients were treated with long-acting SSA for 3 months, followed by reassessment. Nine parameters were tested, including GHn (the nadir GH during OST), ΔGH1 (= [GH0h-GHn]/GH0h, GH0h was the baseline GH during OST), ΔGH2 (= [GHm-GHn]/GHm, GHm was the mean GH on day curve), AUC(0-6h) (the GH area under the curve during OST) , ΔAUC1 (= [GH0h-AUC(0-6h)]/GH0h), ΔAUC2 (=[GHm-AUC(0-6h)]/GHm), AUC(m-6h) (the GH AUC during OST where GHm was used instead of GH0h), ΔAUC1' (=[GH0h-AUC(m-6h)]/GH0h) and ΔAUC2' (=[GHm-AUC(m-6h)]/GHm). The Youden indices were calculated to determine the optimal cutoffs to predict the short-term efficacy of SSA. ΔGH2 more than 86.83%, ΔAUC2 more than -57.48% and ΔAUC2' more than -57.98% provided the best predictors of a good GH response (sensitivity 93.8%, specificity 85.7%). ΔGH2 more than 90.51% provided the best predictor of a good tumor size response (sensitivity 84.8%, specificity 87.5%). The percentage fall of GHn (ΔGH) was a better predictive parameter than GHn. OST showed higher efficiency in predicting the efficacy of octreotide LAR than lanreotide SR. In conclusion, OST is a valid tool to predict both GH and tumor size response to short-term efficacy of SSA in acromegaly, especially for octreotide LAR. GHm is better to be used as basal GH than GH0 during OST.

  3. Type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors: long-term follow-up of the efficacy of treatment with a slow-release somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Sylvain; Pagenault, Mael; de Lajarte-Thirouard, Anne-Sophie; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term results of treating gastric carcinoid tumors with a slow-release somatostatin analogue. We report three patients with type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors who were treated in the above mentioned way and followed for 27-50 months. In all cases, alternative endoscopic or surgical management was considered but deemed inappropriate. Treatment with a slow-release somatostatin analogue was begun in light of a favorable recent report. The result was regression or complete disappearance of macroscopic fundal tumors. No side-effects were reported and, most notably, none of the patients developed gallstones. This small study may help define the optimal duration, dose, and administration interval of the treatment. Slow-release somatostatin analogue is a safe and efficacious treatment for type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors, and can be used when tumors are growing rapidly. Slow-release somatostatin analogue represents an alternative to repeated endoscopic treatment or high-risk surgery.

  4. Treatment of 27 postoperative enterocutaneous fistulas with the long half-life somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995.

    PubMed Central

    Nubiola, P; Badia, J M; Martinez-Rodenas, F; Gil, M J; Segura, M; Sancho, J; Sitges-Serra, A

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with postoperative enterocutaneous fistulas were treated with parenteral nutrition and SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/8 hours, subcutaneously), a long half-life somatostatin analogue. At the time SMS 201-995 was started, 11 patients had low output fistulas (less than 1000 ml/48 hours), 11 patients had high output fistulas (above 1000 ml/48 hours), and 5 patients had fistulas sitting in large abdominal wall defects. Within 24 hours of treatment, a mean reduction of 55% of the fistula output was observed. Fistula site or output before treatment had no influence on the magnitude of output reduction. Spontaneous closure was achieved in 77% of the patients after a mean of 5.8 +/- 2.7 days of treatment with this drug. Two patients died (7.4%). Pain at the injection site was referred by 15% of the patients but no other side effects were observed. Glucose intolerance was not observed. SMS 201-995 has been shown to be very useful in the conservative treatment of enterocutaneous fistulas because of its ability to rapidly reduce fistula output and accelerate spontaneous closure. PMID:2500900

  5. [Treatment effects analysis of preoperative long-acting somatostatin analogs combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery for patients with growth hormone secreting pituitary macroadenomas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Y; Deng, K; Zhang, Y; Yao, Y; Zhu, H J; Jin, Z M; Pan, H

    2017-02-07

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment effects of preoperative long-acting somatostatin analogue (SSA) combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery for patients with growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenomas. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out on 20 patients with GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas who were treated with preoperative SSA and trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery in our apartment from January 2010 to January 2016. We also selected 20 patients with only trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery treatment and 20 patients with preoperative SSA and non-trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery treatment. The changes of tumor imaging, endocrine and blood pressure before and after treatment were analysed. Results: The Gross total resection (GTR) rate of invasive GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas of preoperative SSA combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group (8/13) were higher than that if only trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group (4/16) and preoperative SSA combined non endoscopic surgery group (1/8) (P<0.05). Meanwhile, preoperative SSA combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group had significantly improved the GH levels, blood glucose, lipid metabolism and blood pressure levels (P<0.05). Conclusion: The trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery on patients with GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas has a significant improvement on GH levels, blood glucose, lipid metabolism and blood pressure levels. Through the treatment of preoperative long-acting SSA, the gross total resection rate is higher than other two groups.

  6. The Expanding Role of Somatostatin Analogs in the Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are neoplasms arising most often in the GI tract, pancreas, or lung. Diagnosis of NETs is often delayed until the disease is advanced, because of the variable and nonspecific nature of the initial symptoms. Surgical resection for cure is therefore not an option for most patients. METHODS: Somatostatin analogues represent the cornerstone of therapy for patients with NETs. This article reviews the important role that somatostatin analogues continue to play in the treatment of patients with NETs. RESULTS: Octreotide was the first somatostatin analogue to be developed; more than 30 years of data have accumulated demonstrating its efficacy and safety. Lanreotide is another somatostatin analogue in clinical use, and pasireotide is a promising somatostatin analogue in development. Newer long-acting depot formulations are now available offering once-monthly administration. Although octreotide was initially developed for symptom control, recent results indicate that it also has an antiproliferative effect, significantly increasing time to progression in patients with midgut NETs. Combinations of octreotide with other targeted therapies may further improve patient outcomes. Findings in recent studies of the combination of octreotide and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus are encouraging. The combinations of octreotide with other agents (eg, interferon-α, bevacizumab, cetuximab, AMG-706, and sunitinib) are being investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Somatostatin analogues have been used to treat the symptoms of NETs for decades and also have an antineoplastic effect, markedly prolonging progression-free survival. Somatostatin analogues are likely to remain the cornerstone of treatment for most patients with advanced NETs. Promising new combination therapies are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:23112884

  7. Interim report on intrathoracic radiotherapy of human small-cell lung carcinoma in nude mice with Re-188-RC-160, a radiolabeled somatostatin analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, P.O. |; Bender, H.; Biersack, H.J.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of Re-188-RC-160 in experimental models of human small cell lung carcinomas which mimic the clinical presentation. In the experimental model, cells from the human small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H69 cells were inoculated into the thoracic cavity of athymic mice and rats. Subsequently, the biodistribution of Re-188-RC-160 after injection into the pleural cavity, a radiolabeled somatostatin analogue, was monitored as was the effect on the subsequent growth of tumors. The results presented here, and which are a part of a larger series of studies, suggest that Re-188-RC-160 can be effectively used in this animal model to restrict the growth of small cell lung carcinoma in the thoracic cavity.

  8. Application and dosimetric requirements for 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues in targeted radionuclide therapy for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Taïeb, David; Garrigue, Philippe; Bardiès, Manuel; Esmaeel, Abdullah Ahmad; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are associated with variable prognosis, with grade 1 and 2 NETs having a more favorable outcome than G3 ones (also called carcinoma). GEP-NET patients need highly individualized interdisciplinary evaluations and treatment. New treatment options have become available (i.e., sunitinib, mTOR inhibitors) with significant improvements in progression-free survival. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using 90Y or 177Lu-labeled somatostatin analogs has also shown promise in the treatment of advanced progressive NETs but randomized clinical trials comparing with other modalities are still lacking. SST-targeting represents the essence of theranostics. 68Ga-DOTA-SSTa can be used as companion imaging agents to assist in such a radionuclide therapy selection. 68Ga-DOTA-SSTa PET/CT might also provide critical information for prognosis, tumor response assessement to PRRT, and internal dosimetry. It is also expected that the development of novel receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals will contribute to the development of molecular-based personalized medicine approaches. PMID:26384594

  9. Effect of one year continuous subcutaneous infusion of a somatostatin analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy, metabolic control and thyroid function in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, C; Nørgaard, K; Snorgaard, O; Bek, T; Larsen, M; Lund-Andersen, H

    1990-06-01

    Growth hormone is assumed to be involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy. In a randomized study we evaluated the possible effects of one year treatment with a somatostatin (SRIH) analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy and on metabolism in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Eleven patients were allocated to treatment with a continuous sc infusion of 400 micrograms octreotide per day and 9 served as controls. Only 7 patients from each group completed the study. Three octreotide-treated patients left the study owing to severe diarrhea. The subjects were evaluated at entry, after 2, 6 and 12 months treatment, and 2 months after withdrawal. Octreotide induced a decrease in GH secretion, expressed as the area under the 24 h serum GH profiles (p less than 0.05), and of the serum levels of IGF-I (p less than 0.05). The entire decline in GH levels occurred during the daytime, whereas the nocturnal levels were unaffected. Retinopathy, as assessed by determination of the blood retina barrier permeability, by colour fundus photography, and flurescein angiography was unchanged in both groups. Apart from a decline in insulin requirements, octreotide had no major effect on glycemic control, but induced a mild transient pituitary hypothyroidism, not clinically relevant. We conclude that treatment with octreotide for one year has modest effects on GH, IGF-I, and glucose metabolism, but has no significant effect on early retinopathy in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes.

  10. 64Cu-labeled somatostatin analogues conjugated with cross-bridged phosphonate-based chelators via strain-promoted click chemistry for PET imaging: in silico through in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengxin; Ouyang, Qin; Zeng, Dexing; Nguyen, Kim N; Modi, Jalpa; Wang, Lirong; White, Alexander G; Rogers, Buck E; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2014-07-24

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sstr2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors. The homology model of sstr2 was built and was used to aid the design of new somatostatin analogues modified with phosphonate-containing cross-bridged chelators for evaluation of using them as PET imaging radiopharmaceuticals. The new generation chelators were conjugated to Tyr3-octreotate (Y3-TATE) through bioorthogonal, strain-promoted alkyne azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) to form CB-TE1A1P-DBCO-Y3-TATE (AP) and CB-TE1K1P-PEG4-DBCO-Y3-TATE (KP) in improved yields compared to standard direct conjugation methods of amide bond formation. Consistent with docking studies, the clicked bioconjugates showed high binding affinities to sstr2, with Kd values ranging from 0.6 to 2.3 nM. Selected isomers of the clicked products were used in biodistribution and PET/CT imaging. Introduction of the bulky dibenzocyclooctyne group in AP decreased clearance rates from circulation. However, the additional carboxylate group and PEG linker from the KP conjugate significantly improved labeling conditions and in vivo stability of the copper complex and ameliorated the slower pharmacokinetics of the clicked somatostatin analogues.

  11. The octreotide test dose is not a reliable predictor of the subsequent response to somatostatin analogue therapy in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Pokrajac, Ana; Claridge, Andrew G; Shakoor, S K Abdul; Trainer, Peter J

    2006-02-01

    In many centres, a test dose (TD) of octreotide is administered before commencing somatostatin analogue therapy (SAT), although the merits of this procedure are uncertain. We have analysed the value of the GH response to a TD in predicting the efficacy of subsequent SAT in 47 patients with acromegaly (25 male, median age 51 years, range 20-82). The primary goal of SAT was a mean GH of < 5 mU/l. Median baseline GH was 19.3 mU/l (2.2-233 mU/l) and with the TD fell by 78% (35-98%) to a nadir of 4.2 mU/l (< 0.3-85 mU/l). Optimal predictive power was observed when GH fell to < 5 mU/l after the TD. With this criterion, the TD had a positive predictive value (PPV) of achieving the primary goal on SAT of 82% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 50%. However, baseline GH was also highly predictive of the likelihood of successful SAT (GH < 5 mU/l). The GH response to the TD had PPV of 83% and NPV of 61% of normalising IGF-I on SAT. In summary, baseline GH and nadir after a TD are highly predictive of a good response to SAT; however, a poor response to a TD does not exclude an optimal response to SAT. Furthermore, failure to achieve biochemical control does not equate to no benefit, as biochemical improvement was seen in every patient; therefore, no patient should be deprived of octreotide therapy because of the result of a TD. In conclusion, our data indicate that the octreotide TD has no place in selecting patients for SAT.

  12. Reciprocal regulation of antral gastrin and somatostatin gene expression by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S J; Stone, D

    1988-01-01

    Gastric acid exerts a feedback inhibition on the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells. This study examines whether gastrin gene expression is also regulated by changes in gastric pH. Achlorhydria was induced in rats by the gastric H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor, omeprazole (100 mumol/kg). This resulted in fourfold increases in both serum gastrin (within 2 h) and gastrin mRNA levels (after 24 h). Antral somatostatin D cells probably act as chemoreceptors for gastric acid to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin secretion from adjacent G cells. Omeprazole-induced achlorhydria reduced D-cell activity as shown by a threefold decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels that began after 24 h. Exogenous administration of the somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 (10 micrograms/kg) prevented both the hypergastrinemia and the increase in gastrin mRNA levels caused by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria. Exogenous somatostatin, however, did not influence the decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels seen with achlorhydria. These data, therefore, support the hypothesis that antral D cells act as chemoreceptors for changes in gastric pH, and modulates somatostatin secretion and synthesis to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin gene expression in adjacent G cells. Images PMID:2901431

  13. Feasibility, endocrine and anti-tumour effects of a triple endocrine therapy with tamoxifen, a somatostatin analogue and an antiprolactin in post-menopausal metastatic breast cancer: a randomized study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Bontenbal, M.; Foekens, J. A.; Lamberts, S. W.; de Jong, F. H.; van Putten, W. L.; Braun, H. J.; Burghouts, J. T.; van der Linden, G. H.; Klijn, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Suppression of the secretion of prolactin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) might be important in the growth regulation and treatment of breast cancer. Because oestrogens may counteract the anti-tumour effects of such treatment, the combination of an anti-oestrogen (tamoxifen), a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) and a potent anti-prolactin (CV 205-502) might be attractive. In this respect, we performed a first exploratory long-term study on the feasibility of combined treatment and possible clear differences in endocrine and anti-tumour effects during such combined treatment vs standard treatment with tamoxifen alone. Twenty-two post-menopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer (ER and/or PR positive or unknown) were randomized to receive either 40 mg of tamoxifen per day or the combination of 40 mg of tamoxifen plus 75 microg of CV 205-502 orally plus 3 x 0.2 mg of octreotide s.c. as first-line endocrine therapy. An objective response was found in 36% of the patients treated with tamoxifen alone and in 55% of the patients treated with combination therapy. Median time to progression was 33 weeks for patients treated with tamoxifen and 84 weeks for patients treated with combination therapy, but the numbers are too small for hard conclusions. There was no difference in overall post-relapse survival between the two treatment arms. With respect to the endocrine parameters, there was a significant decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels in both treatment arms, whereas during combined treatment plasma growth hormone tended to decrease and plasma prolactin levels were strongly suppressed; in some patients insulin and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) decreased during the triple therapy. Although there was no significant difference in mean decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels between the two treatment arms, combined treatment resulted in a more uniform suppression of IGF-1. Therefore, the addition of a somatostatin analogue and an anti

  14. Budget Impact of Long-Acting Insulin Analogues: The Case in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Everton Nunes; Pereira, Maurício G

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting insulin analogues for type 1 diabetes (T1D) treatment have been available on the Brazilian market since 2002. However, the population cannot access the analogues through the public health system. Objective To estimate the incremental budget impact of long-acting insulin analogues coverage for T1D patients in the Brazilian public health system compared to NPH insulin. Methods We performed a budget impact analysis of a five-year period. The eligible population was projected using epidemiological data from the International Diabetes Federation estimates for patients between 0–14 and 20–79 years old. The prevalence of T1D was estimated in children, and the same proportion was applied to the 15-19-year-old group due to a gap in epidemiological information. We considered 4,944 new cases per year and a 34.61/100,000 inhabitants mortality rate. Market share for long-acting insulin analogues was assumed as 20% in the first year, reaching 40% in the fifth year. The mean daily dose was taken from clinical trials. We calculated the bargaining power of the Ministry of Health by dividing the price paid for human insulin in the last purchase by the average regulated price. We performed univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. Results The incremental budget impact of long-acting insulin analogues was US$ 28.6 million in the first year, and reached US$ 58.7 million in the fifth year. The total incremental budget impact was US$ 217.9 million over the five-year period. The sensitivity analysis showed that the percentage of T1D among diabetic adults and the insulin analogue price were the main factors that affected the budget impact. Conclusions The cost of the first year of long-acting insulin analogue coverage would correspond to 0.03% of total public health expenditure. The main advantage of this study is that it identifies potential bargaining power because it features more realistic profiles of resource usage, once centralized purchasing is

  15. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A. Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, CA Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels )

    1988-07-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 {plus minus} 20 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N{sub i} to inhibit adenylate cyclase.

  16. Reversible inhibition of central precocious puberty with a long acting GnRH analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, P S; Ward, I; McNinch, A W; Savage, D C

    1985-01-01

    A 7 year old girl with precocious puberty was treated with buserelin, a long acting analogue of gonadotrophin releasing hormone. Spontaneous and stimulated gonadotrophin secretion became prepubertal but returned to pubertal values when buserelin was withdrawn, suggesting that normal sexual maturation should follow cessation of treatment. PMID:3931565

  17. Somatostatin and Somatostatin-Containing Neurons in Shaping Neuronal Activity and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery over four decades ago, somatostatin (SOM) receives growing scientific and clinical interest. Being localized in the nervous system in a subset of interneurons somatostatin acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and its role in the fine-tuning of neuronal activity and involvement in synaptic plasticity and memory formation are widely recognized in the recent literature. Combining transgenic animals with electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular methods allowed to characterize several subpopulations of somatostatin-containing interneurons possessing specific anatomical and physiological features engaged in controlling the output of cortical excitatory neurons. Special characteristic and connectivity of somatostatin-containing neurons set them up as significant players in shaping activity and plasticity of the nervous system. However, somatostatin is not just a marker of particular interneuronal subpopulation. Somatostatin itself acts pre- and postsynaptically, modulating excitability and neuronal responses. In the present review, we combine the knowledge regarding somatostatin and somatostatin-containing interneurons, trying to incorporate it into the current view concerning the role of the somatostatinergic system in cortical plasticity. PMID:27445703

  18. Somatostatin Analogue Treatment of a TSH-Secreting Adenoma Presenting With Accelerated Bone Metabolism and a Pericardial Effusion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mousiolis, Athanasios C; Rapti, Eleni; Grammatiki, Maria; Yavropoulou, Maria; Efstathiou, Maria; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Daniilidis, Michalis; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Increased bone turnover and other less frequent comorbidities of hyperthyroidism, such as heart failure, have only rarely been reported in association with central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma). Treatment is highly empirical and relies on eliminating the tumor and the hyperthyroid state.We report here an unusual case of a 39-year-old man who was initially admitted for management of pleuritic chest pain and fever of unknown origin. Diagnostic work up confirmed pericarditis and pleural effusion both refractory to treatment. The patient had a previous history of persistently elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), indicative of increased bone turnover. He had also initially been treated with thyroxine supplementation due to elevated TSH levels. During the diagnostic process a TSHoma was revealed. Thyroxine was discontinued, and resection of the pituitary tumor followed by treatment with a somatostatin analog led to complete recession of the effusions, normalization of ALP, and shrinkage of pituitary tumor.Accelerated bone metabolism and pericardial and pleural effusions attributed to a TSHoma may resolve after successful treatment of the tumor. The unexpected clinical course of this case highlights the need for careful long-term surveillance in patients with these rare pituitary adenomas.

  19. Somatostatin in rat tissues is depleted by cysteamine administration

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; Reichlin, S.

    1981-12-01

    Administration of cysteamine (mercaptoethylamine) induces in rats severe perforating duodenal ulcers. Because the ulcerogenic properties of cysteamine are markedly reduced by treatment with somatostatin, we considered the possibility that cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer might be mediated by depletion of tissue somatostatin, and thereby of its paracrine influences on gastrin and gastric acid secretion. To test this hypothesis, we measured the concentration of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-somatostatin) in stomach and duodenal mucosa at intervals after administration of a single ulcerogenic dose (30 mg/kg by stomach tube). IR-somatostatin in these tissues fell rapidly to reach a minimum at 4 h (stomach 31%, duodenum 60% of control respectively). IR-somatostatin in hypothalamus and pancreas decreased gradually to a minimum at 7 h. Another duodenal ulcerogen, propionitrile (10 mg/100 g bw, s.c.) which is more toxic than cysteamine, and several stressful procedures including ether anesthesia, restraint and s.c. formalin did not lower stomach or duodenal IR-somatostatin. Gut, pancreas and hypothalamic VIP levels were not influenced by cysteamine. These findings suggest that cysteamine is a relatively specific depletor of tissue somatostatin. Because blood levels of somatostatin fell, and only trivial amounts of the peptide were found in the stomach lumen after cysteamine administration, it appears likely that this agent acts at the cellular level to cause breakdown of preformed somatostatin and/or to acutely reduce its synthesis.

  20. Long-term (up to 18 years) effects on GH/IGF-1 hypersecretion and tumour size of primary somatostatin analogue (SSTa) therapy in patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenoma responsive to SSTa

    PubMed Central

    Maiza, Jean Christophe; Vezzosi, Delphine; Matta, Maria; Donadille, Florence; Loubes-Lacroix, Florence; Cournot, Maxime; Bennet, Antoine; Caron, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Context The role of somatostatin analogues (SSTa) in the treatment of acromegaly. Objective To evaluate the antihormonal and antitumour efficacy of long-term (up to 18 years) primary treatment with SSTa in patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenoma responsive to SSTa. Design An open, prospective, single-centre, clinical study. Patients Thirty-six acromegalic patients, aged 17–75 years (postoral glucose tolerance test GH > 1 µg/l, increased IGF-1 for age and sex), were monitored in a single centre and treated with SSTa as first-line therapy. The mean pretreatment GH level was 13·5 ±3·1 µg/l, and IGF-1 (as a percentage of the value over the normal range) was 302 ± 26%. The patients had macroadenoma (n = 25), microadenoma (n = 8) or empty sella turcica (n = 3). The mean duration of treatment was 8 years (range 3–18 years). Hormonal and morphological monitoring was undertaken after 6 months, and then the patients were followed annually. Results After 1 year, the mean GH and IGF-1 levels had reduced considerably (GH: 2·4 ± 0·3 µg/l; IGF-1; 174 ± 14%, P < 0·01), and they continued to decrease over 10 years, with a mean GH level of 1·6 ± 0·1 µg/l and IGF-1 of 123 ± 18% (P = 0·02). GH < 2 µg/l, normal IGF-1, or both were observed in 25 (70%), 24 (67%) and 21 (58%) patients, respectively. The mean reduction in tumour volume was 43% (range 13–97%) and shrinkage > 20% was obtained in 21 patients (72%). SSTa treatment was well tolerated with few digestive or metabolic side-effects. Conclusion Long-term (up to 18 years) treatment with SSTa used as first-line therapy is effective from both an antihormonal and antitumour perspective, and is well tolerated in acromegalic patients. PMID:17524029

  1. Central effects of growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) on growth hormone release are inhibited by central somatostatin action.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, K M; Mynett, A; Robinson, I C

    1995-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) release is stimulated by a variety of synthetic secretagogues, of which growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) has been most thoroughly studied; it is thought to have actions at both pituitary and hypothalamic sites. To evaluate the central actions of this peptide, we have studied GH release in response to direct i.c.v. injections in anaesthetized guinea pigs. GHRP-6 (0.04-1 microgram) stimulated GH release > 10-fold 30-40 min after i.c.v. injection. The same GH response required > 20-fold more GHRP-6 when given by i.v. injection. GH release could also be elicited by a non-peptide GHRP analogue (L-692,585, 1 microgram i.c.v.), whereas a growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) analogue (human GRF27Nle(1-29)NH2, 2 micrograms, i.c.v.) was ineffective. A long acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin, SMS 201-995, 10 micrograms i.c.v.) (SMS) given 20 min before 200 ng GHRP-6 blocked GH release. This was unlikely to be due to a direct effect of SMS leaking out to the pituitary, since central SMS injections did not affect basal GH release, nor did they block GH release in response to i.v. GRF injections. We conclude that the hypothalamus is a major target for GHRP-6 in vivo. Since the GH release induced by central GHRP-6 injections can be inhibited by a central action of somatostatin, and other data indicate that GHRP-6 activates GRF neurones, we suggest that somatostatin may block this activation via receptors known to be located on or near the GRF cells themselves. Somatostatin may therefore be a functional antagonist of GHRP-6 acting centrally, as well as at the pituitary gland.

  2. Positive somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlates with the presence of somatostatin receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Meyerhof, W; Richter, D; Waser, B; Schaer, J C; Scherübl, H; Boese-Landgraf, J; Neuhaus, P; Ziske, C; Mölling, K; Riecken, E O; Reubi, J C; Wiedenmann, B

    1996-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is positive in approximately 75% of all patients with neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumours. This study aimed to identify specific somatostatin receptor (sstr) subtypes, which are responsible for the in vivo binding of the widely used somatostatin analogue, octreotide in human neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumours. Twelve patients underwent SRS with radiolabelled octreotide. After surgical resection, tumour tissues were analysed in vitro for somatostatin and octreotide binding sites by autoradiography. In addition, for the first time, sstr subtype mRNA expression was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Tumour tissues from all SRS positive patients were positive by autoradiography. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed most prominently sstr2 expression in scintigraphically positive tumours. Two SRS negative tumours contained in vitro octreotide binding sites as well as high levels of sstr1 and sstr2 mRNAs. Positive SRS is mainly due to sstr2. sstr1, 3, 4, and probably 5 are less important for in vivo octreotide binding. False negative scintigraphic results seem to be influenced by factors independent of the expression of specific sstr. Images Figure 4 PMID:8566856

  3. LAPS-FSH: a new and effective long-acting follicle-stimulating hormone analogue for the treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunyoung; Park, Youngjin; Kim, YoungHoon; Kim, Yu Yon; Choi, Hyun-Ji; Son, Woo-Chan; Kwon, SeChang

    2014-10-01

    Although several long-acting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) therapies have been developed to enhance the ovarian response, a disadvantage of FSH therapy is its relatively short half-life, which requires women to receive one to two injections per day for almost 2 weeks. In the present study, we developed a novel FSH analogue by conjugating recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) and the constant region of the human immunoglobulin G4 fragment via non-peptidyl linkers. The efficacy of the FSH analogue was evaluated in vitro by cAMP level assessments, pharmacokinetic studies and a determination of ovarian weight and by comparing these findings with the results from other FSH analogues. In addition, the total number of antral and Graafian follicles was determined after 7 days of treatment with control, 6µgkg(-1) follitropin β, 6, 12 or 42µgkg(-1) corifollitropin α or 3, 6 or 12µgkg(-1) long acting protein/peptide discovery-follicle-stimulating hormone (LAPS-FSH). As a result, the animals treated with 12µgkg(-1) LAPS-FSH produced additional and larger healthy follicles. These data demonstrate that LAPS-FSH promotes growth and inhibits atresia of the ovarian follicle compared with other available drugs, suggesting that our new drug enhances the efficacy and duration of treatment. It is expected that our new FSH analogue will result in a higher chance of pregnancy in patients who are unresponsive to other drugs.

  4. An immunocytochemical mapping of somatostatin in the cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, F; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2003-10-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the localization of somatostatin-28 (1-12)-like immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies in the auditory cortex of the cat (anterior, primary, secondary, temporal, ventral, ventroposterior, posterior and dorsoposterior auditory fields) was studied. In general, the distribution of SOM-ir structures is widespread in the auditory cortex of the feline. A high density of immunoreactive fibers as well as a low density of cell bodies containing somatostatin were observed in all the layers of the eight above-mentioned auditory fields. These data indicate that somatostatin-28 (1-12) could act as a neurotransmitter and/or a neuromodulator in the auditory cortex of the cat. The origin of the SOM-ir fibers in the auditory cortex of the cat, as well as the issue of whether the cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) are local or projecting neurons is discussed.

  5. Somatostatin Modulates Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme Metabolism: Implications for the Regulation of Microglia Activity in AD

    PubMed Central

    Tundo, Grazia; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Boraso, Mariaserena; Viviani, Barbara; Coletta, Massimiliano; Marini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) into senile plaques and the impairment of somatostatin-mediated neurotransmission are key pathological events in the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin-degrading-enzyme (IDE) is one of the main extracellular protease targeting Aβ, and thus it represents an interesting pharmacological target for AD therapy. We show that the active form of somatostatin-14 regulates IDE activity by affecting its expression and secretion in microglia cells. A similar effect can also be observed when adding octreotide. Following a previous observation where somatostatin directly interacts with IDE, here we demonstrate that somatostatin regulates Aβ catabolism by modulating IDE proteolytic activity in IDE gene-silencing experiments. As a whole, these data indicate the relevant role played by somatostatin and, potentially, by analogue octreotide, in preventing Aβ accumulation by partially restoring IDE activity. PMID:22509294

  6. Long-acting lipidated analogue of human pancreatic polypeptide is slowly released into circulation.

    PubMed

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Elling, Christian E; Madsen, Andreas N; Little, Paul B; Lundgren, Karsten; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Bergmann, Ralf; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2011-04-28

    The main disadvantages of peptide pharmaceuticals are their rapid degradation and excretion, their low hydrophilicity, and low shelf lifes. These bottlenecks can be circumvented by acylation with fatty acids (lipidation) or polyethylene glycol (PEGylation). Here, we describe the modification of a human pancreatic polypeptide analogue specific for the human (h)Y(2) and hY(4) receptor with PEGs of different size and palmitic acid. Receptor specificity was demonstrated by competitive binding studies. Modifications had only a small influence on binding affinities and no influence on secondary structure. Both modifications improved pharmacokinetic properties of the hPP analogue in vivo and in vitro, however, lipidation showed a greater resistance to degradation and excretion than PEGylation. Furthermore, the lipidated peptide is taken up and degraded solely by the liver but not the kidneys. Lipidation resulted in prolonged action of the hPP analogue in respect of reducing food intake in mice after subcutaneous administration. Therefore, the lipidated hPP analogue could constitute a potential new therapeutic agent against obesity.

  7. Pituitary Somatostatin Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a major regulator of pituitary function, mostly inhibiting hormone secretion and to a lesser extent pituitary cell growth. Five SRIF receptor subtypes (SSTR1–5) are ubiquitously expressed G-protein coupled receptors. In the pituitary, SSTR1, SSTR2, SSTR3 and SSTR5 are expressed, with SSTR2 and SSTR5 predominating. As new SRIF-analogs have recently been introduced for treatment of pituitary disease, we evaluate the current knowledge of cell-specific pituitary SRIF receptor signaling and highlight areas of future research for comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms. Elucidating pituitary SRIF receptor signaling enables understanding of pituitary hormone secretion and cell growth, and also points to future therapeutic development for pituitary disorders. PMID:20149677

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for somatostatin receptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the developments and briefly characterize the somatostatin analogs which are currently used for somatostatin receptor imaging in clinical routine or in early phase clinical trials. Somatostatin (sst) receptor targeting with radiolabeled peptides has become an integral part in nuclear oncology during the last 20 years. This integration process has been initiated in Europe with the introduction to the market of 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide [111In-pentetreotide]. Introducing 99mTc in somatostatin receptor targeting radiopeptides resulted in much better image quality, higher sensitivity of tumor detection and lower mean effective dose for the examined patient. The next generation are 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs. Due to the spatial resolution of PET technique and increasing number of PET scanners, the PET or PET/CT technique became very important in somatostatin receptor imaging. Until up to a couple of years ago the analogs of somatostatin were constructed aiming at their agonistic behavior, expecting that their internalization with the receptor acti-vated by the radiolabeled ligand and its retention within the tumor cell are crucial for efficient imaging and therapy. Recently it has been shown that the antagonists recognize more binding sites at the tumor cell membrane and hence offer an improved diagnostic efficacy, especially when the density of sst receptors is low. This approach may in future improve diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor imaging techniques. The developments in tracer design are followed by the improvements in imaging techniques. The new SPECT scanners offer resolution close to that of PET, which might open a new era for 99mTc and other SPECT radiotracers.

  9. Insulin degludec, a long-acting once-daily basal analogue for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Berard, Lori; MacNeill, Gail

    2015-02-01

    Here, we discuss certain practical issues related to use of insulin degludec, a new long-acting basal insulin analogue. Degludec provides uniform ("peakless") action that extends over more than 24 hours and is highly consistent from dose to dose. Like the 2 previously available basal analogues (detemir and glargine), degludec is expected to simplify dose adjustment and enable patients to reach their glycemic targets with reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Phase 3 clinical trials involving type 1 and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated that degludec was noninferior to glargine in allowing patients to reach a target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7%, and nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred significantly less frequently with degludec. In addition, when dosing intervals vary substantially from day to day, degludec continues to be effective and to maintain a low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Degludec thus has the potential to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, to enhance the flexibility of the dosing schedule and to improve patient and caregiver confidence in the stability of glycemic control. A dedicated injector, the FlexTouch prefilled pen, containing degludec 200 units/mL, will be recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Degludec will also be available as 100 units/mL cartridges, to be used in the NovoPen 4 by patients requiring smaller basal insulin doses, including most patients with type 1 diabetes.

  10. Noncompetitive and irreversible inhibition of xanthine oxidase by benzimidazole analogues acting at the functional flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor.

    PubMed

    Skibo, E B

    1986-07-29

    Benzimidazole derivatives possessing a leaving group in the 2 alpha-position and either 4,7-dione, 4,7-diol, or 4,7-dimethoxy substituents were examined as inhibitors of buttermilk xanthine oxidase. The quinone and hydroquinone derivatives are not inhibitors of xanthine-oxygen reductase activity, even though the latter is a powerful alkylating agent. The methoxylated hydroquinones are linear noncompetitive inhibitors, the best of which is the 2 alpha-bromo analogue (Ki = 46 microM). During xanthine-oxygen reductase activity, the 2 alpha-bromo analogue irreversibly traps the reduced enzyme. Formation of a C(4a) adduct of the reduced functional FAD cofactor is postulated on the basis of UV-visible spectral evidence and reconstitution of the enzyme after removal of the altered FAD. A probable sequence of events is reversible binding at or near the reduced cofactor followed by adduct formation. It is concluded that potent tight binding inhibitors could be designed that act at the FAD cofactor rather than the purine active site.

  11. Presynaptic modulation by somatostatin in the neostriatum.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Huerta, Violeta Gisselle; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Guzman, Jaime N; Bargas, Jose; Galarraga, Elvira

    2008-08-01

    Medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) are the main neuronal population in the neostriatum. MSNs are inhibitory and GABAergic. MSNs connect with other MSNs via local axon collaterals that produce lateral inhibition, which is thought to select cell assemblies for motor action. MSNs also receive inhibitory inputs from GABAergic local interneurons. This work shows, through the use of the paired pulse protocol, that somatostatin (SST) acts presynaptically to regulate GABA release from the terminals interconnecting MSNs. This SST action is reversible and not mediated through the release of dopamine. It is blocked by the SST receptor (SSTR) antagonist ciclosomatostatin (cicloSST). In contrast, SST does not regulate inhibition coming from interneurons. Because, SST is released by a class of local interneuron, it is concluded that this neuron helps to regulate the selection of motor acts.

  12. Somatostatin receptor expression on von Hippel-Lindau-associated hemangioblastomas offers novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Sizdahkhani, Saman; Feldman, Michael J.; Piazza, Martin G.; Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Edwards, Nancy A.; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Maric, Dragan; Merrill, Marsha J.; Pacak, Karel; Zhuang, Zhengping; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-associated hemangioblastomas (VHL-HB) arise in the central nervous system (CNS), and are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in VHL disease. Currently, surgical resection is the most effective way to manage symptomatic VHL-HBs. Surgically unresectable VHL-HBs or those in frail patients are challenging problems. Therapies targeting oncologic and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathways have failed to demonstrate tumor control. Our experience and previous reports on VHL-HB avidity to somatostatin analogues suggested somatostatin receptor (SSTR) expression in VHL-HBs, offering an alternative therapeutic strategy. We explored this possibility by demonstrating consistent histologic expression of SSTR1, 2a, 4, and 5 in VHL-HBs. We found that somatostatin analogue octreotide induces apoptosis in VHL-HB stromal cells in a dose-dependent fashion by BAX – caspase-3 pathway unrelated to canonical VHL pathway. When administered to a patient with unresectable symptomatic suprasellar hemangioblastoma, octreotide resulted in tumor volume reduction, symptom stabilization, and tumor cytopenia on repeat 68Ga-DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography (PET) within 6 months, suggesting tumor infarction. We conclude that VHL-HBs harbor multiple SSTR subtypes that offer actionable chemo-therapeutic strategy for management of symptomatic, unresectable tumors by somatostatin analogue therapy. PMID:28094316

  13. Somatostatin receptor expression on von Hippel-Lindau-associated hemangioblastomas offers novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Sizdahkhani, Saman; Feldman, Michael J; Piazza, Martin G; Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Edwards, Nancy A; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Maric, Dragan; Merrill, Marsha J; Pacak, Karel; Zhuang, Zhengping; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2017-01-17

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-associated hemangioblastomas (VHL-HB) arise in the central nervous system (CNS), and are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in VHL disease. Currently, surgical resection is the most effective way to manage symptomatic VHL-HBs. Surgically unresectable VHL-HBs or those in frail patients are challenging problems. Therapies targeting oncologic and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathways have failed to demonstrate tumor control. Our experience and previous reports on VHL-HB avidity to somatostatin analogues suggested somatostatin receptor (SSTR) expression in VHL-HBs, offering an alternative therapeutic strategy. We explored this possibility by demonstrating consistent histologic expression of SSTR1, 2a, 4, and 5 in VHL-HBs. We found that somatostatin analogue octreotide induces apoptosis in VHL-HB stromal cells in a dose-dependent fashion by BAX - caspase-3 pathway unrelated to canonical VHL pathway. When administered to a patient with unresectable symptomatic suprasellar hemangioblastoma, octreotide resulted in tumor volume reduction, symptom stabilization, and tumor cytopenia on repeat (68)Ga-DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography (PET) within 6 months, suggesting tumor infarction. We conclude that VHL-HBs harbor multiple SSTR subtypes that offer actionable chemo-therapeutic strategy for management of symptomatic, unresectable tumors by somatostatin analogue therapy.

  14. Somatostatin receptor imaging with (111)In-pentetreotide in gastro-intestinal tract and lung neuroendocrine tumors-Impact on targeted treatment.

    PubMed

    Gerasimou, George; Moralidis, Efstratios; Gotzamani-Psarrakou, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Somatostatin is a neuropeptide that confers a wide range of pharmacological properties. Indium-111-tagged pentetreotide ((111)In-P) is a radiolabeled analogue of somatostatin indicated for the in vivo scintigraphic localization of neuroendocrine tumors (NET). In cases of NET of the gastro-intestinal tract we describe the sensitivity compared to conventional anatomical imaging modalities and especially the possibility that (111)In-P may change therapeutic management into up one fourth of the patients. In cases of small cell lung carcinoma it has been used for the evaluation of somatostatin receptor status and a substantial tool for differentiation between limited and extensive disease, especially when combined with anatomical imaging methods. We also describe the radiolabeled with yttrium-90 or lutetium-177 somatostatin analogue peptides in the treatment of NET and also the use of (111)In-P for the selection of patients for targeted treatment.

  15. Somatostatin inhibits cANP-mediated cholinergic transmission in the myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which somatostatin acts to modulate cholinergic transmission is not clear. In this study the authors investigated the role of the adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in mediating cholinergic transmission in the guinea pig myenteric plexus and examined the ability of somatostatin to alter acetylcholine (ACh) release stimulated by various cAMP agonists. Forskolin, 8-bromo-cAMP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and cholera toxin each stimulated the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh in a dose-related manner. Addition of theophylline enhanced the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh stimulated by these cAMP agonists. The observations suggest that cAMP may serve as a physiological mediator for ACh release from myenteric neurons. Somatostatin inhibited release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by various cAMP agonists in a dose-related manner. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin antagonized the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by forskolin, VIP, or cholera toxin but had no effect on the inhibitory action of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by 8-bromo-cAMP. This suggests that the principal mechanism by which somatostatin inhibits cAMP-mediated cholinergic transmission is via activation of the inhibitory regulatory protein (N{sub i} subunit) of adenyalte cyclase.

  16. [Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma: scintigraphic expression of somatostatin receptors].

    PubMed

    García Vicente, A; García Del Castillo, E; Soriano Castrejón, A; Alonso Farto, J

    1999-10-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumor originating in the upper nasal cavity and constitutes 3% of all intranasal neoplasms. Few references exist about the expression of somatostatin receptors in these tumors. Our case demonstrates a good correlation between the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with short-acting insulin analogues or human regular insulin: efficacy, safety, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Radermecker, Régis Pierre; Scheen, André Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Portable insulin infusion devices are effective and safe insulin delivery systems for managing diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes. Rapidly absorbed insulin analogues, such as insulin lispro or insulin aspart, may offer an advantage over regular human insulin for insulin pumps. Several open-label randomised crossover trials demonstrated that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with insulin lispro provided a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia and a slightly but significantly lower glycated haemoglobin level, with lower daily insulin requirement and similar or even less hypoglycaemic episodes. A CSII study comparing insulin lispro and insulin aspart demonstrated similar results with the two analogues, and better results than those with regular insulin. Because these analogues have a quicker onset and a shorter duration of action than regular insulin, one might expect an earlier and greater metabolic deterioration in case of CSII interruption, but a more rapid correction of metabolic abnormalities after insulin boluses when reactivating the pump. These expectations were confirmed in randomised protocols comparing the metabolic changes occurring during and after CSII interruption of various durations when the pump infused either insulin lispro or regular insulin. The extra cost resulting from the use of CSII and insulin analogues in diabetes management should be compensated for by better metabolic control and quality of life. In conclusion, CSII delivering fast-acting insulin analogues may be considered as one of the best methods to replace insulin in a physiological manner by mimicking meal and basal insulin requirements, without higher risk of hypoglycaemia or ketoacidosis in well-educated diabetic patients.

  18. Somatostatin blocks a calcium current in rat sympathetic ganglion neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, S R; Schofield, G G

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of somatostatin and somatostatin analogues on a Ca2+ current from acutely isolated and short-term (24-48 h) cultured adult rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurones were studied using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. 2. [D-Trp8]Somatostatin (SOM) produced a rapid, reversible and concentration-dependent reduction of the Ca2+ current. Ca2+ current amplitude was reduced over the voltage range -15 to +40 mV with the greatest reduction occurring where the amplitude was maximal (ca +10 mV). In the presence of SOM, the Ca2+ current rising phase was slower and biphasic at potentials between 0 and +40 mV. 3. Application of 0.1 microM-SOM for greater than 10 s resulted in a desensitization of the response. During a 4 min application of 0.1 microM-SOM, Ca2+ current amplitude returned to about 90% of control. A second application of 0.1 microM-SOM produced less block than the initial application. 4. Concentration-response curves for SOM, somatostatin-14 (SOM-14) and somatostatin-28 (SOM-28) were fitted to a single-site binding isotherm. The concentrations producing half-maximal block and the maximal attainable blocks of the Ca2+ current for SOM, SOM-14 and SOM-28 were 3.3, 5.4 and 35 nM, respectively and 55, 51 and 54%, respectively. SOM-14 and SOM-28 slowed the Ca2+ current rising phase in a manner similar to that of SOM. Somatostatin-28 had no effect on the Ca2+ current at 1 microM. 5. The magnitude of the Ca2+ current block produced by 0.1 microM-SOM was not significantly altered in the presence of 1 microM-idazoxan, atropine, naloxone or the somatostatin antagonist aminoheptanoyl-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-O-benzyl-Thr. 6. Internal dialysis with solutions containing 500 microM-guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) or guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)(GTP-gamma-S) decreased the Ca2+ current amplitude by 36 and 41%, respectively, and induced a biphasic rising phase in the Ca2+ current. Under these conditions, application of 0.1 microM-SOM produced

  19. Growing vascular endothelial cells express somatostatin subtype 2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J C; Balster, D A; Gebhardt, B M; O'Dorisio, T M; O'Dorisio, M S; Espenan, G D; Drouant, G J; Woltering, E A

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that non-proliferating (quiescent) human vascular endothelial cells would not express somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2) and that this receptor would be expressed when the endothelial cells begin to grow. To test this hypothesis, placental veins were harvested from 6 human placentas and 2 mm vein disks were cultured in 0.3% fibrin gels. Morphometric analysis confirmed that 50–75% of cultured vein disks developed radial capillary growth within 15 days. Sst 2 gene expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the RNA from veins before culture and from tissue-matched vein disks that exhibited an angiogenic response. The sst 2 gene was expressed in the proliferating angiogenic sprouts of human vascular endothelium. The presence of sst 2 receptors on proliferating angiogenic vessels was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and in vivo scintigraphy. These results suggest that sst 2 may be a unique target for antiangiogenic therapy with sst 2 preferring somatostatin analogues conjugated to radioisotopes or cytotoxic agents. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461088

  20. Incorporation of monodisperse oligoethyleneglycol amino acids into anticonvulsant analogues of galanin and neuropeptide y provides peripherally acting analgesics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liuyin; Klein, Brian D; Metcalf, Cameron S; Smith, Misty D; McDougle, Daniel R; Lee, Hee-Kyoung; White, H Steve; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2013-02-04

    Delivery of neuropeptides into the central and/or peripheral nervous systems supports development of novel neurotherapeutics for the treatment of pain, epilepsy and other neurological diseases. Our previous work showed that the combination of lipidization and cationization applied to anticonvulsant neuropeptides galanin (GAL) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) improved their penetration across the blood-brain barrier yielding potent antiepileptic lead compounds, such as Gal-B2 (NAX 5055) or NPY-B2. To dissect peripheral and central actions of anticonvulsant neuropeptides, we rationally designed, synthesized and characterized GAL and NPY analogues containing monodisperse (discrete) oligoethyleneglycol-lysine (dPEG-Lys). The dPEGylated analogues Gal-B2-dPEG(24), Gal-R2-dPEG(24) and NPY-dPEG(24) displayed analgesic activities following systemic administration, while avoiding penetration into the brain. Gal-B2-dPEG(24) was synthesized by a stepwise deprotection of orthogonal 4-methoxytrityl and allyloxycarbonyl groups, and subsequent on-resin conjugations of dPEG(24) and palmitic acids, respectively. All the dPEGylated analogues exhibited substantially decreased hydrophobicity (expressed as logD values), increased in vitro serum stabilities and pronounced analgesia in the formalin and carrageenan inflammatory pain assays following systemic administration, while lacking apparent antiseizure activities. These results suggest that discrete PEGylation of neuropeptides offers an attractive strategy for developing neurotherapeutics with restricted penetration into the central nervous system.

  1. Somatostatin binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, B.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E. )

    1990-11-01

    A method has been developed for the study of somatostatin (SS) binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex. Binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS to cells obtained by mechanical dissociation of rat cerebral cortex was dependent on time and temperature, saturable, reversible and highly specific. Under conditions of equilibrium, i.e., 60 min at 25 degrees C, native SS inhibited tracer binding in a dose-dependent manner. The Scatchard analysis of binding data was linear and yielded a dissociation constant of 0.60 +/- 0.08 nM with a maximal binding capacity of 160 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein. The binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS was specific as shown in experiments on tracer displacement by the native peptides, SS analogues, and unrelated peptides.

  2. In vivo application of ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide for detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Setyono-Han, B.; de Jong, M.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Bruns, C.; van Hagen, P.M.; Marbach, P.; Visser, T.J.; Pless, J.; Lamberts, S.W.J. Sandoz Research Inst., Berne Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, Rotterdam Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    In this study the authors investigated its in vivo application in the visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats. The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical was investigated after intravenous injection in normal rats and in rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic carcinoma CA 20948. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies showed that specific accumulation of radioactivity occurred in somatostatin receptor-containing tissue (anterior pituitary gland). However, in contrast to the adrenals and pituitary, the tracer accumulation in the kidneys was not mediated by somatostatin receptors. Increasing radioactivity over the somatostatin receptor-positive tumors was measured rapidly after injection and the tumors were clearly visualized by gamma camera scintigraphy. In rats pretreated with 1 mg octreotide accumulation of ({sup 111}In-DPTA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide in the tumors was prevented. Because of its relatively long effective half-life, ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a radionuclide-coupled somatostatin analogue which can be used to visualize somatostatin receptor-bearing tumors efficiently after 24 hr, when interfering background radioactivity is minimized by renal clearance.

  3. A novel long-acting glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide analogue: enhanced efficacy in normal and diabetic rodents

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, K; Hargrove, D M; Jodka, C M; Gedulin, B R; Smith, P A; Hoyt, J A; Lwin, A; Collins, L; Mamedova, L; Levy, O E; D’Souza, L; Janssen, S; Srivastava, V; Ghosh, S S; Parkes, D G

    2014-01-01

    Aim Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone that is released from intestinal K cells in response to nutrient ingestion. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of the novel N- and C-terminally modified GIP analogue AC163794. Methods AC163794 was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. Design involved the substitution of the C-terminus tail region of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV)-resistant GIP analogue [d-Ala2]GIP(1–42) with the unique nine amino acid tail region of exenatide. The functional activity and binding of AC163794 to the GIP receptor were evaluated in RIN-m5F β-cells. In vitro metabolic stability was tested in human plasma and kidney membrane preparations. Acute insulinotropic effects were investigated in isolated mouse islets and during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in normal and diabetic Zucker fatty diabetic (ZDF) rats. The biological actions of AC163794 were comprehensively assessed in normal, ob/ob and high-fat-fed streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Acute glucoregulatory effects of AC163794 were tested in diet-induced obese mice treated subchronically with AC3174, the exendatide analogue [Leu14] exenatide. Human GIP or [d-Ala2]GIP(1–42) were used for comparison. Results AC163794 exhibited nanomolar functional GIP receptor potency in vitro similar to GIP and [d-Ala2]GIP(1–42). AC163794 was metabolically more stable in vitro and displayed longer duration of insulinotropic action in vivo versus GIP and [d-Ala2]GIP(1–42). In diabetic mice, AC163794 improved HbA1c through enhanced insulinotropic action, partial restoration of pancreatic insulin content and improved insulin sensitivity with no adverse effects on fat storage and metabolism. AC163794 provided additional baseline glucose-lowering when injected to mice treated with AC3174. Conclusions These studies support the potential use of a novel GIP analogue AC163794 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23859463

  4. Multiple allosteric sites are involved in the modulation of insulin-degrading-enzyme activity by somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Grazia R; Di Muzio, Elena; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Di Pierro, Donato; Polticelli, Fabio; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Somatostatin is a cyclic peptide, released in the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system, where it is involved in the regulation of cognitive and sensory functions, motor activity and sleep. It is a substrate of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), as well as a modulator of its activity and expression. In the present study, we have investigated the modulatory role of somatostatin on IDE activity at 37 °C and pH 7.3 for various substrates [i.e. insulin, β-amyloid (Aβ)1-40 and bradykinin], aiming to quantitatively characterize the correlation between the specific features of the substrates and the regulatory mechanism. Functional data indicate that somatostatin, in addition to the catalytic site of IDE (being a substrate), is also able to bind to two additional exosites, which play different roles according to the size of the substrate and its binding mode to the IDE catalytic cleft. In particular, one exosite, which displays high affinity for somatostatin, regulates only the interaction of IDE with larger substrates (such as insulin and Aβ1-40 ) in a differing fashion according to their various modes of binding to the enzyme. A second exosite, which is involved in the regulation of enzymatic processing by IDE of all substrates investigated (including a 10-25 amino acid long amyloid-like peptide, bradykinin and somatostatin itself, which had been studied previously), probably acts through the alteration of an 'open-closed' equilibrium.

  5. P10: Is the OctreoScan score a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogs treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Ottaviano, Margaret; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Segreto, Sabrina; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Pellegrino, Sara; De Placido, Sabino; Marino, Mirella; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background The somatostatin receptor expression in thymic neoplasms is assessed in vivo imaging by 111In-octreotide SPECT (OctreoScan). This retrospective study aimed to verify the predictive role of intensity expression of OctreoScan to somatostatin analogues treatment. Methods We evaluated 28 patients (14 male and 14 female with a median age of 54 years, range, 27–78 years) with thymic tumors candidated to somatostatine analogs therapy as second or third line of treatment or maintenance treatment. For this reason all of them performed OctreoScan of the thorax and tumor-to-background ratio was determined on the 24-h coronal sections. Thymic tumors were classified by WHO 2004 and staged according to Masaoka-Koga system. Specifically, AB three patients; B1 two patients; B2 five patients; B3 nine patients; B2/B3 three patients; thymic carcinoma five patients; B3/thymic carcinoma one patient. All the patients had a III of IV stage of disease. Lesions with pathologically increased tracer uptake were categorized according to the following 3-pointscore: equivocal, probably pathologic, and definitely pathologic. Results All patients were OctreoScan positive, four with an equivocal point score, nineteen and five with a probably and definitely pathological score respectively. Somatostatin analogs were administrated as second or third line of therapy in 10 patients, as maintenance therapy in 16 patients and as both of modality in two patients. Median time to progression was 16 months (range, 6–77 months) and it was not influenced by uptake pathological score. Conclusions The intensity of uptake of Indium-111-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in thymic tumors is not a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogues treatment. The OctreoScan positivity is the best rationale for treating thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) with somatostatin analogs.

  6. Beta-endorphin and islet hormone release in type-2 diabetes mellitus the effects of normoglycemia, enkephalin, naloxone and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Cozzolino, D; Salvatore, T; Ceriello, A; Giunta, R; Torella, R; D'Onofrio, F

    1987-01-01

    The present study was aimed at characterizing the effects of beta-endorphin on plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon plasma levels in subjects with type-2 diabetes mellitus. Infusion of 0.5 mg/h human beta-endorphin produced significant and simultaneous increments in both insulin and glucagon concentrations and decreased plasma glucose levels (-18 +/- 4 mg/dl, 60 min level, p less than 0.01). When the same diabetics were rendered euglycemic by an insulin infusion (1 mU/kg/min), beta-endorphin did not produce the expected decrease in plasma glucose concentrations nor raise plasma insulin levels; only the response of glucagon was preserved. Normal subjects were rendered hyperglycemic by an intravenous glucose infusion to match the plasma glucose levels of diabetic subjects. In this condition, beta-endorphin produced a significant increase of insulin concentrations, whereas glucagon remained suppressed. The intravenous administration of the long-acting met-enkephalin analogue DAMME (0.25 mg) blunted the hormonal responses to the subsequent beta-endorphin infusion in diabetic patients, although the inhibition was short-lived (30-40 min). Naloxone (5 mg), an opiate antagonist, did not produce any significant change in the insulin and glucagon responses to beta-endorphin, while somatostatin (0.25 mg/h) completely abolished the hormonal responses to the opioid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Somatostatin therapy of acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Koop, H; Winckler, K; Fölsch, U R; Creutzfeldt, W

    1977-01-01

    Because somatostatin (SRIF) reduces exocrine pancreatic secretion, its effect on acute pancreatitis was investigated in rats. Linear SRIF reduced serum amylase and lipase but had no effect on pancreatic necrosis, oedema, leucocyte infiltration, and enzyme content. The mortality rate was not reduced. These results do not recommend the use of SRIF in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:604191

  8. Epidrug-induced upregulation of functional somatostatin type 2 receptors in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Marije J; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Dogan, Fadime; Farrell, William E; Feelders, Richard A; Lamberts, Steven W J; de Herder, Wouter W; Vitale, Giovanni; Hofland, Leo J

    2016-05-19

    Somatostatin receptors are a pivotal target for treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), either with somatostatin analogues (SSA) or radiolabeled SSA. The highest affinity target for the most commonly used SSA is the somatostatin receptor type 2 (sst2). An important factor that may complicate treatment efficacy, is the variable number of receptors expressed on pNETs. Gene expression is subject to complex regulation, in which epigenetics has a central role. In this study we explored the possible role of epigenetic modifications in the variations in sst2 expression levels in two human pNET cell lines, BON-1 and QGP-1. We found upregulation of sst2 mRNA after treatment with the epidrugs 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and valproic acid (VPA), an increased uptake of radiolabeled octreotide, as well as increased sensitivity to the SSA octreotide in functional cAMP inhibition. At epigenetic level we observed low methylation levels of the sst2 gene promoter region irrespective of expression. Activating histone mark H3K9Ac can be regulated with epidrug treatment, with an angle of effect corresponding to the effect on mRNA expression. Repressive histone mark H3K27me3 is not regulated by either 5-aza-dC or VPA. We conclude that epidrug treatment, in particular with combined 5-aza-dC and VPA treatment, might hold promise for improving and adding to current SSA treatment strategies of patients with pNETs.

  9. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand.

  10. Differential actions of the prostacyclin analogues treprostinil and iloprost and the selexipag metabolite, MRE-269 (ACT-333679) in rat small pulmonary arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Orie, N N; Ledwozyw, A; Williams, D J; Whittle, B J; Clapp, L H

    2013-10-01

    The prostacyclin (IP) receptor agonists, treprostinil, iloprost and the selexipag metabolite, MRE-269 (ACT-333679) were evaluated in rat distal pulmonary blood vessels. Small pulmonary arteries and veins were pre-contracted with the thromboxane mimetic, U46619 (25 and 100nM, respectively), and relaxation determined with and without IP receptor antagonists, RO1138452 and RO3244794. In arteries, treprostinil was a more potent vasorelaxant than iloprost, while the efficacy of iloprost was greater. In pulmonary arteries, treprostinil-induced relaxation was essentially abolished by both IP antagonists (1μM), while responses to iloprost were partially inhibited. Both treprostinil and iloprost were equipotent, prominently relaxing pulmonary veins with responses being similarly and partially sensitive to IP antagonists. In contrast, RO1138452 failed to inhibit relaxations to MRE-269 in either pulmonary arteries or veins, suggesting no involvement of typical IP receptors. Thus, rat pulmonary tissues cannot be considered appropriate to assess classical IP receptors using the proposed highly selective non-prostanoid agonist MRE-269, contrasting with the IP receptor agonism profile of prostacyclin analogues, iloprost and treprostinil.

  11. Analogue Gravity.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for) gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing) and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity).

  12. Somatostatin receptor targeted liposomes with Diacerein inhibit IL-6 for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Rashmi; Dey, Goutam; Banerjee, Indranil; Dey, Kaushik Kumar; Parida, Sheetal; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Das, Chandan Kanta; Pal, Ipsita; Mukherjee, Manabendra; Misra, Mridula; Pradhan, Anjan K; Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K; Fisher, Paul B; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-03-01

    Selective targeting to the tumor niche remains a major challenge in successful cancer therapy. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) is overexpressed in breast cancer cells thus making this receptor an attractive target for selective guidance of ligand-conjugated drug liposomes to the tumor site. In this study, a synthetic somatostatin analogue (SST) was used as SSTR2 targeting agent and Diacerein was employed as therapeutic molecule. Diacerein loaded liposomes (DNL) were prepared and they were further decorated with the synthetic and stable analogue of somatostatin (SST-DNL). Fabricated liposomes were nano-size in range and biocompatible. SST-DNL displayed significantly better anti-tumor efficacy as compared to free Diacerein (DN) and DNL in breast cancer models. Enhanced apoptosis in breast cancer cells was detected in SST-DNL treated groups as monitored by cell cycle analysis and changes in expression level of apoptotic/anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved Caspase 3 and PARP. SST-DNL more effectively inhibited the oncogenic IL-6/IL-6R/STAT3/MAPK/Akt signalling pathways as compared to DN or DNL in cancer cells. In addition, SST-DNL effectively suppressed angiogenesis and cancer cell invasion. In vivo tumor growth in a MDA-MB-231 mouse xenograft model was significantly suppressed following SST-DNL treatment. In xenograft model, immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 and CD-31 indicated that SST-DNL improved the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic impacts of Diacerein. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed enhanced circulation time in the DNL or SST-DNL treated groups as compared to free DN. Considering all of these findings, we conclude that SST-DNL provides a novel strategy with better efficacy for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Somatostatin and dopamine receptor regulation of pituitary somatotroph adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Liu, Ning-Ai; Melmed, Shlomo

    2017-02-01

    Somatostatin and dopamine receptors are expressed in normal and tumoral somatotroph cells. Upon receptor stimulation, somatostatin and the somatostatin receptor ligands octreotide, lanreotide, and pasireotide, and to a lesser extent, dopamine and the dopamine analogs bromocriptine and cabergoline, suppress growth hormone (GH) secretion from a GH-secreting pituitary somatotroph adenoma. Somatostatin and dopamine receptors are Gαi-protein coupled that inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP production and reduce intracellular calcium concentration and calcium flux oscillations. Although their main action on somatotroph cells is acute inhibition of GH secretion, they also may inhibit GH production and possibly somatotroph proliferation. These receptors have been reported to create complexes that exhibit functions distinct from that of receptor monomers. Somatostatin suppression of GH is mediated mainly by somatostatin receptor subtype 2 and to a lesser extent by SST5. Human somatostatin receptor subtype 5 has also been shown to harbor mutations associated with GH levels, somatotroph tumor behavior, and somatostatin receptor ligand (SRL) responsiveness. Reviewing current knowledge of somatostatin and dopamine receptor expression and signaling in normal and tumoral somatotroph cells offers insights into mechanisms underlying SRL and dopamine agonist effectiveness in patients with acromegaly.

  14. GnRH antagonists: a new generation of long acting analogues incorporating p-ureido-phenylalanines at positions 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Jiang, G; Stalewski, J; Galyean, R; Dykert, J; Schteingart, C; Broqua, P; Aebi, A; Aubert, M L; Semple, G; Robson, P; Akinsanya, K; Haigh, R; Riviere, P; Trojnar, J; Junien, J L; Rivier, J E

    2001-02-01

    A series of antagonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) of the general formula Ac-D2Nal-D4Cpa-D3Pal-Ser-4Aph/4Amf(P)-D4Aph/D4Amf(Q)-Leu-ILys-Pro-DAla-NH2 was synthesized, characterized, and screened for duration of inhibition of luteinizing hormone release in a castrated male rat assay. Selected analogues were tested in a reporter gene assay (IC50 and pA2) and an in vitro histamine release assay. P and Q contain urea/carbamoyl functionalities designed to increase potential intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding opportunities for structural stabilization and peptide/receptor interactions, respectively. These substitutions resulted in analogues with increased hydrophilicity and a lesser propensity to form gels in aqueous solution than azaline B [Ac-D2Nal-D4Cpa-D3Pal-Ser-4Aph(Atz)-D4Aph(Atz)-Leu-ILys-Pro-DAla-NH2 with Atz = 3'-amino-1H-1',2',4'-triazol-5'-yl, 5], and in some cases they resulted in a significant increase in duration of action after subcutaneous (s.c.) administration. Ac-D2Nal-D4Cpa-D3Pal-Ser-4Aph(L-hydroorotyl)-D4Aph(carbamoyl)-Leu-ILys-Pro-DAla-NH2 (acetate salt is FE200486) (31) and eight other congeners (20, 35, 37, 39, 41, 45-47) were identified that exhibited significantly longer duration of action than acyline [Ac-D2Nal-D4Cpa-D3Pal-Ser-4Aph(Ac)-D4Aph(Ac)-Leu-ILys-Pro-DAla-NH2] (6) when administered subcutaneously in castrated male rats at a dose of 50 microg in 100 microL of phosphate buffer. No correlation was found between retention times on a C18 reverse phase column using a triethylammonium phosphate buffer at pH 7.0 (a measure of hydrophilicity) or affinity in an in vitro human GnRH report gene assay (pA2) and duration of action. FE200486 was selected for preclinical studies, and some of its properties were compared to those of other clinical candidates. In the intact rat, ganirelix, abarelix, azaline B, and FE200486 inhibited plasma testosterone for 1, 1, 14, and 57 days, respectively, at 2 mg/kg s.c. in 5% mannitol (injection

  15. Identification and in vivo and in vitro characterization of long acting and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4-R) selective α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogues.

    PubMed

    Conde-Frieboes, Kilian; Thøgersen, Henning; Lau, Jesper F; Sensfuss, Ulrich; Hansen, Thomas K; Christensen, Leif; Spetzler, Jane; Olsen, Helle B; Nilsson, Cecilia; Raun, Kirsten; Dahl, Kirsten; Hansen, Birgit S; Wulff, Birgitte S

    2012-03-08

    We report in vitro and in vivo data of new α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogues which are N-terminal modified with a long chain fatty acid derivative. While keeping the pharmacophoric motif (d-Phe-Arg-Trp) fixed, we tried to improve selectivity and physicochemical parameters like solubility and stability of these analogues by replacing amino acids further away from the motif. Receptor specific changes in binding affinity to the melanocortin receptors were observed between the acetyl derivatives and the fatty acid analogues. Furthermore, amino acids at the N-terminal of α-MSH (Ser-Tyr-Ser) not considered to be part of the pharmacophore were found to have an influence on the MC4/MC1 receptor selectivity. While the acetyl analogues have an in vivo effect for around 7 h, the long chain fatty acid analogues have an effect up to 48 h in an acute feeding study in male Sprague-Dawley rats after a single subcutaneous administration.

  16. Peptide Receptor Targeting in Cancer: The Somatostatin Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1–5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed. PMID:23476673

  17. Cysteamine-induced depletion of somatostatin and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, W.J.; Sagar, S.M.; Martin, J.B.

    1985-06-01

    Cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol (CSH), given in vivo or in vitro, rapidly but reversibly depletes immunoreactive somatostatin (irSS) in the central nervous system and gut as well as biological and immunological prolactin (PRL) activity in both the anterior pituitary and blood of the rat. This depletion of irSS and PRL is dose dependent and cannot be accounted for by release of either compound. Basal and potassium-stimulated SS release is reduced from hypothalamic tissue in vitro in CSH-treated animals. PRL secretion induced both pharmacologically and physiologically is abolished after CSH administration. Furthermore, CSH reduces cellular PRL content in a number of hyperprolactinemic states. The mechanism by which CSH reduces PRL levels is not clear, but it does not appear to act through the dopamine receptor nor does it alter the morphological structure of the lactotrope in normal animals. Most likely, CSH acts by interacting with the disulfide bonds of PRL, thus rendering the molecule both immunologically and biologically inactive.

  18. Intracellular receptor for somatostatin in gastric mucosal cells: decomposition and reconstitution of somatostatin-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Reyl, F J; Lewin, M J

    1982-02-01

    Using 32P-labeled histone as exogenous substrate, we showed a potent stimulatory effect of somatostatin on cytosolic phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPPases; phosphoprotein phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.16) in rat gastric mucosal cells. Partial purification of cytosolic fraction in DEAE-Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and further gel filtration on Sephadex C-75 and Sephadex G-100 separated somatostatin-dependent PPPases into three distinct molecular species. One corresponding to Mr 130,000 was devoid of any PPPase activity but specifically bound [Tyr1]somatostatin 125I-labeled on the Tyr ([125I-Tyr1]somatostatin) with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 3 x 10(-10) M. The two other molecular species corresponded to Mrs 64,000 and 13,000. They produced catalytic dephosphorylation of 32P-labeled histone, but they were not sensitive to somatostatin and did not show any specific binding to radiolabeled hormone. Mixing of the larger with either of the two smaller molecular species resulted in concentration -dependent inhibition of PPPase activity. However this inhibition was reversed by increased concentrations of somatostatin, with the concentration for half-maximal reactivation on being close to 0.1 nM. Furthermore somatostatin stimulation in reconstituted materials developed according to a rapid time course (t1/2, less than 5 sec), consistent with that observed for binding of [125I-Tyr1]somatostatin. These results strongly argue for the presence of an intracellular somatostatin receptor in gastric mucosal cells and characterize this receptor as a PPPase regulatory subunit. Thus, substrate dephosphorylation could be the primary event triggering physiological effects of somatostatin in stomach and perhaps other organs of the digestive tract [Reyl, F. & Lewin, M. J.l M. (1981) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 675, 297-300].

  19. Evidence for selective release of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28(1-12) from rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhit, C.; Koda, L.; Benoit, R.; Morrison, J.H.; Bloom, F.E.

    1984-02-01

    Cysteamine administration to rats results in a marked depletion of hypothalamic somatostatin-14 (SS14) and a decrease of the potassium-evoked in vitro release of SS14 without a significant change in the content or release of somatostatin-28(1-12)-like immunoreactivity (SS28(1-12)-L1). Furthermore, cysteamine enhances the spontaneous release and markedly potentiates the potassium-evoked release of SS14 in the in vitro slice preparation. However, in vitro-administered cysteamine does not alter the spontaneous or potassium-evoked release of SS28(1-12)-LI. Immunohistochemical visualization of hypothalamic neuronal cell bodies and fibers following cysteamine administration shows a disappearance of the SS14 immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies with no apparent change in the SS28(1-12) immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies. These data suggest that, in rat hypothalamus, selective release of SS14 and SS28(1-12) can occur. The results are discussed in relation to possible sites of storage and release of the somatostatin-related peptides from synaptic nerve terminals.

  20. Fields of application of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of diabetes and implications in the use of rapid-acting insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, D; Rizzi, A; Scavone, G; Tanese, L; Zaccardi, F; Manto, A; Ghirlanda, G

    2013-09-01

    In western countries, diabetes mellitus, because of macrovascular and microvascular complications related to it, is still an important cause of death. Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have a six-time higher risk of mortality than healthy patients. Since the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) established how an intensive therapy is necessary to prevent diabetes mellitus complications, many studies have been conducted to understand which method is able to reach an optimal metabolic control. In the past 30 years continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion established/introduced as a validate alternative to multiple daily injections. Several trials demonstrated that, when compared to MDI, CSII brings to a better metabolic control, in terms of a reduction of glycated hemoglobin and blood glucose variability, hypoglycemic episodes and improvement in quality of life. Because of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, rapid-action insulin analogues are imposed as best insulin to be used in CSII. The rapid onset and the fast reached peak make them better mimic the way how pancreas secretes insulin. CSII by pump is not free from issues. Catheter occlusions, blockages, clogs can arrest insulin administration. The consequent higher levels of glycemic values, can easily bring to the onset of ketoacidosis, with an high risk for patients' life. Aspart is a rapid analogue obtained by aminoacidic substitution. It is as effective as lispro and glulisine in gaining a good metabolic control and even better in reducing glucose variability. Some studies tried to compare rapid analogues in terms of stability. Obtained data are controversial. An in vivo study evidenced higher stability or glulisine, while studies in vitro highlighted a higher safety of aspart. Nowadays it is not possible to assess which analogues is safer. When the infusion set is changed every 48 hours equivalent rates of occlusions have been observed.

  1. Effects of the single and combined treatment with dopamine agonist, somatostatin analog and mTOR inhibitors in a human lung carcinoid cell line: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Claudia; Rousaki, Panagoula; Negri, Mariarosaria; Sarnataro, Maddalena; Napolitano, Maria; Marino, Federica Zito; Patalano, Roberta; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Kaltsas, Gregory A; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2016-09-29

    Somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors have been used as medical therapy in lung carcinoids with variable results. No data are available on dopamine agonists as treatment for lung carcinoids. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of the combined treatment of somatostatin analogue octreotide and the dopamine agonist cabergoline with mTOR inhibitors in an in vitro model of typical lung carcinoids: the NCI-H727 cell line. In NCI-H727 cell line, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence were assessed to characterize the expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 and 5, dopamine receptor 2 and mTOR pathway components. Fifteen typical lung carcinoids tissue samples have been used for somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and the main mTOR pathway component p70S6K expression and localization by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and western blot have been assessed to test the pharmacological effects of octreotide, cabergoline and mTOR inhibitors, and to evaluate the activation of specific cell signaling pathways in NCI-H727 cell line. NCI-H727 cell line expressed somatostatin receptor 2, somatostatin receptor 5 and dopamine receptor 2 and all mTOR pathway components at messenger and protein levels. Somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and p70S6K (non phosphorylated and phosphorylated) proteins were expressed in most typical lung carcinoids tissue samples. Octreotide and cabergoline did not reduce cell viability as single agents but, when combined with mTOR inhibitors, they potentiate mTOR inhibitors effect after long-term exposure, reducing Akt and ERK phosphorylation, mTOR escape mechanisms, and increasing the expression DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4, an mTOR suppressor. In conclusion, the single use of octreotide and cabergoline is not sufficient to block cell viability but the combined approach of these agents with mTOR inhibitors

  2. Somatostatin modulates generation of inspiratory rhythms and determines asphyxia survival.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O; Lara-Hernández, Sergio; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Aguileta, Miguel A; Rivera-Angulo, Ana J; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Breathing and the activity of its generator (the pre-Bötzinger complex; pre-BötC) are highly regulated functions. Among neuromodulators of breathing, somatostatin (SST) is unique: it is synthesized by a subset of glutamatergic pre-BötC neurons, but acts as an inhibitory neuromodulator. Moreover, SST regulates breathing both in normoxic and in hypoxic conditions. Although it has been implicated in the neuromodulation of breathing, neither the locus of SST modulation, nor the receptor subtypes involved have been identified. In this study, we aimed to fill in these blanks by characterizing the SST-induced regulation of inspiratory rhythm generation in vitro and in vivo. We found that both endogenous and exogenous SST depress all preBötC-generated rhythms. While SST abolishes sighs, it also decreases the frequency and increases the regularity of eupnea and gasping. Pharmacological experiments showed that SST modulates inspiratory rhythm generation by activating SST receptor type-2, whose mRNA is abundantly expressed in the pre-Bötzinger complex. In vivo, blockade of SST receptor type-2 reduces gasping amplitude and consequently, it precludes auto-resuscitation after asphyxia. Based on our findings, we suggest that SST functions as an inhibitory neuromodulator released by excitatory respiratory neurons when they become overactivated in order to stabilize breathing rhythmicity in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  3. Hyperactive Somatostatin Interneurons Contribute to Excitotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Schroeder, David; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Cox, Gregory A.; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Here using TDP-43A315T mice, an ALS and FTD model with profound cortical pathology, we demonstrated that hyperactive somatostatin interneurons disinhibited layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5-PN) and contributed to their excitotoxicity. Focal ablation of somatostatin interneurons efficiently restored normal excitability of L5-PN and alleviated neurodegeneration, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for ALS and FTD. PMID:26900927

  4. Somatostatin peptides inhibit basolateral potassium channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Warhurst, G; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Lomax, R B

    1999-11-01

    Somatostatin is a powerful inhibitor of intestinal Cl(-) secretion. We used patch-clamp recording techniques to investigate the effects of somatostatin on low-conductance (23-pS) K(+) channels in the basolateral membrane of human colonic crypts, which are an important component of the Cl(-) secretory process. Somatostatin (2 microM) elicited a >80% decrease in "spontaneous" K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patches in nonstimulated crypts (50% inhibition = approximately 8 min), which was voltage-independent and was prevented by pretreating crypts for 18 h with pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml), implicating a G protein-dependent mechanism. In crypts stimulated with 100-200 microM dibutyryl cAMP, 2 microM somatostatin and its synthetic analog octreotide (2 microM) both produced similar degrees of K(+) channel inhibition to that seen in nonstimulated crypts, which was also present under low-Cl(-) (5 mM) conditions. In addition, 2 microM somatostatin abolished the increase in K(+) channel activity stimulated by 2 microM thapsigargin but had no effect on the thapsigargin-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca(2+). These results indicate that somatostatin peptides inhibit 23-pS basolateral K(+) channels in human colonic crypt cells via a G protein-dependent mechanism, which may result in loss of the channel's inherent Ca(2+) sensitivity.

  5. Human somatostatin I: sequence of the cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L P; Pictet, R L; Rutter, W J

    1982-01-01

    RNA has been isolated from a human pancreatic somatostatinoma and used to prepare a cDNA library. After prescreening, clones containing somatostatin I sequences were identified by hybridization with an anglerfish somatostatin I-cloned cDNA probe. From the nucleotide sequence of two of these clones, we have deduced an essentially full-length mRNA sequence, including the preprosomatostatin coding region, 105 nucleotides from the 5' untranslated region and the complete 150-nucleotide 3' untranslated region. The coding region predicts a 116-amino acid precursor protein (Mr, 12.727) that contains somatostatin-14 and -28 at its COOH terminus. The predicted amino acid sequence of human somatostatin-28 is identical to that of somatostatin-28 isolated from the porcine and ovine species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences of human and anglerfish preprosomatostatin I indicated that the COOH-terminal region encoding somatostatin-14 and the adjacent 6 amino acids are highly conserved, whereas the remainder of the molecule, including the signal peptide region, is more divergent. However, many of the amino acid differences found in the pro region of the human and anglerfish proteins are conservative changes. This suggests that the propeptides have a similar secondary structure, which in turn may imply a biological function for this region of the molecule. Images PMID:6126875

  6. Fates of endocytosed somatostatin sst2 receptors and associated agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, J A; Kaur, R; Dodgeon, I; Edwardson, J M; Humphrey, P P

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin agonists are rapidly and efficiently internalized with the somatostatin sst2 receptor. The fate of internalized agonists and receptors is of critical importance because the rate of ligand recycling back to the cell surface can limit the amount of radioligand accumulated inside the cells, whereas receptor recycling might be of vital importance in providing the cell surface with dephosphorylated, resensitized receptors. Furthermore the accumulation of radioisotope-conjugated somatostatin agonists inside cancer cells resulting from receptor-mediated internalization has been used as a treatment for cancers that overexpress somatostatin receptors. In the present study, radio-iodinated agonists at the sst2 somatostatin receptor were employed to allow quantitative analysis of the fate of endocytosed agonist. After endocytosis, recycling back to the cell surface was the main pathway for both 125I-labelled somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14) and the more stable agonist 125I-labelled cyclo(N-Me-Ala-Tyr-d-Trp-Lys-Abu-Phe) (BIM-23027; Abu stands for aminobutyric acid), accounting for 75-85% of internalized ligand when re-endocytosis of radioligand was prevented. We have shown that there is a dynamic cycling of both somatostatin agonist ligands and receptors between the cell surface and internal compartments both during agonist treatment and after surface-bound agonist has been removed, unless steps are taken to prevent the re-activation of receptors by recycled agonist. Internalization leads to increased degradation of 125I-labelled SRIF-14 but not 125I-labelled BIM-23027. The concentration of recycled agonist accumulating in the extracellular medium was sufficient to re-activate the receptor, as measured both by the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase and the recovery of surface receptor number after internalization. PMID:9820803

  7. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors.

  8. Pharmacology and anti-addiction effects of the novel κ opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Sal B, a potent and long-acting analogue of salvinorin A

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, B; Morani, A S; Ewald, A W M; Walker, L; Kumar, N; Simpson, D; Miller, J H; Prisinzano, T E; Kivell, B M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Acute activation of κ opioid (KOP) receptors results in anticocaine-like effects, but adverse effects, such as dysphoria, aversion, sedation and depression, limit their clinical development. Salvinorin A, isolated from the plant Salvia divinorum, and its semi-synthetic analogues have been shown to have potent KOP receptor agonist activity and may induce a unique response with similar anticocaine addiction effects as the classic KOP receptor agonists, but with a different side effect profile. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the duration of effects of Mesyl Sal B in vivo utilizing antinociception assays and screened for cocaine-prime induced cocaine-seeking behaviour in self-administering rats to predict anti-addiction effects. Cellular transporter uptake assays and in vitro voltammetry were used to assess modulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) function and to investigate transporter trafficking and kinase signalling pathways modulated by KOP receptor agonists. KEY RESULTS Mesyl Sal B had a longer duration of action than SalA, had anti-addiction properties and increased DAT function in vitro in a KOP receptor-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. These effects on DAT function required ERK1/2 activation. We identified differences between Mesyl Sal B and SalA, with Mesyl Sal B increasing the Vmax of dopamine uptake without altering cell-surface expression of DAT. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS SalA analogues, such as Mesyl Sal B, have potential for development as anticocaine agents. Further tests are warranted to elucidate the mechanisms by which the novel salvinorin-based neoclerodane diterpene KOP receptor ligands produce both anti-addiction and adverse side effects. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641310

  9. Synthesis and radiolabeling of a somatostatin analog for multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    A new multimodal imaging agent for imaging the somatostatin receptor has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A somatostatin analog, conjugated to both 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaceticacid (DOTA) and cypate (BS-296), was synthesized entirely on the solid phase (Fmoc) and purified by RP-HPLC. DOTA was added as a ligand for radiometals such as 64Cu or 177Lu for either radio-imaging or radiotherapy respectively. Cytate, a cypatesomatostatin analog conjugate, has previously demonstrated the ability to visualize somatostatin receptor rich tumor xenografts and natural organs by optical imaging techniques. BS-296 exhibited low nanomolar inhibitory capacity toward the binding of radiolabeled somatostatin analogs in cell membranes enriched in the somatostatin receptor, demonstrating the high affinity of this multimodal imaging peptide and indicating its potential as a molecular imaging agent. 64Cu, an isotope for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy, was selected as the isotope for radiolabeling BS-296. BS-296 was radiolabeled with 64Cu in high specific activity (200 μCi/μg) in 90% radiochemical yield. Addition of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid) prevented radiolysis of the sample, allowing for study of the 64Cu -BS-296 the day following radiolabeling. Furthermore, inclusion of DMSO at a level of 20% was found not to interfere with radiolabeling yields and prevented the adherence of 64Cu -BS-296 to the walls of the reaction vessel.

  10. Profound suppression of kindled seizures by cysteamine: possible role of somatostatin to kindled seizures.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, T; Sikand, G S; Kato, N; Wada, J A; Friesen, H G

    1983-12-12

    Recently we reported significant increase in immunoreactive somatostatin content in various brain regions of amygdaloid-kindled rats. We report here that acute intraperitoneal administration of cysteamine, an agent reported to deplete brain and gastrointestinal immunoreactive somatostatin content in kindled rats, led to profound suppression of kindled seizures. Purified anti-somatostatin antibody injected intracerebroventricularly also blocked the kindled seizures. The results show that endogenous immunoreactive somatostatin has a role in the development of seizures in amygdaloid kindled rats.

  11. Evidence that somatostatin is localized and synthesized in lymphoid organs

    SciTech Connect

    Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Dees, W.L.; Haensly, W.E. )

    1991-12-15

    Because several peptides originally found in the pituitary as within the central nervous system have been localized in lymphoid tissues and because somatostatin (somatotropin-release-inhibiting hormone, SRIH) can act on cells of the immune system, the authors searched for this peptide in lymphoid organs. The authors demonstrated that SRIH mRNA exists in lymphoid tissue, albeit in smaller levels that in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus, the brain region that contains the highest level of this mRNA. SRIH mRNA was found in the spleen and thymus of male rats and in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius of the chicken. Its localization in the Bursa indicates that the peptide must be present in B lymphocytes since this is the site of origin of B lymphocytes in birds. The SRIH concentration in these lymphoid organs as determined by radioimmunoassay was greater in the thymus than in the spleen of the rat. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of SRIH-positive cells in clusters inside the white pulp and more dispersed within the red pulp of the spleen of both the rat and the chicken. The thymus from these species also contained SRIH-positive cells within the medulla and around the corticomedullary junction. In the chicken, there were large cluster of SRIH-positive cells in the medullary portion of each nodule of the bursa of Fabricius. The results indicate that SRIH is synthesized and stored in cells of the immune system. SRIH may be secreted from these cells to exert paracrine actions that alter the function of immune cells in spleen and thymus.

  12. Somatostatin-secreting Pheochromocytoma Mimicking Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Midorikawa, Sanae; Suzuki, Shinichi; Sasano, Hironobu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We herein present the findings of a 42-year-old woman with either adrenal pheochromocytoma or intraadrenal paraganglioma that simultaneously secreted somatostatin, thus mimicking insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Pheochromocytoma was clinically diagnosed based on scintigraphy, elevated catecholamine levels, and finally a histopathological analysis of resected specimens. The patient had diabetic ketosis, requiring 40 U insulin for treatment. Following laparoscopic adrenalectomy, insulin therapy was discontinued and the urinary c-peptide levels changed from 5.5-9.0 to 81.3-87.0 μg/day. Histologically, somatostatin immunoreactivity was detected and the somatostatin levels were elevated in the serum-like fluid obtained from the tumor. Clinicians should be aware of the possible occurrence of simultaneous ectopic hormone secretion in patients with pheochromocytoma. PMID:27746437

  13. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  14. Somatostatin, tau, and beta-amyloid within the anterior olfactory nucleus in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, D; Ubeda-Bañon, I; de la Rosa-Prieto, C; Argandoña-Palacios, L; Garcia-Muñozguren, S; Insausti, R; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2010-06-01

    Impaired olfaction is an early symptom of Alzheimer disease (AD). This likely to reflect neurodegenerative processes taking place in basal telencephalic structures that mediate olfactory processing, including the anterior olfactory nucleus. Betaeta-amyloid (Abeta) accumulation in AD brain may relate to decline in somatostatin levels: somatostatin induces the expression of the Abeta-degrading enzyme neprilysin and somatostatin deficiency in AD may therefore reduce Abeta clearance. We have investigated the expression of somatostatin in the anterior olfactory nucleus of AD and control brain. We report that somatostatin levels were reduced by approximately 50% in AD brain. Furthermore, triple-immunofluorescence revealed co-localization of somatostatin expression with Abeta (65.43%) with Abeta and tau (19.75%) and with tau (2.47%). These data indicate that somatostatin decreases in AD and its expression may be linked with Abeta deposition.

  15. The truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor5 (sst5TMD4) is associated with poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manel; Luque, Raúl M; Reverter, Jordi L; López-Sánchez, Laura M; Gahete, Manuel D; Culler, Michael D; Díaz-Soto, Gonzalo; Lomeña, Francisco; Squarcia, Mattia; Mate, José Luis; Mora, Mireia; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Vidal, Oscar; Alastrué, Antonio; Balibrea, Jose; Halperin, Irene; Mauricio, Dídac; Castaño, Justo P

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (ssts) are expressed in thyroid cancer cells, but their biological significance is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess ssts in well differentiated (WDTC) and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) by means of imaging and molecular tools and its relationship with the efficacy of somatostatin analog treatment. Thirty-nine cases of thyroid carcinoma were evaluated (20 PDTC and 19 WDTC). Depreotide scintigraphy and mRNA levels of sst-subtypes, including the truncated variant sst5TMD4, were carried out. Depreotide scans were positive in the recurrent tumor in the neck in 6 of 11 (54%) PDTC, and in those with lung metastases in 5/11 cases (45.4%); sst5TMD4 was present in 18/20 (90%) of PDTC, being the most densely expressed sst-subtype, with a 20-fold increase in relation to sst2. In WDTC, sst2 was the most represented, while sst5TMD4 was not found; sst2 was significantly increased in PDTC in comparison to WDTC. Five depreotide positive PDTC received octreotide for 3-6 months in a pilot study with no changes in the size of the lesions in 3 of them, and a significant increase in the pulmonary and cervical lesions in the other 2. All PDTC patients treated with octreotide showed high expression of sst5TMD4. ROC curve analysis demonstrated that only sst5TMD4 discriminates between PDTC and WDTC. We conclude that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in PDTC and may be involved in the lack of response to somatostatin analogue treatment.

  16. [Effect of cyclic somatostatin on ethanol-induced hypoglycemia].

    PubMed

    Piccardo, M G; Marchetti, A M; Breda, E

    1979-06-30

    The authors examined the activity of the cyclic Somatostatin on Ethanol hypoglycemia. While the peptide is capable of increasing the plasma glucose levels of hypoglicemia starved rats, it does not increase the levels of plasma glucose in normal rats under the action of ethanol perfusion.

  17. Truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 confers aggressive features (proliferation, invasion and reduced octreotide response) to somatotropinomas

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Raúl M.; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Taboada, Giselle F.; Hormaechea-Agulla, Daniel; Kasuki, Leandro; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Culler, Michael D.; Gahete, Manuel D.; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Castaño, Justo P.

    2015-01-01

    The GH/IGF1 response of somatotropinomas to somatostatin analogues (SSA) is associated with their pattern of somatostatin receptor (sst1–sst5) expression. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of a truncated sst5-variant (sst5TMD4) can influence the secretory response of somatotropinomas to SSA-therapy; however, its potential relationship with aggressive features (e.g. invasion/proliferation) is still unknown. Here, we show that sst5TMD4 is present in 50% of non-functioning pituitary-adenomas (NFPA) (n = 30) and 89% of somatotropinomas (n = 36), its expression levels being highest in somatotropinomas > > NFPAs > > > normal pituitaries (negligible expression; n = 8). In somatotropinomas, sst5TMD4 mRNA and protein levels correlated positively, and its expression was directly associated with tumor invasiveness (cavernous/sphenoid sinus), and inversely correlated with age and GH/IGF1 reduction after 3–6 months with octreotide-LAR therapy. GNAS+ somatotropinomas expressed lower sst5TMD4 levels. ROC analysis revealed sst5TMD4 expression as the only marker, within all sst-subtypes, capable to predict tumor invasiveness in somatotropinomas. sst5TMD4 overexpression increased cell viability in cultured somatotropinoma (n = 5). Hence, presence of sst5TMD4 associates with increased aggressive features and worse prognosis in somatotropinomas, thereby providing a potentially useful tool to refine somatotropinoma diagnosis, predict outcome of clinical response to SSA-therapy and develop new therapeutic targets. PMID:25637790

  18. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  19. Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogues Therapy in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Single Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Filice, A.; Fraternali, A.; Frasoldati, A.; Asti, M.; Grassi, E.; Massi, L.; Sollini, M.; Froio, A.; Erba, P. A.; Versari, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of PRRT in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Patients and Methods. From January 2007 to August 2011, we enrolled 65 patients (m/f 38/27; mean age 65 years, range 33–83) with advanced NETs having enhanced SSTR expression, treated with PRRT. The enhanced expression of SSTR was assessed using 68Ga-DOTATOC/DOTATATE PET/CT. Among all the enrolled patients, 6 of them were excluded from the present analysis since they voluntarily interrupted treatment. Mean activity/cycle of 2.6 GBq (90Y-DOTATOC/DOTATATE) or 6.0 GBq (177Lu-DOTATOC/DOTATATE) was administrated intravenously (max 9 cycles). Results. Complete response (CR) was found in 1/59 (2%) patients, partial remission (PR) in 24/59 (40.5%) patients, stable disease (SD) in 24/59 (40.5%), and progression (PD) in 10/59 (17%) patients. The overall tumor response rate (CR + PR) was 42.5%. In 40.5% of patients, the disease could be stabilized. Overall, 49 out of 59 patients had no tumor progression (83%). Twelve patients out of 59 (20%) had grade 2-3 hematological side effects including anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. Long-term nephrotoxicity was observed in 3 patients (2 moderate, 1 severe). Conclusions. PRRT is a promising perspective for patients with advanced NETs. PMID:22934111

  20. Pros and cons in endocrine practice: pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogues in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Bollerslev, Jens

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this commentary is to balance the pros and cons for pre-surgical SSA treatment in a modern perspective ending up with a pragmatic recommendation for treatment based on the current evidence and expertise of the authors. Even though prospective and randomized studies in this particular area are hampered by obvious limitations, the interpretation of the four published trials has in general been in favor of pre-treatment with SSA, showing a better outcome following surgery. However, major drawbacks of these studies, such as non-optimal diagnostic criteria for cure, potential selection bias, and timing of the postoperative evaluation in SSA pre-treated patients, limit their overall interpretation. Three matched-controlled studies showed remarkably similar results with no apparent beneficial effect of SSA pre-treatment on surgical outcome. Both prospective, randomized studies and retrospective studies did not find any significant difference in the rate of endocrine and non-endocrine complications related to surgery, despite the beneficial clinical effects of SSA treatment in most acromegalic patients. The newly diagnosed patient with acromegaly should be carefully evaluated in the trans-disciplinary neuroendocrine team and treatment individualized accordingly. The issue of SSA pre-treatment to improve surgical outcome is yet to be settled and further methodologically sound studies are probably necessary to clarify this point.

  1. Aberrant Methylation Inactivates Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Type 1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Kondo, Haruki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to define somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SSTR1) methylation profiles for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors at diagnosis and follow up and to evaluate their prognostic significance and value as a biomarker. Methods Gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter methylation status was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) in HNSCC. Results Methylation was associated with transcription inhibition. SST methylation in 81% of HNSCC tumor specimens significantly correlated with tumor size (P = 0.043), stage (P = 0.008), galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) methylation (P = 0.041), and tachykinin-1 (TAC1) (P = 0.040). SSTR1 hypermethylation in 64% of cases was correlated with tumor size (P = 0.037), stage (P = 0.037), SST methylation (P < 0.001), and expression of galanin (P = 0.03), GALR2 (P = 0.014), TAC1 (P = 0.023), and tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1) (P = 0.003). SST and SSTR1 promoter hypermethylation showed highly discriminating receiver operator characteristic curve profiles, which clearly distinguished HNSCC from adjacent normal mucosal tissues. Concurrent hypermethylation of galanin and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0001). Among patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, methylation of both SST and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.028). In multivariate logistic-regression analysis, concomitant methylation of galanin and SSTR1 was associated with an odds ratio for recurrence of 12.53 (95% CI, 2.62 to 59.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions CpG hypermethylation is a likely mechanism of SST and SSTR1 gene inactivation, supporting the hypothesis that SST and SSTR1 play a role in the tumorigenesis of HNSCC and that this hypermethylation may serve as an important biomarker. PMID:25734919

  2. Somatostatin analog (SMS 201-995) inhibits the basal and angiotensin II-stimulated sup 3 H-thymidine uptake by rat adrenal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlikowski, M.; Lewinski, A.; Sewerynek, E.; Szkudlinski, M.; Kunert-Radek, J.; Wajs, E. )

    1990-02-14

    The effects of a long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995 injections on the basal and angiotensin II-stimulated ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake by the rat adrenal glands incubated in vitro were examined. It was shown that SMS 201-995 significantly inhibited the ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake and, additionally, suppressed the stimulatory effect of a single angiotensin II injection.

  3. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling study of thiadiazolo[3,2-a][1,3]diazepine analogues of HIE-124 as a new class of short acting hypnotics.

    PubMed

    El-Subbagh, Hussein I; Hassan, Ghada S; El-Taher, Kamal E H; El-Messery, Shahenda M; Al-Azab, Adel S; Abdelaziz, Alaa A-M; Hefnawy, Mohamed M

    2016-11-29

    A new series of 6,7-dihydro-[1,3,4]thiadiazolo[3,2-a][1,3]diazepine analogues were synthesized, and biological evaluated. Compound GS-62 (33) exhibited potent in vivo short acting hypnotic activity with onset time, duration of sleep and therapeutic index of 6.4 ± 0.2, 94.8 ± 5.3 min, 6.62, respectively), in comparison to thiopental sodium (6). Compounds 33 did not show any sign of acute tolerance reported with the maintenance dose of 6. Meanwhile 33 potentiated the in vivo hypnotic effect of 6 in an equimolar amounts (0.06 mmol) combination showing an onset and duration of 7.5 ± 1.3, 62.5 ± 5.9 min, respectively. This combination allowed the use of lower doses of both drugs to avoid the undesirable side effects. Docking studies revealed favorable interactions and binding to BDZ binding site of the GABAA receptor especially with Arg87, Arg149, and Thr151 amino acid residues.

  4. Reduced Numbers of Somatostatin Receptors in the Cerebral Cortex in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint Beal, M.; Mazurek, Michael F.; Tran, Vinh T.; Chattha, Geetinder; Bird, Edward D.; Martin, Joseph B.

    1985-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor concentrations were measured in patients with Alzheimer's disease and controls. In the frontal cortex (Brodmann areas 6, 9, and 10) and temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21), the concentrations of somatostatin in receptors in the patients were reduced to approximately 50 percent of control values. A 40 percent reduction was seen in the hippocampus, while no significant changes were found in the cingulate cortex, postcentral gyrus, temporal pole, and superior temporal gyrus. Scatchard analysis showed a reduction in receptor number rather than a change in affinity. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in both the frontal and temporal cortex. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was linearly related to somatostatin-receptor binding in the cortices of Alzheimer's patients. These findings may reflect degeneration of postsynaptic neurons or cortical afferents in the patients' cerebral cortices. Alternatively, decreased somatostatinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease might indicate increased release of somatostatin and down regulation of postsynaptic receptors.

  5. Effect of cysteamine on cytosolic somatostatin binding sites in rabbit duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Guijarro, L.; Lopez-Ruiz, M.P.; Bodegas, G.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E.

    1987-04-01

    Administration of cysteamine in rabbits elicited a rapid depletion of both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin. A significant reduction was observed within 5 min, returning toward control values by 150 min. The depletion of somatostatin was associated with an increase in the binding capacity and a decrease in the affinity of both high- and low-affinity binding sites present in cytosol of duodenal mucosa. Incubation of cytosolic fraction from control rabbits with 1 mM cysteamine did not modify somatostatin binding. Furthermore, addition of cysteamine at the time of binding assay did not affect the integrity of /sup 125/I-Tyr11-somatostatin. It is concluded that in vivo administration of cysteamine to rabbits depletes both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin and leads to up-regulation of duodenal somatostatin binding sites.

  6. Gastrointestinal somatostatin: extraction and radioimmunoassay in different species.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, C; Arnold, R; Bothe, E; Becker, H; Köbberling, J; Creutzfeldt, W

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay capable of detecting 300 fg somatostatin has been developed and levels of the polypeptide in gastrointestinal tissues from man, dog, and rat have been measured. Rapid freezing of collected samples and careful control of extraction is necessary. Concentrations in different regions of dog antrum (425 +/- 50 to 773 +/- 254 ng/g tissue) are similar to those in antrum from duodenal ulcer patients and control subjects: 614 +/- 125 and 465 +/- 104 ng/g tissue respectively. Levels in histologically normal human pancreas (253 +/- 43 ng/g tissue) are comparable with those in dog pancreas (333 +/- 66 ng/g tissue), whereas in two cases of neonatal hypoglycaemia the concentration exceeded 3000 ng/g tissue. On gel chromatography the majority of immunoreactive somatostatin elutes as the synthetic tetradecapeptide and a small fraction as a larger species. PMID:680597

  7. Somatostatin receptor subtypes mRNA in TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas: a case showing a dramatic reduction in tumor size during short octreotide treatment.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Masanobu; Umezawa, Ryohei; Satoh, Teturo; Hashimoto, Koshi; Tosaka, Masahiko; Yamada, Shozo; Mori, Masatomo

    2007-06-01

    TSH-secreting adenoma is a rare pituitary adenoma, and the expression levels of the specific subtypes of somatostatin receptors (sstr) mRNAs have remained obscure. To determine the quantitative expression of the sstr1-5 mRNAs in TSH-secreting adenomas that may be related to the efficacy of treatment with a somatostatin analogue, expression of the sstr1-5 mRNAs was examined and compared in TSH-secreting adenomas and other pituitary adenomas. The pituitary adenomas were obtained at transsphenoidal surgery from 4 cases of TSH-secreting adenoma, including 1 patient showing a significant shrinkage of the tumor size after only 10 days of octreotide treatment, 2 patients without tumor size reduction and 1 patient without treatment, and 5 GH-secreting adenomas, 6 prolactinomas, 5 nonfunctioning adenomas, 4 ACTH-secreting adenomas and normal pituitaries at autopsy from 4 normal subjects. In comparison to the normal pituitary, sstr2A>sstr1>sstr5>sstr3 mRNAs were expressed in the TSH-secreting adenomas examined. No expression of sstr2B or sstr4 mRNA was observed. The expression level of sstr2 mRNA was significantly higher than those in normal pituitary, prolactinomas, ACTH-secreting and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. The patient with marked shrinkage of the tumor showed the highest expression of both sstr2 and sstr5 mRNAs among all the cases of pituitary adenoma. A TSH-secreting tumor without shrinkage showed a similar expression level of sstr2 mRNA. These findings demonstrated that TSH-secreting adenomas express sstr1, 2A, 3 and 5 mRNAs, predominantly sstr2A, and in addition to the expression of sstr2 mRNA, the expression level of sstr5 mRNA may be a factor affecting the tumor shrinkage by somatostatin analogues against TSH-secreting adenomas.

  8. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P<0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P<0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression.

  9. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P < 0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P < 0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression. PMID:24966923

  10. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Schaer, J C; Markwalder, R; Waser, B; Horisberger, U; Laissue, J

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs.

  11. Somatostatin, insulin and glucagon secretion by the perfused pancreas from the cysteamine-treated rat

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestre, R.A.; Miralles, P.; Moreno, P.; Villanueva, M.L.; Marco, J.

    1986-02-13

    In rats, administration of a single dose of cysteamine (300 mg/kg, intragastrically) induces a depletion of pancreatic somatostatin content (approximately 60%) without modifying pancreatic insulin or glucagon content. In perfused pancreases from cysteamine-treated rats, there was a lack of somatostatin response to glucose, arginine or tolbutamide. In the absence of stimulated somatostatin release, the secretory responses of insulin and glucagon to glucose, to arginine, and to tolbutamide were not significantly different from those observed in pancreases from control rats. Our data do not support the concept that pancreatic somatostatin plays a major role in the control of insulin and glucagon release.

  12. Radiolabelling, quality control and radiochemical purity assessment of the Octreotide analogue 68Ga DOTA NOC.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, D; Rizzello, A; Cicoria, G; Lodi, F; Marengo, M; Pancaldi, D; Trespidi, S; Boschi, S

    2008-08-01

    Somatostatin receptors 1-5 are over expressed in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). 68Ga-labelled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-Nal3-Octreotide (DOTA NOC), a recent synthesized somatostatin analogue, shows high affinity for those receptors. Herein, modifications of a commercial module for the labelling of DOTA NOC with 68Ga, as well as the assessment of time course of the radiochemical purity variation are described. The evaluation of radiochemical stability was done by two different chromatographic methods: reversed-phase radio HPLC and fast TLC analysis. Labelled compound has been found radiochemically stable within 3h from the end of labelling (EOL) and radiochemical purity was always higher than 99%. After 73 labelling sessions the system showed great reproducibility and high radiochemical yield.

  13. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-09-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p)>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/. When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor.

  14. GH and IGF-I induction by passive immunization of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum using a somatostatin 14 antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of the growth axis by somatostatin was studied in juvenile rainbow trout using passive immunization with a previously isolated somatostatin antibody (antiSS-14). Upon subcutaneously injection of laying hens (Gallus domesticus) with conjugated somatostatin-14 (SS-14), the antiSS-14 was iso...

  15. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  16. Central Amygdala Somatostatin Neurons Gate Passive and Active Defensive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kai; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Albeanu, Dinu F.

    2016-01-01

    The central amygdala (CeA) has a key role in learning and expression of defensive responses. Recent studies indicate that somatostatin-expressing (SOM+) neurons in the lateral division of the CeA (CeL) are essential for the acquisition and recall of conditioned freezing behavior, which has been used as an index of defensive response in laboratory animals during Pavlovian fear conditioning. However, how exactly these neurons participate in fear conditioning and whether they contribute to the generation of defensive responses other than freezing remain unknown. Here, using fiber-optic photometry combined with optogenetic and molecular techniques in behaving mice, we show that SOM+ CeL neurons are activated by threat-predicting sensory cues after fear conditioning and that activation of these neurons suppresses ongoing actions and converts an active defensive behavior to a passive response. Furthermore, inhibition of these neurons using optogenetic or molecular methods promotes active defensive behaviors. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence that SOM+ neurons represent a CeL population that acquires learning-dependent sensory responsiveness during fear conditioning and furthermore reveal an important role of these neurons in gating passive versus active defensive behaviors in animals confronted with threat. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to develop adaptive behavioral responses to threat is fundamental for survival. Recent studies indicate that the central lateral amygdala (CeL), in particular its somatostatin-expressing neurons, is crucial for both learning and the expression of defensive response. However, how exactly these neurons participate in such processes remains unclear. Here we show for the first time in behaving mice that the somatostatin-expressing neurons in the CeL acquire learning-dependent responsiveness to sensory cues predicting a threat. Furthermore, our results indicate that these neurons gate the behavioral output of an animal

  17. Cysteamine normalizes cerebral somatostatin level and binding in pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Ozo, E.; Lopez-Ruiz, M.P.; Gonzalez-Guijarro, L.; Arilla, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Rats were kindled by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) every 48 h. Once kindled, some of the animals received a single injection of cysteamine. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) and {sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 11} -somatostatin binding were measured in the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus of the two experimental groups and the control rats. After PTZ kindling the following was observed: (1) SLI content was increased int he two areas; (2) Somatostatin receptor affinity decreased in the frontoparietal cortex and was unaltered in the hippocampus; (3) The number of somatostatin receptors decreased in the hippocampus and was unaltered in the frontoparietal cortex. Cysteamine, an agent which depletes brain somatostatin and suppresses kindled seizures in PTZ-treated rats, revered the altered SLI levels and binding in these rats.

  18. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  19. Somatostatin system: molecular mechanisms regulating anterior pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Eigler, Tamar; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-08-01

    The somatostatin (SRIF) system, which includes the SRIF ligand and receptors, regulates anterior pituitary gland function, mainly inhibiting hormone secretion and to some extent pituitary tumor cell growth. SRIF-14 via its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors (subtypes 1-5) activates multiple cellular signaling pathways including adenylate cyclase/cAMP, MAPK, ion channel-dependent pathways, and others. In addition, recent data have suggested SRIF-independent constitutive SRIF receptor activity responsible for GH and ACTH inhibition in vitro. This review summarizes current knowledge on ligand-dependent and independent SRIF receptor molecular and functional effects on hormone-secreting cells in the anterior pituitary gland.

  20. Hippocampal Somatostatin Interneurons Control the Size of Neuronal Memory Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Thomas; Bertollini, Cristina; Lüscher, Christian; Muller, Dominique; Mendez, Pablo

    2016-03-02

    Hippocampal neurons activated during encoding drive the recall of contextual fear memory. Little is known about how such ensembles emerge during acquisition and eventually form the cellular engram. Manipulating the activity of granule cells (GCs) of the dentate gyrus (DG), we reveal a mechanism of lateral inhibition that modulates the size of the cellular engram. GCs engage somatostatin-positive interneurons that inhibit the dendrites of surrounding GCs. Our findings reveal a microcircuit within the DG that controls the size of the cellular engram and the stability of contextual fear memory.

  1. Ontogeny of somatostatin mRNA-containing perikarya in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick-McElligott, S.; Card, J.P.; O'Kane, T.M.; Baldino, F. Jr. )

    1991-02-01

    The distribution of neuronal perikarya containing somatostatin mRNA in the developing rat brain was investigated with in situ hybridization histochemistry. This study describes the expression of somatostatin mRNA during selected perinatal stages and demonstrates regional changes in somatostatin mRNA expression at the single cell level. The mRNA expression closely parallels previously reported developmental localization of the peptide. As early as embryonic day 13 (E13), somatostatin mRNA was observed in discrete spinal cord and brainstem regions. At birth, densely hybridized somata could be seen primarily in ventral and caudal brain areas with small scattered neurons in the hippocampus and dorsal neocortex. After birth, somatostatin mRNA increased in forebrain regions, such as the hippocampus, dorsal neocortex, and caudate. By postnatal day 14 (P14), the distribution in the telencephalic and diencephalic regions approached that of the adult brain. Several brain regions manifested large changes in the density of somatostatin mRNA hybridization during development. For example, the cerebellar vermis and brainstem contained somatostatin mRNA perikarya during early postnatal development but decreased in these regions in the adult. During perinatal development, increases in somatostatin mRNA content were the results of increases in both the number of neurons containing somatostatin mRNA as well as in the amount of this mRNA expressed in each cell. As the brain differentiates, the apparent numbers of somatostatin mRNA containing neurons in certain brain regions are reduced. These data provide evidence for transient somatostatinergic neurons during early development in discrete areas of the occipital cortex, pyriform cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem and suggest that this peptide may play a role in the development of these regions.

  2. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Catriona; Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  3. Survey of Analogue Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    Analogue spacetimes (and more boldly, analogue models both of and for gravity), have attracted significant and increasing attention over the last decade and a half. Perhaps the most straightforward physical example, which serves as a template for most of the others, is Bill Unruh's model for a dumb hole,(mute black hole, acoustic black hole), wherein sound is dragged along by a moving fluid—and can even be trapped behind an acoustic horizon. This and related analogue models for curved spacetimes are useful in many ways: analogue spacetimes provide general relativists with extremely concrete physical models to help focus their thinking, and conversely the techniques of curved spacetime can sometimes help improve our understanding of condensed matter and/or optical systems by providing an unexpected and countervailing viewpoint. In this chapter, I shall provide a few simple examples of analogue spacetimes as general background for the rest of the contributions.

  4. C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide fragments and vasopressin but not somatostatin-28 induce miosis in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Almegård, B; Bill, A

    1993-11-30

    The miotic effects of C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) fragments, somatostatin-28 and vasopressin have been evaluated with special attention being paid to possible interactions with cholecystokinin (CCK)A receptors. The peptides were injected intracamerally to anesthetized monkeys pretreated with indomethacin and atropine. CGRP-(32-37) induced a miosis with a potency 1000 times lower than that previously found with sulphated CCK-8. Two other fragments, CGRP-(30-37) and CGRP-(31-37), also had miotic properties. The CGRP-(32-37)-induced miosis was antagonized by the CCKA receptor antagonist loxiglumide. No contractile effect was elicited by 67 pmol-7.4 nmol somatostatin-28. Vasopressin (360 pmol) caused a small reduction in pupil size. Loxiglumide pretreatment did not affect the reduction in pupil size but a vasopressin receptor antagonist partly inhibited the response. The results indicate that CGRP-(32-37) is a miotic with low potency but high efficacy in the monkey eye, probably interacting with CCKA receptors, and that vasopressin is a mitotic with low potency and efficacy, probably acting via vasopressin receptors.

  5. Sleep and movement differentiates actions of two types of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneuron in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Katona, Linda; Lapray, Damien; Viney, Tim J; Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Micklem, Benjamin R; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2014-05-21

    Neuropeptides acting on pre- and postsynaptic receptors are coreleased with GABA by interneurons including bistratified and O-LM cells, both expressing somatostatin but innervating segregated dendritic domains of pyramidal cells. Neuropeptide release requires high-frequency action potentials, but the firing patterns of most peptide/GABA-releasing interneurons during behavior are unknown. We show that behavioral and network states differentiate the activities of bistratified and O-LM cells in freely moving rats. Bistratified cells fire at higher rates during sleep than O-LM cells and, unlike O-LM cells, strongly increase spiking during sharp wave-associated ripples (SWRs). In contrast, O-LM interneurons decrease firing during sleep relative to awake states and are mostly inhibited during SWRs. During movement, both cell types fire cooperatively at the troughs of theta oscillations but with different frequencies. Somatostatin and GABA are differentially released to distinct dendritic zones of CA1 pyramidal cells during sleep and wakefulness to coordinate segregated glutamatergic inputs from entorhinal cortex and CA3.

  6. BMP-6 modulates somatostatin effects on luteinizing hormone production by gonadrotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Toma, Kishio; Otsuka, Fumio; Oguni, Kohei; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Komatsubara, Motoshi; Tsukamoto-Yamauchi, Naoko; Inagaki, Kenichi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2016-02-01

    The effects of somatostatin analogs and roles of BMP-6 in the regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion were investigated using mouse gonadotrope LβT2 cells. LH mRNA expression and LH secretion induced by GnRH were suppressed by treatments with somatostatin analogs, including octreotide and pasireotide, in LβT2 cells. Of note, the inhibitory effects of somatostatin analogs on LH secretion were enhanced by the action of BMP-6. BMP-6 increased the expression levels of somatostatin receptor (SSTR)5, suggesting that BMP-6 upregulates SSTR activity that leads to reduction of GnRH-induced LH secretion. In addition, GnRH-induced phosphorylation of MAPKs including ERK, but not P38 or SAPK, was suppressed by pasireotide in the presence of BMP-6. Given that each inhibitor of ERK, JNK or P38 signaling suppressed GnRH-induced LH transcription, MAPKs are individually involved in the induction of LH production by LβT2 cells. Somatostatin analogs also impaired BMP-6-induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation by suppressing BMPRs and augmenting Smad6/7 expression. Collectively, the results indicate that somatostatin analogs have dual effects on the modulation of GnRH-induced MAPK signaling and BMP activity. The pituitary BMP system may play a regulatory role in GnRH-induced LH secretion by tuning the responsiveness to somatostatin analogs in gonadotrope cells.

  7. Reversal of gastric somatostatin receptor inhibition by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide with ebrotidine and sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Skrodzka, D; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-05-01

    1. Among the consequences of H. pylori infection is an increase in gastric acid secretion due to the impairement in feedback inhibition by somatostatin. Here, we show that lipopolysaccharide from H. pylori inhibits the binding of somatostatin to gastric mucosal receptor, and that antiulcer agents, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, are capable of countering this effect. 2. The somatostatin receptor was prepared from the solubilized gastric mucosal epithelial cell membranes by affinity chromatography on Affi-Gel-bound [D-Tryp8] SRIF-14 and used in the binding assays for 125I-labeled somatostatin in the presence of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide and antiulcer agents. 3. The assays revealed a dose-dependent inhibition in the receptor-somatostatin binding by the lipopolysaccharide which reached a maximum of 94.1%. The effect of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide was countered by ebrotidine and sulglycotide, which at their optimal doses produced 94.9% and 84% restoration in somatostatin-receptor binding, respectively. 4. The results demonstrate that the antiulcer agents, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, possess the ability to counteract the H. pylori interference with somatostatin regulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  8. Somatostatin and the intestinal transport of glucose and other nutrients in the anaesthetised rat.

    PubMed Central

    Daumerie, C; Henquin, J C

    1982-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on oral glucose tolerance and on intestinal absorption of glucose and other nutrients have been studied in anaesthetised rats. Intravenous somatostatin (0.1-0.6 nmol/min) increased the rate of gastric emptying. After intraduodenal administration of glucose, the rise in peripheral plasma levels of the sugar was delayed, but finally exaggerated by somatostatin, which inhibited the insulin response. Absorption was evaluated by measuring the disappearance of radioactive nutrients from the lumen of a 'tied duodenojejunal loop'. At a luminal concentration of 4 mmol/l of 3-0-methylglucose, neither disappearance of the sugar from the lumen nor its appearance in plasma was affected by somatostatin. Passive transport of 3-0-methylglucose (100 mmol/l) was not significantly modified by somatostatin, although the appearance of the labelled tracer in plasma was delayed. Somatostatin had no significant effect on absorption of galactose (4 mmol/l), sucrose (40 mmol/l), leucine (4 mmol/l) or palmitate (0.1 and 0.4 mmol/l). These results show that somatostatin delays appearance of ingested sugars in peripheral plasma without direct effect on the absorption sites; this delay may result from changes in intestinal motility, enzyme secretion and splanchnic blood flow. PMID:6121743

  9. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  10. Synthesis and characterization of multiply-tyrosinated, multiply-iodinated somatostatin analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Woltering, E A.; O'Dorisio, M S.; Murphy, W A.; Chen, F; Drouant, G J.; Espenan, G D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Sharma, C; Diaco, D S.; Maloney, T M.; Fuselier, J A.; Nelson, J A.; O'Dorisio, T M.; Coy, D H.

    1999-02-01

    Radio-labeled somatostatin analogs have recently gained popularity as agents useful in intraoperative tumor localization, external scintigraphy and in situ radiotherapy. We have synthesized and characterized a series of novel N-terminally extended multiply-tyrosinated somatostatin analogs that possess high binding affinity for somatostatin receptors, exhibit biological activity comparable to the native peptide and retain these characteristics after iodination. These analogs can be radio-iodinated to high specific activities. Following radio-iodination, these analogs exhibit minimal radiolysis and may be clinically useful for tumor localization, scanning and therapy.

  11. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  12. Orexins (hypocretins) actions on the GHRH/somatostatin-GH axis.

    PubMed

    López, M; Nogueiras, R; Tena-Sempere, M; Diéguez, C

    2010-03-01

    The secretion of growth hormone (GH) is regulated through a complex neuroendocrine control system that includes two major hypothalamic regulators, namely GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SST) that stimulate and inhibit, respectively, GH release. Classical experiments involving damage and electrical stimulation suggested that the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) modulated the somatotropic axis, but the responsible molecular mechanisms were unclear. Evidence obtained during the last decade has demonstrated that orexins/hypocretins, a family of peptides expressed in the LHA controlling feeding and sleep, play an important regulatory role on GH, by inhibiting its secretion modulating GHRH and SST neurones. Considering that GH release is closely linked to the sleep-wake cycle and feeding state, understanding orexin/hypocretin physiology could open new therapeutic possibilities in the treatment of sleep, energy homeostasis and GH-related pathologies, such as GH deficiency.

  13. Somatostatin depletion by cysteamine: mechanism and implication for duodenal ulceration

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; Reichlin, S.

    1985-06-01

    Cysteamine (CSH) and its close derivatives deplete immunoreactive somatostatin (SS) in rat organs. The effect of CSH is dose and time dependent and reversible. Structural requirements of the analogs are the presence of either -SH or -NH2 on a two- or three-carbon alkyl molecule; both radicals together increase, whereas insertion of carboxyl abolishes potency. The duodenal ulcerogenic potency of CSH derivatives is correlated significantly with their SS-depleting activity in the gastric mucosa. The mechanism of this action of CSH is poorly understood, but it is not caused by increased release, enhanced degradation of the peptide, or selective necrosis of SS cells. It is likely that in the intracellular environment CSH causes a conformational change in the peptide that affects the antigenic and functional properties of SS.

  14. Cysteamine effects on somatostatin, catecholamines, pineal NAT and melatonin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.M.; Champney, T.H.; Steger, R.W.; Vaughan, M.K.; Reiter, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The thiol reagent cysteamine was administered to adult male rats with the aim of investigating its effect on different neural and pineal components. As expected, immunoreactive somatostatin decreased in the median eminence (ME) (p less than 0.05) and gastric antrum (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine; however, no significant change was observed in the pineal IRS content after drug treatment. A decrease in norepinephrine was observed in the ME (p less than 0.001), hypothalamus (p less than 0.001) and pineal gland (p less than 0.05), together with a rise in ME (p less than 0.005) and hypothalamic dopamine (p less than 0.005) content; these results are consistent with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibiting effect of cysteamine. No effect was observed on hypothalamic serotonin and 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid content. Pineal N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine than after saline, but no statistically significant effect was observed on pineal melatonin content. The mechanism involved in the NAT rise is presumably not related to the known stimulatory effect of norepinephrine, which fell after cysteamine. It is suggested that cysteamine may act at an intracellular level, inhibiting NAT degradation, an effect demonstrated in vitro and thought to be related to a thiol:disulfide exchange mechanism.

  15. Cysteamine-induced decrease of somatostatin in rat brain synaptosomes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, R.; Sperk, G.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of somatostatin depletion induced by cysteamine (2-mercaptoethylamine (CySH)) was studied in isolated nerve endings (synaptosomes) from rat brain in vitro. A dose-dependent reduction of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) was observed which reached its maximal extent (41%) at a concentration of 300 microM CySH after 1-5 min. There was no release of somatostatin into the incubation medium. CySH at concentrations of up to 10 mM did not interfere in the RIA. Among a variety of compounds, structurally related to CySH 4-aminothiophenol, 2-aminothiophenol and N,N-dimethylaminothiol exhibited the highest efficacy in decreasing somatostatin. The disulfide form of CySH cystamine and dimercaprol resulted in about 15% reduction after 10-min incubation, whereas taurine, alanine, cysteine, and mercaptoethanol were inactive. A saturable, sodium-dependent uptake process was found for the disulfide form of (/sup 35/S)CySH cystamine (Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) = 18.6 microM, maximum velocity (Vmax) = 2.3 nmol/mg protein X 3 min) which was inhibited by cysteine (87% at 1 mM). (/sup 35/S)CySH, at concentrations of 20 microM or less, was not stable in buffer solution. It underwent considerable nonenzymatic conversion into its dimeric form (60% at 37 C and 3 min), however it exhibited the same kinetic data for its uptake. Size exclusion HPLC of purified hypothalamic synaptosomes revealed a major SLI peak coeluting with synthetic somatostatin-14 and two minor peaks representing somatostatin-28 and a 13,000 mol wt protein. The three molecular forms of somatostatin were reduced to varied extent by CySH. Our experiments suggest that high affinity uptake of CySH may precede its action in decreasing somatostatin levels.

  16. Brain somatostatin receptor 2 mediates the dipsogenic effect of central somatostatin and cortistatin in rats: role in drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yakabi, Seiichi; Wang, Lixin; Stengel, Andreas; Rivier, Jean; Taché, Yvette

    2014-10-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of stable somatostatin (SST) agonists stimulates food and water intake in rats. We investigated the receptor subtype(s) involved in the dipsogenic effect of intracerebroventricular injection of SST agonists, mechanisms of action, and role. In nonfasted and non-water-deprived male rats with chronic intracerebroventricular cannula, intake of water without food or food without water was monitored separately to avoid any interactions compared with intracerebroventricular vehicle. SST-14 and cortistatin (CST-14) (1 μg/rat icv) increased water intake by 3.1- and 2.7-fold, respectively, while both peptides did not alter food intake at 1 h postinjection in the light phase. By contrast, the stable pan-somatostatin agonist ODT8-SST (1 μg/rat icv) increased both water and food intake by 4.9- and 3.7-fold, respectively. S-346-011, a selective receptor 2 (sst2) agonist (1 μg/rat icv) induced water ingestion, while sst1 or sst4 agonist, injected under the same conditions, did not. The sst2 antagonist S-406-028 (1 μg/rat icv) prevented the 1-h water intake induced by intracerebroventricular ODT8-SST and CST-14. Losartan (100 μg/rat icv), an angiotensin receptor 1 (AT1) antagonist, completely blocked the water consumption induced by intracerebroventricular ODT8-SST, whereas intracerebroventricular injection of S-406-028 did not modify the intracerebroventricular ANG II-induced dipsogenic response. The sst2 antagonist reduced by 40% the increase of the 3-h water intake in the early dark phase. These data indicate that SST-14 and CST-14 interact with sst2 to exert a potent dipsogenic effect, which is mediated downstream by angiotensin-AT1 signaling. These data also indicate that sst2 activation by brain SST-14 and/or CST-14 may play an important role in the regulation of drinking behavior.

  17. Somatostatin signaling system as an ancestral mechanism: Myoregulatory activity of an Allatostatin-C peptide in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2016-08-01

    The coordination of physiological processes requires precise communication between cells. Cellular interactions allow cells to be functionally related, facilitating the maintaining of homeostasis. Neuropeptides functioning as intercellular signals are widely distributed in Metazoa. It is assumed that neuropeptides were the first intercellular transmitters, appearing early during the evolution. In Cnidarians, neuropeptides are mainly involved in neurotransmission, acting directly or indirectly on epithelial muscle cells, and thereby controlling coordinated movements. Allatostatins are a group of chemically unrelated neuropeptides that were originally characterized based on their ability to inhibit juvenil hormone synthesis in insects. Allatostatin-C has pleiotropic functions, acting as myoregulator in several insects. In these studies, we analyzed the myoregulatory effect of Aedes aegypti Allatostatin-C in Hydra sp., a member of the phylum Cnidaria. Allatostatin-C peptide conjugated with Qdots revealed specifically distributed cell populations that respond to the peptide in different regions of hydroids. In vivo physiological assays using Allatostatin-C showed that the peptide induced changes in shape and length in tentacles, peduncle and gastrovascular cavity. The observed changes were dose and time dependent suggesting the physiological nature of the response. Furthermore, at highest doses, Allatostatin-C induced peristaltic movements of the gastrovascular cavity resembling those that occur during feeding. In silico search of putative Allatostatin-C receptors in Cnidaria showed that genomes predict the existence of proteins of the somatostatin/Allatostatin-C receptors family. Altogether, these results suggest that Allatostatin-C has myoregulatory activity in Hydra sp, playing a role in the control of coordinated movements during feeding, indicating that Allatostatin-C/Somatostatin based signaling might be an ancestral mechanism.

  18. In vivo somatostatin, vasopressin, and oxytocin synthesis in diabetic rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Fernstrom, J.D.; Fernstrom, M.H.; Kwok, R.P. )

    1990-04-01

    The in vivo labeling of somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin was studied in rat hypothalamus after third ventricular administration of (35S)cysteine to streptozotocin-diabetic and normal rats. Immunoreactive somatostatin levels in hypothalamus were unaffected by diabetes, as was the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into hypothalamic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. In contrast, immunoreactive vasopressin levels in hypothalamus and posterior pituitary (and oxytocin levels in posterior pituitary) were below normal in diabetic rats. Moreover, (35S)cysteine incorporation into hypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin (probably mainly in the paraventricular nucleus because of its proximity to the third ventricular site of label injection) was significantly above normal. The increments in vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were reversed by insulin administration. In vivo cysteine specific activity and the labeling of acid-precipitable protein did not differ between normal and diabetic animals; effects of diabetes on vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were therefore not caused by simple differences in cysteine specific activity. These results suggest that diabetes (1) does not influence the production of somatostatin peptides in hypothalamus but (2) stimulates the synthesis of vasopressin and oxytocin. For vasopressin at least, the increase in synthesis may be a compensatory response to the known increase in its secretion that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes.

  19. Depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat central nervous system by cysteamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Landry, D.; Millard, W.J.; Badger, T.M.; Arnold, M.A.; Martin, J.B.

    1982-02-01

    Selective neurotoxins have been of value in providing a means for specifically interfering with the actions of endogenous neurotransmitter candidates. Others have shown cysteamine (CSH) to deplete the gastrointestinal tract and hypothalamus of rats of immunoreactive somatostatin, suggesting a toxic action of that compound directed against somatostatin-containing cells. The present study further defines the actions of cysteamine on somatostatin in the central nervous system. (CNS). Cysteamine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously results in a depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in the retina, brain, and cervical spinal cord of rats. The effect is demonstrable at doses of 30 mg/kg of body weight and above, occurs within 2 to 4 hr of a single injection of the drug, and is largely reversible within 1 week. The mean depletion of SLI observed within the CNS varies from 38% in cerebral cortex to 65% in cervical spinal cord 24 hr following administration of CSH, 300 mg/kg of body weight, s.c. By gel permeation chromatography, all molecular weight forms of SLI are affected, with the largest reductions in those forms that co-chromatograph with synthetic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. These results indicate that CSH has a generalized, rapid, and largely reversible effect in depleting SLI from the rat CNS.

  20. Identification of human somatostatin receptor 2 domains involved in internalization and signaling in QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Valeria; Vitali, Eleonora; Morone, Diego; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea Gerardo

    2016-07-12

    Somatostatin exerts inhibitory effects on hormone secretion and cell proliferation via five receptor subtypes (SST1-SST5), whose internalization is regulated by β-arrestins. The receptor domains involved in these effects have been only partially elucidated. The aim of the study is to characterize the molecular mechanism and determinants responsible for somatostatin receptor 2 internalization and signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine QGP-1 cell line, focusing on the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal domains. We demonstrated that in cells transfected with somatostatin receptor 2 third intracellular loop mutant, no differences in β-arrestins recruitment and receptor internalization were observed after somatostatin receptor 2 activation in comparison with cells bearing wild-type somatostatin receptor 2. Conversely, the truncated somatostatin receptor 2 failed to recruit β-arrestins and to internalize after somatostatin receptor 2 agonist (BIM23120) incubation. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression, P-ERK1/2 levels, apoptosis and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion was completely lost in cells transfected with either third intracellular loop or carboxyl terminal mutants. In conclusion, we demonstrated that somatostatin receptor 2 internalization requires intact carboxyl terminal while the effects of SS on cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis mediated by somatostatin receptor 2 need the integrity of both third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal.

  1. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ian R; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days.

  2. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors.

  3. Topical Administration of Somatostatin Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; García-Ramírez, Marta; Corraliza, Lidia; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Farrera-Sinfreu, Josep; Ponsati, Berta; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Valverde, Ángela M.; Simó, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Somatostatin (SST) is an endogenous neuroprotective peptide that is downregulated in the diabetic eye. The aim of the study was to test the usefulness of topical administration of SST in preventing retinal neurodegeneration. For this purpose, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (STZ-DM) were treated with either SST eye drops or vehicle for 15 days. Nondiabetic rats treated with vehicle served as a control group. Functional abnormalities were assessed by electroretinography (ERG), and neurodegeneration was assessed by measuring glial activation and the apoptotic rate. In addition, proapoptotic (FasL, Bid, and activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3) and survival signaling pathways (BclxL) were examined. Intraretinal concentrations of glutamate and its main transporter glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) were also determined. Treatment with SST eye drops prevented ERG abnormalities, glial activation, apoptosis, and the misbalance between proapoptotic and survival signaling detected in STZ-DM rats. In addition, SST eye drops inhibited glutamate accumulation in the retina and GLAST downregulation induced by diabetes mellitus. We conclude that topical administration of SST has a potent effect in preventing retinal neurodegeneration induced by diabetes mellitus. In addition, our findings open up a new preventive pharmacological strategy targeted to early stages of DR. PMID:23474487

  4. Neuropeptide Y and somatostatin inhibit insulin secretion through different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schwetz, Tara A; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2013-01-15

    Pancreatic β-cells regulate glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin in response to glucose elevation and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SST) attenuate insulin secretion through G(i) activation of Y(1) and SSTR(1&5) receptors, respectively. The downstream pathways altered by NPY and SST are poorly understood. Thus, we investigated these underlying mechanisms. NPY and SST increase cellular redox potential, suggesting that their inhibitory effect may not be mediated through metabolic inhibition. NPY does not affect intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) activity upon glucose stimulation, whereas SST alters this response. G(βγ)-subunit inhibition by gallein attenuates insulin secretion but does not alter metabolism or [Ca(2+)](i). mSIRK-induced G(βγ) activation does not modulate glucose metabolism but increases [Ca(2+)](i) activity and potentiates insulin release. Cotreatment with gallein and NPY or SST reduces insulin secretion to levels similar to that of gallein alone. mSIRK and NPY cotreatment potentiates insulin secretion similarly to mSIRK alone, whereas mSIRK and SST treatment decreases insulin release. The data support a model where SST attenuates secretion through G(βγ) inhibition of Ca(2+) activity, while NPY activates a Ca(2+)-independent pathway mediated by G(α). GPCR ligands signal through multiple pathways to inhibit insulin secretion, and determining these mechanisms could lead to novel diabetic therapies.

  5. Neuropeptide Y and somatostatin inhibit insulin secretion through different mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schwetz, Tara A.; Ustione, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells regulate glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin in response to glucose elevation and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SST) attenuate insulin secretion through Gi activation of Y1 and SSTR1&5 receptors, respectively. The downstream pathways altered by NPY and SST are poorly understood. Thus, we investigated these underlying mechanisms. NPY and SST increase cellular redox potential, suggesting that their inhibitory effect may not be mediated through metabolic inhibition. NPY does not affect intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) activity upon glucose stimulation, whereas SST alters this response. Gβγ-subunit inhibition by gallein attenuates insulin secretion but does not alter metabolism or [Ca2+]i. mSIRK-induced Gβγ activation does not modulate glucose metabolism but increases [Ca2+]i activity and potentiates insulin release. Cotreatment with gallein and NPY or SST reduces insulin secretion to levels similar to that of gallein alone. mSIRK and NPY cotreatment potentiates insulin secretion similarly to mSIRK alone, whereas mSIRK and SST treatment decreases insulin release. The data support a model where SST attenuates secretion through Gβγ inhibition of Ca2+ activity, while NPY activates a Ca2+-independent pathway mediated by Gα. GPCR ligands signal through multiple pathways to inhibit insulin secretion, and determining these mechanisms could lead to novel diabetic therapies. PMID:23211512

  6. Somatostatin-Expressing Inhibitory Interneurons in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Yavorska, Iryna; Wehr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons. PMID:27746722

  7. Hippocampal somatostatin receptors and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in histamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Puebla, L; Rodríguez-Martín, E; Arilla, E

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of histamine (0.1, 1.0 or 10.0 micrograms) on the hippocampal somatostatin (SS) receptor/effector system in Wistar rats were investigated. In view of the rapid onset of histamine action, the effects of histamine on the somatostatinergic system were studied 2 h after its administration. Hippocampal SS-like immunoreactivity (SSLI) levels were not modified by any of the histamine doses studied. SS-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin (FK)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was markedly increased in hippocampal membranes from rats treated with 10 micrograms of histamine (23% +/- 1% vs. 17% +/- 1% and 37% +/- 2% vs. 23% +/- 1%, respectively). In contrast, neither the basal nor the FK-stimulated enzyme activities were affected by histamine administration. The functional activity of the hippocampal guanine-nucleotide binding inhibitory protein (Gi protein), as assessed by the capacity of the stable GTP analogue 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) to inhibit FK-stimulated AC activity, was not modified by histamine administration. These data suggest that the increased response of the enzyme to SS was not related to an increased functional activity of Gi proteins. In fact, the increased AC response to SS in hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats was associated with quantitative changes in the SS receptors. Equilibrium binding data obtained with [125I]Tyr11-SS indicate an increase in the number with specific SS receptors (541 +/- 24 vs. 365 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein, P < 0.001) together with a decrease in their apparent affinity (0.57 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.41 +/- 0.03 nM, P < 0.05) in rat hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats as compared to control animals. With the aim of determining if these changes were related to histamine binding to its specific receptor sites, the histaminergic H1 and H2 receptor antagonists mepyramine and cimetidine

  8. [The therapeutic effect of somatostatin on acute severe pancreatitis: a clinical contrastive observation].

    PubMed

    Bai, G; Ma, Y

    1996-08-01

    We observed the effect of somatostatin on the treatment of acute severe pancreatitis and on the inhibition of pancreatic secretion. 21 patients with acute severe pancreatitis were divided into control group (n = 12) and treatment group (n = 9) according to the admission time from 1992 to 1995. The control group was treated regularly and the treatment group was given intravenous somatostatin within 24h of onset 6mg/day for 5-7 days besides the regular treatment. No significant difference was noted in the general conditions of the two groups on admission. The volume of stomach suction in the somatostatin treated group was lower than that in the controls on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th admission days (P < 0.05). The serum amylase level of the treatment group was lower than that of the controls. 12 complications occurred in the somatostatin treated group as compared with 17 in the control group (P > 0.05). The clinical cure time was 15.6 +/- 4.8 days for the treatment group and 21.5 +/- 7.6 days for the controls (P = 0.02). We consider that as a pancreatic secretion inhibitor somatostatin can control the disease process and shorten the clinical cure time to some extent if it is used on the early stage of acute severe pancreatitis.

  9. Bak Foong Pills induce an analgesic effect by inhibiting nociception via the somatostatin pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Cui, Yu Gui; So, Siu Cheung; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Dysmenorrhoea, defined as cramping pain in the lower abdomen occurring before or during menstruation, affects, to varying degrees, up to 90% of women of child-bearing age. We investigated whether BFP (Bak Foong Pills), a traditional Chinese medicine treatment for dysmenorrhoea, possesses analgesic properties. Results showed that BFP was able to significantly reduce pain responses following subchronic treatment for 3 days, but not following acute (1 h) treatment in response to acetic acid-induced writhing in C57/B6 mice. The analgesic effect was not due to inhibition of COX (cyclo-oxygenase) activity, evidenced by the lack of inhibition of prostacyclin and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) production. Molecular analysis revealed that BFP treatment modulated the expression of a number of genes in the spinal cord of mice subjected to acetic acid writhing. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis of spinal cord samples showed that both sst4 (somatostatin receptor 4) and sst2 receptor mRNA, but not μOR (μ-opiate receptor) and NK1 (neurokinin-1) receptor mRNA, were down-regulated following BFP treatment, thus implicating somatostatin involvement in BFP-induced analgesia. Administration of c-som (cyclo-somatostatin), a somatostatin antagonist, prior to acetic acid-induced writhing inhibited the analgesic effect. Thus subchronic treatment with BFP has anti-nociceptive qualities mediated via the somatostatin pathway.

  10. Tungstate stimulates insulin release and inhibits somatostatin output in the perfused rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Ramona A; Egido, Eva M; Hernández, Raquel; Marco, José

    2005-09-05

    In the rat pancreas, infusion of sodium-tungstate stimulates basal insulin release in a dose-dependent manner. We have studied tungstate's effects on the insulin secretion elicited by various B-cell secretagogues. Somatostatin output was also measured. The study was performed in the perfused pancreas isolated from normal or somatostatin-depleted pancreases as induced by cysteamine pre-treatment. In control rats, tungstate co-infusion (5 mM) potentiated the insulin secretory responses to glucose (2.7-fold; P<0.01), arginine (2-fold; P<0.01), exendin-4 (3-fold; P<0.01), glucagon (4-fold; P<0.05), and tolbutamide (2-fold; P<0.01). It also inhibited the somatostatin secretory responses to glucose (90%; P<0.01), arginine (95%; P<0.01), glucagon (80%; P<0.025), exendin-4 (80%; P<0.05) and tolbutamide (85%; P<0.01). In somatostatin-depleted pancreases, the stimulatory effect of tungstate on basal insulin secretion and its potentiation of arginine-induced insulin output were comparable to those found in control rats. Our observations suggest an amplifying effect of tungstate on a common step in the insulin stimulus/secretion coupling process, and would rule out a paracrine effect mediated by the inhibition of somatostatin secretion induced by this compound.

  11. Somatostatin v placebo in bleeding oesophageal varices: randomised trial and meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, P. C.; Gjørup, I.; Bonnén, H.; Brahe, N. E.; Becker, U.; Burcharth, F.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study whether somatostatin or its derivative octreotide is more effective than placebo for treating bleeding oesophageal varices. METHODS--Randomised, double blind trial and meta-analysis with blinded analysis of data and writing of manuscripts. SETTING--Departments of medical and surgical gastroenterology in Copenhagen. SUBJECTS--Patients suspected of bleeding from oesophageal varices and of having cirrhosis of the liver. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival, number of blood transfusions, and use of Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. RESULTS--86 patients were randomised; in each group 16 died within six weeks (95% confidence interval for difference in mortality--19% to 22%). There were no differences between those treated with somatostatin or placebo in median number of blood transfusions (8 v 5, P = 0.07, 0 to 4 transfusions) or in numbers of patients who needed balloon tamponade (16 v 13, P = 0.54, -11% to 28%). In a meta-analysis of three trials involving 290 patients somatostatin had no effect on survival compared with placebo (P = 0.59, odds ratio 1.16; 0.67 to 2.01). For blood transfusions and use of balloon tamponade there was heterogeneity between the trials with no convincing evidence in favour of somatostatin. No placebo controlled trials have been performed with octreotide. CONCLUSION--Within the limited power of this study and meta-analysis we were unable to show a clinical benefit of somatostatin in the emergency treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices. PMID:7787594

  12. Cysteamine induces a loss of tissue somatostatin-28 when measured as somatostatin-28(15-28)-like immunoreactivity but not when assessed as somatostatin-28(1-14)-like immunoreactivity: evidence for the importance of the disulfide bond for cysteamine action

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Y.C.; Pierzchala, I.

    1985-05-01

    The reported loss of somatostatin-14 (S-14)-like immunoreactivity (LI) by cysteamine (CSH) could be mediated through an action on the S-14 disulfide bond. If so, then in the case of somatostatin-28 (S-28) (a linear 14 amino acid N-terminally extended form of S-14), it should be possible to demonstrate with region-specific antisera, a selective effect of CSH on the disulfide bond containing C-terminal half of the molecule. To obtain evidence for thisthe authors have determined by RIAs, the effect of CSH on S-28 concentration measured separately as S-28(15-28) LI and S-28(1-14) LI in the jejunal mucosa, a tissue rich in S-28. Four hours after a single sc injection of CSH to rats, mucosal S-28(15-28) LI was reduced from 16.4 +/- 0.6 to 4.6 +/- 0.51 pmol/mg protein (P less than 0.01). By contrast, S-28(1-14) LI sustained no loss and in fact increased from 27.6 +/- 1.9 to 41.6 +/- 2.2 pmol/mg protein (P less than 0.01). On Sephadex G-50 columns (in 6 M urea) approximately 70% of S-28(15-28) LI and S-28(1-14) LI coeluted with synthetic S-28 marker. These data suggest that CSH acts on the 15-28 segment of the S-28 molecule and renders it nonimmunoreactive probably through interaction with the disulfide bond. This mechanism probably also accounts for CSH-induced S-14 loss.

  13. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  14. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  15. Somatostatin in the rat periventricular nucleus: sex differences and effect of gonadal steroids

    PubMed Central

    Van Vugt, Harmke H.; Van de Heijning, Bert J. M.

    2008-01-01

    In the rat, the sexual dimorphism in growth hormone release is driven by sex steroids, and is suggested to result mainly from differences in somatostatin (SOM) release patterns from the median eminence. We studied the effect of gonadal steroids on SOM peptide-containing cells in the periventricular nucleus (PeVN) of ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, and compared these data with data from intact male rats. Adult female rats were treated with estradiol (E2) and/or progesterone (P), 3 months (long-term) or 2 weeks (short-term) after ovariectomy (OVX). Perfusion-fixed brains were sliced and stained, and the number of SOM-immunoreactive (-ir) cells and total SOM-ir area (in μm2) were determined using computer assisted analysis. SOM-ir cells in the PeVN showed a very characteristic rostro-caudal distribution and localization in relation to the third ventricle. Both the number of SOM-ir cells and total SOM-ir area in the PeVN were higher in male compared to OVX female rats. Neither the number of SOM-ir cells, nor the total SOM-ir area in the PeVN was affected by E2 or P treatment alone. Treatment with both gonadal steroids, however, did increase total SOM-immunoreactivity. This study is the first to describe SOM cell distribution within the rat PeVN in great detail. A clear sex difference exists in SOM peptide content in the rat PeVN. In addition, E2 and P may act synergistically to affect SOM cells in the female PeVN, suggesting that both gonadal steroids may be involved in the generation of the typical feminine SOM release pattern. PMID:18421448

  16. Selective, State-Dependent Activation of Somatostatin-Expressing Inhibitory Interneurons in Mouse Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fanselow, Erika E.; Richardson, Kristen A.; Connors, Barry W.

    2008-01-01

    The specific functions of subtypes of cortical inhibitory neurons are not well understood. This is due in part to a dearth of information about the behaviors of interneurons under conditions when the surrounding circuit is in an active state. We investigated the firing behavior of a subset of inhibitory interneurons, identified using mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a subset of somatostatin-expressing inhibitory cells (“GFP-expressing inhibitory neuron” [GIN] cells). The somata of the GIN cells were in layer 2/3 of somatosensory cortex and had dense, layer 1–projecting axons that are characteristic of Martinotti neurons. Interestingly, GIN cells fired similarly during a variety of diverse activating conditions: when bathed in fluids with low-divalent cation concentrations, when stimulated with brief trains of local synaptic inputs, when exposed to group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, or when exposed to muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonists. During these manipulations, GIN cells fired rhythmically and persistently in the theta-frequency range (3–10 Hz). Synchronous firing was often observed and its strength was directly proportional to the magnitude of electrical coupling between GIN cells. These effects were cell type specific: the four manipulations that persistently activated GIN cells rarely caused spiking of regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal cells or fast-spiking (FS) inhibitory interneurons. Our results suggest that supragranular GIN interneurons form an electrically coupled network that exerts a coherent 3- to 10-Hz inhibitory influence on its targets. Because GIN cells are more readily activated than RS and FS cells, it is possible that they act as “first responders” when cortical excitatory activity increases. PMID:18799598

  17. Somatostatin receptor expression in vivo and response to somatostatin analog therapy with or without other antineoplastic treatments in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vainas, I; Koussis, Ch; Pazaitou-Panayiotou, K; Drimonitis, A; Chrisoulidou, A; Iakovou, I; Boudina, M; Kaprara, A; Maladaki, A

    2004-12-01

    The long-term treatment of metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with somatostatin (SST) analogs was evaluated in 22 patients with persistant or relapsed disease and with in vivo positive SST receptor (SSTR) tumors. After surgical intervention all patients but one, initially or at a later time, had persistenly (15) or after relapse (7) elevated serum calcitonin (CT, 252-69482 pg/ml) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 8-1130 ng/ml) concentrations; also, all of them showed positive uptake in 111In-pentetreotide scanning. Daily doses of 0.4-1.0 mg octreotide subcutaneously, or monthly doses of 20-30 mg long-acting octreotide (LAR) intramuscularly for 3-21 months were administered. Systemic chemotherapy (Ch) with or without external radiotherapy (eRT) was given to 13 patients simultaneously. A beneficial effect on pre-existing diarrhea was observed in 8 patients (subjective partial remmission, sPR 36.4%); 10 other patients showed stable disease, while in 4 a worsening of pre-existing diarrhea was observed. CT and CEA concentrations decreased more than 25% in 4 out of 22 patients (18%) and 11 patients showed a decrease of less than 25% (biological SD). No objective response in tumour growth was demonstrated. Patients (10 survivors in group B) treated with Ch+eRT plus Octerotide showed higher sR (92.5%), lower mortality (23.1%), longer mean time to death (130 months) and longer mean total survival (mts) time (145 months) in comparison to group A patients who had 66.7% sR, 33.3% mortality, only 88.5 months mean time to death and 101 months mts-time. Long-term octreotide and octreotide-LAR treatment offers a subjective and biological partial remission in one third and in one fourth of the MTC patients respectively, but it does not improve the natural course of the tumor. It remains to be answered if these drugs, combined with other antineoplastic therapies, have a synergistic effect relating to treatment response and to patient survival and mortality.

  18. Antiproliferative and GH-inhibitory activity of chimeric peptides consisting of GHRP-6 and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, P; Singh, A T; Mukherjee, R

    1999-06-07

    Chimeric peptides consisting of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP-6) linked to somatostatin (6-11) via an amide bond to provide the effector parts of both the peptides were synthesized. The anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, and GH-inhibitory activities of these chimeric peptides were determined in vitro in the rat pituitary adenoma cell line GH3. One of the chimeric peptides, GSD, exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.001) anti-neoplastic and GH-inhibitory activity, as compared to RC-160. The hybrid peptides displayed high affinity binding to somatostatin receptors on GH3 cells. The bioactivity of GSD was found to be mediated by the stimulation of tyrosine phosphatase, involving a cGMP-dependent pathway, through pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. Such potent GH-inhibitory chimeric peptides may be of potential importance in the therapy of acromegaly, as well as provide novel tools to study the regulation of GH secretion by GHRP and somatostatin.

  19. Developmental change and molecular properties of somatostatin receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.

    1989-04-14

    The postnatal development and molecular properties of somatostatin receptor were studied in rat cerebral cortex. With (/sup 125/I-Tyr11)SRIF as a radiolabeled ligand, the specific ligand binding to crude membrane increased transiently in the early phase of postnatal development and then decreased. This increase of somatostatin binding was mainly due to the increased number of binding sites. The two subtypes classified by Tran et al., SSA and SSB, were confirmed and the studies on the relative amount of the subtypes revealed that more SSA subtype was expressed compared with SSB subtype during a week after birth, but, thereafter, both subtypes were almost equally expressed throughout the developmental stages tested. Molecular weight of the covalently labeled somatostatin receptor (SSA subtype), which was determined with the aid of the cross-linking agents, was estimated to be approximately 71,000 with no intramolecular disulfide bond.

  20. Pertussis toxin inhibits somatostatin-induced K/sup +/ conductance in human pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, N.; Kojima, I.; Shibuya, N.; Ogata, E.

    1987-07-01

    The effect of pertussis toxin on somatostatin-induced K/sup +/ current was examined in dissociated human pituitary tumor cells obtained from two acromegalic patients. Somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization or K/sup +/ current was observed in 20 of 23 cells in adenoma 1 and 10 of 11 cells in adenoma 2. After treatment with pertussis toxin for 24 h, these responses were completely suppressed (0/14 in adenoma, 1, 0/10 in adenoma 2). Spontaneous action potentials, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/ currents were well preserved after pertussis toxin treatment. When crude membrane fraction was incubated with (/sup 32/P)NAD, a 41K protein was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin. Hormone release was inhibited by somatostatin and this inhibition was blocked by pertussis toxin treatment.

  1. Sex-related toxicity of somatostatin and its interaction with pentobarbital and strychnine.

    PubMed

    Caprino, L; Borrelli, F; Antonetti, F; Cantelmo, A

    1983-06-01

    The intravenous LD50 of the hypothalamic tetradecapeptide somatostatin was determined in mice and rats of both sexes. It was found that somatostatin has a sex-related toxicity both in mice and rats. The interaction of low and high doses of peptide with the LD50s of two central nervous system (CNS) drugs, namely pentobarbital and strychnine, was also studied in male and female mice. Differential effects were observed as follows: a very low dose (0.1 mg/kg) of somatostatin does not affect the toxicity of these compounds, whereas the injection of 1 mg/kg of peptide increased pentobarbital toxicity and decreased the toxicity of strychnine. However, an increase in the toxicity of both substances was obtained with very high non-lethal doses of peptide (20 and 30 mg/kg, in female and male mice, respectively).

  2. Mapping of somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the alpaca (Lama pacos) brainstem.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Eliana; Sánchez, Manuel Lisardo; Aguilar, Luís Ángel; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Ángel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the distribution of cell bodies and fibers containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the alpaca brainstem. Immunoreactive fibers were widely distributed throughout the whole brainstem: 34 brainstem nuclei/regions showed a high or a moderate density of these fibers. Perikarya containing the peptide were widely distributed throughout the mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata. Cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) were observed in the lateral and medial divisions of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, reticular formation (mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata), inferior colliculus, periaqueductal gray, superior colliculus, pericentral division of the dorsal tegmental nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, nucleus of the trapezoid body, vestibular nucleus, motor dorsal nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, nucleus praepositus hypoglossi, and in the substantia nigra. This widespread distribution indicates that somatostatin-28 (1-12) is involved in multiple physiological actions in the alpaca brainstem.

  3. Characterization and regulation of somatostatin receptors in rat pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Presky, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This research investigated the interaction of the hypothalamic peptide somatostatin (SRIF) with GH/sub 4/C/sub 1/ rat pituitary tumor cells. Using an acid extraction technique to discriminate between intracellular and surface-bound peptide, the author found that neither receptor-bound (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 1/)SRIF nor (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 11/)SRIF was rapidly internalized. However, both radioanalogs were partially (50/70%) degraded to /sup 125/I-tyrosine prior to dissociation. Since the lysosomal inhibitors leupetin, ammonium chlorine and chloroquine did not reduce receptor mediated SRIF degradation, this process must be nonlysosomal. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was rapidly internalized and degraded to /sup 125/I-tyrosine in lysosomes. Chronic treatment of cells with SRIF increased the number of SRIF receptors. This increase required 15 h to reach a plateau level of 220% of untreated controls and was dose-dependent (ED/sub 50/ = 2 nM). The effects of SRIF treatment on receptor modulation were specific for the SRIF receptor. Modulation of SRIF binding was not mimicked by other agents which regulate hormone release indicated that occupancy of SRIF receptors triggered this event. Detailed analysis of the binding kinetics of (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 11/)SRIF showed that this radioanalog was superior to (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 11/)SRIF for binding studies in cells due to its higher affinity for the SRIF receptor. Photo-affinity labelling and affinity cross-linking experiments identified the EGF receptor as a protein with a molecular weight of 180,000. The SRIF receptor, however, could not be identified with these techniques.

  4. Does combination of "cold" and "hot" somatostatin analogs prolong survival of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Stefanska, Agnieszka; Chrapczynski, Pawel; Trofimiuk-Müldner, Malgorzata; Szura, Miroslaw; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2017-02-27

    A number of detected neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has been on the increase due to our awareness of the NENs risk and the development of different imaging techniques. Therapy of NENs involves surgery, chemotherapy, "cold" somatostatin analogs (SSA), peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) and kinase inhibitors in pancreatic NENs. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of SSA in combination with "hot" somatostatin analogs, and the survival rate of our patients with advanced NENs. Seventy nine patients with metastatic NEN and positive somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) were enrolled in the study. Every patient was supposed to receive a dose of 7.4 GBq/m(2) PRRT in 4-5 cycles every 4-9 weeks. Response to the therapy was assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST). SSA were administered one month after the last cycle of PRRT and have been continued during the whole follow up period. Median observation time was 33 months (IQR 13.6-55.6), median time to progression was 28 months (IQR 12.1-39.2) and median time to event was 28 months (IQR 12.1-39.2). Overall survival for this group of patients was 60 months. PFS was 39 months and EFS was equal to 33 months. In our group of patients not many serious adverse events were observed. PRRT using radiolabelled somatostatin analogs followed by therapy with "cold" somatostatin analogs is a promising treatment option for patients with metastatic or inoperable somatostatin receptor-positive NENs with the possibility of survival prolongation.

  5. Splanchnic and hepatic metabolism of somatostatin: a study in cirrhotic patients with a portacaval shunt.

    PubMed

    Webb, S; Kravetz, D; Bosch, J; Wass, J A; Evans, J; Gomis, R; Rees, L H; Rodés, J

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data suggest that somatostatin is metabolized by both liver and kidneys. Results in humans are conflicting. By studying a group of cirrhotic patients with surgically induced end-to-side portacaval shunts, basally and during a somatostatin infusion, we have been able to analyze separately the hepatic and splanchnic metabolism of this peptide. After catheterization, samples were obtained from the pulmonary artery, portal and hepatic veins. Basal pulmonary artery immunoreactive somatostatin (IRS) was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in the cirrhotic patients (96 +/- 11 pg per ml) than in a sex- and age-matched control group (31.4 +/- 5.8 pg per ml). During the infusion of exogenous somatostatin, IRS values were higher in arterial (12,269 +/- 1,198 pg per ml) than in hepatic venous blood (7,648 +/- 1,234 pg per ml), indicating hepatic extraction of the peptide; but there was also a substantial splanchnic extraction demonstrated by higher arterial (12,269 +/- 1,532 pg per ml) than portal values (6,754 +/- 1,040 pg per ml) of IRS. During the somatostatin infusion, at very high circulation IRS levels, the liver was able to extract 38% of the peptide. This suggests that the high basal IRS levels found in liver cirrhosis are not likely to be due to hepatic failure. Possible mechanisms may involve increased somatostatin secretion, predominance of high molecular weight moieties of IRS which may not be as effectively removed by the liver, and/or portal-systemic shunting.

  6. In vivo and in vitro response to octreotide LAR in a TSH-secreting adenoma: characterization of somatostatin receptor expression and role of subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Federico; Barbieri, Federica; Castelletti, Lara; Arvigo, Marica; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Annunziata, Francesca; Saveanu, Alexandru; Minuto, Francesco; Castellan, Lucio; Zona, Gianluigi; Florio, Tullio; Ferone, Diego

    2011-06-01

    Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas (TSHomas) are a rare cause of hyperthyroidism and account for less than 2% of pituitary adenomas. Medical therapy with somatostatin analogues (SSAs) effectively reduces TSH secretion in approximately 80% of patients and induces shrinkage in about 45% of tumors. According with previous data, resistance to SSA treatment might be due to heterogeneity in somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) expression. We report the case of TSHoma in a 41-year-old man treated with octreotide LAR that caused a dramatic decrease of TSH and thyroid hormones and tumor shrinkage already after 3 months of pre-surgical therapy. In search of potential molecular determinants of octreotide effectiveness, we measured, in primary cultures from this tumor, SSTR and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) expression, and octreotide and/or cabergoline effects on TSH secretion and cell proliferation. SSTR5 and D2R expression was higher than SSTR2. Octreotide significantly inhibited TSH secretion more effectively than cabergoline (P<0.001), whereas the combined treatment was comparable with cabergoline alone. Similarly, octreotide resulted more effective than cabergoline on cell proliferation, while the combination did not show any additive or synergistic effects. In conclusion, the significant antisecretive and antiproliferative effect of octreotide in this patient might be related to the high expression of SSTR5, in the presence of SSTR2. After reviewing the literature, indeed, in line with previous observations, we hypothesize that SSTR5/SSTR2 ratio in TSHomas may represent a useful marker in predicting the outcome of therapy with SSAs. The role of D2R should be further explored considering that the presence of D2R can influence SSTRs functionality.

  7. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-08

    of an aromatic binding pocket such as that for Trp(8) of SRIF-14. Conversely, these calculations accommodate the experimental findings that pyrazin-2-ylmethyl and pyridinylmethyl substituents at C4- of C1-indole-substituted glycosides afford higher affinities at sst4 than the C4-benzyl group of (+)-2. This result is consistent with the high electron density in the plane of the heterocycle depicted in Figure 6 which can accept hydrogen bonds from the C4 binding pocket of the receptor. Unexpectedly, we found that the 2-fluoropyridin-5-ylmethyl analogue (+)-14 more closely resembles the binding affinity of (+)-8 than that of (+)-2, thus suggesting that (+)-14 represents a rare example of a carbon linked fluorine atom acting as a hydrogen bond acceptor. We attribute this result to the ability of the proton to bind the nitrogen and fluorine atoms simultaneously in a bifurcated arrangement. At the NK1 receptor of substance P (SP), the free hydroxyl at C4 optimizes affinity.

  8. Somatostatin protects photoreceptor cells against high glucose–induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Aurora; Cazzoni, Daniele; Beltramo, Elena; Hernández, Cristina; Porta, Massimo; Simó, Rafael; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many cellular and molecular studies in experimental animals and early retinal function tests in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) have shown that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of the disease. Somatostatin (SST) is one of the most important neuroprotective factors synthesized by the retina: SST levels are decreased in parallel to retinal neurodegeneration in early stages of DR. In this study, we characterized the induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in a 661W photoreceptor-like cell line cultured under high glucose (HG) conditions and the effect of SST. Methods A 661W photoreceptor-like cell line and retinal explants from 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were cultured under HG conditions and treated with SST. Results Hyperglycemia significantly reduced the cellular viability by increasing the percentage of apoptotic cells, and this effect was ameliorated by SST (p˂0.05). Activation of caspase-8 by hyperglycemia was found in the 661W cells and retinal explants and decreased in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Moreover, we detected activation of calpain-2 associated with hyperglycemia-induced cell death, as well as increased protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) protein levels; both had a pattern of cleavage that was absent in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Treatment of the 661W cells and retinal explants with SST for 24 h increased the phosphorylation of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR; tyrosine 1165/1166) and protein kinase B (Akt; serine 473), suggesting this survival signaling is activated in the neuroretina by SST (p˂0.05). Conclusions This study has provided new mechanistic insights first into the involvement of calpain-2 and PTP1B in the loss of cell survival and increased caspase-8-dependent apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia in photoreceptor cells and second, on the protective effect of SST against apoptosis by the enhancement of IGF-IR-mediated Akt phosphorylation. PMID:28050125

  9. New rubrolide analogues as inhibitors of photosynthesis light reactions.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Jodieh O S; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Ramos, Gabriela Álvarez; Varejão, Eduardo V V; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2015-04-01

    Natural products called rubrolides have been investigated as a model for the development of new herbicides that act on the photosynthesis apparatus. This study comprises a comprehensive analysis of the photosynthesis inhibitory ability of 27 new structurally diverse rubrolide analogues. In general, the results revealed that the compounds exhibited efficient inhibition of the photosynthetic process, but in some cases low water solubility may be a limiting factor. To elucidate their mode of action, the effects of the compounds on PSII and PSI, as well as their partial reaction on chloroplasts and the chlorophyll a fluorescence transients were measured. Our results showed that some of the most active rubrolide analogues act as a Hill reaction inhibitors at the QB level by interacting with the D1 protein at the reducing side of PSII. All of the active analogues follow Tice's rule of 5, which indicates that these compounds present physicochemical properties suitable for herbicides.

  10. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  11. Carboxyl-terminal multi-site phosphorylation regulates internalization and desensitization of the human sst2 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Schütz, Dagmar; Nagel, Falko; Stumm, Ralf; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-04-25

    The somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2) is the pharmacological target of somatostatin analogs that are widely used in the diagnosis and treatment of human neuroendocrine tumors. We have recently shown that the stable somatostatin analogs octreotide and pasireotide (SOM230) stimulate distinct patterns of sst2 receptor phosphorylation and internalization. Like somatostatin, octreotide promotes the phosphorylation of at least six carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues namely S341, S343, T353, T354, T356 and T359, which in turn leads to a robust receptor endocytosis. Unlike somatostatin, pasireotide stimulates a selective phosphorylation of S341 and S343 of the human sst2 receptor followed by a partial receptor internalization. Here, we show that exchange of S341 and S343 by alanine is sufficient to block pasireotide-driven internalization, whereas mutation of T353, T354, T356 and T359 to alanine is required to strongly inhibited both octreotide- and somatostatin-induced internalization. Yet, combined mutation of T353, T354, T356 and T359 is not sufficient to prevent somatostatin-driven β-arrestin mobilization and receptor desensitization. Replacement of all fourteen carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues by alanine completely abrogates sst2 receptor internalization and β-arrestin mobilization in HEK293 cells. Together, our findings demonstrate for the first time that agonist-selective sst2 receptor internalization is regulated by multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail.

  12. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  13. Postsynaptic targets of somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Katona, I; Acsády, L; Freund, T F

    1999-01-01

    Two characteristic interneuron types in the hippocampus, the so-called hilar perforant path-associated cells in the dentate gyrus and stratum oriens/lacunosum-moleculare neurons in the CA3 and CA1 regions, were suggested to be involved in feedback circuits. In the present study, interneurons identical to these cell populations were visualized by somatostatin-immunostaining, then reconstructed, and processed for double-immunostaining and electron microscopy to establish their postsynaptic target selectivity. A combination of somatostatin-immunostaining with immunostaining for GABA or other interneuron markers revealed a quasi-random termination pattern. The vast majority of postsynaptic targets were GABA-negative dendritic shafts and spines of principal cells (76%), whereas other target elements contained GABA (8%). All of the examined neurochemically defined interneuron types (parvalbumin-, calretinin-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-, cholecystokinin-, substance P receptor-immunoreactive neurons) received innervation from somatostatin-positive boutons. Recent anatomical and electrophysiological data showed that the main excitatory inputs of somatostatin-positive interneurons originate from local principal cells. The present data revealed a massive GABAergic innervation of distal dendrites of local principal cells by these feedback driven neurons, which are proposed to control the efficacy and plasticity of entorhinal synaptic input as a function of local principal cell activity and synchrony.

  14. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    viral vector; neurogenesis; i nflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: Progress during the reporting year is congruent with...in which we can test the effects of somatostatin gene delivery on aberrant neurogenesis, n euroinflammation and learning and memory . The studies

  15. Growth enhancement of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by passive immunisation against somatostatin-14

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were passively immunised against somatostatin-14 (SS-14) using an antibody originating from egg laying chicken (Gallus domesticus). Fish were immunised weekly (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 d) with chicken egg yolk derived immunoglobulin (IgY) against SS-14 (1:25 ...

  16. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J.; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E.; Cowing–Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D.; Adams, Michael W.; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L.; Huising, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone Urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co–released with insulin and potentiates glucose–stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptor on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 demonstrate fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque diabetes models and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:26076035

  17. Cysteamine-induced depletion of brain somatostatin is associated with up-regulation of cerebrocortical somatostatin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Srikant, C.B.; Patel, Y.C.

    1984-09-01

    Cysteamine (CSH) administered as a single sc injection to rats produced rapid depletion of cerebrocortical Somatostatin-14 like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) with a significant 48% reduction occurring within 5 min and maximum (72%) decrease at 4 h. The depletion of S-14 LI was associated with a 1.7 fold increase in Bmax of the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors 5 min after CSH administration and a concomitant but slower increase in the affinity of these receptors. Incubation of intact synaptosomes with 1 mM CSH at 37 C in vitro for 60 min also caused a rapid depletion of S-14 LI, but there was no change in the Bmax or Kd of the S-14 receptors for up to 30 min beyond which time a 2.8-fold decrease in the affinity of S-14 receptors was observed. Higher concentrations of CSH (greater than or equal to 10 mM) added during the incubation of synaptosomes in vitro completely abolished the specific binding of these receptors. The pituitary S-14 receptors were studied 30 min after CSH administration and unlike the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors at this time did not exhibit any change in Bmax or affinity. When added at the time of the binding assay CSH (1 mM) was without a direct effect on cerebrocortical as well as pituitary membrane S-14 receptors. Furthermore, addition of CSH at the time of binding assay did not destroy the integrity of (/sup 125/I-Tyr11)S-14. It is concluded that administration of CSH to rats in vivo depletes brain S-14 LI and up-regulates synaptosomal S-14 receptors. Exposure of synaptosomes to CSH in vitro for 30 min also depletes S-14 LI but has no effect on S-14 receptors. CSH has a direct inhibitory effect on S-14 receptor binding after prolonged in vitro incubation. Pituitary S-14 receptors unlike those in the brain are unaffected by S-14 LI depletion at least acutely.

  18. Effect of somatostatin on nonesterified fatty acid levels modifies glucose homeostasis during fasting

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, G.K.; Frizzell, R.T.; Cherrington, A.D. )

    1987-10-01

    In the 7-days fasted conscious dog, unlike the postabsorptive conscious dog, somatostatin infusion results in decreased levels of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and increased glucose utilization (R{sub d}) even when insulin and glucagon levels are held constant. The aim of this study was to determine whether NEFA replacement in such animals would prevent the increase in R{sub d}. In each of three protocols there was an 80-min tracer equilibration period, a 40-min basal period, and a 3-h test period. During the test period in the first protocol saline was infused, in the second protocol somatostatin was infused along with intraportal replacement amounts of insulin and glucagon (hormone replacement), while in the third protocol somatostatin plus the pancreatic hormones were infused with concurrent heparin plus Intralipid infusion. Glucose turnover was assessed using (3-{sup 3}H)glucose. The peripheral levels of insulin, glucagon, and glucose were similar and constant in all three protocols; however, during somatostatin infusion, exogenous glucose infusion was necessary to maintain euglycemia. The NEFA level was constant during saline infusion and decreased in the hormone replacement protocol. In the hormone replacement plus NEFA protocol, the NEFA level did not change during the first 90-min period and then increased during the second 90-min period. After a prolonged fast in the dog, (1) somatostatin directly or indirectly inhibits adipose tissue NEFA release and causes a decrease in the plasma NEFA level, and (2) this decrease in the NEFA level causes an increase in R{sub d}.

  19. DOTA-Derivatives of Octreotide Dicarba-Analogs with High Affinity for Somatostatin sst2,5 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumors and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst's) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogs, which show interesting binding profiles at sst's. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogs could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogs of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogs exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  20. Pre-Clinical Testing of New Hydroxybutyrate Analogues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    the effects of DHB analogues to ascertain if they are longer-acting compounds than the parent compound. Although obtaining the first and only drug ...useful in the treatment of PD. Body of Work The goal of this study is to fully assess and compare the potency of compounds that are structurally...SARA 313: Carcinogenicity Classification (components present at 0.1% or more): none, unless listed below TSCA (US Toxic Substances Control Act

  1. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  2. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  3. Effect of long-term GHRH and somatostatin administration on GH release and body weight in prepubertal female rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Romero, A; Rol de Lama, M A; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A

    1999-12-01

    In order to find a chronic GHRH administration capable of stimulating growth rate without depleting pituitary GH content, prepubertal female rats were subcutaneously (sc) treated with GHRH (1-29)-NH2 and somatostatin (SS). In experiment 1, the rats received sc injections of GHRH and cyclic natural SS for 19 days. In the second study, female rats were continuously treated during 21 days with GHRH, using a slow release pellet, alone or combined with one daily injection of long acting SS (octreotide). In experiment 1, body weight was significantly increased when GHRH was administered at the highest daily dosage (1200 microg/day), accompanied by an slight increment in pituitary GH content. Hypothalamic SS concentrations decreased when GHRH or SS were administered alone whereas the combined treatment with both peptides did not modify this parameter, which suggests the existence of a balance between the chronic actions of both peptides on hypothalamus. In experiment 2, the continuous infusion of GHRH increased plasma GH levels and tended to enhance pituitary GH content. Nevertheless, GHRH effect was not effective enough to increase body weight. By adding one daily injection of SS both GHRH effects on the pituitary gland were abolished. Our study indicates that female rats retain responsiveness to chronic GHRH and SS treatments at both pituitary and hypothalamic levels.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase interneurons in the monkey cerebral cortex are subsets of the somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, and calbindin cells.

    PubMed

    Smiley, J F; McGinnis, J P; Javitt, D C

    2000-04-28

    99%) immunoreactive for somatostatin and neuropeptide Y, but did not express calbindin. The LNOS cells comprised about 30% of the somatostatin cells and about 60% of the neuropeptide Y cells. The SNOS cells were nearly always (87-98%) calbindin-immunoreactive, and were rarely or never labeled with antibodies to somatostatin or neuropeptide Y. The SNOS cells accounted for about 20% of all of the calbindin cells. The findings demonstrate that the two types of nNOS cells can be distinguished by antibodies to calbindin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y, but none of these markers is found exclusively in nNOS cells. Nevertheless, neuropeptide Y-immunoreactivity provides a useful marker for LNOS cells, because it is very dense in these cells and only light in the interneurons that lack nNOS.

  5. Unsaturated Analogues of the Neurotransmitter GABA: trans-4-Aminocrotonic, cis-4-Aminocrotonic and 4-Aminotetrolic Acids.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2016-03-01

    Analogues of the neurotransmitter GABA containing unsaturated bonds are restricted in the conformations they can attain. This review traces three such analogues from their synthesis to their use as neurochemicals. trans-4-Aminocrotonic acid was the first conformationally restricted analogue to be extensively studied. It acts like GABA across a range of macromolecules from receptors to transporters. It acts similarly to GABA on ionotropic receptors. cis-4-Aminocrotonic acid selectively activates bicuculline-insensitive GABAC receptors. 4-Aminotetrolic acid, containing a triple bond, activates bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptors. These findings indicate that GABA activates GABAA receptors in extended conformations and GABAC receptors in folded conformations. These and related analogues are important for the molecular modelling of ionotropic GABA receptors and to the development of new agents acting selectively on these receptors.

  6. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    PubMed

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  7. Effects of somatostatin and oral potassium administration on terbutaline-induced hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Schnack, C; Podolsky, A; Watzke, H; Schernthaner, G; Burghuber, O C

    1989-01-01

    Terbutaline, a beta 2-adrenergic agonist, has been shown to cause hypokalemia and an increase of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations. We considered that terbutaline-induced hypokalemia may be due to the insulin-induced shift of potassium (K+) from the extracellular to the intracellular space. If so, then inhibition of insulin secretion by somatostatin would prevent terbutaline-induced hypokalemia. Further, we wondered whether oral potassium pretreatment could prevent terbutaline-induced hypokalemia. Therefore, 10 healthy volunteers (5 men, 5 women; mean age, 23 yr +/- 3 SD) received either sodium chloride (NaCl) or somatostatin intravenously together with 0.25 mg terbutaline subcutaneously in a double-blind crossover design. On a third test day, they received 39 mval of K+ powder orally before terbutaline injection in an open trial. Terbutaline caused a significant decrease of K+ (from 3.96 +/- 0.08 to 3.3 +/- 0.13 mmol/L +/- SEM; p less than 0.0005), accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose (from 83 +/- 3.6 to 101 +/- 4.4 mg/dl +/- SEM; p less than 0.01) and serum insulin concentrations (from 11.7 +/- 0.9 to 19.9 +/- 1.1 microU/ml +/- SEM; p less than 0.001), confirming earlier data. Somatostatin pretreatment inhibited the terbutaline-induced hypokalemia; the small fall of K+ (from 3.7 +/- 0.08 to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mmol/L) was no longer significant. Insulin secretion was completely blocked by somatostatin, leading to an even more pronounced increase of blood glucose. Hypokalemia after terbutaline injection was not prevented by oral potassium pretreatment. In summary, the present findings confirm that terbutaline-induced hypokalemia is associated with increased plasma glucose and insulin levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Spinal Subarachnoid Injection of Somatostatin Causes Neurological Deficits and Neuronal Injury in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    and Martin. 1986 ). Somatostatin immunoreactivity is present in relatively high concentration in the spinal cord. * In conducting the research...Use of Laboratory Animals of the Institute of sler et al.. 1986 : Hbkfelt et al.. 1976: Forsmann. Laboratorn Animal Resources. National Research Council...sponse to these stimuli (Wiesenfeld-Hallin. 1985: antagonist cvclo[7-aminoheptonyl-Phe-D-Trp- 1986 ). and to cause behaviors indicative of noci- Lys-Thr

  9. Quantitative in Situ Assessment of the Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess Response to Targeted Therapy With 111-in-Penetreotide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess Response to Targeted Therapy with 111-in-Pentetreotide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gina G...31 Mar 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Quantitative in situ Assessment of the Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess...Somatostatin (SST) is a peptide hormone implicated in the growth and progression of cancers and SSTR2 is the predominant receptor subtype expressed

  10. Quantitative in situ Assessment of the Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess Response to Targeted Therapy with 111-in-Pentetreotide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess Response to Targeted Therapy with 111-in-Pentetreotide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gina G...Quantitative in situ Assessment of the Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess Response to Targeted Therapy with 111-in-Pentetreotide 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Somatostatin (SST) is a peptide hormone implicated in the growth and progression of cancers and SSTR2 is the predominant receptor subtype expressed in

  11. Effect of cysteamine on secretion of gastrin and somatostatin from the rat stomach

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, C.; Bakich, V.; Trotter, T.; Kwok, Y.N.; Nishimura, E.; Pederson, R.; Brown, J.

    1984-05-01

    Cysteamine (beta-mercaptoethylamine HCl) administration to rats induces a hypergastrinemia and a reduction in gastric tissue somatostatin content. The possibility that this reduction may contribute to the elevated gastrin levels has been investigated in the isolated perfused rat stomach. Cysteamine (1 mM) rapidly increased immunoreactive gastrin release to levels ranging between 41% and 125% above basal. Increasing the dose to 10 mM caused a 1148% increase in immunoreactive gastrin. Secretion of somatosc immunoreactivity did not change. Perfusion of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (1 nM) induced a sustained increase in somatostatin like immunoreactivity secretion and a transient rise in gastrin. Addition of 10 mM cysteamine during gastric inhibitory polypeptide perfusion caused a 300% increase in immunoreactive gastrin. These levels were lower than in response to cysteamine alone. The results demonstrate that cysteamine can stimulate immunoreactive gastrin secretion without any change in somatostatinlike immunoreactivity release. When somatostatinlike immunoreactivity secretion is stimulated by an agent such as gastric inhibitory polypeptide, the cysteamine-induced release of immunoreactive gastrin is attenuated, suggesting the presence of a functional linkage between somatostatin and gastrin under these conditions.

  12. Review of Insulin and its Analogues in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mane, Krishnappa; Chaluvaraju, KC; Niranjan, MS; Zaranappa, TR; Manjuthej, TR

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where in human body does not produce or properly uses insulin, a hormone that is required to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy. Diabetes finally leads to more complications and to prevent these complications insulin and its analogues are used. After more than half a century of treating diabetics with animal insulin’s, recombinant DNA technologies and advanced protein chemistry made human insulin preparations available in the early 1980s. As the next step, over the last decade, insulin analogues were constructed by changing the structure of the native protein with the goal of improving the therapeutic properties of it, because the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rapid, intermediate and long-acting preparations of human insulin make it almost impossible to achieve sustained normoglycemia. The first clinically available insulin analogue, lispro, confirmed the hopes by showing that improved glycaemic control can be achieved without an increase in hypoglycaemic events. Two new insulin analogues, insulin glargine and insulin aspart, have recently been approved for clinical use in the United States and several other analogues are being intensively tested. PMID:24826038

  13. Cysteamine blocks somatostatin secretion without altering the course of insulin or glucagon release. A new model for the study of islet function

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.L.; Grouse, L.H.; Elde, R.P.

    1983-04-01

    Cysteamine (300 mg/kg) administered subcutaneously depletes pancreatic somatostatin to 36% of control levels, but does not alter pancreatic insulin or glucagon content. Although perfusion of pancreata from normal animals with glucose (300 mg/dl) markedly stimulated somatostatin release, pancreata from cysteamine-treated animals failed to secrete somatostatin in response to glucose. Cysteamine treatment was without effect on insulin and glucagon release under the conditions tested. The isolated perfused pancreas from the cysteamine-treated rat provides a model for further investigations into regulation of islet hormone release in the absence of stimulated somatostatin release.

  14. Melatonin influences somatostatin secretion from human pancreatic δ-cells via MT1 and MT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zibolka, Juliane; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Peschke, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin is an effector of the diurnal clock on pancreatic islets. The membrane receptor-transmitted inhibitory influence of melatonin on insulin secretion is well established and contrasts with the reported stimulation of glucagon release from α-cells. Virtually, nothing is known concerning the melatonin-mediated effects on islet δ-cells. Analysis of a human pancreatic δ-cell model, the cell line QGP-1, and the use of a somatostatin-specific radioimmunoassay showed that melatonin primarily has an inhibitory effect on somatostatin secretion in the physiological concentration range. In the pharmacological range, melatonin elicited slightly increased somatostatin release from δ-cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the major second messenger dose-dependently stimulating somatostatin secretion, in experiments employing the membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP. 8-Br-cyclic guanosine monophosphate proved to be of only minor relevance to somatostatin release. As the inhibitory effect of 1 nm melatonin was reversed after incubation of QGP-1 cells with the nonselective melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole, but not with the MT2-selective antagonist 4-P-PDOT (4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline), an involvement of the MT1 receptor can be assumed. Somatostatin release from the δ-cells at low glucose concentrations was significantly inhibited during co-incubation with 1 nm melatonin, an effect which was less pronounced at higher glucose levels. Transient expression experiments, overexpressing MT1, MT2, or a deletion variant as a control, indicated that the MT1 and not the MT2 receptor was the major transmitter of the inhibitory melatonin effect. These data point to a significant influence of melatonin on pancreatic δ-cells and on somatostatin release.

  15. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  16. Effects of cysteamine on dopamine-mediated behaviors: evidence for dopamine-somatostatin interactions in the striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Iverson, M.T.; Radke, J.M.; Vincent, S.R.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of prior treatment with cysteamine, a drug which appears to deplete selectively the neuropeptide somatostatin, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preferences were investigated. Twelve hours following systemic cysteamine injections apomorphine-induced stereotypy was attenuated and striatal somatostatin levels were reduced by half. Systemic cysteamine also decreased the motor stimulant effects of amphetamine, without influencing the rewarding properties as determined by the conditioned place preference procedure. Direct injections of cysteamine into the nucleus accumbens also decreased the locomotor response to amphetamine, and produced a local reduction in somatostatin levels in the accumbens. Cysteamine did not appear to alter monoamine turnover in the striatum after either systemic or intra-accumbens injections. These results suggest that somatostatin in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen modulates the motor, but not the reinforcing properties of dopaminergic drugs, possibly via an action postsynaptic to dopamine-releasing terminals. Furthermore, it is evident from these results that cysteamine is an important tool with which to study the central actions of somatostatin.

  17. Synthesis of daidzin analogues as potential agents for alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guang-Yao; Li, Dian-Jun; Keung, Wing Ming

    2003-09-01

    Daidzin, the active principle of an herbal remedy for 'alcohol addiction', has been shown to reduce alcohol consumption in all laboratory animals tested to date. Correlation studies using structural analogues of daidzin suggests that it acts by raising the monoamine oxidase (MAO)/mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) activity ratio (J. Med. Chem. 2000, 43, 4169). Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on the 7-O-substituted analogues of daidzin have revealed structural features important for ALDH-2 and MAO inhibition (J. Med. Chem. 2001, 44, 3320). We here evaluated effects of substitutions at 2, 5, 6, 8, 3' and 4' positions of daidzin on its potencies for ALDH-2 and MAO inhibition. Results show that analogues with 4'-substituents that are small, polar and with hydrogen bonding capacities are most potent ALDH-2 inhibitors, whereas those that are non-polar and with electron withdrawing capacities are potent MAO inhibitors. Analogues with a 5-OH group are less potent ALDH-2 inhibitors but are more potent MAO inhibitors. All the 2-, 6-, 8- and 3'-substituted analogues tested so far do not inhibit ALDH-2 and/or have decreased potencies for MAO inhibition. This, together with the results obtained from previous studies, suggests that a potent antidipsotropic analogue would be a 4',7-disubstituted isoflavone. The 4'-substituent should be small, polar, and with hydrogen bonding capacities such as, -OH and -NH(2); whereas the 7-substituent should be a straight-chain alkyl with a terminal polar function such as -(CH(2))(n)-OH with 2< or =n < or =6, -(CH(2))(n)-COOH with 5< or =n < or =10, or -(CH(2))(n)-NH(2) with n > or =4.

  18. Somatostatin Agonist Pasireotide Promotes a Physiological State Resembling Short-Day Acclimation in the Photoperiodic Male Siberian Hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Dumbell, R A; Scherbarth, F; Diedrich, V; Schmid, H A; Steinlechner, S; Barrett, P

    2015-07-01

    The timing of growth in seasonal mammals is inextricably linked to food availability. This is exemplified in the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus), which uses the annual cycle of photoperiod to optimally programme energy expenditure in anticipation of seasonal fluctuations in food resources. During the autumn, energy expenditure is progressively minimised by physiological adaptations, including a 30% reduction in body mass, comprising a reduction in both fat and lean tissues. However, the mechanistic basis of this adaptation is still unexplained. We hypothesised that growth hormone (GH) was a likely candidate to underpin these reversible changes in body mass. Administration of pasireotide, a long-acting somatostatin receptor agonist developed for the treatment of acromegaly, to male hamsters under a long-day (LD) photoperiod produced a body weight loss. This comprised a reduction in lean and fat mass, including kidneys, testes and brown adipose tissue, typically found in short-day (SD) housed hamsters. Furthermore, when administered to hamsters switched from SD to LD, pasireotide retarded the body weight increase compared to vehicle-treated hamsters. Pasireotide did not alter photoperiod-mediated changes in hypothalamic energy balance gene expression but altered the expression of Srif mRNA expression in the periventricular nucleus and Ghrh mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus consistent with a reduction in GH feedback and concurrent with reduced serum insulin-like growth factor-1. Conversely, GH treatment of SD hamsters increased body mass, which included increased mass of liver and kidneys. Together, these data indicate a role for the GH axis in the determination of seasonal body mass of the Siberian hamster.

  19. DOTA-Derivatives of Octreotide Dicarba-Analogs with High Affinity for Somatostatin sst2,5 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M.; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumors and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst's) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogs, which show interesting binding profiles at sst's. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogs could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogs of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogs exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes. PMID:28286746

  20. Functional coupling of a mammalian somatostatin receptor to the yeast pheromone response pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Price, L A; Kajkowski, E M; Hadcock, J R; Ozenberger, B A; Pausch, M H

    1995-01-01

    A detailed analysis of structural and functional aspects of G-protein-coupled receptors, as well as discovery of novel pharmacophores that exert their effects on members of this class of receptors, will be facilitated by development of a yeast-based bioassay. To that end, yeast strains that functionally express the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) were constructed. High-affinity binding sites for somatostatin ([125I-Tyr-11]S-14) comparable to those in native tissues were detected in yeast membrane extracts at levels equivalent to the alpha-mating pheromone receptor (Ste2p). Somatostatin-dependent growth of strains modified by deletion of genes encoding components of the pheromone response pathway was detected through induction of a pheromone-responsive HIS3 reporter gene, enabling cells to grow on medium lacking histidine. Dose-dependent growth responses to S-14 and related SSTR2 subtype-selective agonists that were proportional to the affinity of the ligands for SSTR2 were observed. The growth response required SSTR2, G alpha proteins, and an intact signal transduction pathway. The sensitivity of the bioassay was affected by intracellular levels of the G alpha protein. A mutation in the SST2 gene, which confers supersensitivity to pheromone, was found to significantly enhance the growth response to S-14. In sst2 delta cells, SSTR2 functionally interacted with both a chimeric yeast/mammalian G alpha protein and the yeast G alpha protein, Gpa1p; to promote growth. These yeast strains should serve as a useful in vivo reconstitution system for examination of molecular interactions of the G-protein-coupled receptors and G proteins. PMID:7565771

  1. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K sup + channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    De Weille, J.R.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4{beta}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels are discussed.

  2. Distribution of somatostatin immunoreactive neurons and fibres in the central nervous system of a chondrostean, the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri).

    PubMed

    Adrio, Fátima; Anadón, Ramón; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel

    2008-05-13

    Somatostatin (SOM) is a neuropeptide that is widely distributed in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Two isoforms of somatostatin (SS1 and SS2) have been characterized in sturgeon and in situ hybridisation studies in the sturgeon brain have demonstrated that mRNAs of the two somatostatin precursors (PSS1 and PSS2) are differentially expressed in neurons [Trabucchi, M., Tostivint, H., Lihrmann, I., Sollars, C., Vallarino, M., Dores, R.M., Vaudry, H., 2002. Polygenic expression of somatostatin in the sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus: molecular cloning and distribution of the mRNAs encoding two somatostatin precursors. J. Comp. Neurol. 443, 332-345.]. However, neither the morphology of somatostatinergic neurons nor the patterns of innervation have yet been characterized. To gain further insight into the evolution of this system in primitive bony fishes, we studied the distribution of somatostatin-immunoreactive (SOM-ir) cells and fibres in the brain of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri). Most SOM-ir cells were found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus and abundant SOM-ir fibres coursed along the hypothalamic floor towards the median eminence, suggesting a hypophysiotrophic role for SOM in sturgeon. In addition, SOM-ir cells and fibres were observed in extrahypothalamic regions such as the telencephalon thalamus, rhombencephalon and spinal cord, which also suggests neuromodulatory and/or neurotransmitter functions for this peptide. Overall there was a good correlation between the distribution of SOM-ir neurons throughout the brain of A. baeri and that of PSS1 mRNA in Acipenser transmontanus. Comparative analysis of the results with those obtained in other groups of fishes and tetrapods indicates that widespread distribution of this peptide in the brain is shared by early vertebrate lines and that the general organization of the somatostatinergic systems has been well-conserved during evolution.

  3. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration;  hippocampus ,  memory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...associated viral vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project...generation in  hippocampus , with a bias toward non­neuronal phenotypes, and somatostatin gene  delivery uniformly suppressed this regardless of therapeutic

  4. Insulin analogues in pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Morgan, Margery; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Insulin analogues are commonly used in pregnant women with diabetes. It is not known if the use of insulin analogues in pregnancy is associated with any higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring compared with use of human insulin. We performed a literature search for studies of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes using insulin analogues in the first trimester and information on congenital anomalies. The studies were analysed to compare the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses of mothers using insulin analogues with foetuses of mothers using human insulin. Of 29 studies, we included 1286 foetuses of mothers using short-acting insulin analogues with 1089 references of mothers using human insulin and 768 foetuses of mothers using long-acting insulin analogues with 685 references of mothers using long-acting human insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn). The congenital anomaly rate was 4.84% and 4.29% among the foetuses of mothers using lispro and aspart. For glargine and detemir, the congenital anomaly rate was 2.86% and 3.47%, respectively. No studies on the use of insulin glulisine and degludec in pregnancy were found. There was no statistically significant difference in the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses exposed to insulin analogues (lispro, aspart, glargine or detemir) compared with those exposed to human insulin or Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin. The total prevalence of congenital anomalies was not increased for foetuses exposed to insulin analogues. The small samples in the included studies provided insufficient statistical power to identify a moderate increased risk of specific congenital anomalies.

  5. FK962, a novel enhancer of somatostatin release, exerts cognitive-enhancing actions in rats.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Kenichi; Inoue, Tatsuo; Yamazaki, Shunji; Wang, Feng; Yamaji, Takayuki; Matsuoka, Nobuya; Mutoh, Seitaro

    2005-12-19

    FK962 (N-(1-acetylpiperidin-4-yl)-4-fluorobenzamide) is a derivative of FK960 (N-(4-acetyl-1-piperazinyl)-p-fluorobenzamide monohydrate), with putative anti-dementia properties. Here, we wanted to determine whether FK962 retained the ability of the parent compound to both facilitate somatostatinergic nerve activity in hippocampal neurons and to ameliorate cognitive dysfunction in rat models. FK962 (10(-9) - 10(- 6) M) significantly enhanced high K+-evoked somatostatin release from rat hippocampal slices. FK962 also significantly reduced somatostatin-induced inhibition of Ca2+ channels at 10(-9) - 10(-7) M in single rat hippocampal neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp. Furthermore, administration of FK962 (0.032-3.2 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly ameliorated memory deficits in passive avoidance task in animal models: scopolamine-treated rats, nucleus basalis magnocellularis-lesioned rats and aged rats. FK962 (0.01- 1) mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved spatial memory deficits induced by nucleus basalis magnocellularis-lesion in water maze task. These results suggest that FK962 ameliorates cognitive impairment in rats via activation of the somatostatinergic nervous system in the hippocampus, indicating that FK962 could be a potent cognitive enhancer and therefore might be of therapeutic value for cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Survival prediction in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy based on intratumoral somatostatin-receptor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Harun; Higuchi, Takahiro; Buck, Andreas K.; Lehner, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Peter; Bengel, Frank; Schatka, Imke; Muegge, Dirk O.; Papp, László; Zsótér, Norbert; Große-Ophoff, Tobias; Essler, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    The NETTER-1 trial demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) emphasizing the high demand for response prediction in appropriate candidates. In this multicenter study, we aimed to elucidate the prognostic value of tumor heterogeneity as assessed by somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-PET/CT. 141 patients with SSTR-expressing tumors were analyzed obtaining SSTR-PET/CT before PRRT (1-6 cycles, 177Lu somatostatin analog). Using the Interview Fusion Workstation (Mediso), a total of 872 metastases were manually segmented. Conventional PET parameters as well as textural features representing intratumoral heterogeneity were computed. The prognostic ability for PFS and overall survival (OS) were examined. After performing Cox regression, independent parameters were determined by ROC analysis to obtain cut-off values to be used for Kaplan-Meier analysis. Within follow-up (median, 43.1 months), 75 patients showed disease progression (median, 22.2 m) and 54 patients died (median, 27.6 m). Cox analysis identified 8 statistically independent heterogeneity parameters for time-to-progression and time-to-death. Among them, the textural feature Entropy predicted both PFS and OS. Conventional PET parameters failed in response prediction. Imaging-based heterogeneity assessment provides prognostic information in PRRT candidates and outperformed conventional PET parameters. Its implementation in clinical practice can pave the way for individualized patient management. PMID:27705948

  7. Mouse hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin responses to probes of signal transduction systems.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-01-01

    Signal transduction mechanisms involved in mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) release were investigated using an in vitro perifusion system. Hypothalamic fragments were exposed to depolarizing agents, protein kinase A and C activators, and a calcium ionophore. The depolarizing agents, KCl (60 mM) and veratridine (50 microM), induced similar patterns of GRH and SRIH release. Somatostatin release in response to both agents was twofold greater than that of GRH. Forskolin (10 microM and 100 microM), an adenylate cyclase activator, stimulated both GRH and SRIH release, though with different secretory profiles. The SRIH response was prolonged and persisted beyond removal of the drug from the system, while the GRH response was brief, ending even prior to forskolin removal. Neither GRH nor SRIH were stimulated by 1,9-dideoxy-forskolin (100 microM), a forskolin analog with cAMP-independent actions. A23187 (5 microM), a calcium ionophore, stimulated the release of SRIH to a much greater extent than that of GRH. The GRH and SRIH secretory responses to PMA (1 microM), a protein kinase C activator, were similar, though delayed. The results suggest that 1) GRH and SRIH secretion are regulated by both protein kinase A and C pathways, and 2) depolarizing agents are important for the release of both hormones.

  8. Neuronal Analogues of Conditioning Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-24

    Although the mechanisms of interneuronal communication have been well established, the changes underlying most forms of learning have thus far eluded...stimulating electrodes on one of the connectives was adjusted so as to produce a small excitatory postsynaptic potential ( EPSP ) in the impaled cell...two stimuli would constitute a neuronal analogue of conditioning by producing an increased EPSP in response to the test stimulus alone. If so, then

  9. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  10. Somatostatin and Neuropeptide Y Neurons Undergo Different Plasticity in Parahippocampal Regions in Kainic Acid–Induced Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Drexel, Meinrad; Kirchmair, Elke; Wieselthaler-Hölzl, Anna; Preidt, Adrian Patrick; Sperk, Günther

    2012-01-01

    Parahippocampal brain areas including the subiculum, presubiculum and parasubiculum, and entorhinal cortex give rise to major input and output neurons of the hippocampus and exert increased excitability in animal models and human temporal lobe epilepsy. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for somatostatin and neuropeptide Y, we investigated plastic morphologic and neurochemical changes in parahippocampal neurons in the kainic acid (KA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Although constitutively contained in similar subclasses of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons, both neuropeptide systems undergo distinctly different changes in their expression. Somatostatin messenger RNA (mRNA) is rapidly but transiently expressed de novo in pyramidal neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex 24 hours after KA. Surviving somatostatin interneurons display increased mRNA levels at late intervals (3 months) after KA and increased labeling of their terminals in the outer molecular layer of the subiculum; the labeling correlates with the number of spontaneous seizures, suggesting that the seizures may trigger somatostatin expression. In contrast, neuropeptide Y mRNA is consistently expressed in principal neurons of the proximal subiculum and the lateral entorhinal cortex and labeling for the peptide persistently increased in virtually all major excitatory pathways of the hippocampal formation. The pronounced plastic changes differentially involving both neuropeptide systems indicate marked rearrangement of parahippocampal areas, presumably aiming at endogenous seizure protection. Their receptors may be targets for anticonvulsive drug therapy. PMID:22437342

  11. Effect of somatostatin on the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreas in rats. Role of endogenous gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Dembiński, A; Warzecha, Z; Konturek, S J; Schally, A V

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influence of somatostatin on the growth of gastric, duodenal, and pancreatic tissue in rats placed on liquid diet. In the first part of the study animals were fed an elemental liquid diet for 10 days and then killed, and the growth of the oxyntic gland area of the stomach, 2 cm segments of duodenum and pancreatic tissue was determined. Feeding an elemental diet caused a decrease in organ weight, nucleic acid contents and serum gastrin level. Subsequent addition of pentagastrin prevented this reduction in organ weight and RNA and DNA contents while somatostatin failed to affect the decrease in growth parameters or serum gastrin level in tests with or without addition of pentagastrin. In a second part of the study, sham operated and antrectomised rats were used. Antrectomy caused a significant decrease in serum gastrin concentration and resulted in a significant reduction in the weight and RNA and DNA contents of the tissue tested. As in liquid diet, subsequent administration of pentagastrin prevented the reduction in the growth parameters both in tests with and without somatostatin. These results suggest that somatostatin inhibits the growth of the gastroduodenal mucosa by a mechanism involving, at least in part, the suppression of gastrin release. PMID:2446962

  12. FGFR4 polymorphic alleles modulate mitochondrial respiration: A novel target for somatostatin analog action in pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Shereen; Wang, Ri; Pintilie, Melania; Asa, Sylvia L

    2017-01-10

    We reported that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 388 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4-Gly388Arg) can result in distinct proteins that alter pituitary cell growth and function. Here, we examined the differential properties of the available therapeutic somatostatin analogs, octreotide and pasireotide, in pituitary tumor cells expressing the different FGFR4 isoforms. Consistent with their enhanced growth properties, FGFR4-R388-expressing cells show higher mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation driving basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) than pituitary cells expressing the more common FGFR4-G388 isoform. While both somatostatin analogs reduce the OCR in FGFR4-G388 cells, pasireotide was more effective in decreasing OCR in cells expressing the variant FGFR4-R388 isoform. Down-regulation of somatostatin receptor 5 (SSTR5) abrogated the effect of pasireotide, demonstrating its involvement in mediating this action. The effects on OCR were recapitulated by introducing a constitutively active serine STAT3 but not by a tyrosine-active mutant. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition demonstrated the role for the phosphatase PP2A in mediating the dephosphorylation of STAT3-S727 by pasireotide. Our data indicate that FGFR4 polymorphic isoforms mediate signaling that yields mitochondrial therapeutic targets of relevance to the actions of different somatostatin analogs.

  13. The role of somatostatin (octreotide) in the regulation of melatonin secretion in healthy volunteers and in patients with primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Wikner, J; Wetterberg, L; Röjdmark, S

    1999-01-01

    Somatostatin has been found in the pineal gland of several animal species, which suggests that it may be involved in the regulation of melatonin secretion. Whether somatostatin has regulatory influence on melatonin secretion in man has never been unequivocally shown. We studied the nocturnal melatonin secretion in 8 healthy volunteers, and 6 women with untreated primary hypothyroidism, a disease state that is associated with increased nocturnal secretion of melatonin. The participants were given subcutaneous injections at 18:00 h and 23:00 h of either saline or octreotide (Sandostatin; each injection 50 microg). During the nights when the healthy volunteers were given octreotide, melatonin secretion was similar to that recorded during administration of saline. Also the urinary excretion of melatonin was of similar magnitude at these two occasions. By contrast, the GH secretion was significantly lower the nights the healthy controls were given octreotide (GH AUC 22.6+/-5.4 mU/l x h during octreotide and 126.6+/-21.9 mU/l x h during saline; p<0.01). The patients with hypothyroidism also showed similar nocturnal melatonin secretion during octreotide and saline. Urinary excretion of melatonin also remained unchanged, as did GH secretion. The total nocturnal secretion of TSH was, however, significantly reduced by octreotide (TSH AUC 562+/-136 mU/l x h during octreotide and 851+/-185 mU/l x h during saline; p<0.05), thus suggesting that 100 microg of octreotide should be sufficient to inhibit also the pinealocytes if their function were regulated by somatostatin. Since exogenous somatostatin--in the form of octreotide--fails to influence nocturnal secretion and urinary excretion of melatonin in normal subjects and in patients with primary hypothyroidism, it is reasonable to assume that endogenous somatostatin may not be an important regulator of melatonin secretion in man.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of a tag-free photoactive phospho-ceramide analogue-1 (PCERA-1) probe to study immunomodulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dandela, Rambabu; Mashiach, Roi; Adepu, Raju; Gregor, Rachel; Athamna, Muhammad; Zecharia, Efrat; Ernst, Orna; Zor, Tsaffrir; Meijler, Michael M

    2017-03-30

    Phospho-ceramide analogue-1 (PCERA-1), a synthetic analogue of ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), has been previously shown to act as a potent modulator of macrophage activity and inflammation. We have developed an efficient synthesis of PCERA-1 from readily available starting materials, and designed and prepared derivatives of this analogue, including a photoaffinity probe to tag and identify putative proteins that bind PCERA-1.

  15. Effects of cysteamine administration on the in vivo incorporation of (/sup 35/S)cysteine into somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin in rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, J.L.; Fernstrom, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of cysteamine injection on the in vivo incorporation of (/sup 35/S)cysteine into somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14), SRIF-28, arginine vasopressin (AVP), and oxytocin (OXT) in rat hypothalamus was studied. (/sup 35/S)Cysteine was injected into the third ventricle 1 h, 4 h, or 1 week after cysteamine (300 mg/kg, sc) injection; animals were killed 4 h later. The drug was found to substantially reduce immunoreactive SRIF levels, but not OXT or AVP, 4 h after its injection. Cysteamine also caused large reductions in label incorporation into SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and OXT 1 and 4 h after drug injection. However, (/sup 35/S)cysteine incorporation into AVP was increased substantially at these time points, while that into acid-precipitable protein was normal. One week after cysteamine injection, label incorporation into all hypothalamic peptides was normal. Cysteine specific activity was also measured after (/sup 35/S)cysteine injection and was found to be similar in treatment and control groups. The results suggest that cysteamine inhibits the syntheses of SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and OXT and stimulates that of AVP.

  16. High-resolution mass spectrometry analysis of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its analogues in puffer fish and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Bane, Vaishali; Brosnan, Brid; Barnes, Paul; Lehane, Mary; Furey, Ambrose

    2016-09-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is an emerging toxin in the European marine environment. It has various known structural analogues. It acts as a sodium channel blocker; the ability of each analogue to bind to the sodium channel varies with the particular structure of each analogue. Thus, each analogue will vary in its toxic potential. TTX analogues co-occur in food samples at variable concentrations. An LC-MS method was developed for the identification and quantitation of several analogues of TTX using an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer. The LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer facilitates high mass accuracy measurement up to 100,000 full width at half maximum (FWHM). Using high resolution at 100,000 FWHM allows for the identification of TTX and its analogues in various matrices, including puffer fish and molluscan shellfish samples (Δ ppm = 0.28-3.38). The confirmation of characteristic fragment ions of TTX and its analogues was achieved by determining their elemental formulae via high mass accuracy. A quantitative method was then developed and optimised using these characteristic fragment ions. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of the method was 0.136 µg g(-1) (S/N = 10) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.041 µg g(-1) (S/N = 3) spiking TTX standard into TTX-free mackerel fish extracts. The method was applied to naturally contaminated puffer fish and molluscan shellfish samples to confirm the presence of TTX and its analogues.

  17. Quantitative and functional expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes in human prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, P; Ouafik, L; Saveanu, A; Gunz, G; Fina, F; Dufour, H; Culler, M D; Moreau, J P; Enjalbert, A

    1999-09-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that somatostatin analogs preferential for the SSTR5 subtype suppress PRL release from prolactinoma cell cultures by 30-40%. These data supported the idea of somatostatin receptor subtype-specific control of PRL secretion in such tumors. The present study examines the quantitative profile of SSTRs messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in 10 PRL-secreting tumors and correlates the expression with the ability of native somatostatins (SS14 and SS28), SSTR2 preferential analogs (octreotide and BIM-23197), and the SSTR5 preferential analog BIM-23268 to suppress PRL secretion. RT-PCR quantitative analysis showed a large predominance of SSTR5 mRNA [5648 +/- 1918 pg/pg glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)] vs. SSTR2 mRNA (148 +/- 83 pg/pg GAPDH). The SSTR1 transcript was also highly expressed in prolactinomas (1296 +/- 669 pg/pg GAPDH). SSTR5 mRNA expression correlated with PRL inhibition induced by both SRIF14 and SRIF28. Among the different analogs tested, only BIM-23268 produced inhibition of PRL release similar to that achieved with the native peptides. Its EC50 for PRL suppression was 0.28 +/- 0.10 nmol/L. No additive effects on PRL suppression were achieved by cotreatment of the tumor cells with SSTR2 and SSTR5 preferential analogs. In the same tumor cell cultures, quinagolide, a potent dopamine agonist, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of PRL with an EC50 at least 10 times lower than that of BIM-23268. Coincubation of quinagolide and BIM-23268, particularly in tumor cells resistant to dopamine agonist treatment, did not produce additive effects on PRL suppression. In conclusion, prolactinomas have a specific pattern of SSTR subtype mRNA expression (SSTR5 and SSTR1). SSTR5 expression is correlated to PRL regulation. These inhibitory effects are superimposable, at a higher concentration, to those of the dopamine agonists, but are not additive, particularly in the adenomas resistant to dopaminergic suppression of PRL release.

  18. Cysteamine-induced reduction in gastrointestinal somatostatin: evidence for a region-specific loss in immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, C H; Bakich, V; Bokenfohr, K; DiScala-Guenot, D; Kwok, Y N; Brown, J C

    1988-06-01

    Administration of cysteamine (beta-mercaptoethylamine; 2-aminoethanethiol) to rats has been shown to decrease the levels of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas but its mode of action is unclear. In the current study the effect of cysteamine on gastrointestinal and pancreatic SLI has been studied using two antisera with different regional specificities. In addition, the in vitro effect of cysteamine on SS-14 and SS-28 has been studied by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Characterization of the two antisera (AS 26.3.2 and AS 1001) with a range of analogs of SS-14 revealed that both were directed against the midportion of the molecule but that AS 1001 was also sensitive to changes at the N- and C-termini. Tissue extracts from cysteamine-treated rats measured with AS 26.3.2 showed no significant change for the stomach, jejunum or pancreas but duodenal levels were reduced. With AS 1001 SLI levels were reduced in all tissues. Gel permeation chromatography of stomach extracts measured with AS 1001 showed a reduction in both SS-14 and SS-28. With AS 26.3.2 an increase in SLI eluting prior to the SS-14 peak occurred explaining why no significant reduction in total SLI was detected. With duodenal extracts the elution profiles with AS 1001 reflected the large reduction in total SLI whereas with AS 26.3.2 a smaller reduction occurred. Both SS-14 and SS-28 were reduced. HPLC analysis of SS-14 and SS-28 following incubation with cysteamine in vitro showed a time-dependent decrease in both somatostatin species with absorbance at 280 nm was measured. New peptide peaks which developed were not all detectable by radioimmunoassay with either antibody. The results suggest that cysteamine causes a change in the structure of somatostatin which probably first involves a reduction of the disulphide bridge and then the N- and C-terminal regions of the molecule thus making it unmeasurable by antisera sensitive to changes in these

  19. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs."

  20. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  1. Choline Analogues in Malaria Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peyrottes, Suzanne; Caldarelli, Sergio; Wein, Sharon; Périgaud, Christian; Pellet, Alain; Vial, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging resistance against well-established anti-malaria drugs warrants the introduction of new therapeutic agents with original mechanisms of action. Inhibition of membrane-based phospholipid biosynthesis, which is crucial for the parasite, has thus been proposed as a novel and promising therapeutic strategy. This review compiles literature concerning the design and study of choline analogues and related cation derivatives as potential anti-malarials. It covers advances achieved over the last two decades and describes: the concept validation, the design and selection of a clinical candidate (Albitiazolium), back-up derivatives while also providing insight into the development of prodrug approaches. PMID:22607139

  2. Privacy Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  3. Evidence for a single class of somatostatin receptors in ground squirrel cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Krantic, S.; Petrovic, V.M.; Quirion, R.; Kordon, C.

    1989-01-01

    In the present study we characterized high-affinity somatostatin (SRIF) binding sites (Kd = 2.06 +/- 0.32 nM and Bmax = 295 +/- 28 fmol/mg protein) in cerebral cortex membrane preparations of European ground squirrel using /sup 125/I-(Tyr0-D-Trp8)-SRIF14 as a radioligand. The inhibition of radioligand specific binding by SRIF14, as well as by its agonists (SRIF28, Tyr0-D-Trp8-SRIF14, SMS 201 995) was complete and monophasic, thus revealing a single population of somatostatinergic binding sites. Radioautographic analysis of /sup 125/I-(Tyr0-D-Trp8)-SRIF14 labeled brain sections confirmed the results of our biochemical study. The homogeneity of SRIF binding sites in the ground squirrel neocortex was not dependent on the animal's life-cycle phase.

  4. High-throughput receptor-binding methods for somatostatin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Birzin, Elizabeth T; Rohrer, Susan P

    2002-08-01

    Three high-throughput screening methods for quantitating 125I-SS14 binding to human somatostatin receptor 2 (hSST2) have been developed. Microplate-based separation assays were performed in Packard Unifilter and Millipore Multiscreen plates. A homogeneous ligand-binding assay was developed by employing wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated Flashplates. Apparent dissociation constants for 125I-SS14 binding to hSST2 were obtained with each method. IC(50) values were determined for 12 compounds using each of the methods. Similar IC(50) values were obtained for each compound with all of the methods. The WGA-Flashplate is suitable for fully automated high-throughput screening whereas the Unifilter and Multiscreen methods are more suitable for semiautomated and manual screening applications.

  5. A gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma expressing somatostatin in a bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jeremiah A; Newman, Shelley J; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Dunlap, John

    2010-03-01

    A metastatic gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma in a 2.5-year-old inland bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) with a chronic history of anorexia, weight loss, depression, and acute melena is described. Histologic examination of the gastric mass revealed a densely cellular tumor arranged in nests and occasional rosettes of hyperchromatic cells with oval to spindle-shaped nuclei and minimal cytoplasm; the tumor was supported by a moderate fibrovascular stroma. Similar cells invaded through the gastric mucosa, and there were multiple hepatic metastases. The neoplastic cells were weakly immunopositive for neuron-specific enolase and moderately positive for somatostatin but were negative for chromogranin AB and gastrin. Ultrastructural studies revealed scattered neurosecretory granules in the neoplastic cells, confirming the diagnosis of a neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  6. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  7. Excitatory input onto hilar somatostatin interneurons is increased in a chronic model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Halabisky, Brian; Parada, Isabel; Buckmaster, Paul S; Prince, David A

    2010-10-01

    The density of somatostatin (SOM)-containing GABAergic interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus is significantly decreased in both human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy. We used the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus and temporal lobe epilepsy in mice to study anatomical and electrophysiological properties of surviving somatostatin interneurons and determine whether compensatory functional changes occur that might offset loss of other inhibitory neurons. Using standard patch-clamp techniques and pipettes containing biocytin, whole cell recordings were obtained in hippocampal slices maintained in vitro. Hilar SOM cells containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were identified with fluorescent and infrared differential interference contrast video microscopy in epileptic and control GIN (EGFP-expressing Inhibitory Neurons) mice. Results showed that SOM cells from epileptic mice had 1) significant increases in somatic area and dendritic length; 2) changes in membrane properties, including a small but significant decrease in resting membrane potential, and increases in time constant and whole cell capacitance; 3) increased frequency of slowly rising spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) due primarily to increased mEPSC frequency, without changes in the probability of release; 4) increased evoked EPSC amplitude; and 5) increased spontaneous action potential generation in cell-attached recordings. Results suggest an increase in excitatory innervation, perhaps on distal dendrites, considering the slower rising EPSCs and increased output of hilar SOM cells in this model of epilepsy. In sum, these changes would be expected to increase the inhibitory output of surviving SOM interneurons and in part compensate for interneuronal loss in the epileptogenic hippocampus.

  8. Molecular cloning of the cDNAs encoding three somatostatin variants in the dogfish (Scylorhinus canicula).

    PubMed

    Quan, Feng B; Kenigfest, Natalia B; Mazan, Sylvie; Tostivint, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the somatostatin gene family was likely composed of at least three paralogous genes in the common ancestor of all extant jawed vertebrates. These three genes, namely SS1, SS2 and SS5, are thought to have been generated through the two rounds of whole-genome duplications (2R) that took place early during the vertebrate evolution. In the present study, we report the cloning of three distinct somatostatin cDNAs from the dogfish Scylorhinus canicula, a member of the group of cartilaginous fish. We decided to call these cDNAs, at least provisionally, SSa, SSb and SSc, respectively. Two of them, SSa and SSb, encode proteins that both contain the same tetradecapeptide sequence at their C-terminal extremity (AGCKNFFWKTFTSC). This putative peptide is identical to that generated by the SS1 gene in other vertebrate species. The last cDNA, SSc, encodes a protein that contains at its C-terminal extremity the same peptide sequence as that generated by the SS2 gene in teleosts (APCKNFFWKTFTSC). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the SSa and SSc genes likely correspond to the dogfish counterparts of the SS1 and SS2 genes, respectively. In contrast, the phylogenetic status of the SSb gene is less clear. Several lines of evidence suggest that it could correspond to the SS5 gene, but this view will need to be confirmed, for example by synteny analysis. Finally, RT-PCR analysis revealed that SSa, SSb and SSc genes are differentially expressed in dogfish tissues, suggesting that the corresponding peptides may exert distinct functions.

  9. Neuropeptidomics of mouse hypothalamus after imipramine treatment reveal somatostatin as a potential mediator of antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Stroth, Nikolas; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Qi, Hongshi; Fälth, Maria; Sköld, Karl; Hoyer, Daniel; Andrén, Per E; Svenningsson, Per

    2012-01-01

    Excessive activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been associated with numerous diseases, including depression, and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine has been shown to suppress activity of the HPA axis. Central hypothalamic control of the HPA axis is complex and involves a number of neuropeptides released from multiple hypothalamic subnuclei. The present study was therefore designed to determine the effects of imipramine administration on the mouse hypothalamus using a peptidomics approach. Among the factors found to be downregulated after acute (one day) or chronic (21 days) imipramine administration were peptides derived from secretogranin 1 (chromogranin B) as well as peptides derived from cerebellin precursors. In contrast, peptides SRIF-14 and SRIF-28 (1-11) derived from somatostatin (SRIF, somatotropin release inhibiting factor) were significantly upregulated by imipramine in the hypothalamus. Because diminished SRIF levels have long been known to occur in depression, a second part of the study investigated the roles of individual SRIF receptors in mediating potential antidepressant effects. SRA880, an antagonist of the somatostatin-1 autoreceptor (sst1) which positively modulates release of endogenous SRIF, was found to synergize with imipramine in causing antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test. Furthermore, chronic co-administration of SRA880 and imipramine synergistically increased BDNF mRNA expression in the cerebral cortex. Application of SRIF or L054264, an sst2 receptor agonist, but not L803807, an sst4 receptor agonist, increased phosphorylation of CaMKII and GluR1 in cerebrocortical slices. Our present experiments thus provide evidence for antidepressant-induced upregulation of SRIF in the brain, and strengthen the notion that augmented SRIF expression and signaling may counter depressive-like symptoms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  10. Elucidating the Role of Disulfide Bond on Amyloid Formation and Fibril Reversibility of Somatostatin-14

    PubMed Central

    Anoop, Arunagiri; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Dhaked, Bhagwan Das; Jha, Narendra Nath; Pratihar, Supriya; Ghosh, Saikat; Sahay, Shruti; Kumar, Santosh; Das, Subhadeep; Kombrabail, Mamata; Agarwal, Kumud; Jacob, Reeba S.; Singru, Praful; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of protein/peptide hormones within subcellular compartments and subsequent release are crucial for their native function, and hence these processes are intricately regulated in mammalian systems. Several peptide hormones were recently suggested to be stored as amyloids within endocrine secretory granules. This leads to an apparent paradox where storage requires formation of aggregates, and their function requires a supply of non-aggregated peptides on demand. The precise mechanism behind amyloid formation by these hormones and their subsequent release remain an open question. To address this, we examined aggregation and fibril reversibility of a cyclic peptide hormone somatostatin (SST)-14 using various techniques. After proving that SST gets stored as amyloid in vivo, we investigated the role of native structure in modulating its conformational dynamics and self-association by disrupting the disulfide bridge (Cys3–Cys14) in SST. Using two-dimensional NMR, we resolved the initial structure of somatostatin-14 leading to aggregation and further probed its conformational dynamics in silico. The perturbation in native structure (S-S cleavage) led to a significant increase in conformational flexibility and resulted in rapid amyloid formation. The fibrils formed by disulfide-reduced noncyclic SST possess greater resistance to denaturing conditions with decreased monomer releasing potency. MD simulations reveal marked differences in the intermolecular interactions in SST and noncyclic SST providing plausible explanation for differential aggregation and fibril reversibility observed experimentally in these structural variants. Our findings thus emphasize that subtle changes in the native structure of peptide hormone(s) could alter its conformational dynamics and amyloid formation, which might have significant implications on their reversible storage and secretion. PMID:24782311

  11. Intracellular Ca2+ signals in human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cells (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Squires, P E; Amiranoff, B; Dunne, M J

    1994-10-01

    Single-cell microfluorimetry techniques have been used to examine the effects of acetylcholine (0.1-100 microM) on the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cell line, QGP-1N. When applied to the bath solution, acetylcholine was found to evoke a marked and rapid increase in [Ca2+]i at all concentrations tested. These responses were either sustained, or associated with the generation of complex patterns of [Ca2+]i transients. Overall, the pattern of response was concentration related. In general, 0.1-10 microM acetylcholine initiated a series of repetitive oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+, whilst at higher concentrations the responses consisted of a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i followed by a smaller more sustained increase. Without external Ca2+, 100 microM acetylcholine caused only a transient rise in [Ca2+]i, whereas lower concentrations of the agonist were able to initiate, but not maintain, [Ca2+]i oscillations. Acetylcholine-evoked Ca2+ signals were abolished by atropine (1-10 microM), verapamil (100 microM) and caffeine (20 mM). Nifedipine failed to have any significant effect upon agonist-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, whilst 50 mM KCl, used to depolarise the cell membrane, only elicited a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Ryanodine (50-500 nM) and caffeine (1-20 mM) did not increase basal Ca2+ levels, but the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-hydroquinone (TBQ) and thapsigargin both elevated [Ca2+]i levels. These data demonstrate for the first time cytosolic Ca2+ signals in single isolated somatostatin-secreting cells of the pancreas. We have demonstrated that acetylcholine will evoke both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilisation, and we have partially addressed the subcellular mechanism responsible for these events.

  12. Somatostatin modulates mast cell-induced responses in murine spinal neurons and satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Van Op den bosch, Joeri; Van Nassauw, Luc; Van Marck, Eric; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2009-08-01

    The course of intestinal inflammatory responses is tightly coordinated by the extensive communication between the immune system and the enteric nervous system, among which the bidirectional mast cell-neuron interaction within the intestinal wall plays a prominent role. Recent research suggests that somatostatin (SOM) is able to inhibit this self-reinforcing network by simultaneously suppressing the inflammatory activities of both neurons and mast cells. Therefore, we assessed the modulatory effects of SOM on both the short-term and long-term effects induced by the main mast cell mediators histamine (HIS) and 5-HT on spinal sensory neurons. Short-term incubation of dorsal root ganglion cultures with HIS and 5-HT induced neuronal CGRP-release and calcium-mediated activation of both neurons and nonneuronal cells, both of which effects were significantly reduced by SOM. In addition, SOM was also able to suppress the increased neuronal expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides induced by long-term exposure to HIS and 5-HT. Immunocytochemical and molecular-biological experiments revealed the possible involvement of somatostatin receptor 1 (SSTR1) and SSTR2A in these profound SOM-dependent effects. These data, combined with the increased expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides and several SSTRs in murine dorsal root ganglia following intestinal inflammation, reveal that intestinal inflammation not only induces the onset of proinflammatory cascades but simultaneously triggers endogenous systems destined to prevent excessive tissue damage. Moreover, these data provide for the first time functional evidence that SOM is able to directly modulate intestinal inflammatory responses by interference with the coordinating mast cell-neuron communication.

  13. Critical evaluation of cysteamine as a tool to deplete somatostatin in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, L.L.; Bissette, G.; Dole, K.; Nemeroff, C.B.

    1989-02-01

    The wide central nervous system (CNS) distribution of somatostatin (SRIF) as well as the well documented reduction in SRIF concentration in the cerebral cortex in patients with Alzheimer's disease have served as an impetus for studies of this peptide's neurobiological role in the brain. These studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy of centrally administered cysteamine (CYS) as a tool to deplete SRIF in the hypothalamus (HYP) and extrahypothalamic brain areas. Somatostatin was measured by RIA in the frontal cortex (COR), hippocampus (HIP), and HYP in rats after seven daily infusions of CYS into unilateral cannulae stereotaxically positioned into either the lateral ventricle (LV; 300 micrograms/2 microliters) or the dorsal HIP (100 micrograms/2 microliters), and after single (300 mg/kg) or daily (100 mg/kg) sc injections; rats were killed 4 or 24 h after the last injection. After LV infusions, the SRIF concentration was significantly reduced only in the HYP (35% at 4 h and 27% at 24 h). After HIP infusions, the SRIF concentration was significantly reduced only in the HYP at 4 h (23%); no reductions were observed at 24 h. Both a single and repeated sc administrations of CYS reduced SRIF in the HYP only 24 h after treatment (54% and 50%, respectively). Acute sc CYS reduced SRIF in the COR (23%) and the HYP (29%) 4 h after treatment; repeated sc CYS reduced SRIF in the COR (25%) and the HYP (63%). Although the reduction of SRIF in the HYP was increased by repeated sc dosing, the reduction of extrahypothalamic SRIF by sc CYS was relatively small in magnitude and was not enhanced by repeated dosing. These results suggest that CYS is not an ideal tool for depletion of extrahypothalamic SRIF after sc or CNS administration and, moreover, raise serious questions about studies in which behavioral or endocrine alterations after CYS treatment were attributed to specific actions on SRIF-containing neurons.

  14. Release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity from the perfused canine thyroid. Selective stimulatory effect of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, P; Orskov, H

    1981-05-01

    It is well accepted that the C cells of the thyroid contain somatostatin, but the role in local endocrine function has not yet been firmly established in this organ, and it has not been proved that thyroidal somatostatin is released into the circulation. We have measured the contents of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the effluent of canine thyroid glands perfused without recirculation with a synthetic buffer medium. During basal conditions a definite release was consistently found in the order of 10 pg/ml corresponding to 12 pg/min. The somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was studied in dilution experiments and by gel-filtration chromatography, and found to have properties identical to those of synthetic cyclic somatostatin, which was also recovered quantitatively when added to sampling tubes. Various compounds were infused in concentrations that are highly active in pancreas perfusion experiments. 14-min infusion of arginine, 5 and 11.5 mmol/liter; isoproterenol, 10 and 23.7 nmol/liter and 68.7 mumol/liter; acetylcholine, 5 mumol/liter, carbamylcholine, 10 and 100 mumol/liter; glucagon, 1 and 30 nmol/liter; and porcine calcitonin, 1 and 100 ng/ml did not affect the basal release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity significantly. Neither did an increase from the control level of 4 mmol/liter glucose of 10 or 20 mmol/liter, nor an increase in the control level of 4.4 mmol/liter K+ to 7.5 or 14.4 mmol/liter. Each of these compounds were tested in three or four dogs. The effect of an increase in Ca++ from the control level of 1.5 mmol/liter to 2.25, 3.0, and 4.5 mmol/liter was tested in random order in five thyroid lobes. All three doses elicited an immediate increase in effluent somatostatin-like immunoreactivity. In most experiments the response was biphasic with an early spike, followed by a stable level that was maintained during prolonged Ca++ infusion. The secretory response was not diminished through a series of repeated short pulses of calcium infusion

  15. Electrostatic evaluation of isosteric analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayle, Roger; Nicholls, Anthony

    2006-04-01

    A method is presented for enumerating a large number of isosteric analogues of a ligand from a known protein-ligand complex structure and then rapidly calculating an estimate of their binding energies. This approach takes full advantage of the observed crystal structure, by reusing the atomic co-ordinates determined experimentally for one ligand, to approximate those of similar compounds that have approximately the same shape. By assuming that compounds with similar shapes adopt similar binding poses, and that entropic and protein flexibility effects are approximately constant across such an isosteric series ("the frozen ligand approximation"), it is possible to order their binding affinities relatively accurately. Additionally, the constraint that the atomic coordinates are invariant allows for a dramatic simplification in the Poisson-Boltzmann method used to calculation the electrostatic component of the binding energy. This algorithmic improvement allows for the calculation of tens of thousands of binding energies per second for drug-like molecules, enabling this technique to be used in screening large virtual libraries of isosteric analogues. Most significantly, this procedure is shown to be able to reproduce SAR effects of subtle medicinal chemistry substitutions. Finally, this paper reports the results of the proposed methodology on␣seven model systems; dihydrofolate reductase, Lck␣kinase, ribosome inactivating protein, l-arabinose binding protein, neuraminidase, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and COX-2.

  16. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  17. Heteroatom-Containing Porphyrin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Shetti, Vijayendra S; Sharma, Ritambhara; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2017-02-22

    The heteroatom-containing porphyrin analogues or core-modified porphyrins that resulted from the replacement of one or two pyrrole rings with other five-membered heterocycles such as furan, thiophene, selenophene, tellurophene, indene, phosphole, and silole are highly promising macrocycles and exhibit quite different physicochemical properties compared to regular azaporphyrins. The properties of heteroporphyrins depend on the nature and number of different heterocycle(s) present in place of pyrrole ring(s). The heteroporphyrins provide unique and unprecedented coordination environments for metals. Unlike regular porphyrins, the monoheteroporphyrins are known to stabilize metals in unusual oxidation states such as Cu and Ni in +1 oxidation states. The diheteroporphyrins, which are neutral macrocycles without ionizable protons, also showed interesting coordination chemistry. Thus, significant progress has been made in last few decades on core-modified porphyrins in terms of their synthesis, their use in building multiporphyrin arrays for light-harvesting applications, their use as ligands to form interesting metal complexes, and also their use for several other studies. The synthetic methods available in the literature allow one to prepare mono- and diheteroporphyrins and their functionalized derivatives, which were used extensively to prepare several covalent and noncovalent heteroporphyrin-based multiporphyrin arrays. The methods are also developed to synthesize different hetero analogues of porphyrin derivatives such as heterocorroles, heterochlorins, heterocarbaporphyrinoids, heteroatom-substituted confused porphyrins, and so on. This Review summarizes the key developments that have occurred in heteroporphyrin chemistry over the last four decades.

  18. Expression of type 5 somatostatin receptor in TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas: a possible marker for predicting long-term response to octreotide therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Ai; Isozaki, Osamu; Hizuka, Naomi; Nozoe, Yasuko; Harada, Chie; Ono, Masami; Kawamata, Takakazu; Kubo, Osami; Hori, Tomokatsu; Takano, Kazue

    2007-02-01

    In TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas (TSHoma), octreotide (OCT) therapy reduces tumor size and TSH secretion in some cases but not in others. As OCT acts through various types of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), the different responses of TSHoma to OCT might be explained by the differences of SSTR expression. We therefore studied the expression of subtype-specific SSTR mRNA transcripts in tumor tissues by RT-PCR. Type 2 (SSTR2) mRNA transcripts were detected in all 8 tumors but those of SSTR3 and SSTR5 were demonstrated only in 5 of them. Serum TSH levels were decreased by OCT administration test in all patients but OCT therapy was effective in two patients out of three. SSTR5 mRNA was detected in two tumors from the responder, but not in one tumor that was resistant to OCT. These observations suggest that the temporal decrease of TSH by OCT may be mediated by SSTR2, and that the long term response to OCT therapy may be related with the expression of SSTR5. Therefore, the expression of SSTR5 in TSHoma may be a useful marker for predicting the outcome of the therapy, but further studies with larger numbers of patients are necessary.

  19. Comparison of the effect of somatostatin on gastrointestinal function in the conscious and anaesthetized cat and on the isolated cat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Albinus, M; Blair, E L; Case, R M; Coy, D H; Gomez-Pan, A; Hirst, B H; Reed, J D; Schally, A V; Shaw, B; Smith, P A; Smy, J R

    1977-01-01

    1. Somatostatin, 10 microgram kg-1 hr-1, inhibited gastric acid and pepsin secretion stimulated by pentagastrin, 8 microgram kg-1 hr-1, in conscious and anaesthetized cats with chronically implanted gastric fistulae. In the acutely surgically prepared anaesthetized cat, Somatostatin inhibited pepsin secretion but produced little inhibition of gastric acid secretion or mucosal blood flow. 2. Secretin stimulated pancreatic juice volume was not significantly reduced in acutely prepared anaesthetized cats, but there was a limited reduction of cholecystokinin-pancreozymin stimulated pancreatic amylase secretion and gall bladder contraction. 3. Somatostatin had neither stimulatory nor inhibitory effects on electrolyte and amylase secretion in the isolated saline-perfused cat pancreas. 4. The results suggest that some of the effects of Somatostatin may depend on the interaction on the target cell of other factors, nervous or humoral which may vary in different experimental preparations. PMID:330838

  20. Inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the basal and TSH-stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into rat thyroid lobes incubated in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zerek-Melen, G.; Lewinski, A.

    1988-07-15

    The effects of somatostatin on the spontaneous and TSH--stimulated incorporation of tritiated thymidine into the rat thyroid lobes incubated in vitro were investigated. The rate of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was used as an index of thyroid follicular cells (TFC) proliferation. It was shown that: 1) somatostatin, at a concentration of 10(-7)M, decreased /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of TFC, 2) the highest somatostatin concentration, as tested in this study (10(-6)M), produced a similar decreasing effect; the decrease, in this case, did not attain significance vs. controls, 3) somatostatin, when employed together with TSH, suppressed the stimulatory effect of the latter hormone on /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of thyroid lobes.

  1. Effect of electro-acupuncture at Foot-Yangming Meridian on somatostatin and expression of somatostatin receptor genes in rabbits with gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Shou-Xiang; Yang, Ren-Da; Yan, Jie; Chang, Xiao-Rong; Ling, Ya-Ping

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the protective effect of electroacupunc-ture at the Foot-Yangming Meridian on gastric mucosal lesion, somatostatin (SS) and the expression of SS receptor genes (SSR1mRNA ) in rabbits with gastric ulcer and to further explore the relative specificity of meridians and viscera at gene expression level. METHODS: Forty rabbits were randomly divided into control group (A), gastric ulcer model group (B), Foot-Yangming Meridian group (C), Foot-Shaoyang Meridian group (D) and Foot-Taiyang Meridian group (E). The gastric ulcer model was prepared by infusing alcohol into stomach. Groups C - E were treated with electro-acupuncture at points along the above meridians using meridian stimulating instruments for 7 days respectively. By the end of treatment, the index of gastric ulcer was determined, the amount of epidermal growth factor(EGF) and somatostatin was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). SS-R1mRNA expression in gastric mucosa was determined by RT-PCR. RESULTS: The value of EGF in model group was ob-viously lower(73.6 ± 14.8 vs 91.3 ± 14.9 pg/mL, P < 0.01) than that in control group. The index of gastric ulcer, content of SS and expression of SSR1mRNA in gastric mucosa were significantly higher than those in control group(24.88 ± 6.29 vs 8.50 ± 2.98 scores, P< 0.01; 2978.6 ± 587.6 vs 1852.4 ± 361.7 mIU/mL, P < 0.01; 2.56± 0.25 vs 1.04 ± 0.36, P<0.01). The value of EGF in Foot-Yangming Meridian group was higher than that in model group(92.2 ± 6.7 vs 73.6 ± 14.8 pg/mL, P  < 0.01). The index of gastric ulcer, content of SS and expression of SS-R1mRNA in gastric mucosa were significantly lower than those in control group(10.88 ± 3.23 vs 24.88± 6.29 scores, P< 0.01; 1800.2 ± 488 vs 2978.6 ± 587.6 mIU/mL, P < 0.01; 1.07 ± 0.08 vs 2.56 ± 0.25mIU/mL, P < 0.01). Compared to the model group, the content of SS and expression of SSR1mRNA in gastric mucosa in

  2. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  3. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog (125I)CGP 23996. (125I)CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity (125I)CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of (125I)CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect (125I)CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with (125I) CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to (125I)CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors.

  4. In vivo detection of somatostatin receptors in patients with functionless pituitary adenomas by means of a radioiodinated analog of somatostatin ((123I)SDZ 204-090)

    SciTech Connect

    Faglia, G.; Bazzoni, N.; Spada, A.; Arosio, M.; Ambrosi, B.; Spinelli, F.; Sara, R.; Bonino, C.; Lunghi, F. )

    1991-10-01

    The recent availability of a Tyr3-substituted octreotide (SDZ 204-090) for radioiodination has allowed somatostatin (SRIH) receptor binding to be studied in vivo, and receptor-positive tumors of different origins to be visualized with a gamma-camera. This prompted us to investigate whether this compound could be used for external imaging of functionless pituitary adenomas displaying SRIH receptors. Eight patients with functionless pituitary adenomas, three patients with acromegaly, and three with macroprolactinoma were injected iv with 123I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide and then scanned with a gamma-camera. Positive scans were obtained in the three acromegalics and in two of the eight patients with functionless pituitary tumors. The patients with macroprolactinoma had negative scans. The diagnosis of functionless pituitary adenomas was confirmed by light and electron microscopic examination as well as immunocytochemical studies. In vitro binding of (125I)Tyr11-SRIH to cell membranes was evaluated in four functionless and three GH-secreting adenomas removed from seven of the patients. All of the GH-secreting as well as one of the four functionless adenomas had high affinity SRIH-binding sites, without differences in number or affinity, whereas SRIH-binding sites were not detected in the others. Positive scans were observed only in patients bearing tumors with high affinity SRIH-binding sites. In conclusion, (123I)Tyr3-octreotide appears to be a promising tool for singling out, in vivo, patients with functionless pituitary tumors displaying SRIH receptors who might potentially benefit from octreotide treatment.

  5. Effects of cysteamine and antibody to somatostatin on islet cell function in vitro. Evidence that intracellular somatostatin deficiency augments insulin and glucagon secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Y.C.; Pierzchala, I.; Amherdt, M.; Orci, L.

    1985-04-01

    In this study the authors have characterized the effects of cysteamine (CHS) on the cellular content and release of immunoreactive somatostatin (S-14 LI), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG) from monolayer cultures of neonatal rat islets. Incubation of cultures with 0.1-10 mM CHS for 1 h led to an apparent, dose-dependent reduction of cellular S-14 LI that was 50% of control at 0.3 mM, 87% at 1 mM, and 95% at 10 mM. IRI content was unaffected by CHS up to 1 mM, but at 10 mM 90% loss of IRI occurred. All concentrations were without effect on IRG content. The loss of S-14 LI and IRI was completely reversible with time, but with different recovery rates for the two hormones. Cultures rendered S-14 LI deficient with both CHS and anti-S-14 LI exhibited threefold and 2.3-fold potentiation of IRG and IRI secretions, respectively, greater than that expected from the separate effects of the two agents. Increasing medium glucose from 2.8 mM to 16.7 mM stimulated IRI release by 86% and suppressed IRG by 53%. These results suggest that CHS induces an apparent loss of islet S-14 LI, and at high doses, of IRI as well, but has no effect on A cells. Complete islet S-14 LI deficiency augments IRI and IRG secretion over a wide range of glucose concentrations, suggesting a physiological role of D cells on B cell and A cell regulation.

  6. Somatostatin inhibits activation of dorsal cutaneous primary afferents induced by antidromic stimulation of primary afferents from an adjacent thoracic segment in the rat.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Pickar, Joel G; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Zhao, Yan

    2008-09-10

    To investigate the effect of somatostatin on the cross-excitation between adjacent primary afferent terminals in the rats, we recorded single unit activity from distal cut ends of dorsal cutaneous branches of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in response to antidromic stimulation of the distal cut end of the T11 dorsal root in the presence and absence of somatostatin and its receptor antagonist applied to the receptive field of the recorded nerve. Afferent fibers were classified based upon their conduction velocity. Mean mechanical thresholds decreased and spontaneous discharge rates increased significantly in C and Adelta but not Abeta fibers of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in both male and female rats following antidromic electrical stimulation (ADES) of the dorsal root from adjacent spinal segment (DRASS) indicating cross-excitation of thin fiber afferents. The cross-excitation was not significantly different between male and female rats. Microinjection of somatostatin into the receptive field of recorded units inhibited the cross-excitation. This inhibitory effect, in turn, was reversed by the somatostation receptor antagonist cyclo-somatostatin (c-SOM). Application of c-SOM alone followed by ADES of DRASS significantly decreased the mechanical thresholds and increased the discharge rates of C and Adelta fibers, indicating that endogenous release of somatostatin plays a tonic inhibitory role on the cross-excitation between peripheral nerves. These results suggest that somatostatin could inhibit the cross-excitation involved in peripheral hyperalgesia and have a peripheral analgesic effect.

  7. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  8. Macrolactam analogues of macrolide natural products.

    PubMed

    Hügel, Helmut M; Smith, Andrew T; Rizzacasa, Mark A

    2016-12-07

    The chemical modification of macrolide natural products into aza- or lactam analogues is a strategy employed to improve their metabolic stability and biological activity. The methods for the synthesis of several lactam analogues of macrolide natural products are highlighted and aspects of their biological properties presented.

  9. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618

  10. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-03

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers.

  11. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  12. Surfactin analogues produced by Bacillus subtilis strains grown on rapeseed cake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajor, Paweł; Piłakowska-Pietras, Dorota; Krasowska, Anna; Łukaszewicz, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Microbiologically produced surface acting compounds (biosurfactants) have very interesting properties with many potential industrial applications. Lipopeptides is a particularly promising group of biosurfactants in respect to the potentially huge number of various chemical structures. The chemical diversity results from fatty acid moiety (e.g. length, saturation, branching or hydroxylation) and type and sequence of the amino acids in the peptide chain. The limiting factor for the design and analysis of various lipopeptides is the ability of the targeted biosynthesis. Biosynthesis of particular lipopeptides may be potentially achieved by strain selection, culture conditions, or molecular engineering. The well-known lipopeptedes (surfactins, iturins, and fengycins) producer is B. subtilis. The aim of this study was to study targeted surfactin structural analogues biosynthesis in response to culture conditions in view of the design and production of tailor-made lipopeptides. Two B. subtilis strains (KB1 and #309) were tested for surfactin production. Both strains produced a mixture of five major surfactin analogues with the number of carbons in an alkyl chain ranging from 12 to 16. The two strains differed with respect to their oxygen demand for optimal surfactin biosynthesis (lower oxygen demand for KB1). The amount of air influenced the relative ratios of surfactin analogues. Lower oxygen amount decreased the share of C15 analogues while it increased the share of C12 analogues. Thus, the biosynthesis of a desired surfactin analogue may controlled by both strain and culture conditions.

  13. Impaired excitability of somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Abe, Yasuyuki; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2014-07-29

    Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable developmental epilepsy syndrome with seizure onset in the first year of life. Specific heterozygous deletion of NaV1.1 in forebrain GABAergic-inhibitory neurons is sufficient to cause all the manifestations of Dravet syndrome in mice, but the physiological roles of specific subtypes of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex in this disease are unknown. Voltage-clamp studies of dissociated interneurons from cerebral cortex did not detect a significant effect of the Dravet syndrome mutation on sodium currents in cell bodies. However, current-clamp recordings of intact interneurons in layer V of neocortical slices from mice with haploinsufficiency in the gene encoding the NaV1.1 sodium channel, Scn1a, revealed substantial reduction of excitability in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons and somatostatin-expressing interneurons. The threshold and rheobase for action potential generation were increased, the frequency of action potentials within trains was decreased, and action-potential firing within trains failed more frequently. Furthermore, the deficit in excitability of somatostatin-expressing interneurons caused significant reduction in frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition between neighboring layer V pyramidal neurons mediated by somatostatin-expressing Martinotti cells, which would lead to substantial disinhibition of the output of cortical circuits. In contrast to these deficits in interneurons, pyramidal cells showed no differences in excitability. These results reveal that the two major subtypes of interneurons in layer V of the neocortex, parvalbumin-expressing and somatostatin-expressing, both have impaired excitability, resulting in disinhibition of the cortical network. These major functional deficits are likely to contribute synergistically to the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome.

  14. The Somatostatin Analog Rhenium Re-188-P2045 Inhibits the Growth of AR42J Pancreatic Tumor-xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carol A.; Azure, Michael T.; Adams, Christopher T.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    P2045 is a peptide analog of somatostatin with picomolar affinity for the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) upregulated in some pancreatic tumors. Studies were conducted in rat AR42J pancreatic tumor-xenograft mice to determine if Re-188-P2045 could inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer in an animal model. Methods Re-188-P2045 was intravenously administered every 3 days for 16 days to nude mice with AR42J tumor-xenografts that were ≈ 20 mm3 at study initiation. Tumor volumes were recorded throughout the dosing period. At necropsy all tissues were assessed for levels of radioactivity and evaluated for histological abnormalities. Clinical chemistry and hematology parameters were determined from terminal blood samples. The affinity of non-radioactive Re-185/187-P2045 for somatostatin receptors was compared in human NCI-H69 and rat AR42J tumor-cell membranes expressing predominantly SSTR2. Results In the 1.85 and 5.55 mBq groups tumor growth was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion. In the 11.1 mBq group tumor growth was completely inhibited throughout the dosing period and for 12 days after the last administered dose. The radioactivity level in tumors 4 hours post-injection was 10%ID/g, which was 2-fold higher than in the kidneys. Re-188-P2045 was well tolerated in all dose-groups with no adverse clinical, histological, or hematological findings. The non-radioactive Re-185/187-P2045 bound more avidly (0.2 nM) to SSTR2 in human than rat tumor membranes suggesting that these studies are relevant to human studies. Conclusion Re-188-P2045 is a promising therapeutic candidate for patients with somatostatin-receptor-positive cancer. PMID:25359879

  15. Flaviviridae viruses use a common molecular mechanism to escape nucleoside analogue inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Valdés, James J; Butterill, Philip T; Růžek, Daniel

    2017-03-18

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of Flaviviridae viruses are crucial for replication. The Flaviviridae polymerase is organized into structural motifs (A-G), with motifs F, A, C and E containing interrogating, priming and catalytic substrate-interacting sites. Modified nucleoside analogues act as antiviral drugs by targeting Flaviviridae polymerases and integrating into the synthesized product causing premature termination. A threonine mutation of a conserved serine residue in motif B of Flaviviridae polymerases renders resistance to 2'-C-methylated nucleoside analogues. The mechanism how this single mutation causes Flaviviridae viruses to escape nucleoside analogues is not yet known. Given the pivotal position of the serine residue in motif B that supports motif F, we hypothesized the threonine mutation causes alterations in nucleoside exploration within the entry tunnel. Implementing a stochastic molecular software showed the all-atom 2'-C-methylated analogue reaction within the active sites of wild type and serine-threonine mutant polymerases from Hepacivirus and Flavivirus. Compared with the wild type, the serine-threonine mutant polymerases caused a significant decrease of analogue contacts with conserved interrogating residues in motif F and a displacement of metal ion cofactors. The simulations significantly showed that during the analogue exploration of the active site the hydrophobic methyl group in the serine-threonine mutant repels water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the 2'-C-methylated analogue, causing a concentration of water-mediated bonds at the substrate-interacting sites. Collectively, the data are an insight into a molecular escape mechanism by Flaviviridae viruses from 2'-C-methylated nucleoside analogue inhibitors.

  16. IDX-1: a new homeodomain transcription factor expressed in rat pancreatic islets and duodenum that transactivates the somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C P; McGehee, R E; Habener, J F

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning from a rat islet somatostatin-producing cell line of a 1.4 kb cDNA encoding a new homeoprotein, IDX-1 (islet/duodenum homeobox-1), with close sequence similarity to the Drosophila melanogaster homeobox protein Antennapedia (Antp) and the Xenopus laevis endoderm-specific homeoprotein XlHbox8. Analyses of IDX-1 mRNA and protein in rat tissues show that IDX-1 is expressed in pancreatic islets and ducts and in the duodenum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays IDX-1 binds to three sites in the 5' flanking region of the rat somatostatin gene. In co-transfection experiments IDX-1 transactivates reporter constructs containing somatostatin promoter sequences, and mutation of the IDX-1 binding sites attenuates transactivation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of islet RNA using degenerate amplimers for mRNAs encoding homeoproteins indicates that IDX-1 is the most abundant of 12 different Antp-like homeodomain mRNAs expressed in adult rat islets. The pattern of expression, relative abundance and transcriptional regulatory activity suggests that IDX-1 may be involved in the regulation of islet hormone genes and in cellular differentiation in the endocrine pancreas and the duodenum. Images PMID:7907546

  17. Iodination of (Tyr11)somatostatin yields a super high affinity ligand for somatostatin receptors in GH4C1 pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Presky, D.H.; Schonbrunn, A.

    1988-11-01

    GH4C1 cells are a clonal strain of rat pituitary tumor cells which contain high affinity receptors for the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SRIF). In contrast to other peptides that bind to specific receptors on these cells, receptor-bound (125I-Tyr1)SRIF does not undergo rapid endocytosis. Rather, partial degradation to 125I-tyrosine occurs concomitantly with the dissociation of (125I-Tyr1)SRIF from cell surface receptors. In this study we characterize the binding, biological activity and receptor-mediated degradation of (125I-Tyr11)SRIF, a SRIF analog that is radiolabeled in the center of the molecule. The binding of trace concentrations of (125I-Tyr11)SRIF (less than 50 pM) required 6 hr to reach equilibrium at 37 degrees compared with the 60 min required for (125I-Tyr1)SRIF. Analysis of the kinetics of (125I- Tyr11)SRIF binding showed that the rate constant for association (kon = 1.7 x 10(8) M-8min-1) was similar to that for (125I-Tyr1)SRIF (0.8 x 10(8) M-1min-1). However, the two radioligands exhibited markedly different dissociation kinetics; the koff for (125I-Tyr11)SRIF was 0.002 min-1 compared with the value of 0.02 min-1 for (125I-Tyr1) SRIF. In agreement with its much slower rate of dissociation, (125I-Tyr11)SRIF bound to the SRIF receptor with higher affinity (Kd = 70 pM) than did (125I-Tyr1)SRIF (Kd = 350 pM). However, the apparent ED50 for (I-Tyr11)SRIF to inhibit cAMP accumulation (1.9 +/- 0.4 nM) was greater than the ED50 for SRIF (0.19 +/- 0.04 nM). The low potency of (I-Tyr11)SRIF probably resulted from the fact that subsaturating concentrations of this peptide did not achieve equilibrium binding during the 30-min incubation used to assay biological activity. As previously reported for (125I-Tyr1)SRIF, receptor-bound (125I-Tyr11)SRIF was not internalized and was released from the cells as a mixture of intact (125I-Tyr11)SRIF (30%) and the degradation product 125I-tyrosine (65%).

  18. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  19. Cysteamine induces cholecystokinin release from the duodenum. Evidence for somatostatin as an inhibitory paracrine regulator of cholecystokinin secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Abucham, J.; Reichlin, S. )

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether cholecystokinin secretion is regulated by endogenous somatostatin, somatostatin deficiency was induced in vivo with cysteamine (250 mg/kg body wt, IV) or anti-somatostatin antiserum in anaesthetized rats and in vitro with cysteamine (30 micrograms/mL) in a rat duodenum-incubation system. Cholecystokinin secretion was assessed in vivo by measuring amylase in duodenal perfusates collected at 10-minute intervals for 1 hour and in vitro by a carboxy-terminal radioimmunoassay. Cysteamine induced a marked decrease in duodenal immunoreactive somatostatin both in vivo (50%) and in vitro (60%). The rate of amylase secretion increased from 9.7 +/- 2.1 U (mean +/- SE) to 28.0 +/- 4.8 U at 20 minutes (P less than 0.001). The cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist CR-1392 abolished amylase response for 30 minutes, whereas the more potent antagonists Asperlicin (18.0 mg/kg body wt, IV) and L-364,718 (0.25 mg/kg body wt, IV) caused prolonged blockade. The rate of amylase secretion in gastrectomized animals increased from 7.2 +/- 2.0 U to 15.0 +/- 2.2 U 20 minutes after cysteamine administration (P less than 0.01), indicating that the effect was not due to the presence of gastrin. In vitro, cysteamine caused a nearly fourfold increase in cholecystokinin secretion compared with controls (63.1 +/- 4.9 vs. 15.2 +/- 3.7, respectively; P less than 0.001). In vivo immunoneutralization of circulating somatostatin with a high-affinity and high-capacity antiserum produced no significant change in the rate of amylase secretion. These results suggest that cholecystokinin secretion is tonically inhibited by somatostatin and that this effect is mediated by locally secreted (paracrine) but not by circulating somatostatin.

  20. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  1. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  2. Space analogue studies in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lugg, D; Shepanek, M

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  3. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  4. Cortical plasticity induced by transplantation of embryonic somatostatin or parvalbumin interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunshuo; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian

    2014-12-23

    GABAergic inhibition has been shown to play an important role in the opening of critical periods of brain plasticity. We recently have shown that transplantation of GABAergic precursors from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the source of neocortical parvalbumin- (PV(+)) and somatostatin-expressing (SST(+)) interneurons, can induce a new period of ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) after the endogenous period has closed. Among the diverse subtypes of GABAergic interneurons PV(+) cells have been thought to play the crucial role in ODP. Here we have used MGE transplantation carrying a conditional allele of diphtheria toxin alpha subunit and cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase to deplete PV(+) or SST(+) interneurons selectively and to investigate the contributions of each of these types of interneurons to ODP. As expected, robust plasticity was observed in transplants containing PV(+) cells but in which the majority of SST(+) interneurons were depleted. Surprisingly, transplants in which the majority of PV(+) cells were depleted induced plasticity as effectively as those containing PV(+) cells. In contrast, depleting both cell types blocked induction of plasticity. These findings reveal that PV(+) cells do not play an exclusive role in ODP; SST(+) interneurons also can drive cortical plasticity and contribute to the reshaping of neural networks. The ability of both PV(+) and SST(+) interneurons to induce de novo cortical plasticity could help develop new therapeutic approaches for brain repair.

  5. Quantitative Classification of Somatostatin-Positive Neocortical Interneurons Identifies Three Interneuron Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Laura M.; Packer, Adam M.; Fino, Elodie; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Sippy, Tanya; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Deciphering the circuitry of the neocortex requires knowledge of its components, making a systematic classification of neocortical neurons necessary. GABAergic interneurons contribute most of the morphological, electrophysiological and molecular diversity of the cortex, yet interneuron subtypes are still not well defined. To quantitatively identify classes of interneurons, 59 GFP-positive interneurons from a somatostatin-positive mouse line were characterized by whole-cell recordings and anatomical reconstructions. For each neuron, we measured a series of physiological and morphological variables and analyzed these data using unsupervised classification methods. PCA and cluster analysis of morphological variables revealed three groups of cells: one comprised of Martinotti cells, and two other groups of interneurons with short asymmetric axons targeting layers 2/3 and bending medially. PCA and cluster analysis of electrophysiological variables also revealed the existence of these three groups of neurons, particularly with respect to action potential time course. These different morphological and electrophysiological characteristics could make each of these three interneuron subtypes particularly suited for a different function within the cortical circuit. PMID:20617186

  6. Ectopic ACTH secretion due to a bronchopulmonary carcinoid localized by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Iser, G; Pfohl, M; Dörr, U; Weiss, E M; Seif, F J

    1994-11-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old woman with an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting bronchopulmonary carcinoid. This patient showed the typical long history of Cushing's syndrome, including hypokaliemia, impaired glucose tolerance, high levels of ACTH and beta-endorphin, and coproduction of other peptides. At the onset of clinical symptoms in 1979 an adrenal adenoma was suspected, and left-sided adrenalectomy was performed. The symptoms soon recurred, and the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome was made. As no ACTH-secreting tumor was found, the right adrenal was resected, and the patient was followed up regularly. Fourteen years later chest roentgenography and computed tomography revealed a para-aortic pulmonary lesion, which was suspicious for a bronchopulmonary carcinoid. ACTH and beta-endorphin were excessively, pancreatic polypeptide slightly elevated at that time. The final diagnosis was made using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy which confirmed the hormonal activity of the suspicious lesion; no additional focus was found. This method turned out to be not only a useful additional localization technique but also a promising tool for characterization and staging of a suspected ACTH-producing carcinoid. The tumor was resected curatively, and the diagnosis was confirmed histologically.

  7. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  8. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  9. Molecular signatures of mu opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor 2 in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jorand, Raphael; Biswas, Sunetra; Wakefield, Devin L.; Tobin, Steven J.; Golfetto, Ottavia; Hilton, Kelsey; Ko, Michelle; Ramos, Joe W.; Small, Alexander R.; Chu, Peiguo; Singh, Gagandeep; Jovanovic-Talisman, Tijana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a particularly aggressive malignancy, has been linked to atypical levels, certain mutations, and aberrant signaling of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs have been challenging to target in cancer because they organize into complex networks in tumor cells. To dissect such networks with nanometer-scale precision, here we combine traditional biochemical approaches with superresolution microscopy methods. A novel interaction specific to PDAC is identified between mu opioid receptor (MOR) and somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2). Although MOR and SSTR2 did not colocalize in healthy pancreatic cells or matching healthy patient tissues, the pair did significantly colocalize in pancreatic cancer cells, multicellular tumor spheroids, and cancerous patient tissues. Moreover, this association in pancreatic cancer cells correlated with functional cross-talk and increased metastatic potential of cells. Coactivation of MOR and SSTR2 in PDAC cells led to increased expression of mesenchymal markers and decreased expression of an epithelial marker. Together these results suggest that the MOR-SSTR2 heteromer may constitute a novel therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:27682590

  10. Circadian modulation of anxiety: a role for somatostatin in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Anne; Thiere, Marlen; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge Ricardo; Poranzke, Janine; Müller, Bettina; Stork, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests that the neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) exerts anxiolytic action via the amygdala, but findings concerning the putative role of endogenous SST in the regulation of emotional responses are contradictory. We hypothesized that an endogenous regulation of SST expression over the course of the day may determine its function and tested both SST gene expression and the behavior of SST knock out (SST⁻/⁻) mice in different aversive tests in relation to circadian rhythm. In an open field and a light/dark avoidance test, SST⁻/⁻ mice showed significant hyperactivity and anxiety-like behavior during the second, but not during the first half of the active phase, failing to show the circadian modulation of behavior that was evident in their wild type littermates. Behavioral differences occurred independently of changes of intrinsically motivated activity in the home cage. A circadian regulation of SST mRNA and protein expression that was evident in the basolateral complex of the amygdala of wild type mice may provide a neuronal substrate for the observed behavior. However, fear memory towards auditory cue or the conditioning context displayed neither a time- nor genotype-dependent modulation. Together this indicates that SST, in a circadian manner and putatively via its regulation of expression in the amygdala, modulates behavior responding to mildly aversive conditions in mice.

  11. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  12. Parallel secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from human pancreastatin producing cell line (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Kitayama, N; Jimi, A; Matsuoka, Y; Kono, A

    1993-05-01

    In this investigation we studied pancreastatin (PST) secretion from a human PST producing cell line (QGP-1N) in response to various secretagogues. Immunocytochemical study revealed the immunoreactivity of PST and somatostatin (SMT) in the same cells of a monolayer culture. Ki-ras DNA point mutation on codon 12 was found. Carbachol stimulated secretion of PST and SMT and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in the range of 10(-6)-10(-4) M. The secretion and Ca2+ mobilization were inhibited by atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (A23187) stimulated secretion of PST and SMT. The removal of extracellular calcium suppressed both secretions throughout stimulation with 10(-5) M carbachol. Fluoride, a well-known activator of guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein, stimulated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and secretion of PST and SMT in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 5-40 mM. Also, 10(-5) M carbachol and 20 mM fluoride stimulated inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate production. However, cholecystokinin and gastrin-releasing peptide did not stimulate Ca2+ mobilization or secretion of the two peptides. These results suggest that secretion of PST and SMT from QGP-1N cells is regulated mainly by acetylcholine in a parallel fashion through muscarinic receptors coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide breakdown by a G-protein and that increases in intracellular Ca2+ and protein kinase C play an important role in stimulus-secretion coupling.

  13. Molecular signatures of mu opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor 2 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jorand, Raphael; Biswas, Sunetra; Wakefield, Devin L; Tobin, Steven J; Golfetto, Ottavia; Hilton, Kelsey; Ko, Michelle; Ramos, Joe W; Small, Alexander R; Chu, Peiguo; Singh, Gagandeep; Jovanovic-Talisman, Tijana

    2016-11-07

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a particularly aggressive malignancy, has been linked to atypical levels, certain mutations, and aberrant signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs have been challenging to target in cancer because they organize into complex networks in tumor cells. To dissect such networks with nanometer-scale precision, here we combine traditional biochemical approaches with superresolution microscopy methods. A novel interaction specific to PDAC is identified between mu opioid receptor (MOR) and somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2). Although MOR and SSTR2 did not colocalize in healthy pancreatic cells or matching healthy patient tissues, the pair did significantly colocalize in pancreatic cancer cells, multicellular tumor spheroids, and cancerous patient tissues. Moreover, this association in pancreatic cancer cells correlated with functional cross-talk and increased metastatic potential of cells. Coactivation of MOR and SSTR2 in PDAC cells led to increased expression of mesenchymal markers and decreased expression of an epithelial marker. Together these results suggest that the MOR-SSTR2 heteromer may constitute a novel therapeutic target for PDAC.

  14. Variations in plasma motilin, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide concentrations and the interdigestive myoelectric complex in dog.

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Lemoyne, M; Tasse, D; Trudel, L; Yamada, T; Taylor, I L

    1985-12-01

    We have looked at the plasma concentrations of motilin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and somatostatin (STS) during the various phases of the interdigestive motor complex (IDMC) in dogs. As expected, motilin cyclical increase was always associated with the phase III of the IDMC. Statistical analysis of PP variations revealed a significant rise 10 min before duodenal phase III; however, in individual animals, this relationship was inconsistent. Although a dose-related increase in PP blood levels was induced by administration of synthetic canine motilin (0-200 ng kg-1 iv), fasting plasma levels of PP were not correlated with the concentrations of circulating endogenous motilin. After truncal vagotomy, while motilin release and the intestinal motility pattern remained unaltered, the phase III associated cyclical increases of PP disappeared. Infusion of physiological amounts of PP (1 microgram kg-1 h-1 for 3 h) mimicking the postprandial release failed to reproduce a fed pattern type of intestinal motility and of motilin secretion. No statistical correlation could be established between STS plasma levels and the motor activity of the intestine. STS plasma levels were not correlated with circulating concentrations of motilin and the exogenous administration of physiological doses of synthetic canine motilin failed to modify STS plasma levels. Morphine (200 micrograms kg-1 iv) stimulated only the release of motilin. These data suggest that the role played by circulating concentrations of PP and STS in the control of the IDMC in dog is at most minimal.

  15. Target-specific effects of somatostatin-expressing interneurons on neocortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Cottam, James C H; Smith, Spencer L; Häusser, Michael

    2013-12-11

    A diverse array of interneuron types regulates activity in the mammalian neocortex. Two of the most abundant are the fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive (PV(+)) interneurons, which target the axosomatic region of pyramidal cells, and the somatostatin-positive (SOM(+)) interneurons, which target the dendrites. Recent work has focused on the influence of PV(+) and SOM(+) interneurons on pyramidal cells. However, the connections among PV(+) and SOM(+) interneurons are poorly understood and could play an important role in cortical circuitry, since their interactions may alter the net influence on pyramidal cell output. We used an optogenetic approach to investigate the effect of SOM(+) interneurons on pyramidal cells and PV(+) interneurons during visual stimulation in mouse primary visual cortex. We find that SOM(+) interneuron activation suppresses PV(+) cell spiking at least twice as potently as pyramidal cell spiking during visual stimulation. This differential effect of SOM(+) cell stimulation is detectable even when only two to three SOM(+) cells are activated. Importantly, the remaining responses to oriented gratings in PV(+) cells are more orientation tuned and temporally modulated, suggesting that SOM(+) activity unmasks this tuning by suppressing untuned input. Our results highlight the importance of SOM(+) inhibition of PV(+) interneurons during sensory processing. This prominent competitive inhibition between interneuron types leads to a reconfiguration of inhibition along the somatodendritic axis of pyramidal cells, and enhances the orientation selectivity of PV(+) cells.

  16. Somatostatin receptor staining in FFPE sections using a ligand derivative dye as an alternative to immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Shinji; Ito, Takaaki

    2017-01-01

    The confirmation of target expression in tissues is a prerequisite for molecular-targeted therapy. However, difficulties are sometimes associated with the production of appropriate antibodies against receptors. We herein developed a ligand derivative dye for the staining of receptors. The somatostatin receptor (sstr) was selected as the target and FITC-octreotate as the detective agent. We performed a blot analysis to detect sstr in the transfer membrane. The sstr2 recombinant protein or cell lysate from a small cell lung carcinoma cell line (H69) was boiled and loaded onto SDS-PAGE, and the proteins were transferred to a membrane. Even after denaturing processes, FITC-octreotate still bound sstr on the membrane. Furthermore, FITC-octreotate depicted the expression of sstr in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections, a method that we named ligand derivative staining (LDS). The accuracies of immunostaining and LDS were compared at the points of the detection of sstr using FFPE sections of 30 neuroendocrine tumor specimens. The sensitivity of LDS was 81.8%, while those of immunostaining using anti-sstr2 and sstr5 antibodies were 72.7% and 63.6%, respectively. Thus, LDS appears to be superior to immunostaining. A ligand derivative may be used as a substitute for antibodies, and has the potential to support economical, simple, and accurate detection methods. PMID:28182792

  17. Theoretical analysis of somatostatin receptor 5 with antagonists and agonists for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Santhosh Kumar; Babu, Sathya; Madhavan, Thirumurthy

    2017-02-02

    We report on SSTR5 receptor modeling and its interaction with reported antagonist and agonist molecules. Modeling of the SSTR5 receptor was carried out using multiple templates with the aim of improving the precision of the generated models. The selective SSTR5 antagonists, agonists and native somatostatin SRIF-14 were employed to propose the binding site of SSTR5 and to identify the critical residues involved in the interaction of the receptor with other molecules. Residues Q2.63, D3.32, Q3.36, C186, Y7.34 and Y7.42 were found to be highly significant for their strong interaction with the receptor. SSTR5 antagonists were utilized to perform a 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship study. A comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was conducted using two different alignment schemes, namely the ligand-based and receptor-based alignment methods. The best statistical results were obtained for ligand-based ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] = 0.988, noc = 4) and receptor-guided methods (docked mode 1:[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], noc = 5), (docked mode 2:[Formula: see text] = 0.555, [Formula: see text], noc = 5). Based on CoMFA contour maps, an electropositive substitution at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] position and bulky group at [Formula: see text] position are important in enhancing molecular activity.

  18. Protein phosphatase modulation of somatostatin receptor signaling in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Sarah J.; Armstrong, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Many inhibitory interneurones in the hippocampus release the neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) which inhibits neuronal excitability through Gi/Go-coupled receptors. To investigate the signaling pathways underlying the SST inhibition of neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, we performed perforated patch-clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurones in acute brain slices from P14-P18 mice. Bath application of 1 μM SST reversibly reduces the frequency of action potential firing in response to depolarising current steps, and is associated with neuronal hyperpolarisation and a reduction in membrane resistance. This effect is mediated by potassium channels with KCNK-like pharmacology. In addition, in slices that have been cultured in vitro for seven days or more, SST also produces a hyperpolarisation independent reduction in action potential firing, which can be also observed in acute slices when the Ser/Thr protein phosphatases PP2A and PP4 are inhibited selectively with fostriecin. This hyperpolarisation independent effect of SST appears to be mediated by G-protein activated inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels. Knockdown of protein phosphatase 5, by Cre recombinase mediated deletion of the floxed Ppp5c gene, blocks the hyperpolarisation independent effect of SST, and reduces the hyperpolarisation dependent effect in a manner consistent with increased SST receptor desensitisation. Thus, reversible protein phosphorylation provides a mechanism to enhance or diminish the inhibitory effect of SST, which could allow system level regulation of circuit excitability in the hippocampus. PMID:26196943

  19. Interaction between phosphoinositide turnover system and cyclic AMP pathway for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1992-06-30

    It is found that secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells is regulated through muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositide hydrolysis system. In this report, whether the cAMP pathway interacts with the phosphoinositide turnover system for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptors was studied. Stimulation of QGP-1N cells with carbachol increased intracellular cAMP levels. The carbachol-induced increase in cAMP levels was inhibited by atropine. Calcium ionophore (A23187) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased cAMP synthesis. Dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin and theophylline stimulated secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin. When either dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin or theophylline was added in culture medium with A23187, phorbol ester or carbachol, a synergistic effect was found on pancreastatin and somatostatin secretion. These results suggest that interaction between the phosphoinositide turnover system and the cAMP pathway occurs in QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptor stimulation for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin.

  20. Effects of cysteamine and antibody to somatostatin on islet cell function in vitro. Evidence that intracellular somatostatin deficiency augments insulin and glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Pierzchala, I; Amherdt, M; Orci, L

    1985-04-01

    In this study we have characterized the effects of cysteamine (CHS) on the cellular content and release of immunoreactive somatostatin (S-14 LI), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG) from monolayer cultures of neonatal rat islets. Incubation of cultures with 0.1-10 mM CHS for 1 h led to an apparent, dose-dependent reduction of cellular S-14 LI that was 50% of control at 0.3 mM, 87% at 1 mM, and 95% at 10 mM. IRI content was unaffected by CHS up to 1 mM, but at 10 mM 90% loss of IRI occurred. All concentrations were without effect on IRG content. The loss of S-14 LI and IRI was completely reversible with time, but with different recovery rates for the two hormones (48 h for S-14 LI, and 72 h for IRI). Released S-14 LI rose progressively with increasing doses of CHS from 21 +/- 2.5 pg/ml per hour to 41 +/- 1.4 pg/ml per hour at CHS concentrations of 5 mM and 10 mM. IRI and IRG secretion were both also significantly enhanced (by 55% and 88%, respectively), despite the elevated medium S-14 LI. Since CHS reduced cellular S-14 LI but augmented medium S-14 LI, the relative effects of CHS (1 mM) and immunoneutralization with antibody to S-14 LI on IRI and IRG secretion were tested. Anti S-14 LI alone stimulated basal IRG (67%) but not IRI. Cultures rendered S-14 LI deficient with both CHS and anti-S-14 LI exhibited threefold and 2.3-fold potentiation of IRG and IRI secretions, respectively, greater than that expected from the separate effects of the two agents. Increasing medium glucose from 2.8 mM to 16.7 mM stimulated IRI release by 86% and suppressed IRG by 53%. CHS (1 mM) and anti-S-14 LI further augmented stimulated IRI release, by 30%; although 16.7 mM glucose suppression of IRG was still maintained under these conditions, the quantitative IRG response was significantly greater. These results suggest that CHS induces an apparent loss of islet S-14 LI, and at high doses, of IRI as well, but has no effect on A cells. Complete islet S-14 LI deficiency augments IRI and IRG

  1. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities.

  2. Recombinant DNA derived monomeric insulin analogue: comparison with soluble human insulin in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Vora, J. P.; Owens, D. R.; Dolben, J.; Atiea, J. A.; Dean, J. D.; Kang, S.; Burch, A.; Brange, J.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the rate of absorption from subcutaneous tissue and the resulting hypoglycaemic effect of iodine-125 labelled soluble human insulin and a monomeric insulin analogue derived by recombinant DNA technology. DESIGN--Single blind randomised comparison of equimolar doses of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue. SETTING--Study in normal people at a diabetes research unit and a university department of medical physics. SUBJECTS--Seven healthy male volunteers aged 20-39 not receiving any other drugs. INTERVENTIONS--After an overnight fast and a basal period of one hour two doses (0.05 and 0.1 U/kg) of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue were injected subcutaneously into the anterior abdominal wall on four separate days. END POINT--To find a fast acting insulin for meal related requirements in insulin dependent diabetics. MEASUREMENTS and main results--Residual radioactivity at the injection site was measured continuously for the first two hours after injection of the 125I labelled preparations and thereafter for five minutes simultaneously with blood sampling. Frequent venous blood samples were obtained over six hours for determination of plasma immunoreactive insulin, insulin analogue, glucose, and glucagon values. Time to 50% of initial radioactivity at the injection site for the insulin analogue compared with soluble insulin was 61 v 135 minutes (p less than 0.05) with 0.05 U/kg and 67 v 145 minutes (p less than 0.001) with 0.1 U/kg. Concentrations in plasma increased faster after the insulin analogue compared with soluble insulin, resulting in higher plasma concentrations between 10 and 150 minutes (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) after 0.05 U/kg and between 40 and 360 minutes (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) after 0.1 U/kg. The hypoglycaemic response to insulin analogue was a plasma glucose nadir at 60 minutes with both doses compared with 90 and 120 minutes with soluble insulin at 0.5 and 0.1 U

  3. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  4. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance.

  5. Postsynaptic targets of somatostatin-containing interneurons in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jay F; Mascagni, Franco; McDonald, Alexander J

    2007-01-20

    The basolateral amygdala contains several subpopulations of inhibitory interneurons that can be distinguished on the basis of their content of calcium-binding proteins or peptides. Although previous studies have shown that interneuronal subpopulations containing parvalbumin (PV) or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) innervate distinct postsynaptic domains of pyramidal cells as well as other interneurons, very little is known about the synaptic outputs of the interneuronal subpopulation that expresses somatostatin (SOM). The present study utilized dual-labeling immunocytochemical techniques at the light and electron microscopic levels to analyze the innervation of pyramidal cells, PV+ interneurons, and VIP+ interneurons in the anterior basolateral amygdalar nucleus (BLa) by SOM+ axon terminals. Pyramidal cell somata and dendrites were selectively labeled with antibodies to calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK); previous studies have shown that the vast majority of dendritic spines, whether CAMK+ or not, arise from pyramidal cells. Almost all SOM+ axon terminals formed symmetrical synapses. The main postsynaptic targets of SOM+ terminals were small-caliber CaMK+ dendrites and dendritic spines, some of which were CaMK+. These SOM+ synapses with dendrites were often in close proximity to asymmetrical (excitatory) synapses to these same structures formed by unlabeled terminals. Few SOM+ terminals formed synapses with CaMK+ pyramidal cell somata or large-caliber (proximal) dendrites. Likewise, only 15% of SOM+ terminals formed synapses with PV+, VIP+, or SOM+ interneurons. These findings suggest that inhibitory inputs from SOM+ interneurons may interact with excitatory inputs to pyramidal cell distal dendrites in the BLa. These interactions might affect synaptic plasticity related to emotional learning.

  6. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance. PMID:26005406

  7. K(+) channel expression distinguishes subpopulations of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-containing neocortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Chow, A; Erisir, A; Farb, C; Nadal, M S; Ozaita, A; Lau, D; Welker, E; Rudy, B

    1999-11-01

    Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 K(+) channel proteins form similar voltage-gated K(+) channels with unusual properties, including fast activation at voltages positive to -10 mV and very fast deactivation rates. These properties are thought to facilitate sustained high-frequency firing. Kv3.1 subunits are specifically found in fast-spiking, parvalbumin (PV)-containing cortical interneurons, and recent studies have provided support for a crucial role in the generation of the fast-spiking phenotype. Kv3.2 mRNAs are also found in a small subset of neocortical neurons, although the distribution of these neurons is different. We raised antibodies directed against Kv3.2 proteins and used dual-labeling methods to identify the neocortical neurons expressing Kv3.2 proteins and to determine their subcellular localization. Kv3.2 proteins are prominently expressed in patches in somatic and proximal dendritic membrane as well as in axons and presynaptic terminals of GABAergic interneurons. Kv3.2 subunits are found in all PV-containing neurons in deep cortical layers where they probably form heteromultimeric channels with Kv3.1 subunits. In contrast, in superficial layer PV-positive neurons Kv3.2 immunoreactivity is low, but Kv3.1 is still prominently expressed. Because Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels are differentially modulated by protein kinases, these results raise the possibility that the fast-spiking properties of superficial- and deep-layer PV neurons are differentially regulated by neuromodulators. Interestingly, Kv3. 2 but not Kv3.1 proteins are also prominent in a subset of seemingly non-fast-spiking, somatostatin- and calbindin-containing interneurons, suggesting that the Kv3.1-Kv3.2 current type can have functions other than facilitating high-frequency firing.

  8. Endogenous hypothalamic somatostatins differentially regulate growth hormone secretion from goldfish pituitary somatotropes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Warren K; Smith, Sean; Graves, Chad; Davis, Philip J; Unniappan, Surajlal; Rivier, Jean E; Peter, Richard E; Chang, John P

    2003-09-01

    Using Southern blot analysis of RT-PCR products, mRNA for three different somatostatin (SS) precursors (PSS-I, -II, and -III), which encode for SS(14), goldfish brain (gb)SS(28), and [Pro(2)]SS(14), respectively, were detected in goldfish hypothalamus. PSS-I and -II mRNA, but not PSS-III mRNA, were also detected in cultured pituitary cells. We subsequently examined the effects of the mature peptides, SS(14), gbSS(28), and [Pro(2)]SS(14), on somatotrope signaling and GH secretion. The gbSS(28) was more potent than either SS(14) or [Pro(2)]SS(14) in reducing basal GH release but was the least effective in reducing basal cellular cAMP. The ability of SS(14), [Pro(2)]SS(14), and gbSS(28) to attenuate GH responses to GnRH were comparable. However, gbSS(28) was less effective than SS(14) and [Pro(2)]SS(14) in diminishing dopamine- and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-stimulated GH release, as well as GH release resulting from the activation of their underlying signaling cascades. In contrast, the actions of a different 28-amino-acid SS, mammalian SS(28), were more similar to those of SS(14) and [Pro(2)]SS(14). We conclude that, in goldfish, SSs differentially couple to the intracellular cascades regulating GH secretion from pituitary somatotropes. This raises the possibility that such differences may allow for the selective regulation of various aspects of somatotrope function by different SS peptides.

  9. GABAergic Somatostatin-immunoreactive Neurons in the Amygdala Project to the Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Alexander J.; Zaric, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex and other hippocampal and parahippocampal cortices are interconnected by a small number of GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons in addition to glutamatergic pyramidal cells. Since the cortical and basolateral amygdalar nuclei have cortex-like cell types and have robust projections to the entorhinal cortex, we hypothesized that a small number of amygdalar GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons might participate in amygdalo-entorhinal projections. To test this hypothesis we combined Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tract tracing with immunohistochemistry for the amygdalar nonpyramidal cell markers glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and the m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2R). Injections of FG into the rat entorhinal cortex labeled numerous neurons that were mainly located in the cortical and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. Although most of these amygdalar FG+ neurons labeled by entorhinal injections were large pyramidal cells, 1–5% were smaller long-range nonpyramidal neurons (LRNP neurons) that expressed SOM, or both SOM and NPY. No amygdalar FG+ neurons in these cases were PV+ or VIP+. Cell counts revealed that LRNP neurons labeled by injections into the entorhinal cortex constituted about 10–20% of the total SOM+ population, and 20–40% of the total NPY population in portions of the lateral amygdalar nucleus that exhibited a high density of FG+ neurons. Sixty-two percent of amygdalar FG+/SOM+ neurons were GAD+, and 51% were M2R+. Since GABAergic projection neurons typically have low perikaryal levels of GABAergic markers, it is actually possible that most or all of the amygdalar LRNP neurons are GABAergic. Like GABAergic LRNP neurons in hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, amygdalar LRNP neurons that project to the entorhinal cortex are most likely involved in synchronizing oscillatory activity between the two regions. These oscillations could entrain

  10. Testing the role of preBötzinger Complex somatostatin neurons in respiratory and vocal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Rieger, Michael A; Ling, Guang-Yi; Park, Thomas J; Dougherty, Joseph D; Goodchild, Ann K; Gray, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Identifying neurons essential for the generation of breathing and related behaviors such as vocalisation is an important question for human health. The targeted loss of preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) glutamatergic neurons, including those that express high levels of somatostatin protein (SST neurons), eliminates normal breathing in adult rats. Whether preBötC SST neurons represent a functionally specialised population is unknown. We tested the effects on respiratory and vocal behaviors of eliminating SST neuron glutamate release by Cre-Lox-mediated genetic ablation of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGlut2). We found the targeted loss of VGlut2 in SST neurons had no effect on viability in vivo, or on respiratory period or responses to neurokinin 1 or μ-opioid receptor agonists in vitro. We then compared medullary SST peptide expression in mice with that of two species that share extreme respiratory environments but produce either high or low frequency vocalisations. In the Mexican free-tailed bat, SST peptide-expressing neurons extended beyond the preBötC to the caudal pole of the VII motor nucleus. In the naked mole-rat, however, SST-positive neurons were absent from the ventrolateral medulla. We then analysed isolation vocalisations from SST-Cre;VGlut2(F/F) mice and found a significant prolongation of the pauses between syllables during vocalisation but no change in vocalisation number. These data suggest that glutamate release from preBötC SST neurons is not essential for breathing but play a species- and behavior-dependent role in modulating respiratory networks. They further suggest that the neural network generating respiration is capable of extensive plasticity given sufficient time.

  11. Proteomics Suggests a Role for APC-Survivin in Response to Somatostatin Analog Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kjellin, Hanna; Hashemi, Jamileh; Barriuso, Jorge; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Lu, Ming; Höög, Anders; Pastrián, Laura G.; Lamarca, Angela; Soto, Victoria Heredia; Zedenius, Jan; Mendiola, Marta; Lehtiö, Janne; Kjellman, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Context: Somatostatin analogs are established in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) including small intestinal NET; however, the molecular mechanisms are not well known. Here, we examined the direct effects of lanreotide in NET cell line models. Setting and Design: The cell lines HC45 and H727 were treated with 10nM lanreotide for different time periods and alterations of the proteome were analyzed by in-depth high-resolution isoelectric focusing tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We next investigated whether the observed suppression of survivin was mediated by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and possible effects on tumor proliferation in vitro. Expression of survivin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 112 NET cases and compared with patient outcome. Results: We quantified 6451 and 7801 proteins in HC45 and H727, respectively. After short time lanreotide treatment APC was increased and survivin reduced. Overexpression of APC in H727 cells decreased, and APC knock-down elevated the survivin level. The lanreotide regulation of APC-survivin could be suppressed by small interfering RNA against somatostatin receptor 2. Although lanreotide only gave slight inhibition of proliferation, targeting of survivin with the small molecule YM155 dramatically reduced proliferation. Moderate or high as compared with low or absent total survivin expression was associated with shorter progression-free survival, independent of tumor stage, grade, and localization. Conclusions: We report a proteome-wide analysis of changes in response to lanreotide in NET cell lines. This analysis suggests a connection between somatostatin analog, APC, and survivin levels. Survivin is a possible prognostic factor and a new potential therapeutic target in NETs. PMID:27459532

  12. Efficacy and safety of an oral somatostatin DNA vaccine without antibiotic resistance gene in promoting growth of piglets.

    PubMed

    Han, Y -G; Liang, A -X; Han, L; Guo, A -Z; Jiang, X -P; Yang, L -G

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an oral DNA vaccine against somatostatin (SS) (pGS/2SS-asd, encoding two copies of somatostatin genes) mediated by attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis C500 without antibiotic resistance gene on piglets growth. A total of 50 piglets were uniformly divided into five groups. The animals in the first three groups were orally given vaccine in dose of either 5 9 1010, 5 9 109 or 5 9 108 colony-forming units (CFU).The remaining two groups were orally administered with either bacteria C500(containing pVAX-asd plasmid without somatostatin gene) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as controls. The results indicated that the vaccine induced SS-specific antibodies in a dose-dependent pattern. Compared with the PBS control, animals in the high-dose group showed lower SS levels and higher growth hormone (GH) levels in sera. Average daily gain of animals in the high dose group was increased by 32.88% and 26.46% during 4 and 8 weeks,respectively. Anti-SS antibodies were positively correlated with either GH levels or average daily gain at week 8 after primary immunization (P < 0.05). Faecal,soil and water samples originating from immunized piglets and surrounding environment were collected. The target gene (the fusion gene GS/2SS) of C500(pGS/2SS-asd) was not detected by PCR amplification in these samples,indicating that the surrounding environment was not contaminated by residual recombinant bacteria. In conclusion, the vaccine without antibiotic resistance gene is attributable to improve growth performance of piglets through an influence on GH secretion. Moreover, the immunization did not contaminate the surrounding environment of animals.

  13. Neuroligin-2 deletion selectively decreases inhibitory synaptic transmission originating from fast-spiking, but not from somatostatin-positive interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Jay R.; Huber, Kimberly M.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroligins are cell-adhesion molecules involved in synapse formation and/or function. Neurons express four neuroligins (NL1–NL4), of which NL1 is specific to excitatory, and NL2 to inhibitory synapses. Excitatory and inhibitory synapses include numerous subtypes. However, it is unknown whether NL1 performs similar functions in all excitatory and NL2 in all inhibitory synapses, or whether they regulate the formation and/or function of specific subsets of synapses. To address this central question, we performed paired recordings in primary somatosensory cortex of mice lacking NL1 or NL2. Using this system, we examined neocortical microcircuits formed by reciprocal synapses between excitatory neurons and two subtypes of inhibitory interneurons, namely fast-spiking and somatostatin-positive interneurons. We find that the NL1 deletion had little effect on inhibitory synapses, whereas the NL2 deletion decreased (40–50%) the unitary (cell-to-cell) IPSC amplitude evoked from single fast-spiking interneurons. Strikingly, the NL2 deletion had no effect on IPSC amplitude evoked from single somatostatin-positive inhibitory interneurons. Moreover, the frequency of unitary synaptic connections between individual fast-spiking and somatostatin-positive interneurons and excitatory neurons was unchanged. The decrease in unitary IPSC amplitude originating from fast-spiking interneurons in NL2-deficient mice was due to a multiplicative and uniform down-scaling of the amplitude distribution, which in turn was mediated by a decrease in both synaptic quantal amplitude and quantal content – the latter inferred from an increase in the coefficient of variation. Thus, NL2 is not necessary for establishing unitary inhibitory synaptic connections, but is selectively required for “scaling up” unitary connections originating from a subset of interneurons. PMID:19889999

  14. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  15. Clinical uses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Casper, R F

    1991-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) analogues are synthetic derivatives of the native hypothalamic peptide with alterations in their chemical structure that result in changes in biologic activity. Several Gn-RH agonists are available for clinical use, and all act through the same mechanism: first to stimulate and then to inhibit gonadotropin and gonadal steroid secretion by downregulating the pituitary Gn-RN receptors. This review should provide clinicians with a working knowledge of the physiologic and pharmacokinetic features of Gn-RH agonists. Although over 2000 articles concerning Gn-RH analogues have been published I chose to review only those that were the first to report a novel clinical application. Gn-RH agonists have proved to be extremely efficacious in treating gonadal steroid-dependent problems such as endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, precocious puberty and prostate and breast cancers, and they have resulted in very few side effects. Long-term use may, however, lead to skeletal calcium loss in women as a consequence of hypoestrogenism. Further research is needed to prevent this and maintain clinical efficacy. PMID:1986827

  16. Addition of Somatostatin After Successful Endoscopic Variceal Ligation Does not Prevent Early Rebleeding in Comparison to Placebo: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Jha, Sanjeev K.; Mittal, Vibhu V.; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh C.; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efficacy of endoscopic sclerotherapy in controlling acute variceal bleeding is significantly improved when vasoactive drug is added. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is superior to sclerotherapy. Whether efficacy of EVL will also improve with addition of somatostatin is not known. We compared EVL plus somatostatin versus EVL plus placebo in control of acute variceal bleeding. Methods Consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were enrolled. After emergency EVL, patients were randomized to receive either somatostatin (250 mcg/hr) or placebo infusion. Primary endpoint was treatment failure within 5 days. Treatment failure was defined as fresh hematemesis ≥2 h after start of therapy, or a 3 gm drop in Hb, or death. Results 61 patients were enrolled (EVL plus somatostatin group, n = 31 and EVL plus placebo group, n = 30). The baseline characteristics were similar. Within the initial 5-day period, the frequency of treatment failure was similar in both the groups (EVL plus somatostatin group 8/31 [26%] versus EVL plus placebo group 7/30 [23%]; P = 1.000). The mortality was also similar in the two groups (3/31 [10%] vs. 3/30 [10%]; P = 1.000). Baseline HVPG ≥19 mm Hg and active bleeding at index endoscopy were independent predictors of treatment failure. Conclusions Addition of somatostatin infusion to EVL therapy does not offer any advantage in control of acute variceal bleeding or reducing mortality. The reason for this may be its failure to maintain sustained reduction in portal pressure for five days. Active bleeding at index endoscopy and high baseline HVPG should help choose early alternative treatment options. Trial registered with ClincalTrials.gov vide NCT01267669. PMID:26628838

  17. The influence of ovarian factors on the somatostatin-growth hormone system during the postnatal growth and sexual development in lambs.

    PubMed

    Wańkowska, Marta; Polkowska, Jolanta; Misztal, Tomasz; Romanowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the effects of ovarian hormones on somatostatin in the hypothalamic neurons and growth hormone (GH) secretion during the postnatal growth and development of sheep. The study was performed on 9-week-old (infantile) lambs that were ovary-intact (OVI) or ovariectomized (OVX) at 39 days of age, and on 16-week-old (juvenile) lambs that were OVI or OVX at 88 days of age. Hormones in neurons and somatotropic cells were assayed with immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Following ovariectomy, immunoreactive somatostatin was more abundant (p<0.05) in the hypothalamus of infantile lambs, whereas in juvenile lambs it was more abundant (p<0.05) in the periventricular nucleus but reduced (p<0.01) in the median eminence. In contrast to somatostatin in the hypothalamus, the content of immunoreactive GH in the hypophysis was less in OVX infantile lambs, but greater in OVX juvenile lambs (p<0.05). Basal blood serum concentrations of GH were greater (p<0.05) in OVX infantile lambs, whereas in OVX juvenile lambs, mean and basal concentrations of GH and amplitude of GH pulses were less than in OVI lambs (p<0.05). The postnatal increase in body weight was greatest in middle-late infancy (p<0.01). The body weight did not differ (p>0.05) between OVI and OVX lambs. In conclusion, ovarian factors may inhibit the GH secretion in infantile lambs but enhance the GH secretion in juvenile lambs. Transition to puberty, as related to the growth rate, appears to be due mainly to change in gonadal influence on the somatostatin neurosecretion. A stimulation of somatostatin output in the median eminence by gonadal factors in infancy is followed by a stimulation of somatostatin accumulation after infancy. Thus, ovarian factors modulate mechanisms within the somatotropic system of lambs to synchronize the somatic growth with sexual development.

  18. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of 123I/131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with 68Gallium- DOTA-DPhe1, Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA. PMID:24163518

  19. On the mechanical analogue of DNA.

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, Ludmila

    2017-03-01

    The creation of mechanical analogues of biological systems is known as a useful instrument that helps to understand better the dynamical mechanisms of the functioning of living organisms. Mechanical analogues of biomolecules are usually constructed for imitation of their internal mobility, which is one of the most important properties of the molecules. Among the different types of internal motions, angular oscillations of nitrous bases are of special interest because they make a substantial contribution to the base pairs opening that in turn is an important element of the process of the DNA-protein recognition. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to construct a mechanical analogue for imitation of angular oscillations of nitrous bases in inhomogeneous DNA. It is shown that the analogue has the form of a mechanical chain of non-identical pendulums that oscillate in the gravitational field of the Earth and coupled by identical springs. The masses and lengths of pendulums, as well as the distances between neighboring pendulums and the rigidity of springs are calculated. To illustrate the approach, we present the result of construction of the mechanical analogue of the fragment of the sequence of bacteriophage T7D.

  20. Analogue Downscaling of Seasonal Rainfall Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. N.; Timbal, B.; Hendon, H.

    2010-12-01

    We have taken an existing statistical downscaling model (SDM), based on meteorological analogues that was developed for downscaling climate change projections (Timbal et al 2009), and applied it in the seasonal forecasting context to produce downscaled rainfall hindcasts from a coupled model seasonal forecast system (POAMA). Downscaling of POAMA forecasts is required to provide seasonal climate information at local scales of interest. Analogue downscaling is a simple technique to generate rainfall forecasts appropriate to the local scale by conditioning on the large scale predicted GCM circulation and the local topography and climate. Analogue methods are flexible and have been shown to produce good results when downscaling 20th century South Eastern Australian rainfall output from climate models. A set of re-forecasts for three month rainfall at 170 observing stations in the South Murray Darling region of Australia were generated using predictors from the POAMA re-forecasts as input for the analogue SDM. The predictors were optimised over a number of different GCMS in previous climate change downscaling studies. Downscaling with the analogue SDM results in predicted rainfall with realistic variance while maintaining the modest predictive skill of the dynamical model. Evaluation of the consistency between the large scale mean of downscaled and direct GCM output precipitation is encouraging.

  1. Global analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Navin, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    This thesis deals with a global analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect previously pointed out by other authors. The effect was not well understood because the pure Aharonov-Bohm cross section was thought to be merely an approximate low energy limit. This thesis provides a detailed analysis and reveals that in the particular model considered, there is an exact Aharonov-Bohm cross section over the energy range that a mass splitting occurs. At energies slightly above the mass splitting, the effect has completely disappeared and there is effectively no scattering at large distances. This is a curious observation as it was previously thought that a global theory would not act exactly like a local one over an extended range of energies. It begs the heretical speculation that experimentally observed forces modelled with Lagrangians possessing local symmetries may have an underlying global theory.

  2. GABAA Receptor Modulation by Etomidate Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Pejo, Ervin; Santer, Peter; Wang, Lei; Dershwitz, Philip; Husain, S. Shaukat; Raines, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a highly potent anesthetic agent that is believed to produce hypnosis by enhancing γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor function. We characterized the GABAA receptor and hypnotic potencies of etomidate analogues. We then used computational techniques to build statistical and graphical models that relate the potencies of these etomidate analogues to their structures in order to identify the specific molecular determinants of potency. Methods GABAA receptor potencies were defined with voltage-clamp electrophysiology using α1β3γ2 receptors harboring a channel mutation (α1(L264T)) that enhances anesthetic sensitivity (n = 36 – 60 measurements per concentration-response curve). The hypnotic potencies of etomidate analogues were defined using a loss of righting reflexes assay in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 9 – 21 measurements per dose-response curve). Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships were determined in silico using comparative molecular field analysis. Results The GABAA receptor and hypnotic potencies of etomidate and the etomidate analogues ranged by 91-fold and 53-fold, respectively. These potency measurements were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.72), but neither measurement correlated with drug hydrophobicity (r2 = 0.019 and 0.005, respectively). Statistically significant and predictive comparative molecular field analysis models were generated and a pharmacophore model was built that revealed both the structural elements in etomidate analogues associated with high potency and the interactions that these elements make with the etomidate binding site. Conclusion There are multiple specific structural elements in etomidate and etomidate analogues that mediate GABAA receptor modulation. Modifying any one element can alter receptor potency by an order of magnitude or more. PMID:26691905

  3. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  4. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  5. Insulin analogues: action profiles beyond glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    A variety of studies have documented significant improvements in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes after the introduction of artificial insulins. This review gives an overview of insulin analogues which are currently approved for therapeutical use. Clinical data regarding the efficiency to control blood glucose level as well as improving HbA1c level in comparison to conventional insulin preparations in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients are summarized. Furthermore, special features of insulin analogues regarding their signalling properties are discussed with focus on the proliferative effects of insulin glargine as well as some recent data of insulin detemir.

  6. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes.

  7. Parvalbumin, somatostatin and cholecystokinin as chemical markers for specific GABAergic interneuron types in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kondo, Satoru

    2002-01-01

    It remains to be clarified how many classes of GABAergic nonpyramidal cells exist in the cortical circuit. We have divided GABA cells in the rat frontal cortex into 3 groups, based on their firing characteristics: fast-spiking (FS) cells, late-spiking (LS) cells, and non-FS cells. Expression of calcium-binding proteins and peptides could be shown in separate groups of GABA cells in layers II/III and V of the frontal cortex: (1) parvalbumin cells, (2) somatostatin cells, (3) calretinin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) cells [partially positive for cholecystokinin (CCK)] and (4) large CCK cells (almost negative for VIP/calretinin). Combining the physiological and chemical properties of morphologically diverse nonpyramidal cells allows division into several groups, including FS basket cells containing parvalbumin, non-FS somatostatin Martinotti cells with ascending axonal arbors, and non-FS large basket cells positive for CCK. These subtypes show characteristic spatial distributions of axon collaterals and the innervation tendency of postsynaptic elements. With synchronized activity induced by cortical excitatory or inhibitory circuits, firing patterns were also found to differ. Subtype-selective occurrence of electrical coupling, finding for potassium channel Kv3.1 proteins, and cholinergic and serotonergic modulation supports our tentative classification. To clarify the functional architecture in the frontal cortex, it is important to reveal the connectional characteristics of GABA cell subtypes and determine whether they are similar to those in other cortical regions.

  8. Substrate selectivity of Dengue and Zika virus NS5 polymerase towards 2'-modified nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Potisopon, Supanee; Ferron, François; Fattorini, Véronique; Selisko, Barbara; Canard, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    In targeting the essential viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp), nucleotide analogues play a major role in antiviral therapies. In the Flaviviridae family, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be eradicated from chronically infected patients using a combination of drugs which generally include the 2'-modified uridine analogue Sofosbuvir, delivered as nucleotide prodrug. Dengue and Zika viruses are emerging flaviviruses whose RdRp is closely related to that of HCV, yet no nucleoside drug has been clinically approved for these acute infections. We have purified dengue and Zika virus full-length NS5, the viral RdRps, and used them to assemble a stable binary complex made of NS5 and virus-specific RNA primer/templates. The complex was used to assess the selectivity of NS5 towards nucleotide analogues bearing modifications at the 2'-position. We show that dengue and Zika virus RdRps exhibit the same discrimination pattern: 2'-O-Me > 2'-C-Me-2'-F > 2'-C-Me nucleoside analogues, unlike HCV RdRp for which the presence of the 2'-F is beneficial rendering the discrimination pattern 2'-O-Me > 2'-C-Me ≥ 2'-C-Me-2'-F. Both 2'-C-Me and 2'-C-Me-2'-F analogues act as non-obligate RNA chain terminators. The dengue and Zika NS5 nucleotide selectivity towards 2'-modified NTPs mirrors potency of the corresponding analogues in infected cell cultures.

  9. Somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 4 affect seizure susceptibility and hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Moneta, D; Richichi, C; Aliprandi, M; Dournaud, P; Dutar, P; Billard, J M; Carlo, A S; Viollet, C; Hannon, J P; Fehlmann, D; Nunn, C; Hoyer, D; Epelbaum, J; Vezzani, A

    2002-09-01

    We have investigated the role of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst2 and sst4 in limbic seizures and glutamate-mediated neurotransmission in mouse hippocampus. As compared to wild-type littermates, homozygous mice lacking sst2 receptors showed a 52% reduction in EEG ictal activity induced by intrahippocampal injection of 30 ng kainic acid (P < 0.05). The number of behavioural tonic-clonic seizures was reduced by 50% (P < 0.01) and the time to onset of seizures was doubled on average (P < 0.05). Seizure-associated neurodegeneration was found in the injected hippocampus (CA1, CA3 and hilar interneurons) and sporadically in the ipsilateral latero-dorsal thalamus. This occurred to a similar extent in wild-type and sst2 knock-out mice. Intrahippocampal injection of three selective sst2 receptor agonists in wild-type mice (Octreotide, BIM 23120 and L-779976, 1.5-6.0 nmol) did not affect kainate seizures while the same compounds significantly reduced seizures in rats. L-803087 (5 nmol), a selective sst4 receptor agonist, doubled seizure activity in wild-type mice on average. Interestingly, this effect was blocked by 3 nmol octreotide. It was determined, in both radioligand binding and cAMP accumulation, that octreotide had no direct agonist or antagonist action at mouse sst4 receptors expressed in CCl39 cells, up to micromolar concentrations. In hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, octreotide (2 micro m) did not modify AMPA-mediated synaptic responses while facilitation occurred with L-803087 (2 micro m). Similarly to what was observed in seizures, the effect of L-803087 was reduced by octreotide. In hippocampal slices from sst2 knock-out mice, both octreotide and L-803087 were ineffective on synaptic responses. Our findings show that, unlike in rats, sst2 receptors in mice do not mediate anticonvulsant effects. Moreover, stimulation of sst4 receptors in the hippocampus of wild-type mice induced excitatory effects which appeared to depend on the presence of sst2

  10. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  11. Contribution of the pancreas to circulating somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the normal dog.

    PubMed Central

    Taborsky, G J; Ensinck, J W

    1984-01-01

    These studies were performed to assess the contribution of the pancreas to the somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) circulating in arterial and portal venous plasma. Basal SLI concentrations in arterial, pancreatic venous, and portal venous plasma were 95 +/- 9, 277 +/- 32, and 130 +/- 12 pg/ml, (means +/- SEM), respectively. Measurement of pancreatic and portal venous blood flow (5 +/- 1 vs. 365 +/- 46 ml/min) and hematocrit allowed calculation of net, base-line SLI output from the right lobe of the pancreas (521 +/- 104 pg/min) and from the gastrointestinal tract (8,088 +/- 1,487 pg/min), which suggested that the contribution of the pancreas to circulating SLI was minor when the D cells were not stimulated. To stimulate the secretion of SLI from both pancreatic and nonpancreatic sources, isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic agonist, was infused intravenously for 1 h into six anesthetized dogs. Arterial SLI increased by 52 +/- 9 pg/ml; superior pancreatico-duodenal venous SLI increased by 380 +/- 95 pg/ml; portal venous SLI increased by 134 +/- 14 pg/ml. Pancreatic venous blood flow remained unchanged at 5 +/- 1 ml/min, but portal venous blood flow increased to 522 +/- 62 ml/min. SLI output from the right lobe of the pancreas increased by 684 +/- 227 pg/min and that from the gastrointestinal tract increased by 23,911 +/- 3,197 pg/min, again suggesting that the pancreas was a minor source of circulating SLI even when the D cells were stimulated. We conclude that the measurement of arterial-venous SLI concentrations, in the absence of measurements of organ blood flow, can give a false impression of the organ's contributions of circulating SLI. To verify that the contribution of the pancreas was negligible, six dogs received an acute pancreatectomy and then an intravenous infusion of isoproterenol at the same rate. In these dogs, both the base-line level of SLI in arterial plasma (109 +/- 12 pg/ml) and the increment during isoproterenol (56 +/- 8 pg/ml) were similar

  12. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  13. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  14. Solanapyrone analogues from a Hawaiian fungicolous fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new solanayrone analogues (solanapyrones J-M; 1-4) have been isolated from an unidentified fungicolous fungus collected in Hawaii. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by analysis of ID NMR, 2D NMR, and MS data. Solanapyrone J(1) showed antifungal acti...

  15. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment.

  16. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  17. Somatostatin, misoprostol and galanin inhibit gastrin- and PACAP-stimulated secretion of histamine and pancreastatin from ECL cells by blocking specific Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, Maria; Bernsand, Maria; Eliasson, Lena; Håkanson, Rolf; Lindström, Erik

    2005-08-15

    The oxyntic mucosa is rich in ECL cells. They secrete histamine and chromogranin A-derived peptides, such as pancreastatin, in response to gastrin and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Secretion is initiated by Ca2+ entry. While gastrin stimulates secretion by opening L-type and N-type Ca2+ channels, PACAP stimulates secretion by activating L-type and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. Somatostatin, galanin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibit gastrin- and PACAP-stimulated secretion from the ECL cells. In the present study, somatostatin and the PGE2 congener misoprostol inhibited gastrin- and PACAP-stimulated secretion 100%, while galanin inhibited at most 60-65%. Bay K 8644, a specific activator of L-type Ca2+ channels, stimulated ECL-cell secretion, an effect that was inhibited equally effectively by somatostatin, misoprostol and galanin (75-80% inhibition). Pretreatment with pertussis toxin, that inactivates inhibitory G-proteins, prevented all three agents from inhibiting stimulated secretion (regardless of the stimulus). Pretreatment with nifedipine (10 microM), an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, reduced PACAP-evoked pancreastatin secretion by 50-60%, gastrin-evoked secretion by approximately 80% and abolished the response to Bay K 8644. The nifedipine-resistant response to PACAP was abolished by somatostatin and misoprostol but not by galanin. Gastrin and PACAP raised the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a biphasic manner, believed to reflect mobilization of internal Ca2+ followed by Ca2+ entry. Somatostatin and misoprostol blocked Ca2+ entry (and histamine and pancreastatin secretion) but not mobilization of internal Ca2+. The present observations on isolated ECL cells suggest that Ca2+ entry rather than mobilization of internal Ca2+ triggers exocytosis, that gastrin and PACAP activate different (but over-lapping) Ca2+ channels, that somatostatin, misoprostol and galanin interact with inhibitory G-proteins to block Ca2+ entry via L-type Ca

  18. Somatostatin receptor subtypes sst1 and sst2 elicit opposite effects on the response to glutamate of mouse hypothalamic neurones: an electrophysiological and single cell RT-PCR study.

    PubMed

    Lanneau, C; Viollet, C; Faivre-Bauman, A; Loudes, C; Kordon, C; Epelbaum, J; Gardette, R

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that somatostatin can either enhance or decrease AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated responses to glutamate in mouse-dissociated hypothalamic neurones grown in vitro. To investigate whether this effect is due to differential activation of somatostatin (SRIF) receptor subtypes, we compared modulation of the response to glutamate by SRIF with that induced by CH-275 and octreotide, two selective agonists of sst1 and sst2/sst5 receptors, respectively. Somatostatin either significantly decreased (49%) or increased (30%) peak currents induced by glutamate, and was ineffective in the remaining cells. Only the decreased response was obtained with octreotide, whereas only increased responses were elicited by CH-275 (47 and 35% of the tested cells, respectively). Mean amplitude variations under somatostatin or octreotide on the one hand, and under somatostatin or CH-275 on the other hand, were equivalent. Pertussis toxin pretreatment significantly decreased the number of cells inhibited by somatostatin or octreotide, but had no effect on the frequency of neurones showing increased sensitivity to glutamate during somatostatin or CH-275 application. About half of the neurones tested by single cell reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) expressed only one sst receptor (sst1 in 26% and sst2 in 22% of studied cells). Out of the remaining neurones, 34% displayed neither sst1 nor sst2 mRNAs, whereas 18% showed a simultaneous expression of both mRNA subtypes. Expression of sst1 or sst2 mRNA subtypes matched totally with the effects of somatostatin on sensitivity to glutamate in 79% of the neurones processed for PCR after recordings. These data show that pertussis toxin-insensitive activation of the sst1 receptor subtype mediates somatostatin-induced increase in sensitivity to glutamate, whereas decrease in the response to glutamate is linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive activation of the sst2 receptor subtype.

  19. Tryptophan analogues. 1. Synthesis and antihypertensive activity of positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Safdy, M E; Kurchacova, E; Schut, R N; Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1982-06-01

    A series of tryptophan analogues having the carboxyl function at the beta-position was synthesized and tested for antihypertensive activity. The 5-methoxy analogue 46 exhibited antihypertensive activity in the rat via the oral route and was much more potent than the normal tryptophan analogue. The methyl ester was found to be a critical structural feature for activity.

  20. Balancing Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2007-01-01

    For some administrators and planners, designing and building education facilities may sometimes seem like a circus act--trying to project a persona of competence and confidence while juggling dozens of issues. Meanwhile, the audience--students, staff members and taxpayers--watch and wait with anticipation in hopes of getting what they paid for and…

  1. Inhibition of serine and proline racemases by substrate-product analogues.

    PubMed

    Harty, Matthew; Nagar, Mitesh; Atkinson, Logan; Legay, Christina M; Derksen, Darren J; Bearne, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    d-Amino acids can play important roles as specific biosynthetic building blocks required by organisms or act as regulatory molecules. Consequently, amino acid racemases that catalyze the formation of d-amino acids are potential therapeutic targets. Serine racemase catalyzes the reversible formation of d-serine (a modulator of neurotransmission) from l-serine, while proline racemase (an essential enzymatic and mitogenic protein in trypanosomes) catalyzes the reversible conversion of l-proline to d-proline. We show the substrate-product analogue α-(hydroxymethyl)serine is a modest, linear mixed-type inhibitor of serine racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Ki=167±21mM, Ki'=661±81mM, cf. Km=19±2mM). The bicyclic substrate-product analogue of proline, 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-7-ium-1-carboxylate is a weak inhibitor of proline racemase from Clostridium sticklandii, giving only 29% inhibition at 142.5mM. However, the more flexible bicyclic substrate-product analogue tetrahydro-1H-pyrrolizine-7a(5H)-carboxylate is a noncompetitive inhibitor of proline racemase from C. sticklandii (Ki=111±15mM, cf. Km=5.7±0.5mM). These results suggest that substrate-product analogue inhibitors of racemases may only be effective when the active site is capacious and/or plastic, or when the inhibitor is sufficiently flexible.

  2. Hormonal secretion and quality of life in Nelson syndrome and Cushing disease after long acting repeatable octreotide: a short series and update.

    PubMed

    Arregger, Alejandro L; Cardoso, Estela M L; Sandoval, Olga B; Monardes Tumilasci, Elida G; Sanchez, Rocío; Contreras, Liliana N

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of persistent adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) excess in Nelson syndrome (NS) and Cushing disease (CD) remains a challenge. Somatostatin and its analogs as octreotide decrease ACTH secretion through somatostatin receptors of pituitary cells. To our knowledge, there are no reports on the effect of long-acting repeatable octreotide (oct-lar) on hormonal secretion and quality of life in patients with NS and CD who failed conventional therapy. Herein, we describe the effects of treatment with oct-lar (20 mg/month intramurally) in 1 woman with NS and 2 women with persistent CD. Oct-lar therapy reduced ACTH secretion and improved the quality of life in NS patient. By contrast, in CD patients, it failed to control ACTH and cortisol secretion, and the quality of life remained unchanged.

  3. Optimization of propafenone analogues as antimalarial leads.

    PubMed

    Lowes, David J; Guiguemde, W Armand; Connelly, Michele C; Zhu, Fangyi; Sigal, Martina S; Clark, Julie A; Lemoff, Andrew S; Derisi, Joseph L; Wilson, Emily B; Guy, R Kiplin

    2011-11-10

    Propafenone, a class Ic antiarrythmic drug, inhibits growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum. While the drug's potency is significant, further development of propafenone as an antimalarial would require divorcing the antimalarial and cardiac activities as well as improving the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug. A small array of propafenone analogues was designed and synthesized to address the cardiac ion channel and PK liabilities. Testing of this array revealed potent inhibitors of the 3D7 (drug sensitive) and K1 (drug resistant) strains of P. falciparum that possessed significantly reduced ion channel effects and improved metabolic stability. Propafenone analogues are unusual among antimalarial leads in that they are more potent against the multidrug resistant K1 strain of P. falciparum compared to the 3D7 strain.

  4. Enzymatic synthesis of lipid II and analogues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Chih; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has prompted active research in the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. Among all essential bacterial proteins, transglycosylase polymerizes lipid II into peptidoglycan and is one of the most favorable targets because of its vital role in peptidoglycan synthesis. Described in this study is a practical enzymatic method for the synthesis of lipid II, coupled with cofactor regeneration, to give the product in a 50-70% yield. This development depends on two key steps: the overexpression of MraY for the synthesis of lipid I and the use of undecaprenol kinase for the preparation of polyprenol phosphates. This method was further applied to the synthesis of lipid II analogues. It was found that MraY and undecaprenol kinase can accept a wide range of lipids containing various lengths and configurations. The activity of lipid II analogues for bacterial transglycolase was also evaluated.

  5. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in the study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different (significant increase only in the thalamus) in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  6. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouacil. [Propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in this study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  7. Polyamine analogues targeting epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Marton, Laurence J; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2009-11-04

    Over the past three decades the metabolism and functions of the polyamines have been actively pursued as targets for antineoplastic therapy. Interactions between cationic polyamines and negatively charged nucleic acids play a pivotal role in DNA stabilization and RNA processing that may affect gene expression, translation and protein activity. Our growing understanding of the unique roles that the polyamines play in chromatin regulation, and the discovery of novel proteins homologous with specific regulatory enzymes in polyamine metabolism, have led to our interest in exploring chromatin remodelling enzymes as potential therapeutic targets for specific polyamine analogues. One of our initial efforts focused on utilizing the strong affinity that the polyamines have for chromatin to create a backbone structure, which could be combined with active-site-directed inhibitor moieties of HDACs (histone deacetylases). Specific PAHAs (polyaminohydroxamic acids) and PABAs (polyaminobenzamides) polyamine analogues have demonstrated potent inhibition of the HDACs, re-expression of p21 and significant inhibition of tumour growth. A second means of targeting the chromatin-remodelling enzymes with polyamine analogues was facilitated by the recent identification of flavin-dependent LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1). The existence of this enzyme demonstrated that histone lysine methylation is a dynamic process similar to other histone post-translational modifications. LSD1 specifically catalyses demethylation of mono- and di-methyl Lys4 of histone 3, key positive chromatin marks associated with transcriptional activation. Structural and catalytic similarities between LSD1 and polyamine oxidases facilitated the identification of biguanide, bisguanidine and oligoamine polyamine analogues that are potent inhibitors of LSD1. Cellular inhibition of LSD1 by these unique compounds led to the re-activation of multiple epigenetically silenced genes important in tumorigenesis. The use of

  8. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  9. Antitumoral cyclic peptide analogues of chlamydocin.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Fauchere, J L; Atassi, G; Viallefont, P; Lazaro, R

    1993-01-01

    A series of cyclic tetrapeptides bearing the bioactive alkylating group on an epsilon-amino-lysyl function have been examined for their antitumoral activity on L1210 and P388 murine leukemia cell lines. One analogue belonging to the chlamydocin family and bearing a beta-chloroethylnitrosourea group was found to be potent at inhibiting L1210 cell proliferation and had a higher therapeutic index than the reference compound bis-beta-chloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU) on the in vivo P388-induced leukemia model.

  10. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  11. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  12. ACTION OF A HISTIDINE ANALOGUE, 1,2,4-TRIAZOLE-3-ALANINE, IN SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Alfred P.; Hartman, Philip E.

    1963-01-01

    Levin, Alfred P. (The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.), and Philip E. Hartman. Action of a histidine analogue, 1,2,4-triazole-3-alanine, in Salmonella typhimurium. J. Bacteriol. 86:820–828. 1963.—The effect of the histidine analogue, 1,2,4-triazole-3-alanine (TRA), on growth and enzyme synthesis in histidine auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. TRA allows an increase of approximately 50% in the amount of protein in a culture but does not allow concomitant synthesis of ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid. Although the analogue prevents the formation of active bacteriophage and of enzymatically active inosine 5′-phosphate dehydrogenase, it does not prevent the formation of enzymatically active l-histidinol phosphate phosphatase or of imidazoleacetol phosphate transaminase, two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of histidine. Of the three known functions of histidine in the cell, TRA mimics two: it is incorporated into protein, and it acts as a repressor material for synthesis of enzymes involved in the formation of histidine. TRA fails to act as a feedback inhibitor of the first step in the formation of histidine. Images PMID:14066480

  13. Structure-activity relationship studies of flavonol analogues on pollen germination.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Alaina M; Meier, G Patrick; Haendiges, Stacey; Taylor, Loverine P

    2014-03-12

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds required in the fertilization process in many, if not all, plants. However, the exact biological mechanism(s) and the interacting proteins are unknown. To determine the characteristics important in activating or inhibiting the pollination sequence, a structure-activity relationship analysis of natural and synthetic flavonols was conducted. Flavonol analogues were synthesized through a modified "one-pot" procedure that utilized a Baker-Venkataraman type rearrangement and a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of a halo-flavonol with an organotrifluoroborate. Of the flavonols tested, kaempferol was the only compound to act as a full agonist. The other smaller, less sterically hindered flavonols (galangin, kaempferide, and 4'-methyl flavonol) acted as partial agonists. Larger more hydrophobic flavonol analogues (3'- and 4'-benzoyl, 3'- and 4'-phenyl, and 3'- and 4'-iodo flavonols) had minimal or no agonist activity. Competition assays between kaempferol and these minimally activating flavonols showed that these analogues inhibited the action of kaempferol in a manner consistent with noncompetitive antagonism. The results suggest that steric hindrance is the most important factor in determining a good agonist. Hydrogen bonding also had a positive effect as long as the substituent did not cause any steric hindrance.

  14. Purification and characterization of islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, pancreatic, polypeptide and somatostatin) from the Burmese python, Python molurus.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Secor, S M; Adrian, T E; Mynarcik, D C; Whittaker, J

    1997-08-29

    Insulin was purified from an extract of the pancreas of the Burmese python, Python molurus (Squamata:Serpentes) and its primary structure established as: A Chain: Gly-Ile-Val-Glu-Gln-Cys-Cys-Glu-Asn-Thr10-Cys-Ser-Leu-Tyr-Glu-Leu- Glu-Asn-Tyr-Cys20-Asn. B-Chain: Ala-Pro-Asn-Gln-His-Leu-Cys-Gly-Ser-His10-Leu-Val-Glu-Ala-Leu-Tyr- Leu-Val-Cys-Gly20-Asp-Arg-Gly-Phe-Tyr-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Arg-Ser30. With the exception of the conservative substitution Phe --> Tyr at position B25, those residues in human insulin that comprise the receptor-binding and those residues involved in dimer and hexamer formation are fully conserved in python insulin. Python insulin was slightly more potent (1.8-fold) than human insulin in inhibiting the binding of [125I-Tyr-A14] insulin to the soluble full-length recombinant human insulin receptor but was slightly less potent (1.5-fold) than human insulin for inhibiting binding to the secreted extracellular domain of the receptor. The primary structure of python glucagon contains only one amino acid substitution (Ser28 --> Asn) compared with turtle/duck glucagon and python somatostatin is identical to that of mammalian somatostatin-14. In contrast, python pancreatic polypeptide (Arg-Ile-Ala-Pro-Val-Phe-Pro-Gly-Lys-Asp10-Glu-Leu-Ala-Lys-Phe- Tyr20-Thr-Glu-Leu-Gln-Gln-Tyr-Leu-Asn-Ser-Ile30-Asn-Arg-Pro-Arg -Phe.NH2) contains only 35 instead of the customary 36 residues and the amino acid sequence of this peptide has been poorly conserved between reptiles and birds (18 substitutions compared with alligator and 20 substitutions compared with chicken).

  15. Thymidine analogues for tracking DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Brenton L; Walker, Tom; Norazit, Anwar; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2011-09-15

    Replicating cells undergo DNA synthesis in the highly regulated, S-phase of the cell cycle. Analogues of the pyrimidine deoxynucleoside thymidine may be inserted into replicating DNA, effectively tagging dividing cells allowing their characterisation. Tritiated thymidine, targeted using autoradiography was technically demanding and superseded by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and related halogenated analogues, detected using antibodies. Their detection required the denaturation of DNA, often constraining the outcome of investigations. Despite these limitations BrdU alone has been used to target newly synthesised DNA in over 20,000 reviewed biomedical studies. A recent breakthrough in "tagging DNA synthesis" is the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The alkyne group in EdU is readily detected using a fluorescent azide probe and copper catalysis using 'Huisgen's reaction' (1,3-dipolar cycloaddition or 'click chemistry'). This rapid, two-step biolabelling approach allows the tagging and imaging of DNA within cells whilst preserving the structural and molecular integrity of the cells. The bio-orthogonal detection of EdU allows its application in more experimental assays than previously possible with other "unnatural bases". These include physiological, anatomical and molecular biological experimentation in multiple fields including, stem cell research, cancer biology, and parasitology. The full potential of EdU and related molecules in biomedical research remains to be explored.

  16. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  17. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  18. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  19. Amygdalin analogues inhibit IFN-γ signalling and reduce the inflammatory response in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Iole; De Gregorio, Vincenza; Baroni, Adone; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Perez, Juan Jesus

    2013-12-01

    Peptide T (PT), an octapeptide fragment located in the V2 region of the HIV-1 gp120-coating protein, appears to be beneficial in the treatment of psoriasis. Our previous investigations suggest that keratinocytes play a key role in conditioning the therapeutic effects of PT in psoriasis. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of PT and the peptidomimetic natural products, Dhurrin and Prunasin, on the expression of the IL-6, IL-8, IL-23, HSP70 and ICAM-1 on IFN-γ and TNF-α-NHEK activated cells. Moreover, we analysed the interference of PT and its analogues through STAT-3 activation. Our results show that the analogues tested exhibit the beneficial biological effects of PT, suggesting the primary role of keratinocytes upon which PT and the peptidomimetics act directly, by reducing proinflammatory responses. Its reduction appears to be important for therapeutic approach in psoriasis pathogenesis.

  20. Aluminofluorides and beryllofluorides as inhibitors of sulphatases. Analogues of hydrogen sulphate?

    PubMed Central

    Roy, A B

    1991-01-01

    The inhibition of fluoride of sulphatase A from ox liver and of the sulphatases of Helix pomatia and Aspergillus oryzae is decreased by EDTA and increased by Al3+ or Be2+, implicating aluminofluorides and beryllofluorides in the reaction. The inhibition, which is reversible, takes several minutes to develop fully and, at least for the sulphatase of H. pomatia, is of a non-linear mixed competitive-non-competitive type. It is suggested that the aluminofluorides and beryllofluorides are acting as analogues of HSO4-. If so, then this behaviour must be considered, as well as their role as analogues of phosphate, in interpreting the effects of these compounds in intact cells. PMID:1953634

  1. Analogues of diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) as potential anti-platelet-aggregation agents.

    PubMed Central

    Zamecnik, P C; Kim, B; Gao, M J; Taylor, G; Blackburn, G M

    1992-01-01

    Dense granules of platelets contain a high content of diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A). We have previously demonstrated an antithrombotic effect of this compound in a live rabbit model. In the present study we find that certain synthetic Ap4A analogues are superior to Ap4A in inhibiting ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets. Analogues having a P--C--P bridge located in the P2,P3 position of Ap4A are the most potent inhibitors. These analogues are also resistant to hydrolytic enzymes. Analogues having the above characteristics exhibit competitive inhibition with ADP in the ADP-induced platelet aggregation reaction. These compounds, such as AppCHFppA, may be useful as antithrombotic agents. The analogues ApSppSpA and ApSpCHFpSpA also showed good inhibitory effects on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In addition, this action of Ap4A and its analogues provides an example of a dinucleotide inducing an antagonistic effect by occupying an extracellular mononucleotide binding site on platelets. It calls attention to the possibility that Ap4A and its analogues may act in a similar way in whole organisms, triggering effector or inhibitory responses in any one of a variety of cells. PMID:1549600

  2. Pertussis toxin non-sensitive G protein mediates cholinergic stimulation for secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Kono, A

    1992-01-02

    To clarify the possible role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) in the signal transducing system activated by carbachol, actions of carbachol on human pancreastatin producing cell line (QGP-1N) were compared with those of fluoride, a well-known activator of stimulatory (Gs) or inhibitory (Gi) G protein. 10(-5) M of carbachol as well as 20 mM of NaF stimulated secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. These secretion and Ca2+ mobilization were not modified by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi protein. These results suggest that pancreastatin and somatostatin secretions from QGP-1N are regulated by acetylcholine through a muscarinic receptor coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide breakdown by a G protein, which appears to be fluoride sensitive but is other than a Gi-like protein.

  3. Somatostatin Receptor SPECT/CT using 99mTc Labeled HYNIC-TOC Aids in Diagnosis of Primary Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare, benign and slow growing tumor involving the intra-orbital/intra-canalicular segment of the optic nerve. Untreated, they can potentially lead to visual deterioration. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the gold standard imaging modality for diagnosing the entity. Often, a clinical dilemma exists to narrow the differential diagnosis of an enhancing intra-orbital mass on MR. Molecular imaging provides a high degree of precision in diagnosing meningioma in view of relatively high levels of somatostatin receptor expression by these tumors. The following case demonstrates the potential clinical utility of somatostatin receptor SPECT using 99mTc- labeled HYNIC-TOC in clinical diagnosis of ONSM. PMID:28242992

  4. Polyamine analogues bind human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, R; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Thomas, T J; Thomas, T; Carpentier, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2007-10-01

    Polyamine analogues show antitumor activity in experimental models, and their ability to alter activity of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer is well documented. Association of polyamines with nucleic acids and protein is included in their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with several polyamine analogues, such as 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333), in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant protein concentration and various polyamine contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind nonspecifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with binding constants of K333 = 9.30 x 10(3) M(-1), KBE-333 = 5.63 x 10(2) M(-1), and KBE-3333 = 3.66 x 10(2) M(-1). The protein secondary structure showed major alterations with a reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free protein) to 43-50% and an increase of beta-sheet from 17% (free protein) to 29-36% in the 333, BE-333, and BE-3333 complexes, indicating partial protein unfolding upon polyamine interaction. HSA structure was less perturbed by polyamine analogues compared to those of the biogenic polyamines.

  5. New synthetic approaches towards analogues of bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Priebbenow, Daniel L; Barbaro, Lisa; Baell, Jonathan B

    2016-10-12

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is of growing global concern and threatens to undermine increasing efforts to control the worldwide spread of tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline has recently emerged as a new drug developed to specifically treat MDR-TB. Despite being highly effective as a result of its unique mode of action, bedaquiline has been associated with significant toxicities and as such, safety concerns are limiting its clinical use. In order to access pharmaceutical agents that exhibit an improved safety profile for the treatment of MDR-TB, new synthetic pathways to facilitate the preparation of bedaquiline and analogues thereof have been discovered.

  6. The Lehmer Matrix and Its Recursive Analogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Lehmer matrix and its recursive analogue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  7. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [(64)Cu]Cu-/[(177)Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr(3))octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr(3))octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [(64)Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome.

  8. Myenteric neurons of the ileum that express somatostatin are a target of prion neuroinvasion in an alimentary model of sheep scrapie.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David A; Yan, Huijun; Fry, Lindsay M; Alverson, Janet; White, Stephen N; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2008-06-01

    Neuroinvasion of the enteric nervous system by prions is an important step in dissemination to the brain, yet very little is known about the basic process of enteric neuroinvasion. Using an alimentary model of neonatal disease transmission, neuroinvasion by scrapie prions in the ileum of lambs was detected by immunohistochemical staining for the disease-associated form of the prion protein, PrPSc. Odds ratios (OR) were determined for the frequency of PrPSc staining within enteric somata categorized by plexus location (myenteric, submucosal) and neurochemical staining (PGP 9.5, neural nitric oxide synthase, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide). PrPSc was observed in 4.48 +/- 4.26% of myenteric neurons and 2.57 +/- 1.82% of submucosal neurons in five lambs aged 208-226 days but not in a lamb aged 138 days. The relative frequency of PrPSc within enteric somata was interdependent on plexus location and neurochemical type. Interestingly, PrPSc was observed more frequently within myenteric neurons than in submucosal neurons (PGP 9.5; OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval = 1.21-2.44), and was observed within the myenteric plexus approximately 4x (2.16-6.94) more frequently in somatostatin neurons than in the general neural population stained by PGP 9.5. Nerve fibers stained for somatostatin were present in the mucosa and near PrPSc staining within Peyer's patches. The results suggest that somatostatin-expressing enteric neurons, with fiber projections near Peyer's patches, but with somata present in greatest proportion within the myenteric plexus, are an early target for neuroinvasion by scrapie prions and could serve an important role in neural dissemination.

  9. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [64Cu]Cu-/[177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F.; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [64Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome. PMID:27022413

  10. Mapping of tyrosine hydroxylase in the diencephalon of alpaca (Lama pacos) and co-distribution with somatostatin-28 (1-12).

    PubMed

    Marcos, P; Arroyo-Jiménez, M M; Lozano, G; González-Fuentes, J; Lagartos-Donate, M J; Aguilar, L A; Coveñas, R

    2013-05-01

    Based on previous work describing the distribution of somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the male alpaca (Lama pacos) diencephalon, and owing to the well known interactions between this peptide and the catecholaminergic system, the aims of this work are (1) to describe the distribution of putative catecholaminergic cell groups in the alpaca diencephalon and (2) to study the possible morphological basis of the interactions between these substances in the diencephalon of the alpaca by using double immunohistochemistry methods. Thus, the distribution of catecholaminergic cell groups in the alpaca diencephalon agrees with that previously described in the diencephalon of other mammalian species of the same order: the A11, A12, A13, A14 and A15d cell groups have been identified; however, we have observed an additional hitherto undescribed cell group containing tyrosine hydroxylase in the medial habenula. In addition, double-labelling procedures did not reveal neurons containing tyrosine hydroxylase and somatostatin, suggesting that the hypothalamic interactions between catecholamines and somatostatin at intra-cellular level must be carried out by a somatostatin molecule other than fragment (1-12). Otherwise, the overlapping distribution patterns of these substances would suggest some interconnections between groups of chemospecific neurons. These results could be the starting point for future studies on hypothalamic functions in alpacas, for example those concerning reproductive control, since other physiological studies have suggested that this species could have different regulatory mechanisms from other mammalian species. Our results support the Manger hypothesis that the same nuclear complement of neural systems exists in the brain of species of the same order.

  11. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  12. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  13. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  14. Synthesis of a cyanopeptide-analogue with trypsin activating properties.

    PubMed

    Radau, G; Rauh, D

    2000-04-17

    An efficient synthesis of a peptidic analogue of cyanobacterial metabolites with proposed serine protease inhibitory activity has been developed. Surprisingly, one trypsin activating compound was obtained.

  15. Serotonin-, somatostatin- and chromogranin A-containing cells of the urethro-prostatic complex in the sheep. An immunocytochemical and immunofluorescent study.

    PubMed Central

    Vittoria, A; La Mura, E; Cocca, T; Cecio, A

    1990-01-01

    The urethral and prostatic epithelial of the sheep contain a large number of amine- and/or peptide-producing neuroendocrine cells (NE), also called paraneurons. Four different cell types have been immunohistochemically recognised among them. The first contains the amine serotonin, the second the protein chromogranin A, the third the amine and the protein together and the fourth the hormone somatostatin. Serotonin-producing cells are elongated in shape and often show cytoplasmic dendrite-like processes directed towards the basal membrane and/or the lumen. Chromogranin A-containing cells are polymorphic and constitute the more numerous NE subpopulation. Cells containing both the bioactive substances seem to be less numerous than the chromogranin A cells and slightly more frequent than the serotonin cells. All these cell types are diffused along the whole urethro-prostatic complex and show their highest density in the collicular zone. Somatostatin-containing cells often show a unique cytoplasmic extension directed towards the basal membrane and are rare. It is supposed that the presence of serotonin in the urogenital tract is functionally correlated with the emission of urine and/or semen, while somatostatin is associated with the inhibition of local exocrine and/or endocrine secretions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1981998

  16. Bipolar disorder type 1 and schizophrenia are accompanied by decreased density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the parahippocampal region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alice Y; Lohmann, Kathryn M; Yang, C Kevin; Zimmerman, Eric I; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Herring, Nicole; Berretta, Sabina; Heckers, Stephan; Konradi, Christine

    2011-11-01

    GABAergic interneurons synchronize network activities and monitor information flow. Post-mortem studies have reported decreased densities of cortical interneurons in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD). The entorhinal cortex (EC) and the adjacent subicular regions are a hub for integration of hippocampal and cortical information, a process that is disrupted in SZ. Here we contrast and compare the density of interneuron populations in the caudal EC and subicular regions in BPD type I (BPD-I), SZ, and normal control (NC) subjects. Post-mortem human parahippocampal specimens of 13 BPD-I, 11 SZ and 17 NC subjects were used to examine the numerical density of parvalbumin-, somatostatin- or calbindin-positive interneurons. We observed a reduction in the numerical density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the caudal EC and parasubiculum in BPD-I and SZ, but no change in the subiculum. Calbindin-positive interneuron densities were normal in all brain areas examined. The profile of decreased density was strikingly similar in BPD-I and SZ. Our results demonstrate a specific reduction of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the parahippocampal region in BPD-I and SZ, likely disrupting synchronization and integration of cortico-hippocampal circuits.

  17. Exocrine pancreatic secretion and plasma levels of cholecystokinin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin after single and combined intraduodenal application of different bile salts in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Fiedler, F; Kowalski, C; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1996-01-01

    Bile salts are intraduodenal stimulants of basal pancreatic secretion. This study aims to show whether the three main bile salts of human bile differ in their action on pancreatic secretion, and whether they enhance or inhibit each other after combined use. Furthermore, the effect on gastroenteropancreatic peptide release is evaluated. Twelve subjects were provided with a gastroduodenal double-lumen tube. Equimolar doses (0.6 mmol) of taurocholate (322 mg), taurodeoxycholate (313 mg), and a combination of both stimuli were given intraduodenally. Another 12 subjects received taurochenodeoxycholate (313 mg) instead of taurocholate. Volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase were determined in duodenal aspirates. Cholecystokinin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin were measured radioimmunologically in plasma samples. All bile salts and combinations exerted a significant hydrokinetic and ecbolic effect. The hydrokinetic response of the combined stimuli was significantly higher as compared with taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate, respectively. As far as concerns the ecbolic response, the difference was significant only for trypsin output as compared with taurochenodeoxycholate. Plasma cholecystokinin rose significantly only after the combined stimuli. Pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin increased significantly after all stimuli, except pancreatic polypeptide after taurocholate. Combined use enhances the hydrokinetic and ecbolic effects of single bile salts. Cholecystokinin may, hereby, be involved as a mediator of the ecbolic effect. Pancreatic polypeptide release indicates cholinergic mechanisms as further mediators. As demonstrated by somatostatin release, counter-regulatory mechanisms are also triggered by intraduodenal bile salts.

  18. Role of Cosmic Dust Analogues in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, J. R.; Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G. A.; Saladino, R.; di Mauro, E.

    Dust grains could have played an important role in driving the formation of complex molecular compounds relevant for the prebiotic chemistry occurred in the early Earth. Dust and molecular compounds present in space experienced very different environments, with temperatures ranging from few to thousands of Kelvins, and with very harsh conditions due to particle and UV irradiations. Astronomical observations of the interstellar medium, coupled with direct in-situ investigations of solar system bodies performed by space missions and laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial material have shown the presence of large amount of organic molecules. The detection of more than one hundred molecules demonstrates that chemical reactions can proceed successfully in space. However, due to low efficiency, formation of complex molecules in gas phase is not feasible, then an active chemistry has been suggested to take place at cryogenic temperatures (~10 K) on cosmic dust grains acting as catalysts. We will present laboratory results on catalytic effects of Cosmic Dust Analogues (CDAs) with olivine composition, in the synthesis of organic molecules under different physical conditions by using formamide (NH2COH). We will show the important role of CDAs in prebiotic chemistry experiments simulating processes occurring in astronomical environments relevant for the origin of life in the Solar System.

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying a cellular analogue of operant reward learning

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Fred D.; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Operant conditioning is a ubiquitous but mechanistically poorly understood form of associative learning in which an animal learns the consequences of its behavior. Using a single-cell analogue of operant conditioning in neuron B51 of Aplysia, we examined second-messenger pathways engaged by activity and reward and how they may provide a biochemical association underlying operant learning. Conditioning was blocked by Rp-cAMP, a peptide inhibitor of PKA, a PKC inhibitor and by expressing a dominant negative isoform of Ca2+-dependent PKC (apl-I). Thus, both PKA and PKC were necessary for operant conditioning. Injection of cAMP into B51 mimicked the effects of operant conditioning. Activation of PKC also mimicked conditioning, but was dependent on both cAMP and PKA, suggesting that PKC acted at some point upstream of PKA activation. Our results demonstrate how these molecules can interact to mediate operant conditioning in an individual neuron important for the expression of the conditioned behavior. PMID:18786364

  20. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  1. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity.

  2. Obestatin acts in brain to inhibit thirst.

    PubMed

    Samson, Willis K; White, Meghan M; Price, Christopher; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2007-01-01

    Derived from the same prohormone, obestatin has been reported to exert effects on food intake that oppose those of ghrelin. The obestatin receptor GPR39 is present in brain and pituitary gland. Since the gene encoding those two peptides is expressed also in those tissues, we examined further the possible actions of obestatin in vivo and in vitro. Intracerebroventricular administration of obestatin inhibited water drinking in ad libitum-fed and -watered rats, and in food-and water-deprived animals. The effects on water drinking preceded and were more pronounced than any effect on food intake, and did not appear to be the result of altered locomotor/behavioral activity. In addition, obestatin inhibited ANG II-induced water drinking in animals provided free access to water and food. Current-clamp recordings from cultured, subfornical organ neurons revealed significant effects of the peptide on membrane potential, suggesting this as a potential site of action. In pituitary cell cultures, log molar concentrations of obestatin ranging from 1.0 pM to 100 nM failed to alter basal growth hormone (GH) secretion. In addition, 100 nM obestatin failed to interfere with the stimulation of GH secretion by GH-releasing hormone or ghrelin and did not alter the inhibition by somatostatin in vitro. We conclude that obestatin does not act in pituitary gland to regulate GH secretion but may act in brain to alter thirst mechanisms. Importantly, in rats the effects of obestatin on food intake may be secondary to an action of the peptide to inhibit water drinking.

  3. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  4. A nonlinear dynamic analogue model of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Büchner, J.

    Linear prediction filter studies have shown that the magnetospheric response to energy transfer from the solar wind contains both directly driven and unloading components. These studies have also shown that the magnetospheric response is significantly nonlinear and, thus, the linear prediction filtering technique and other correlative techniques which assume a linear magnetospheric response cannot give a complete deacription of that response. Here, the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is discussed within the framework of deterministic nonlinear dynamics. An earlier dripping faucet mechanical analogue to the magnetosphere is first reviewed and then the plasma physical counterpart to the mechanical model is constructed. A Faraday loop in the magnetotail is considered and the relationship of electric potentials on the loop to changes in the magnetic flux threading the loop is developed. This approach leads to a model of geomagnetic activity which is similar to the earlier mechanical model but described in terms of the geometry and plasma contents of the magnetotail. This Faraday loop response model contains analogues to both the directly driven and the storage-release magnetospheric responses and it includes, in a fundamental way, the inherent nonlinearity of the solar wind-magnetosphere system. It can be chancterized as a nonlinear, damped harmonic oscillator that is driven by the loading-unloading substorm cycle. The model is able to explain many of the features of the linear prediction filter results. In particular, at low geomagnetic activity levels the model exbibits the "regular dripping" response which provides an explanation for the unloading component at 1 hour lag in the linear prediction filters. Further, the model suggests that the disappearance of the unloading component in the linear prediction filters at high geomagnetic activity levels is due to a chaotic transition beyond which the loading-unloading mechanism becomes aperiodic. The model predicts

  5. Reduced densities of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in experimental cortical dysplasia and heterotopia in early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Akakin, Dilek; Martinez-Diaz, Hildabelis; Chen, Huan-Xin; Roper, Steven N

    2013-05-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) is strongly associated with intractable epilepsy, probably due to hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. GABAergic interneurons provide major inhibitory function in the CNS and have different subtypes, but it is not clear how each subtype is affected in CD during early post-natal development. We have examined the developmental alterations of the densities of two major subtypes of interneurons, parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SS)-expressing interneurons in an animal model of CD, in utero irradiation, using immunocytochemistry. We found that the density of PV- and SS-positive interneurons increases significantly in CD and controls during the first three weeks of postnatal life. However, compared to controls, the densities of both subtypes are significantly decreased in CD and heterotopia at all age groups although the time of onset for both PV and SS expression remained unchanged. Our results indicate that the densities of both PV- and SS-positive interneurons are significantly decreased in CD and heterotopia, which may be one important mechanism leading to hyperexcitability of CD.

  6. Selective activation of parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons triggers epileptic seizurelike activity in mouse medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Lagostena, Laura; Russo, Giovanni; Taverna, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are thought to play a critical role in eliciting interictal spikes (IICs) and triggering ictal discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy, yet the contribution of different interneuronal subtypes to seizure initiation is still largely unknown. Here we took advantage of optogenetic techniques combined with patch-clamp and field recordings to selectively stimulate parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SOM)-positive interneurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (CHR-2) in layers II-III of adult mouse medial entorhinal cortical slices during extracellular perfusion with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 100-200 μM). In control conditions, blue laser photostimulation selectively activated action potential firing in either PV or SOM interneurons and, in both cases, caused a robust GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition in pyramidal cells (PCs). During perfusion with 4-AP, brief photostimuli (300 ms) activating either PV or SOM interneurons induced patterns of epileptiform activity that closely replicated spontaneously occurring IICs and tonic-clonic ictal discharges. Laser-induced synchronous firing in both interneuronal types elicited large compound GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) correlating with IICs and preictal spikes. In addition, spontaneous and laser-induced epileptic events were similarly initiated in concurrence with a large increase in extracellular potassium concentration. Finally, interneuron activation was unable to stop or significantly shorten the progression of seizurelike episodes. These results suggest that entorhinal PV and SOM interneurons are nearly equally effective in triggering interictal and ictal discharges that closely resemble human temporal lobe epileptic activity.

  7. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  8. A somatostatin-secreting cell line established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma (somatostatinoma): release experiment and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, H; Hayashi, I; Kono, A

    1990-06-15

    Production and secretion of somatostatin (SRIF) were studied using a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing cell line (QGP-1) established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. High concentrations of SRIF (274 +/- 51 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) and CEA (3083 +/- 347 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) were present in QGP-1 cells, and the basal secretion rates of SRIF and CEA by the cells (n = 5) were 46.4 +/- 4.8 and 1690 +/- 78 pg/10(5) cells/h, respectively. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of SRIF in xenografts of QGP-1 cells and colocalization of SRIF and CEA. Secretion of SRIF by QGP-1 cells was stimulated in the presence of high K+ (50 mmol) and theophylline (10 mmol), but arginine (10 mmol) and glucose (300 mg/dl) had no effect on the SRIF secretion. The QGP-1 cell line may be useful for studying the regulation mechanism of SRIF secretion.

  9. Effects of somatostatin and some of its tetrapeptide fragments on ethanol - induced gastric mucosal erosion in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Laszlo, F.; Pavo, I.; Penke, B.; Balint, G.A.

    1987-08-31

    A study was made of the cytoprotective effects of somatostatin (SRIF) and its 3-6, 5-8, 7-10, 9-12 and 11-14 tetrapeptide fragments on absolute ethanol-induced hemorrhagic erosions in the stomach of rat. The SRIF molecule was found to prevent the gastric erosions induced by ethanol. The 7-10 and 11-14 fragments exhibited similar properties. There are two peaks in the cytoprotective dose-response curves. It is concluded that various fragments of SRIF can also exert cytoprotective effects. SRIF is superior to cimetidine in the therapy of bleeding duodenal and gastric ulcers in humans. It prevents the duodenal ulcer produced by cysteamine and the gastric ulcer caused by stress. According to Szabo and Usadel, SRIF has a cytoprotective property, i.e. it decreases the harmful effects of absolute ethanol on the stomach of rat. The aim of this study was to establish whether various SRIF fragment have protective effects, and how the cytoprotection depends on the doses applied. 18 references, 1 figure.

  10. Somatostatin 4 receptor activation modulates TRPV1[correction of TPRV1] currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Louise; Just, Stefan; Doods, Henri

    2014-06-24

    Somatostatin (sst) is a cyclic neuropeptide known to have inhibitory roles in the central nervous system. It exerts its biological effects via the activation of the 5 sst receptor subtypes, which belong to the family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). This peptide has analgesic properties, specifically via the activation of the sst4 receptor subtype. Although this is established, the precise molecular mechanisms causing this have not yet been fully elucidated. This research aimed to identify a possible anti-nociceptive mechanism, showing functional links to the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) within the pain processing pathway. Calcium imaging and whole cell voltage clamp experiments were conducted on DRG neurons prepared from adult rats, utilizing capsaicin stimulations and the sst4 receptor specific agonist J-2156. The complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inflammatory pain model was used to examine if effects are augmented in pain conditions. The sst4 receptor agonist J-2156 was able significantly to inhibit capsaicin induced calcium and sodium influx, where the effect was more potent after CFA treatment. This inhibition identifies a contributory molecular mechanism to the analgesic properties of sst4 receptor activation.

  11. Ribosome-Mediated Incorporation of Dipeptides and Dipeptide Analogues into Proteins in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Maini, Rumit; Dedkova, Larisa M; Paul, Rakesh; Madathil, Manikandadas M; Chowdhury, Sandipan Roy; Chen, Shengxi; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-09-09

    Plasmids containing 23S rRNA randomized at positions 2057-2063 and 2502-2507 were introduced into Escherichia coli, affording a library of clones which produced modified ribosomes in addition to the pre-existing wild-type ribosomes. These clones were screened with a derivative of puromycin, a natural product which acts as an analogue of the 3'-end of aminoacyl-tRNA and terminates protein synthesis by accepting the growing polypeptide chain, thereby killing bacterial cells. The puromycin derivative in this study contained the dipeptide p-methoxyphenylalanylglycine, implying the ability of the modified ribosomes in clones sensitive to this puromycin analogue to recognize dipeptides. Several clones inhibited by the puromycin derivative were used to make S-30 preparations, and some of these were shown to support the incorporation of dipeptides into proteins. The four incorporated species included two dipeptides (Gly-Phe (2) and Phe-Gly (3)), as well as a thiolated dipeptide analogue (4) and a fluorescent oxazole (5) having amine and carboxyl groups approximately the same distance apart as in a normal dipeptide. A protein containing both thiolated dipeptide 4 and a 7-methoxycoumarin fluorophore was found to undergo fluorescence quenching. Introduction of the oxazole fluorophore 5 into dihydrofolate reductase or green fluorescent protein resulted in quite strong enhancement of its fluorescence emission, and the basis for this enhancement was studied. The aggregate results demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating dipeptides as a single ribosomal event, and illustrate the lack of recognition of the central peptide bond in the dipeptide, potentially enabling the incorporation of a broad variety of structural analogues.

  12. Tren-based analogues of bacillibactin: structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Dertz, Emily A; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2006-07-10

    Synthetic analogues were designed to highlight the effect of the glycine moiety of bacillibactin on the overall stability of the ferric complex as compared to synthetic analogues of enterobactin. Insertion of a variety of amino acids to catecholamide analogues based on a Tren (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) backbone increased the overall acidity of the ligands, causing an enhancement of the stability of the resulting ferric complex as compared to TRENCAM. Solution thermodynamic behavior of these siderophores and their synthetic analogues was investigated through potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations. X-ray crystallography, circular dichroism, and molecular modeling were used to determine the chirality and geometry of the ferric complexes of bacillibactin and its analogues. In contrast to the Tren scaffold, addition of a glycine to the catechol chelating arms causes an inversion of the trilactone backbone, resulting in opposite chiralities of the two siderophores and a destabilization of the ferric complex of bacillibactin compared to ferric enterobactin.

  13. Analogue Divider by Averaging a Triangular Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Krishnagiri Chinnathambi

    2017-03-01

    A new analogue divider circuit by averaging a triangular wave using operational amplifiers is explained in this paper. The triangle wave averaging analog divider using operational amplifiers is explained here. The reference triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level up towards positive power supply voltage level. Its positive portion is obtained by a positive rectifier and its average value is obtained by a low pass filter. The same triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level to down towards negative power supply voltage level. Its negative portion is obtained by a negative rectifier and its average value is obtained by another low pass filter. Both the averaged voltages are combined in a summing amplifier and the summed voltage is given to an op-amp as negative input. This op-amp is configured to work in a negative closed environment. The op-amp output is the divider output.

  14. Naturalness in an emergent analogue spacetime.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2006-04-21

    Effective field theories (EFTs) have been widely used as a framework in order to place constraints on the Planck suppressed Lorentz violations predicted by various models of quantum gravity. There are, however, technical problems in the EFT framework when it comes to ensuring that small Lorentz violations remain small--this is the essence of the "naturalness" problem. Herein we present an "emergent" spacetime model, based on the "analogue gravity" program, by investigating a specific condensed-matter system. Specifically, we consider the class of two-component BECs subject to laser-induced transitions between the components, and we show that this model is an example for Lorentz invariance violation due to ultraviolet physics. Furthermore, our model explicitly avoids the naturalness problem, and makes specific suggestions regarding how to construct a physically reasonable quantum gravity phenomenology.

  15. Derivatisable Cyanobactin Analogues: A Semisynthetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oueis, Emilia; Adamson, Catherine; Mann, Greg; Ludewig, Hannes; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many natural cyclic peptides have potent and potentially useful biological activities. Their use as therapeutic starting points is often limited by the quantities available, the lack of known biological targets and the practical limits on diversification to fine‐tune their properties. We report the use of enzymes from the cyanobactin family to heterocyclise and macrocyclise chemically synthesised substrates so as to allow larger‐scale syntheses and better control over derivatisation. We have made cyclic peptides containing orthogonal reactive groups, azide or dehydroalanine, that allow chemical diversification, including the use of fluorescent labels that can help in target identification. We show that the enzymes are compatible and efficient with such unnatural substrates. The combination of chemical synthesis and enzymatic transformation could help renew interest in investigating natural cyclic peptides with biological activity, as well as their unnatural analogues, as therapeutics. PMID:26507241

  16. A simple analogue of lung mechanics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, T F

    1993-12-01

    A model of the chest and lungs can be easily constructed from a bottle of water, a balloon, a syringe, a rubber stopper, glass and rubber tubing, and clamps. The model is a more exact analogue of the body than the classic apparatus of Hering in two respects: 1) the pleurae and intrapleural fluid are represented by water rather than air, and 2) the subatmospheric "intrapleural" pressure is created by the elasticity of the "lung" (balloon) rather than by a vacuum pump. With this model, students can readily see how the lung is inflated and deflated by movements of the "diaphragm and chest" (syringe plunger) and how intrapleural pressures change as this is accomplished.

  17. Terrestrial Analogues for Lunar Impact Melt Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pahoehoe and ?a ?a lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pahoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pahoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  18. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  19. Terrestrial analogues for lunar impact melt flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pāhoehoe and ´a´ā lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pāhoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pāhoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  20. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  1. Novel analogues of degarelix incorporating hydroxy-, methoxy- and pegylated-urea moieties at positions 3, 5, 6 and the N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Manoj P.; Hong, Doley J.; Croston, Glenn; Rivier, Catherine; Rivier, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Novel degarelix (Fe200486) analogues were screened for antagonism of GnRH-induced response (IC50) in a reporter gene assay. Inhibition of luteinizing hormone release over time was measured in the castrated male rat. Nω-hydroxy- and Nω-methoxy-carbamoylation of Dab and Dap at position 3 (3-6), and Nω-hydroxy-, Nω-methoxy-carbamoylation and pegylation of 4Aph at positions 5 and 6 (7-10, 15-17, 22-25) were carried out. Modulation of hydrophobicity was achieved using different acylating groups at the N-terminus (11-14, 18-21, 26-28). Analogues 8, 15-17, 22 and 23 were equipotent to acyline (IC50 = 0.69 nM) and degarelix (IC50 = 0.58 nM) in vitro. Analogues 7, 17 and 23 were shorter acting than acyline, when 9, 11, 13, 15, 16 and 22 were longer acting. Only 9 and 14 were inactive at releasing histamine. No analogue exhibited a duration of action comparable to that of degarelix. Analogues with shorter and longer retention times on HPLC (a measure of hydrophilicity) than degarelix were identified. PMID:16759096

  2. Analogues of uracil nucleosides with intrinsic fluorescence (NIF-analogues): synthesis and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Segal, Meirav; Fischer, Bilha

    2012-02-28

    Uridine cannot be utilized as fluorescent probe due to its extremely low quantum yield. For improving the uracil fluorescence characteristics we extended the natural chromophore at the C5 position by coupling substituted aromatic rings directly or via an alkenyl or alkynyl linker to create fluorophores. Extension of the uracil base was achieved by treating 5-I-uridine with the appropriate boronic acid under the Suzuki coupling conditions. Analogues containing an alkynyl linker were obtained from 5-I-uridine and the suitable boronic acid in a Sonogashira coupling reaction. The uracil fluorescent analogues proposed here were designed to satisfy the following requirements: a minimal chemical modification at a position not involved in base-pairing, resulting in relatively long absorption and emission wavelengths and high quantum yield. 5-((4-Methoxy-phenyl)-trans-vinyl)-2'-deoxy-uridine, 6b, was found to be a promising fluorescent probe. Probe 6b exhibits a quantum yield that is 3000-fold larger than that of the natural chromophore (Φ 0.12), maximum emission (478 nm) which is 170 nm red shifted as compared to uridine, and a Stokes shift of 143 nm. In addition, since probe 6b adopts the anti conformation and S sugar puckering favored by B-DNA, it makes a promising nucleoside analogue to be incorporated in an oligonucleotide probe for detection of genetic material.

  3. PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) protein regulates phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3)-specific activation of somatostatin by forming a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Kwon, Ohman; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Park, Hye Kyung; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Kyung Lock; Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Seok, Heon; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Choi, Jang Hyun; Kang, Byoung Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-06-15

    Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) is a key molecule in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling. Many studies have shown that the four PLC-β subtypes have different physiological functions despite their similar structures. Because the PLC-β subtypes possess different PDZ-binding motifs, they have the potential to interact with different PDZ proteins. In this study, we identified PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) as a PDZ protein that specifically interacts with PLC-β3. To elucidate the functional roles of PDZK1, we next screened for potential interacting proteins of PDZK1 and identified the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) as another protein that interacts with PDZK1. Through these interactions, PDZK1 assembles as a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and SSTRs. Interestingly, the expression of PDZK1 and PLC-β3, but not PLC-β1, markedly potentiated SST-induced PLC activation. However, disruption of the ternary complex inhibited SST-induced PLC activation, which suggests that PDZK1-mediated complex formation is required for the specific activation of PLC-β3 by SST. Consistent with this observation, the knockdown of PDZK1 or PLC-β3, but not that of PLC-β1, significantly inhibited SST-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which further attenuated subsequent ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the formation of a complex between SSTRs, PDZK1, and PLC-β3 is essential for the specific activation of PLC-β3 and the subsequent physiologic responses by SST.

  4. [Possibilities of treatment of external pancreatic fistula].

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, D V; Pervova, O V; Diatlov, V Iu; Kurbanov, D Sh

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of sekretolitičeskoj therapy with synthetic analogue of somatostatin, a short-acting oktreotid (group 1) and extended oktreotid-depo (group 2) in 24 patients with external pancreatic fistulas after destructive pancreatitis. Results of clinical studies have shown that against the backdrop of an analogue of somatostatin-depo true healing and purulent-necrotic pancreatic external fistula occurs in less time: average 19 ± 1.8, and 16.2 ± 1.2 day observations, respectively.

  5. Nitroglycerin enhances the propagation of cortical spreading depression: comparative studies with sumatriptan and novel kynurenic acid analogues

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Levente; Szita, Bence; Kocsis, Kitti; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2017-01-01

    Background The complex pathophysiology of migraine is not yet clearly understood; therefore, experimental models are essential for the investigation of the processes related to migraine headache, which include cortical spreading depression (CSD) and NO donor-induced neurovascular changes. Data on the assessment of drug efficacy in these models are often limited, which prompted us to investigate a novel combined migraine model in which an effective pharmacon could be more easily identified. Materials and methods In vivo electrophysiological experiments were performed to investigate the effect of nitroglycerin (NTG) on CSD induced by KCl application. In addition, sumatriptan and newly synthesized neuroactive substances (analogues of the neuromodulator kynurenic acid [KYNA]) were also tested. Results The basic parameters of CSDs were unchanged following NTG administration; however, propagation failure was decreased compared to the controls. Sumatriptan decreased the number of CSDs, whereas propagation failure was as minimal as in the NTG group. On the other hand, both of the KYNA analogues restored the ratio of propagation to the control level. Discussion The ratio of propagation appeared to be the indicator of the effect of NTG. This is the first study providing direct evidence that NTG influences CSD; furthermore, we observed different effects of sumatriptan and KYNA analogues. Sumatriptan changed the generation of CSDs, whereas the analogues acted on the propagation of the waves. Our experimental design overlaps with a large spectrum of processes present in migraine pathophysiology, and it can be a useful experimental model for drug screening. PMID:28053504

  6. The 2-methoxy methyl analogue of salvinorin A attenuates cocaine-induced drug seeking and sucrose reinforcements in rats.

    PubMed

    Morani, Aashish S; Ewald, Amy; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Kivell, Bronwyn M

    2013-11-15

    κ Opioid receptor activation by traditional arylacetamide agonists and the novel neoclerodane diterpene κ opioid receptor agonist Salvinorin A (Sal A) results in attenuation of cocaine-seeking behavior in pre-clinical models of addiction. However, adverse effects such as sedation, depression and aversion limit their clinical utility. The Sal A analogue, 2-methoxy-methyl salvinorin B (MOM Sal B) is a longer acting Sal A analogue with high affinity for κ opioid receptors. In this study, we tested MOM Sal B for its ability to modulate cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. MOM Sal B (0.3mg/kg) successfully attenuated cocaine-seeking but also attenuated sucrose reinforcement. No change in activity was observed in either cocaine-induced hyperactivity or spontaneous open field activity tests but increased immobility and decreased swimming times in the forced swim test were observed. This study indicates that κ opioid receptor activation by more potent Sal A analogues modulates cocaine-seeking behavior non-selectively without causing sedation, suggesting an improved side effects profile. However, pro-depressive effects are seen, which may limit the therapeutic potential of this compound. Future studies with Sal A analogues having affinities at other opioid receptors are warranted as they have the potential to identify compounds having effective anti-addiction properties.

  7. The 2-Methoxy methyl analogue of salvinorin A attenuates cocaine-induced drug seeking and sucrose reinforcements in rats

    PubMed Central

    Morani, Aashish S.; Ewald, Amy; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Kivell, Bronwyn

    2014-01-01

    κ opioid receptor activation by traditional arylacetamide agonists and the novel neoclerodane diterpene κ opioid receptor agonist Salvinorin A (Sal A) results in attenuation of cocaine-seeking behavior in pre-clinical models of addiction. However, adverse effects such as sedation, depression and aversion limit their clinical utility. The Sal A analogue, 2-methoxymethyl salvinorin B (MOM Sal B) is a longer acting Sal A analogue with high affinity for κ opioid receptors. In this study, we tested MOM Sal B for its ability to modulate cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. MOM Sal B (0.3 mg/kg) successfully attenuated cocaine-seeking but also attenuated sucrose reinforcement. No change in activity was observed in either cocaine-induced hyperactivity or spontaneous open field activity tests but increased immobility and decreased swimming times in the forced swim test were observed. This study indicates that κ opioid receptor activation by more potent Sal A analogues modulates cocaine-seeking behavior non-selectively without causing sedation, suggesting an improved side effects profile. However, pro-depressive effects are seen, which may limit the therapeutic potential of this compound. Future studies with Sal A analogues having affinities at other opioid receptors are warranted as they have the potential to identify compounds having effective anti-addiction properties. PMID:24201308

  8. Reversal of methylcholanthrene-induced changes in mouse prostates in vitro by retinoic acid and its analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Lasnitzki, I.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of vitamin A-related compounds on hyperplasia and metaplasia induced by methylcholanthrene was studied in mouse prostate glands in organ culture. Methylcholanthrene was found to cause extensive hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the prostatic epithelium which persisted after withdrawal of the carcinogen. The retinoids included retinoic acid and 6 of its structural analogues synthesized in an attempt to enhance the anticarcinogenic action and reduce the toxicity of the parent compound. These where the cyclopentenyl analogus 7699, A2-retinoic acid, 13-cis-alpha-retinoic acid and 3 aromatic analogues. Administration of the compounds following the carcinogen reduced the extent and incidence of hyperplasia significantly and with the exception of one compound reversed the squamous metaplasia. Two of the aromatic analogues, one with a terminal ethylamide group (1430), and the other with a terminal ethylester group (9369), proved to be the most potent inhibitors, followed by compound 7699 and (9369), proved to be the most potent inhibitors, followed by compound 7699 and retinoic acid. A2-retinoic acid and 13-cis-alpha-retinoic acid showed the lowest activity. The inhibition of hyperplasia appeared to be mediated via a reduction of DNA synthesis. It seemed unrelated to either the biological growth-promoting activity of the compounds or their surface-active properties. It is tentatively suggested that vitamin A and its analogues may act as hormones. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:987794

  9. Design of multi-epitope, analogue-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fikes, John D; Sette, Alessandro

    2003-09-01

    The current objective of our cancer programme is to develop an effective vaccine based on rationally designed T cell epitope analogues, for use in the adjuvant setting for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colon cancer. Analogue epitopes, enhanced for either human leukocyte antigen (HLA) binding or T cell receptor (TCR) signalling, have been shown to be more effective at breaking immunological tolerance than cognate wild-type epitopes. Although encouraging early-phase clinical data has been obtained by others using a limited number of HLA-A2-restricted epitope analogues, the clinical benefits and immune correlates for vaccines comprised of multiple epitope analogues restricted by multiple HLA supertypes remains to be investigated. Clinical studies are currently being conducted on EP-2101, a prototype vaccine that delivers multiple HLA-A2-restricted analogue epitopes. In parallel, fixed anchor and heteroclitic analogues restricted by three other commonly expressed HLA supertypes are being identified. These analogues will be incorporated into future vaccines including optimised minigenes (epigenes) and tested in preclinical and clinical studies addressing various different cancer indications.

  10. Functionalized Congener Approach to Muscarinic Antagonists: Analogues of Pirenzepine

    PubMed Central

    Karton, Yishai; Bradbury, Barton J.; Baumgold, Jesse; Paek, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine (5,11-dihydro-11-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)acetyl]-6H-pyrido[2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one) was derivatized to explore points of attachment of functionalized side chains for the synthesis of receptor probes and ligands for affinity chromatography. The analogues prepared were evaluated in competitive binding assays versus [3H]-N-methylscopolamine at four muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1AChR-m4AChR) in membranes from rat heart tissue and transfected A9L cells. 9-(Hydroxymethyl)pirenzepine, 8-(methylthio)pirenzepine, and a series of 8-aminosulfonyl derivatives were synthesized. Several 5-substituted analogues of pirenzepine also were prepared. An alternate series of analogues substituted on the 4-position of the piperazine ring was prepared by reaction of 4-desmethylpirenzepine with various electrophiles. An N-chloroethyl analogue of pirenzepine was shown to form a reactive aziridine species in aqueous buffer yet failed to affinity label muscarinic receptors. Within a series of aminoalkyl analogues, the affinity increased as the length of the alkyl chain increased. Shorter chain analogues were generally much less potent than pirenzepine, and longer analogues (7–10 carbons) were roughly as potent as pirenzepine at m1 receptors, but were nonselective. Depending on the methylene chain length, acylation or alkyl substitution of the terminal amine also influenced the affinity at muscarinic receptors. PMID:2066986

  11. Structure-activity relationship of tryptamine analogues on the heart of Venus mercenaria.

    PubMed

    GREENBERG, M J

    1960-09-01

    A number of tryptamine analogues and other exciter agents have been tested on the heart of Venus mercenaria. The method of estimation of potency, especially for irreversibly acting compounds, is discussed. Specificity of action with respect to the site of action of 5-hydroxytryptamine is defined experimentally. The specific activity of tyramine and phenethylamine and the non-specific excitatory action of indole and skatole indicate that the indole ring is neither necessary nor sufficient for 5-hydroxytryptamine-like activity. Tryptamine analogues differ in mode of action as well as potency. Congeners without a 5-hydroxyl group tend to act more slowly and irreversibly as well as less strongly than 5-hydroxytryptamine. Methyl substitution also increases the time of action and difficulty of reversal. However, the potency of such compounds may be increased or decreased depending upon the position of substitution and the presence of the 5-hydroxyl group. The relations between structure and potency and mode of action are discussed. Suggestions are made concerning the effective conformation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine molecule and the nature of its receptor.

  12. Studies of inositol 1-phosphate analogues as inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate synthase in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroyuki; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Nomiya, Hiroki; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported a novel pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol in mycobacteria via phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) [Morii H., Ogawa, M., Fukuda, K., Taniguchi, H., and Koga, Y (2010) J. Biochem. 148, 593-602]. PIP synthase in the pathway is a promising target for the development of new anti-mycobacterium drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the characteristics of the PIP synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Four types of compounds were chemically synthesized based on the assumption that structural homologues of inositol 1-phosphate, a PIP synthase substrate, would act as PIP synthase inhibitors, and the results confirmed that all synthesized compounds inhibited PIP synthase activity. The phosphonate analogue of inositol 1-phosphate (Ino-C-P) had the greatest inhibitory effect among the synthesized compounds examined. Kinetic analysis indicated that Ino-C-P acted as a competitive inhibitor of inositol 1-phosphate. The IC(50) value for Ino-C-P inhibition of the PIP synthase activity was estimated to be 2.0 mM. Interestingly, Ino-C-P was utilized in the same manner as the normal PIP synthase substrate, leading to the synthesis of a phosphonate analogue of PIP (PI-C-P), which had a structure similar to that of the natural product, PIP. In addition, PI-C-P had high inhibitory activity against PIP synthase.

  13. Release of somatostatin and its role in the mediation of the anti-inflammatory effect induced by antidromic stimulation of sensory fibres of rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, J; Helyes, Z; Oroszi, G; Németh, J; Pintér, E

    1998-03-01

    1. The effect of antidromic stimulation of the sensory fibres of the sciatic nerve on inflammatory plasma extravasation in various tissues and on cutaneous vasodilatation elicited in distant parts of the body was investigated in rats pretreated with guanethidine (8 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and pipecuronium (200 microg kg(-1), i.v.). 2. Antidromic sciatic nerve stimulation with C-fibre strength (20 V, 0.5 ms) at 5 Hz for 5 min elicited neurogenic inflammation in the innervated area and inhibited by 50.3 +/- 4.67% the development of a subsequent plasma extravasation in response to similar stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve. Stimulation at 0.5 Hz for 1 h also evoked local plasma extravasation and inhibited the carrageenin-induced (1%, 100 microl s.c.) cutaneous inflammation by 38.5 +/- 10.0% in the contralateral paw. Excitation at 0.1 Hz for 4 h elicited no local plasma extravasation in the stimulated hindleg but still reduced the carrageenin-induced oedema by 52.1 +/- 9.7% in the paw on the contralateral side. 3. Plasma extravasation in the knee joint in response to carrageenin (2%, 200 microl intra-articular injection) was diminished by 46.1 +/- 12.69% and 40.9 +/- 4.93% when the sciatic nerve was stimulated in the contralateral leg at 0.5 Hz for 1 h or 0.1 Hz for 4 h, respectively. 4. Stimulation of the peripheral stump of the left vagal nerve (20 V, 1 ms, 8 Hz, 10 min) elicited plasma extravasation in the trachea, oesophagus and mediastinal connective tissue in rats pretreated with atropine (2 mg kg(-1), i.v.), guanethidine (8 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and pipecuronium (200 microg kg(-1), i.v.). These responses were inhibited by 37.8 +/- 5.1%, 49.7 +/- 9.9% and 37.6 +/- 4.2%, respectively by antidromic sciatic nerve excitation (5 Hz, 5 min) applied 5 min earlier. 5. Pretreatment with polyclonal somatostatin antiserum (0.5 ml/rat, i.v.) or the selective somatostatin depleting agent cysteamine (280 mg kg(-1), s.c.) prevented the anti-inflammatory effect of sciatic nerve

  14. A chemoselective and continuous synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues

    PubMed Central

    Verlee, Arno; Heugebaert, Thomas; van der Meer, Tom; Kerchev, Pavel I; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2017-01-01

    For the synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues, small molecules which are known for their bioactivity, a chemoselective procedure has been developed starting from m-(chlorosulfonyl)benzoyl chloride. Although a chemoselective process in batch was already reported, a continuous-flow process reveals an increased selectivity at higher temperatures and without catalysts. In total, 15 analogues were synthesized, using similar conditions, with yields ranging between 65 and 99%. This is the first automated and chemoselective synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues. PMID:28326139

  15. Mars on Earth: soil analogues for future Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    Preparations for missions to Mars are a major concern for scientists. Predicting how equipment and experiments will perform on the planet is difficult because tests are restricted to Earth. Mars soil analogues are being used to solve this problem. These terrestrial materials are chemically and physically similar to martian soils and, because they contain unusual minerals and trace amounts of organic matter, are scientifically interesting in their own right. However, no current analogue is appropriate for all necessary tests. Here we describe Mars soil analogues, identify limitations and suggest the need for new Mars simulants.

  16. Synthesis, antiarrhythmic activity, and toxicological evaluation of mexiletine analogues.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mariagrazia; Carocci, Alessia; Budriesi, Roberta; Micucci, Matteo; Toma, Maddalena; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lovece, Angelo; Catalano, Alessia; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; De Palma, Annalisa; Contino, Marialessandra; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Chiarini, Alberto; Franchini, Carlo; Ghelardini, Carla; Habtemariam, Solomon; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-10-04

    Four mexiletine analogues have been tested for their antiarrhythmic, inotropic, and chronotropic effects on isolated guinea pig heart tissues and to assess calcium antagonist activity, in comparison with the parent compound mexiletine. All analogues showed from moderate to high antiarrhythmic activity. In particular, three of them (1b,c,e) were more active and potent than the reference drug, while exhibiting only modest or no negative inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasorelaxant activity, thus showing high selectivity of action. All compounds showed no cytotoxicity and 1b,c,d did not impair motor coordination. All in, these new analogues exhibit an interesting cardiovascular profile and deserve further investigation.

  17. Different effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin on growth hormone and stable metabolite of prostaglandin E2, 13, 14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-M) in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Zacharieva, S; Muchá, I; Popova, J; Andonova, K

    1992-01-01

    Twenty four healthy subjects were placed in two treatment groups: 1. The first group consisted of twelve subjects in whom growth releasing hormone (GRH) (1 microgram/kg.BW) resulted in a marked and sustained elevation of serum growth hormone (GH) and a slight and delayed increase in plasma prostaglandin E2-M. In the second group, consisting also of twelve subjects, somatostatin infusion (500 micrograms/250 ml) was initiated and maintained for 60 min. Serum GH significantly decreased at 30 and 60 min during infusion and 15 min thereafter. We did not observe any changes in plasma prostaglandin E2-M during or after somatostatin infusion. The results obtained confirm previous in vitro studies and suggest a possible link between growth releasing hormone and prostaglandin E2 in their action on growth hormone secretion. It seems that somatostatin does not play a role in the control of prostaglandin E2 release.

  18. Pattern of Fos expression in the brain induced by selective activation of somatostatin receptor 2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Miriam; Stengel, Andreas; Wang, Lixin; Coskun, Tamer; Alsina-Fernandez, Jorge; Rivier, Jean; Taché, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Central activation of somatostatin (sst) receptors by oligosomatostatin analogs inhibits growth hormone and stress-related rise in catecholamine plasma levels while stimulating grooming, feeding behaviors, gastric transit and acid secretion, which can be mimicked by selective sst2 receptor agonist. To evaluate the pattern of neuronal activation induced by peptide sst receptor agonists, we assessed Fos-expression in rat brain after intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a newly developed selective sst2 agonist compared to the oligosomatostatin agonist, ODT8-SST, a pan-sst1–5 agonist. Ninety min after injection of vehicle (10µl) or previously established maximal orexigenic dose of peptides (1µg=1nmol/rat), brains were assessed for Fos-immunohistochemistry and doublelabeling. Food and water were removed after injection. The sst2 agonist and ODT8-SST induced a similar Fos distribution pattern except in the arcuate nucleus where only the sst2 agonist increased Fos. Compared to ODT8-SST, the sst2 agonist induced higher Fos-expression by 3.7-fold in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, 1.2-fold in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), 1.6-fold in the magnocellular paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (mPVN), 4.1-fold in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus, and 2.6-fold in both the inferior olivary nucleus and superficial layer of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus. Doublelabeling in the hypothalamus showed that ODT8-SST activates 36% of oxytocin, 63% of vasopressin and 79% of sst2 immunoreactive neurons in the mPVN and 28%, 55% and 25% in the SON, respectively. Selective activation of sst2 receptor results in a more robust neuronal activation than the pan-sst1–5 agonist in various brain regions that may have relevance in sst2 mediated alterations of behavioral, autonomic and endocrine functions. PMID:20637739

  19. Somatostatin receptor expression in small cell lung cancer as a prognostic marker and a target for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Hänscheid, Heribert; Wild, Vanessa; Pelzer, Theo; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Droll, Sabine; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial responsiveness to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) commonly relapses within months. Although neuroendocrine characteristics may be difficult to demonstrate in individual cases, a relevant expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on the cell surface has been described. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of SSTR-expression in advanced SCLC. We further examined pre-requisites for successful peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). 21 patients with extensive stage SCLC were enrolled. All patients underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-DOTATATE to select patients for SSTR-directed therapy. PET scans were visually and semi-quantitatively assessed and compared to SSTR2a and SSTR5 expression in biopsy samples. Peak standardized uptake values (SUVpeak) of tumors as well as tumor-to-liver ratios were correlated to progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In 4/21 patients all SCLC lesions were PET-positive. 6/21 subjects were rated “intermediate” with the majority of lesions positive, the remaining 11/21 patients were PET-negative. PET-positivity correlated well with histologic SSTR2a, but not with SSTR5 expression. Neither PET-positivity nor SUVpeak were predictors of PFS or OS. In 4 patients with intensive SSTR2a-receptor expression, PRRT was performed with one partial response and one stable disease, respectively. SSTR-expression as detected by 68Ga-DOTATATE-PET and/or histology is not predictive of PFS or OS in patients with advanced SCLC. However, in patients exhibiting sufficient tracer uptake, PRRT might be a treatment option given its low toxicity and the absence of effective alternatives. PMID:26936994

  20. Calcium-permeable presynaptic kainate receptors involved in excitatory short-term facilitation onto somatostatin interneurons during natural stimulus patterns.

    PubMed

    Sun, H Y; Bartley, A F; Dobrunz, L E

    2009-02-01

    Schaffer collateral synapses in hippocampus show target-cell specific short-term plasticity. Using GFP-expressing Inhibitory Neuron (GIN) transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in a subset of somatostatin-containing interneurons (SOM interneurons), we previously showed that Schaffer collateral synapses onto SOM interneurons in stratum (S.) radiatum have unusually large (up to 6-fold) paired-pulse facilitation. This results from a low initial release probability and the enhancement of facilitation by synaptic activation of presynaptic kainate receptors. Here we further investigate the properties of these kainate receptors and examine their effects on short-term facilitation during physiologically derived stimulation patterns, using excitatory postsynaptic currents recorded in S. radiatum interneurons during Schaffer collateral stimulation in acute slices from juvenile GIN mice. We find that GluR5 and GluR6 antagonists decrease short-term facilitation at Schaffer collateral synapses onto SOM interneurons with no additive effects, suggesting that the presynaptic kainate receptors are heteromers containing both GluR5 and GluR6 subunits. The calcium-permeable receptor antagonist 1-napthyl acetyl spermine (NASPM) both mimics and occludes the effect of the kainate receptor antagonists, indicating that the presynaptic kainate receptors are calcium permeable. Furthermore, Schaffer collateral synapses onto SOM interneurons show up to 11-fold short-term facilitation during physiologically derived stimulus patterns, in contrast to other interneurons that have less than 1.5-fold facilitation. Blocking the kainate receptors reduces facilitation in SOM interneurons by approximately 50% during the physiologically derived patterns and reduces the dynamic range. Activation of calcium-permeable kainate receptors containing GluR5/GluR6 causes a dramatic increase in short-term facilitation during physiologically derived stimulus patterns, a mechanism

  1. The expression of the truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor subtype 5 associates with aggressiveness in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molè, Daniela; Gentilin, Erica; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Gagliano, Teresa; Gahete, Manuel D; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Pansini, Giancarlo; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; degli Uberti, Ettore; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2015-11-01

    The truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 associates with increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast cancer. We previously found that sst5 activation may counteract sst2 selective agonist effects in a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, the TT cells, and that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate sst5TMD4 expression in a series of human MTC and to explore the functional role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells. We evaluated sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression in 36 MTC samples. Moreover, we investigated the role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells evaluating cell number, DNA synthesis, free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), calcitonin and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, cell morphology, protein expression, and invasion. We found that in MTC the balance between sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression influences disease stage. sst5TMD4 overexpression in TT cells confers a greater growth capacity, blocks sst2 agonist-induced antiproliferative effects, modifies the cell phenotype, decreases E-cadherin and phosphorylated β-catenin levels, increases vimentin, total β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK3B levels (in keeping with the development of epithelial to mesenchymal transition), and confers a greater invasion capacity. This is the first evidence indicating that sst5TMD4 is expressed in human MTC cells, where it associates with more aggressive behavior, suggesting that sst5TMD4 might play a functionally relevant role.

  2. Somatostatin receptor subtype 4 activation is involved in anxiety and depression-like behavior in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Scheich, Bálint; Gaszner, Balázs; Kormos, Viktória; László, Kristóf; Ádori, Csaba; Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Tékus, Valéria; Bölcskei, Kata; Ábrahám, István; Pintér, Erika; Szolcsányi, János; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-02-01

    Somatostatin regulates stress-related behavior and its expression is altered in mood disorders. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms, especially about the importance of its receptors (sst1-sst5) in anxiety and depression-like behavior. Here we analyzed the potential role of sst4 receptor in these processes, since sst4 is present in stress-related brain regions, but there are no data about its functional relevance. Genetic deletion of sst4 (Sstr4(-/-)) and its pharmacological activation with the newly developed selective non-peptide agonist J-2156 were used. Anxiety was examined in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and depression-like behavior in the forced swim (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). Neuronal activation during the TST was monitored by Fos immunohistochemistry, receptor expression was identified by sst4(LacZ) immunostaining in several brain regions. Sstr4(-/-) mice showed increased anxiety in the EPM and enhanced depression-like behavior in the FST. J-2156 (100 μg/kg i.p.) exhibited anxiolytic effect in the EPM and decreased immobility in the TST. J-2156 alone did not influence Fos immunoreactivity in intact mice, but significantly increased the stress-induced Fos response in the dorsal raphe nucleus, central projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus, periaqueductal gray matter, the magnocellular, but not the parvocellular part of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, lateral septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the amygdala. Notably, sst4(LacZ) immunoreactivity occurred in the central and basolateral amygdala. Together, these studies reveal that sst4 mediates anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects by enhancing the stress-responsiveness of several brain regions with special emphasis on the amygdala.

  3. Estradiol Regulates GH Releasing-Peptide's Interactions with GH-Releasing Hormone and Somatostatin in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Catalina; Rollene, Nanette L.; Erickson, Dana; Miles, John M.; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Estrogen stimulates pulsatile secretion of growth hormone (GH), albeit via mechanisms that are largely unknown. An untested hypothesis is that estradiol (E2) drives GH secretion by amplifying interactions among GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SS) and GH-releasing peptide (GHRP). Design The design comprised double-blind randomized prospective administration of transdermal E2 vs placebo to healthy postmenopausal women (N=24) followed by pulsatile GHRH or SS infusions for 13 hr overnight with or without continuous GHRP-2 stimulation. Methods Endpoints were mean GH concentration, deconvolved GH secretion, and GH ApEn (a regularity measure). Results By generalized ANOVA models, E2 vs placebo supplementation: (1) augmented mean (13-hr) GH concentrations (P=0.023), GHRH-induced pulsatile GH secretion over the first 3.0 hr (P=0.0085) and pulsatile GH secretion over the next 10 hr (P=0.054); (2) increased GHRP- (P=0.022) and SS- (P<0.001) modulated GH ApEn; and (3) did not amplify GHRH/GHRP synergy on pulsatile GH secretion. By linear regression, E2 concentrations correlated positively with GH secretion during GHRP-2 infusion (P=0.022), whereas BMI correlated negatively with GH secretion during GHRH (P=0.006) and combined GHRH/GHRP (P=0.015) stimulation. E2 and BMI jointly determined triple (combined L-arginine, GHRH, GHRP-2) stimulation of GH secretion after saline (R2=0.44, P=0.003) and pulsatile GHRH (R2=0.39, P=0.013) infusions. Conclusion In summary, in postmenopausal individuals, E2 supplementation augments the amount (mass) and alters the pattern (regularity) of GH secretion via interactions among GHRH, SS, GHRP, and BMI. These outcomes introduce a more complex model of E2 supplementation in coordinating GH secretion in aging women. PMID:24114435

  4. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Reiter, Theresa; Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Gärtner, Florian C

    2016-11-22

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR-PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR.15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity.SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET- subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET- patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up.In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively.Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series.

  5. Synaptic relationship between somatostatin- and neurokinin-1 receptor-immunoreactive neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex of rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Yu; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T; Ju, Gong; Liu, Ying-Ying

    2012-09-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) in the ventrolateral medulla oblongata is critical for the generation of respiratory rhythm in mammals. Somatostatin (SST) and neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) immunoreactivity have been used as markers of the pre-BötC. SST immunoreactivity almost completely overlaps with small fusiform NK1R-immunoreactive (ir) neurons, the presumed rhythmogenic neurons, but not with large multipolar NK1R-ir neurons. Understanding the neurochemical characteristics, especially the synaptic relationship of SST/NK1R-ir neurons within the pre-BötC network is essential in providing cellular and structural bases for understanding their physiological significance. This work has not been documented so far. We found that SST immunoreactivity was highly expressed in terminals, somas, and primary dendrites in the pre-BötC. Besides the small fusiform neurons, a small population of medium-sized NK1R-ir neurons also colocalized with SST. Large NK1R-ir neurons were not SST-ir, but received somatostatinergic inputs. SST-ir terminals were glutamatergic or GABAergic, and synapsed with NK1R-ir neurons. Most of synapses between them were of the symmetric type, indicating their inhibitory nature. Asymmetric synapses were evident between SST-ir terminals and NK1R-ir dendrites, strongly suggesting an excitatory innervation from the presumed rhythmogenic neurons as these neurons are glutamatergic. We speculate that SST-mediated excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto NK1R-ir rhythmogenic and follower neurons synchronizes their activity to contribute to respiratory rhythmogenesis and control.

  6. Contrast dependence and differential contributions from somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing neurons to spatial integration in mouse V1.

    PubMed

    Nienborg, Hendrikje; Hasenstaub, Andrea; Nauhaus, Ian; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z Josh; Callaway, Edward M

    2013-07-03

    A characteristic feature in the primary visual cortex is that visual responses are suppressed as a stimulus extends beyond the classical receptive field. Here, we examined the role of inhibitory neurons expressing somatostatin (SOM⁺) or parvalbumin (PV⁺) on surround suppression and preferred receptive field size. We recorded multichannel extracellular activity in V1 of transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin in SOM⁺ neurons or PV⁺ neurons. Preferred size and surround suppression were measured using drifting square-wave gratings of varying radii and at two contrasts. Consistent with findings in primates, we found that the preferred size was larger for lower contrasts across all cortical depths, whereas the suppression index (SI) showed a trend to decrease with contrast. We then examined the effect of these metrics on units that were suppressed by photoactivation of either SOM⁺ or PV⁺ neurons. When activating SOM⁺ neurons, we found a significant increase in SI at cortical depths >400 μm, whereas activating PV⁺ neurons caused a trend toward lower SIs regardless of cortical depth. Conversely, activating PV⁺ neurons significantly increased preferred size across all cortical depths, similar to lowering contrast, whereas activating SOM⁺ neurons had no systematic effect on preferred size across all depths. These data suggest that SOM⁺ and PV⁺ neurons contribute differently to spatial integration. Our findings are compatible with the notion that SOM⁺ neurons mediate surround suppression, particularly in deeper cortex, whereas PV⁺ activation decreases the drive of the input to cortex and therefore resembles the effects on spatial integration of lowering contrast.

  7. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR–PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR. 15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity. SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET− subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET− patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up. In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively. Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series. PMID:27780922

  8. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  9. Role of Somatostatin in Preventing Post-endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Pancreatitis: An Update Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Li, Pei-Lin; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Jin-Ping; Hu, Yao-Jun; Yu, Zheng; Wang, Jin-Peng; Zhu, Dan; Tong, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis is the most common serious complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Although, somatostatin (SOM) has been used in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP), the efficacy of SOM remains inconsistent. Methods: Electronic databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), and the Science Citation Index were searched to retrieve relevant studies. Details of the study population, including patients’ characteristics, sample size, regimen of drug administration and incidence of PEP, hyperamylasemia and abdominal pain were extracted by two investigators. Data were analyzed with Review Manager 5.3 software. Results: Eleven randomized controlled trials, enrolling a total of 4192 patients, were included in the meta-analysis. After data were pooled, we observed decreased incidence of ERCP-induced outcomes, such as PEP (RR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.40, 0.98; P = 0.04) and hyperamylasemia (RR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.84; P < 0.001) in patients treated with SOM than those with placebo. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity found decreased incidence of PEP and hyperamylasemia in Asia only. Subgroup analysis by treatment schedule and dosage revealed decreased incidence of PEP and hyperamylasemia when SOM were treated with a single bolus or long-term infusion, or at dose above 3000 μg. We did not observed efficacy of SOM on abdominal pain in pooled or subgroup analysis. Conclusion: This meta-analysis of patients undergoing ERCP showed reduced incidence of PEP and hyperamylasemia when SOM was administrated with single bolus, long-term infusion, or high dosage. More data are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:28018225

  10. Roles of substance P and somatostatin on transmission of nociceptive information induced by formalin in spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T.; Shibata, M.; Takahashi, H.; Inoki, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Nociceptive response induced by 0.5% Formalin in the hindpaw of mice had two peaks, 0-5 min (first phase) and 15-20 min (second phase). By using the distinct biphasic response, the nature of the transmitter systems activated by Formalin in the spinal cord was studied for the purpose of determining the difference of the role of substance P (SP) and somatostatin (SST). The injection of (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP and SP antiserum inhibited only the first phase response. The i.t. injection of -Aminoheptanoyl-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-(OBz)-Thr- (an SST antagonist), SST antiserum and cysteamine (an SST depletor) inhibited only the second phase. This result indicates that SP is involved in the transmission of the first phase, and SST is involved in the transmission of the second phase of the Formalin-induced nociceptive response. With regard to other nociceptive stimuli, two i.t. SP antagonists produced a significant analgesia in the hot plate and tail pinch tests but had no effect in the acetic acid writhing test. However, i.t. SST antagonist and cysteamine produced a significant analgesia in the writhing test but had no effect in the hot plate and tail pinch test. These results suggest that SP participates in the transient pain induced by such acute stimuli as hot plate, tail pinch and the first phase of Formalin response and that SST participates in the prolonged and inflammatory pain induced by stimuli such as acetic acid and the second phase response.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not neurotrophin-3 enhances differentiation of somatostatin neurons in hypothalamic cultures.

    PubMed

    Loudes, C; Petit, F; Kordon, C; Faivre-Bauman, A

    2000-09-01

    The present work investigated whether neurotrophins could differentially affect in vitro growth and maturation of two related subsets of hypothalamic neurons, hypophysiotropic somatostatin (SRIH) neurons projecting from the periventricular area and arcuate SRIH interneurons. For this purpose, the hypothalamus of 17-day-old rat fetuses was sampled and separated into a ventral and a dorsal fragment containing respectively periventricular and arcuate regions. Each fragment was dissociated and seeded separately in defined medium. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), two important members of the neurotrophin family involved in neuronal differentiation and plasticity, were added to the cultures at seeding time. After 6 or 11 days in vitro, neurons were labeled with an anti-SRIH antiserum and submitted to morphometric analysis. In parallel, SRIH mRNA was estimated by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and neuronal SRIH content, basal and depolarisation-stimulated releases measured by radioimmunoassay. The response of control, non-labeled neurons was estimated by neuronal counts and by assaying glutamic acid decarboxylase, a marker of a large majority of hypothalamic neurons. BDNF markedly increased the size and the branching number of SRIH periventricular cell bodies. Expression of SRIH mRNA, as well as SRIH content and release into the culture medium, were also stimulated by the neurotrophin. Non-SRIH neurons were not affected by the treatment. Under the same conditions, arcuate neurons exhibited a weak, mostly transient response to BDNF. NT-3 was ineffective on either neuronal subset. Immunoneutralization of Trk receptors provided further evidence for BDNF effect specificity. The results indicate that BDNF is a selective activator of the differentiation of hypophysiotropic SRIH neurons in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus.

  12. Distribution of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the caecilian Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): comparative aspects in amphibians.

    PubMed

    López, Jesús M; Moreno, Nerea; Morona, Ruth; Muñoz, Margarita; Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín

    2007-03-20

    The organization of the somatostatin-like-immunoreactive (SOM-ir) structures in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians has been well documented, and significant differences were noted between the two amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the gymnophionans (caecilians). In the present study, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of SOM-ir cells and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. In addition, because of its known relationship with catecholamines in other vertebrates, double immunostaining for SOM and tyrosine hydroxylase was used to investigate this situation in the gymnophionan. Abundant SOM-ir cell bodies and fibers were widely distributed throughout the brain. In the telencephalon, pallial and subpallial cells were labeled, being most numerous in the medial pallium and amygdaloid region. Most of the SOM-ir neurons were found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus and showed a clear projection to the median eminence. Less conspicuously, SOM-ir structures were found in the thalamus, tectum, tegmentum, and reticular formation. Both SOM-ir cells and fibers were demonstrated in the spinal cord. The double-immunohistofluorescence technique revealed that catecholaminergic neurons and SOM-ir cells are largely intermingled in many brain regions but form totally separated populations. Many differences were found between the distribution of SOM-ir structures in Dermophis and that in anurans or urodeles. Some features were shared only with anurans, such as the abundant pallial SOM-ir cells, whereas others were common only to urodeles, such as the organization of the hypothalamohypophysial SOM-ir system. In addition, some characteristics were found only in Dermophis, such as the localization of the SOM-ir spinal cells and the lack of colocalization of catecholamines and SOM throughout the brain. Therefore, any conclusions concerning the SOM system in amphibians are incomplete without

  13. Discordant effects of endogenous and exogenous somatostatin on growth hormone-releasing hormone secretion from perifused mouse hypothalami.

    PubMed

    Pecori Giraldi, F; Frohman, L A

    1995-05-01

    The role of somatostatin (SRIF) on growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) secretion has been controversial because of discordant findings that may be model dependent. We have examined possible explanations for these findings by altering endogenous and exogenous SRIF tone in a mouse hypothalamic perifusion system. Four mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were perifused in a single chamber for 6 h. After a 2-hour equilibration period, test substances were introduced and maintained throughout the perifusion. After an additional 2 h, fragments were submaximally stimulated with 30 mM K+. Depletion of tissue SRIF by 10(-3) M cysteamine increased K(+)-stimulated GRH release 2-fold without altering basal GRH secretion. Removal of endogenous SRIF tone by anti-SRIF serum also augmented the GRH response to K+. Perifusion of SRIF at concentrations ranging from 10(-12) to 10(-8) M significantly increased the GRH response to K+ in a dose-dependent manner. A significant increase was also observed during the perifusion of 10(-9) M octreotide. Simultaneous perifusion with anti-SRIF serum and 10(-9) M octreotide (to which the antibody does not bind) resulted in a response of GRH to K+ that was similar to that observed with anti-SRIF serum alone. Combined perifusion with cysteamine and 10(-9) M SRIF also resulted in a GRH response to K+ that did not differ from the response observed during cysteamine alone. The enhancement of GRH secretion by reduction of endogenous SRIF tone or tissue content implies an inhibitory role of endogenous SRIF on GRH secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 are responsible for the degradation of somatostatin, neurotensin, and other neuropeptides by cultivated rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mentlein, R; Dahms, P

    1994-01-01

    Several neuropeptides, including neurotensin, somatostatin, bradykinin, angiotensin II, substance P, and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone but not vasopressin and oxytocin, were actively metabolized through proteolytic degradation by cultivated astrocytes obtained from rat cerebral cortex. Because phenanthroline was an effective degradation inhibitor, metalloproteases were responsible for neuropeptide fragmentation. Neurotensin was cleaved by astrocytes at the Pro10-Tyr11 and Arg8-Arg9 bonds, whereas somatostatin was cleaved at the Phe6-Phe7 and Thr10-Phe11 bonds. These cleavage sites have been found previously with endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 purified from rat brain. Addition of specific inhibitors of these proteases, the dipeptide Pro-Ile and N-[1-(RS)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Phe-4-aminobenzoate, significantly reduced the generation of the above neuropeptide fragments by astrocytes. The presence of endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 in homogenates of astrocytes could also be demonstrated by chromatographic separations of supernatant solubilized cell preparations. Proteolytic activity for neurotensin eluted after both gel and hydroxyapatite chromatography at the same positions as found for purified endopeptidase 24.16 or 24.15. In incubation experiments or in chromatographic separations no phosphoramidon-sensitive endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) or captopril-sensitive peptidyl dipeptidase A (angiotensin-converting enzyme) could be detected in cultivated astrocytes. Because astrocytes embrace the neuronal synapses where neuropeptides are released, we presume that the endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 on astrocytes are strategically located to contribute significantly to the inactivation of neurotensin, somatostatin, and other neuropeptides in the brain.

  15. Plasma somatostatin-like immunoreactivity increases in the plasma of septic patients and rats with systemic inflammatory reaction: experimental evidence for its sensory origin and protective role.

    PubMed

    Suto, Balazs; Szitter, Istvan; Bagoly, Terez; Pinter, Erika; Szolcsányi, Janos; Loibl, Csaba; Nemeth, Timea; Tanczos, Krisztian; Molnar, Tihamer; Leiner, Tamas; Varnai, Bianka; Bardonicsek, Zsofia; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2014-04-01

    Alterations of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SST-LI) in the plasma of 11 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients were investigated in correlation with cytokines, adhesion molecules and coagulation markers repeatedly during 4 days. The origin and role of SST were studied in the cecum ligation and puncture (CLP) rat SIRS model. Capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic sensory nerves were defunctionalized by resiniferatoxin (RTX) pretreatment 2 weeks earlier, in a separate group animals were treated with the somatostatin receptor antagonist cyclo-somatostatin (C-SOM). Plasma SST-LI significantly elevated in septic patients compared to healthy volunteers during the whole 4-day period. Significantly decreased Horowitz score showed severe lung injury, increased plasma C-reactive protein and procalcitonin confirmed SIRS. Soluble P-selectin, tissue plasminogen activator and the interleukin 8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 significantly increased, interleukin 6 and soluble CD40 ligand did not change, and soluble Vascular Adhesion Molecule-1 decreased. SST-LI significantly increased in rats both in the plasma and the lung 6h after CLP compared to sham-operation. After RTX pretreatment SST-LI was not altered in intact animals, but the SIRS-induced elevation was absent. Lung MPO activity significantly increased 6h following CLP compared to sham operation, which was significantly higher both after RTX-desensitization and C-SOM-treatment. Most non-pretreated operated rats survived the 6h, but 60% of the RTX-pretreated ones died showing a significantly worse survival. This is the first comprehensive study in humans and animal experiments providing evidence that SST is released from the activated peptidergic sensory nerves. It gets into the bloodstream and mediates a potent endogenous protective mechanism.

  16. Growth hormone-secreting macroadenoma of the pituitary gland successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE: case report.

    PubMed

    Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Gut, Paweł; Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Liebert, Włodzimierz; Gryczyńska, Maria; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Blanco-Gangoo, Al Ricardo; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Pituitary tumors causing acromegaly are usually macroadenomas at the time of diagnosis, and they can grow aggressively, infiltrating surrounding tissues. Difficulty in achieving complete tumor removal at surgery can lead toward a strong tendency for recurrence, making it necessary to consider a means of treatment other than those currently used such as somatostatin analogs (SSAs), growth hormone (GH) receptor antagonist, surgical removal, and radiotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to describe a patient diagnosed with an aggressive, giant GH-secreting tumor refractory to medical therapy but ultimately treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE. A 26-year-old male with an invasive macroadenoma of the pituitary gland (5.6 × 2.5 × 3.6 cm) and biochemically confirmed acromegaly underwent 2 partial tumor resections: the first used the transsphenoidal approach and the second used the transcranial method. The patient received SSAs pre- and postoperatively. Because of the progression in pituitary tumor size, he underwent classic irradiation of the tumor (50 Gy). One and a half years later, the patient presented with clinically and biochemically active disease, and the tumor size was still 52 mm in diameter (height). Two neurosurgeons disqualified him from further surgical procedures. After confirming the presence of somatostatin receptors in the pituitary tumor by using (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, we treated the patient 4 times with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE. After this treatment, the patient attained partial biochemical remission and a reduction in the tumor mass for the first time. Treatment with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE may be a promising option for some aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenomas when other methods have failed.

  17. Orexin-1 receptor mediates the increased food and water intake induced by intracerebroventricular injection of the stable somatostatin pan-agonist, ODT8-SST in rats.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yakabi, Seiichi; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2014-07-25

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of the stable somatostatin pan-agonist, ODT8-SST induces a somatostatin 2 receptor (sst2) mediated robust feeding response that involves neuropeptide Y and opioid systems in rats. We investigated whether the orexigenic system driven by orexin also plays a role. Food and water intake after icv injection was measured concomitantly in non-fasted and non-water deprived rats during the light phase. In vehicle treated rats (100% DMSO, icv), ODT8-SST (1μg/rat, icv) significantly increased the 2-h food and water intake compared to icv vehicle plus saline (5.1±1.0g vs. 1.2±0.4g and 11.3±1.9mL vs. 2.5±1.2mL, respectively). The orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867 (16μg/rat, icv) completely inhibited the 2-h food and water intake induced by icv ODT8-SST. In contrast, the icv pretreatment with the selective somatostatin sst2 antagonist, S-406-028, established to block the orexigenic effect of icv ODT8-SST, did not modify the increased food and water intake induced by icv orexin-A (10.7μg/rat). These data indicate that orexin-1 receptor signaling system is part of the brain neurocircuitry contributing to the orexigenic and dipsogenic responses induced by icv ODT8-SST and that orexin-A stimulates food intake independently from brain sst2 activation.

  18. Somatostatin-14-like antigenic sites in fixed islet D-cells are unaltered by cysteamine: a quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Ravazzola, M; Amherdt, M; Orci, L

    1987-04-01

    Exposure of somatostatin cells to cysteamine (CSH) produces a marked reduction in somatostatin-14-like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) in cell extracts. In the present study we have evaluated the effects of CSH on S-14-like sites in fixed islet D-cells using immunofluorescence and quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Monolayer cultures of rat islet cells exposed to CSH (10 mM) for 1 h and subsequently extracted in 1 M acetic acid exhibited a severe reduction in S-14 LI from 6.6 +/- 0.48 to 0.7 +/- 0.06 ng/dish. CSH-induced reduction in S-14 LI persisted when cells were fixed in Zamboni's solution for 16 h and subsequently extracted and assayed. By immunofluorescence, however, the relative numbers of somatostatin-positive cells as well as the fluorescent intensity were identical in control and CSH-treated cells. CSH did not produce any identifiable abnormality in the ultrastructural appearance of D-cells. Protein A-gold labeling of the islet cells showed a uniform distribution of gold particles in both control and CSH-treated cultures. The density of gold particles over D-cell secretory granules from CSH-exposed cultures (36.6 +/- 3.5 particles/micron2) was not different from that in control D-cell granules (42.2 +/- 5.9 particles/micron2). These data clearly indicate that despite a profound reduction by CSH of S-14 LI in tissue extracts, there is no detectable decrease in the same antigenic sites in tissue sections when assessed immunocytochemically.

  19. Somatostatin-14-like antigenic sites in fixed islet D-cells are unaltered by cysteamine: a quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Y.C.; Ravazzola, M.; Amherdt, M.; Orci, L.

    1987-04-01

    Exposure of somatostatin cells to cysteamine (CSH) produces a marked reduction in somatostatin-14-like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) in cell extracts. In the present study we have evaluated the effects of CSH on S-14-like sites in fixed islet D-cells using immunofluorescence and quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Monolayer cultures of rat islet cells exposed to CSH (10 mM) for 1 h and subsequently extracted in 1 M acetic acid exhibited a severe reduction in S-14 LI from 6.6 +/- 0.48 to 0.7 +/- 0.06 ng/dish. CSH-induced reduction in S-14 LI persisted when cells were fixed in Zamboni's solution for 16 h and subsequently extracted and assayed. By immunofluorescence, however, the relative numbers of somatostatin-positive cells as well as the fluorescent intensity were identical in control and CSH-treated cells. CSH did not produce any identifiable abnormality in the ultrastructural appearance of D-cells. Protein A-gold labeling of the islet cells showed a uniform distribution of gold particles in both control and CSH-treated cultures. The density of gold particles over D-cell secretory granules from CSH-exposed cultures (36.6 +/- 3.5 particles/micron2) was not different from that in control D-cell granules (42.2 +/- 5.9 particles/micron2). These data clearly indicate that despite a profound reduction by CSH of S-14 LI in tissue extracts, there is no detectable decrease in the same antigenic sites in tissue sections when assessed immunocytochemically.

  20. First cohomology of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1|1) acting on linear differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdouri, Imed; Boujelben, Maha; Derbali, Ammar

    2016-10-01

    We consider the 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-module structure on the spaces of differential operators acting on the spaces of weighted densities. We compute the first differential cohomology of the Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) with coefficients in differential operators acting on the spaces of weighted densities. We study also the super analogue of this problem getting the same results.

  1. [Unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor detected in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 and hypergastrinemia].

    PubMed

    Marín-Oyaga, V; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Guerrero-Vázquez, R; Luján-Rodríguez, D; Vázquez-Albertino, R

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) is characterized by the presence of tumors in parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary gland, endocrine pancreas and duodenum. However, other tumors may also occur. One of them is the carcinoid tumor, which in this context, is more common in the gastrointestinal tract. Less common is the presence of carcinoid tumors of bronchial origin, which with histologic confirmation, may occur in 5-8% of cases and that appears more frequently in patients with hypergastrinemia. We report a patient with MEN1 syndrome, hypergastrinemia and an incidental finding in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy of an unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor that was confirmed histologically.

  2. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  3. Fluorescent polyene ceramide analogues as membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Ingrid; Artetxe, Ibai; Abad, José Luis; Alonso, Alicia; Busto, Jon V; Fajarí, Lluís; Montes, L Ruth; Sot, Jesús; Delgado, Antonio; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-03-03

    Three ceramide analogues have been synthesized, with sphingosine-like chains containing five conjugated double bonds. Pentaene I has an N-palmitoyl acyl chain, while the other two pentaenes contain also a doxyl radical, respectively, at C5 (Penta5dox) and at C16 (Penta16dox) positions of the N-acyl chain. Pentaene I maximum excitation and emission wavelengths in a phospholipid bilayer are 353 and 478 nm, respectively. Pentaene I does not segregate from the other lipids in the way natural ceramide does, but rather mixes with them in a selective way according to the lipid phases involved. Fluorescence confocal microscopy studies show that when lipid domains in different physical states coexist, Pentaene I emission is higher in gel than in fluid domains, and in liquid-ordered than in liquid-disordered areas. Electron paramagnetic resonance of the pentaene doxyl probes confirms that these molecules are sensitive to the physical state of the bilayer. Calorimetric and fluorescence quenching experiments suggest that the lipids under study orient themselves in lipid bilayers with their polar moieties located at the lipid-water interface. The doxyl radical in the N-acyl chain quenches the fluorescence of the pentaene group when in close proximity. Because of this property, Penta16dox can detect gel-fluid transitions in phospholipids. The availability of probes for lipids in the gel phase is important in view of novel evidence for the existence of gel microdomains in cell membranes.

  4. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  5. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABAA receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABAA receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanol were investigated on recombinant human '-aminobutyric acid (GABAA, a1ß2'2s) r...

  6. Molecular imaging of late somatostatin receptor-positive metastases of renal cell carcinoma in the pancreas by 68Ga DOTATOC PET/CT: a rare differential diagnosis to multiple primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Peter, Luisa; Sänger, Jörg; Hommann, Merten; Baum, Richard Paul; Kaemmerer, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT, currently the most sensitive imaging modality for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, is based on the molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) that are expressed in different tumor entities such as neuroendocrine neoplasms, lymphomas, meningiomas, or renal cell cancer (RCC). Most neuroendocrine neoplasms show a high expression of SSTR subtypes 2A and 5, whereas the overexpression of SSTR2A in RCC is mainly seen in peritumoral vessels. Here we report a case with strongly SSTR-positive pancreatic lesions detected by Ga DOTATOC PET/CT, which histologically turned out to be ultralate metastases of a RCC.

  7. Sulphur Spring: Busy Intersection and Possible Martian Analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nankivell, A.; Andre, N.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Allen, C.; McKay, D.

    2000-01-01

    Life in extreme environments exhibiting conditions similar to early Earth and Mars, such as Sulphur Spring, may harbor microbiota serving as both relics from the past as well as present day Martian analogues.

  8. From BPA to its analogues: Is it a safe journey?

    PubMed

    Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most abundant synthetic chemicals in the world due to its uses in plastics. Its widespread exposure vis-a-vis low dose effects led to a reduction in its safety dose and imposition of ban on its use in infant feeding bottles. This restriction paved the way for the gradual market entry of its analogues. However, their structural similarity to BPA has put them under surveillance for endocrine disrupting potential. The application of these analogues is increasing and so are the studies reporting their toxicity. This review highlights the reasons which led to the ban of BPA and also reports the exposure and toxicological data available on its analogues. Hence, this compilation is expected to answer in a better way whether the replacement of BPA by these analogues is safer or more harmful?

  9. Cell-cycle analyses using thymidine analogues in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry.

  10. Weather and event generators based on analogues of atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiou, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Analogues of atmospheric circulation have had numerous applications on weather prediction, climate reconstructions and detection/attribution analyses. A stochastic weather generator based on circulation analogues was recently proposed by Yiou (2014) to simulate sequences of European temperatures. One of the features of this weather generator is that it preserves the spatial and temporal structures of the climate variables to be simulated. This method is flexible enough to be combined efficiently with a storm detection algorithm in order to generate large catalogues of high impact extra-tropical storms that hit Europe. I will present the gist of the method of circulation analogues and some performances. Two promising applications for weather generators based on this method (ensemble climate prediction and extra-tropical storms) will be tested. References Yiou, P.: AnaWEGE: a weather generator based on analogues of atmospheric circulation, Geosci. Model Dev., 7, 531-543, doi:10.5194/gmd-7-531-2014, 2014.

  11. Effect of glutamate analogues on brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G L; Bartel, R; Freidman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1985-10-01

    Glutamate analogues have been used in many different experimental approaches in neurobiology. A small number of these analogues have been classified as gliotoxic. We have examined the effect of seven glutamate analogues (five gliotoxic and two neurotoxic) on the growth and viability of four human glioma cell lines, one human medulloblastoma cell line, and one human sarcoma cell line. Aminoadipic acid and homocysteic acid predominantly affected the growth of two glioma cell lines in the presence of 4 mM glutamine. Phosphonobutyric acid predominantly affected the other two glioma cell lines and the medulloblastoma cell line in the presence of 4 mM glutamine. In medium containing no glutamine, all three analogues had marked effects on all the cell lines except the sarcoma cell line. These effects were dose dependent. We postulate that these results can in part be explained on the basis of metabolic compartmentalization.

  12. A Non-Verbal Analogue to the Verbal Transformation Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Norman J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of non-speech auditory stimuli in eliciting transformations analogous to those reported for speech stimuli to determine if a non-verbal analogue to the verbal transformation effect exists. (DD)

  13. Octreotide for conservative management of intractable high output post operative chylous fistula: a case report.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Sundararaman; Thomas, Shaji

    2015-03-01

    A case of high output post neck dissection chylous fistula is presented, which was successfully managed conservatively with octreotide; a long acting somatostatin analogue. Routine measures had failed, and secondary complications precluded thoracoscopic ligation. We discuss the spectrum of problems associated with chylous fistula and review the rationale behind the use of octreotide.

  14. Iterative Approach to the Discovery of Novel Degarelix Analogues: Substitutions at Positions 3, 7 and 8. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Manoj P.; Gulyas, Jozsef; Hong, Doley J.; Croston, Glenn; Rivier, Catherine; Rivier, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Degarelix, (FE200486, Ac-d-2Nal1-d-4Cpa2-d-3Pal3-Ser4-4Aph(l-Hor)5-d-4Aph(Cbm)6-Leu7-Ilys8-Pro9-d-Ala10-NH2) is a potent and very long acting antagonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) after subcutaneous administration in mammals including humans. Analogues of degarelix were synthesized, characterized and screened for the antagonism of GnRH-induced response in a reporter gene assay in HEK-293 cells expressing the human GnRH receptor. The duration of action was also determined in the castrated male rat assay in order to measure the extent (efficacy and duration of action) of inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) release. Structurally, this series of analogues has novel substitutions at positions 3, 7, 8 and Nα-methylation at positions 6, 7 and 8 in the structure of degarelix. These substitutions were designed to probe the spatial limitations of the receptors cavity and to map the steric and ionic boundaries. Some functional groups were introduced that were hypothesized to influence the phamacokinetic properties of the analogues like bioavailability, solubility, intra- or inter-molecular hydrogen bond forming capacity and ability to bind carrier proteins. Substitutions at positions 3 ([Nβ-(2-pyridyl-methyl)d-Dap3]degarelix, IC50 = 2.71 nM) (5), 7 ([Pra7]degarelix, IC50 = 2.11 nM) (16), 8 ([Nδ-(IGly)Orn8]degarelix, IC50 = 1.38 nM) (20), and N-methylation ([Nα-methyl-Leu7]degarelix, IC50 = 1.47 nM) (32) yielded analogues that were equipotent to degarelix (2) in vitro (IC50 = 1.64 nM) but shorter acting in vivo. Out of the 33 novel analogues tested for the duration of action in this series, two analogues ([Nε-cyclohexyl-Lys8]degarelix, IC50 = 1.50 nM) (23) and ([Nβ-(IβAla)Dap8]degarelix, IC50 = 1.98 nM) (26) had antagonist potencies and duration of action similar to that of azaline B {inhibited LH (>80%) release for >72 h after sc injection to castrated male rats at a standard dose of 50 µg/rat in 5% mannitol}. Under similar conditions analogues ([N

  15. Amphiphilic Tobramycin Analogues as Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Fosso, Marina Y.; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal activities, cytotoxicities, and membrane-disruptive actions of amphiphilic tobramycin (TOB) analogues. The antifungal activities were established by determination of MIC values and in time-kill studies. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in mammalian cell lines. The fungal membrane-disruptive action of these analogues was studied by using the membrane-impermeable dye propidium iodide. TOB analogues bearing a linear alkyl chain at their 6″-position in a thioether linkage exhibited chain length-dependent antifungal activities. Analogues with C12 and C14 chains showed promising antifungal activities against tested fungal strains, with MIC values ranging from 1.95 to 62.5 mg/liter and 1.95 to 7.8 mg/liter, respectively. However, C4, C6, and C8 TOB analogues and TOB itself exhibited little to no antifungal activity. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the most potent TOB analogues (C12 and C14) against A549 and Beas 2B cells were 4- to 64-fold and 32- to 64-fold higher, respectively, than their antifungal MIC values against various fungi. Unlike conventional aminoglycoside antibiotics, TOB analogues with alkyl chain lengths of C12 and C14 appear to inhibit fungi by inducing apoptosis and disrupting the fungal membrane as a novel mechanism of action. Amphiphilic TOB analogues showed broad-spectrum antifungal activities with minimal mammalian cell cytotoxicity. This study provides novel lead compounds for the development of antifungal drugs. PMID:26033722

  16. Adjuvant properties of a simplified C32 monomycolyl glycerol analogue.

    PubMed

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Minnikin, David E; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Bramwell, Vincent W; Perrie, Yvonne; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2009-04-01

    A simplified C(32) monomycolyl glycerol (MMG) analogue demonstrated enhanced immunostimulatory activity in a dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA)/Ag85B-ESAT-6 formulation. Elevated levels of IFN-gamma and IL-6 were produced in spleen cells from mice immunised with a C(32) MMG analogue comparable activity to the potent Th1 adjuvant, trehalose 6,6'-di-behenate (TDB).

  17. Semisynthesis of salviandulin E analogues and their antitrypanosomal activity.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Koji; Yamazaki, Akira; Sugawara, Naoko; Yano, Reiko; Fukaya, Haruhiko; Hitotsuyanagi, Yukio; Takeya, Koichi; Ishiyama, Aki; Iwatsuki, Masato; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Haruki; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2014-01-15

    A series of analogues of salviandulin E, a rearranged neoclerodane diterpene originally isolated from Salvia leucantha (Lamiaceae), were prepared and their in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei was evaluated with currently used therapeutic drugs as positive controls. One of the 19 compounds prepared and assayed in the present study, butanoyl 3,4-dihydrosalviandulin E analogue was found to be a possible candidate for an antitrypanosomal drug with fairly strong antitrypanosomal activity and lower cytotoxicity.

  18. Catalytic antioxidants: regenerable tellurium analogues of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay P; Poon, Jia-fei; Engman, Lars

    2013-12-20

    In an effort to improve the chain-breaking capacity of the natural antioxidants, an octyltelluro group was introduced next to the phenolic moiety in β- and δ-tocopherol. The new vitamin E analogues quenched peroxyl radicals more efficiently than α-tocopherol and were readily regenerable by aqueous N-acetylcysteine in a simple membrane model composed of a stirring chlorobenzene/water two-phase system. The novel tocopherol analogues could also mimic the action of the glutathione peroxidase enzymes.

  19. Analogue and digital linear modulation techniques for mobile satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, W. J.; Bateman, A.; Mcgeehan, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The choice of modulation format for a mobile satellite service is complex. The subjective performance is summarized of candidate schemes and voice coder technologies. It is shown that good performance can be achieved with both analogue and digital voice systems, although the analogue system gives superior performance in fading. The results highlight the need for flexibility in the choice of signaling format. Linear transceiver technology capable of using many forms of narrowband modulation is described.

  20. The relevance of analogue studies for understanding obsessions and compulsions.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Fabricant, Laura E; Taylor, Steven; Deacon, Brett J; McKay, Dean; Storch, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Analogue samples are often used to study obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms and related phenomena. This approach is based on the hypothesis that results derived from such samples are relevant to understanding OC symptoms in individuals with a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Two decades ago, Gibbs (1996) reviewed the available literature and found initial support for this hypothesis. Since then there have been many important advances addressing this issue. The purpose of the present review was to synthesize various lines of research examining the assumptions of using analogue samples to draw inferences about people with OCD. We reviewed research on the prevalence of OC symptoms in non-clinical populations, the dimensional (vs. categorical) nature of these symptoms, phenomenology, etiology, and studies on developmental and maintenance factors in clinical and analogue samples. We also considered the relevance of analogue samples in OCD treatment research. The available evidence suggests research with analogue samples is highly relevant for understanding OC symptoms. Guidelines for the appropriate use of analogue designs and samples are suggested.

  1. Cladribine Analogues via O6-(Benzotriazolyl) Derivatives of Guanine Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Satishkumar, Sakilam; Vuram, Prasanna K.; Relangi, Siva Subrahmanyam; Gurram, Venkateshwarlu; Zhou, Hong; Kreitman, Robert J.; Montemayor, Michelle M. Martínez; Yang, Lijia; Kaliyaperumal, Muralidharan; Sharma, Somesh; Pottabathini, Narender; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Cladribine, 2-chloro-2′-deoxyadenosine, is a highly efficacious clinically used nucleoside for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia. It is also being evaluated against other lymphoid malignancies and has been a molecule of interest for well over half a century. In continuation of our interest on the amide bond-activation in purine nucleosides via the use of (benzotriazol-1yl-oxy)tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate, we have evaluated the use of O6-(benzotriazol-1-yl)-2′-deoxyguanosine as a potential precursor to cladribine and its analogues. These compounds, after appropriate deprotection, were assessed for their biological activities and the data are presented herein. Against hairy cell leukemia (HCL), T-cell lymphoma (TCL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cladribine was the most active against all. The bromo analogue of cladribine showed comparable activity to the ribose analogue of cladribine against HCL, but was more active against TCL and CLL. The bromo ribo analogue of cladribine possessed activity, but was least active among the C6-NH2-containing compounds. Substitution with alkyl groups at the exocyclic amino group appears detrimental to activity, and only the C6 piperidinyl cladribine analogue demonstrated any activity. Against adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, only cladribine and its ribose analogue were most active. PMID:26556315

  2. Analogue gravitational phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finazzi, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Analogue gravity is based on the simple observation that perturbations propagating in several physical systems can be described by a quantum field theory in a curved spacetime. While phenomena like Hawking radiation are hardly detectable in astrophysical black holes, these effects may be experimentally tested in analogue systems. In this Thesis, focusing on Bose-Einstein condensates, we present our recent results about analogue models of gravity from three main perspectives: as laboratory tests of quantum field theory in curved spacetime, for the techniques that they provide to address various issues in general relativity, and as toy models of quantum gravity. The robustness of Hawking-like particle creation is investigated in flows with a single black hole horizon. Furthermore, we find that condensates with two (white and black) horizons develop a dynamical instability known in general relativity as black hole laser effect. Using techniques borrowed from analogue gravity, we also show that warp drives, which are general relativistic spacetimes allowing faster-than-light travel, are unstable. Finally, the cosmological constant issue is investigated from an analogue gravity perspective and relativistic Bose-Einstein condensates are proposed as new analogue systems with novel interesting properties.

  3. Cladribine Analogues via O⁶-(Benzotriazolyl) Derivatives of Guanine Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Satishkumar, Sakilam; Vuram, Prasanna K; Relangi, Siva Subrahmanyam; Gurram, Venkateshwarlu; Zhou, Hong; Kreitman, Robert J; Montemayor, Michelle M Martínez; Yang, Lijia; Kaliyaperumal, Muralidharan; Sharma, Somesh; Pottabathini, Narender; Lakshman, Mahesh K

    2015-10-09

    Cladribine, 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine, is a highly efficacious, clinically used nucleoside for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia. It is also being evaluated against other lymphoid malignancies and has been a molecule of interest for well over half a century. In continuation of our interest in the amide bond-activation in purine nucleosides via the use of (benzotriazol-1yl-oxy)tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate, we have evaluated the use of O⁶-(benzotriazol-1-yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine as a potential precursor to cladribine and its analogues. These compounds, after appropriate deprotection, were assessed for their biological activities, and the data are presented herein. Against hairy cell leukemia (HCL), T-cell lymphoma (TCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), cladribine was the most active against all. The bromo analogue of cladribine showed comparable activity to the ribose analogue of cladribine against HCL, but was more active against TCL and CLL. The bromo ribose analogue of cladribine showed activity, but was the least active among the C6-NH₂-containing compounds. Substitution with alkyl groups at the exocyclic amino group appears detrimental to activity, and only the C6 piperidinyl cladribine analogue demonstrated any activity. Against adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, cladribine and its ribose analogue were most active.

  4. Analogues to features and processes of a high-level radioactive waste repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Stuckless, John S.; with a Foreword by Abraham Van Luik, U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-01-01

    Natural analogues are defined for this report as naturally occurring or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have taken place over time periods of decades to millennia and on spatial scales as much as tens of kilometers. Analogues provide an important temporal and spatial dimension that cannot be tested by laboratory or field-scale experiments. Analogues provide one of the multiple lines of evidence intended to increase confidence in the safe geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Although the work in this report was completed specifically for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste under the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the applicability of the science, analyses, and interpretations is not limited to a specific site. Natural and anthropogenic analogues have provided and can continue to provide value in understanding features and processes of importance across a wide variety of topics in addressing the challenges of geologic isolation of radioactive waste and also as a contribution to scientific investigations unrelated to waste disposal. Isolation of radioactive waste at a mined geologic repository would be through a combination of natural features and engineered barriers. In this report we examine analogues to many of the various components of the Yucca Mountain system, including the preservation of materials in unsaturated environments, flow of water through unsaturated volcanic tuff, seepage into repository drifts, repository drift stability, stability and alteration of waste forms and components of the engineered barrier system, and transport of radionuclides through unsaturated and saturated rock zones.

  5. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  6. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  7. Habitability & Astrobiology Research in Mars Terrestrial Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    We performed a series of field research campaigns (ILEWG EuroMoonMars) in the extreme Utah desert relevant to Mars environments, and in order to help in the interpretation of Mars missions measurements from orbit (MEX, MRO) or from the surface (MER, MSL), or Moon geochemistry (SMART-1, LRO). We shall give an update on the sample analysis in the context of habitability and astrobiology. Methods & Results: In the frame of ILEWG EuroMoonMars campaigns (2009 to 2013) we deployed at Mars Desert Research station, near Hanksville Utah, a suite of instruments and techniques [A, 1, 2, 9-11] including sample collection, context imaging from remote to local and microscale, drilling, spectrometers and life sensors. We analyzed how geological and geochemical evolution affected local parameters (mineralogy, organics content, environment variations) and the habitability and signature of organics and biota. Among the important findings are the diversity in the composition of soil samples even when collected in close proximity, the low abundances of detectable PAHs and amino acids and the presence of biota of all three domains of life with significant heterogeneity. An extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles was observed [3,4,9]. A dominant factor seems to be soil porosity and lower clay-sized particle content [6-8]. A protocol was developed for sterile sampling, contamination issues, and the diagnostics of biodiversity via PCR and DGGE analysis in soils and rocks samples [10, 11]. We compare the 2009 campaign results [1-9] to new measurements from 2010-2013 campaigns [10-12] relevant to: comparison between remote sensing and in-situ measurements; the study of minerals; the detection of organics and signs of life. Keywords: field analogue research, astrobiology, habitability, life detection, Earth-Moon-Mars, organics References [A] Foing, Stoker & Ehrenfreund (Editors, 2011) "Astrobiology field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments", Special Issue of International

  8. The new truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 is associated to poor prognosis in breast cancer and increases malignancy in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Durán-Prado, M; Gahete, M D; Hergueta-Redondo, M; Martínez-Fuentes, A J; Córdoba-Chacón, J; Palacios, J; Gracia-Navarro, F; Moreno-Bueno, G; Malagón, M M; Luque, R M; Castaño, J P

    2012-04-19

    Somatostatin receptors (sst1-5) are present in different types of tumors, where they inhibit key cellular processes such as proliferation and invasion. Although ssts are densely expressed in breast cancer, especially sst2, their role and therapeutic potential remain uncertain. Recently, we identified a new truncated sst5 variant, sst5TMD4, which is related to the abnormal response of certain pituitary tumors to treatment with somatostatin analogs. Here, we investigated the possible role of sst5TMD4 in breast cancer. This study revealed that sst5TMD4 is absent in normal mammary gland, but is abundant in a subset of poorly differentiated human breast tumors, where its expression correlated to that of sst2. Moreover, in the MCF-7 breast cancer model cell, sst5TMD4 expression increased malignancy features such as invasion and proliferation abilities (both in cell cultures and nude mice). This was likely mediated by sst5TMD4-induced increase in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p-Akt levels, and cyclin D3 and Arp2/3 complex expression, which also led to mesenchymal-like phenotype. Interestingly, sst5TMD4 interacts physically with sst2 and thereby alters its signaling, enabling disruption of sst2 inhibitory feedback and providing a plausible basis for our findings. These results suggest that sst5TMD4 could be involved in the pathophysiology of certain types of breast tumors.

  9. In vivo biosynthesis of L-(/sup 35/S)Cys-arginine vasopressin, -oxytocin, and -somatostatin: rapid estimation using reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Bourland, R.E.; Fernstrom, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    L(/sup 35/S)Cys-arginine vasopressin, -oxytocin, and -somatostatin were purified from hypothalami and neurohypophyses 4 h after rats received L(/sup 35/S)Cys via the third ventricle. After acetic acid extraction, Sephadex G-25 filtration, and chemoadsorption to C18-silica (Sep-Pak cartridges), the labeled peptides were rapidly separated by gradient elution, reversed phase, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identity and isotopic purity of the labeled peptides were determined by several reversed phase HPLC procedures in conjunction with chemical modification. The labeled peptide fractions were at least 50% radiochemically pure. Using this HPLC isolation procedure, incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)Cys into each peptide was determined in hydrated and dehydrated rats. Label incorporation into arginine vasopressin and oxytocin in the hypothalamus and the neurohypophysis of dehydrated rats was 2-3 times greater than that in hydrated rats. Incorporation of label into hypothalamic and neurohypophyseal somatostatin was unaffected by the hydration state of the animal. This procedure thus provides a very rapid, but sensitive, set of techniques for studying the control of small peptide biosynthesis in the brain.

  10. Isolation, Characterization, and Biological Evaluation of Syn and Anti Diastereomers of [99mTc]Technetium Depreotide: a Somatostatin Receptor Binding Tumor Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, John E.; Pearson, Daniel A.; Nelson, Carol A.; Lyons, Barbara A.; Zheng, Yongyong; Bartis, Judit; He, Jiafang; Cantorias, Melchor V.; Howell, Robertha C.; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2007-01-01

    The early and later eluting [99mTcO]depreotide products on RP-HPLC were confirmed to be the anti and syn diastereomers, respectively, based on proton NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy. NMR provided evidence of a folded, conformationally constrained structure for the syn diastereomer. The syn diastereomer is predominant (anti/syn ~ 10:90) in the [99mTcO]depreotide preparation and shows a slightly higher affinity (IC50 = 0.15 nM) for the somatostatin receptor than the anti diastereomer (IC50 = 0.89 nM). Both diastereomers showed higher binding affinities than the free peptide (IC50 = 7.4 nM). Biodistribution studies in AR42J tumor xenograft nude mice also showed higher tumor uptake for syn [99mTcO]depreotide (6.58% ID/g) than for the anti [99mTcO]depreotide (3.38% ID/g). Despite the differences in biological efficacy, the favorable binding affinity, tumor uptake, and tumor-to-background ratio results for both diastereomeric species predict that both are effective for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in vivo. PMID:17691760

  11. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma using (177)lutetium-labeled somatostatin analogs in combination with radiosensitizing chemotherapy: a potential novel treatment based on molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Salavati, Ali; Prasad, Vikas; Schneider, Claus-Peter; Herbst, Rudolf; Baum, Richard Paul

    2012-05-01

    Few studies have been published on the safety and feasibility of synchronous use of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT), as source of internal radiation therapy, in combination with chemotherapy. In this study we reported a 53-year-old man with stage IV Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), who underwent synchronous internal radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Based on presumable poor prognosis with chemotherapy only, functional similarities of MCC with other neuroendocrine tumors and available evidence of effectiveness and safety of synchronous use of external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy in treatment of high-risk MCC patients, our interdisciplinary neuroendocrine tumor board recommended him to add PRRNT to his ongoing chemotherapy. He received 2 courses of (177)Lu-DOTATATE(1, 4, 7, 10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid-1-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Thr8-octreotide) in combination with ongoing 8 cycles of liposomal doxorubicin based on standard protocols. Response to therapy was evaluated by (18)F-FDG and (68)gallium-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT. There was an impressive improvement of the clinical symptoms. However, follow-up PET/CT studies showed mixed pattern of response. Synchronous use of PRRNT and radiosensitizing chemotherapy seems safe and feasible in high risk MCC patients, however, further prospective studies and clinical trials are warranted to provide reliable evidence of possible pitfalls and effectiveness of PRRNT and (68)Ga-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT in the management of MCC.

  12. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET and gene expression profile in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas: strong correlation between PET tracer uptake and gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingrid H; Langer, Seppo W; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Oxbøl, Jytte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor expression on both protein and gene expression level was compared with in vivo (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Twenty-one patients with verified NEC who underwent a (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT between November 2012 and May 2014, were retrospectively included. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, we quantitatively determined the gene expression of several genes and compared with (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET uptake. By immunohistochemistry we qualitatively studied the expression of assorted proteins in NEC. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range 41-84) years. All patients had WHO performance status 0-1. Median Ki67 index was 50% (range 20-100%). Gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype (SSTR) 2 and Ki67 were both positively correlated to the (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake (r=0.89; p<0.0001 and r=0.5; p=0.021, respectively). Furthermore, SSTR2 and SSTR5 gene expression were strongly and positively correlated (r=0.57; p=0.006). This study as the first verifies a positive and close correlation of (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake and gene expression of SSTR2 in NEC. SSTR2 gene expression has a stronger correlation to (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake than SSTR5. In addition, the results indicate that the gene expression levels of SSTR2 and SSTR5 at large follow one another.

  13. Effects of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A in diencephalic regions of the teleost fish Coris julis occur preferentially via distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Alo', Raffaella; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Madeo, Maria; Giusi, Giuseppina; Carelli, Antonio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2005-04-15

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol A, a contaminant used in the manufacturing of polymers for many consumer products, has been shown to mimic estrogenic actions. This xenoestrogen regulates secretion and expression of pituitary lactotrophs plus morphological and structural features of estrogen target tissues in rodents. Recently, ecological hazards produced by bisphenol A have drawn interests towards the effects of this environmental chemical on neurobiological functions of aquatic vertebrates of which little is known. In this study, the effects of bisphenol A on the distribution of the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtypes in diencephalic regions of the teleost fish Coris julis were assessed using nonpeptide agonists (L-779, 976 and L-817, 818) that are highly selective for subtype(2) and subtype(5), respectively. Bisphenol A proved to be responsible for highly significant increased binding levels of subtype(2) in hypothalamic areas, while markedly decreased levels of subtype(5) were found in these diencephalic areas, as well as in the medial preglomerular nucleus. The extensive distribution of somatostatin receptor subtype(2) and subtype(5) in the teleost diencephalic areas suggests that, like in mammals, this receptor system may not only be involved in enhanced hypophysiotropic neurohormonal functions but might also promote neuroplasticity events.

  14. Development of octreotide-conjugated polymeric prodrug of bufalin for targeted delivery to somatostatin receptor 2 overexpressing breast cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Jia, Tingting; Yuan, Xia; Liu, Cheng; Sun, Jian; Ni, Zhenhua; Xu, Jian; Wang, Xuhui; Yuan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background Development of polymeric prodrugs of small molecular anticancer drugs has become one of the most promising strategies to overcome the intrinsic shortcomings of small molecular anticancer drugs and improve their anticancer performance. Materials and methods In the current work, we fabricated a novel octreotide (Oct)-modified esterase-sensitive tumor-targeting polymeric prodrug of bufalin (BUF) and explored its anticancer performance against somatostatin receptor 2 overexpressing breast cancer. Results The obtained tumor-targeting polymeric prodrug of BUF, P(oligo[ethylene glycol] monomethyl ether methacrylate [OEGMA]-co-BUF-co-Oct), showed a nanosize dimension and controlled drug release features in the presence of esterase. It was demonstrated by in vitro experiment that P(OEGMA-co-BUF-co-Oct) showed enhanced cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and apoptosis in comparison with those of free BUF. In vivo experiment further revealed the improved accumulation of drugs in tumor tissues and enhanced anticancer performance of P(OEGMA-co-BUF-co-Oct). Conclusion Taken together, this study indicated that polymeric prodrug of BUF holds promising potential toward the treatment of somatostatin receptor 2 overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:27284243

  15. Reconstitution of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells with somatostatin transcription factor-1 partially restores insulin promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Harmon, J S; Tanaka, Y; Olson, L K; Robertson, R P

    1998-06-01

    We have reported that chronic culture of HIT-T15 cells in medium containing supraphysiologic glucose concentrations (11.1 mmol/l) causes a decrease in insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin release. Furthermore, decreases in insulin gene transcription and binding activity of two essential beta-cell transcription factors, somatostatin transcription factor-1 (STF-1; also known as GSTF, IDX-1, IPF-1, PDX-1, and GSF) and RIPE-3b1 activator, are associated with this glucotoxic effect. In this study, we observed that the loss of RIPE-3b1 occurs much earlier (79% decrease at passage [p]81) than the loss of STF-1 (65% decrease at p104), with abolishment of both factors by p122. Since the STF-1, but not the RIPE-3b1 activator, gene has been cloned, we examined its restorative effects on insulin gene promoter activity after reconstitution with STF-1 cDNA. Basal insulin promoter activities normalized to early (p71-74) passage cells (1.000 +/- 0.069) were 0.4066 +/- 0.093 and 0.142 +/- 0.034 for intermediate (p102-106) and late (p118-122) passage cells, respectively. Early, intermediate, and late passage cells, all chronically cultured in medium containing 11.1 mmol/l glucose, were transfected with STF-1 alone or cotransfected with E2-5, an E-box factor known to be synergistically associated with STF-1. Compared with basal levels, we observed a trend toward an increase in insulin promoter activity in intermediate passage cells with STF-1 transfection (1.43-fold) that became a significant increase when E2-5 was cotransfected (1.78-fold). In late passage cells, transfection of STF-1 alone significantly stimulated a 2.2-fold increase in the insulin promoter activity. Cotransfection of STF-1 and E2-5 in late passage cells stimulated insulin promoter activity 2.8-fold, which was 40% of the activity observed in early passage cells. Control studies in glucotoxic betaTC-6 cells deficient in RIPE-3b1 activator but not STF-1 did not demonstrate an increase in insulin promoter

  16. Immunohistochemical analysis of the effects of cysteamine on somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ceccatelli, S; Hökfelt, T; Hallman, H; Nylander, I; Terenius, L; Elde, R; Brownstein, M

    1987-01-01

    The brain and spinal cord of untreated and cysteamine-treated rats were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using antisera raised against somatostatin (SOM)-28(1-14) and SOM-28(15-28). Sections incubated with increasing dilutions of antiserum were evaluated subjectively on coded slides and with computer-assisted image analysis. For control experiments, antisera raised against methionine-enkephalin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and dynorphin (DYN)(1-13) were used. The latter antiserum does not visualize the conventional DYN systems in the brain, but reacts with an unknown epitope, which here could be shown to be present in SOM neurons. In cysteamine-treated rats a marked decrease in SOM-28(15-28)-like immunoreactivity (1.1) could be recorded subjectively at all antibody concentrations in fibers in several brain areas, including nucleus accumbens, tuberculum olfactorium and the hypothalamic ventromedial and arcuate nuclei. In these areas SOM-LI is fairly weak in untreated rats. In SOM-rich regions such as the median eminence and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the depleting effect of cysteamine could be recorded subjectively only when diluted antisera were used. Image analysis confirmed the subjective analysis, and, in addition, differences between controls and cysteamine-treated rats could be shown also at high antiserum concentrations. SOM-28(15-28)-immunoreactive cell bodies could be seen in the brains of either control or drug-treated rats. No effect of cysteamine could be observed when antiserum raised to SOM-28(1-14) was used. Cysteamine did not seem to affect enkephalin-LI, NPY-LI or an epitope in SOM neurons reacting with DYN(1-13) antiserum. After preabsorption of SOM-28(15-28) antiserum with SOM-28(15-28) peptide, the staining patterns described above disappeared completely. However, if the SOM-28(15-28) peptide was pretreated with a high concentration (1 M) of cysteamine before being used for absorption with SOM antiserum, no blocking effect could be observed

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of analogues of HYNIC as bifunctional chelators for technetium.

    PubMed

    Meszaros, Levente K; Dose, Anica; Biagini, Stefano C G; Blower, Philip J

    2011-06-21

    6-Hydrazinonicotinic acid (HYNIC, 1) is a well-established bifunctional technetium-binding ligand often used to synthesise bioconjugates for radiolabelling with Tc-99m. It is capable of efficient capture of technetium at extremely low concentrations, but the structure of the labelled complexes is heterogeneous and incompletely understood. In particular, it is of interest to determine whether, at the no-carrier-added level, it acts in a chelating or non-chelating mode. Here we report two new isomers of HYNIC: 2-hydrazinonicotinic acid (2-HYNIC, 2), which (like 1) is capable of chelation through the mutually ortho hydrazine and pyridine nitrogens and 4-hydrazinonicotinic acid (4-HYNIC, 3), which is not (due to the para-relationship of the hydrazine and pyridine nitrogens). LC-MS shows that the coordination chemistry of 2 with technetium closely parallels that of conventional 1, and no advantages of one over the other in terms of potential labelling efficiency or isomerism were discernable. Both 1 and 2 formed complexes with the loss of 5 protons from the ligand set, whether the co-ligand was tricine or EDDA. Ligand 3, however, failed to complex technetium except at very high ligand concentration: the marked contrast with 1 and 2 suggests that chelation, rather than nonchelating coordination, is a key feature of technetium coordination by HYNIC. Two further new HYNIC analogues, 2-chloro-6-hydrazinonicotinic acid (2-chloro-HYNIC, 4a) and 2,6-dihydrazinonicotinic acid (diHYNIC, 5) were also synthesised. The coordination chemistry of 4a with technetium was broadly parallel to that of 1 and 2 although it was a less efficient chelator, while 5 also behaved as an efficient chelator of technetium, but its coordination chemistry remains poorly defined and requires further investigation before it can sensibly be adopted for (99m)Tc-labelling. The new analogues 4a and 5 present an opportunity to develop trifunctional HYNIC analogues for more complex bioconjugate synthesis.

  18. Terrestrial research in Mars analogue environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, G.

    Fatty acids (FA) content was measured by GC-MS SIM technique in Sulfide ores of present day (Mid-Atlantic Ridge and others) and ancient (Ural Paleocene, Russia) black smokers; Early Proterozoic kerites of Volyn; Siberian, Canadian and Antarctic permafrosts and also in rocks of East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement. Analysis was shown presence those and only those fatty acids which are specific to microorganisms. FA with 12 up 19 of carbon atoms are thought to be a bacterial biomass sign. 3-Hydroxy fatty acids also found in samples and are strong specific markers of gram-negative bacteria. Cultivation yield living bacteria in some cases. The East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement rocks opened by Vorotilov Deep Well (VDW) drilled through Puchezh-Katunski impact structure were studied within depths 2575 - 2805 m. 34 microbial lipid markers were detected by GC-MS and 22 species were identified. Bacteria of g. Bacillus reached 6,8 % in subsurface communities. However, members of gg. Clostridium (37,1 - 33,2 %) and Rhodococcus (27,6 - 33,7 %) were absolute dominants within studied depth interval. Some lipid patterns of kerite samples could be assessed to definite genera or, in special cases, to species of contemporary microorganisms. For instance, 2-hydroxylauric acid is specific to Pseudomonas putida group or Acinetobacter spp., and hydroxymyristic together with hydroxypalmitic are specific to P.cepacea and cyanobacteria. 3-hydroxystearic acid was known as component of Acetobacter diazothrophycus and Gloebacter violaceous cyanobacterium. 10-hydroxystearic acid associated with Nocardia spp., which oxidizes oleic acid in organic substrates. 10-methylhexadecanoic (10Me16) acid together with 10Me14, 10Me15 and 10Me17 analogues are markers of actinomycetes. Significant part of Black Smokers organic matter is probably biogenic. Fatty acid features strongly assigns it to bacterial, microeucariotic and planta cells. Par example 3-hydroxy acids are

  19. Use of Molecular Modeling to Design Selective-NTS2 Neurotensin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Roberto; Floquet, Nicolas; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; Delort, Bartholomé; Vivancos, Mélanie; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Renault, Pedro; Martinez, Jean; Sarret, Philippe; Cavelier, Florine

    2017-04-03

    Neurotensin exerts potent analgesia by acting at both NTS1 and NTS2 receptors, whereas NTS1 activation also results in other physiological effects, such as hypotension and hypothermia. Here, we used molecular modeling approach to design highly-selective NTS2 ligands by investigating the docking of novel NT[8-13] compounds at both NTS1 and NTS2 sites. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed an interaction of the Tyr(11) residue of NT[8-13] with an acidic residue (Glu(179)) located in the ECL2 of hNTS2 or with a basic residue (Arg(212)) at the same position in hNTS1. The importance of the residue at position 11 for NTS1/NTS2 selectivity was further demonstrated by the design of new NT analogues bearing basic (Lys, Orn) or acid (Asp or Glu) function. As predicted by the molecular dynamics simulations, binding of NT[8-13] analogues harboring a Lys(11) exhibited higher affinity toward the hNTS1-R212E mutant receptor, in which Arg(212) was substituted by the negatively charged Glu residue.

  20. Receptor-mediated uptake of boron-rich neuropeptide y analogues for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Verena M; Frank, René; Boehnke, Solveig; Schütz, Christian L; Hampel, Gabriele; Iffland, Dorothée S; Bings, Nicolas H; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2015-01-01

    Peptidic ligands selectively targeting distinct G protein-coupled receptors that are highly expressed in tumor tissue represent a promising approach in drug delivery. Receptor-preferring analogues of neuropeptide Y (NPY) bind and activate the human Y1 receptor subtype (hY1 receptor), which is found in 90% of breast cancer tissue and in all breast-cancer-derived metastases. Herein, novel highly boron-loaded Y1 -receptor-preferring peptide analogues are described as smart shuttle systems for carbaboranes as (10) B-containing moieties. Various positions in the peptide were screened for their susceptibility to carbaborane modification, and the most promising positions were chosen to create a multi-carbaborane peptide containing 30 boron atoms per peptide with excellent activation and internalization patterns at the hY1 receptor. Boron uptake studies by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed successful uptake of the multi-carbaborane peptide into hY1 -receptor-expressing cells, exceeding the required amount of 10(9) boron atoms per cell. This result demonstrates that the NPY/hY receptor system can act as an effective transport system for boron-containing moieties.

  1. Therapeutics of Diabetes Mellitus: Focus on Insulin Analogues and Insulin Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Valla, Vasiliki

    2010-01-01

    Aim. Inadequately controlled diabetes accounts for chronic complications and increases mortality. Its therapeutic management aims in normal HbA1C, prandial and postprandial glucose levels. This review discusses diabetes management focusing on the latest insulin analogues, alternative insulin delivery systems and the artificial pancreas. Results. Intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections (MDI) allows better imitation of the physiological rhythm of insulin secretion. Longer-acting, basal insulin analogues provide concomitant improvements in safety, efficacy and variability of glycaemic control, followed by low risks of hypoglycaemia. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides long-term glycaemic control especially in type 1 diabetic patients, while reducing hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic variability. Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems provide information on postprandial glucose excursions and nocturnal hypo- and/or hyperglycemias. This information enhances treatment options, provides a useful tool for self-monitoring and allows safer achievement of treatment targets. In the absence of a cure-like pancreas or islets transplants, artificial “closed-loop” systems mimicking the pancreatic activity have been also developed. Conclusions. Individualized treatment plans for insulin initiation and administration mode are critical in achieving target glycaemic levels. Progress in these fields is expected to facilitate and improve the quality of life of diabetic patients. PMID:20589066

  2. Fluorescent analogues of methotrexate: characterization and interaction with dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A A; Kempton, R J; Anstead, G M; Freisheim, J H

    1983-01-18

    The dansylated derivatives of lysine and ornithine analogues of methotrexate exhibit fluorescence properties characteristic of the dansyl moiety with an excitation at 328 nm and an emission maximum at 580 nm in aqueous media. As in the case of dansyl amino acids, the fluorescence emission is dependent upon the polarity of the medium. In solvents of low dielectric constant there is an enhancement of the dansyl fluorescence intensity as well as a shift to shorter wavelengths. The dansylated analogues show a reduction in the quantum yields as compared to N epsilon-dansyl-L-lysine and 5-(N,N-dimethylamino)-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid. The absorption spectra of the two dansyl analogues are similar to the spectra of the parent basic amino acid precursors but with reduced molar extinction values. The two fluorescent analogues of methotrexate were found to be potent inhibitors of purified dihydrofolate reductases from Lactobacillus casei and from chicken liver. The binding of these fluorescent analogues to either dihydrofolate reductase resulted in 10-15-nm blue shift of the ligand emission maxima and a 2-5-fold enhancement of the emission. These fluorescent properties of the bound ligands indicate a possible interaction of the dansyl moiety with a region on the enzyme molecule which is more hydrophobic relative to the surrounding solvent.

  3. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  4. Bioluminescent properties of obelin and aequorin with novel coelenterazine analogues.

    PubMed

    Gealageas, Ronan; Malikova, Natalia P; Picaud, Sandrine; Borgdorff, Aren J; Burakova, Ludmila P; Brûlet, Philippe; Vysotski, Eugene S; Dodd, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    The main analytical use of Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins from luminous coelenterates is for real-time non-invasive visualization of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) dynamics in cells and whole organisms. A limitation of this approach for in vivo deep tissue imaging is the fact that blue light emitted by the photoprotein is highly absorbed by tissue. Seven novel coelenterazine analogues were synthesized and their effects on the bioluminescent properties of recombinant obelin from Obelia longissima and aequorin from Aequorea victoria were evaluated. Only analogues having electron-donating groups (m-OCH3 and m-OH) on the C6 phenol moiety or an extended resonance system at the C8 position (1-naphthyl and α-styryl analogues) showed a significant red shift of light emission. Of these, only the α-styryl analogue displayed a sufficiently high light intensity to allow eventual tissue penetration. The possible suitability of this compound for in vivo assays was corroborated by studies with aequorin which allowed the monitoring of [Ca(2+)]i dynamics in cultured CHO cells and in hippocampal brain slices. Thus, the α-styryl coelenterazine analogue might be potentially useful for non-invasive, in vivo bioluminescence imaging in deep tissues of small animals.

  5. Direct effects of catecholamines, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone and prolactin secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, M; Yamaji, T

    1984-01-01

    To determine the mechanism and the site of action of catecholamines as well as hormones including thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)1 and somatostatin on pituitary hormone release in patients with acromegaly and in normal subjects, the effects of these substances on growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture were examined. When dopamine (0.01-0.1 microM) or bromocriptine (0.01-0.1 microM) was added to the culture media, a significant inhibition of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells from acromegalic patients was observed. This inhibition was blocked by D2 receptor blockade with metoclopramide or sulpiride, but not by D1 receptor blockade. Similarly, dopamine suppressed GH and PRL release by nonadenomatous pituitary cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was again blocked by D2 receptor blockade. The minimum effective concentration of dopamine required for a significant inhibition of PRL secretion (0.01 microM) was lower than that for GH release (0.1 microM). Norepinephrine, likewise, caused a suppression of PRL secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells. This effect was blocked by sulpiride, phentolamine, however, was ineffective. When TRH was added to the media, both GH and PRL secretion were enhanced in adenoma cells, while only the stimulation of PRL release was observed in nonadenomatous pituitary cells. Coincubation of TRH and dopamine resulted in variable effects on GH and PRL secretion. Somatostatin consistently lowered GH and PRL secretion in both adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells and completely blocked the TRH-induced stimulation of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells. Opioid peptides (1 microM) failed to affect hormone release. These results suggest that no qualitative difference in GH and PRL responses to dopaminergic agonists or to somatostatin exists between adenoma cells of acromegalic patients and normal pituitary cells, and that the

  6. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  7. Synthesis and antioxidant activity of a procyanidin B3 analogue.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Mirei; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsubayashi, Satoko; Imai, Kohei; Arai, Takuya; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-15

    Proanthocyanidin, an oligomer of catechin, is a natural antioxidant and a potent inhibitor of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1, which is involved in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. We synthesized proanthocyanidin analogue 1, in which the geometry of one catechin molecule in procyanidin B3, a dimer of (+)-catechin, is constrained to be planar. The antioxidant activities of the compounds were evaluated in terms of their capacities to scavenge galvinoxyl radicals, and results demonstrate that while procyanidin was 3.8 times more potent than (+)-catechin, the radical scavenging activity of proanthocyanidin analogue 1 was further increased to 1.9 times that of procyanidin B3. This newly designed proanthocyanidin analogue 1 may be a promising lead compound for the treatment of arteriosclerosis and related cerebrovascular diseases.

  8. Analogue modelling of syntectonic leucosomes in migmatitic schists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Carreras, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Migmatites from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt display a wide variety of structures, from those formed when the leucosomes were melt-bearing, to those developed during solid-state deformation. The observed field structures have been modelled by means of analogue experiments. The materials used in the models are layered plasticine as a schist analogue, and chocolate as analogue of the crystallizing leucosome. A model for the development of syntectonic migmatites is proposed in which initial melt-bearing patches, preferentially formed within fertile pelitic layers, progressively evolve towards lens-shaped veins. Furthermore, heterogeneous deformation of anisotropic metasediments facilitates formation of extensional sites for further melt accumulation and transport. Melt crystallization implies a rapid increase in effective viscosity of leucosomes producing a reversal in competence contrast with respect to the enclosing schists. During the whole process, deformation localizes around crystallizing veins, giving rise to different and contrasting structures for melt-bearing and for solid-state stages.

  9. Design of novel CSA analogues as potential safeners and fungicides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang; Liu, Bin; Gou, Zhaopin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yanqing; Yu, Shujing; Li, Yonghong; Sun, Dequn

    2015-02-15

    Study of safeners has been seldom reported in literature. In this work, a series of novel acylsulfamoylbenzamide analogues was designed and synthesized with newly developed safener cyprosulfamide (CSA) as the leading compound. The activity assay against the herbicide thiencarbazone-methyl (TCM) on maize revealed that fifteen compounds showed better protective effect than CSA on the fresh weight of aerial parts, twelve compounds exhibited better activity on the dry weight of aerial parts. Remarkably, two compounds (6Ih, 7II) had protective effect on the four aspects of TCM treated maize. Further antifungal assay showed their excellent activity against Physollospora piricola. The structure-activity relationships of CSA analogues as safeners and fungicides were discussed and it might be valuable for further molecular modification of new CSA analogues.

  10. Conception, synthesis, and biological evaluation of original discodermolide analogues.

    PubMed

    de Lemos, Elsa; Agouridas, Evangelos; Sorin, Geoffroy; Guerreiro, Antonio; Commerçon, Alain; Pancrazi, Ange; Betzer, Jean-François; Lannou, Marie-Isabelle; Ardisson, Janick

    2011-08-29

    Due to its intriguing biological activity profile and potential chemotherapeutic application discodermolide (DDM) proved to be an attractive target. Therefore, notable efforts have been carried out directed toward its total synthesis and toward the production and evaluation of synthetic analogues. Recently, we achieved the total synthesis of DDM. At the present, guided by the knowledge gained during our DDM total synthesis and by the requirement of keeping the bioactive "U" shape conformation, we report the convergent preparation of five original analogues. Three types of changes were realized through modification of the terminal (Z)-diene moiety, of the methyl group at the C14-position, and the lactone region. All analogues were active in the nanomolar range and two of them turned out to be equipotent to DDM.

  11. Migrastatin analogues target fascin to block tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Shengyu; Jakoncic, Jean; Zhang, J Jillian; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2010-04-15

    Tumour metastasis is the primary cause of death of cancer patients. Development of new therapeutics preventing tumour metastasis is urgently needed. Migrastatin is a natural product secreted by Streptomyces, and synthesized migrastatin analogues such as macroketone are potent inhibitors of metastatic tumour cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here we show that these migrastatin analogues target the actin-bundling protein fascin to inhibit its activity. X-ray crystal structural studies reveal that migrastatin analogues bind to one of the actin-binding sites on fascin. Our data demonstrate that actin cytoskeletal proteins such as fascin can be explored as new molecular targets for cancer treatment, in a similar manner to the microtubule protein tubulin.

  12. Largazole Analogues Embodying Radical Changes in the Depsipeptide Ring: Development of a More Selective and Highly Potent Analogue.

    PubMed

    Almaliti, Jehad; Al-Hamashi, Ayad A; Negmeldin, Ahmed T; Hanigan, Christin L; Perera, Lalith; Pflum, Mary Kay H; Casero, Robert A; Tillekeratne, L M Viranga

    2016-12-08

    A number of analogues of the marine-derived histone deacetylase inhibitor largazole incorporating major structural changes in the depsipeptide ring were synthesized. Replacing the thiazole-thiazoline fragment of largazole with a bipyridine group gave analogue 7 with potent cell growth inhibitory activity and an activity profile similar to that of largazole, suggesting that conformational change accompanying switching hybridization from sp(3) to sp(2) at C-7 is well tolerated. Analogue 7 was more class I selective compared to largazole, with at least 464-fold selectivity for class I HDAC proteins over class II HDAC6 compared to a 22-fold selectivity observed with largazole. To our knowledge 7 represents the first example of a potent and highly cytotoxic largazole analogue not containing a thiazoline ring. The elimination of a chiral center derived from the unnatural amino acid R-α-methylcysteine makes the molecule more amenable to chemical synthesis, and coupled with its increased class I selectivity, 7 could serve as a new lead compound for developing selective largazole analogues.

  13. Precocious puberty associated with neurofibromatosis and optic gliomas. Treatment with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Laue, L; Comite, F; Hench, K; Loriaux, D L; Cutler, G B; Pescovitz, O H

    1985-11-01

    Seven children with central precocious puberty and either neurofibromatosis and/or optic gliomas were referred to the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md, for evaluation and treatment with the long-acting luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa) D-Trp6-Pro9-NEt-LHRH. Only six of the seven children chose to receive treatment. Four children presented with neurofibromatosis, three of whom also had optic gliomas; the remaining three children had isolated optic gliomas, without other neurocutaneous stigmas. All had central precocious puberty mediated by activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Six months of LHRHa therapy caused suppression of gonadotropin and sex steroid levels, stabilization or regression of secondary sexual characteristics, and decreases in growth velocity and the rate of bone age maturation. We conclude that LHRHa therapy is effective in the treatment of central precocious puberty secondary to neurofibromatosis and/or optic gliomas.

  14. The Object-analogue approach for probabilistic forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frediani, M. E.; Hopson, T. M.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hacker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The object-analogue is a new method to estimate forecast uncertainty and to derive probabilistic predictions of gridded forecast fields over larger regions rather than point locations. The method has been developed for improving the forecast of 10-meter wind speed over the northeast US, and it can be extended to other forecast variables, vertical levels, and other regions. The object-analogue approach combines the analog post-processing technique (Hopson 2005; Hamill 2006; Delle Monache 2011) with the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) for forecast verification (Davis et al 2006a, b). Originally, MODE is used to verify mainly precipitation forecasts using features of a forecast region represented by an object. The analog technique is used to reduce the NWP systematic and random errors of a gridded forecast field. In this study we use MODE-derived objects to characterize the wind fields forecasts into attributes such as object area, centroid location, and intensity percentiles, and apply the analogue concept to these objects. The object-analogue method uses a database of objects derived from reforecasts and their respective reanalysis. Given a real-time forecast field, it searches the database and selects the top-ranked objects with the most similar set of attributes using the MODE fuzzy logic algorithm for object matching. The attribute probabilities obtained with the set of selected object-analogues are used to derive a multi-layer probabilistic prediction. The attribute probabilities are combined into three uncertainty layers that address the main concerns of most applications: location, area, and magnitude. The multi-layer uncertainty can be weighted and combined or used independently in such that it provides a more accurate prediction, adjusted according to the application interest. In this study we present preliminary results of the object-analogue method. Using a database with one hundred storms we perform a leave-one-out cross-validation to

  15. Privacy Act Statement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Any information you provide to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Suspension and Debarment Program will be governed by the Privacy Act and will be included in the EPA Debarment and Suspension Files, a Privacy Act system of records.

  16. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  17. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  18. Autism: Why Act Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Autism: Why Act Early? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... helped the world make sense." Florida teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder "Because my parents acted early, I ...

  19. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt