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Sample records for acting somatostatin analogue

  1. Long-acting somatostatin analogues provide significant beneficial effect in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia: Results from a proof of concept open label mono-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Barry; Breslin, Niall; McNamara, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel angiodysplasias account for over 50% of causes of small bowel bleeding and carry a worse prognosis than lesions located elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Re-bleeding rates are high even after first-line endoscopic therapy and are associated with high levels of morbidity for affected patients. Small trials of long-acting somatostatin analogues have shown promising results but have not yet been assessed in patients with refractory small bowel disease. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of long-acting somatostatin analogues in reducing re-bleeding rates and transfusion requirements, and improving haemoglobin levels in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia. Methods Patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia were treated with 20 mg of long-acting octreotide for a minimum of three months. Response was assessed according to: rates of re-bleeding, haemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, and side effects. Results A total of 24 patients were initially treated and 20 received at least three doses. Rates of complete, partial and non-response were 70%, 20% and 10% respectively. Average haemoglobin rates increased from 9.19 g/dl to 11.35 g/dl (p = 0.0027, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3.5 to −1.1) in the group overall and 70% remained transfusion-free after a mean treatment duration of 8.8 months. The rate of adverse events was higher than previously reported at 30%. Conclusion Long-acting somatostatin analogues offer a therapeutic advantage in a significant proportion of patients with small bowel angiodysplasia. With careful patient selection and close observation, a long-acting somatostatin analogue should be considered in all patients with persistent anaemia attributable to refractory disease in conjunction with other standard treatments. PMID:26966525

  2. From somatostatin to octreotide LAR: evolution of a somatostatin analogue

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Lowell; Freda, Pamela U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acromegaly is characterized by overproduction of growth hormone (GH) by the pituitary gland. GH stimulates the synthesis of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and the somatic growth and metabolic dysfunction that characterize acromegaly are a consequence of elevated GH and IGF-I levels. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare, slow-growing neoplasms that have usually metastasized by the time of diagnosis. The majority of GEP-NETs are carcinoid tumors whose syndrome is caused by the hypersecretion of biogenic amines, peptides and polypeptides responsible for the principal symptoms of diarrhea and flushing. Methods The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for preclinical and clinical studies of octreotide (Sandostatin*), a potent synthetic somatostatin analogue, in patients with acromegaly or GEP-NETs. Objective This article reviews the 20 years of clinical experience with octreotide and the impact it has made in patients with acromegaly or GEP-NETs. Results Octreotide has proven to be an essential component in the management strategy of acromegaly and GEP-NETs over the past 20 years. The multiple beneficial effects of octreotide throughout the body, combined with its established safety profile (the most common adverse effects are injection-site pain and gastrointestinal events), have made it an appealing option for clinicians. The advent of the long-acting release (LAR) formulation of octreotide provided additional benefits to patients through monthly administration, while maintaining the efficacy and tolerability profile of the daily subcutaneous formulation. Conclusions Octreotide is a potent synthetic somatostatin analogue that has become the mainstay of medical therapy for tumor control in neuroendocrine disorders such as acromegaly and GEP-NETs. The development of octreotide LAR offered a further advancement; less frequent dosing provided valuable benefits in quality of life to patients, with equivalent efficacy and

  3. Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogue Therapy Of Gastroenteropancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M; Krenning, Eric P

    2016-05-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been utilized for more than two decades and has been accepted as an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of inoperable or metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) or neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The two most commonly used radiopeptides for PRRT, (90)Y-octreotide and (177)Lu-octreotate, produce disease-control rates of 68%-94%, with progression-free survival rates that compare favorably with chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, and newer targeted therapies. In addition, biochemical and symptomatic responses are commonly observed. In general, PRRT is well tolerated with only low to moderate toxicity in most individuals. In line with the need to place PRRT in the therapeutic sequence of gastroenteropancreatic NENs, a recently sponsored phase III randomized trial in small intestine NENs treated with (177)Lu-octreotate vs high-dose octreotide long-acting release demonstrated that (177)Lu-octreotate significantly improved progression-free survival. Other strategies that are presently being developed include combinations with targeted therapies or chemotherapy, intra-arterial PRRT, and salvage treatments. Sophisticated molecular tools need to be incorporated into the management strategy to more effectively define therapeutic efficacy and for an early identification of adverse events. The strategy of randomized controlled trials is a key issue to standardize the treatment and establish the position of PRRT in the therapeutic algorithm of NENs. PMID:27067503

  4. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  5. Tumor imaging and therapy using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marion; Breeman, Wout A P; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P

    2009-07-21

    Molecular imaging plays an essential role in balancing the clinical benefits and risks of radionuclide-based cancer therapy. To effectively treat individual patients, careful assessment of biodistribution, dosimetry, and toxicity is essential. In this Account, we describe advances that combine features of molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy to provide new avenues toward individualized cancer treatment. Selective receptor-targeting radiopeptides have emerged as an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy of tumors that overexpress peptide receptors on the cell membrane. After such peptides labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides bind to their receptors, they allow clinicians to visualize receptor-expressing tumors non-invasively. Peptides labeled with beta-particle emitters could also eradicate receptor-expressing tumors. The somatostatin receptors, which are overexpressed in a majority of neuroendocrine tumors, represent the first and best example of targets for radiopeptide-based imaging and radionuclide therapy. The somatostatin analogue (111)In-octreotide permits the localization and staging of neuroendocrine tumors that express the appropriate somatostatin receptors. Newer modified somatostatin analogues, including Tyr(3)-octreotide and Tyr(3)-octreotate, are successfully being used for tumor imaging and radionuclide therapy. Because there are few effective therapies for patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumors, this therapy is a promising novel treatment option for these patients. Peptide receptor imaging and radionuclide therapy can be combined in a single probe, called a "theranostic". To select patients who are likely to benefit from this type of intervention, we first use a peptide analogue labeled with a diagnostic radionuclide to obtain a scan. Selected patients will be treated using the same or a similar peptide analogue labeled with a therapeutic radionuclide. The development of such

  6. Acute in vivo effect of octreotide acetate, a somatostatin analogue on the cellular function of gastric mucosa in the rat.

    PubMed

    Motegi, M; Nagamachi, Y; Kaneko, T; Matsuzaki, S

    1998-02-01

    Somatostatin is known to suppress various cellular functions of the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, octreotide acetate, a synthetic long-acting somatostatin analogue was tested for its effects on some cellular functions of gastric mucosa. Octreotide raised the gastric mucosal pH within 1 h after a single subcutaneous injection to rats at doses of 1-100 microg/kg bodyweight. Serum gastrin levels increased transiently at a dose of 10 microg/kg bodyweight but not at 100 microg/kg. Basal levels of serum gastrin were not affected, while famotidine-induced gastrin secretion was suppressed by octreotide at a single dose of 100 microg/kg. The increase in the intragastric acidity and histidine decarboxylase activity following pentagastrin treatment was significantly reduced by octreotide. These results suggested that this somatostatin analogue inhibits the function of not only the parietal cell and G cell but also the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell, resulting in intraluminal hypoacidity.

  7. Stability studies of a somatostatin analogue in biodegradable implants.

    PubMed

    Rothen-Weinhold, A; Besseghir, K; Vuaridel, E; Sublet, E; Oudry, N; Gurny, R

    1999-02-15

    In recent years, peptides and proteins have received much attention as drug candidates. For many polypeptides, particularly hormones, it is desirable to release the drug continuously at a controlled rate over a period of weeks or even months, and thus a controlled release system is needed. Polylactic acid (PLA) is a biocompatible and biodegradable material with wide utility for many applications, including the design of controlled release systems for pharmaceutical agents. Pharmaceutical development of these delivery systems presents new problems in the area of stability assessment, especially for peptide drugs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different steps, during the manufacturing of an implant, on peptide stability in the polymeric matrix. Polylactic acid implants containing vapreotide, a somatostatin analogue, were prepared by extrusion. The effects of time, extrusion and temperature on the peptide stability were studied. The influence of various gamma sterilization doses, as well as the conditions under which the implants were irradiated, were also investigated. Peptide stability in the polymeric matrix was evaluated at various temperatures and at various time intervals up to 9 months. PMID:10205641

  8. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  9. Unresectable Recurrent Multiple Meningioma: A Case Report with Radiological Response to Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Ortolá Buigues, Ana; Crespo Hernández, Irene; Jorquera Moya, Manuela; Díaz Pérez, Jose Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Medical treatment of meningiomas is reserved for cases in which surgery and radiotherapy have failed. Given that a high percentage of meningiomas express somatostatin receptors, treatment with somatostatin analogues has been proposed. In addition, these medications have been shown to have an antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effect in vitro. To date, very few cases with clinical response and none with radiological response have been described. The case described here is the first to report a radiological response. A 76-year-old Caucasian male was first diagnosed with unresectable meningioma at age 47. The patient experienced multiple recurrences and underwent three surgeries and radiotherapy over the years from the initial diagnosis. Despite treatment, the disease continued its progression. Based on an Octreoscan positive for tumour uptake, therapy with extended-release somatostatin analogues was started. Although no clinical neurological improvement was observed, magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a discreet but continuous radiological response over time. After >2 years of continuous administration of lanreotide, the patient remains progression free. In highly selected cases, somatostatin analogue treatment for meningioma may be beneficial. Based on our findings, treatment with somatostatin analogues should be maintained longer than previously described before evaluating treatment response. PMID:27721778

  10. Experimental and clinical studies with somatostatin analogue octreotide in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, V. M.; Smith, I. E.; Everard, M. J.; Teale, J. D.; Reubi, J. C.; Millar, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    We have detected somatostatin receptors (SSR) by autoradiography in 3/4 established small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines but not in two non-SCLC cell lines. The growth of 1/3 SSR positive SCLC cell lines was significantly inhibited by the long-acting somatostatin analogue octreotide (SMS 201-995, Sandostatin) 10(-9) M. We treated 20 SCLC patients with octreotide 250 micrograms three times daily for 1 week prechemotherapy (six patients) or at relapse after chemotherapy (14). Octreotide was well tolerated, and serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels were suppressed to 62 +/- 7% of pre-treatment levels. However there was no evidence of anti-tumour activity measured by tumour bulk or serum levels of neuron-specific enolase. In one patient metastatic skin nodules were shown to be SSR positive before and at the end of 2 weeks octreotide. Despite this the patient had progressive disease, and tumour cells obtained by fine needle aspirate before and after treatment showed no growth inhibition when cultured with octreotide immediately or following establishment as a cell line. In summary we saw little correlation between SSR expression and growth inhibition by octreotide, either in vitro or clinically. Images Figure 4 PMID:1654981

  11. [Efficacy of somatostatin and its analogues in the treatment of acute pancreatitis: clinical retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Citone, G; Perri, S; Nardi, M; Maira, E; Lotti, R; Gabbrielli, F; Antonellis, M; Orsini, S

    2001-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas, with variable involvement of other regional tissues or remote organ systems. Acute pancreatitis is mild in 80% of cases; virtually all patients with this form of disease will survive, because it's associated with minimal organ dysfunction and uneventful recovery; the severe pancreatitis develops in 20% of cases and is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. It's most important to identify the severity of disease at the moment of hospital admission; many scoring systems have been developed to serve as early prognostic signs: Ranson's criteria, Imrie's criteria, Apache II score, Balthazar's TC score. Recently, new drugs have been proposed in the treatment of acute pancreatitis, as, for example, calcitonine, glucagon, systemic antioxidants, antagonists of the receptors of interleukines, antiproteases (aprotinin and gabexate-mesilate) and the inhibitors of pancreatic secretions (somatostatin and its analogues). However, many controversies still exist concerning the real efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of acute pancreatitis, particularly regarding the inhibitors of pancreatic secretions: recently, some studies showed that somatostatin is able to actually reduce the local complication of the disease and the development of severe forms of acute pancreatitis; on the other hand, other studies failed to show real advantages of somatostatin reducing morbidity and mortality for pancreatitis. The aim of present study is a retrospective analysis of patients affected by acute pancreatitis in order to evaluate efficacy of somatostatin and its analogues. All patients subdivided in two groups: group A, patients treated with conventional therapy plus somatostatin and/or octreotide (SS/LS), and group B, patients treated only with conventional therapy. Results seem to show that somatostatin does not positively affect morbidity and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. The Authors conclude

  12. In vivo use of a radioiodinated somatostatin analogue: dynamics, metabolism, and binding to somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in man

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Breeman, W.A.; Kooij, P.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Koper, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Lameris, J.S.; Visser, T.J.; Lamberts, S.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues, labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides, are of potential value in the localization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors with gamma camera imaging. We investigated the application in man of a radioiodinated analogue of somatostatin, 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide, which has similar biologic characteristics as the native peptide. The radiopharmaceutical is cleared rapidly from the circulation (up to 85% of the dose after 10 min) mainly by the liver. Liver radioactivity is rapidly excreted into the biliary system. Until 3 hr after injection, radioactivity in the circulation is mainly in the form of 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide. Thereafter, plasma samples contain increasing proportions of free iodide. Similarly, during the first hours after injection, radioactivity in the urine exists mainly in the form of the unchanged peptide. Thereafter, a progressive increase in radioiodide excretion is observed, indicating degradation of the radiopharmaceutical in vivo. Fecal excretion of radioactivity amounts to only a few percent of the dose. The calculated median effective dose equivalent is comparable with values for applications of other 123I-radiopharmaceuticals (0.019 mSv/MBq).

  13. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Nicolas, Guillaume; Forrer, Flavio

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors with variable malignant behavior. The majority of NETs express increased levels of somatostatin (SST) receptors, particularly SST2 receptors. Radiolabeled peptides specific for the SST2 receptors may be used for diagnosis of NETs and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). [(111)In-DTPA(0)]-octreotide has been the first peptide used for PRRT. This radiolabeled peptide, emitting Auger electrons, often induced symptomatic relief, but objective morphological responses were rarely documented. After the introduction of the chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) other peptides, primarily [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) and [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC) were labeled with (90)Y or (177)Lu and used for therapy applications. The rate of objective response obtained with these radiolabeled peptides ranges between 6% and 46%, owing to differences in inclusion criteria adopted in different studies, length and type of therapy, and criteria of evaluation of the response. The present data in the literature do not allow defining the most suitable peptide and radionuclide for the treatment of NETs. Instead emerging evidence indicates that a combination of nuclides with different physical characteristics might be more effective than the use of a single nuclide. Kidney and bone marrow toxicity are the limiting factors for PRRT. Mild toxicity is often encountered while severe toxicity is rarer. Toxicity could be reduced and therapeutic efficacy enhanced by patient-specific dosimetry. Future directions include different issues of PRRT, such as defining the most suitable treatment scheme, evaluation of new peptides with different affinity profiles to other SST receptor subtypes, and reduction of toxicity. PMID:22292758

  14. Nonsurgical closure of esophago-respiratory fistulas: role for the somatostatin analogue octreotide acetate?

    PubMed

    Nylen, E S; Hall, J L; Krasnow, S H; Becker, K L; Wadleigh, R G

    1994-09-01

    Esophago-respiratory fistulas (ERF) do not close spontaneously and are uniformly fatal. A somatostatin analogue (octreotide acetate) was used in three consecutive patients to promote the closure of ERF. In 2 patients with esophageal cancer, treatment with octreotide acetate was associated with fistula closure in 30 and 46 days, respectively. In a third patient with virally-induced ERF, treatment was associated with improvement of the inflammation of the fistula before the patient's death from pulmonary aspiration after 40 days of treatment. These preliminary observations suggest that octreotide acetate treatment of ERF should receive further investigative scrutiny.

  15. [Somatostatin and the digestive system. Clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2013-09-29

    The effect of somatostatin on the gastrointestinal tract is complex; it inhibits the release of gastrointestinal hormones, the exocrine function of the stomach, pancreas and bile, decreases motility and influences absorption as well. Based on these diverse effects there was an increased expectation towards the success of somatostatin therapy in various gastrointestinal disorders. The preconditions for somatostatin treatment was created by the development of long acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide). During the last twenty-five years large trials clarified the role of somatostatin analogues in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases. This study summarizes shortly these results. Somatostatin analogue treatment could be effective in various pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, however, this therapeutic modality became a part of the clinical routine only in neuroendocrine tumours and adjuvant treatment of oesophageal variceal bleeding and pancreatic fistulas.

  16. Role of somatostatin and its analogues in the treatment of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Büchler, M W; Binder, M; Friess, H

    1994-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is caused by the activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas and a possible treatment, therefore, is the inhibition of enzyme secretion. This approach is somewhat controversial, however, as it is not clear whether pancreatic secretion continues to occur during the course of acute pancreatitis. Animal studies show an appreciable reduction of secretion in the inflamed pancreas, but studies in humans are not conclusive. The use of somatostatin or its analogue, octreotide, has been investigated in several clinical studies. A meta analysis of six individual studies in which somatostatin was given for acute pancreatitis showed that somatostatin significantly reduces mortality. A trial in patients with moderate to severe acute pancreatitis showed a lower rate (although not statistically significant) of complications in patients treated with 3 x 200 and 3 x 500 micrograms/day octreotide, compared with controls and patients receiving a lower dose of octreotide. A further study showed a significant reduction in patient controlled analgesics in patients treated with octreotide compared with controls. Pain is the important clinical symptom of chronic pancreatitis, possibly resulting from an increased intraductal pressure during secretion. The effect on pain of the inhibition of pancreatic secretion by octreotide has been investigated in two studies. One showed no significant reduction in pain after treatment with octreotide for three days. In the other, in which octreotide was used for three weeks, significantly less pain and analgesic use was recorded during octreotide treatment than during placebo. The most common complication of chronic pancreatitis is the formation of pseudocysts. There is some evidence that octreotide may be useful in their treatment. PMID:7911442

  17. Outcome of Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery in Combination with Somatostatin Analogues in Patients with Growth Hormone Producing Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Wang, Fuyu; Meng, Xianghui; Ba, Jianmin; Wei, Shaobo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of endoscopic surgery in combination with long-acting somatostatin analogues (SSAs) in treating patients with growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumor. Methods We performed retrospective analysis of 133 patients with GH producing pituitary adenoma who underwent pure endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery in our center from January 2007 to July 2012. Patients were followed up for a range of 3-48 months. The radiological remission, biochemical remission and complication were evaluated. Results A total of 110 (82.7%) patients achieved radiological complete resection, 11 (8.2%) subtotal resection, and 12 (9.0%) partial resection. Eighty-eight (66.2%) patients showed nadir GH level less than 1 ng/mL after oral glucose administration. No mortality or severe disability was observed during follow up. Preoperative long-acting SSA successfully improved left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) and blood glucose in three patients who subsequently underwent success operation. Long-acting SSA (20 mg every 30 days) achieved biochemical remission in 19 out 23 (82.6%) patients who showed persistent high GH level after surgery. Conclusion Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery can biochemically cure the majority of GH producing pituitary adenoma. Post-operative use of SSA can improve biochemical remission. PMID:25535518

  18. Effect of the somatostatin analogue octreotide acetate on hemostasis in humans.

    PubMed

    Witzig, T E; Kvols, L K; Moertel, C G; Bowie, E J

    1991-03-01

    Octreotide acetate is a somatostatin analogue that has been shown to ameliorate the side effects of excessive secretion of hormone from benign and malignant tumors. The ability of this drug to inhibit the growth of malignant cells and to control gastrointestinal hemorrhage will prompt additional clinical trials. Because some of these patients may have thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, or a coagulopathy, we studied tests of platelet function and blood coagulation in 15 patients before and after 14 days of therapy with octreotide acetate at a dosage of 500 micrograms three times daily. We found no substantial change in the results of these tests, and no patient experienced bleeding or thrombosis. These results suggest that octreotide acetate does not adversely affect platelet function or the coagulation system in humans.

  19. Somatostatin analogue, octreotide, reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Serri, O.; Beauregard, H.; Brazeau, P.; Abribat, T.; Lambert, J.; Harris, A.; Vachon, L. Sandoz Canada Inc., Dorval, Quebec )

    1991-02-20

    To determine whether treatment with a somatostatin analogue can reduce kidney hyperfiltration and hypertrophy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the authors studied 11 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and glomerular hyperfiltration. The patients were assigned randomly to receive continuous subcutaneous infusion of either octreotide, 300 {mu}g/24 h (five patients) or placebo (six patients) for 12 weeks. At baseline, mean glomerular filtration rate and mean total kidney volume were not significantly different in the two groups. However, after 12 weeks of treatment, the mean glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, the mean total kidney volume was significantly lower after treatment in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Glycemic control did not change significantly in either group. They conclude that subcutaneous infusion of octreotide for 12 weeks reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus despite the fact that glycemic control remains unchanged.

  20. Inhibition of experimental angiogenesis by the somatostatin analogue octreotide acetate (SMS 201-995).

    PubMed

    Danesi, R; Agen, C; Benelli, U; Paolo, A D; Nardini, D; Bocci, G; Basolo, F; Campagni, A; Tacca, M D

    1997-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the somatostatin analogue octreotide acetate (SMS 201-995) on experimental angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Octreotide reduced the proliferation of human HUV-EC-C endothelial cells (mean, -45.8% versus controls at 10(-9) M; P < 0.05) as well as the density of the vascular network of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (mean, -35.7% versus controls at 50 microgram; P < 0.05). Furthermore, octreotide significantly inhibited chick chorioallantoic membrane neovascularization by the human MCF-10Aint-2 mammary cells secreting the angiogenic protein FGF-3. The proliferation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from rat aorta explants on fibronectin was reduced by octreotide 10(-8) M (mean, -32.6% versus controls; P < 0.05), and a similar effect was produced on cells sprouting from explants cultured in fibrin (mean, -52.9% versus controls; P < 0.05). Topical administration of octreotide 10 microgram/day for 6 days inhibited rat cornea neovascularization induced by AgNO3/KNO3 (mean, -50.6% versus controls; P < 0.05). Octreotide 40 microgram/day i.p was tested on angiogenesis in rat mesentery obtained by i.p. injections of compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulating agent, or conditioned medium from MCF-10Aint-2 cells and was able to reduce the extent of neovascularization (mean, -45.6 and -64.1%, respectively, versus controls; P < 0.05). These data provide evidence that octreotide is an inhibitor of experimental angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Octreotide, a Somatostatin Analogue, Fails to Inhibit Hypoxia-induced Retinal Neovascularization in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Averbukh, Edward; Halpert, Michael; Yanko, Ravit; Yanko, Lutza; Peèr, Jacob; Levinger, Samuel; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to prevent angiogenesis in diverse in vitro models. We evaluated its effect on retinal neovascularization in vivo, using a neonatal rat retinopathy model. Methods: We used, on alternating days, hypoxia (10% O2) and hyperoxia (50% O2) during the first 14 days of neonatal rats, to induce retinal neovascularization. Half of the rats were injected subcutaneously with octreotide 0.7 μg/g BW twice daily. At day 18 the eyes were evaluated for the presence of epiretinal and vitreal hemorrhage, neovascularization and epiretinal proliferation. Octreotide pharmacokinetics and its effect on serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were examined in 28 rats. Results: Serum octreotide levels were 667 μg/1 two hours after injection, 26.4 μg/1 after nine hours and 3.2 μg/1 after 14 hours. GH levels were decreased by 40% (p = 0.002) two hours after injection but thereafter returned to baseline. IGF-I levels were unchanged two hours after injection and were elevated by 26% 14 hours after injection (p = 0.02). Epiretinal membranes were highly associated with epiretinal hemorrhages (p < 0.001), while retinal neovascularization was notably associated with vitreal hemorrhages (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Twice-daily injections of octreotide failed to produce sustained decrease in serum GH, but produced rebound elevation of serum IGF-I. Accordingly, no statistically significant effect of injections on retinal pathology was noted. This finding, however, does not contradict our assumption that GH suppression may decrease the severity of retinopathy. PMID:11469389

  2. Somatostatin analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥ 5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  3. De novo design, synthesis, and pharmacology of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone analogues derived from somatostatin by a hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Han, Guoxia; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Kendall, Laura; Bonner, Gregg; Hadley, Mac E; Cone, Roger D; Hruby, Victor J

    2004-03-11

    A number of alpha-melanotropin (alpha-MSH) analogues have been designed de novo, synthesized, and bioassayed at different melanocortin receptors from frog skin (fMC1R) and mouse/rat (mMC1R, rMC3R, mMC4R, and mMC5R). These ligands were designed from somatostatin by a hybrid approach, which utilizes a modified cyclic structure (H-d-Phe-c[Cys---Cys]-Thr-NH(2)) related to somatostatin analogues (e.g. sandostatin) acting at somatostatin receptors, CTAP which binds specifically to micro opioid receptors, and the core pharmacophore of alpha-MSH (His-Phe-Arg-Trp). Ligands designed were H-d-Phe-c[XXX-YYY-ZZZ-Arg-Trp-AAA]-Thr-NH(2) [XXX and AAA = Cys, d-Cys, Hcy, Pen, d-Pen; YYY = His, His(1'-Me), His(3'-Me); ZZZ = Phe and side chain halogen substituted Phe, d-Phe, d-Nal(1'), and d-Nal(2')]. The compounds showed a wide range of bioactivities at the frog skin MC1R; e.g. H-d-Phe-c[Hcy-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (6, EC(50) = 0.30 nM) and H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-d-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (8, EC(50) = 0.10 nM). In addition, when a lactam bridge was used as in H-d-Phe-c[Asp-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-Thr-NH(2) (7, EC(50) = 0.10 nM), the analogue obtained is as potent as alpha-MSH in the frog skin MC1R assay. Interestingly, switching the bridge of 6 to give H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-Hcy]-Thr-NH(2) (5, EC(50) = 1000 nM) led to a 3000-fold decrease in agonist activity. An increase in steric size in the side chain of d-Phe(7) reduced the bioactivity significantly. For example, H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Nal(1')-Arg-Trp-d-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (24) is 2000-fold less active than 9. On the other hand, H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Phe(p-I)-Arg-Trp-d-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (23) lost all agonist activity and became a weak antagonist (IC(50) = 1 x 10(-5) M). Furthermore, the modified CTAP analogues with a d-Trp at position 7 all showed weak antagonist activities (EC(50) = 10(-6) to 10(-7) M). Compounds bioassayed at mouse/rat MCRs displayed intriguing results. Most of them are potent at all four receptors tested (m

  4. Dopamine and Somatostatin Analogues Resistance of Pituitary Tumors: Focus on Cytoskeleton Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Giardino, Elena; Vitali, Eleonora; Lania, Andrea G.; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary tumors, that origin from excessive proliferation of a specific subtype of pituitary cell, are mostly benign tumors, but may cause significant morbidity in affected patients, including visual and neurologic manifestations from mass-effect, or endocrine syndromes caused by hormone hypersecretion. Dopamine (DA) receptor DRD2 and somatostatin (SS) receptors (SSTRs) represent the main targets of pharmacological treatment of pituitary tumors since they mediate inhibitory effects on both hormone secretion and cell proliferation, and their expression is retained by most of these tumors. Although long-acting DA and SS analogs are currently used in the treatment of prolactin (PRL)- and growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors, respectively, clinical practice indicates a great variability in the frequency and entity of favorable responses. The molecular basis of the pharmacological resistance are still poorly understood, and several potential molecular mechanisms have been proposed, including defective expression or genetic alterations of DRD2 and SSTRs, or an impaired signal transduction. Recently, a role for cytoskeleton protein filamin A (FLNA) in DRD2 and SSTRs receptors expression and signaling in PRL- and GH-secreting tumors, respectively, has been demonstrated, first revealing a link between FLNA expression and responsiveness of pituitary tumors to pharmacological therapy. This review provides an overview of the known molecular events involved in SS and DA resistance, focusing on the role played by FLNA. PMID:26733942

  5. Application and Dosimetric Requirements for Gallium-68-labeled Somatostatin Analogues in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Taïeb, David; Garrigue, Philippe; Bardiès, Manuel; Abdullah, Ahmad Esmaeel; Pacak, Karel

    2015-10-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are associated with variable prognosis, with grade 1 and 2 NETs having more favorable outcomes than grade 3. Patients with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP)-NET need individualized interdisciplinary evaluations and treatment. New treatment options have become available with significant improvements in progression-free survival. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using (90)Y or (177)Lu-labeled somatostatin analogues (SSTa) has also shown promise in the treatment of advanced progressive NETs. (68)Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-SSTa can be used as companion imaging agents to assist in radionuclide therapy selection. (68)Ga-DOTA-SSTa PET/computed tomography might also provide information for prognosis, tumor response assessment to PRRT, and internal dosimetry.

  6. The effect of a somatostatin analogue on the release of hormones from human midgut carcinoid tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Wängberg, B; Nilsson, O; Theodorsson, E; Dahlström, A; Ahlman, H

    1991-07-01

    The use of a somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995) has greatly facilitated the treatment of patients with the midgut carcinoid syndrome. Clinical studies have shown that SMS reduces the peripheral levels of tumour-produced serotonin (5-HT) and tachykinins, e.g. neuropeptide K (NPK), basally and after pentagastrin provocation. Some studies have indicated an inhibitory effect of SMS on tumour cell growth as well. In the present study we have investigated the effects of SMS on four different human midgut carcinoid tumours maintained in long term culture. Media levels of 5-HT and NPK-LI in tumour cell cultures decreased rapidly during incubation with SMS (10(-8)-10(-10) M) in all four tumours studied without evidence for tachyphylaxis (up to 6 weeks observation period). SMS treatment (10(-8) M) during 4 days reduced the media concentrations of 5-HT by 56%, while the intracellular contents of 5-HT were decreased by 27% indicating dual inhibitory effects on synthesis and secretion of 5-HT from tumour cells. The DNA contents of cultures were not affected by SMS (10(-8) M or 10(-10) M) treatment for 4 or 14 days. When tumour cell cultures were challenged with isoprenaline (IP) (10(-6) M) no reduction of the IP induced release of 5-HT could be detected after pretreatment of tumour cell cultures with SMS (10(-8) M) for 1 h, 4 h or 4 days. These studies provide evidence for a direct action of the somatostatin analogue on midgut carcinoid tumour cells, reducing both synthesis and secretion of hormones from tumour cells. This effect appears not to be related to inhibition of tumour cell growth. The inhibition of 5-HT secretion from tumour cells by SMS seems to operate via a second messenger system different from the one mediating the beta-adrenoceptor stimulated release of 5-HT. PMID:1713051

  7. Modified method using a somatostatin analogue, octreotide acetate (Sandostatin) to assess in vivo insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ikebuchi, M; Suzuki, M; Kageyama, A; Hirose, J; Yokota, C; Ikeda, K; Shinozaki, K; Todo, R; Harano, Y

    1996-02-01

    In order to evaluate the steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) method by using a new somatostatin derivative, octreotide acetate (Sandostatin) instead of somatostatin that we had used for the insulin sensitivity test, we examined whether octreotide was able to suppress C-peptide (CPR), glucagon (IRG), and GH to a similar degree to that achieved with somatostatin. A total of 52 studies were performed in 45 essential hypertensive subjects and 7 healthy subjects. Octreotide was given subcutaneously in a does of 50 micrograms or 100 micrograms 10 min before the test (sc 50, sc 100 groups) or intravenously infused over 2 h (10 micrograms in bolus followed by a constant infusion, 50, 100, or 150 micrograms/2 h: i.v. 50, i.v. 100, i.v. 150 groups). In all of the groups the plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) concentration increased gradually after insulin injection and reached the steady state plasma insulin (SSPI) level between 40 and 60 microU/ml at 60 min through 120 min. Plasma CPR at 120 min was the most suppressed (by 67% of the basal level in i.v. 150 group during the study period), but on the other hand in both the sc 100 and i.v. 100 groups the plasma CPR concentration at 120 min was suppressed by nearly 40%, but not significantly suppressed in either the sc 50 or the i.v. 50 group. Plasma IRG and GH were strongly suppressed after 60 min in all groups during the study period. Plasma glucose had increased significantly at 30 min and reached the steady state at 90 min through 120 min in hypertensive and healthy subjects. The results indicated that the modified SSPG method with continuous intravenous infusion of Octreotide at 150 micrograms/2 h was adequate for the measurement of insulin sensitivity.

  8. Phase II study of RC-160 (vapreotide), an octapeptide analogue of somatostatin, in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, K J; Dobbs, N; Propper, D J; Braybrooke, J P; Koukourakis, M I; Mitchell, K; Woodhull, J; Talbot, D C; Schally, A V; Harris, A L

    1999-01-01

    RC-160 (octastatin/vapreotide) is a potent octapeptide analogue of somatostatin with growth inhibitory activity in experimental tumours in vitro and in vivo, including breast cancer. We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of high-dose RC-160, 3 mg day−1 on week 1 increased to 4.5 mg day−1 for weeks 2–4 and subsequently 6 mg day−1 until the end of treatment, administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion in the management of 14 women with previously treated metastatic breast cancer. The age range was 37–80 years (median 58.5 years) and performance status 0–2. The treatment was well tolerated with no dose reductions being required. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were seen. Abscess formation developed at the infusion site in eight patients and erythema and discomfort was seen in a further three patients. A significant reduction in IGF-I levels occurred by day 7 and was maintained throughout the treatment. The lowest dose of RC-160 produced the maximal IGF-I response. Although there was no reduction in prolactin levels in patients whose baseline levels were normal, elevated prolactin levels found in three patients fell to within the normal range 7 days after commencing RC-160 treatment. A small but significant rise in fasting blood glucose levels was also recorded, the highest level on treatment being 7.6 mmol l−1. No objective tumour responses were observed, all patients showing disease progression within 3 months of commencing treatment. These findings demonstrate that high-dose RC-160, administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion, can reduce serum levels of the breast growth factors IGF-I and prolactin but is ineffective in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Encouraging preclinical anti-tumour activity and the favourable toxicity profile in patients suggest the merit of future studies combining RC-160 with anti-oestrogen, cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic agents. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188884

  9. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1997-12-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SRIF) are mediated by a family of G protein-coupled receptors (termed sst) that are encoded by five nonallelic genes located on separate chromosomes. The receptors can be further divided into two subfamilies: sst(2,3,5) react with octapeptide and hexapeptide SRIF analogues and belong to one subclass; sst(1,4) react poorly with these compounds and fall into another subclass. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacology and function of these receptors, with particular emphasis on the ligand-binding domain, subtype-selective analogues, agonist-dependent receptor regulation and desensitization responses, subtype-specific effector coupling, and signal transduction pathways responsible for inhibiting cell secretion and cell growth or induction of apoptosis.

  10. The Expanding Role of Somatostatin Analogs in the Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are neoplasms arising most often in the GI tract, pancreas, or lung. Diagnosis of NETs is often delayed until the disease is advanced, because of the variable and nonspecific nature of the initial symptoms. Surgical resection for cure is therefore not an option for most patients. METHODS: Somatostatin analogues represent the cornerstone of therapy for patients with NETs. This article reviews the important role that somatostatin analogues continue to play in the treatment of patients with NETs. RESULTS: Octreotide was the first somatostatin analogue to be developed; more than 30 years of data have accumulated demonstrating its efficacy and safety. Lanreotide is another somatostatin analogue in clinical use, and pasireotide is a promising somatostatin analogue in development. Newer long-acting depot formulations are now available offering once-monthly administration. Although octreotide was initially developed for symptom control, recent results indicate that it also has an antiproliferative effect, significantly increasing time to progression in patients with midgut NETs. Combinations of octreotide with other targeted therapies may further improve patient outcomes. Findings in recent studies of the combination of octreotide and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus are encouraging. The combinations of octreotide with other agents (eg, interferon-α, bevacizumab, cetuximab, AMG-706, and sunitinib) are being investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Somatostatin analogues have been used to treat the symptoms of NETs for decades and also have an antineoplastic effect, markedly prolonging progression-free survival. Somatostatin analogues are likely to remain the cornerstone of treatment for most patients with advanced NETs. Promising new combination therapies are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:23112884

  11. Interim report on intrathoracic radiotherapy of human small-cell lung carcinoma in nude mice with Re-188-RC-160, a radiolabeled somatostatin analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, P.O. |; Bender, H.; Biersack, H.J.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of Re-188-RC-160 in experimental models of human small cell lung carcinomas which mimic the clinical presentation. In the experimental model, cells from the human small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H69 cells were inoculated into the thoracic cavity of athymic mice and rats. Subsequently, the biodistribution of Re-188-RC-160 after injection into the pleural cavity, a radiolabeled somatostatin analogue, was monitored as was the effect on the subsequent growth of tumors. The results presented here, and which are a part of a larger series of studies, suggest that Re-188-RC-160 can be effectively used in this animal model to restrict the growth of small cell lung carcinoma in the thoracic cavity.

  12. The sensitivity of growth hormone and prolactin secretion to the somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 in patients with prolactinomas and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, S W; Zweens, M; Klijn, J G; van Vroonhoven, C C; Stefanko, S Z; Del Pozo, E

    1986-08-01

    The somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 has recently been shown to be effective in suppressing GH secretion in most acromegalic patients. In the present study it was investigated whether PRL release in prolactinoma and acromegalic patients might also be sensitive to SMS 201-995 and whether co-secretion of PRL in acromegaly plays a role in determining the sensitivity of GH secretion to SMS 201-995. The s.c. administration of 50 micrograms SMS 201-995 did not affect high plasma PRL levels in four microprolactinoma patients. Therapy of one of these patients for 3 d with 50 micrograms three times a day also did not affect PRL levels. The single administration of 50 micrograms SMS 201-995 in 22 acromegalic patients lowered plasma GH levels for 2-6 h to less than 5 micrograms/l in 14 patients and to less than 50% of control values in 16 patients. In 18 of these 22 patients the immunohistochemical picture of the pituitary tumour was known. Eleven patients had pure GH-containing tumours and in seven patients there were mixed GH/PRL-containing tumours. In two of these latter patients there was evidence for GH and PRL being secreted by the same tumour cells. The sensitivity of GH secretion to SMS 201-995 did not differ between the patients with pure GH or mixed GH/PRL-containing adenomas. Plasma PRL levels were not affected by SMS 201-995 in the patients with pure GH-secreting tumours, but were significantly suppressed in four of the seven patients with mixed GH/PRL containing tumours. Chronic treatment for 16 weeks of one patient with a mixed GH/PRL-containing tumour with SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms three times a day) resulted in normalization of both the increased GH and PRL levels. It is concluded that SMS 201-995 does not affect tumorous PRL secretion in patients with pure prolactinomas. In acromegalic patients with mixed GH/PRL-containing tumours PRL secretion in some patients is sensitive to SMS 201-995, making these patients good candidates for chronic treatment with

  13. Radioimmunoassay for octapeptide analogs of somatostatin: Measurement of serum levels after administration of long-acting microcapsule formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mason-Garcia, M.; Vaccarella, M.; Horvath, J.; Redding, T.W.; Groot, K.; Orsolini, P.; Schally, A.V. )

    1988-08-01

    The development of a long-acting delivery system for D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Trp-NH{sub 2} (RC-160), an octapeptide analog of somatostatin, required the establishment of a method for determining the concentration of this analog in serum during treatment. A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for RC-160 was developed and used for following the rate of liberation of this peptide from microcapsules of poly(DL-lactide-coglycolide). Antibodies were generated in a rabbit against RC-160 conjugated to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. At an antiserum dilution of 1:100,000, the antibodies bound approximately 25% of added radiolabeled RC-160. Somatostatin octapeptide analogs that had a disulfide bridge showed crossreactivity with the antiserum, but analogs without the disulfide bridge and other peptides tested did not crossreact. The minimum detectable dose of RC-160 was 10 pg. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation ranged from 9.1% to 12.8% and from 14% to 30%, respectively. The RIA was suitable for direct determination of RC-160 in serum. Eleven prototype batches of microcapsules were tested in rats, and the rate of release of the analog from the microcapsules was followed. An improved batch of microcapsules made from RC-160 pamoate maintained high serum levels of RC-160 for more than 30 days after intramuscular injection. The RIA should be of value for monitoring levels of this analog in serum during long-term therapy.

  14. Radioimmunoassay for octapeptide analogs of somatostatin: measurement of serum levels after administration of long-acting microcapsule formulations.

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Garcia, M; Vaccarella, M; Horvath, J; Redding, T W; Groot, K; Orsolini, P; Schally, A V

    1988-01-01

    The development of a long-acting delivery system for D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Trp-NH2 (RC-160), an octapeptide analog of somatostatin, required the establishment of a method for determining the concentration of this analog in serum during treatment. A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for RC-160 was developed and used for following the rate of liberation of this peptide from microcapsules of poly(DL-lactide-coglycolide). Antibodies were generated in a rabbit against RC-160 conjugated to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. At an antiserum dilution of 1:100,000, the antibodies bound approximately 25% of added radiolabeled RC-160. Somatostatin octapeptide analogs that had a disulfide bridge showed crossreactivity with the antiserum, but analogs without the disulfide bridge and other peptides tested did not crossreact. The minimum detectable dose of RC-160 was 10 pg. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation ranged from 9.1% to 12.8% and from 14% to 30%, respectively. The RIA was suitable for direct determination of RC-160 in serum. Eleven prototype batches of microcapsules were tested in rats, and the rate of release of the analog from the microcapsules was followed. An improved batch of microcapsules made from RC-160 pamoate maintained high serum levels of RC-160 for more than 30 days after intramuscular injection. The RIA should be of value for monitoring levels of this analog in serum during long-term therapy. PMID:2899894

  15. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  16. Long-term treatment of acromegaly with a long-acting analogue of somatostatin, octreotide.

    PubMed

    Page, M D; Millward, M E; Taylor, A; Preece, M; Hourihan, M; Hall, R; Scanlon, M F

    1990-02-01

    We have treated 16 acromegalic patients for up to 44 months with octreotide in varying doses. Growth hormone levels were suppressed in 14 patients with associated clinical improvement. IGF-1 levels were measured in 12 and fell into the normal range in 10. Prolactin was suppressed in six hyperprolactinaemic patients but was unaltered in normoprolactinaemic acromegalic patients. Post-prandial hyperglycaemia with impaired insulin secretion was noted in all patients, and one patient required oral hypoglycaemic agents. Octreotide did not affect thyroid function. CT scans from before and after six months of treatment demonstrated minimal tumour shrinkage in only two patients. Octreotide was well tolerated with no serious haematological or biochemical disturbance and no evidence of malabsorption. Two patients developed gallstones. Octreotide is effective in acromegaly. The development of gallstones is the only serious adverse event we have encountered.

  17. Somatostatin analogues do not affect calcium metabolism in patients with acromegaly and primary hyperparathyroidism [corrected] due to MEN 1-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bogazzi, F; Lombardi, M; Russo, D; Sardella, C; Raggi, F; Brogioni, S; Cetani, F; Ceccarelli, C; Mariani, G; Basolo, F; Martino, E

    2011-02-01

    Patients with clinical features of MEN 1 without mutations in the menin gene fulfill the criteria of MEN1-like syndrome. Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is the most frequent clinical finding in both syndromes and is usually treated by surgery. However, PHP has been reported to respond to somatostatin analogues (SSA) in MEN 1 patients. 7 patients with PHP in the context of MEN 1-like syndrome (and absence of mutations in the menin gene) were enrolled in the study and treated with SSA for 6 months for the non-PHP disease before parathyroidectomy. Serum ionized calcium, phosphorus, and PTH concentrations, and 24-h urinary calcium and phosphorus excretion were measured before and after SSA therapy. Mean serum ionized calcium, phosphorus, and PTH concentrations did not significantly change after a 6-month course with SSA. SSA scintigraphy did not reveal uptake in the neck region corresponding to the parathyroid adenoma identified at surgery and confirmed at histology. However, immunohistochemistry revealed SS-type 2A receptor in parathyroid tissue samples of 6 out of 7 patients. SSA therapy does not affect calcium-phosphorus metabolism in patients with MEN 1-like syndrome, suggesting that the drug has no role in controlling PHP in these subset of patients.

  18. Somatostatin receptor expression and biological functions in endocrine pancreatic cells: review based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-producing betacells within the pancreatic islets. Somatostatin acts as an inhibitor of hormone secretion through specific receptors (sst1-5). All ssts were expressed in normal rat and mouse pancreatic islets, although the expression intensity and the co-expression pattern varied between ssts as well as between species. This may reflect a difference in response to somatostatin in islet cells of the two species. The Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model is an experimental model of type 1 diabetes, with insulitis accompanied by spontaneous hyperglycaemia. Pancreatic specimens from NOD mice at different age and stage of disease were stained for ssts. The islet cells of diabetic NOD mice showed increased islet expression of sst2-5 compared to normoglycemic NOD mice. The increase in sst2-5 expression in the islets cells may suggest either a contributing factor in the process leading to diabetes, or a defense response against ongoing beta-cell destruction. Somatostatin analogues were tested on a human endocrine pancreatic tumour cell line and cultured pancreatic islets. Somatostatin analogues had an effect on cAMP accumulation, chromogranin A secretion and MAP kinase activity in the cell line. Treatment of rat pancreatic islets with somatostatin analogues with selective receptor affinity was not sufficient to induce an inhibition of insulin and glucagon secretion. However, a combination of selective analogues or non-selective analogues via costimulation of receptors can cause inhibition of hormone production. For insulin and glucagon, combinations of sst2 + sst5 and sst1 + sst2, respectively, showed a biological effect. In summary, knowledge of islet cell ssts expression and the effect of somatostatin analogues with high affinity to ssts may be valuable in the future attempts to influence beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes mellitus, since down-regulation of beta-cell function may promote survival of

  19. Application and dosimetric requirements for 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues in targeted radionuclide therapy for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Taïeb, David; Garrigue, Philippe; Bardiès, Manuel; Esmaeel, Abdullah Ahmad; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are associated with variable prognosis, with grade 1 and 2 NETs having a more favorable outcome than G3 ones (also called carcinoma). GEP-NET patients need highly individualized interdisciplinary evaluations and treatment. New treatment options have become available (i.e., sunitinib, mTOR inhibitors) with significant improvements in progression-free survival. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using 90Y or 177Lu-labeled somatostatin analogs has also shown promise in the treatment of advanced progressive NETs but randomized clinical trials comparing with other modalities are still lacking. SST-targeting represents the essence of theranostics. 68Ga-DOTA-SSTa can be used as companion imaging agents to assist in such a radionuclide therapy selection. 68Ga-DOTA-SSTa PET/CT might also provide critical information for prognosis, tumor response assessement to PRRT, and internal dosimetry. It is also expected that the development of novel receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals will contribute to the development of molecular-based personalized medicine approaches. PMID:26384594

  20. Reciprocal regulation of antral gastrin and somatostatin gene expression by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S J; Stone, D

    1988-01-01

    Gastric acid exerts a feedback inhibition on the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells. This study examines whether gastrin gene expression is also regulated by changes in gastric pH. Achlorhydria was induced in rats by the gastric H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor, omeprazole (100 mumol/kg). This resulted in fourfold increases in both serum gastrin (within 2 h) and gastrin mRNA levels (after 24 h). Antral somatostatin D cells probably act as chemoreceptors for gastric acid to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin secretion from adjacent G cells. Omeprazole-induced achlorhydria reduced D-cell activity as shown by a threefold decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels that began after 24 h. Exogenous administration of the somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 (10 micrograms/kg) prevented both the hypergastrinemia and the increase in gastrin mRNA levels caused by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria. Exogenous somatostatin, however, did not influence the decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels seen with achlorhydria. These data, therefore, support the hypothesis that antral D cells act as chemoreceptors for changes in gastric pH, and modulates somatostatin secretion and synthesis to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin gene expression in adjacent G cells. Images PMID:2901431

  1. Conversion of daily pegvisomant to weekly pegvisomant combined with long-acting somatostatin analogs, in controlled acromegaly patients.

    PubMed

    Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; de Herder, Wouter W; Feelders, Richard A; van der Lely, A J

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of combined treatment in active acromegaly with both long-acting somatostatin analogs (SRIF) and pegvisomant (PEG-V) has been well established. The aim was to describe the PEG-V dose reductions after the conversion from daily PEG-V to combination treatment. To clarify the individual beneficial and adverse effects, in two acromegaly patients, who only normalized their insulin like growth factor (IGF-I) levels with high-dose pegvisomant therapy. We present two cases of a 31 and 44 years old male with gigantism and acromegaly that were controlled subsequently by surgery, radiotherapy, SRIF analogs and daily PEG-V treatment. They were converted to combined treatment of monthly SSA and (twice) weekly PEG-V. High dose SSA treatment was added while the PEG-V dose was decreased during carful monitoring of the IGF-I. After switching from PEG-V monotherapy to SRIF analogs plus pegvisomant combination therapy IGF-I remained normal. However, the necessary PEG-V dose, to normalize IGF-I differed significantly between these two patients. One patient needed twice weekly 100 mg, the second needed 60 mg once weekly on top of their monthly lanreotide Autosolution injections of 120 mg. The weekly dose reduction was 80 and 150 mg. After the introducing of lanreotide, fasting glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations increased. Diabetic medication had to be introduced or increased. No changes in liver tests or in pituitary adenoma size were observed. In these two patients, PEG-V in combination with long-acting SRIF analogs was as effective as PEG-V monotherapy in normalizing IGF-I levels, although significant dose-reductions in PEG-V could be achieved. However, there seems to be a wide variation in the reduction of PEG-V dose, which can be obtained after conversion to combined treatment. PMID:21221818

  2. Feasibility, endocrine and anti-tumour effects of a triple endocrine therapy with tamoxifen, a somatostatin analogue and an antiprolactin in post-menopausal metastatic breast cancer: a randomized study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Bontenbal, M.; Foekens, J. A.; Lamberts, S. W.; de Jong, F. H.; van Putten, W. L.; Braun, H. J.; Burghouts, J. T.; van der Linden, G. H.; Klijn, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Suppression of the secretion of prolactin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) might be important in the growth regulation and treatment of breast cancer. Because oestrogens may counteract the anti-tumour effects of such treatment, the combination of an anti-oestrogen (tamoxifen), a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) and a potent anti-prolactin (CV 205-502) might be attractive. In this respect, we performed a first exploratory long-term study on the feasibility of combined treatment and possible clear differences in endocrine and anti-tumour effects during such combined treatment vs standard treatment with tamoxifen alone. Twenty-two post-menopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer (ER and/or PR positive or unknown) were randomized to receive either 40 mg of tamoxifen per day or the combination of 40 mg of tamoxifen plus 75 microg of CV 205-502 orally plus 3 x 0.2 mg of octreotide s.c. as first-line endocrine therapy. An objective response was found in 36% of the patients treated with tamoxifen alone and in 55% of the patients treated with combination therapy. Median time to progression was 33 weeks for patients treated with tamoxifen and 84 weeks for patients treated with combination therapy, but the numbers are too small for hard conclusions. There was no difference in overall post-relapse survival between the two treatment arms. With respect to the endocrine parameters, there was a significant decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels in both treatment arms, whereas during combined treatment plasma growth hormone tended to decrease and plasma prolactin levels were strongly suppressed; in some patients insulin and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) decreased during the triple therapy. Although there was no significant difference in mean decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels between the two treatment arms, combined treatment resulted in a more uniform suppression of IGF-1. Therefore, the addition of a somatostatin analogue and an anti

  3. The effect of albumin fusion patterns on the production and bioactivity of the somatostatin-14 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuedi; Fan, Jun; Li, Wenxin; Yang, Runlin; Peng, Ying; Deng, Lili; Wu, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2013-08-01

    Somatostatin is a natural inhibitor of growth hormone, and its analogues are clinically used for the therapy of acromegaly, gigantism, thyrotropinoma, and other carcinoid syndrome. However, natural somatostatin is limited for clinical usage because of its short half-life in vivo. Albumin fusion technology was used to construct long-acting fusion proteins, and Pichia pastoris was used as an expression system. Three fusion proteins, (somatostatin (SS)14)2-human serum albumin (HSA), (SS14)3-HSA, and HSA-(SS14)3, were constructed with different fusion copies of somatostatin-14 and fusion orientations. The expression level of (SS14)3-HSA and HSA-(SS14)3 was much lower than (SS14)2-HSA due to the additional fusion of the somatostatin-14 molecule. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that severe degradation occurred in the fermentation process. Similar to the standard of somatostatin-14, all three fusion proteins were able to inhibit growth hormone secretion in the blood, with (SS14)2-HSA being the most effective one. On the whole, (SS14)2-HSA was the most effective protein in both production level and bioactivity, and increasing the number of small protein copies fused to HSA may not be a suitable method to improve the protein bioactivity. PMID:23712794

  4. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-01-01

    It is now well established that the biological actions of tetradecapeptide somatostatin (somatostatin-14, S-14) are receptor-mediated. These receptors were first quantified in GH4C pituitary tumor cells using [125I-Tyr1] S-14 as radioligand which was found to exhibit high non-specific binding to membrane receptor preparations from normal tissues. Our studies have shown that [125I-Tyr11] S-14 in which the radiolabel is situated away from the N-terminus exhibits significantly lower non-specific binding and therefore is more suitable for S-14 receptor studies. In the CNS, highest concentration of S-14 receptors was found in the cerebral cortex, followed by thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus while medulla-pons, cerebellum and spinal cord exhibited negligible binding. Outside the CNS membrane receptors for S-14 have been characterized in pituitary, adrenal cortex and pancreatic acini. In all these tissues a single class of high affinity binding sites for S-14 were present, the receptors in pancreatic acinar cells exhibiting significantly greater affinity for binding S-14 than in other tissues.

  5. The use of the long-acting somatostatin analogue, octreotide acetate, in patients with islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Maton, P N

    1989-12-01

    Octreotide lowers plasma concentrations of the marker peptide in the majority of patients with islet cell tumors. However, as described above the effect of octreotide on plasma concentrations of marker peptides is not necessarily related to the effect on symptoms. Nevertheless octreotide is capable of producing symptomatic relief in a large proportion of patients with islet cell tumor syndromes. The data on the effect of octreotide on the symptoms due to VIPoma and due to the carcinoid syndrome (presumably including some who have islet cell tumors) are strong and the drug has been approved for these indications by the Food and Drug Administration. With respect to the other islet cell tumor syndromes, the published data suggest that the utility of octreotide differs in the different syndromes. Insulinomas are usually single, benign, and can and should be removed surgically, resulting in cure. Octreotide therefore has no role to play in such patients, particularly since the response of insulinomas is variable. However in the 10 per cent of insulinomas that are malignant octreotide is certainly effective in at least a portion of cases, although as yet the true response rate and efficacy compared with diazoxide is not clear. Although octreotide is effective at reducing acid output, and thus improving symptoms in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, because of the effectiveness of histamine H2-receptor antagonists and omeprazole, there is no need for octreotide in this syndrome. For patients with glucagonoma, GHRHoma, Cushing's syndrome, and other rare islet cell tumor syndromes octreotide may well be of benefit and should be considered. The current data do not support the use of octreotide for an antitumor effect.

  6. Early cerebral activities of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A appear to act via the somatostatin receptor subtype sst(2).

    PubMed Central

    Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Madeo, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been aroused by the specific actions of bisphenol A (BPA). The present investigation represents a first study dealing with the interaction of BPA with the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtype (sst(2)) in the rat limbic circuit. After treating pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats with two doses (400 microg/kg/day; 40 microg/kg/day) of BPA, the binding activity of the above receptor subtype was evaluated in some limbic regions of the offspring. The higher dose proved to be the more effective one, as demonstrated by the elevated affinity of sst(2) with its specific radioligand, [(125)I]-Tyr(0)somatostatin-14. The most dramatic effects of BPA on sst(2) levels occurred at the low-affinity states of such a subtype in some telencephalic limbic areas of postnatal rats (10 days of age; postnatal day [PND] 10). These included lower (p < 0.05) sst(2) levels in the gyrus dentate of the hippocampus and basomedial nucleus of the amygdala; significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels were observed only for the high-affinity states of the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. A similar trend was maintained in PND 23 rats with the exception of much lower levels of the high-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in the amygdala nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. However, greater changes produced by this environmental estrogen were reported when the binding activity of sst(2) was checked in the presence of the two more important selective agonists (zolpidem and Ro 15-4513) specific for the alpha-containing Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor complex. In this case, an even greater potentiating effect (p < 0.001) was mainly obtained for the low-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in PND 10 animals, with the exception of the high-affinity type in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and gyrus dentate. These results support the contention that an sst(2) subtype alpha-containing GABA type A receptor system might

  7. Somatostatin Analogue Treatment of a TSH-Secreting Adenoma Presenting With Accelerated Bone Metabolism and a Pericardial Effusion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mousiolis, Athanasios C; Rapti, Eleni; Grammatiki, Maria; Yavropoulou, Maria; Efstathiou, Maria; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Daniilidis, Michalis; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Increased bone turnover and other less frequent comorbidities of hyperthyroidism, such as heart failure, have only rarely been reported in association with central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma). Treatment is highly empirical and relies on eliminating the tumor and the hyperthyroid state.We report here an unusual case of a 39-year-old man who was initially admitted for management of pleuritic chest pain and fever of unknown origin. Diagnostic work up confirmed pericarditis and pleural effusion both refractory to treatment. The patient had a previous history of persistently elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), indicative of increased bone turnover. He had also initially been treated with thyroxine supplementation due to elevated TSH levels. During the diagnostic process a TSHoma was revealed. Thyroxine was discontinued, and resection of the pituitary tumor followed by treatment with a somatostatin analog led to complete recession of the effusions, normalization of ALP, and shrinkage of pituitary tumor.Accelerated bone metabolism and pericardial and pleural effusions attributed to a TSHoma may resolve after successful treatment of the tumor. The unexpected clinical course of this case highlights the need for careful long-term surveillance in patients with these rare pituitary adenomas. PMID:26765410

  8. Somatostatin and Somatostatin-Containing Neurons in Shaping Neuronal Activity and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery over four decades ago, somatostatin (SOM) receives growing scientific and clinical interest. Being localized in the nervous system in a subset of interneurons somatostatin acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and its role in the fine-tuning of neuronal activity and involvement in synaptic plasticity and memory formation are widely recognized in the recent literature. Combining transgenic animals with electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular methods allowed to characterize several subpopulations of somatostatin-containing interneurons possessing specific anatomical and physiological features engaged in controlling the output of cortical excitatory neurons. Special characteristic and connectivity of somatostatin-containing neurons set them up as significant players in shaping activity and plasticity of the nervous system. However, somatostatin is not just a marker of particular interneuronal subpopulation. Somatostatin itself acts pre- and postsynaptically, modulating excitability and neuronal responses. In the present review, we combine the knowledge regarding somatostatin and somatostatin-containing interneurons, trying to incorporate it into the current view concerning the role of the somatostatinergic system in cortical plasticity. PMID:27445703

  9. Somatostatin in rat tissues is depleted by cysteamine administration

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; Reichlin, S.

    1981-12-01

    Administration of cysteamine (mercaptoethylamine) induces in rats severe perforating duodenal ulcers. Because the ulcerogenic properties of cysteamine are markedly reduced by treatment with somatostatin, we considered the possibility that cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer might be mediated by depletion of tissue somatostatin, and thereby of its paracrine influences on gastrin and gastric acid secretion. To test this hypothesis, we measured the concentration of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-somatostatin) in stomach and duodenal mucosa at intervals after administration of a single ulcerogenic dose (30 mg/kg by stomach tube). IR-somatostatin in these tissues fell rapidly to reach a minimum at 4 h (stomach 31%, duodenum 60% of control respectively). IR-somatostatin in hypothalamus and pancreas decreased gradually to a minimum at 7 h. Another duodenal ulcerogen, propionitrile (10 mg/100 g bw, s.c.) which is more toxic than cysteamine, and several stressful procedures including ether anesthesia, restraint and s.c. formalin did not lower stomach or duodenal IR-somatostatin. Gut, pancreas and hypothalamic VIP levels were not influenced by cysteamine. These findings suggest that cysteamine is a relatively specific depletor of tissue somatostatin. Because blood levels of somatostatin fell, and only trivial amounts of the peptide were found in the stomach lumen after cysteamine administration, it appears likely that this agent acts at the cellular level to cause breakdown of preformed somatostatin and/or to acutely reduce its synthesis.

  10. Somatostatin, somatostatin receptors, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Fisher, William E; Kim, Hee Joon; Wang, Xiaoping; Brunicardi, Charles F; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-03-01

    Somatostatin may play an important role in the regulation of cancer growth including pancreatic cancer by interaction with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) on the cell surface. Five SSTRs were cloned, and the function of these SSTRs is addressed in this review. SSTR-2, SSTR-5, and SSTR-1 are thought to play major roles in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth both in vitro and in vivo. SSTR-3 may be involved in mediating apoptosis, but the role of SSTR-4 is not clear. In most pancreatic cancers, functional SSTRs are absent. Reintroduction of SSTR genes has been shown to inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in cell cultures and animal models.

  11. Somatostatin: a metabolic regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dileepan, K.N.; Wagle, S.R.

    1985-12-23

    Somatostatin, the hypothalamic release-inhibiting factor, has been found to stimulate gluconeogenesis in rat kidney cortical slices. Stimulation by somatostatin was linear and dose-dependent. Other bioactive peptides such as cholecystokinin, gastro-intestinal peptide, secretin, neurotensin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, pancreatic polypeptide, beta endorphin and substance P did not affect the renal gluconeogenic activity. Somatostatin-induced gluconeogenesis was blocked by phentolamine (alpha adrenergic antagonist) and prazosin (alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic antagonist) but not by propranolol (beta adrenergic antagonist) and yohimbine (alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic antagonist) suggesting that the effect is via alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic stimuli. Studies on the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ revealed that tissue depletion and omission of Ca/sup 2 +/ from the reaction mixture would abolish the stimulatory effect of somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin enhanced the uptake of /sup 45/calcium in renal cortical slices which could be blocked by lanthanum, an inhibitor of Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of somatostatin on renal gluconeogenesis is mediated by alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors, or those which functionally resemble the alpha/sub 1/ receptors and that the increased influx of Ca/sup 2 +/ may be the causative factor for carrying out the stimulus. 88 references.

  12. Identification and characterization of somatostatin receptors in neonatal rat long bones.

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, C; Dietl, M M; Palacios, J M; Pless, J

    1990-01-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release inhibiting factor; SRIF) has widespread functions as a modulator of neural activity as well as of endocrine and exocrine secretion. In the present paper, the binding characteristics of somatostatin receptors have been investigated in rat long bones using the stable analogue, 125I-SDZ 204-090, as a ligand. Binding studies revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites for 125I-SDZ 204-090 on cells prepared from neonatal rat long bones with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 70.1 +/- 8.2 pM (n = 3). An excellent correlation was found between the ability of various somatostatin analogues to inhibit growth hormone in pituitary cells and to displace the binding of 125I-SDZ 204-090 to the bone cell preparation, indicating that the receptors are very similar, if not identical. The localization of the somatostatin-binding sites was examined by autoradiography after labelling in vitro and in vivo. The binding sites were shown by both procedures to be selectively localized to the metaphysis of rat long bones. The labelling experiments in vivo indicate that these receptors can be reached in the living animal by circulating somatostatin analogues. In addition, the analogue SMS 201-995 inhibited the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in bone cell suspensions. These results suggest that somatostatin could be an important regulatory factor in bone metabolism. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1967933

  13. Somatostatin modulates insulin-degrading-enzyme metabolism: implications for the regulation of microglia activity in AD.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Grazia; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Boraso, Mariaserena; Viviani, Barbara; Coletta, Massimiliano; Marini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) into senile plaques and the impairment of somatostatin-mediated neurotransmission are key pathological events in the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin-degrading-enzyme (IDE) is one of the main extracellular protease targeting Aβ, and thus it represents an interesting pharmacological target for AD therapy. We show that the active form of somatostatin-14 regulates IDE activity by affecting its expression and secretion in microglia cells. A similar effect can also be observed when adding octreotide. Following a previous observation where somatostatin directly interacts with IDE, here we demonstrate that somatostatin regulates Aβ catabolism by modulating IDE proteolytic activity in IDE gene-silencing experiments. As a whole, these data indicate the relevant role played by somatostatin and, potentially, by analogue octreotide, in preventing Aβ accumulation by partially restoring IDE activity.

  14. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors.

  15. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors. PMID:27523384

  16. An immunocytochemical mapping of somatostatin in the cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, F; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2003-10-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the localization of somatostatin-28 (1-12)-like immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies in the auditory cortex of the cat (anterior, primary, secondary, temporal, ventral, ventroposterior, posterior and dorsoposterior auditory fields) was studied. In general, the distribution of SOM-ir structures is widespread in the auditory cortex of the feline. A high density of immunoreactive fibers as well as a low density of cell bodies containing somatostatin were observed in all the layers of the eight above-mentioned auditory fields. These data indicate that somatostatin-28 (1-12) could act as a neurotransmitter and/or a neuromodulator in the auditory cortex of the cat. The origin of the SOM-ir fibers in the auditory cortex of the cat, as well as the issue of whether the cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) are local or projecting neurons is discussed.

  17. Patient selection for personalized peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are malignant solid tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells dispersed throughout the body. Differentiated neuroendocrine tumors overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), which enable the diagnosis using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Internalization and retention within the tumor cell are important for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using the same peptide. The use of the same DOTA-peptide for SSTR PET/CT using (68)Ga and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using therapeutic radionuclides like (177)Lu and (90)Y offers a unique theranostic advantage.

  18. Insulin degludec, a long-acting once-daily basal analogue for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Berard, Lori; MacNeill, Gail

    2015-02-01

    Here, we discuss certain practical issues related to use of insulin degludec, a new long-acting basal insulin analogue. Degludec provides uniform ("peakless") action that extends over more than 24 hours and is highly consistent from dose to dose. Like the 2 previously available basal analogues (detemir and glargine), degludec is expected to simplify dose adjustment and enable patients to reach their glycemic targets with reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Phase 3 clinical trials involving type 1 and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated that degludec was noninferior to glargine in allowing patients to reach a target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7%, and nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred significantly less frequently with degludec. In addition, when dosing intervals vary substantially from day to day, degludec continues to be effective and to maintain a low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Degludec thus has the potential to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, to enhance the flexibility of the dosing schedule and to improve patient and caregiver confidence in the stability of glycemic control. A dedicated injector, the FlexTouch prefilled pen, containing degludec 200 units/mL, will be recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Degludec will also be available as 100 units/mL cartridges, to be used in the NovoPen 4 by patients requiring smaller basal insulin doses, including most patients with type 1 diabetes.

  19. Insulin degludec, a long-acting once-daily basal analogue for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Berard, Lori; MacNeill, Gail

    2015-02-01

    Here, we discuss certain practical issues related to use of insulin degludec, a new long-acting basal insulin analogue. Degludec provides uniform ("peakless") action that extends over more than 24 hours and is highly consistent from dose to dose. Like the 2 previously available basal analogues (detemir and glargine), degludec is expected to simplify dose adjustment and enable patients to reach their glycemic targets with reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Phase 3 clinical trials involving type 1 and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated that degludec was noninferior to glargine in allowing patients to reach a target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7%, and nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred significantly less frequently with degludec. In addition, when dosing intervals vary substantially from day to day, degludec continues to be effective and to maintain a low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Degludec thus has the potential to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, to enhance the flexibility of the dosing schedule and to improve patient and caregiver confidence in the stability of glycemic control. A dedicated injector, the FlexTouch prefilled pen, containing degludec 200 units/mL, will be recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Degludec will also be available as 100 units/mL cartridges, to be used in the NovoPen 4 by patients requiring smaller basal insulin doses, including most patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25065475

  20. β-Arrestin 1 and 2 and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression in pituitary adenomas: role in the regulation of response to somatostatin analogue treatment in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Federico; Feelders, Richard; van der Pas, Rob; Kros, Johan M; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; van der Lelij, Aart-Jan; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Minuto, Francesco; de Herder, Wouter; Lamberts, Steven W J; Ferone, Diego; Hofland, Leo J

    2013-12-01

    Recent in vitro studies highlighted G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)2 and β-arrestins as important players in driving somatostatin receptor (SSTR) desensitization and trafficking. Our aim was to characterize GRK2 and β-arrestins expression in different pituitary adenomas and to investigate their potential role in the response to somatostatin analog (SSA) treatment in GH-secreting adenomas (GHomas). We evaluated mRNA expression of multiple SSTRs, GRK2, β-arrestin 1, and β-arrestin 2 in 41 pituitary adenomas (31 GHomas, 6 nonfunctioning [NFPAs], and 4 prolactinomas [PRLomas]). Within the GHomas group, mRNA data were correlated with the in vivo response to an acute octreotide test and with the GH-lowering effect of SSA in cultured primary cells. β-Arrestin 1 expression was low in all 3 adenoma histotypes. However, its expression was significantly lower in GHomas and PRLomas, compared with NFPAs (P < .01). GRK2 expression was higher in PRLomas and NFPAs compared with GHomas (P < .05). In the GHoma group, GRK2 expression was inversely correlated to β-arrestin 1 (P < .05) and positively correlated to β-arrestin 2 (P < .0001). SSA treatment did not affect GRK2 and β-arrestin expression in GHomas or in cultured rat pituitary tumor GH3 cells. Noteworthy, β-arrestin 1 was significantly lower (P < .05) in tumors responsive to octreotide treatment in vitro, whereas GRK2 and SSTR subtype 2 were significantly higher (P < .05). Likewise, β-arrestin 1 levels were inversely correlated with the in vivo response to acute octreotide test (P = .001), whereas GRK2 and SSTR subtype 2 expression were positively correlated (P < .05). In conclusion, for the first time, we characterized GRK2, β-arrestin 1, and β-arrestin 2 expression in a representative number of pituitary adenomas. β-Arrestin 1 and GRK2 seem to have a role in modulating GH secretion during SSA treatment.

  1. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis, and pancreatic polypeptide hypersecretion: a new association and clinical and hormonal responses to long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, T W; Sacks, H S; O'Dorisio, T M; Tuttle, S; Solomon, S S

    1987-06-01

    We describe a 63-yr-old man with disseminated medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis with pancreatic polypeptide (PP) hypersecretion. His major symptoms were watery diarrhea, flushing, and abdominal bloating; these and the elevated plasma PP levels did not change after resection of the distal two thirds of the pancreas, which contained a 2-cm mass of nesidioblastotic tissue. Postoperatively, a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/day), normalized PP secretion acutely and chronically (7 months) and ameliorated his symptoms. The analog had no side-effects and did not alter glucose tolerance, calcitonin hypersecretion, or growth of the medullary carcinoma, but it did inhibit GH secretion. After withdrawal from therapy for 1 month, PP hypersecretion and all symptoms except diarrhea recurred. The coexistence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and PP cell nesidioblastosis represents a new variant of the overlap syndromes between multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and II. Patients with medullary carcinoma and unexplained watery diarrhea should have fasting gastroenteropancreatic hormone assays done to screen for a potential gastrointestinal or pancreatic origin for the diarrhea. PMID:2883196

  2. Metastatic Insulinoma Managed with Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ricardo; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Almeida Filho, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Insulinoma is a rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Overproduction of insulin and associated hypoglycemia are hallmark features of this disease. Diagnosis can be made through demonstration of hypoglycemia and elevated plasma levels of insulin or C-Peptide. Metastatic disease can be detected through computerized tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can be used not only to document metastatic disease but also as a predictive marker of the benefit from therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analog. Unresectable metastatic insulinomas may present as a major therapeutic challenge for the treating physician. When feasible, resection is the mainstay of treatment. Prevention of hypoglycemia is a crucial goal of therapy for unresectable/metastatic tumors. Diazoxide, hydrochlorothiazide, glucagon, and intravenous glucose infusions have been used for glycemic control yielding temporary and inconsistent results. Sandostatin and its long-acting depot forms have occasionally been used in the treatment of Octreoscan-positive insulinomas. Herein, we report a case of metastatic insulinoma with very difficult glycemic control successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog lutetium (177LU). PMID:24455330

  3. Fine-tuning somatostatin receptor signalling by agonist-selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation: IUPHAR Review 5.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Stefan; Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Nagel, Falko

    2014-04-01

    The biological actions of somatostatin are mediated by a family of five GPCRs, named sst1 to sst5 . Somatostatin receptors exhibit equally high-binding affinities to their natural ligand somatostatin-14 and largely overlapping distributions. The overexpression of somatostatin receptors in human tumours is the molecular basis for diagnostic and therapeutic application of the stable somatostatin analogues octreotide, lanreotide and pasireotide. The efficiency of somatostatin receptor signalling is tightly regulated and ultimately limited by the coordinated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues. Here, we review and discuss recent progress in the generation and application of phosphosite-specific antibodies for human sst2 and sst5 receptors. These phosphosite-specific antibodies are unique tools to monitor the spatial and temporal dynamics of receptors phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Using a combined approach of phosphosite-specific antibodies and siRNA knock-down screening, relevant kinases and phosphatases were identified. Emerging evidence suggests distinct mechanisms of agonist-selective fine-tuning for individual somatostatin receptors. The recently uncovered differences in phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these receptors may hence be of physiological significance in mediating responses to acute, persistent or repeated stimuli in a variety of target tissues.

  4. Can a new ultra-long-acting insulin analogue improve patient care? Investigating the potential role of insulin degludec.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Campbell, R Keith

    2012-12-24

    The basal-bolus concept of delivering insulin to diabetic patients makes physiological sense, as it mimics normal insulin release in people without diabetes. In line with this concept, a major effort put forth by insulin manufacturers has been to develop the ideal exogenous basal insulin product. The perfect basal insulin product would be injected into subcutaneous tissue without causing irritation, release insulin continuously at a constant rate for at least 24 hours, be stable, not contribute to weight gain, have a low risk of allergic reactions and, very importantly, minimize the risk of hypoglycaemia. While the perfect insulin has not yet been discovered, advancements are still being made. Insulin degludec is an ultra-long-acting basal insulin analogue that possesses a flat, stable glucose-lowering effect in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin degludec achieves these pharmacokinetic properties by forming soluble multihexamers upon subcutaneous injection, resulting in the formation of a depot in the subcutaneous tissue that is slowly released and absorbed into circulation. Insulin degludec has been associated with slightly less weight gain and fewer nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes when compared with insulin glargine in some, but not all, clinical studies. This article briefly reviews current evidence for the use of insulin degludec in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and discusses the potential impact of this new basal insulin on clinical practice. PMID:23145524

  5. Chylous ascites: Treated with total parenteral nutrition and somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Jun; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of total parenteral nutrition and somatostatin on patients with chylous ascites. METHODS: Five patients were diagnosed with chylous ascites on the basis of laboratory findings of ascites sample from Nov 1999 to May 2003. Total parenteral nutrition and somatostatin or its analogue was administered to 4 patients, while the other one only received total parenteral nutrition. All the patients had persistent peritoneal drainage, with the quantity and quality of drainage fluid observed daily. Necessary supportive treatments were given to the patients individually during the therapy. RESULTS: Two of 4 patients who received somatostatin therapy obtained complete recovery within 10 d without any recurrence while on a normal diet. In these 2 patients, the peritoneal drainage reduced to zero in one and the other's decreased from 2000 mL to 80 mL with a clear appearance and negative qualitative analysis of chyle. Recurrent chylous ascites, though relieved effectively by the same method every time, developed in one patient with advanced pancreatic cancer. The other patient's lymphatic fistula was blocked with the fibrin glue after conservative treatment. The patient who only received total parenteral nutrition was cured 24 d after therapy. CONCLUSION: Total parenteral nutrition along with somatostatin can relieve the symptoms and close the fistula in patients with chylous ascites rapidly. It appears to be an effective therapy available for the treatment of chylous ascites caused by various disorders. PMID:15300913

  6. Dose-finding study for the use of long-acting gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues prior to ovarian stimulation for IVF.

    PubMed

    Yim, S F; Lok, I H; Cheung, L P; Briton-Jones, C M; Chiu, T T; Haines, C J

    2001-03-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues improve the outcome of treatment with IVF by increasing the number and quality of oocytes retrieved and by reducing cycle cancellation rates. Whilst short-acting GnRH analogues are most commonly used, depot preparations are now available that are more convenient for patient use. Some studies have reported that pregnancy rates with depot GnRH analogues are similar to those of short-acting preparations, but others have suggested that the more profound down-regulation seen with depot GnRH analogues results in inferior embryo quality. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lower than conventional dose of a depot GnRH analogue may be more appropriate for use in ovarian stimulation prior to IVF. Sixty patients were randomized to receive either 3.75 mg (conventional dose) or 1.87 mg (low dose) triptorelin prior to ovarian stimulation for IVF. Suppression was measured using serum concentrations of LH measured 2 and 3 weeks after the administration of the GnRH analogues, the dose of gonadotrophin used and the time to resumption of menses. Mean concentrations of LH were 2.2 +/- 1.0 and 1.1 +/- 0.6 IU/l in the conventional dose group and 3.5 +/- 5.5 and 2.7 +/- 1.9 IU/l in the low dose group (P < 0.05 at 2 and 3 weeks). There were no significant differences between the doses of gonadotrophins used, the number of oocytes and embryos available and the time to resumption of menses, nor in the pregnancy rates. Although the degree of suppression as measured biochemically was more profound with the conventional dose, this did not affect the IVF outcome. The use of a lower dose therefore appears to be equally effective and could contribute to a reduction in the cost of treatment.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for somatostatin receptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the developments and briefly characterize the somatostatin analogs which are currently used for somatostatin receptor imaging in clinical routine or in early phase clinical trials. Somatostatin (sst) receptor targeting with radiolabeled peptides has become an integral part in nuclear oncology during the last 20 years. This integration process has been initiated in Europe with the introduction to the market of 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide [111In-pentetreotide]. Introducing 99mTc in somatostatin receptor targeting radiopeptides resulted in much better image quality, higher sensitivity of tumor detection and lower mean effective dose for the examined patient. The next generation are 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs. Due to the spatial resolution of PET technique and increasing number of PET scanners, the PET or PET/CT technique became very important in somatostatin receptor imaging. Until up to a couple of years ago the analogs of somatostatin were constructed aiming at their agonistic behavior, expecting that their internalization with the receptor acti-vated by the radiolabeled ligand and its retention within the tumor cell are crucial for efficient imaging and therapy. Recently it has been shown that the antagonists recognize more binding sites at the tumor cell membrane and hence offer an improved diagnostic efficacy, especially when the density of sst receptors is low. This approach may in future improve diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor imaging techniques. The developments in tracer design are followed by the improvements in imaging techniques. The new SPECT scanners offer resolution close to that of PET, which might open a new era for 99mTc and other SPECT radiotracers. PMID:27479790

  8. Resistance to somatostatin analogs in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Colao, Annamaria; Auriemma, Renata S; Lombardi, Gaetano; Pivonello, Rosario

    2011-04-01

    Somatostatin analogs (SA) are widely used in acromegaly, either as first-line or adjuvant treatment after surgery. First-line treatment with these drugs is generally used in the patients with macroadenomas or in those with clinical conditions so severe as to prevent unsafe reactions during anesthesia. Generally, the response to SA takes into account both control of GH and IGF-I excess, with consequent improvement of clinical symptoms directly related to GH and IGF-I excess, and tumor shrinkage. This latter effect is more prominent in the patients treated first-line and bearing large macroadenomas, but it is also observed in patients with microadenomas, even with little clinical implication. Predictors of response are patients' gender, age, initial GH and IGF-I levels, and tumor mass, as well as adequate expression of somatostatin receptor types 2 and 5, those with the highest affinity for octreotide and lanreotide. Only sporadic cases of somatostatin receptor gene mutation or impaired signaling pathways have been described in GH-secreting tumors so far. The response to SA also depends on treatment duration and dosage of the drug used, so that a definition of resistance based on short-term treatments using low doses of long-acting SA is limited. Current data suggest that response to these drugs is better analyzed taking together biochemical and tumoral effects because only the absence of both responses might be considered as a poor response or resistance. This latter evidence seems to occur in 25% of treated patients after 12 months of currently available long-acting SA. PMID:21123741

  9. Somatostatin receptors in differentiated ovarian tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Horisberger, U.; Klijn, J. G.; Foekens, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of somatostatin receptors was investigated in 57 primary human ovarian tumors using in vitro receptor autoradiography with three different somatostatin radioligands, 125I-[Tyr11]-somatostatin-14, 125I-[Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25]-somatostatin-28, or 125I-[Tyr3]-SMS 201-995. Three cases, all belonging to epithelial tumors, were receptor positive; specifically 1 of 42 adenocarcinomas, 1 of 3 borderline malignancies, and 1 of 2 cystadenomas. Four other epithelial tumors (3 fibroadenomas, 1 Brenner tumor), 4 sex cord-stromal tumors (2 fibrothecomas, 2 granulosa cell tumors), and 2 germ cell tumors (1 dysgerminoma, 1 teratoma) were receptor negative. In the positive cases, the somatostatin receptors were localized on epithelial cells exclusively, were of high affinity (KD = 4.6 nmol/l [nanomolar]), and specific for somatostatin analogs. These receptors bound somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 radioligands with a higher affinity than the octapeptide [Tyr3]-SMS 201-995. Healthy ovarian tissue had no somatostatin receptors. A subpopulation of relatively well-differentiated ovarian tumors, therefore, was identified pathobiochemically on the basis of its somatostatin receptor content. This small group of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors may be a target for in vivo diagnostic imaging with somatostatin ligands. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1850962

  10. Somatostatin receptors in differentiated ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reubi, J.C.; Horisberger, U.; Klijn, J.G.; Foekens, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The presence of somatostatin receptors was investigated in 57 primary human ovarian tumors using in vitro receptor autoradiography with three different somatostatin radioligands, {sup 125}I-(Tyr11)-somatostatin-14, {sup 125}I-(Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25)-somatostatin-28, or {sup 125}I-(Tyr3)-SMS 201-995. Three cases, all belonging to epithelial tumors, were receptor positive; specifically 1 of 42 adenocarcinomas, 1 of 3 borderline malignancies, and 1 of 2 cystadenomas. Four other epithelial tumors (3 fibroadenomas, 1 Brenner tumor), 4 sex cord-stromal tumors (2 fibrothecomas, 2 granulosa cell tumors), and 2 germ cell tumors (1 dysgerminoma, 1 teratoma) were receptor negative. In the positive cases, the somatostatin receptors were localized on epithelial cells exclusively, were of high affinity (KD = 4.6 nmol/l (nanomolar)), and specific for somatostatin analogs. These receptors bound somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 radioligands with a higher affinity than the octapeptide (Tyr3)-SMS 201-995. Healthy ovarian tissue had no somatostatin receptors. A subpopulation of relatively well-differentiated ovarian tumors, therefore, was identified pathobiochemically on the basis of its somatostatin receptor content. This small group of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors may be a target for in vivo diagnostic imaging with somatostatin ligands.

  11. Patient selection for personalized peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are malignant solid tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells dispersed throughout the body. Differentiated neuroendocrine tumors overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), which enable the diagnosis using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Internalization and retention within the tumor cell are important for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using the same peptide. The use of the same DOTA-peptide for SSTR PET/CT using (68)Ga and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using therapeutic radionuclides like (177)Lu and (90)Y offers a unique theranostic advantage. PMID:25029937

  12. Structure-based de novo design, molecular docking and molecular dynamics of primaquine analogues acting as quinone reductase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murce, Erika; Cuya-Guizado, Teobaldo Ricardo; Padilla-Chavarria, Helmut Isaac; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Pimentel, Andre Silva

    2015-11-01

    Primaquine is a traditional antimalarial drug with low parasitic resistance and generally good acceptance at higher doses, which has been used for over 60 years in malaria treatment. However, several limitations related to its hematotoxicity have been reported. It is believed that this toxicity comes from the hydroxylation of the C-5 and C-6 positions of its 8-aminoquinoline ring before binding to the molecular target: the quinone reductase II (NQO2) human protein. In this study we propose primaquine derivatives, with substitution at position C-6 of the 8-aminoquinoline ring, planned to have better binding to NQO2, compared to primaquine, but with a reduced toxicity related to the C-5 position being possible to be oxidized. On this sense the proposed analogues were suggested in order to reduce or inhibit hydroxylation and further oxidation to hemotoxic metabolites. Five C-6 substituted primaquine analogues were selected by de novo design and further submitted to docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that all analogues bind better to NQO2 than primaquine and may become better antimalarials. However, the analogues 3 and 4 are predicted to have a better activity/toxicity balance.

  13. The somatostatin receptor family.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Greenwood, M T; Panetta, R; Demchyshyn, L; Niznik, H; Srikant, C B

    1995-01-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SST) are mediated through a family of G protein coupled receptors of which 5 members have been recently identified by molecular cloning. This review focuses on the molecular biology, pharmacology, expression, and function of these receptors with particular emphasis on the human (h) homologs. hSSTRs are encoded by a family of 5 genes which map to separate chromosomes and which, with one exception, are intronless. SSTR2 gives rise to spliced variants, SSTR2A and 2B. hSSTR1-4 display weak selectivity for SST-14 binding whereas hSSTR5 is SST-28 selective. Based on structural similarity and reactivity for octapeptide and hexapeptide SST analogs, hSSTR2,3, and 5 belong to a similar SSTR subclass. hSSTR1 and 4 react poorly with these analogs and belong to a separate subclass. All 5 hSSTRs are functionally coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via pertussis toxin sensitive GTP binding proteins. Some of the subtypes are also coupled to tyrosine phosphatase (SSTR1,2), Ca2+ channels (SSTR2), Na+/H+ exchanger (SSTR1), PLA-2 (SSTR4), and MAP kinase (SSTR4). mRNA for SSTR1-5 is widely expressed in brain and peripheral organs and displays an overlapping but characteristic pattern that is subtype-selective, and tissue- and species-specific. Pituitary and islet tumors express several SSTR genes suggesting that multiple SSTR subtypes are coexpressed in the same cell. Structure-function studies indicate that the core residues in SST-14 ligand Phe6-Phe11 dock within a ligand binding pocket located in TMDs 3-7 which is lined by hydrophobic and charged amino acid residues.

  14. Bombesin, somatostatin, and related peptides: actions on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.

    1981-11-01

    Bombesin acts within the anterior hypothalamic preoptic area to interfere with thermoregulation in the rat. The body temperature (T/sub b/) of animals receiving bombesin varies in parallel with ambient temperature (T/sub a/). Bombesin-induced reduction of T/sub b/ in animals at low T/sub a/ is associated with a marked reduction of oxygen consumption (Vo/sub 2/). Some somatostatin-related peptides, e.g., desAA/sup 1,2,4,5,12,13/ (D-Trp/sup 8/)-somatostatin (ODT8-SS), act within the brain to prevent bombesin-induced reduction of Vo/sub 2/ and T/sub b/. ODT8-SS also produces hyperthermia not associated with an increase in Vo/sub 2/.

  15. [Treatment with somatostatin of pancreatic ascites].

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Gallego, P; Cobo, J; Medraño, J C; Molina, F

    1992-04-01

    Pancreatic ascites is an entity defined as amylase levels up to 1.000 U/l in ascitic liquid. Frequently, it is secondary to a rupture of pancreatic ductus or pseudocyst and foreward communication to peritoneal space. We present a male diagnosed of calcified alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic ascites secondary to a pseudocyst. Combination of parenteral nutrition and sintetic cyclic somatostatin was efficient. It would act by reducing pancreatic secretion in a long-term manner, which is the final purpose of the treatment. This association would be considered as a former tool in ascitic pancreatic patients, evacuatory punction or delayed surgery been relegated to a conservatory treatment failure or when primary pathology indicate it.

  16. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABA(A) receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam C; Griffith, Theanne N; Tsikolia, Maia; Kotey, Francesca O; Gill, Nikhila; Humbert, Danielle J; Watt, Erin E; Yermolina, Yuliya A; Goel, Shikha; El-Ghendy, Bahaa; Hall, C Dennis

    2011-09-30

    GABA(A) receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanols were investigated on recombinant human γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A), α(1)β(2)γ(2s)) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and compared to the modulatory effects on GABA currents observed with exposures to the intravenous anaesthetic agent, propofol. Submaximal EC(20) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 μM cyclohexanols. For instance, at 30 μM 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol (a novel compound) GABA responses were increased ~3-fold (although similar enhancements were achieved at 3 μM propofol). As regards rank order for modulation by the cyclohexanol analogues at 30 μM, the % enhancements for 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol~2,6-di-sec-butylcyclohexanol ≫2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexanol~4-tert-butylcyclohexanol>cyclohexanol~cyclopentanol~2-methylcyclohexanol. We further tested the potencies of the cyclohexanol analogues as general anaesthetics using a tadpole in vivo assay. Both 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol and 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol were effective as anaesthetics with EC(50)s of 14.0 μM and 13.1 μM respectively, while other cyclohexanols with bulkier side chains were less potent. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyclohexanols are both positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors currents and anaesthetics. The positioning and size of the alkyl groups at the 2 and 6 positions on the cyclohexanol ring were critical determinants of activity.

  17. Somatostatin inhibits cANP-mediated cholinergic transmission in the myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which somatostatin acts to modulate cholinergic transmission is not clear. In this study the authors investigated the role of the adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in mediating cholinergic transmission in the guinea pig myenteric plexus and examined the ability of somatostatin to alter acetylcholine (ACh) release stimulated by various cAMP agonists. Forskolin, 8-bromo-cAMP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and cholera toxin each stimulated the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh in a dose-related manner. Addition of theophylline enhanced the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh stimulated by these cAMP agonists. The observations suggest that cAMP may serve as a physiological mediator for ACh release from myenteric neurons. Somatostatin inhibited release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by various cAMP agonists in a dose-related manner. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin antagonized the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by forskolin, VIP, or cholera toxin but had no effect on the inhibitory action of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by 8-bromo-cAMP. This suggests that the principal mechanism by which somatostatin inhibits cAMP-mediated cholinergic transmission is via activation of the inhibitory regulatory protein (N{sub i} subunit) of adenyalte cyclase.

  18. Effect of somatostatin and octreotide acetate on OP-CCK-stimulated exocrine secretion in the denervated canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Garvin, P J; Burton, F R; Reese, J C; Dysarz, F A; Lingle, D; Niehoff, M L; Pandya, P K; Presti, M E

    1996-10-01

    Somatostatin and its analogue, octreotide acetate (Sandostatin), have been demonstrated to suppress exocrine secretion in a denervated canine pancreatic autograft model. To help define this inhibitory mechanism, the effect of these agents on cholecystokinin (CCK)-stimulated acinar cell secretion was evaluated. In vitro assessment evaluated the effect of somatostatin on octapeptide (OP)-CCK-stimulated amylase release of pancreatic tissue slices. In vivo assessment employed animals with pancreatic autografts and pancreaticocystostomies, evaluating the effect of a bolus intravenous injection of 100 micrograms of octreotide acetate on the basal and OP-CCK-stimulated (125 ng/kg/h) secretion of urinary (autograft) amylase and bicarbonate. Incubation of tissue slices with 0.16, 0.24, or 0.32 microgram/ml somatostatin had no significant effect on in vitro OP-CCK-simulated amylase release. Intravenous octreotide acetate resulted in a significant decrease in the basal rate of amylase secretion but had no significant effect on OP-CCK-stimulated autograft amylase or bicarbonate release. These studies demonstrate that octreotide acetate has an in vivo inhibitory effect on basal amylase release of pancreatic autografts but cannot counteract maximal stimulation with exogenous OP-CCK. Also, somatostatin does not inhibit OP-CCK-stimulated acinar cell secretion of pancreatic tissue slices. These results indicate that the exocrine inhibition produced by somatostatin analogues in the grafted pancreas occurs via an indirect mechanism.

  19. Somatostatin and cancer: applying endocrinology to oncology.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Adda

    2004-08-01

    Somatostatin is a peptide hormone that normally suppresses growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), insulin and gut hormone release, as well as affecting multiple aspects of gastrointestinal function. It achieves these pleiotropic effects by binding somatostatin receptors (SSTR), a family of five G-protein coupled membrane receptors. Somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide, lanreotide and vapreotide, are well-established treatments for tumors that over secrete these hormones. Recently, use of somatostatin analogs for treating nonendocrine malignancies are being explored. Hu et al. found progressive reduction in SSTR3 expression when comparing normal gastric mucosa versus well differentiated versus poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinomas; octreotide inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in vitro of those cells expressing SSTR3. Potential mechanisms by which somatostatin analogs may be useful in oncology include its endocrine actions, autocrine/paracrine effects, SSTR-mediated cell signaling and SSTR-mediated cell labeling.

  20. In vivo application of ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide for detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Setyono-Han, B.; de Jong, M.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Bruns, C.; van Hagen, P.M.; Marbach, P.; Visser, T.J.; Pless, J.; Lamberts, S.W.J. Sandoz Research Inst., Berne Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, Rotterdam Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    In this study the authors investigated its in vivo application in the visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats. The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical was investigated after intravenous injection in normal rats and in rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic carcinoma CA 20948. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies showed that specific accumulation of radioactivity occurred in somatostatin receptor-containing tissue (anterior pituitary gland). However, in contrast to the adrenals and pituitary, the tracer accumulation in the kidneys was not mediated by somatostatin receptors. Increasing radioactivity over the somatostatin receptor-positive tumors was measured rapidly after injection and the tumors were clearly visualized by gamma camera scintigraphy. In rats pretreated with 1 mg octreotide accumulation of ({sup 111}In-DPTA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide in the tumors was prevented. Because of its relatively long effective half-life, ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a radionuclide-coupled somatostatin analogue which can be used to visualize somatostatin receptor-bearing tumors efficiently after 24 hr, when interfering background radioactivity is minimized by renal clearance.

  1. Somatostatin binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, B.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E. )

    1990-11-01

    A method has been developed for the study of somatostatin (SS) binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex. Binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS to cells obtained by mechanical dissociation of rat cerebral cortex was dependent on time and temperature, saturable, reversible and highly specific. Under conditions of equilibrium, i.e., 60 min at 25 degrees C, native SS inhibited tracer binding in a dose-dependent manner. The Scatchard analysis of binding data was linear and yielded a dissociation constant of 0.60 +/- 0.08 nM with a maximal binding capacity of 160 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein. The binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS was specific as shown in experiments on tracer displacement by the native peptides, SS analogues, and unrelated peptides.

  2. Italian Society of Endocrinology Career Award Lecture: from somatostatin to…somatomedin.

    PubMed

    Ferone, D

    2012-10-01

    Somatostatin plays different parts in hormonal regulation through 5 specific receptors in human body. It has two interesting actions such as an antisecretory activity, mostly on the gastrointestinal system and pituitary level, and an antiproliferative action on tumor cells. Many synthetic somatostatin analogues, more stable than the natural one, have been developed and two are already used in different clinical settings, including endocrine oncology. The inhibitory action on tumor growth may result from both indirect actions, namely the suppression of growth factors and growth-promoting hormones (e.g., GH/IGF-I axis) and inhibition of angiogenesis, as well as modulation of the immune system, and direct actions, such as activation of anti-growth activities (e.g., apoptosis). Recently, the development of specific polyclonal antibodies allowed the precise identification of the 5 specific somatostatin receptors and their localization in different cell species. Somatostatin receptor subtypes belong to the G protein-coupled receptor family, share a common molecular topology, and can traffic not only in vitro within different cell types but also in vivo. A picture of the pathways and proteins involved in these processes is beginning to emerge. Moreover, the process of homo- and/or heterodimerization of G-protein coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinase families are crucial for implicating the fundamental properties of receptor proteins including receptor expression, trafficking, and desensitization, as well as signal transduction. Furthermore, functional consequences of such an interaction in modulation of signaling pathways linked to pathological conditions specifically in cancer are discussed.

  3. Somatostatin Receptor Based Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) belong to the typical 7-transmembrane domain family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Five distinct subtypes (termed SSTR1-5) have been identified, with SSTR2 showing the highest affinity for natural SST and synthetic SST analogs. Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have high expression levels of SSTRs, which opens the possibility for tumor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled SST analogs. A number of tracers have been developed for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of NETs with impressive results, which facilitates the applications of human SSTR subtype 2 (hSSTr2) reporter gene based imaging and therapy in SSTR negative or weakly positive tumors to provide a novel approach for the management of tumors. The hSSTr2 gene can act as not only a reporter gene for in vivo imaging, but also a therapeutic gene for local radionuclide therapy. Even a second therapeutic gene can be transfected into the same tumor cells together with hSSTr2 reporter gene to obtain a synergistic therapeutic effect. However, additional preclinical and especially translational and clinical researches are needed to confirm the value of hSSTr2 reporter gene based imaging and therapy in tumors. PMID:25879040

  4. Somatostatin analog treatment of acromegaly: new aspects.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, S W; del Pozo, E

    1988-01-01

    Ten acromegalics received daily doses of 200-300 micrograms of a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (Sandostatin, SMS), for an average of 64 weeks. Basal mean GH values of 44 +/- (SE) 7.8 ng/ml had fallen into the normal range at the end of the observation period (mean 64 weeks). This effect was accompanied by a substantial drop in somatomedin-C values. Reduction of pituitary tumor size could be documented in 3 of 6 patients. Whereas SMS did not affect high plasma PRL in 4 microprolactinoma patients, lactotrophs turned sensitive to this agent in mixed GH/PRL tumors. In a comparative study between SMS and bromocriptine, the former normalized circulating GH in 10 of 17 acromegalics in an acute trial, whereas bromocriptine was effective in only 5. A combination of both substances was effective in 2 of 3 patients who were insensitive to single drug administration. Cultures of GH-secreting tumor cells showed a statistically significant hormone decrease in the medium when exposed to SMS. However, in some instances, a diminution of the GH contents of the tumor cells was also observed, presumably as the basis for intracellular breakdown and clinical tumor shrinkage.

  5. Somatostatin-14 mainly binds the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 in human neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Prevost, G; Veber, N; Viollet, C; Roubert, V; Roubert, P; Benard, J; Eden, P

    1996-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer for which a cure is elusive for most children with disseminated disease. Neuroblastomas possess receptors for somatostatin (SS). Some SS analogues can inhibit their proliferation. In addition, when SS analogues were used as agents for scintigraphy, neuroblastoma tumor sites can be localized with high efficiency. In this study, to better characterize the SS receptor subtype(s) (sst1-5) present in primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma, we show that: (1) The ligand 125I-Tyr11-SS-14 binding on membrane proteins from primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma cell line IGR-N-91 developed in nude mice shows similar values of Kd (in order of 0.1 nM) and Bmax (in order of fmol/mg) by filter-retention assay. These data are close to those measured on two other neuroblastoma cell lines: SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or to that measured on the rat cerebral cortex. (2) The IGR-N-91 sublines derived from primary tumor and metastases show one major complex of 57 kD by the chemical cross-linking assay using the ligands: 125I-SS-14 and 125I-BIM23014. One similar major complex of 57 kD was also detected in SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or in the cerebral cortex. (3) Addition of excess nonlabeled peptides selective for sst2 (BIM23014, BIM23060, BIM23068) suppressed the formation of the complex 57 kD whereas addition of BIM23052 or BIM23056 (sst5 and sst3 selective respectively) does not. This pharmacological profile corresponds to sst2. (4) Only RNA message of sst2 gene is detected in IGR-N-91 cells and its metastases derived sublines by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization in keeping with the presence of sst2. (5) In human biopsies, the complex of 57 kD corresponding to sst2 is consistently detected in three samples of the histological subset of the disease: benign ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma and immature neuroblastoma. Therefore, the sst2 should be considered as the primary target to develop more potent

  6. Somatostatin-14 mainly binds the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 in human neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Prevost, G; Veber, N; Viollet, C; Roubert, V; Roubert, P; Benard, J; Eden, P

    1996-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer for which a cure is elusive for most children with disseminated disease. Neuroblastomas possess receptors for somatostatin (SS). Some SS analogues can inhibit their proliferation. In addition, when SS analogues were used as agents for scintigraphy, neuroblastoma tumor sites can be localized with high efficiency. In this study, to better characterize the SS receptor subtype(s) (sst1-5) present in primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma, we show that: (1) The ligand 125I-Tyr11-SS-14 binding on membrane proteins from primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma cell line IGR-N-91 developed in nude mice shows similar values of Kd (in order of 0.1 nM) and Bmax (in order of fmol/mg) by filter-retention assay. These data are close to those measured on two other neuroblastoma cell lines: SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or to that measured on the rat cerebral cortex. (2) The IGR-N-91 sublines derived from primary tumor and metastases show one major complex of 57 kD by the chemical cross-linking assay using the ligands: 125I-SS-14 and 125I-BIM23014. One similar major complex of 57 kD was also detected in SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or in the cerebral cortex. (3) Addition of excess nonlabeled peptides selective for sst2 (BIM23014, BIM23060, BIM23068) suppressed the formation of the complex 57 kD whereas addition of BIM23052 or BIM23056 (sst5 and sst3 selective respectively) does not. This pharmacological profile corresponds to sst2. (4) Only RNA message of sst2 gene is detected in IGR-N-91 cells and its metastases derived sublines by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization in keeping with the presence of sst2. (5) In human biopsies, the complex of 57 kD corresponding to sst2 is consistently detected in three samples of the histological subset of the disease: benign ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma and immature neuroblastoma. Therefore, the sst2 should be considered as the primary target to develop more potent

  7. PF-05231023, a long-acting FGF21 analogue, decreases body weight by reduction of food intake in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W Clayton; Zhou, Yingjiang; Talukdar, Saswata; Musante, Cynthia J

    2016-08-01

    PF-05231023, a long-acting FGF21 analogue, is a promising potential pharmacotherapy for the treatment of obesity and associated comorbidities. Previous studies have shown the potential of FGF21 and FGF21-like compounds to decrease body weight in mice, non-human primates, and humans; the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. In particular, there have been conflicting reports on the degree to which FGF21-induced weight loss in non-human primates is attributable to a decrease in food intake versus an increase in energy expenditure. Here, we present a semi-mechanistic mathematical model of energy balance and body composition developed from similar work in mice. This model links PF-05231023 administration and washout to changes in food intake, which in turn drives changes in body weight. The model is calibrated to and compared with recently published data from cynomolgus macaques treated with PF-05231023, demonstrating its accuracy in describing pharmacotherapy-induced weight loss in these animals. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PF-05231023 decreases body weight in cynomolgus macaques solely by a reduction in food intake, with no direct effect on energy expenditure. PMID:27405817

  8. Differential effects of somatostatin and angiopeptin on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, Forbes; Lauder, Heather; Feniuk, Wasyl; Fan, Tai-Ping D; Humphrey, Patrick P A

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) exerts antiproliferative effects, and angiopeptin (an sst2/sst5 receptor-selective analogue) has recently been evaluated in clinical trials for the prophylaxis of restenosis following coronary angioplasty. Using an in vitro model of cell growth we have examined the effects of SRIF and angiopeptin on cell proliferation in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the human or rat recombinant sst2 or sst5 receptor and compared these with their effects on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) expressing endogenous somatostatin receptors.In CHO-K1 cells, expressing either human or rat recombinant sst2 or sst5 receptors, or in rat aortic VSMC, SRIF and angiopeptin (0.1–1000 nM) had no effect on basal re-growth of cells into a denuded area of a previously confluent monolayer. In contrast, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, 10 ng ml−1) stimulated re-growth of these cells.SRIF (0.1–1000 nM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of the bFGF-stimulated re-growth in CHO-K1 cells expressing human sst2 (h sst2) or sst5 (h sst5) receptors (pIC50=8.05±0.03 and 8.56±0.12, respectively). In contrast, angiopeptin (0.1–1000 nM) acted as a partial agonist at the h sst2 receptor (44.6±2.7% inhibition of the bFGF-stimulated re-growth at 100 nM; pIC50=8.69±0.25) but was devoid of any agonist activity at the h sst5 receptor.In CHO-K1 cells stably expressing rat recombinant sst2 (r sst2) or sst5 (r sst5) receptors, SRIF (0.1–1000 nM) was able to inhibit the bFGF-stimulated re-growth (pIC50=7.98±24 and 8.50±0.12, respectively). Angiopeptin (0.1–1000 nM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of bFGF-stimulated re-growth at the r sst2 receptor (pIC50=8.08±0.24) but acted as a partial agonist at the r sst5 receptor (maximum response=57.7±3.6% inhibition of bFGF-stimulated re-growth at 100 nM; pIC50=8.60±0.16).Although angiopeptin was inactive as an agonist at the h sst5 receptor, 100

  9. Iodine-131 MIBG uptake in metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. A patient treated with somatostatin

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, C.A.; Basso, L.V.

    1988-04-01

    A 47-year-old man with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2a syndrome in whom metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) concentrated in lesions from metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is reported. A somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin SMS 201-995) alleviated the symptoms of flushing and diarrhea associated with the elevated calcitonin levels but it did not alter either the course of the disease or the MIBG images. A review of the literature is presented of the noncatecholamine secreting tumors associated with MIBG uptake. Similarities between this case and metastatic carcinoid syndrome are discussed. 27 references.

  10. Somatostatin receptor subtypes in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines and tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Jonas, S; John, M; Boese-Landgraf, J; Häring, R; Prevost, G; Thomas, F; Rosewicz, S; Riecken, E O; Wiedenmann, B; Neuhaus, P

    1995-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is positive in approximately 80% of all patients who have been found to have neuroendocrine (NE) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumors. The reasons for negative results are unclear. The aim of the present study was identification of the specific somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes that are responsible for the in vivo binding of the widely used somatostatin (SST) analogues octreotide and lanreotide in human neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors. Ten patients were subjected to SRS with radiolabeled octreotide. Following surgical resection, tumor tissues were analyzed for SSTR subtype mRNA expression by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, SSTR subtype transcripts were investigated by Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines. Expression of SSTR at the protein level was studied by chemical cross-linking experiments. Three patients were negative by SRS. However, RT-PCR revealed most prominently SSTR 2 expression in all tumor specimens. In addition, all tumor tissues analyzed by chemical crosslinking exhibited SST-14 binding sites, indicating that at least some NE tumors were false-negative on SRS.

  11. Somatostatin receptors on human lymphocytes and leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hiruma, K; Koike, T; Nakamura, H; Sumida, T; Maeda, T; Tomioka, H; Yoshida, S; Fujita, T

    1990-01-01

    Receptors for somatostatin were identified on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and human leukaemic cells in 87.5% of lymphoblastic leukaemia and in 12.5% of non-lymphocytic leukaemia, using a somatostatin radiobinding assay. The specific binding of 125I-somatostatin of these cells increased linearly with the cell numbers and was suppressed by non-iodinated somatostatin. We investigated the distribution of fluorescent somatostatin to mitogen-activated PBL by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Over 95% of the cell populations bound fluorescent somatostatin and no distinct predilection was found among certain lymphocyte subpopulations and somatostatin receptor-positive cells. Scatchard analysis showed a single class (low affinity) of binding site on mitogen-activated PBL and two classes (high and low affinity) of specific binding sites on lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. PMID:2177723

  12. Somatostatin, somatostatin analogs and somatostatin receptor dynamics in the biology of cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Ruscica, M; Arvigo, M; Steffani, L; Ferone, D; Magni, P

    2013-05-01

    The pharmacological effects (i.e., inhibition of endocrine secretion and cell proliferation) mediated by the hormone somatostatin (SRIF) are derived from its universal high-affinity binding to five different G proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs), named sst1-5. However, SRIF has a half-life of less than 3 min, whereas the available mono- and bi-specific SRIF preferential analogs show prolonged half-life and increased potency. These compounds may control tumor development, cell proliferation and metastatization by direct actions, including cell division arrest in G0/G1 phase (i.e., induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1) or p21(Cip1)), induction of apoptosis (i.e., induction of p53 and Bax) and suppression of cell invasion. Along with these direct actions on the biology of cancer progression, in vivo SRIF analogs may also regulate tumor growth through indirect actions, by suppressing the secretion of growth-promoting hormones and growth factors and angiogenesis. Interestingly, when ssts are co-expressed, they may interact forming homo- or heterodimers, also with other GPCRs such as type 2 dopamine receptor and the μ-opioid receptor 1, altering their original pharmacological and functional properties. Dimers can be not only constitutive, but perhaps also ligandpromoted: hence, compounds with high affinity for different ssts isoforms may be used to achieve effects elicited by specific dimers. Future developments in the knowledge of ssts dynamics upon SRIF and SRIF analogs binding in neoplastic tissues may allow the full elucidation of the pathophysiological role of this system and the exploitation of the therapeutic potential of its modulation.

  13. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Marshak, D; Basinger, S; Walsh, J; Morley, J; Stell, W

    1980-01-01

    A substance with somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) was found in extracts of goldfish, frog, and cow retina. Dilutions of retinal SLI parallel the standard curve for radioimmunoassay obtained with synthetic somatostatin. Chromatography of goldfish retinal extract on Sephadex G-50 revealed two peaks of SLI, one that coeluted with synthetic somatostatin and one that eluted as a larger molecule. Incubation in 8 M urea did not alter the chromatographic pattern of the extract. SLI was present in extracts of frog optic nerve and tectum in concentrations higher than those found in the retina. In goldfish retina, SLI was localized by immunofluorescence to four types of processes in the inner plexiform layer; their origins could be traced to three classes of SLI-containing cell bodies in the proximal row of the inner nuclear layer and one class in the ganglion cell layer. Localization of SLI to cells of the retina and characterizations of the molecular forms of retinal SLI suggest that the retina is a promising model system for studies on the potential neurotransmitter function of somatostatin. Images PMID:6103539

  14. Elevated circulating somatostatin levels in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Arosio, M; Porretti, S; Epaminonda, P; Giavoli, C; Gebbia, C; Penati, C; Beck-Peccoz, P; Peracchi, M

    2003-06-01

    GH increases hypothalamic somatostatin (SS) synthesis and secretion but it is unknown if chronic GH excess, as found in acromegaly, may influence circulating SS levels, that are mainly of enteropancreatic source and affect several gastrointestinal functions, including motility. Circulating SS occurs in several post-translational forms including somatostatin-14 (SS-14), somatostatin-28 (SS-28) and other small peptides. The aim of the present study was to characterize the fasting and postprandial pattern of plasma circulating somatostatin in normal subjects and patients with acromegaly. Fasting total SS and SS-28 levels were measured in 32 subjects, 16 acromegalic patients with a new diagnosis (A) (8 F, 8 M, median age 48) and 16 matched healthy volunteers (C) (8 F, 8 M, median age 45). SS was also determined after a standard solid-liquid meal (550 kCal) in 24 of the subjects (12 C and 12 A). Fasting SS and SS-28 were significantly higher in acromegalic patients as compared to healthy subjects. In the former, a positive correlation was found between IGF-I and SS levels (r = 0.525 p < 0.05). Furthermore, the ratio between SS (as pmol equivalent SS-14/I) and SS-28 was higher in the acromegalic patients than in the controls (3.4 +/- 2.1 vs 2.0 +/- 1.6, p < 0.05). The postprandial SS peak, as well as the incremental area above baseline values, was similar in the patients and controls. In conclusion, fasting but not postprandial hypersomatostatinemia, mainly due to an increase in SS-14, characterizes acromegaly. Excess GH/IGF-I could be a causal factor in somatostatin hypersecretion. Conceivably this abnormality might play a role in some alterations of gastrointestinal function of acromegalic patients such as prolonged bowel transit.

  15. Somatostatin receptor 2 knockout/lacZ knockin mice show impaired motor coordination and reveal sites of somatostatin action within the striatum.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeremy P; Hathway, Gareth J; Clarke, Neil J; Jowett, Mike I; Topps, Stephanie; Kendrick, Keith M; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Emson, Piers C

    2003-05-01

    The peptide somatostatin can modulate the functional output of the basal ganglia. The exact sites and mechanisms of this action, however, are poorly understood, and the physiological context in which somatostatin acts is unknown. Somatostatin acts as a neuromodulator via a family of five 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, SSTR1-5, one of which, SSTR2, is known to be functional in the striatum. We have investigated the role of SSTR2 in basal ganglia function using mice in which Sstr2 has been inactivated and replaced by the lacZ reporter gene. Analysis of Sstr2lacZ expression in the brain by beta-galactosidase histochemistry demonstrated a widespread pattern of expression. By comparison to previously published in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical data, Sstr2lacZ expression was shown to accurately recapitulate that of Sstr2 and thus provided a highly sensitive model to investigate cell-type-specific expression of Sstr2. In the striatum, Sstr2 expression was identified in medium spiny projection neurons restricted to the matrix compartment and in cholinergic interneurons. Sstr2 expression was not detected in any other nuclei of the basal ganglia except for a sparse number of nondopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Microdialysis in the striatum showed Sstr2-null mice were selectively refractory to somatostatin-induced dopamine and glutamate release. In behavioural tests, Sstr2-null mice showed normal levels of locomotor activity and normal coordination in undemanding tasks. However, in beam-walking, a test of fine motor control, Sstr2-null mice were severely impaired. Together these data implicate an important neuromodulatory role for SSTR2 in the striatum. PMID:12752788

  16. Somatostatin receptors in the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The multiple actions of somatostatin are mediated by specific membrane-bound receptors present in all somatostatin target tissues, such as brain, pituitary, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract. Three different types of tissues in the human gastrointestinal tract express somatostatin receptors: (1) the gastrointestinal mucosa, (2) the peripheral nervous system, and (3) the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, where the receptors are preferentially located in germinal centers. In all these cases, somatostatin binding is of high affinity and specific for bioactive somatostatin analogs. Somatostatin receptors are also expressed in pathological states, particularly in neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Ninety percent of the carcinoids and a majority of islet-cell carcinomas, including their metastases, usually have a high density of somatostatin receptors. Only 10 percent of the colorectal carcinomas and none of the exocrine pancreatic carcinomas, however, contain somatostatin receptors. The somatostatin receptors in tumors are identified with in vitro binding methods or with in vivo imaging techniques; the latter allow the precise localization of the tumors and their metastases in the patients. Since somatostatin receptors in gastroenteropancreatic tumors are functional, their identification can be used to assess the therapeutic efficacy of octreotide to inhibit excessive hormone release in the patients. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1340064

  17. The effect of albumin fusion structure on the production and bioactivity of the somatostatin-28 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuedi; Fan, Jun; Li, Wenxin; Peng, Ying; Yang, Runlin; Deng, Lili; Fu, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Somatostatin, a natural inhibitor of growth hormone (GH), and its analogs have been used in clinical settings for the treatment of acromegaly, gigantism, thyrotropinoma, and other carcinoid syndromes. However, natural somatostatin is limited for clinical usage because of its short half-life in vivo. Albumin fusion technology was used to construct long-acting fusion proteins and Pichia pastoris was used as an expression system. Three fusion proteins (SS28)(2)-HSA, (SS28)(3)-HSA, and HSA-(SS28)(2), were constructed with different fusion copies of somatostatin-28 and fusion orientations. The expression level of (SS28)(3)-HSA was much lower than (SS28)(2)-HSA and HSA-(SS28)(2) due to the additional fusion of the somatostatin-28 molecule. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed that severe degradation occurred in the fermentation process. Similar to the standard, somatostatin-14, all three fusion proteins were able to inhibit GH secretion in blood, with (SS28)(2)-HSA being the most effective one. A pharmacokinetics study showed that (SS28)(2)-HSA had a prolonged half-life of 2 h. These results showed that increasing the number of small protein copies fused to HSA may not be a suitable method for improving protein bioactivity.

  18. The effect of albumin fusion structure on the production and bioactivity of the somatostatin-28 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuedi; Fan, Jun; Li, Wenxin; Peng, Ying; Yang, Runlin; Deng, Lili; Fu, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Somatostatin, a natural inhibitor of growth hormone (GH), and its analogs have been used in clinical settings for the treatment of acromegaly, gigantism, thyrotropinoma, and other carcinoid syndromes. However, natural somatostatin is limited for clinical usage because of its short half-life in vivo. Albumin fusion technology was used to construct long-acting fusion proteins and Pichia pastoris was used as an expression system. Three fusion proteins (SS28)(2)-HSA, (SS28)(3)-HSA, and HSA-(SS28)(2), were constructed with different fusion copies of somatostatin-28 and fusion orientations. The expression level of (SS28)(3)-HSA was much lower than (SS28)(2)-HSA and HSA-(SS28)(2) due to the additional fusion of the somatostatin-28 molecule. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed that severe degradation occurred in the fermentation process. Similar to the standard, somatostatin-14, all three fusion proteins were able to inhibit GH secretion in blood, with (SS28)(2)-HSA being the most effective one. A pharmacokinetics study showed that (SS28)(2)-HSA had a prolonged half-life of 2 h. These results showed that increasing the number of small protein copies fused to HSA may not be a suitable method for improving protein bioactivity. PMID:24752560

  19. Novel sst(4)-selective somatostatin (SRIF) agonists. 4. Three-dimensional consensus structure by NMR.

    PubMed

    Grace, Christy Rani R; Koerber, Steven C; Erchegyi, Judit; Reubi, Jean Claude; Rivier, Jean; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-18

    The three-dimensional NMR structures of eight cyclic octapeptide analogues of somatostatin (SRIF) are described. These analogues, with the basic sequence H-c[Cys(3)-Phe(6)-Xxx(7)-Yyy(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Zzz(11)-Cys(14)]-OH (the numbering refers to the position in native SRIF), with Xxx(7) being Phe/Ala/Tyr, Yyy(8) being Trp/DTrp/D-threo-beta-Me2Nal/L-threo-beta-Me2Nal, and Zzz(11) being Phe/Ala, exhibit potent and highly selective binding to human SRIF type 4 (sst(4)) receptors. The conformations reveal that the backbones of these analogues do not have the usual type-II' beta-turn reported in the literature for sst(2)-subtype-selective analogues. Instead, the structures contain a unique arrangement of side chains of Yyy(8), Lys(9), and Phe(6) or Phe(11). The conformational preferences and results from biological analyses of these analogues (parts 1-3 of this series, Rivier et al., Erchegyi et al., and Erchegyi et al., J. Med. Chem. 2003, preceding papers in this issue) allow a detailed study of the structure-activity relationship of SRIF. The proposed consensus structural motif at the binding pocket for the sst(4)-selective analogues requires a unique set of distances between an indole/2-naphthyl ring, a lysine side chain, and another aromatic ring. This motif is necessary and sufficient to explain the binding affinities of all of the analogues studied and is distinct from the existing model suggested for sst(2)/sst(5) selectivity. PMID:14667215

  20. Pituitary: Secretory Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much prolactin, the hormone that causes milk production. Prolactinomas affect both men and women. While excess ... acting somatostatin analogue, a drug that suppresses GH production. Somatostatin analogues are given by a monthly injection ...

  1. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  2. Conformational Properties of Seven Toac-Labeled Angiotensin I Analogues Correlate with Their Muscle Contraction Activity and Their Ability to Act as ACE Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Luis Gustavo D.; Malavolta, Luciana; Bersanetti, Patrícia A.; Schreier, Shirley; Carmona, Adriana K.; Nakaie, Clovis R.

    2015-01-01

    Conformational properties of the angiotensin II precursor, angiotensin I (AngI) and analogues containing the paramagnetic amino acid TOAC (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid) at positions 0, 1, 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10, were examined by EPR, CD, and fluorescence. The conformational data were correlated to their activity in muscle contraction experiments and to their properties as substrates of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). Biological activity studies indicated that TOAC0-AngI and TOAC1-AngI maintained partial potency in guinea pig ileum and rat uterus. Kinetic parameters revealed that only derivatives labeled closer to the N-terminus (positions 0, 1, 3, and 5) were hydrolyzed by ACE, indicating that peptides bearing the TOAC moiety far from the ACE cleavage site (Phe8-His9 peptide bond) were susceptible to hydrolysis, albeit less effectively than the parent compound. CD spectra indicated that AngI exhibited a flexible structure resulting from equilibrium between different conformers. While the conformation of N-terminally-labeled derivatives was similar to that of the native peptide, a greater propensity to acquire folded structures was observed for internally-labeled, as well as C-terminally labeled, analogues. These structures were stabilized in secondary structure-inducing agent, TFE. Different analogues gave rise to different β-turns. EPR spectra in aqueous solution also distinguished between N-terminally, internally-, and C-terminally labeled peptides, yielding narrower lines, indicative of greater mobility for the former. Interestingly, the spectra of peptides labeled at, or close, to the C-terminus, showed that the motion in this part of the peptides was intermediate between that of N-terminally and internally-labeled peptides, in agreement with the suggestion of turn formation provided by the CD spectra. Quenching of the Tyr4 fluorescence by the differently positioned TOAC residues corroborated the data obtained by the

  3. Pharmacology and anti-addiction effects of the novel κ opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Sal B, a potent and long-acting analogue of salvinorin A

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, B; Morani, A S; Ewald, A W M; Walker, L; Kumar, N; Simpson, D; Miller, J H; Prisinzano, T E; Kivell, B M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Acute activation of κ opioid (KOP) receptors results in anticocaine-like effects, but adverse effects, such as dysphoria, aversion, sedation and depression, limit their clinical development. Salvinorin A, isolated from the plant Salvia divinorum, and its semi-synthetic analogues have been shown to have potent KOP receptor agonist activity and may induce a unique response with similar anticocaine addiction effects as the classic KOP receptor agonists, but with a different side effect profile. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the duration of effects of Mesyl Sal B in vivo utilizing antinociception assays and screened for cocaine-prime induced cocaine-seeking behaviour in self-administering rats to predict anti-addiction effects. Cellular transporter uptake assays and in vitro voltammetry were used to assess modulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) function and to investigate transporter trafficking and kinase signalling pathways modulated by KOP receptor agonists. KEY RESULTS Mesyl Sal B had a longer duration of action than SalA, had anti-addiction properties and increased DAT function in vitro in a KOP receptor-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. These effects on DAT function required ERK1/2 activation. We identified differences between Mesyl Sal B and SalA, with Mesyl Sal B increasing the Vmax of dopamine uptake without altering cell-surface expression of DAT. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS SalA analogues, such as Mesyl Sal B, have potential for development as anticocaine agents. Further tests are warranted to elucidate the mechanisms by which the novel salvinorin-based neoclerodane diterpene KOP receptor ligands produce both anti-addiction and adverse side effects. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641310

  4. Biosynthesis of somatostatin in canine fundic D cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, T; Park, J; Yamada, T

    1988-01-01

    The observation that virtually all of the somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the stomach consists of somatostatin-14 (S14), to the exclusion of somatostatin-28 (S28), suggests a unique pattern of prosomatostatin posttranslational processing. In order to examine the mechanisms by which S14 is produced from its precursor in the stomach, we investigated the biosynthesis of somatostatin in isolated canine fundic D cells. D cells pulse-labeled with [35S]cysteine revealed a cycloheximide inhibitable time-dependent incorporation of radioactivity into S14. A small fraction of radioactivity was incorporated into S28 but not into larger precursors. However, when the cells were incubated with monensin (1 microM), incorporation of radioactivity into a presumed somatostatin precursor was noted. Upon transfer of [35S]cysteine prelabeled cells to radioactivity-free medium, no conversion of S28 to S14 could be detected and the decrease of labeled S14 in cells correlated with a complimentary increase in the culture medium. Exogenous somatostatin inhibited somatostatin biosynthesis in a fashion that could be blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Stimulation of prelabeled D cells with tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (10(-7) M) or forskolin (10(-4) M) for 2 h resulted in release of 41 and 33% of the newly synthesized radioactive S14, respectively, while only 9 and 6% of the total cell content of radioimmunoassayable somatostatin was secreted. These data suggest that: (a) somatostatin is synthesized in fundic D cells primarily as S14, (b) S14 is produced by rapid processing of a larger precursor but there is little, if any, conversion of S28 to S14, (c) somatostatin biosynthesis is autoregulated, and (d) newly synthesized S14 is preferentially released from D cells in response to stimulation. PMID:2892859

  5. Peptide receptor targeting in cancer: the somatostatin paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1-5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed.

  6. Peptide Receptor Targeting in Cancer: The Somatostatin Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1–5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed. PMID:23476673

  7. [Somatostatin does not modify 3-oxymethylglucose and leucine uptake by rat enterocytes].

    PubMed

    Crespo, C A; Martínez-Sapiña, J; Taboada, M C

    1988-09-01

    The effects of somatostatin on 3-oxymethylglucose (3-OMG) and leucine uptake by rat enterocytes were examined. Somatostatin did not decrease the 3-OMG enterocyte uptake. When the 3-OMG active transport was inhibited by phloridzin, Somatostatin presented no significant modifications. Somatostatin showed a slight decrease in 3-OMG release through the basolateral membrane, when such a release was inhibited with theophylline. Somatostatin did not modify the intestinal leucine uptake or its inhibition by methionine.

  8. Somatostatin modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in canine antral muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Koelbel, C.B.; van Deventer, G.; Khawaja, S.; Mogard, M.; Walsh, J.H.; Mayer, E.A. UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA )

    1988-02-01

    Somatostatin has been shown to inhibit antral motility in vivo. To examine the effect of somatostatin on cholinergic neurotransmission in the canine antrum, we studied the mechanical response of and the release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine from canine longitudinal antral muscle in response to substance P, gastrin 17, and electrical stimulation. In unstimulated tissues, somatostatin had a positive inotropic effect on spontaneous phasic contractions. In tissues stimulated with substance P and gastrin 17, but not with electrical stimulation, somatostatin inhibited the phasic inotropic response dose dependently. This inhibitory effect was abolished by indomethacin. Somatostatin stimulated the release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} radioimmunoreactivity, and prostaglandin E{sub 2} inhibited the release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. Somatostatin increased the release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine from unstimulated tissues by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive mechanism but inhibited the release induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. These results suggest that somatostatin has a dual modulatory effect on cholinergic neutrotransmission in canine longitudinal antral muscle. This effect is excitatory in unstimulated tissues and inhibitory in stimulated tissues. The inhibitory effect is partially mediated by prostaglandins.

  9. Biosynthesis and processing of the somatostatin family of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P C; Dixon, J E

    1986-01-01

    Understanding of the biosynthesis of the somatostatin family of peptide hormones has greatly increased in recent years. Isolation and sequencing of the rat somatostatin gene indicates that it contains a single intron located between the codons for Gn(-57) and Glu(-56) of pre-prosomatostatin. The gene contains three repetitive sequences, one at the 5' end of the gene and two of them 3' to the coding portion. Two of the sequences consist of alternating purine-pyrimidine bases and have been shown to adopt Z-DNA structures in vitro. The cDNA for rat somatostatin codes for a 116-residue peptide structurally similar to the anglerfish and catfish precursors to the 14-residue somatostatin (SST-14). In addition to SST-14, the catfish and the anglerfish both contain an additional pancreatic somatostatin, each derived from a different gene. The catfish contains a 22-residue somatostatin, which is O-glycosylated at Thr-5. The second somatostatin gene from anglerfish encodes a prosomatostatin that is processed to a 28-residue peptide. The mature peptide contains a hydroxylated lysine at position 23. PMID:2876503

  10. Detection of somatostatin receptors in surgical and percutaneous needle biopsy samples of carcinoids and islet cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Kvols, L K; Waser, B; Nagorney, D M; Heitz, P U; Charboneau, J W; Reading, C C; Moertel, C

    1990-09-15

    Somatostatin (SS) receptor status was investigated in the tumor tissues from 62 patients with carcinoid tumors and 15 patients with islet cell carcinomas using receptor autoradiography techniques with two different iodinated somatostatin analogues as radioligands, a [Leu8, DTrp22, Tyr25]somatostatin-28 and a somatostatin octapeptide, Tyr3-octreotide. The carcinoid tumors were either primaries (n = 32) or metastases (n = 43), sampled as surgical specimens or as small needle liver biopsies. Fifty-four of 62 carcinoid patients had SS receptor-positive tumors (87%). All 15 islet cell carcinoma patients had positive tumors (4 primaries, 11 metastases), i.e., 3 vipomas, 3 insulinomas, 2 glucagonomas, 1 gastrinoma, 2 polyfunctional tumors, and 4 nonfunctioning tumors. Saturation and competition experiments on tissue sections revealed saturable, high affinity binding sites pharmacologically specific for bioactive SS analogues. In a majority of the tumors, the receptors were densely distributed and were always homogeneously found in the whole tumor. All except two tumors were labeled with both radioligands. Multiple liver metastases (n = 16) from three different patients were all shown to contain a comparable amount of receptors. SS receptors could be demonstrated even in very small tissue samples of liver metastases obtained by percutaneous liver biopsies (mean weight, 6.8 mg). The majority of the eight SS receptor-negative carcinoids were mainly bronchial carcinoids (n = 5), usually poorly differentiated. On the contrary, SS receptor-positive cases were never found to be anaplastic. All tumors except one from patients pretreated with octreotide (3 days to 3.8 years) were SS receptor positive. In the majority of carcinoids or islet cell carcinomas, the SS receptor status correlated with the in vivo biochemical response (hormone inhibition) to octreotide. These data demonstrate (a) the high prevalence of SS receptors in the primary tumors of both carcinoids and islet cell

  11. Evidence for selective release of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28(1-12) from rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhit, C.; Koda, L.; Benoit, R.; Morrison, J.H.; Bloom, F.E.

    1984-02-01

    Cysteamine administration to rats results in a marked depletion of hypothalamic somatostatin-14 (SS14) and a decrease of the potassium-evoked in vitro release of SS14 without a significant change in the content or release of somatostatin-28(1-12)-like immunoreactivity (SS28(1-12)-L1). Furthermore, cysteamine enhances the spontaneous release and markedly potentiates the potassium-evoked release of SS14 in the in vitro slice preparation. However, in vitro-administered cysteamine does not alter the spontaneous or potassium-evoked release of SS28(1-12)-LI. Immunohistochemical visualization of hypothalamic neuronal cell bodies and fibers following cysteamine administration shows a disappearance of the SS14 immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies with no apparent change in the SS28(1-12) immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies. These data suggest that, in rat hypothalamus, selective release of SS14 and SS28(1-12) can occur. The results are discussed in relation to possible sites of storage and release of the somatostatin-related peptides from synaptic nerve terminals.

  12. Somatostatin modulates generation of inspiratory rhythms and determines asphyxia survival.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O; Lara-Hernández, Sergio; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Aguileta, Miguel A; Rivera-Angulo, Ana J; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Breathing and the activity of its generator (the pre-Bötzinger complex; pre-BötC) are highly regulated functions. Among neuromodulators of breathing, somatostatin (SST) is unique: it is synthesized by a subset of glutamatergic pre-BötC neurons, but acts as an inhibitory neuromodulator. Moreover, SST regulates breathing both in normoxic and in hypoxic conditions. Although it has been implicated in the neuromodulation of breathing, neither the locus of SST modulation, nor the receptor subtypes involved have been identified. In this study, we aimed to fill in these blanks by characterizing the SST-induced regulation of inspiratory rhythm generation in vitro and in vivo. We found that both endogenous and exogenous SST depress all preBötC-generated rhythms. While SST abolishes sighs, it also decreases the frequency and increases the regularity of eupnea and gasping. Pharmacological experiments showed that SST modulates inspiratory rhythm generation by activating SST receptor type-2, whose mRNA is abundantly expressed in the pre-Bötzinger complex. In vivo, blockade of SST receptor type-2 reduces gasping amplitude and consequently, it precludes auto-resuscitation after asphyxia. Based on our findings, we suggest that SST functions as an inhibitory neuromodulator released by excitatory respiratory neurons when they become overactivated in order to stabilize breathing rhythmicity in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  13. Differential effect of the immunomodulatory hormone somatostatin on replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, L; Phaneuf, D; Wainberg, M A

    1995-01-01

    The long-acting somatostatin analog octreotide (SMS 201-995) possesses immunosuppressive properties and has been successfully used for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated diarrhea, a condition commonly observed in the absence of known enteric pathogens. Since HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication can occur in both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, we hypothesized that this benefit might be due to local effects on HIV-1 replication in these two T-cell subsets. As a model, we studied the effects of two synthetic molecules, SRIH 1-14 and SRIH 1-28, closely related to naturally occurring forms of somatostatin, as well as SMS 201-995 on HIV-1 replication in CD4+ and CD8+ cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We found that HIV-1 replication was inhibited in CD8+ cells but enhanced in infected CD4+ lymphocytes, as measured by p24 antigen levels in culture fluids. These differential effects were drug concentration dependent. We also observed that somatostatin inhibited the mitogen-induced proliferative responsiveness of both cell types. These effects on both HIV-1 replication and cell proliferation were independent of somatostatin gene expression, since somatostatin mRNAs were not detected in mitogen-stimulated PBMC, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR. PMID:7697528

  14. Structure and evolution of somatostatin genes.

    PubMed

    Su, C J; White, J W; Li, W H; Luo, C C; Frazier, M L; Saunders, G F; Chan, L

    1988-03-01

    A bovine pancreatic preprosomatostatin cDNA clone has been isolated and sequenced. Although it encodes a predicted 116 amino acid preprosomatostatin that is very similar in primary structure to those deduced from other mammalian preprosomatostatin cDNAs, there are some differences in amino acid composition. Hybridization of this clone to Northern blots of fetal bovine pancreatic poly(A+) RNA reveals a mRNA of 700 nucleotides. Evolution of the preprosomatostatin genes was studied by statistical analysis of anglerfish, catfish, bovine, rat, and human cDNA sequences. The results suggest that the two somatostatin genes present in both anglerfish and catfish were the result of a gene duplication event in a common ancestor of anglerfish and catfish. PMID:2899837

  15. Hyperactive Somatostatin Interneurons Contribute to Excitotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Schroeder, David; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Cox, Gregory A.; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Here using TDP-43A315T mice, an ALS and FTD model with profound cortical pathology, we demonstrated that hyperactive somatostatin interneurons disinhibited layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5-PN) and contributed to their excitotoxicity. Focal ablation of somatostatin interneurons efficiently restored normal excitability of L5-PN and alleviated neurodegeneration, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for ALS and FTD. PMID:26900927

  16. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors.

  17. Impairment in motor learning of somatostatin null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zeyda, T; Diehl, N; Paylor, R; Brennan, M B; Hochgeschwender, U

    2001-07-01

    Somatostatin was first identified as a hypothalamic factor which inhibits the release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (somatotropin release inhibitory factor, SRIF). Both SRIF and its receptors were subsequently found widely distributed within and outside the nervous system, in the adult as well as in the developing organism. Reflecting this wide distribution, somatostatin has been implicated regulating a diverse array of biological processes. These include body growth, homeostasis, sensory perception, autonomous functions, rate of intestinal absorption, behavior, including cognition and memory, and developmental processes. We produced null mutant mice lacking somatostatin through targeted mutagenesis. The mutant mice are healthy, fertile, and superficially indistinguishable from their heterozygous and wildtype littermates. A 'first round' phenotype screen revealed that mice lacking somatostatin have elevated plasma growth hormone levels, despite normal body size, and have elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels. In order to uncover subtle and unexpected differences, we carried out a systematic behavioral phenotype screen which identified a significant impairment in motor learning revealed when increased demands were made on motor coordination. Motor coordination and motor learning require an intact cerebellum. While somatostatin is virtually absent from the adult cerebellum, the ligand and its receptor(s) are transiently expressed at high levels in the developing cerebellum. This result suggests the functional significance of transient expression of SRIF and its receptors in the development of the cerebellum. PMID:11430867

  18. Synthesis and radiolabeling of a somatostatin analog for multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    A new multimodal imaging agent for imaging the somatostatin receptor has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A somatostatin analog, conjugated to both 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaceticacid (DOTA) and cypate (BS-296), was synthesized entirely on the solid phase (Fmoc) and purified by RP-HPLC. DOTA was added as a ligand for radiometals such as 64Cu or 177Lu for either radio-imaging or radiotherapy respectively. Cytate, a cypatesomatostatin analog conjugate, has previously demonstrated the ability to visualize somatostatin receptor rich tumor xenografts and natural organs by optical imaging techniques. BS-296 exhibited low nanomolar inhibitory capacity toward the binding of radiolabeled somatostatin analogs in cell membranes enriched in the somatostatin receptor, demonstrating the high affinity of this multimodal imaging peptide and indicating its potential as a molecular imaging agent. 64Cu, an isotope for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy, was selected as the isotope for radiolabeling BS-296. BS-296 was radiolabeled with 64Cu in high specific activity (200 μCi/μg) in 90% radiochemical yield. Addition of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid) prevented radiolysis of the sample, allowing for study of the 64Cu -BS-296 the day following radiolabeling. Furthermore, inclusion of DMSO at a level of 20% was found not to interfere with radiolabeling yields and prevented the adherence of 64Cu -BS-296 to the walls of the reaction vessel.

  19. Positron emission tomographic imaging of copper 64- and gallium 68-labeled chelator conjugates of the somatostatin agonist tyr3-octreotate.

    PubMed

    Nedrow, Jessie R; White, Alexander G; Modi, Jalpa; Nguyen, Kim; Chang, Albert J; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional chelator and radiometal have been shown to have a direct effect on the pharmacokinetics of somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-targeted imaging agents. We evaluated three Y3-TATE analogues conjugated to NOTA-based chelators for radiolabeling with 64Cu and 68Ga for small-animal positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging. Two commercially available NOTA analogues, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and NODAGA, were evaluated. The p-SCN-Bn-NOTA analogues were conjugated to Y3-TATE through β-Ala and PEG8 linkages. The NODAGA chelator was directly conjugated to Y3-TATE. The analogues labeled with 64Cu or 68Ga were analyzed in vitro for binding affinity and internalization and in vivo by PET/CT imaging, biodistribution, and Cerenkov imaging (68Ga analogues). We evaluated the effects of the radiometals, chelators, and linkers on the performance of the SSTR subtype 2--targeted imaging agents and also compared them to a previously reported agent, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE. We found that the method of conjugation, particularly the length of the linkage between the chelator and the peptide, significantly impacted tumor and nontarget tissue uptake and clearance. Among the 64Cu- and 68Ga-labeled NOTA analogues, NODAGA-Y3-TATE had the most optimal in vivo behavior and was comparable to 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE. An advantage of NODAGA-Y3-TATE is that it allows labeling with 64Cu and 68Ga, providing a versatile PET probe for imaging SSTr subtype 2-positive tumors.

  20. Evidence that somatostatin is localized and synthesized in lymphoid organs

    SciTech Connect

    Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Dees, W.L.; Haensly, W.E. )

    1991-12-15

    Because several peptides originally found in the pituitary as within the central nervous system have been localized in lymphoid tissues and because somatostatin (somatotropin-release-inhibiting hormone, SRIH) can act on cells of the immune system, the authors searched for this peptide in lymphoid organs. The authors demonstrated that SRIH mRNA exists in lymphoid tissue, albeit in smaller levels that in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus, the brain region that contains the highest level of this mRNA. SRIH mRNA was found in the spleen and thymus of male rats and in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius of the chicken. Its localization in the Bursa indicates that the peptide must be present in B lymphocytes since this is the site of origin of B lymphocytes in birds. The SRIH concentration in these lymphoid organs as determined by radioimmunoassay was greater in the thymus than in the spleen of the rat. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of SRIH-positive cells in clusters inside the white pulp and more dispersed within the red pulp of the spleen of both the rat and the chicken. The thymus from these species also contained SRIH-positive cells within the medulla and around the corticomedullary junction. In the chicken, there were large cluster of SRIH-positive cells in the medullary portion of each nodule of the bursa of Fabricius. The results indicate that SRIH is synthesized and stored in cells of the immune system. SRIH may be secreted from these cells to exert paracrine actions that alter the function of immune cells in spleen and thymus.

  1. Somatostatin receptor 1–5; expression profiles during rat development

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Carina; Sandler, Stellan; Stridsberg, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Background Somatostatin acts through five receptor subtypes (SSTRs 1–5). We aimed to investigate SSTRs mRNA expression and protein distribution in whole rat embryos, with special emphasis on the pancreas. Material and methods Rat embryos were collected on embryonal days 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, and at birth. Presence of SSTRs was investigated with RT-PCR techniques and immunohistochemistry. Results There was no SSTR5 mRNA expression in the whole rat embryos. All SSTR1–5 proteins were observed at embryonal day 10, but the localization varied between the different subtypes. From day 11 to birth SSTRs protein presence increased with time in major structures such as skin and cartilage. It remained similar over time in the heart and liver. In the fetal pancreas mRNA expression of SSTR2 and 4 was detected at day 14, and there was an increase up to birth. Only SSTR1 protein co-localized to a higher extent with the islet hormones studied. SSTR2 was present in all islet endocrine cells except for β-cells. In contrast, the immunostaining for SSTR3–4 was co-localized with insulin and PP, and, finally, SSTR5 with glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide. In mRNA isolated from whole rat embryos SSTR1-2 and SSTR4 expression showed a peak at day 14, while SSTR3 mRNA was not present until day 15. Conclusion The present data suggest a role for SSTRs during the development of the rat embryo. Subsequent functional studies may elucidate regulatory roles of specific SSTRs for the growth and differentiation of the pancreas as well as other organs. PMID:25926390

  2. Long-term treatment of central precocious puberty with a long-acting analogue of luteinizing hormone release hormone (D-Tryp6-GnRH) in monthly injections. Its possible use in normal puberty.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, J A; Abujamra, A C; Minanni, S L; Mendonca, B B; Nery, M; Lerario, A C; Pereira, M A; Abelin, N; Wajchenberg, B L

    1993-02-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-like agonist D-Tryp6-GnRH (GnRHa) has been shown to induce reversible suppression of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in patients with central precocious puberty. We examined the effect of a long-acting preparation of GnRHa in biodegradable microcapsules. D-Tryptophane6-GnRH, administered intramuscularly at 1 month intervals, for 12 consecutive months, on growth and skeletal maturation in 3 girls and 4 boys with neurogenic or idiopathic precocious puberty. Suppression of gonadotropin release after GnRH stimulation and gonadal steroids was maintained in all subjects. Growth velocity fell from a mean rate (+/- SEM) or 8.60 +/- 0.75 cm/year before treatment to 5.81 +/- 0.60 cm/year (p < 0.005) after 1 year. Bone age advanced a mean of 8.0 +/- 0.45 months during treatment, suggesting an increase in predicted height from the ratio delta bone age/delta chronological age. Two subjects, one of them with compensated Bartter's syndrome with normal hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal-axis, received the analogue to delay pubertal growth with the hope to improve final height. In the first one, the growth velocity fell from 9.9 cm/year to 8 cm/year and delta bone age/delta chronological age decreased from 1.28 to 1.0 and in the other subject, the growth velocity fell from 12 cm/year to 6.0 cm/year in the last year of treatment and delta bone age/delta chronological age fell from 3.2 to 0.75, indicating an improvement in predicted height.

  3. The truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor5 (sst5TMD4) is associated with poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manel; Luque, Raúl M; Reverter, Jordi L; López-Sánchez, Laura M; Gahete, Manuel D; Culler, Michael D; Díaz-Soto, Gonzalo; Lomeña, Francisco; Squarcia, Mattia; Mate, José Luis; Mora, Mireia; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Vidal, Oscar; Alastrué, Antonio; Balibrea, Jose; Halperin, Irene; Mauricio, Dídac; Castaño, Justo P

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (ssts) are expressed in thyroid cancer cells, but their biological significance is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess ssts in well differentiated (WDTC) and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) by means of imaging and molecular tools and its relationship with the efficacy of somatostatin analog treatment. Thirty-nine cases of thyroid carcinoma were evaluated (20 PDTC and 19 WDTC). Depreotide scintigraphy and mRNA levels of sst-subtypes, including the truncated variant sst5TMD4, were carried out. Depreotide scans were positive in the recurrent tumor in the neck in 6 of 11 (54%) PDTC, and in those with lung metastases in 5/11 cases (45.4%); sst5TMD4 was present in 18/20 (90%) of PDTC, being the most densely expressed sst-subtype, with a 20-fold increase in relation to sst2. In WDTC, sst2 was the most represented, while sst5TMD4 was not found; sst2 was significantly increased in PDTC in comparison to WDTC. Five depreotide positive PDTC received octreotide for 3-6 months in a pilot study with no changes in the size of the lesions in 3 of them, and a significant increase in the pulmonary and cervical lesions in the other 2. All PDTC patients treated with octreotide showed high expression of sst5TMD4. ROC curve analysis demonstrated that only sst5TMD4 discriminates between PDTC and WDTC. We conclude that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in PDTC and may be involved in the lack of response to somatostatin analogue treatment.

  4. Molecular biology of somatostatin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Greenwood, M; Panetta, R; Hukovic, N; Grigorakis, S; Robertson, L A; Srikant, C B

    1996-08-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) receptors (ssts) comprise a family of heptahelical membrane proteins encoded by five related genes that map to separate chromosomes and which, with the exception of sst1, are intronless. The ssts1-4 display weak selectivity for SRIF-14 binding, whereas sst5 is SRIF-28-selective. Based on structural similarity and reactivity for octapeptide and hexapeptide sst analogs, ssts2,3 and sst5 belong to a similar sst subclass; ssts1-4 react poorly with these analogs and belong to a separate subclass. All five ssts are functionally coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via pertussis toxin-sensitive guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins. mRNA for ssts1-5 is widely expressed in brain and peripheral organs and displays an overlapping but characteristic pattern that is subtype-selective and tissue- and species-specific. All pituitary cell subsets express sst2 and sst5, with sst5 being more abundant. Individual pituitary cells coexpress multiple sst subtypes. The binding pocket for SRIF-14 ligand lies deep within the membrane in transmembrane domains (TMDs) 3 to 7. Except for extracellular loop 2, it does not involve the other exofacial structures. Human (h)sst2A and hsst5 undergo agonist-mediated desensitization, associated with receptor internalization. The C-tail segment of hsst5 displays positive molecular internalization signals. The ssts inhibit the growth of tumor cells directly, through blockade of mitogenic signaling leading to growth arrest and through induction of apoptosis. This process is associated with translocation of phosphotyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1C from the cytosol to the membrane.

  5. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  6. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Large, Adam M; Kunz, Nicholas A; Mielo, Samantha L; Oswald, Anne-Marie M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  7. Effects of somatostatin and related peptides on the membrane potential and input resistance of rat ventral subicular neurons, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Greene, J R; Mason, A

    1996-02-01

    The effects of bath-applied somatostatin (SS), and related peptides on the membrane potential and input resistance of 117 ventral subicular neurons were investigated by intracellular recording in rat brain slices. Electrophysiological properties, which included burst-firing in response to depolarizing current pulses, indicated that the neurons studied were of the pyramidal type. For the 89 cells analyzed quantitatively, membrane potential was -69.1 +/- 0.3 mV (mean +/- S.E.) and input resistance was 23.9 +/- 0.5 megohms. SS (5 microM) caused a hyperpolarization of 3.4 +/- 0.3 mV (n = 9) and reduced input resistance by 16 +/- 3.1% (n = 6). SS D-Trp8, somatostatin, octreotide, CGP 23996 and MK 678 shared these effects, but somatostatin was inactive. SS effects persisted when bathing solutions contained tetrodotoxin, reduced calcium and elevated magnesium concentrations and when both of these treatments were combined. They were unaltered by antagonists at gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors or at ionotropic glutamate receptors. The effects of MK 678, SS, SS D-Trp8 and somatostatin were concentration-dependent, and these peptides were equipotent at 500 nM and at 5 microM. For MK 678, the EC50 was 316 nM for the hyperpolarization and 90 nM for the reduction in input resistance. We conclude that SS acts directly on pyramidal neurons of the rat subiculum to cause a hyperpolarization and a decrease in input resistance. We suggest that these effects are mediated by the SSTR2 receptor subtype. PMID:8632306

  8. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  9. Somatostatin, tau, and beta-amyloid within the anterior olfactory nucleus in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, D; Ubeda-Bañon, I; de la Rosa-Prieto, C; Argandoña-Palacios, L; Garcia-Muñozguren, S; Insausti, R; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2010-06-01

    Impaired olfaction is an early symptom of Alzheimer disease (AD). This likely to reflect neurodegenerative processes taking place in basal telencephalic structures that mediate olfactory processing, including the anterior olfactory nucleus. Betaeta-amyloid (Abeta) accumulation in AD brain may relate to decline in somatostatin levels: somatostatin induces the expression of the Abeta-degrading enzyme neprilysin and somatostatin deficiency in AD may therefore reduce Abeta clearance. We have investigated the expression of somatostatin in the anterior olfactory nucleus of AD and control brain. We report that somatostatin levels were reduced by approximately 50% in AD brain. Furthermore, triple-immunofluorescence revealed co-localization of somatostatin expression with Abeta (65.43%) with Abeta and tau (19.75%) and with tau (2.47%). These data indicate that somatostatin decreases in AD and its expression may be linked with Abeta deposition.

  10. Truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 confers aggressive features (proliferation, invasion and reduced octreotide response) to somatotropinomas

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Raúl M.; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Taboada, Giselle F.; Hormaechea-Agulla, Daniel; Kasuki, Leandro; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Culler, Michael D.; Gahete, Manuel D.; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Castaño, Justo P.

    2015-01-01

    The GH/IGF1 response of somatotropinomas to somatostatin analogues (SSA) is associated with their pattern of somatostatin receptor (sst1–sst5) expression. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of a truncated sst5-variant (sst5TMD4) can influence the secretory response of somatotropinomas to SSA-therapy; however, its potential relationship with aggressive features (e.g. invasion/proliferation) is still unknown. Here, we show that sst5TMD4 is present in 50% of non-functioning pituitary-adenomas (NFPA) (n = 30) and 89% of somatotropinomas (n = 36), its expression levels being highest in somatotropinomas > > NFPAs > > > normal pituitaries (negligible expression; n = 8). In somatotropinomas, sst5TMD4 mRNA and protein levels correlated positively, and its expression was directly associated with tumor invasiveness (cavernous/sphenoid sinus), and inversely correlated with age and GH/IGF1 reduction after 3–6 months with octreotide-LAR therapy. GNAS+ somatotropinomas expressed lower sst5TMD4 levels. ROC analysis revealed sst5TMD4 expression as the only marker, within all sst-subtypes, capable to predict tumor invasiveness in somatotropinomas. sst5TMD4 overexpression increased cell viability in cultured somatotropinoma (n = 5). Hence, presence of sst5TMD4 associates with increased aggressive features and worse prognosis in somatotropinomas, thereby providing a potentially useful tool to refine somatotropinoma diagnosis, predict outcome of clinical response to SSA-therapy and develop new therapeutic targets. PMID:25637790

  11. Survey of Analogue Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    Analogue spacetimes (and more boldly, analogue models both of and for gravity), have attracted significant and increasing attention over the last decade and a half. Perhaps the most straightforward physical example, which serves as a template for most of the others, is Bill Unruh's model for a dumb hole,(mute black hole, acoustic black hole), wherein sound is dragged along by a moving fluid—and can even be trapped behind an acoustic horizon. This and related analogue models for curved spacetimes are useful in many ways: analogue spacetimes provide general relativists with extremely concrete physical models to help focus their thinking, and conversely the techniques of curved spacetime can sometimes help improve our understanding of condensed matter and/or optical systems by providing an unexpected and countervailing viewpoint. In this chapter, I shall provide a few simple examples of analogue spacetimes as general background for the rest of the contributions.

  12. Relationship between receptor binding and biopotency of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 in mouse pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Heisler, S

    1985-07-01

    Somatostatin-14 (S-14) acts via specific receptors to inhibit basal as well as hormone- and forskolin-stimulated ACTH secretion in tumor cells (AtT-20/D16-16) of mouse anterior pituitary. In addition S-14 inhibits the stimulated but not basal cAMP accumulation. The potency of somatostatin-28 (S-28) for regulating these processes in these tumor cells has not been reported. In this study we have investigated the relationship between receptor-binding affinities of S-14 and S-28 and their biopotency in these cells. Membrane receptors for S-14 characterized using [125I-Tyr11]S-14 as the radioligand [maximum binding capacity (Bmax) = 1.28 +/- 0.1 pmol/mg; dissociation constant (Kd) = 1.1 +/- 0.04 nM] bound S-28 with 3-fold greater affinity than S-14. Binding sites quantitated using an S-28 analog [Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25]S-28 as radioligand (Bmax = 1.18 +/- 0.15 pmol/mg; Kd = 0.08 +/- 0.06 nM) also exhibited greater affinity for S-28 than S-14. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and ACTH secretion in these cells were inhibited to a greater extent (4- and 9-fold, respectively) by S-28 than S-14. Preincubation of the cells with S-14 and S-28 (10(-7) M) resulted in a marked decrease (36% and 71%, respectively) of S-14 receptor concentration. Coincubation of the cells with both S-14 and S-28 led to 56% decrease in S-14 receptor binding. The responsiveness of the cells to forskolin stimulation of ACTH secretion and cAMP accumulation was significantly enhanced by preincubation with S-14 (10(-7) M) whereas the responsiveness to forskolin was completely abolished by preincubation with S-28. Simultaneous exposure of the cells to both S-14 and S-28 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibiting effect of S-28 on forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in these cells but did not result in a partial reversal of the inhibitory effect of S-28 on forskolin-stimulated ACTH secretion in these cells. These results demonstrate that S-28 is more potent than S-14 in AtT-20/D16

  13. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor.

  14. Nonstationary analogue black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    We study the existence of analogue nonstationary spherically symmetric black holes. The prime example is the acoustic model see Unruh (1981 Phys. Rev. Lett. 46 1351). We consider also a more general class of metrics that could be useful in other physical models of analogue black and white holes. We give examples of the appearance of black holes and of disappearance of white holes. We also discuss the relation between the apparent and the event horizons for the case of analogue black holes. In the end we study the inverse problem of determination of black or white holes by boundary measurements for the spherically symmetric nonstationary metrics.

  15. Somatostatin analog (SMS 201-995) inhibits the basal and angiotensin II-stimulated sup 3 H-thymidine uptake by rat adrenal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlikowski, M.; Lewinski, A.; Sewerynek, E.; Szkudlinski, M.; Kunert-Radek, J.; Wajs, E. )

    1990-02-14

    The effects of a long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995 injections on the basal and angiotensin II-stimulated ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake by the rat adrenal glands incubated in vitro were examined. It was shown that SMS 201-995 significantly inhibited the ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake and, additionally, suppressed the stimulatory effect of a single angiotensin II injection.

  16. Pharmacological characterisation of the goldfish somatostatin sst5 receptor.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Caroline; Feuerbach, Dominik; Lin, Xinwei; Peter, Richard; Hoyer, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release inhibiting factor, SRIF), exerts its effects via specific G protein coupled receptors of which five subtypes have been cloned (sst1-5). Recently, SRIF receptors have also been cloned from fish tissues. In this study, goldfish sst5 receptors (gfsst5) were expressed and characterised in the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line, that harbours the luciferase reporter gene driven by the serum responsive element (CCL39-SRE-Luci). The agonist radioligands [125I]-LTT-SRIF-28 ([Leu8, DTrp22, 125I-Tyr25]SRIF-28) and [125I][Tyr10]cortistatin-14 labelled similar receptor densities with high affinity and in a saturable manner (pKd: 9.99-9.71; Bmax: 300-350 fmol mg-1). 5'-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate inhibited radioligand binding to some degree (38.5-57.9%). In competition binding studies, the pharmacological profile of SRIF binding sites defined with [125I]LTT-SRIF-28 and [125I][Tyr10]cortistatin-14 correlated significantly (r2=0.97, n=20). Pharmacological profiles of human and mouse sst5 receptors expressed in CCL39 cells correlated markedly less with those of the gfsst5 profile (r2=0.52-0.78, n > or = b16). Functional expression of the gfsst5 receptor was examined by measurement of agonist-induced luciferase expression and stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS ([35S]guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) binding. Profiles were similar to those achieved in radioligand binding studies (r2=0.81-0.93, n=20), although relative potency (pEC50) was reduced compared to pKd values. Relative efficacy profiles of luciferase expression and [35S]GTPgammaS binding, were rather divergent (r2=0.48, n=20) with peptides showing full agonism at one pathway and absence of agonism at the other. BIM 23056 (D-Phe-Phe-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Phe-D-Nal-NH2) acted as an antagonist on the effects of SRIF-14 (pKB=6.74 +/- 0.23) on stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Pertussis toxin abolished the effect of SRIF-14 on luciferase expression and [35S]GTPgammaS binding suggesting

  17. Aberrant Methylation Inactivates Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Type 1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Kondo, Haruki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to define somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SSTR1) methylation profiles for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors at diagnosis and follow up and to evaluate their prognostic significance and value as a biomarker. Methods Gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter methylation status was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) in HNSCC. Results Methylation was associated with transcription inhibition. SST methylation in 81% of HNSCC tumor specimens significantly correlated with tumor size (P = 0.043), stage (P = 0.008), galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) methylation (P = 0.041), and tachykinin-1 (TAC1) (P = 0.040). SSTR1 hypermethylation in 64% of cases was correlated with tumor size (P = 0.037), stage (P = 0.037), SST methylation (P < 0.001), and expression of galanin (P = 0.03), GALR2 (P = 0.014), TAC1 (P = 0.023), and tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1) (P = 0.003). SST and SSTR1 promoter hypermethylation showed highly discriminating receiver operator characteristic curve profiles, which clearly distinguished HNSCC from adjacent normal mucosal tissues. Concurrent hypermethylation of galanin and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0001). Among patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, methylation of both SST and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.028). In multivariate logistic-regression analysis, concomitant methylation of galanin and SSTR1 was associated with an odds ratio for recurrence of 12.53 (95% CI, 2.62 to 59.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions CpG hypermethylation is a likely mechanism of SST and SSTR1 gene inactivation, supporting the hypothesis that SST and SSTR1 play a role in the tumorigenesis of HNSCC and that this hypermethylation may serve as an important biomarker. PMID:25734919

  18. Solid phase synthesis of somatostatin-28 II. A new biologically active octacosapeptide from anglerfish pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, P; Delfour, A; Boussetta, H; Morel, A; Rholam, M; Cohen, P

    1986-10-30

    Somatostatin-28 II, an octacosapeptide recently isolated from anglerfish pancreatic islets, was synthetized by the solid phase method along with its somatostatin-14 II and somatostatin-28 II-(1-12) corresponding domains. Homogeneity of the synthetic peptides was demonstrated by analytical RP-HPLC, thin layer chromatography and electrophoresis. The peptides were further characterized by amino acids analysis, fast atomic bombarding mass spectrometry and/or 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. Synthetic somatostatin-28 II and somatostatin-14 II displace equally well the potent agonist (Tyr0,D-Trp8)-somatostatin-14 from its specific binding sites on anterior pituitary cells membranes. Both peptides activate adenylate cyclase from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells. PMID:2877662

  19. Position 4 substituted somatostatin analogs: increased binding to somatostatin receptors in pituitary and brain.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Coy, D H; Patel, Y C

    1983-07-11

    Somatostatin (S-14) analogs with Phe4 substitutions bound to pituitary and cerebrocortical S-14 receptors more avidly than did S-14. The 2-4 fold greater affinities of the Phe4 S-14 as well as analogs with structural modification of the Phe4 residue for binding to pituitary S-14 receptors showed good correlation with their reported potencies for in vivo Gh inhibition. In the cerebral cortex, [Phe4] S-14, [Phe4, D-Trp8] S-14 and [F5-Phe4] S14 were 2-3 times more potent while [p-NH2-Phe4] S-14 was 6 times more potent compared to S-14 in binding to S-14 receptors. The increased binding affinities of the Phe4 analogs in these two tissues does not appear to be due to differential stability of the analogs compared to S-14 under the experimental conditions used. [Thr4] S-14 exhibited very low binding in both these tissues. Thus structural modification of the position 4 moiety of the S-14 molecule does not result in dissociated affinities for binding to S-14 receptors in the brain and the pituitary. The increased receptor binding affinities of the Phe4 analogs in the cerebral cortex suggest that they may be more potent than S-14 in the CNS.

  20. Gastrointestinal somatostatin: extraction and radioimmunoassay in different species.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, C; Arnold, R; Bothe, E; Becker, H; Köbberling, J; Creutzfeldt, W

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay capable of detecting 300 fg somatostatin has been developed and levels of the polypeptide in gastrointestinal tissues from man, dog, and rat have been measured. Rapid freezing of collected samples and careful control of extraction is necessary. Concentrations in different regions of dog antrum (425 +/- 50 to 773 +/- 254 ng/g tissue) are similar to those in antrum from duodenal ulcer patients and control subjects: 614 +/- 125 and 465 +/- 104 ng/g tissue respectively. Levels in histologically normal human pancreas (253 +/- 43 ng/g tissue) are comparable with those in dog pancreas (333 +/- 66 ng/g tissue), whereas in two cases of neonatal hypoglycaemia the concentration exceeded 3000 ng/g tissue. On gel chromatography the majority of immunoreactive somatostatin elutes as the synthetic tetradecapeptide and a small fraction as a larger species. PMID:680597

  1. Electrophysiological actions of somatostatin on the atrioventricular junction in sinus rhythm and reentry tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S C; Krikler, D M; Hendry, W G; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1986-01-01

    Because somatostatin, a neuroregulatory peptide, is found in abundance in the atria and atrioventricular node, its electrophysiological and antiarrhythmic properties were compared with those of verapamil in ten patients with paroxysmal atrioventricular tachycardia. During sinus rhythm, intravenous somatostatin slowed the heart rate whereas verapamil increased it. Though both agents prolonged atrioventricular conduction time and refractoriness, verapamil was more potent. They were equally effective at terminating reentry atrioventricular tachycardia, restoring sinus rhythm in six of seven patients. Whereas verapamil consistently blocked conduction in the atrioventricular node, somatostatin usually induced ventricular extrasystoles at the time of conversion. Somatostatin may have physiological importance in the neurohumoral control of cardiac impulse formation and conduction. PMID:2875723

  2. Expression of somatostatin and cDNA cloning in the thymus of the African ostrich.

    PubMed

    Min, Chen; Min, He; Kemei, Peng; Ke, Xiao; Haibo, Huang; Daiyun, Zhu; Xinting, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The thymus in addition to being a central lymphoid organ is also an endocrine organ which produces various neuropeptides that influence the function of this gland. Somatostatin is a neuropeptide that was isolated initially in the hypothalamus and which inhibits the release of growth hormone. The distribution of somatostatin-producing cells and the sequence of somatostatin have been determined in many species. In the present study, we investigated the expression of somatostatin in the thymus of the African ostrich and its sequence by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that somatostatin mRNA was expressed in the thymus and somatostatin immunoreative cells were distributed in both the cortical and medullary regions of the thymus. Results of cDNA cloning revealed that the nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of African ostrich somatostatin were 348 bases and 116 amino acids in length and that it is highly conserved to that of other reported species. These findings indicated that the somatostatin expressed in the thymus of ostrich might play an important role in the function of the gland. In addition, this research has provided novel molecular data allowing further study of somatostatin in the ostrich.

  3. NEN - the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Opalińska, Marta; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Stefańska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Detection of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and monitoring of their response to therapy is still challenging due to huge heterogeneity of that group of tumors. Actually, NENs visualization is mainly based on molecular imaging while in the past it was relied on less effective structural imaging including CT and MRI. Molecular imaging techniques in combination with structural imaging (hybrid imaging), especially in patients with well-differentiated NENs, in addition to morphological provide the functional information about tumor which benefits in a more accurate patient management, including more sensitive visualization of primary tumors, more precise staging and better therapy follow-up. Overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on NENs' cell membrane was a basis for development of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using single photon emission tomography SPECT, which is today a well-established standard in molecular imaging of NENs, and further imaging improvement in the field of positron emission tomography (PET). Use of hybrid imaging (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) increased sensitivity of examination, mainly resulting in better detection of small lesions. Generally, somatostatin receptor imaging with PET/CT is an emerging technique, although still with limited access, but due to several advantages over SSTR SPECT/CT, should be used if available. It is worth mentioning, that both SSTR PET/CT and SSTR SPECT/CT have some limitations, such as relatively low detection rate of benign insulinomas, poorly differentiated GEP-NETs and liver metastases. For that reason further improvement of NETs imaging is necessary. The most promising new tracers' families are based on SSTR antagonists, 64Cu-radiolabeled ligands and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) imaging. Finally, in case of poor-differentiated neuroendocrine cancers 18F-FDG PET/CT may be beneficial in comparison with molecular imaging based on somatostatin receptor modalities. PMID:27479789

  4. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use SST analogs or radiolabeled SST analogs in the treatment of SCLC patients. In the current review, we would focus on the possible role of SST analogs in SCLC. PMID:27067504

  5. Characterization of pituitary membrane receptors for somatostatin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1982-06-01

    We have demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for somatostatin (SRIF) in normal rat pituitary membranes using ([125I]Tyr11]SRIF) as the radioligand. These receptors bind SRIF with high affinity (Ka approximately 0.47 X 10(10) M-1) and have a maximal binding capacity of 0.095 pmol/mg membrane protein. Two other radioiodinated SRIF analogs which contain N-terminally situated radiolabel, [125I-Tyr1]SRIF and [125I-N-Tyr] SRIF, were found unsuitable for receptor binding studies due to loss of the radiolabel from the ligand molecule under the experimental conditions employed. Binding of [125I]Tyr11]SRIF to these receptors was specific and was not influenced by a variety of other neuropeptides. The specificity of SRIF receptors was also examined using 10 synthetic SRIF analogs as well as catfish somatostatin I. Catfish somatostatin I was 8.3 times less potent than SRIF in binding to SRIF receptors, although it has been reported to be equipotent in terms of in vitro GH inhibition. Analogs which exhibit greater potency for GH inhibition in vitro bound to these receptors with greater affinities than SRIF, whereas biologically inactive analogs showed markedly reduced binding, suggesting that the in vitro GH inhibitory actions of SRIF analogs are related to their ability to interact with SRIF receptors.

  6. Somatostatin receptors: identification and characterization in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1981-06-01

    We have identified and characterized specific receptors for tetradecapeptide somatostatin (SRIF; somatotropin release-inhibiting factor) in rat brain using [125I]Tyr11]SRIF as the radioligand. These receptors are present in membranes obtained from a subfraction of synaptosomes. Membranes derived from cerebral cortex bind SRIF with high affinity (Ka = 1.25 X 10(10) M-1) and have a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.155 X 10(-12) mol/mg. Neither opiates nor other neuropeptides appear to influence the binding of SRIF to brain membranes. Synthetic analogs with greater biological potency than SRIF--[D-Trp8]SRIF, [D-Cys14]SRIF, and [D-Trp8, D-Cys14]SRIF--bind to the receptors with greater avidity than SRIF, whereas inactive analogs [(2H)Ala3]SRIF and [Ala6]SRIF exhibit low binding. The ratio of receptor density to endogenous somatostatin is high in the cortex, thalamus, and striatum, low in the hypothalamus, and extremely low in the brain stem and cerebellum. Thus, SRIF receptors in the brain appear to be a distinct, new class of receptors with a regional distribution different from that of endogenous somatostatin.

  7. Somatostatin receptor ligands and resistance to treatment in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Somatostatin (SST), an inhibitory polypeptide with two biologically active forms SST14 and SST28, inhibits GH, prolactin (PRL), TSH, and ACTH secretion in the anterior pituitary gland. SST also has an antiproliferative effect inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Such actions are mediated through five G-protein-coupled somatostatin receptors (SSTR): SSTR1-SSTR5. In GH-secreting adenomas, SSTR2 expression predominates, and somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs; octreotide and lanreotide) directed to SSTR2 are presently the mainstays of medical therapy. However, about half of patients show incomplete biochemical remission, but the definition of resistance per se remains controversial. We summarize here the determinants of SRL resistance in acromegaly patients, including clinical, imaging features as well as molecular (mutations, SSTR variants, and polymorphisms), and histopathological (granulation pattern, and proteins and receptor expression) predictors. The role of SSTR5 may explain the partial responsiveness to SRLs in patients with adequate SSTR2 density in the cell membrane. In patients with ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas, i.e. Cushing's disease (CD), SSTR5 is the most abundant receptor expressed and tumors show low SSTR2 density due to hypercortisolism-induced SSTR2 down-regulation. Clinical studies with pasireotide, a multireceptor-targeted SRL with increased SSTR5 activity, lead to approval of pasireotide for treatment of patients with CD. Other SRL delivery modes (oral octreotide), multireceptor-targeted SRL (somatoprim) or chimeric compounds targeting dopamine D2 receptors and SSTR2 (dopastatin), are briefly discussed. PMID:24647046

  8. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  9. Biodegradable analogues of DDT*

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Robert L.; Kapoor, Inder P.; Hirwe, Asha S.

    1971-01-01

    Despite the immense utility of DDT for vector control its usefulness is prejudiced by its stability in the environment and by the low rate at which it can be degraded biologically. Metabolic studies in insects, in mice, and in a model ecosystem with several food chains have shown that DDT analogues with substituent groups readily attacked by multifunction oxidases undergo a substantial degree of biological degradation and do not appear to be stored readily in animal tissues or concentrated in food chains. Detailed metabolic pathways have been worked out and it is clear that comparative biochemistry can be used to develop DDT analogues that are adequately persistent yet biodegradable. A number of new DDT analogues have been evaluated for insecticidal activity against flies and mosquitos and for their potential usefulness as safe, persistent, and biodegradable insecticides. PMID:5315354

  10. Novel gold nanoparticles coated with somatostatin as a potential delivery system for targeting somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed A H; Zayed, Gamal; El-Bakry, Asmaa; Zaky, Alaa; Saleem, Imran Y; Tawfeek, Hesham M

    2016-11-01

    Targeting of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) like somatostatin-14 (SST-14) could have a potential interest in delivery of anti-cancer agents to tumor cells. Attachment of SST to different nano-carriers e.g. polymeric nanoparticles is limited due to the difficulty of interaction between SST itself and those nano-carriers. Furthermore, the instability problems associated with the final formulation. Attaching of SST to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using the positive and negative charge of SST and citrate-AuNPs could be considered a new technique to get stable non-aggregated AuNPs coated with SST. Different analyses techniques have been performed to proof the principle of coating between AuNPs and SST. Furthermore, cellular uptake studies on HCC-1806, HELA and U-87 cell lines has been investigated to show the ability of AuNPs coated SST to enter the cells via SST receptors. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated a successful coating of SST on the MUA-AuNPs surface. Furthermore, all the performed analysis including DLS, SDS-PAGE and UV-VIS absorption spectra indicated a successful coating of AuNPs with SST. Cellular uptake studies on HCC-1806, HELA and U-87 cell lines showed that the number of AuNPs-SST per cell is signiflcantly higher compared to citrate-AuNPs when quantified using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Moreover, the binding of AuNPs-SST to cells can be suppressed by addition of antagonist, indicating that the binding of AuNPs-SST to cells is due to receptor-specific binding. In conclusion, AuNPs could be attached to SST via adsorption to get stable AuNPs coated SST. This new formulation has a potential to target SST receptors localized in many normal and tumor cells. PMID:27032509

  11. Processing of an anglerfish somatostatin precursor to a hydroxylysine-containing somatostatin 28.

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, J; Noe, B D

    1985-01-01

    A novel 28-residue somatostatin (SS) has been isolated from anglerfish pancreatic islets and characterized by complete Edman degradation, peptide mapping, and amino acid analysis. The primary structure of this anglerfish SS-28 (aSS-28) containing hydroxylysine (Hyl) was established to be H-Ser-Val-Asp-Ser-Thr-Asn-Asn-Leu-Pro-Pro-Arg-Glu-Arg-Lys-Ala-Gly-Cys- Lys-Asn-Phe-Tyr-Trp-Hyl-Gly-Phe-Thr-Ser-Cys-OH. This sequence (with the exception of hydroxylysine-23, which is replaced by lysine) is identical to the sequence of the COOH-terminal 28 residues of prepro-SS II predicted on the basis of cDNA analysis [Hobart, P., Crawford, R., Shen, L., Pictet, R. & Rutter, W. J. (1980) Nature (London) 288, 137-141]. This is the first instance in which hydroxylysine (to date characteristically observed in collagen or collagen-like structures) has been found in a potential regulatory peptide. Chromatographic characterization of peptides, radiolabeled in islet culture, revealed that aSS-28 contained 10-12% of the radioactivity incorporated into the 8000- to 1000-dalton SS-like polypeptides, whereas 88-90% of this radioactivity was detected in anglerfish SS-14. It appears probable that aSS-28 represents the predominant primary cleavage product derived from prepro-SS II by cleavage at the COOH-terminal side of a single arginine. Based on knowledge of the collagen biosynthesis, it is speculated that hydroxylation may take place as an early post-translational event. Images PMID:2857489

  12. Somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 pretreatment down-regulate somatostatin-14 receptors and have biphasic effects on forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine, 3',5'-monophosphate synthesis and adrenocorticotropin secretion in mouse anterior pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Heisler, S; Srikant, C B

    1985-07-01

    Activation of somatostatin-14 (S-14) receptors on mouse AtT-20 pituitary tumor cells by S-14 or somatostatin-28 (S-28) inhibits forskolin-stimulated cAMP synthesis and ACTH secretion. In this study, the effects of prolonged exposure of cells to S-14 or S-28 was found to reduce, in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, the density of S-14 receptors without affecting the affinity of these sites for [125I]Tyr11-S-14. This response was rapidly reversible after removal of peptide from incubation media. Additionally, S-14 and S-28 pretreatment also resulted in a time-dependent sensitizing effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and ACTH secretion which preceded S-14 receptor down-regulation. Enhancement of the forskolin response was concentration dependent, with maximal effects observed at 10(-8) M with either peptide. Higher pretreatment concentrations of S-14 resulted in an abolition of the enhanced biological response to forskolin; pretreatment with S-28 (10(-6) M) depressed forskolin- and (-)isoproterenol-induced cAMP formation below levels observed in nonpretreated cells. The enhancing effect of S-14 and S-28 required new protein synthesis, since it was partially blocked by cycloheximide; the depressor effect was independent of new protein synthesis. Both the enhanced and depressed forskolin responses after peptide pretreatment were reversible after withdrawal of S-14 or S-28; normalization of the forskolin response (cAMP formation and ACTH secretion) followed the return to control levels of S-14 receptor density. Pretreatment of cells with 10(-8) M or 10(-6) M S-28 increased and decreased, respectively, the ACTH secretory response to agonists which act in the absence of prior cAMP synthesis such as 8-bromo-cAMP, A-23187, and phorbol ester. The data suggest that S-14 receptor down-regulation is not causally associated with the sensitizing effects of S-14 and S-28 on adenylate cyclase and that the S-14 receptor may be also coupled to other effector

  13. Regional distribution of somatostatin receptor binding and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L; Garlind, A; Nilsson, L; Alafuzoff, I; Fowler, C J; Winblad, B; Cowburn, R F

    1991-10-01

    We have previously reported a reduction in the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the superior temporal cortex of a group of Alzheimer's disease cases, compared to a group of matched controls. In the present study, the levels of high affinity 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding, its modulation by guanine nucleotides and the effects of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity have been measured in preparations of frontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and cerebellum from the same patient and control groups. A significant reduction in 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding was observed in the frontal cortex, but not other regions, of the Alzheimer's disease group, compared with control values. The profiles of inhibition of specific 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding by Gpp(NH)p were similar in all regions in both groups. No significant differences in basal, forskolin-stimulated, or somatostatin and neuropeptide Y inhibitions of adenylyl cyclase activity were found between the two groups. The pattern of change of somatostatin binding in the Alzheimer's disease cases observed in the present study differs from the reported pattern of loss of somatostatin neurons and may be secondary to the degeneration of somatostatin receptor-bearing cholinergic afferents arising from the nucleus basalis. The results of this study indicate that impaired somatostatin modulation of adenylyl cyclase is not a global phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease brain and also that there are no major disruptions of somatostatin receptor-G-protein coupling or of adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity in this disorder. PMID:1684616

  14. Control of Gastric Acid Secretion in Somatostatin Receptor 2 Deficient Mice: Shift from Endocrine/Paracrine to Neurocrine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Martinez, Vicente; Piqueras, Laura; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette; Chen, Duan

    2008-01-01

    The gastrin-enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell-parietal cell axis is known to play an important role in the regulation of gastric acid secretion. Somatostatin, acting on somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2), interferes with this axis by suppressing the activity of the gastrin cells, ECL cells, and parietal cells. Surprisingly, however, freely fed SSTR2 knockout mice seem to display normal circulating gastrin concentration and unchanged acid output. In the present study, we compared the control of acid secretion in these mutant mice with that in wild-type mice. In SSTR2 knockout mice, the number of gastrin cells was unchanged; whereas the numbers of somatostatin cells were reduced in the antrum (−55%) and increased in the oxyntic mucosa (35%). The ECL cells displayed a reduced expression of histidine decarboxylase and vesicle monoamine transport type 2 (determined by immunohistochemistry), and an impaired transformation of the granules to secretory vesicles (determined by electron microscopic analysis), suggesting low activity of the ECL cells. These changes were accompanied by an increased expression of galanin receptor type 1 in the oxyntic mucosa. The parietal cells were found to respond to pentagastrin or to vagal stimulation (evoked by pylorus ligation) with increased acid production. In conclusion, the inhibitory galanin-galanin receptor type 1 pathway is up-regulated in the ECL cells, and the direct stimulatory action of gastrin and vagal excitation is enhanced on the parietal cells in SSTR2 knockout mice. We suggest that there is a remodeling of the neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate acid secretion in these mutant mice. PMID:17974627

  15. Natural Analogue Synthesis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Simmons

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present analogue studies and literature reviews designed to provide qualitative and quantitative information to test and provide added confidence in process models abstracted for performance assessment (PA) and model predictions pertinent to PA. This report provides updates to studies presented in the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [151945], Section 13) and new examples gleaned from the literature, along with results of quantitative studies conducted specifically for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate additional understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure at a potential Yucca Mountain repository. The report focuses on key processes by providing observations and analyses of natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) systems to improve understanding and confidence in the operation of these processes under conditions similar to those that could occur in a nuclear waste repository. The process models include those that represent both engineered and natural barrier processes. A second purpose of this report is to document the various applications of natural analogues to geologic repository programs, focusing primarily on the way analogues have been used by the YMP. This report is limited to providing support for PA in a confirmatory manner and to providing corroborative inputs for process modeling activities. Section 1.7 discusses additional limitations of this report. Key topics for this report are analogues to emplacement drift degradation, waste form degradation, waste package degradation, degradation of other materials proposed for the engineered barrier, seepage into drifts, radionuclide flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ), analogues to coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes, saturated zone (SZ) transport, impact of radionuclide

  16. Lipophilization of somatostatin analog RC-160 with long chain fatty acid improves its antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, P; Mukherjee, R

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of the somatostatin analogue RC-160 having antiproliferative activity, is limited by its short serum half life. To overcome this limitation, fatty acids namely butanoic acid and myristic acid were conjugated to the N-terminal residue of RC-160. The lipophilized derivatives of RC-160 were synthesized, purified by reverse phase HPLC and characterized by ES-mass spectroscopy. The antiproliferative activity of lipophilized derivatives of RC-160 on the growth of MIA-PaCa2 (human pancreatic carcinoma), DU145 (human prostate carcinoma), ECV304 (human umbilical chord endothelioma), as well as their antiangiogenic activity was evaluated in vitro. The relative stability of myristoyl-RC-160 towards degradation by proteases and serum was also determined. Myristoyl-RC-160 exhibited significantly higher antiproliferative efficacy than RC-160, on the above cell lines (P<0.01). Receptor binding assays, demonstrated that the affinity of RC-160 towards somatostatin receptors remains unaltered by myristoylation. Unlike RC-160, the myristoylated derivative was found to have significantly greater resistance to protease and serum degradation (P<0.01). Myristoyl-RC-160 exhibited significantly greater antiproliferative activity on ECV304, than RC-160 (P<0.01). Myristoyl RC-160 could also inhibit capillary tube formation more efficiently than RC-160 in a dose dependent manner, suggesting that it possessed enhanced antiangiogenic activity in vitro (P<0.001). Lipophilization of RC-160 with long chain fatty acids like myristic acid endows it with improved antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity, stability and therapeutic index. British Journal of Pharmacology (2000) 109, 101 - 109

  17. Truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 confers aggressive features (proliferation, invasion and reduced octreotide response) to somatotropinomas.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raúl M; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Taboada, Giselle F; Hormaechea-Agulla, Daniel; Kasuki, Leandro; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Kineman, Rhonda D; Culler, Michael D; Gahete, Manuel D; Gadelha, Mônica R; Castaño, Justo P

    2015-04-10

    The GH/IGF1 response of somatotropinomas to somatostatin analogues (SSA) is associated with their pattern of somatostatin receptor (sst1-sst5) expression. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of a truncated sst5-variant (sst5TMD4) can influence the secretory response of somatotropinomas to SSA-therapy; however, its potential relationship with aggressive features (e.g. invasion/proliferation) is still unknown. Here, we show that sst5TMD4 is present in 50% of non-functioning pituitary-adenomas (NFPA) (n = 30) and 89% of somatotropinomas (n = 36), its expression levels being highest in somatotropinomas > > NFPAs > > > normal pituitaries (negligible expression; n = 8). In somatotropinomas, sst5TMD4 mRNA and protein levels correlated positively, and its expression was directly associated with tumor invasiveness (cavernous/sphenoid sinus), and inversely correlated with age and GH/IGF1 reduction after 3-6 months with octreotide-LAR therapy. GNAS+ somatotropinomas expressed lower sst5TMD4 levels. ROC analysis revealed sst5TMD4 expression as the only marker, within all sst-subtypes, capable to predict tumor invasiveness in somatotropinomas. sst5TMD4 overexpression increased cell viability in cultured somatotropinoma (n = 5). Hence, presence of sst5TMD4 associates with increased aggressive features and worse prognosis in somatotropinomas, thereby providing a potentially useful tool to refine somatotropinoma diagnosis, predict outcome of clinical response to SSA-therapy and develop new therapeutic targets. PMID:25637790

  18. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the (68)Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUVmax reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three (68)Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these (68)Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On (68)Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUVmax) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUVmax-values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUVmax-data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients. Therefore, follow-up with (68)Ga

  19. Purified yeast aspartic protease 3 cleaves anglerfish pro-somatostatin I and II at di- and monobasic sites to generate somatostatin-14 and -28.

    PubMed

    Cawley, N X; Noe, B D; Loh, Y P

    1993-10-18

    Anglerfish somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (aSS-28) are derived from pro-somatostatin I (aPSS-I) and pro-somatostatin II (PSS-II), respectively. Purified yeast aspartic protease 3 (YAP3), was shown to cleave aPSS-I at the Arg81-Lys82 to yield SS-14 and Lys-1SS-14. In contrast, YAP3 cleaved aPSS-II only at the monobasic residue, Arg73 to yield aSS-28. Since the paired basic and monobasic sites are present in both precursors, the results indicate that the structure and conformation of these substrates dictate where cleavage occurs. Furthermore, the data show that YAP3 has specificity for both monobasic and paired basic residues. PMID:8104828

  20. Identification of the promoter sequences involved in the cell specific expression of the rat somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, O M; Hayes, T E; Roos, B; Dixon, J E

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequences containing the 5' flanking region of the rat somatostatin gene were linked to the coding sequence of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. This recombinant plasmid is active in expressing CAT activity in the neuronally derived, somatostatin producing CA-77 cell line. Deletion analyses of the somatostatin promoter show that the sequences proximal to position -60, relative to the cap site are required for expression of this promoter. A 4 base pair deletion of residues -46 through -43 within the somatostatin promoter results in a down mutation in vivo suggesting the existence of an element critical for the expression of the promoter in CA-77 cells. In addition, the somatostatin recombinant and its 5' deletion constructs preferentially express CAT activity in CA-77 cells, whereas only basal level of expression is observed in HeLa, BSC40, and RIN-5F cell lines, pointing to the cell specific nature of this promoter. Images PMID:2886975

  1. Homogeneity in the growth hormone-lowering effect of dopamine and somatostatin in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Oppizzi, G; Botalla, L; Verde, G; Cozzi, R; Liuzzi, A; Chiodini, P G

    1980-09-01

    We have studied the effect of maximally inhibiting doses of dopamine (DA) or somatostatin on GH levels in 39 acromegalic patients. The GH-lowering effects of the two drugs were highly variable in different patients. A significant correlation (r = 0.45; P < 0.01) was found between the percent changes obtained during the infusions of DA (500 microgram/min) and somatostatin (3.33 microgram/min). Pretreatment with L-sulpiride markedly blunted the inhibitory effect of DA but did not affect the response to somatostatin. We conclude that the GH-secreting cells of acromegalic patients contain separate receptors for DA and somatostatin. We hypothesize that the partial or total lack of responsiveness to DA or somatostatin may be due to the loss of receptors for these agents on the GH-secreting neoplastic cells.

  2. Somatostatin in the human heart and comparison with guinea pig and rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Day, S M; Gu, J; Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1985-01-01

    Somatostatin has been shown to have negative inotropic and chronotopic effects and to restore sinus rhythm in some cases of cardiac arrhythmia. Using acid extracts, regions of human heart were examined by radioimmunoassay to determine their somatostatin content. Mean (SD) concentrations of 4.1 (0.8) pmol/g and 2.9 (0.8) pmol/g were found in atrioventricular node and right atria respectively and were significantly higher than in other heart regions. Using fresh heart tissue from guinea pigs, somatostatin was localised to cardiac nerves by immunocytochemistry. Nerves containing somatostatin were most abundant in the atria, where the concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay were 7.6 (1.0) and 2.6 (0.4) pmol/g for right and left atria respectively. Somatostatin contained in cardiac nerves may have a physiological role in the cardiac conduction system. Images PMID:2857086

  3. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  4. Molecular cloning of a somatostatin-28 receptor and comparison of its expression pattern with that of a somatostatin-14 receptor in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhof, W; Wulfsen, I; Schönrock, C; Fehr, S; Richter, D

    1992-01-01

    The tetradecapeptide somatotropin-release inhibiting factor somatostatin-14 regulates the release of peptide hormones and also functions as neurotransmitter. The octacosapeptide somatostatin-28, the N-terminally extended form of somatostatin-14, shows similar biological activities yet with different potencies. Both peptides most likely function through distinct receptors. Here we report on the molecular and functional characterization of a somatostatin-28 receptor (SSR-28) cloned from a rat brain cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence contains an open reading frame for a protein of 428 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 47 kDa. Binding assays using radiolabeled somatostatin-14 and membranes from COS cells transfected with the cloned cDNA show that this receptor, SSR-28, has a higher binding affinity for somatostatin-28 (IC50 = 0.24 nM) than for somatostatin-14 (IC50 = 0.89 nM). RNA blot analysis reveals a 4.4-kilobase mRNA in rat cerebellum and at significantly lower abundance in other brain regions. In situ hybridization indicates that SSR-28 mRNA is present in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellum and in the large cells of the hypoglossal nucleus of the brain stem. Signals for SSR-28 mRNA do not overlap with those of a previously cloned rat receptor that preferentially binds somatostatin-14 (SSR-14). SSR-14 mRNA is found in the medial cerebellar nucleus, horizontal limb of the diagonal band, various hypothalamic nuclei, and in layers IV and V of the cortex. In the rat cerebellum, SSR-14 and SSR-28 mRNAs are developmentally regulated; the levels of the former are highest around birth and levels of the latter are highest at the adult stage. Images PMID:1279674

  5. Somatostatin and macrophage function: modulation of hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor release.

    PubMed

    Chao, T C; Cheng, H P; Walter, R J

    1995-07-21

    Recent studies have shown that somatostatin modulates lymphocyte function, but the effects of somatostatin on macrophage function are not clearly defined. In the present study, peritoneal macrophages (Mluminal diameter) obtained from male rats were treated in vitro with somatostatin or octreotide and their effects on the release of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitrite, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) determined. Macrophages treated with somatostatin (10(-9) M to 10(-7) M) or octreotide (10(-8) M and 10(-7) M) released significantly greater amounts of PMA-stimulated H2O2 than did the untreated controls. In addition, 10(-9) M of somatostatin significantly enhanced PMA-stimulated H2O2 release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. Octreotide had no effect on H2O2 release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. At concentrations of 10(-14) M, 10(-13) M, or greater than 10(-8) M, somatostatin or octreotide suppressed nitrite release by Mluminal diameter. Somatostatin or octreotide did not affect nitrite release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. On the other hand, Mluminal diameter treated with 10(-11) M of somatostatin or octreotide released greater amounts of TNF than did the untreated controls. In contrast, TNF release by Mluminal diameter treated with 10(-9) M to 10(-5) M of somatostatin or 10(-7) M to 10(-5) M of octreotide was less than that of the controls. Anti-TNF antibody (1:1000) caused a reduction in the release of H2O2 and nitrite. These findings demonstrate that somatostatin and octreotide modulate the release of H2O2, nitric oxide, and TNF by Mluminal diameter depending on the concentration of hormones used.

  6. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  7. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Catriona; Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  8. [Summary of work session 4: Effects of calcitonin and somatostatin on the stomach and pancreas--a possible therapeutic principle].

    PubMed

    Goebell, H; Hotz, J

    1976-03-01

    Although calcitonin and somatostatin are polypeptid hormones of entirely different structure, in pharmacological doses they possess a similar effect to secretions of stomach and pancreas. Given intravenously, they generally inhibit the basal secretion of organs, stimulated by pentagastrin or pancreozymin, as well as the contraction of the gallbladder. Orally, calcitonin also suppresses by direct contact the secretion of the stomach. While calcitonin in higher doses shows only very slight and tolerable side effects (nausea, headache), somatostatin acts suppressively on many other hormone-regulated systems. Apart from this, disturbances of blood coagulation in monkeys and man were observed, findings which necessitate very careful application. Therapeutical trials appear reasonable with calcitonin in treating acute pancreatitis, in prophylaxis and treatment of stress ulcers with the danger of bleeding, in intensive care medicine, in preoperative procedure of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome as well as in duodenal ulcers (oral calcitonin). Double blind studies are carried out at present to answer most of these questions (acute pancreatitis, stress ulcers, duodenal ulcers), results of which should definitely be awaited.

  9. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  10. Splanchnic neural regulation of somatostatin secretion in the isolated perfused human pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Brunicardi, F C; Elahi, D; Andersen, D K

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The somatostatin-secreting delta cells in the islets of Langerhans appear to be regulated by neural mechanisms that have not been defined clearly. In this study, the celiac neural bundle of the human pancreas was electrically stimulated in the presence and absence of selective neural antagonists. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The authors previously reported on studies of the splanchnic neural regulation of insulin, glucagon, and pancreatic polypeptide secretion. In these studies, alpha-adrenergic fibers appeared to have a predominant effect, strongly inhibiting the secretion of insulin, glucagon, and pancreatic polypeptide secretion. Cholinergic fibers appeared to stimulate strongly, although beta-adrenergic fibers weakly stimulated, the secretion of these hormones. Investigations of neural regulatory mechanisms governing human somatostatin release in vitro have not been previously reported. METHODS: Pancreata were obtained from eight cadaveric organ donors. The isolated perfused human pancreas technique was used to assess the regulation of somatostatin secretion by the various neural fibers contained within the celiac plexus. The secretory response of somatostatin was examined in the presence of 16.7 mmol/L glucose, with and without neural stimulation, and specific neural antagonists. RESULTS: The basal somatostatin secretion was 88 +/- 26 fmol/g/min and increased 131 +/- 23% (n = 8, p < 0.01) in response to 16.7 mmol/L glucose. The augmentation seen with glucose was inhibited 66 +/- 22% (n = 8, p < 0.05) during celiac neural bundle stimulation. Alpha-adrenergic blockade resulted in a 90 +/- 30% (n = 6, p < 0.01) augmentation of somatostatin release. Beta-adrenergic blockade caused a 13 +/- 2% (n = 6, p < 0.05) suppression of somatostatin release. Complete adrenergic blockade resulted in a 25 +/- 23% (n = 5, p = not significant) inhibition of somatostatin release. Cholinergic blockade resulted in a 40 +/- 10% (n = 6, p < 0.02) suppression of somatostatin

  11. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  12. Expression of Somatostatin Receptor Type 2A and PTEN in Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Is Associated with Tumor Grade but Not with Site of Origin.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Matsuda, Katsuya; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Miura, Shiro; Ueki, Nozomi; Kinoshita, Akira; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are derived from endocrine cells in various organs and share common morphological features. This study aimed to clarify whether NENs of different organs are comparable at the molecular pathologic level. We retrospectively collected 99 cases of NENs from gastro-entero-pancreatic, lung, and other organs and reclassified these according to identical criteria. Grade, site, and molecular expression profile including NE markers, Ki-67, p53, somatostatin receptor type 2A (SSTR2A), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were compared. PTEN immunoreactivity was also compared with genomic copy number by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). No significant differences were observed in the immunoreactivities of NE markers, p53, SSTR2A, or PTEN expression in NENs between the different organ sites. PTEN and p53 functional inactivation along with the loss of membranous SSTR2A expression appeared to be commonly involved in high-grade NEN. FISH results were significantly correlated with the level of PTEN immunoreactivity and with the findings of ddPCR analyses. The demonstration that these tumors are comparable at the molecular level will likely contribute to the broadening of therapeutic options such as the use of somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors against NENs regardless of the affected organ, whereas molecular characterization of tumor grade will be useful for determining treatment strategy. PMID:27256098

  13. Technetium-99m labelling of glycosylated somatostatin-14.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Hiltunen, J; Marquez, M; Nilsson, S; Holmberg, A R

    2001-08-01

    This study presents a technetium-99m labelling method based on organometallic chemistry. It describes the simple mixing of a 99mTc(I)-carbonyl compound [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ with a histidine-tagged somatostatin-dextran (SMS-Dx-His) conjugate. Somatostatin and histidine was coupled to periodate activated dextran. The linkage was stabilised by reductive amination. The conjugate was then radiolabelled with 99mTc by using the 99mTc(CO)3 core. The labelling efficiency was 65-80% and the radiochemical purity > 95%. In the in vitro cysteine challenge, the result showed that 25% of the radiolabel was released after 1 h incubation at 37 degrees C (cysteine-conjugate at 1000:1 molar ratio). The radiolabelled SMS-Dx-His showed similar HPLC profile as the unlabelled conjugate. This labelling method, employing non reducing conditions, is useful for the labelling of peptides containing disulphide bonds. It should be possible to be used also for labelling with rhenium-188 for therapeutic applications.

  14. Role of the somatostatin system in contextual fear memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Christian; Stoppel, Christian; Szinyei, Csaba; Stork, Oliver; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2008-04-01

    Somatostatin has been implicated in various cognitive and emotional functions, but its precise role is still poorly understood. Here, we have made use of mice with somatostatin deficiency, based upon genetic invalidation or pharmacologically induced depletion, and Pavlovian fear conditioning in order to address the contribution of the somatostatin system to associative fear memory. The results demonstrate an impairment of foreground and background contextual but not tone fear conditioning in mice with targeted ablation of the somatostatin gene. These deficits were associated with a decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Both the behavioral and the electrophysiological phenotypes were mimicked in wild-type mice through application of the somatostatin-depleting substance cysteamine prior to fear training, whereas no further deficits were observed upon application in the somatostatin null mutants. These results suggest that the somatostatin system plays a critical role in the acquisition of contextual fear memory, but not tone fear learning, and further highlights the role of hippocampal synaptic plasticity for information processing concerning contextual information.

  15. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a brain-specific somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J F; Xu, Y; Song, J; Berelowitz, M

    1992-01-01

    The PCR and conventional library screening were used to clone the brain-specific somatostatin receptor rSSTR-4 from a rat genomic library. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 384 amino acids and displays structural and sequence homologies with members of the G protein-receptor superfamily. The amino acid sequence of rSSTR-4 is 60% and 48% identical to that of somatostatin receptors SSTR-1 and SSTR-2, respectively, two recently cloned subtypes. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor transiently expressed in COS-1 cells revealed a higher apparent affinity for somatostatin 14 than for somatostatin 28. In contrast, the somatostatin analogs SMS 201-995, IM 4-28, and MK-678 failed to displace specific binding in transfected cells. These characteristics resemble the pharmacological binding properties of the previously described brain-specific somatostatin-receptor subtype. Examination of the tissue distribution of mRNA for rSSTR-4 revealed expression limited to various brain regions with highest levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Thus, based on the pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor, we conclude that rSSTR-4 represents a brain-specific somatostatin receptor. Images PMID:1360663

  16. Identification of a cyclic-AMP-responsive element within the rat somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Montminy, M R; Sevarino, K A; Wagner, J A; Mandel, G; Goodman, R H

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the regulation of somatostatin gene expression by cAMP in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells transfected with the rat somatostatin gene. Forskolin at 10 microM caused a 4-fold increase in somatostatin mRNA levels within 4 hr of treatment in stably transfected cells. Chimeric genes containing the somatostatin gene promoter fused to the bacterial reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase were also induced by cAMP in PC12 cells. To delineate the sequences required for response to cAMP, we constructed a series of promoter deletion mutants. Our studies defined a region between 60 and 29 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site that conferred cAMP responsiveness when placed adjacent to the simian virus 40 promoter. Within the cAMP-responsive element of the somatostatin gene, we observed an 8-base palindrome, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', which is highly conserved in many other genes whose expression is regulated by cAMP. cAMP responsiveness was greatly reduced when the somatostatin fusion genes were transfected into the mutant PC12 line A126-1B2, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase 2. Our studies indicate that transcriptional regulation of the somatostatin gene by cAMP requires protein kinase 2 activity and may depend upon a highly conserved promoter element. Images PMID:2875459

  17. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  18. Effects of exogenous somatostatin and antisomatostatin on serum parameters of the American eel.

    PubMed

    Epple, A; Nibbio, B; Trachtman, M S

    1983-01-01

    1. Bolus injections of a wide range of concns. of somatostatin and of antisomatostatin, in cardiac-cannulated eels had no specific effects on serum osmolality, sodium, potassium and chloride. 2. A presumably physiological dose of somatostatin had a pronounced and sustained hyperglycemic effect beginning 160 min after the injection, which was absent at higher doses. However, an extremely high dose caused an early, temporary hyperglycemia. 3. Antisomatostatin also caused a hyperglycemia, which appeared after 20 min and lasted less than 24 hr. 4. It appears that, in the freshwater eel, somatostatin affects both hyper- and hypoglycemic mechanisms and that these effects depend on its concn and/or site of action.

  19. The amino-acid sequences of sculpin islet somatostatin-28 and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Cutfield, J F

    1987-04-01

    Two pancreatic peptides, somatostatin-28 and peptide YY, have been isolated from the Brockmann bodies of the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin). Following purification by reverse-phase HPLC, each peptide was sequenced completely through to the carboxyl-terminus by gas-phase Edman degradation. Somatostatin-28 was the major form of somatostatin detected and is similar to the gene II product from anglerfish. Peptide YY (36 amino acids) more closely resembles porcine neuropeptide YY and intestinal peptide YY than it does the pancreatic polypeptides. PMID:2883025

  20. Using and interpreting analogue designs.

    PubMed

    Cook, Bryan G; Rumrill, Phillip D

    2005-01-01

    Researchers in rehabilitation counseling and disability studies sometimes use analogue research, which involves materials that approximate or describe reality (e.g., written vignettes, videotaped exemplars) rather than investigating phenomena in real-world settings. Analogue research often utilizes experimental designs, and it thereby frequently possesses a high degree of internal validity. Analogue research allows investigators to exercise tight control over the implementation of the independent or treatment variable and over potentially confounding variables, which enables them to isolate the effects of those treatment variables on selected outcome measures. However, the simulated nature of analogue research presents an important threat to external validity. As such, the generalizability of analogue research to real-life settings and situations may be problematic. These and other issues germane to analogue research in vocational rehabilitation are discussed in this article, illustrated with examples from the contemporary literature.

  1. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in aqueous media. V. The effect of the disulfide bridge on the structural features of the peptide hormone somatostatin-14.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Carelli, Claude; Coïc, Yves-Marie; De Coninck, Joël; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2009-09-24

    To emphasize the role played by the S-S bridge in the structural features of somatostatin-14 (SST-14), newly recorded CD and Raman spectra of this cyclic peptide and its open analogue obtained by Cys-->Ser substitution are presented. CD spectra of both peptides recorded in aqueous solutions in the 100-500 microM concentration range are strikingly similar. They reveal principally that random conformers constitute the major population in both peptides. Consequently, the S-S bridge has no structuring effect at submillimolar concentrations. In methanol, the CD spectrum of somatostatin-14 keeps globally the same spectral shape as that observed in water, whereas its open analogue presents a major population of helical conformers. Raman spectra recorded as a function of peptide concentration (5-20 mM) and also in the presence of 150 mM NaCl provide valuable conformational information. All Raman spectra present a mixture of random and beta-hairpin structures for both cyclic and open peptides. More importantly, the presence or the absence of the disulfide bridge does not seem to influence considerably different populations of secondary structures within this range of concentrations. CD and Raman data obtained in the submillimolar and millimolar ranges of concentrations, respectively, lead us to accept the idea that SST-14 monomers aggregate upon increasing concentration, thus stabilizing beta-hairpin conformations in solution. However, even at high concentrations, random conformers do not disappear. Raman spectra of SST-14 also reveal a concentration effect on the flexibility of the S-S linkage and consequently on that of its cyclic part. In conclusion, although the disulfide linkage does not seem to markedly influence the SST-14 conformational features in aqueous solutions, its presence seems to be necessary to ensure the flexibility of the cyclic part of this peptide and to maintain its closed structure in lower dielectric constant environments.

  2. Heterogeneity in hepatic transport of somatostatin analog octapeptides.

    PubMed

    Fricker, G; Dubost, V; Schwab, D; Bruns, C; Thiele, C

    1994-07-01

    Hepatic transport of the synthetic somatostatin analog octreotide-SMS 201-995, (D)Phe-Cys-Phe-(D)Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys-Throl--and its novel derivative N-alpha-(alpha-D-glucosyl(1-4)-1-deoxy-D-fructosyl)-octreotide--SD Z CO-611, N-alpha-(alpha-D-glucosyl(1-4)-1-deoxy-D-fructosyl)-(D)Phe-Cys-Phe- (D)Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys-Throl--was studied. In rats SMS 201-995 showed a plasma elimination half-life of 1.2 +/- 0.2 hr; that of SDZ CO-611 was 1.9 +/- 0.3 hours. Within 120 min 66% of a mesenterically injected 4.4-nmol dose of SMS 201-995 was excreted in bile, but only 5.3% of SDZ CO-611 was excreted in bile. Biliary concentration of SMS 201-995 showed a maximum enrichment of 540-fold +/- 75-fold over peripheral blood concentration, indicating hepatic transport mechanisms different from simple diffusion. Comparison of plasma profiles of both peptides after mesenteric and femoral administration demonstrated the relative importance of hepatic extraction for SMS 201-995 but not for SDZ CO-611. The mode of extraction was studied by means of multiple-indicator dilution in isolated perfused rat liver, with inulin as nonpermeable marker. Ratio plots, ln([inulin]/[peptide]) vs. time, exhibited decreasing slopes for SMS 201-995, suggesting very rapid binding to hepatocyte membranes. The slope of the ratio plot of (inulin/SDZ CO-611) was almost zero even at low doses (down to 0.2 microgram), implying mainly extracellular distribution and nonhepatic elimination. Binding assays indicated the absence of somatostatin receptors in sinusoidal hepatocyte membranes. However, SMS 201-995 and SDZ CO-611 bound with high affinity to somatostatin receptors in rat cortical membranes. Multiple-indicator dilution experiments in presence of increasing cholyltaurine concentrations suggested an interaction of SMS 201-995 with sinusoidal bile salt transport. In isolated hepatocytes, uptake of SMS 201-995 was saturable and showed mutual inhibition with cholyltaurine. The results indicate that SMS 201-995 transport

  3. Tetrahydro-β-carboline-based spirocyclic lactam as type II' β-turn: application to the synthesis and biological evaluation of somatostatine mimetics.

    PubMed

    Lesma, Giordano; Cecchi, Roberto; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Gobbi, Marco; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Musolino, Manuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Silvani, Alessandra

    2013-03-15

    The synthesis of novel spirocyclic lactams, embodying D-tryptophan (Trp) amino acid as the central core and acting as peptidomimetics, is presented. It relies on the strategic combination of Seebach's self-reproduction of chirality chemistry and Pictet-Spengler condensation as key steps. Investigation of the conformational behavior by molecular modeling, X-ray crystallography, and NMR and IR spectroscopies suggests very stable and highly predictable type II' β-turn conformations for all compounds. Relying on this feature, we also pursued their application to two potential mimetics of the hormone somatostatin, a pharmaceutically relevant natural peptide, which contains a Trp-based type II' β-turn pharmacophore.

  4. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  5. DNA Double Strand Breaks as Predictor of Efficacy of the Alpha-Particle Emitter Ac-225 and the Electron Emitter Lu-177 for Somatostatin Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. Methods To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Results Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5–10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). Conclusion γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and

  6. Cysteamine effects on somatostatin, catecholamines, pineal NAT and melatonin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.M.; Champney, T.H.; Steger, R.W.; Vaughan, M.K.; Reiter, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The thiol reagent cysteamine was administered to adult male rats with the aim of investigating its effect on different neural and pineal components. As expected, immunoreactive somatostatin decreased in the median eminence (ME) (p less than 0.05) and gastric antrum (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine; however, no significant change was observed in the pineal IRS content after drug treatment. A decrease in norepinephrine was observed in the ME (p less than 0.001), hypothalamus (p less than 0.001) and pineal gland (p less than 0.05), together with a rise in ME (p less than 0.005) and hypothalamic dopamine (p less than 0.005) content; these results are consistent with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibiting effect of cysteamine. No effect was observed on hypothalamic serotonin and 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid content. Pineal N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine than after saline, but no statistically significant effect was observed on pineal melatonin content. The mechanism involved in the NAT rise is presumably not related to the known stimulatory effect of norepinephrine, which fell after cysteamine. It is suggested that cysteamine may act at an intracellular level, inhibiting NAT degradation, an effect demonstrated in vitro and thought to be related to a thiol:disulfide exchange mechanism.

  7. Caspase-8-mediated intracellular acidification precedes mitochondrial dysfunction in somatostatin-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Martino, G; Thangaraju, M; Sharma, M; Halwani, F; Shen, S H; Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    2000-03-31

    Activation of initiator and effector caspases, mitochondrial changes involving a reduction in its membrane potential and release of cytochrome c (cyt c) into the cytosol, are characteristic features of apoptosis. These changes are associated with cell acidification in some models of apoptosis. The hierarchical relationship between these events has, however, not been deciphered. We have shown that somatostatin (SST), acting via the Src homology 2 bearing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, exerts cytotoxic action in MCF-7 cells, and triggers cell acidification and apoptosis. We investigated the temporal sequence of apoptotic events linking caspase activation, acidification, and mitochondrial dysfunction in this system and report here that (i) SHP-1-mediated caspase-8 activation is required for SST-induced decrease in pH(i). (ii) Effector caspases are induced only when there is concomitant acidification. (iii) Decrease in pH(i) is necessary to induce reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, cyt c release and caspase-9 activation and (iv) depletion of ATP ablates SST-induced cyt c release and caspase-9 activation, but not its ability to induce effector caspases and apoptosis. These data reveal that SHP-1-/caspase-8-mediated acidification occurs at a site other than the mitochondrion and that SST-induced apoptosis is not dependent on disruption of mitochondrial function and caspase-9 activation.

  8. [Effect of calcitonin, somatostatin and cimetidine on stress ulcer in rats].

    PubMed

    Jakesz, R; Hofbauer, F; Lehr, L; Schiessel, R

    1978-05-01

    The prophylactic effect of calcitonin, somatostatin and cimetidine on stress ulcer formation in rats was investigated in two stress models: restraint + ketamin (4 h) and hypovolemia (4 h). The basis of the comparative study was a 70% inhibition of acid secretion for 4 h in pyloric ligated animals. This was achieved with 1000 microgram/kg somatostatin s.c., 10 microgram/kg calcitonin s.c., and 2 X 100 mumol/kg cimetidine s.c. In restraint stress and ketamin with calcitonin and cimetidine a significantly lower frequency of gastric lesions was found than with somatostatin. The most potent substance in hypovolemia was calcitonin, with a significant difference in the frequency of mucosal lesions to the groups with cimetidine and somatostatin.

  9. New rubrolide analogues as inhibitors of photosynthesis light reactions.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Jodieh O S; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Ramos, Gabriela Álvarez; Varejão, Eduardo V V; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2015-04-01

    Natural products called rubrolides have been investigated as a model for the development of new herbicides that act on the photosynthesis apparatus. This study comprises a comprehensive analysis of the photosynthesis inhibitory ability of 27 new structurally diverse rubrolide analogues. In general, the results revealed that the compounds exhibited efficient inhibition of the photosynthetic process, but in some cases low water solubility may be a limiting factor. To elucidate their mode of action, the effects of the compounds on PSII and PSI, as well as their partial reaction on chloroplasts and the chlorophyll a fluorescence transients were measured. Our results showed that some of the most active rubrolide analogues act as a Hill reaction inhibitors at the QB level by interacting with the D1 protein at the reducing side of PSII. All of the active analogues follow Tice's rule of 5, which indicates that these compounds present physicochemical properties suitable for herbicides.

  10. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences with novel somatostatin ligands: advantages, disadvantages and new prospects.

    PubMed

    Hofland, L J; van der Hoek, J; Feelders, R; van der Lely, A J; de Herder, W; Lamberts, S W J

    2005-01-01

    Since the cloning and characterization of the five human somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes, our understanding of the expression and functional role of the five SSTR subtypes in human (neuro-)endocrine tumors has increased significantly. The majority of human (neuro-)endocrine tumors express multiple SSTR. GH-secreting pituitary adenomas preferentially express SSTR2 and SSTR5, prolactinomas SSTR1 and SSTR5, and corticotroph adenomas express SSTR2 (low number) and predominantly SSTR5s. In addition, gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors frequently express multiple SSTR as well, with SSTR2 being expressed at the highest level. Treatment with the current generation of octapeptide somatostatin-analogs, e.g. octreotide and lanreotide, normalizes circulating GH- and IGF-I levels in approximately 60-70% of acromegalic patients, thereby remaining about one-third of patients uncontrolled. In patients with GEP neuroendocrine tumors, both somatostatin-analogs effectively suppress the production of bioactive peptides and hormones by the tumor cells, resulting in an important improvement of the related clinical symptomatology. However, a considerable proportion of patients experience an escape from treatment within months to several years. Altogether, the current generation of somatostatin analogs are effective medical tools in the treatment of acromegalic patients and of patients with neuroendocrine GEP tumors, but there is certainly a need for novel somatostatin analogs. In recent years, a significant number of novel somatostatin-ligands has been developed. These ligands include SSTR selective-, bi-specific, universal, as well as chimeric dopamine (DA)-somatostatin ligands. In vitro studies using human pituitary adenoma cells demonstrate a more profound inhibition of GH, PRL and ACTH secretion by somatostatin-analogs targeting both SSTR2s and SSTR5s, compared with SSTR2-preferential somatostatin-analogs. This likely reflects the SSTR subtype expression pattern

  11. Somatostatin signaling system as an ancestral mechanism: Myoregulatory activity of an Allatostatin-C peptide in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2016-08-01

    The coordination of physiological processes requires precise communication between cells. Cellular interactions allow cells to be functionally related, facilitating the maintaining of homeostasis. Neuropeptides functioning as intercellular signals are widely distributed in Metazoa. It is assumed that neuropeptides were the first intercellular transmitters, appearing early during the evolution. In Cnidarians, neuropeptides are mainly involved in neurotransmission, acting directly or indirectly on epithelial muscle cells, and thereby controlling coordinated movements. Allatostatins are a group of chemically unrelated neuropeptides that were originally characterized based on their ability to inhibit juvenil hormone synthesis in insects. Allatostatin-C has pleiotropic functions, acting as myoregulator in several insects. In these studies, we analyzed the myoregulatory effect of Aedes aegypti Allatostatin-C in Hydra sp., a member of the phylum Cnidaria. Allatostatin-C peptide conjugated with Qdots revealed specifically distributed cell populations that respond to the peptide in different regions of hydroids. In vivo physiological assays using Allatostatin-C showed that the peptide induced changes in shape and length in tentacles, peduncle and gastrovascular cavity. The observed changes were dose and time dependent suggesting the physiological nature of the response. Furthermore, at highest doses, Allatostatin-C induced peristaltic movements of the gastrovascular cavity resembling those that occur during feeding. In silico search of putative Allatostatin-C receptors in Cnidaria showed that genomes predict the existence of proteins of the somatostatin/Allatostatin-C receptors family. Altogether, these results suggest that Allatostatin-C has myoregulatory activity in Hydra sp, playing a role in the control of coordinated movements during feeding, indicating that Allatostatin-C/Somatostatin based signaling might be an ancestral mechanism.

  12. Somatostatin signaling system as an ancestral mechanism: Myoregulatory activity of an Allatostatin-C peptide in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2016-08-01

    The coordination of physiological processes requires precise communication between cells. Cellular interactions allow cells to be functionally related, facilitating the maintaining of homeostasis. Neuropeptides functioning as intercellular signals are widely distributed in Metazoa. It is assumed that neuropeptides were the first intercellular transmitters, appearing early during the evolution. In Cnidarians, neuropeptides are mainly involved in neurotransmission, acting directly or indirectly on epithelial muscle cells, and thereby controlling coordinated movements. Allatostatins are a group of chemically unrelated neuropeptides that were originally characterized based on their ability to inhibit juvenil hormone synthesis in insects. Allatostatin-C has pleiotropic functions, acting as myoregulator in several insects. In these studies, we analyzed the myoregulatory effect of Aedes aegypti Allatostatin-C in Hydra sp., a member of the phylum Cnidaria. Allatostatin-C peptide conjugated with Qdots revealed specifically distributed cell populations that respond to the peptide in different regions of hydroids. In vivo physiological assays using Allatostatin-C showed that the peptide induced changes in shape and length in tentacles, peduncle and gastrovascular cavity. The observed changes were dose and time dependent suggesting the physiological nature of the response. Furthermore, at highest doses, Allatostatin-C induced peristaltic movements of the gastrovascular cavity resembling those that occur during feeding. In silico search of putative Allatostatin-C receptors in Cnidaria showed that genomes predict the existence of proteins of the somatostatin/Allatostatin-C receptors family. Altogether, these results suggest that Allatostatin-C has myoregulatory activity in Hydra sp, playing a role in the control of coordinated movements during feeding, indicating that Allatostatin-C/Somatostatin based signaling might be an ancestral mechanism. PMID:27288244

  13. Cysteamine-induced decrease of somatostatin in rat brain synaptosomes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, R.; Sperk, G.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of somatostatin depletion induced by cysteamine (2-mercaptoethylamine (CySH)) was studied in isolated nerve endings (synaptosomes) from rat brain in vitro. A dose-dependent reduction of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) was observed which reached its maximal extent (41%) at a concentration of 300 microM CySH after 1-5 min. There was no release of somatostatin into the incubation medium. CySH at concentrations of up to 10 mM did not interfere in the RIA. Among a variety of compounds, structurally related to CySH 4-aminothiophenol, 2-aminothiophenol and N,N-dimethylaminothiol exhibited the highest efficacy in decreasing somatostatin. The disulfide form of CySH cystamine and dimercaprol resulted in about 15% reduction after 10-min incubation, whereas taurine, alanine, cysteine, and mercaptoethanol were inactive. A saturable, sodium-dependent uptake process was found for the disulfide form of (/sup 35/S)CySH cystamine (Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) = 18.6 microM, maximum velocity (Vmax) = 2.3 nmol/mg protein X 3 min) which was inhibited by cysteine (87% at 1 mM). (/sup 35/S)CySH, at concentrations of 20 microM or less, was not stable in buffer solution. It underwent considerable nonenzymatic conversion into its dimeric form (60% at 37 C and 3 min), however it exhibited the same kinetic data for its uptake. Size exclusion HPLC of purified hypothalamic synaptosomes revealed a major SLI peak coeluting with synthetic somatostatin-14 and two minor peaks representing somatostatin-28 and a 13,000 mol wt protein. The three molecular forms of somatostatin were reduced to varied extent by CySH. Our experiments suggest that high affinity uptake of CySH may precede its action in decreasing somatostatin levels.

  14. In vivo somatostatin, vasopressin, and oxytocin synthesis in diabetic rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Fernstrom, J.D.; Fernstrom, M.H.; Kwok, R.P. )

    1990-04-01

    The in vivo labeling of somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin was studied in rat hypothalamus after third ventricular administration of (35S)cysteine to streptozotocin-diabetic and normal rats. Immunoreactive somatostatin levels in hypothalamus were unaffected by diabetes, as was the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into hypothalamic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. In contrast, immunoreactive vasopressin levels in hypothalamus and posterior pituitary (and oxytocin levels in posterior pituitary) were below normal in diabetic rats. Moreover, (35S)cysteine incorporation into hypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin (probably mainly in the paraventricular nucleus because of its proximity to the third ventricular site of label injection) was significantly above normal. The increments in vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were reversed by insulin administration. In vivo cysteine specific activity and the labeling of acid-precipitable protein did not differ between normal and diabetic animals; effects of diabetes on vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were therefore not caused by simple differences in cysteine specific activity. These results suggest that diabetes (1) does not influence the production of somatostatin peptides in hypothalamus but (2) stimulates the synthesis of vasopressin and oxytocin. For vasopressin at least, the increase in synthesis may be a compensatory response to the known increase in its secretion that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes.

  15. Somatostatin therapy protects porcine livers in small-for-size liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hessheimer, A J; Escobar, B; Muñoz, J; Flores, E; Gracia-Sancho, J; Taurá, P; Fuster, J; Rimola, A; García-Valdecasas, J C; Fondevila, C

    2014-08-01

    Small-for-size (SFS) injury occurs in partial liver transplantation due to several factors, including excessive portal inflow and insufficient intragraft responses. We aim to determine the role somatostatin plays in reducing portal hyperperfusion and preventing the cascade of deleterious events produced in small grafts. A porcine model of 20% liver transplantation is performed. Perioperatively treated recipients receive somatostatin and untreated controls standard intravenous fluids. Recipients are followed for up to 5 days. In vitro studies are also performed to determine direct protective effects of somatostatin on hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). At reperfusion, portal vein flow (PVF) per gram of tissue increased fourfold in untreated animals versus approximately threefold among treated recipients (p = 0.033). Postoperatively, markers of hepatocellular, SEC and HSC injury were improved among treated animals. Hepatic regeneration occurred in a slower but more orderly fashion among treated grafts; functional recovery was also significantly better. In vitro studies revealed that somatostatin directly reduces HSC activation, though no direct effect on SEC was found. In SFS transplantation, somatostatin reduces PVF and protects SEC in the critical postreperfusion period. Somatostatin also exerts a direct cytoprotective effect on HSC, independent of changes in PVF. PMID:24935350

  16. Depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat central nervous system by cysteamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Landry, D.; Millard, W.J.; Badger, T.M.; Arnold, M.A.; Martin, J.B.

    1982-02-01

    Selective neurotoxins have been of value in providing a means for specifically interfering with the actions of endogenous neurotransmitter candidates. Others have shown cysteamine (CSH) to deplete the gastrointestinal tract and hypothalamus of rats of immunoreactive somatostatin, suggesting a toxic action of that compound directed against somatostatin-containing cells. The present study further defines the actions of cysteamine on somatostatin in the central nervous system. (CNS). Cysteamine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously results in a depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in the retina, brain, and cervical spinal cord of rats. The effect is demonstrable at doses of 30 mg/kg of body weight and above, occurs within 2 to 4 hr of a single injection of the drug, and is largely reversible within 1 week. The mean depletion of SLI observed within the CNS varies from 38% in cerebral cortex to 65% in cervical spinal cord 24 hr following administration of CSH, 300 mg/kg of body weight, s.c. By gel permeation chromatography, all molecular weight forms of SLI are affected, with the largest reductions in those forms that co-chromatograph with synthetic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. These results indicate that CSH has a generalized, rapid, and largely reversible effect in depleting SLI from the rat CNS.

  17. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined. PMID:27575269

  18. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  19. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  20. Serial follow-up of presurgical treatment using pasireotide long-acting release with or without octreotide long-acting release for naïve active acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Tseng, Ham-Min; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the serial changes of GH and IGF-1 in seven patients with naïve, active acromegaly following presurgical treatment of the somatostatin analog pasireotide long-acting release (LAR) and octreotide LAR. The patients were treated with pasireotide LAR with or without octreotide LAR for two years and underwent transsphenoidal adenomectomy. After treatment with the somatostatin analogs, the surgical cure rate was similar to that in patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery alone. Diabetes insipidus was not identified in any patients after the operation. Pasireotide LAR was effective on GH as well as IGF-1 suppression and tumor size decreasing when used as the primary therapy. Future large-population studies to investigate the surgical curative rate after presurgical treatment with somatostatin analogs in patients with acromegaly and macroadenomas close to the cavernous sinus are warranted. However, that hyperglycemia developed following pre-surgical treatment with pasireotide should take into consideration. PMID:27117887

  1. A high molecular weight form of somatostatin-28 (1-12)-like immunoreactive substance without somatostatin-14 immunoreactivity in the rat pancreas. Evidence that somatostatin-14 synthesis can occur independently of somatostatin-28.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Y C

    1983-01-01

    Synthesis of somatostatin-14 (S-14) could occur through direct enzymatic processing of precursor somatostatin (prosomatostatin) or via sequential breakdown of prosomatostatin leads to somatostatin-28 (S-28) leads to S-14. If direct processing is important, it should theoretically generate S-14 and a molecule equivalent to prosomatostatin without the S-14 sequence. In an attempt to identify such a molecule, I characterized the molecular forms of S-28(1-12)-like immunoreactivity (S-28(1-12) LI) in the rat pancreas and compared the relative amounts of these forms with those of S-14-like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI). Pancreatic extracts were chromatographed on Sephadex G-50 and Sephadex G-75 columns (Pharmacia Fine Chemicals Inc., Piscataway, NJ) under denaturing conditions and immunoreactivity in the eluting fractions was analyzed by region-specific radioimmunoassays (RIAs). For RIA of S-28(1-12) LI we used a newly developed rabbit antibody R 21 B, 125I-Tyr12 S-28(1-14), and S-28(1-12) standards. This system detects S-28, S-28(1-12), high molecular weight forms of S-28(1-12), but not S-14. S-14 LI was measured using antibody R149, which detects S-14, S-28, and higher molecular weight S-14-like substances, but not S-28(1-12). Three forms of S-28(1-12) LI were identified: Mr 9,000-11,000, Mr 1,200 (corresponding to S-28(1-12), and Mr less than 1,000, comprising, respectively, 35, 53, and 12% of total immunoreactivity. The relative abundance of the 9,000-11,000 mol wt S-28(1-12) LI material was unchanged following removal of S-14 LI from pancreatic extracts by affinity chromatography before gel filtration. Serial dilutions of fractions containing 9-11,000 and 1,200 mol wt materials exhibited parallelism with synthetic S-28(1-12). The total pancreatic concentration of S-28(1-12) LI was 1.56 pmol/mg protein, of which S-28(1-12) accounted for 0.83 pmol/mg protein and 9-11,000 S-28(1-12) LI comprised 0.55 pmol/mg protein. Pancreatic S-14 LI concentration was 2.07 pmol

  2. Radioiodine and 211At-labeled guanidinomethyl halobenzoyl octreotate conjugates: potential peptide radiotherapeutics for somatostatin receptor-positive cancers.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Boskovitz, Abraham; Shankar, Sriram; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2004-12-01

    Derivatives of the somatostatin analogues octreotide and octreotate labeled with radioiosotopes are used in the diagnosis and therapy of somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-positive tumors. A method has been devised to synthesize {N-(4-guanidinomethyl-3-iodobenzoyl)-Phe1-octreotate (GMIBO). Receptor binding assay and scatchard analysis yielded a Kd of 4.83 +/- 0.19 nM for this peptide. Derivatives of this peptide labeled with radioiodine ([*I]GMIBO) and the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen 211At N-(3-[211At]astato-4-guanidinomethylbenzoyl)-Phe1-octreotate; [211At]AGMBO} were prepared in a single step from a tin precursor in radiochemical yields of 30-35% and 15-20%, respectively. Paired-label internalization assays performed with the SSTR-positive D341 Med human medulloblastoma cell line demonstrated that [125I]GMIBO and [211At]AGMBO were specifically internalized 20-40% more than Nalpha-(1-deoxy-D-fructosyl)-[131I]I-Tyr3-octreotate ([131I]I-Glu-TOCA), the radioiodinated octreotide derivative previously shown to exhibit maximum internalization in this cell line. Uptake of [131I]GMIBO in D341 Med subcutaneous xenografts in a murine model (8.34 +/- 1.82 versus 8.10 +/- 2.23% ID/g at 1h) and SSTR-expressing normal tissues was comparable to that of [125I]I-Glu-TOCA and was shown to be specific. However, the uptake of [131I]GMIBO also was substantially higher in liver (16.9 +/- 3.15 versus 1.39 +/- 0.45% ID/g at 1 h) and in kidneys (44.33 +/- 6.47 versus 3.44 +/- 0.68% ID/g at 1h) compared to that of [125I]I-Glu-TOCA. These data suggest that these novel peptide conjugates retain their specificity for SSTR both in vitro and in vivo; however, because of their higher accumulation in normal tissues they would be best applied in settings amenable to loco-regional administration such as medulloblastoma neoplastic meningitis. PMID:15572196

  3. Mechanism of action of somatostatin: an overview of receptor function and studies of the molecular characterization and purification of somatostatin receptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Murthy, K K; Escher, E E; Banville, D; Spiess, J; Srikant, C B

    1990-09-01

    To determine whether somatostatin receptor subtypes arise from molecular heterogeneity of the receptor protein, we have cross-linked the putative receptor in normal rat tissues and in AtT-20 and GH3 cells, both chemically with SS-14, SS-28 and Tyr3 SMS ligands, as well as by photoaffinity labeling with an azido derivative of Tyr3 SMS (EE 581). Three prominent somatostatin receptor proteins of 58-kDa, 32-kDa, and 27-kDa size have been identified. These proteins exhibit a tissue-specific distribution, ligand selectivity, and relative preference for SS-14 and SS-28 binding, and thus qualify as somatostatin receptor subtypes. Using EE 581 as a photoaffinity probe, the 58-kDa and 32-kDa proteins have been purified to homogeneity from brain and AtT-20 cells by successive SDS-PAGE. The 58-kDa form has been trypsinized and amino acid sequence data obtained from four tryptic fragments. With the help of synthetic oligonucleotides derived from these sequences, work is currently in progress to clone the 58-kDa protein to elucidate its complete sequence, its expression, and its functional relationship to the somatostatin receptor and its pharmacological subtypes.

  4. Regulation of somatostatins and their receptors in fish.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Laura E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2005-05-15

    The multifunctional nature of the somatostatin (SS) family of peptides results from a multifaceted signaling system consisting of many forms of SS peptides that bind to a variety of receptor (SSTR) subtypes. Research in fish has contributed important information about the components, function, evolution, and regulation of this system. Somatostatins or mRNAs encoding SSs have been isolated from over 20 species of fish. Peptides and deduced peptides differ in their amino acid chain length and/or composition, and most species of fish possess more than one form of SS. The structural heterogeneity of SSs results from differential processing of the hormone precursor, preprosomatostatin (PPSS), and from the existence of multiple genes that give rise to multiple PPSSs. The PPSS genes appear to have arisen through a series of gene duplication events over the course of vertebrate evolution. The numerous PPSSs of fish are differentially expressed, both in terms of the distribution among tissues and in terms of the relative abundance within a tissue. Accumulated evidence suggests that nutritional state, season/stage of sexual maturation, and many hormones [insulin (INS), glucagon, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and 17beta-estradiol (E2)] regulate the synthesis and release of particular SSs. Fish and mammals possess multiple SSTRs; four different SSTRs have been described in fish and several of these occur as isoforms. SSTRs are also wide spread and are differentially expressed, both in terms of distribution of tissues as well as in terms of relative abundance within tissues. The pattern of distribution of SSTRs may underlie tissue-specific responses of SSs. The synthesis of SSTR mRNA and SS-binding capacity are regulated by nutritional state and numerous hormones (INS, GH, IGF-I, and E2). Accumulated evidence suggests the possibility of both tissue- and subtype-specific mechanisms of regulation. In many instances, there appears to be coordinate

  5. Receptor binding of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 in rat brain: differential modulation by nucleotides and ions.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Dahan, A; Craig, C

    1990-02-01

    The tissue-selective binding of the two principal bioactive forms of somatostatin, somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (SS-28), their ability to modulate cAMP-dependent and -independent regulation of post-receptor events to different degrees and the documentation of specific labelling of SS receptor subtypes with SS-28 but not SS-14 in discrete regions of rat brain suggest the existence of distinct SS-14 and SS-28 binding sites. Receptor binding of SS-14 ligands has been shown to be modulated by nucleotides and ions, but the effect of these agents on SS-28 binding has not been studied. In the present study we investigated the effects of adenine and guanine nucleotides as well as monovalent and divalent cations on rat brain SS receptors quantitated with radioiodinated analogs of SS-14 ([125I-Tyr11]SS14, referred to in this paper as SS-14) and SS-28 ([Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25] SS-28, referred to as LTT* SS-28) in order to determine if distinct receptor sites for SS-14 and SS-28 could be distinguished on the basis of their modulation by nucleotides and ions. GTP as well as ATP exerted a dose-dependent inhibition (over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M) of the binding of the two radioligands. The nucleotide inhibition of binding resulted in a decrease the Bmax of the SS receptors, the binding affinity remaining unaltered. GTP (10(-4) M) decreased the Bmax of LTT* SS-28 binding sites to a greater extent than ATP (145 +/- 10 and 228 +/- 16 respectively, compared to control value of 320 +/- 20 pmol mg-1). Under identical conditions GTP was less effective than ATP in reducing the number of T* SS-14 binding sites (Bmax = 227 +/- 8 and 182 +/- 15, respectively, compared to 340 +/- 15 pmol mg-1 in the absence of nucleotides). Monovalent cations inhibited the binding of both radioligands, Li+ and Na+ inhibited the binding of T* SS-14 to a greater extent than K+. The effect of divalent cations on the other hand was varied. At low concentration (2 mM) Mg2+, Ba2

  6. Somatostatin-Expressing Inhibitory Interneurons in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Yavorska, Iryna; Wehr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons. PMID:27746722

  7. Regulation of pancreatic somatostatin gene expression by insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed

    Ehrman, Melissa M; Melroe, Gregory T; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2005-05-12

    Rainbow trout were used as a model system to study the effects of insulin and glucagon on the expression of preprosomatostatins (PPSS). We previously showed that the endocrine pancreas of trout contains three mRNAs that encode for distinct somatostatin-containing peptides: PPSS I, which contains somatostain-14 (SS-14) at its C-terminus, and two separate PPSS IIs, PPSS II' and PPSS II'', each containing [Tyr7, Gly10]-SS-14 at their C-terminus. Rainbow trout injected (100 ng/g body weight) with insulin displayed elevated expression of PPSS II' and PPSS II'' mRNAs. Glucagon-injected (100 ng/g body weight) animals displayed elevated pancreatic expression of all PPSS mRNAs compared to saline-injected control animals. Insulin directly stimulated the expression of pancreatic PPSS II' and PPSS II'' mRNAs in vitro in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of 4mM glucose. Glucagon, in the presence of 10mM glucose, directly stimulated the expression of all PPSS mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. These results indicate that the pancreatic expression of PPSS mRNAs is differentially regulated by insulin and glucagon and that the regulatory pattern is dependent on glucose concentration. PMID:15866425

  8. Somatostatin triggers rhythmic electrical firing in hypothalamic GHRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Guillaume; Mitutsova, Violeta; Barre, Alexander; Granier, Manon; Fontanaud, Pierre; Chazalon, Marine; Carmignac, Danielle; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Low, Malcolm J.; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Hodson, David J.; Mollard, Patrice; Méry, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons orchestrate body growth/maturation and have been implicated in feeding responses and ageing. However, the electrical patterns that dictate GHRH neuron functions have remained elusive. Since the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is considered to be a primary oscillator of the GH axis, we examined its acute effects on GHRH neurons in brain slices from male and female GHRH-GFP mice. At the cellular level, SST irregularly suppressed GHRH neuron electrical activity, leading to slow oscillations at the population level. This resulted from an initial inhibitory action at the GHRH neuron level via K+ channel activation, followed by a delayed, sst1/sst2 receptor-dependent unbalancing of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The oscillation patterns induced by SST were sexually dimorphic, and could be explained by differential actions of SST on both GABAergic and glutamatergic currents. Thus, a tripartite neuronal circuit involving a fast hyperpolarization and a dual regulation of synaptic inputs appeared sufficient in pacing the activity of the GHRH neuronal population. These “feed-forward loops” may represent basic building blocks involved in the regulation of GHRH release and its downstream sexual specific functions. PMID:27072430

  9. Is there a gender difference of somatostatin-receptor density in the human brain?

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Maschek, Wilhelmine; Crespillo, Carmen; Esteva, Isabel; Soriguer, Federico

    2002-01-01

    Animal experiments and observations in human brains have convincingly shown that sexual differentiation not only concerns the genitalia but also the brain. This has been investigated also in the light of a possible explanation of a presumed biological aetiology of transsexuality. The volume of the central subdivision of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, a brain area that is essential for sexual behaviour, has been reported to be larger in men than in women. Additionally, the number of somatostatin expressing neurons in this region was shown to be higher in men than in women. As neuronal production of somatostatin is involved the idea is striking whether somatostatin-receptor density in the cortex of cerebral hemispheres might be related to gender identity. We investigated in vivo the density of somatostatin-receptors in selected regions of the human brain in both sexes by means of receptor scintigraphy. Basal ganglia tracer uptake of 111-In-Pentreotide was equally low in both genders at 0,80% +/ 0,26 (related to tracer uptake of the whole brain layer). Temporal cortex accumulated at 2,9% +/ 1,1 in men and at 2,3% +/ 0,76 in women. Frontal brain region had an uptake of 3,0% +/ 1,4 in male and of 2,5% +/ 1,3 in female. This shows a tendency in males for relatively augmented uptake indicating higher somatostatin receptor density in temporal and frontal cerebral cortex.

  10. Bak Foong Pills induce an analgesic effect by inhibiting nociception via the somatostatin pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Cui, Yu Gui; So, Siu Cheung; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Dysmenorrhoea, defined as cramping pain in the lower abdomen occurring before or during menstruation, affects, to varying degrees, up to 90% of women of child-bearing age. We investigated whether BFP (Bak Foong Pills), a traditional Chinese medicine treatment for dysmenorrhoea, possesses analgesic properties. Results showed that BFP was able to significantly reduce pain responses following subchronic treatment for 3 days, but not following acute (1 h) treatment in response to acetic acid-induced writhing in C57/B6 mice. The analgesic effect was not due to inhibition of COX (cyclo-oxygenase) activity, evidenced by the lack of inhibition of prostacyclin and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) production. Molecular analysis revealed that BFP treatment modulated the expression of a number of genes in the spinal cord of mice subjected to acetic acid writhing. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis of spinal cord samples showed that both sst4 (somatostatin receptor 4) and sst2 receptor mRNA, but not μOR (μ-opiate receptor) and NK1 (neurokinin-1) receptor mRNA, were down-regulated following BFP treatment, thus implicating somatostatin involvement in BFP-induced analgesia. Administration of c-som (cyclo-somatostatin), a somatostatin antagonist, prior to acetic acid-induced writhing inhibited the analgesic effect. Thus subchronic treatment with BFP has anti-nociceptive qualities mediated via the somatostatin pathway. PMID:21980955

  11. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Wen; Li, Ying; Mao, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Bing; Song, Bing-Bing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive growth hormone (GH) is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs) and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG) and octreotide long-acting release (LAR), and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4-6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated with presurgical SA may be achieved, although controversy of such adjuvant therapy exists. Combination of SA and pegvisomant or cabergoline shows advantages in some specific cases. Thus, an individual treatment program should be established for each patient under a full evaluation of the risks and benefits. PMID:24421637

  12. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-wen; Li, Ying; Mao, Zhi-gang; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Xiao-bing; Song, Bing-bing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yong-hong; Wang, Hai-jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive growth hormone (GH) is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs) and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG) and octreotide long-acting release (LAR), and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4–6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated with presurgical SA may be achieved, although controversy of such adjuvant therapy exists. Combination of SA and pegvisomant or cabergoline shows advantages in some specific cases. Thus, an individual treatment program should be established for each patient under a full evaluation of the risks and benefits. PMID:24421637

  13. Review of Insulin and its Analogues in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mane, Krishnappa; Chaluvaraju, KC; Niranjan, MS; Zaranappa, TR; Manjuthej, TR

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where in human body does not produce or properly uses insulin, a hormone that is required to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy. Diabetes finally leads to more complications and to prevent these complications insulin and its analogues are used. After more than half a century of treating diabetics with animal insulin’s, recombinant DNA technologies and advanced protein chemistry made human insulin preparations available in the early 1980s. As the next step, over the last decade, insulin analogues were constructed by changing the structure of the native protein with the goal of improving the therapeutic properties of it, because the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rapid, intermediate and long-acting preparations of human insulin make it almost impossible to achieve sustained normoglycemia. The first clinically available insulin analogue, lispro, confirmed the hopes by showing that improved glycaemic control can be achieved without an increase in hypoglycaemic events. Two new insulin analogues, insulin glargine and insulin aspart, have recently been approved for clinical use in the United States and several other analogues are being intensively tested. PMID:24826038

  14. Characterization of a somatostatin-28 generating metallo-endoprotease from rat brain cytosol.

    PubMed

    Beinfeld, M C; Bourdais, J; Morel, A; Kuks, P F; Cohen, P

    1989-04-28

    Brain cytosol contains a neutral metallo-protease of about 80,000 which cleaves a substrate containing the site at which mammalian prosomatostatin is cleaved to generate somatostatin 28 in vivo. This represents a cleavage on the carboxyl side of a single arginine residue at an Arg-Ser bond. The enzyme was unable to cleave several other substrates containing single arginine residues or two substrates containing an Arg-Lys or Lys-Arg pair. When it was incubated with anglerfish pancreatic prosomatostatin, it produced significant quantities of a peptide which co-eluted with somatostatin 28 II. Based on the ability of this enzyme to cleave small and large substrates related to somatostatin, it is a potential candidate for the enzymes which cleaves prosomatostatin in vivo. PMID:2566306

  15. Regulation of hypothalamic somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone mRNA levels by inhibin.

    PubMed

    Carro, E; Señarís, R M; Mallo, F; Diéguez, C

    1999-03-20

    Although it is well established that inhibin plays a major role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, its influence in the regulation of other neuroendocrine functions is still poorly understood. Recent results indicate that inhibin suppresses plasma GH levels, but its site of action is yet unknown. Therefore, in the present work we investigated the effects of inhibin on somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus by 'in situ' hybridization. We found that inhibin administration (4, 12 and 24 h, i.c.v.) led to an increase in somatostatin mRNA levels in the periventricular nucleus, and to a decrease in GHRH mRNA content in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that inhibin regulates the hypothalamic levels of somatostatin and GHRH mRNA.

  16. Developmental change and molecular properties of somatostatin receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.

    1989-04-14

    The postnatal development and molecular properties of somatostatin receptor were studied in rat cerebral cortex. With (/sup 125/I-Tyr11)SRIF as a radiolabeled ligand, the specific ligand binding to crude membrane increased transiently in the early phase of postnatal development and then decreased. This increase of somatostatin binding was mainly due to the increased number of binding sites. The two subtypes classified by Tran et al., SSA and SSB, were confirmed and the studies on the relative amount of the subtypes revealed that more SSA subtype was expressed compared with SSB subtype during a week after birth, but, thereafter, both subtypes were almost equally expressed throughout the developmental stages tested. Molecular weight of the covalently labeled somatostatin receptor (SSA subtype), which was determined with the aid of the cross-linking agents, was estimated to be approximately 71,000 with no intramolecular disulfide bond.

  17. Mapping of somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the alpaca (Lama pacos) brainstem.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Eliana; Sánchez, Manuel Lisardo; Aguilar, Luís Ángel; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Ángel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the distribution of cell bodies and fibers containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the alpaca brainstem. Immunoreactive fibers were widely distributed throughout the whole brainstem: 34 brainstem nuclei/regions showed a high or a moderate density of these fibers. Perikarya containing the peptide were widely distributed throughout the mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata. Cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) were observed in the lateral and medial divisions of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, reticular formation (mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata), inferior colliculus, periaqueductal gray, superior colliculus, pericentral division of the dorsal tegmental nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, nucleus of the trapezoid body, vestibular nucleus, motor dorsal nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, nucleus praepositus hypoglossi, and in the substantia nigra. This widespread distribution indicates that somatostatin-28 (1-12) is involved in multiple physiological actions in the alpaca brainstem.

  18. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-01

    of an aromatic binding pocket such as that for Trp(8) of SRIF-14. Conversely, these calculations accommodate the experimental findings that pyrazin-2-ylmethyl and pyridinylmethyl substituents at C4- of C1-indole-substituted glycosides afford higher affinities at sst4 than the C4-benzyl group of (+)-2. This result is consistent with the high electron density in the plane of the heterocycle depicted in Figure 6 which can accept hydrogen bonds from the C4 binding pocket of the receptor. Unexpectedly, we found that the 2-fluoropyridin-5-ylmethyl analogue (+)-14 more closely resembles the binding affinity of (+)-8 than that of (+)-2, thus suggesting that (+)-14 represents a rare example of a carbon linked fluorine atom acting as a hydrogen bond acceptor. We attribute this result to the ability of the proton to bind the nitrogen and fluorine atoms simultaneously in a bifurcated arrangement. At the NK1 receptor of substance P (SP), the free hydroxyl at C4 optimizes affinity.

  19. Somatostatin Improved B Cells Mature in Macaques during Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Tan, Qinghua; Hu, Bin; Wu, Hao; Wang, Chunhui; Liu, Rui; Tang, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Aims Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion has been taken as an important pathophysiological process for multiple organ dysfunctions in critical patients. Recent studies reported that dual expression programs of the B cells receptors and Toll-like receptors on B-lymphocytes permit these ubiquitous cells to integrate both adaptive and innate immune functions. Our previous studies found that somatostatin inhibited the intestinal inflammatory injury after ischemia-reperfusion in macaques. However, the changes of B cells and the effects of somatostatin on B cells after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion were unclear. Methods 15 macaques were divided into control, intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and somatostatin pretreatment groups. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify the distributions of adaptive and innate immunity markers in the iliac mucosa. Hmy2.cir B lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured in vitro study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure IgM, IL-6 and SIgA, and the expressions of B cells transcription factors, PAX-5 and BLIMP-1, were detected by Western blotting. Results B2 lymphocytes in normal Peyer’s patches were presented the phenotype of PAX-5+CD20+CD5-. Ischemia-reperfusion increased the numbers and sizes of Peyer’s patches but with PAX-5+CD20-CD5- B cells, an unmatured set of B cells. Somatostatin partly kept the phenotype of mature B cells during ischemia-reperfusion. The innate immunity of B cells was inhibited whereas the adaptive immunity was increased in the intestinal mucosa in the somatostatin group, compared to the ischemia-reperfusion group. In vitro, somatostatin significantly inhibited IL-6 and promoted IgM by increasing the expression of both PAX-5 and BLIMP-1 in the proinflammatory condition. Conclusion Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion resulted in the proliferation of unmatured B cells which were involved in the augmentation of innate immunity. Somatostatin, with a bi-directional regulation function on innate as well as

  20. Chroman-4-one and chromone based somatostatin β-turn mimetics.

    PubMed

    Fridén-Saxin, Maria; Seifert, Tina; Malo, Marcus; da Silva Andersson, Krystle; Pemberton, Nils; Dyrager, Christine; Friberg, Annika; Dahlén, Kristian; Wallén, Erik A A; Grøtli, Morten; Luthman, Kristina

    2016-05-23

    A scaffold approach has been used to develop somatostatin β-turn mimetics based on chroman-4-one and chromone ring systems. Such derivatives could adopt conformations resembling type II or type II' β-turns. Side chain equivalents of the crucial Trp8 and Lys9 in somatostatin were introduced in the 2- and 8-positions of the scaffolds using efficient reactions. Interestingly, this proof-of-concept study shows that 4 and 9 have Ki-values in the low μM range when evaluated for their affinity for the sst2 and sst4 receptors.

  1. Similarity in drugs: reflections on analogue design.

    PubMed

    Wermuth, Camille G

    2006-04-01

    A survey of novel small-molecule therapeutics reveals that the majority of them result from analogue design and that their market value represents two-thirds of all small-molecule sales. In natural science, the term analogue, derived from the Latin and Greek analogia, has always been used to describe structural and functional similarity. Extended to drugs, this definition implies that the analogue of an existing drug molecule shares structural and pharmacological similarities with the original compound. Formally, this definition allows the establishment of three categories of drug analogues: analogues possessing chemical and pharmacological similarities (direct analogues); analogues possessing structural similarities only (structural analogues); and chemically different compounds displaying similar pharmacological properties (functional analogues). PMID:16580977

  2. Reduced Somatostatin in Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Adam; Kota, Rama S.; Lewis, David A.; Sibille, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests a central role for dysfunction of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Underlying mechanisms may include altered GABAergic function. Expression of somatostatin (SST), an inhibitory neuropeptide localized to a subset of GABA neurons, has been shown to be lower in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male MDD subjects. Here, to investigate whether alterations in SST may contribute to sgACC dysfunction in MDD, and whether the alterations display sex-specificity, we measured sgACC SST at the mRNA and precursor peptide levels in a large cohort of subjects with MDD. SST mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the postmortem sgACC from male (n=26) and female (n=25) subjects with MDD and sex-matched subjects with no psychiatric diagnosis (n=51). Prepro-SST protein levels were assessed in a subset of subjects (n=42 pairs) by semi-quantitative western blot. The mRNA expression of SST was significantly reduced by 38% in female subjects and by 27% in male subjects with MDD. The characteristic age-related decline in SST expression was observed in control (Pearson R=−0.357, p=0.005) but not MDD (R=−0.104, p=0.234) subjects, as low expression was detected across ages in MDD subjects. Protein expression was similarly reduced by 19% in both MDD groups, and findings were more robust in female (p=0.0056) than in males (p=0.0373) compared to respective controls. In conclusion, low SST represents a robust pathological finding in MDD. Specifically, alterations in SST signaling and/or SST-bearing GABA neurons may represent a critical pathophysiological entity that contributes to sgACC dysfunction and that matches the high female vulnerability to develop MDD. PMID:21232602

  3. Immunohistochemical distribution of somatostatin and somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) in hypothalamus of ApoD knockout mice brain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ujendra

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, the expression of somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) was determined in the hypothalamus of wild-type (wt) and apolipoprotein D knockout (ApoD(-/-)) mice brain. SST-like immunoreactivity, while comparable in most regions of hypothalamus, diminished significantly in arcuate nucleus of ApoD(-/-) mice. SSTR1 strongly localized in all major hypothalamic nuclei as well as in the median eminence and ependyma of the third ventricle of wt mice brain. SSTR1-like immunoreactivity increases in hypothalamus except in paraventricular nucleus of ApoD(-/-) mice. SSTR2 was well expressed in most of the hypothalamic regions whereas it decreases significantly in ventromedial and arcuate nucleus of ApoD(-/-) mice. SSTR3 and SSTR4-like immunoreactivity increases in ApoD(-/-) mice in all major nuclei of hypothalamus, median eminence, and ependymal cells of third ventricle. SSTR5 is well expressed in ventromedial and arcuate nucleus whereas weakly expressed in paraventricular nucleus. In comparison to wt, ApoD(-/-) mice exhibit increased SSTR5-like immunoreactivity in paraventricular nuclei and decreased receptor expression in ventromedial hypothalamus and arcuate nucleus. In conclusion, the changes in hypothalamus of ApoD(-/-) mice may indicate potential role of ApoD in regulation of endocrine functions of somatostatin in a receptor-dependent manner.

  4. Recruitment of β-Arrestin into Neuronal Cilia Modulates Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 3 Ciliary Localization

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jill A.; Schmid, Cullen L.; Bley, Elizabeth; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Bohn, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential sensory and signaling organelles present on nearly every mammalian cell type. Defects in primary cilia underlie a class of human diseases collectively termed ciliopathies. Primary cilia are restricted subcellular compartments, and specialized mechanisms coordinate the localization of proteins to cilia. Moreover, trafficking of proteins into and out of cilia is required for proper ciliary function, and this process is disrupted in ciliopathies. The somatostatin receptor subtype 3 (Sstr3) is selectively targeted to primary cilia on neurons in the mammalian brain and is implicated in learning and memory. Here, we show that Sstr3 localization to cilia is dynamic and decreases in response to somatostatin treatment. We further show that somatostatin treatment stimulates β-arrestin recruitment into Sstr3-positive cilia and this recruitment can be blocked by mutations in Sstr3 that impact agonist binding or phosphorylation. Importantly, somatostatin treatment fails to decrease Sstr3 ciliary localization in neurons lacking β-arrestin 2. Together, our results implicate β-arrestin in the modulation of Sstr3 ciliary localization and further suggest a role for β-arrestin in the mediation of Sstr3 ciliary signaling. PMID:26503786

  5. Chemical cross-linking of somatostatin receptors in rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1986-09-14

    Adrenocortical somatostatin receptors have been shown to interact with somatostatin-14 (S-14) and somatostatin-28 (S-28). To determine whether these peptides interact with the same or different receptor proteins, we chemically cross-linked these receptors using disuccinimidyl suberate to radioligands prepared from tyrosinated S-14 and S-28 analogs. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent autoradiography of [125I-Tyr11] S-14 and [Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25] S-28 cross-linked to their binding sites following solubilization in the presence of 50 mM DTT revealed the presence of a single labelled protein of Mr = 200,000. When the cross-linked material was treated under non-reducing conditions, this band was not observed. Furthermore, addition of excess S-14 and S-28 at the time of binding inhibited the incorporation of both radioligands into the receptor protein. These results demonstrate that adrenocortical membrane receptors for somatostatin contain a single receptor protein sub-unit or sub-units of identical size which interact with both S-14 and S-28.

  6. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  7. Effect of perioperative somatostatin administration of sphincteroplasty-induced increase of amylase.

    PubMed

    Roncoroni, L; De Bernardinis, M; Violi, V; Montanari, M; Peracchia, A

    1986-06-01

    Twenty patients undergoing sphincteroplasty for cholelithiasis were randomly divided into two groups of 10. The former (T) were treated with a 4-h somatostatin intravenous drip (250 micrograms/h), started at the beginning of operation, while the latter (C) made up the control group. Serum and urine amylase, amylase creatinine clearance ratio, and liver function tests were assessed for 2 days before surgery, after the operation and for a period of 5 postoperative days. Homogeneity between the two series was verified in experimental conditions. Statistical differences occurred postoperatively in amylase creatinine clearance ratio, which proved higher in C group, and gamma-GT, which was higher in T group. Short-term somatostatin administration proved effective in reducing the postoperative amylase creatinine clearance ratio, although more evident results are reported after long-term administration. Cholestasis or any serious impairment in liver function did not occur, suggesting the suitability of somatostatin use even in patients with jaundice. Since a relationship between postoperative amylase levels and risk of pancreatitis has not yet been proved, the value of somatostatin in the prevention of postoperative pancreatitis after sphincteroplasty needs to be further verified.

  8. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E; Cowing-Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D; Adams, Michael W; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L; Huising, Mark O

    2015-07-01

    The peptide hormone urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co-released with insulin and potentiates glucose-stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptors on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 have fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion, and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by treatment with synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque models of diabetes and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control, whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:26076035

  9. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J.; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E.; Cowing–Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D.; Adams, Michael W.; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L.; Huising, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone Urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co–released with insulin and potentiates glucose–stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptor on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 demonstrate fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque diabetes models and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:26076035

  10. Somatostatin prevents the postoperative increases in plasma amino acid clearance and urea synthesis after elective cholecystectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Heindorff, H; Billesbølle, P; Pedersen, S L; Hansen, R; Vilstrup, H

    1995-01-01

    The importance of glucagon on postoperative changes in hepatic amino-nitrogen conversion were investigated in six patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy for uncomplicated gall stones. Patients were given infusions of somatostatin (bolus of 6 micrograms/kg followed by continuous infusion of 6 micrograms/kg/h) from induction of anaesthesia to the end of investigation, the first postoperative day (30 hours). Controls were 16 patients undergoing the same procedures omitting the somatostatin infusion. In all patients blood concentration and plasma clearance of total alpha-amino-nitrogen, and amino acid stimulated rate of urea synthesis were measured. Elective cholecystectomy decreased blood alpha-amino-nitrogen concentration from mean (SEM) 2.9 (0.2) to 2.4 (0.1) mmol/l (p < 0.05), increased the clearance of total alpha-amino-nitrogen from 5.2 (0.3) to 6.6 (0.3) ml/s (p < 0.05), and increased the rate of amino acid stimulated urea synthesis from 27 (1) to 37 (2) mumol/s (p < 0.05) pointing to increased hepatic removal of amino-nitrogen at expense of plasma amino-nitrogen. Infusion of somatostatin prevented increase of glucagon for 24 hours after surgery, and prevented the negative changes in postoperative nitrogen homeostasis resulting from the postoperative changes in hepatic nitrogen conversion, suggesting glucagon as mediator. The exact mechanism remains in doubt, however, because of the multiple effects of somatostatin. PMID:7797129

  11. Photoaffinity labeling of the somatostatin receptor: identification of molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Murthy, K K; Escher, E E; Patel, Y C

    1992-05-01

    Pharmacological studies have suggested that the somatostatin (SS) receptor is heterogeneous and may exhibit subtypes selective for SS-14 and SS-28. Whether this heterogeneity can be explained by separate molecular forms of the receptor protein is unclear. In the present study, we have developed a novel photosensitive azido derivative of the octapeptide SS analog Tyr3 SMS (EE 581) and used it as a photoaffinity probe to characterize the molecular components of the SS receptor in five receptor positive tissues (normal rat brain, pituitary, pancreas, and adrenal cortex, and mouse AtT-20 pituitary tumor cells). [125I]EE-581 labeled specific high affinity binding sites in all these tissues (Kd range 1.3-1.67 nM). Photoaffinity labeled membrane SS receptors were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. Three specifically labeled SS receptor proteins of 80 kilodaltons (kDa), 58 kDa, and 32 kDa were identified and exhibited a tissue-specific distribution. The 58 kDa species was the exclusive form in pancreas, adrenal cortex, and AtT-20 cells and the dominant form in brain. The 32 kDa receptor protein was expressed as a minor form (ratio of 58 kDa:32 kDa 3:1), exclusively in brain. The 80 kDa receptor was found only in the pituitary where it occurred as the sole SS receptor species. Competition experiments showed that the 58 kDa and 32 kDa receptor proteins in brain reacted with SS-14 greater than SS-28; in contrast, the 58 kDa protein in AtT-20 cells bound SS-28 greater than SS-14 suggesting the existence of distinct subtypes of the 58 kDa receptor in these two tissues. These data represent the first systematic evaluation of the molecular forms of SS receptor proteins by photoaffinity labeling in different target tissues and provide direct evidence for molecular heterogeneity and SS-14/SS-28 selectivity; a major 58 kDa protein present in most tissues, an additional 32 kDa protein uniquely expressed in brain, and an

  12. Cysteamine-induced depletion of brain somatostatin is associated with up-regulation of cerebrocortical somatostatin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Srikant, C.B.; Patel, Y.C.

    1984-09-01

    Cysteamine (CSH) administered as a single sc injection to rats produced rapid depletion of cerebrocortical Somatostatin-14 like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) with a significant 48% reduction occurring within 5 min and maximum (72%) decrease at 4 h. The depletion of S-14 LI was associated with a 1.7 fold increase in Bmax of the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors 5 min after CSH administration and a concomitant but slower increase in the affinity of these receptors. Incubation of intact synaptosomes with 1 mM CSH at 37 C in vitro for 60 min also caused a rapid depletion of S-14 LI, but there was no change in the Bmax or Kd of the S-14 receptors for up to 30 min beyond which time a 2.8-fold decrease in the affinity of S-14 receptors was observed. Higher concentrations of CSH (greater than or equal to 10 mM) added during the incubation of synaptosomes in vitro completely abolished the specific binding of these receptors. The pituitary S-14 receptors were studied 30 min after CSH administration and unlike the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors at this time did not exhibit any change in Bmax or affinity. When added at the time of the binding assay CSH (1 mM) was without a direct effect on cerebrocortical as well as pituitary membrane S-14 receptors. Furthermore, addition of CSH at the time of binding assay did not destroy the integrity of (/sup 125/I-Tyr11)S-14. It is concluded that administration of CSH to rats in vivo depletes brain S-14 LI and up-regulates synaptosomal S-14 receptors. Exposure of synaptosomes to CSH in vitro for 30 min also depletes S-14 LI but has no effect on S-14 receptors. CSH has a direct inhibitory effect on S-14 receptor binding after prolonged in vitro incubation. Pituitary S-14 receptors unlike those in the brain are unaffected by S-14 LI depletion at least acutely.

  13. Cysteamine-induced depletion of brain somatostatin is associated with up-regulation of cerebrocortical somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1984-09-01

    Cysteamine (CSH) administered as a single sc injection to rats produced rapid depletion of cerebrocortical Somatostatin-14 like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) with a significant 48% reduction occurring within 5 min and maximum (72%) decrease at 4 h. The depletion of S-14 LI was associated with a 1.7 fold increase in Bmax of the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors 5 min after CSH administration and a concomitant but slower increase in the affinity of these receptors [dissociation constant (Kd) being 1.8- and 1.6-fold lower than the control at 30 and 60 min, respectively, post CSH]. Incubation of intact synaptosomes with 1 mM CSH at 37 C in vitro for 60 min also caused a rapid depletion of S-14 LI, but in contrast to the in vivo data, there was no change in the Bmax or Kd of the S-14 receptors for up to 30 min beyond which time a 2.8-fold decrease in the affinity of S-14 receptors was observed. Higher concentrations of CSH (greater than or equal to 10 mM) added during the incubation of synaptosomes in vitro completely abolished the specific binding of these receptors. The pituitary S-14 receptors were studied 30 min after CSH administration and unlike the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors at this time did not exhibit any change in Bmax or affinity. When added at the time of the binding assay CSH (1 mM) was without a direct effect on cerebrocortical as well as pituitary membrane S-14 receptors. Furthermore, addition of CSH at the time of binding assay did not destroy the integrity of [125I-Tyr11]S-14. It is concluded that administration of CSH to rats in vivo depletes brain S-14 LI and up-regulates synaptosomal S-14 receptors. Exposure of synaptosomes to CSH in vitro for 30 min also depletes S-14 LI but has no effect on S-14 receptors suggesting that S-14 receptor regulation by S-14 is an in vivo phenomenon or requires the intact cell. CSH has a direct inhibitory effect on S-14 receptor binding after prolonged in vitro incubation. Pituitary S-14 receptors unlike those in the

  14. Somatostatin and dopamine receptor expression in lung carcinoma cells and effects of chimeric somatostatin-dopamine molecules on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferone, Diego; Arvigo, Marica; Semino, Claudia; Jaquet, Philippe; Saveanu, Alexandru; Taylor, John E; Moreau, Jacques-Pierre; Culler, Michael D; Albertelli, Manuela; Minuto, Francesco; Barreca, Antonina

    2005-12-01

    To study somatostatin/dopamine (SS/D) synergy in a human cell system constitutively expressing SS and D receptors (SSR and DR, respectively), we characterized the expression of SSR and DR subtypes in the non-small-cell lung cancer line Calu-6, and then we evaluated the effect on cell proliferation of SS/D chimeric molecules (BIM-23A387 and BIM-23A370), which bind with high affinity both sst(2) and D(2)R, and compared the results with those obtained by using SS-14 and subtype-selective SS analogs (SSA) and D agonists (DA). Because Calu-6 cells produce insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) peptides, which play a role in the autocrine/paracrine control of cell growth, we also investigated the effects of chimeric compounds on secretion and expression of IGF system components. Relative high levels of sst(2) and the long isoform of the D(2)R were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot in Calu-6, together with sst(5) and to a lesser extent sst(3) and D(4)R. BIM-23A387 and BIM-23A370 significantly inhibited growth of Calu-6, whereas IGF-IGFBP secretion or expression was unaffected, suggesting a direct inhibitory effect. The inhibition of cell growth, measured by both [(3)H]thymidine incorporation and cell count, was significantly lower when individual SSA and DA control peptides or subtype-specific SSA and DA were tested. BIM-23A370 was more potent than BIM-23A387 (P < 0.001). These findings show that SS/D chimeras can inhibit Calu-6 proliferation in an IGF-independent manner and suggest that this enhanced potency might be because of the induction of SSR/DR dimerization. The Calu-6 cell line, constitutively expressing SSR and DR, provides a suitable model to elucidate the mechanism of action of SSA and DA on regulation of cell growth and to characterize the interaction between SSR and DR.

  15. Systemically modeling the dynamics of plasma insulin in subcutaneous injection of insulin analogues for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxu; Kuang, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetics must inject exogenous insulin or insulin analogues one or more times daily. The timing and dosage of insulin administration have been a critical research area since the invention of insulin analogues. Several pharmacokinetical models have been proposed, and some are applied clinically in modeling various insulin therapies. However, their plasma insulin concentration must be computed separately from the models' output. Furthermore, minimal analytical study was performed in these existing models. We propose two systemic and simplified ordinary differential equation models to model the subcutaneous injection of rapid-acting insulin analogues and long-acting insulin analogues, respectively. Our models explicitly model the plasma insulin and hence have the advantage of computing the plasma insulin directly. The profiles of plasma insulin concentrations obtained from these two models are in good agreement with the experimental data. We also study the dynamics of insulin analogues, plasma insulin concentrations, and, in particular, the shape of the dynamics of plasma insulin concentrations. PMID:19292507

  16. Bradykinin antagonists with dehydrophenylalanine analogues at position 5.

    PubMed

    Greiner, G; Dornberger, U; Paegelow, I; Schölkens, B A; Liebmann, C; Reissmann, S

    1998-04-01

    Continuing the studies on structural requirements of bradykinin antagonists, it has been found that analogues with dehydrophenylalanine (deltaPhe) or its ring-substituted analogues (deltaPhe(X)) at position 5 act as antagonists on guinea pig pulmonary artery, and on guinea pig ileum. Because both organs are considered to be bradykinin B2 receptor tissues, the analogues with deltaPhe or deltaPhe(X) at position 5, but without any replacement at position 7, seem to represent a new structural type of B2 receptor antagonist. All the analogues investigated act as partial antagonists; they inhibit the bradykinin-induced contraction at low concentrations and act as agonists at higher concentrations. Ring substitutions by methyl groups or iodine reduce both the agonistic and antagonistic activity. Only substitution by fluorine gives a high potency. Incorporation of deltaPhe into different representative antagonists with key modifications at position 7 does not enhance the antagonist activity of the basic structures, with one exception. Only the combination of deltaPhe at position 5 with DPhe at position 7 increases the antagonistic potency on guinea pig ileum by about one order of magnitude. Radioligand binding studies indicate the importance of position 5 for the discrimination of B2 receptor subtypes. The binding affinity to the low-affinity binding site (KL) was not significantly changed by replacement of Phe by deltaPhe. In contrast, ring-methylation of deltaPhe results in clearly reduced binding to KL. The affinity to the high-affinity binding site (KH) was almost unchanged by the replacement of Phe in position 5 by deltaPhe, whereas the analogue with 2-methyl-dehydrophenylalanine completely failed to detect the KH-site. The peptides were synthesized on the Wang-resin according to the Fmoc/Bu(t) strategy using Mtr protection for the side chain of Arg. The dehydrophenylalanine analogues were prepared by a strategy involving PyBop couplings of the dipeptide unit Fmoc

  17. Effect of 17beta-estradiol on the expression of somatostatin genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Holloway, A C; Melroe, G T; Ehrman, M M; Reddy, P K; Leatherland, J F; Sheridan, M A

    2000-08-01

    In the present study, the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) treatment on the expression of preprosomatostatin (PPSS) I, PPSS II', and PPSS II" mRNA in the hypothalamus and endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body), as well as the effects of E(2) treatment on plasma somatostatin (SS)-14 and -25 concentrations in sexually immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were investigated. E(2) treatment significantly (P < 0.001) depressed both plasma SS-14 and SS-25. In the hypothalamus, E(2) treatment significantly (P < 0.001) decreased the levels of PPSS I and PPSS II" mRNA. However, there was no effect of E(2) treatment on PPSS II' mRNA levels. In the pancreas, E(2) treatment had no significant effect on the levels of either PPSS II' mRNA or PPSS II" mRNA. However, E(2) treatment significantly (P < 0.005) decreased levels of PPSS I mRNA. These data suggest that E(2) acts, in part, to increase plasma growth hormone levels in rainbow trout by decreasing the endogenous inhibitory somatostatinergic tone by inhibiting plasma levels of both SS-14 and SS-25 and hypothalamic levels of mRNA encoding these proteins. PMID:10938224

  18. Phosphonate analogue substrates for enolase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V E; Cleland, W W

    1990-11-20

    Phosphonate analogues in which the bridge between C-2 and phosphorus is a CH2 group are slow substrates for yeast enolase. The pH variation of the kinetic parameters for the methylene analogue of 2-phosphoglycerate suggests that the substrate binds as a dianion and that Mg2+ can bind subsequently only if a metal ligand and the catalytic base are unprotonated. Primary deuterium isotope effects of 4-8 on V/KMg, but ones of only 1.15-1.32 on V for dehydration, show that proton removal to give the carbanion intermediate largely limits V/KMg and that a slow step follows which largely limits V (presumably carbanion breakdown). Since there is a D2O solvent isotope effect on V for the reverse reaction of 5, but not an appreciable one on the forward reaction, it appears that the slow rates with phosphonate analogues result from the fact that the carbanion intermediate is more stable than that formed from the normal substrates, and its reaction in both directions limits V. Increased stability as a result of replacement of oxygen by carbon at C-2 of the carbanion is the expected chemical behavior. PMID:2271661

  19. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  20. Policy issues in space analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Robin N.; Facktor, Debra D.

    Space mission planning is increasingly focusing on destinations beyond Earth orbit. Advancements in technology will inevitably be required to enable long-duration human spaceflight missions, and breakthroughs in the policy arena will also be needed to achieve success in such missions. By exploring how policy issues have been addressed in analogous extreme environments, policymakers can develop a framework for addressing these issues as they apply to long-term human spaceflight. Policy issues that need to be addressed include: crew selection, training, organization, and activities, medical testing, illness, injury, and death; communication; legal accountability and liability; mission safety and risk management; and environmental contamination. This paper outlines the approach of a study underway by The George Washington University and ANSER to examine how these policy issues have been addressed in several analogues and how the experiences of these analogues can help formulate policies for long-duration human spaceflight missions. Analogues being studied include Antarctic bases, submarine voyages, undersea stations, Biosphere 2, and the U.S. Skylab and Russian Mir space stations.

  1. Structure-Activity Relationships of Somatostatin Analogs in the Rabbit Ileum and the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Linda E.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Rivier, Jean; Vale, Wylie; Brown, Marvin; Dharmsathaphorn, Kiertisin

    1983-01-01

    Somatostatin increases absorption of electrolytes and inhibits diarrhea in patients with endocrine tumors and short bowel syndrome. In an attempt to develop a gut-specific somatostatin analog, each amino acid in the somatostatin molecule was replaced with L-alanine, deleted, or substituted with its D-isomer. The potency of each analog to stimulate ion transport in the rabbit ileum was then determined using the modified Ussing chamber technique. The results were compared to the ability of each analog to inhibit the stimulated release of growth hormone from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and to inhibit the arginine-stimulated release of insulin and glucagon in the rat in vivo. Analogs that showed gut selectivity were then tested for their ion transport properties in the rat colon. Results: (a) Substitution with L-alanine or deletion of the amino acid at position 6, 7, 8, or 9 and deletion of Threonine10-produced analogs with significantly reduced ion transport properties to <4% of somatostatin's action. The substitution also markedly reduced the ability of the compounds to inhibit the release of growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon. (b) Selectivity of intestinal ion transport was achieved by any one of the following alterations: L-alanine substitution at Phenylalanine11, deletion of Phenylalanine11, substitution with D-lysine at Lysine4, or substitution with L-alanine at Lysine4. These compounds had intestinal ion transport properties of 52, 34, 139, and 94%, respectively, while demonstrating little or no inhibition of growth hormone, insulin or glucagon release. Conclusions: (a) Phenylalanine6, Phenylalanine7, Tryptophan8, and Lysine9 are required for the ion transport and other biologic actions of somatostatin, whereas Threonine10 serves as an essential spacer. (b) Alteration at Phenylalanine11 or Lysine4 yields analogs that are selective for ion transport in the rabbit ileum and rat colon. These findings should be taken into consideration when developing a

  2. Somatostatin Interneurons Control a Key Component of Mismatch Negativity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with schizophrenia have deficient sensory processing, undermining how they perceive and relate to a changing environment. This impairment can be captured by the reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) index, an electroencephalographic biomarker of psychosis. The biological factors contributing to MMN are unclear, though mouse research, in which genetic and optical methods could be applied, has given some insight. Using fast two-photon calcium imaging and multielectrode recordings in awake mice, we find that visual cortical circuits display adapted (decreased) responses to repeated stimuli and amplified responses to a deviant stimulus, the key component of human MMN. Moreover, pharmacogenetic silencing of somatostatin-containing interneurons specifically eliminated this amplification, along with its associated theta/alpha-band response, leaving stimulus-specific adaption and related gamma-band modulations intact. Our results validate a mouse model of MMN and suggest that abnormalities in somatostatin-containing interneurons cause sensory deficits underlying MMN and schizophrenia. PMID:27396334

  3. Somatostatin Interneurons Control a Key Component of Mismatch Negativity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with schizophrenia have deficient sensory processing, undermining how they perceive and relate to a changing environment. This impairment can be captured by the reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) index, an electroencephalographic biomarker of psychosis. The biological factors contributing to MMN are unclear, though mouse research, in which genetic and optical methods could be applied, has given some insight. Using fast two-photon calcium imaging and multielectrode recordings in awake mice, we find that visual cortical circuits display adapted (decreased) responses to repeated stimuli and amplified responses to a deviant stimulus, the key component of human MMN. Moreover, pharmacogenetic silencing of somatostatin-containing interneurons specifically eliminated this amplification, along with its associated theta/alpha-band response, leaving stimulus-specific adaption and related gamma-band modulations intact. Our results validate a mouse model of MMN and suggest that abnormalities in somatostatin-containing interneurons cause sensory deficits underlying MMN and schizophrenia.

  4. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    PubMed

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  5. [New prospects in the therapeutic use of somatostatin and its derivatives].

    PubMed

    Simeoni, A; Agostino, A; Vecci, E; Iacobelli, P; Vitellone, P; Iacobelli, A

    1991-05-31

    The discovery and subsequent clinical application of somatostatine, a polypeptide neurohormone of 14 amino acids, and of its analogs, opens a novel chapter of neuroendocrinology that is still in full evolution and to a large extent unknown. The isolation of an octapeptide, a selective somatostatine analog, permits to prolong its action, in fact it has a halflife of about 140 min in old subjects and about 100 min. in the young. Thanks to its excellent tolerability, the synthetic hormone can be usefully applied in the treatment of acromegaly, gigantism and hypersomatotropinemic conditions in general, and even in other clinical branches, such as treatment of esophageal hemorrhage due to the rupture of varices in liver cirrhosis or to erosion of gastric blood vessels in patients suffering from peptic ulcer disease. PMID:1678325

  6. In vitro transcription directed from the somatostatin promoter is dependent upon a purified 43-kDa DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, O M; Zhu, Z N; Pot, D A; Dixon, J E

    1989-01-01

    In vitro transcription analyses were used to establish the biological function of a 43-kDa affinity-purified DNA-binding protein. The 43-kDa affinity-purified protein protects the region from position -59 to position -35 of the somatostatin promoter from DNase I digestion. This region of the somatostatin promoter harbors the TGACGTCA motif, also found and required for function in a number of other cAMP-responsive and adenovirus E1A-inducible promoters. Efficient and authentic transcription in vitro directed from the somatostatin promoter requires the TGACGTCA promoter element. In vitro transcription assays performed in the presence of somatostatin (positions -60 to -29), enkephalin (positions -105 to -71), and adenovirus type 5 E3 gene (positions -72 to -42) competitor fragments, harboring similar TGACGTCA motifs, selectively inhibit transcription directed from the somatostatin promoter, suggesting that the TGACGTCA element is the site of interaction of a somatostatin gene transactivator. Furthermore, extracts depleted of the TGACGTCA-binding activities by affinity chromatography utilizing a biotinylated oligonucleotide-avidin resin, are incapable of directing transcription from the somatostatin but not from the adenovirus major late promoter. Addition of the purified 43-kDa protein to the affinity-depleted extract restores transcription from the somatostatin promoter. These results are consistent with the 43-kDa protein being a trans-activator of the somatostatin gene. Images PMID:2564679

  7. Isolation and characterization of S. cerevisiae mutants defective in somatostatin expression: cloning and functional role of a yeast gene encoding an aspartyl protease in precursor processing at monobasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Bourbonnais, Y; Ash, J; Daigle, M; Thomas, D Y

    1993-01-01

    The peptide somatostatin exists as two different molecular species. In addition to the most common form, somatostatin-14, there is also a fourteen amino acid N-terminally extended form of the tetradecapeptide, somatostatin-28. Both peptides are synthesized as larger precursors containing paired basic and monobasic amino acids at their processing sites, which upon cleavage generate either somatostatin-14 or -28, respectively. In some species of fish two distinct, but homologous, precursors (prosomatostatin-I and -II) give rise to somatostatin-14 and -28, respectively. Whereas anglerfish prosomatostatin-II was previously shown to release exclusively somatostatin-28, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteolytically matures the homologous prosomatostatin-I precursor to somatostatin-28 and -14 as well as to a lysine-extended form of somatostatin-14. The Kex2 endoprotease appears to be essential for the formation of lysine somatostatin-14 and is involved either directly or indirectly in the release of mature somatostatin-14. The isolation of yeast mutants defective in somatostatin-28 expression (sex mutant) allowed the cloning of a non-essential gene, which encodes an aspartyl protease, whose disruption severely affects the cleavage of mature somatostatin-28 from both somatostatin precursors. We conclude that two distinct endoproteases, which demonstrate some cross specificity in vivo, are involved in the proteolytic maturation of prosomatostatin at mono- and dibasic processing sites in yeast. PMID:8094050

  8. Isolation and characterization of S. cerevisiae mutants defective in somatostatin expression: cloning and functional role of a yeast gene encoding an aspartyl protease in precursor processing at monobasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, Y; Ash, J; Daigle, M; Thomas, D Y

    1993-01-01

    The peptide somatostatin exists as two different molecular species. In addition to the most common form, somatostatin-14, there is also a fourteen amino acid N-terminally extended form of the tetradecapeptide, somatostatin-28. Both peptides are synthesized as larger precursors containing paired basic and monobasic amino acids at their processing sites, which upon cleavage generate either somatostatin-14 or -28, respectively. In some species of fish two distinct, but homologous, precursors (prosomatostatin-I and -II) give rise to somatostatin-14 and -28, respectively. Whereas anglerfish prosomatostatin-II was previously shown to release exclusively somatostatin-28, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteolytically matures the homologous prosomatostatin-I precursor to somatostatin-28 and -14 as well as to a lysine-extended form of somatostatin-14. The Kex2 endoprotease appears to be essential for the formation of lysine somatostatin-14 and is involved either directly or indirectly in the release of mature somatostatin-14. The isolation of yeast mutants defective in somatostatin-28 expression (sex mutant) allowed the cloning of a non-essential gene, which encodes an aspartyl protease, whose disruption severely affects the cleavage of mature somatostatin-28 from both somatostatin precursors. We conclude that two distinct endoproteases, which demonstrate some cross specificity in vivo, are involved in the proteolytic maturation of prosomatostatin at mono- and dibasic processing sites in yeast. Images PMID:8094050

  9. Theranostics with Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT: monitoring response to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy involves selective targeting of neuroendocrine tumors through the somatostatin receptors, the aim being to increase radiation dose to the tumors and spare the normal tissue. The advantage of this internal radiation therapy is the ability to selectively target multiple metastases throughout the body. Early and accurate assessment of therapy response helps not only to identify the poor responders but also to personalize the treatment regimes with the aim of achieving maximum treatment benefit. This is the basis of theranostics.

  10. A Patient With Metastatic Sarcoma was Successfully Treated With Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Jara, Aurora; González Manzano, Ramón; Lopera Sierra, Maribel; Redal Peña, María Carmen; Brugarolas Masllorens, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present a sarcoma patient with a tumor reduction of more than 50% in lung metastasis after 2 single courses of the investigational medical product Lutathera (177Lu-DOTA0-Tyr3-octreotate). She was resistant to more than 6 lines of therapy including all the available active drugs in soft tissue sarcomas. The high expression of somatostatin receptors was shown by microarrays and Octreoscan. The overall duration of response exceeded 1 year. PMID:27355848

  11. No Mortality Difference Following Treatment with Terlipressin or Somatostatin in Cirrhotic Patients with Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of terlipressin versus somatostatin as adjuvants to endoscopic treatment in cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Patients and Methods: The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll patients who were discharged with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses of cirrhosis and who underwent gastric variceal sclerotherapy for gastric variceal bleeding between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2007. We observed treatment outcomes and identified clinical factors associated with mortality. Results: In total, we enrolled 311 cirrhosis patients who underwent sclerotherapy for active gastric variceal bleeding. Among them, 218 patients received terlipressin, and 93 patients received somatostatin. The overall 30 day mortality rate was 13.2% (41/311). A total of 78 (25.1%) patients underwent second-look endoscopy, but only 12 (7%) needed a second course of gastric variceal sclerotherapy. The overall 30-day mortality rates for patients treated with terlipressin and somatostatin were 13.3% and 12.9%, respectively, showing no statistically significant differences between outcomes in the two treatment groups (P = 0.672). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 3.257, 95% CI: 1.640-6.469, P= 0.001), acute renal failure (HR: 6.261, 95% CI: 2.376-16.499, P < 0.001), or hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 3.091, 95% CI: 1.430-6.680, P= 0.004). Conclusions: Mortality rates did not differ significantly between cirrhosis patients with acute gastric variceal bleeding who received somatostatin or terlipressin as adjuvants to endoscopy. PMID:27184641

  12. Phosphorylation of threonine 333 regulates trafficking of the human sst5 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Aline; Mann, Anika; Kliewer, Andrea; Nagel, Falko; Strigli, Anne; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Pöll, Florian; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The frequent overexpression of the somatostatin receptors sst2 and sst5 in neuroendocrine tumors provides the molecular basis for therapeutic application of novel multireceptor somatostatin analogs. Although the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal region of the sst2 receptor has been studied in detail, little is known about the agonist-induced regulation of the human sst5 receptor. Here, we have generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for the carboxyl-terminal threonines 333 (T333) and 347 (T347), which enabled us to selectively detect either the T333-phosphorylated or the T347-phosphorylated form of sst5. We show that agonist-mediated phosphorylation occurs at T333, whereas T347 is constitutively phosphorylated in the absence of agonist. We further demonstrate that the multireceptor somatostatin analog pasireotide and the sst5-selective ligand L-817,818 but not octreotide or KE108 were able to promote a detectable T333 phosphorylation. Interestingly, BIM-23268 was the only sst5 agonist that was able to stimulate T333 phosphorylation to the same extent as natural somatostatin. Agonist-induced T333 phosphorylation was dose-dependent and selectively mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. Similar to that observed for the sst2 receptor, phosphorylation of sst5 occurred within seconds. However, unlike that seen for the sst2 receptor, dephosphorylation and recycling of sst5 were rapidly completed within minutes. We also identify protein phosphatase 1γ as G protein-coupled receptor phosphatase for the sst5 receptor. Together, we provide direct evidence for agonist-selective phosphorylation of carboxyl-terminal T333. In addition, we identify G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation and protein phosphatase 1γ-mediated dephosphorylation of T333 as key regulators of rapid internalization and recycling of the human sst5 receptor.

  13. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  14. The Canadian Analogue Research Network (CARN): Opportunities for Terrestrial Analogue Studies in Canada and Abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipkin, V.; Osinski, G. R.; Berinstain, A.; Léveillé, R.

    2007-03-01

    We will present an overview of the Canadian Analogue Research Network (CARN), including a description of the various analogue sites in CARN, potential new sites, and a discussion regarding how CARN is applicable to the global exploration strategy.

  15. Neuroendocrine tumor targeting: study of novel gallium-labeled somatostatin radiopeptides in a rat pancreatic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Froidevaux, Sylvie; Eberle, Alex N; Christe, Martine; Sumanovski, Lazar; Heppeler, Axel; Schmitt, Jörg S; Eisenwiener, Klaus; Beglinger, Christoph; Mäcke, Helmut R

    2002-04-20

    Somatostatin analogs labeled with radionuclides are of considerable interest in the diagnosis and therapy of SSTR-expressing tumors, such as gastroenteropancreatic, small cell lung, breast and frequently nervous system tumors. In view of the favorable physical characteristics of the Ga isotopes (67)Ga and (68)Ga, enabling conventional tumor scintigraphy, PET and possibly internal radiotherapy, we focused on the development of a Ga-labeled somatostatin analog suitable for targeting SSTR-expressing tumors. For this purpose, 3 somatostatin analogs, OC, TOC and TATE were conjugated to the metal chelator DOTA and labeled with the radiometals (111)In, (90)Y and (67)Ga. They were then evaluated for their performance in the AR4-2J pancreatic tumor model by testing SSTR2-binding affinity, internalization/externalization in isolated cells and biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice. Surprisingly, we found that, compared to (111)In or (90)Y, labeling with (67)Ga considerably improved the biologic performance of the tested somatostatin analogs with respect to SSTR2 affinity and tissue distribution. (67)Ga-labeled DOTA-somatostatin analogs were rapidly excreted from nontarget tissues, leading to excellent tumor-to-nontarget tissue uptake ratios. Of interest for radiotherapeutic application, [(67)Ga]DOTATOC was strongly internalized by AR4-2J cells. Furthermore, our results suggest a link between the radioligand charge and its kidney retention. The excellent tumor selectivity of Ga-DOTA somatostatin analogs together with the different applications of Ga in nuclear oncology suggests that Ga-DOTA somatostatin analogs will become an important tool in the management of SSTR-positive tumors.

  16. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  17. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  18. Efficacy of octreotide long-acting repeatable in neuroendocrine tumors: RADIANT-2 placebo arm post hoc analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R; Yao, James C; Bajetta, Emilio; Aout, Mounir; Bakker, Bert; Hainsworth, John D; Ruszniewski, Philippe B; Van Cutsem, Eric; Öberg, Kjell; Pavel, Marianne E

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) have demonstrated antiproliferative activity in addition to efficacy for carcinoid symptom control in functional neuroendocrine tumors (NET). A post hoc analysis of the placebo arm of the RAD001 In Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors-2 (RADIANT-2) study was conducted to assess the efficacy of octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Out of 213 patients randomized to placebo plus octreotide LAR in RADIANT-2, 196 patients with foregut, midgut, or hindgut NET were considered for present analysis. Of these, 41 patients were SSA-treatment naïve and 155 had received SSA therapy before study entry. For SSA-naïve patients, median PFS by adjudicated central review was 13.6 (95% CI 8.2–22.7) months. For SSA-naïve patients with midgut NET (n=24), median PFS was 22.2 (95% CI 8.3–29.5) months. For patients who had received SSA previously, the median PFS was 11.1 (95% CI 8.4–14.3) months. Among the SSA-pretreated patients who had midgut NET (n=119), the median PFS was 12.0 (95% CI 8.4–19.3) months. Median OS was 35.8 (95% CI 32.5–48.9) months for patients in the placebo plus octreotide LAR arm; 50.6 (36.4 – not reached) months for SSA-naïve patients and 33.5 (95% CI 27.5–44.7) months for those who had received prior SSA. This post hoc analysis of the placebo arm of the large phase 3 RADIANT-2 study provides data on PFS and OS among patients with progressive NET treated with octreotide therapy. PMID:26373569

  19. Anisotropic metamaterial as an analogue of a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Núñez, Isabel; Bulashenko, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of light in a metamaterial medium which mimics curved spacetime and acts like a black hole is studied. We show that for a particular type of spacetimes and wave polarization, the time dilation appears as dielectric permittivity, while the spatial curvature manifests as magnetic permeability. The optical analogue to the relativistic Hamiltonian which determines the ray paths (null geodesics) in the anisotropic metamaterial is obtained. By applying the formalism to the Schwarzschild metric, we compare the ray paths with full-wave simulations in the equivalent optical medium.

  20. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  1. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  2. Effects of cysteamine on dopamine-mediated behaviors: evidence for dopamine-somatostatin interactions in the striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Iverson, M.T.; Radke, J.M.; Vincent, S.R.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of prior treatment with cysteamine, a drug which appears to deplete selectively the neuropeptide somatostatin, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preferences were investigated. Twelve hours following systemic cysteamine injections apomorphine-induced stereotypy was attenuated and striatal somatostatin levels were reduced by half. Systemic cysteamine also decreased the motor stimulant effects of amphetamine, without influencing the rewarding properties as determined by the conditioned place preference procedure. Direct injections of cysteamine into the nucleus accumbens also decreased the locomotor response to amphetamine, and produced a local reduction in somatostatin levels in the accumbens. Cysteamine did not appear to alter monoamine turnover in the striatum after either systemic or intra-accumbens injections. These results suggest that somatostatin in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen modulates the motor, but not the reinforcing properties of dopaminergic drugs, possibly via an action postsynaptic to dopamine-releasing terminals. Furthermore, it is evident from these results that cysteamine is an important tool with which to study the central actions of somatostatin.

  3. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618

  4. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-03

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers.

  5. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  6. Somatostatin Agonist Pasireotide Promotes a Physiological State Resembling Short-Day Acclimation in the Photoperiodic Male Siberian Hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Dumbell, R A; Scherbarth, F; Diedrich, V; Schmid, H A; Steinlechner, S; Barrett, P

    2015-07-01

    The timing of growth in seasonal mammals is inextricably linked to food availability. This is exemplified in the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus), which uses the annual cycle of photoperiod to optimally programme energy expenditure in anticipation of seasonal fluctuations in food resources. During the autumn, energy expenditure is progressively minimised by physiological adaptations, including a 30% reduction in body mass, comprising a reduction in both fat and lean tissues. However, the mechanistic basis of this adaptation is still unexplained. We hypothesised that growth hormone (GH) was a likely candidate to underpin these reversible changes in body mass. Administration of pasireotide, a long-acting somatostatin receptor agonist developed for the treatment of acromegaly, to male hamsters under a long-day (LD) photoperiod produced a body weight loss. This comprised a reduction in lean and fat mass, including kidneys, testes and brown adipose tissue, typically found in short-day (SD) housed hamsters. Furthermore, when administered to hamsters switched from SD to LD, pasireotide retarded the body weight increase compared to vehicle-treated hamsters. Pasireotide did not alter photoperiod-mediated changes in hypothalamic energy balance gene expression but altered the expression of Srif mRNA expression in the periventricular nucleus and Ghrh mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus consistent with a reduction in GH feedback and concurrent with reduced serum insulin-like growth factor-1. Conversely, GH treatment of SD hamsters increased body mass, which included increased mass of liver and kidneys. Together, these data indicate a role for the GH axis in the determination of seasonal body mass of the Siberian hamster.

  7. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K sup + channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    De Weille, J.R.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4{beta}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels are discussed.

  8. Small Mouse Islets Are Deficient in Glucagon-Producing Alpha Cells but Rich in Somatostatin-Secreting Delta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grapengiesser, Eva; Hellman, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Small and big mouse islets were compared with special reference to their content of glucagon-producing α-cells and somatostatin-producing δ-cells. Areas stained for glucagon and somatostatin were measured in the largest cross section of small (diameter < 60 μm) and big (diameter > 100 μm) islets. Comparison of the areas indicated proportionally more δ- than α-cells in the small islets. After isolation with collagenase these islets were practically devoid of α-cells. We evaluated the functional importance of the islet size by measuring the Ca2+ signal for insulin release. A majority of the small islets responded to the hyperpolarization action of somatostatin with periodic decrease of cytoplasmic Ca2+ when glucose was elevated after tolbutamide blockade of the KATP channels. PMID:27504459

  9. Distribution of somatostatin immunoreactive neurons and fibres in the central nervous system of a chondrostean, the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri).

    PubMed

    Adrio, Fátima; Anadón, Ramón; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel

    2008-05-13

    Somatostatin (SOM) is a neuropeptide that is widely distributed in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Two isoforms of somatostatin (SS1 and SS2) have been characterized in sturgeon and in situ hybridisation studies in the sturgeon brain have demonstrated that mRNAs of the two somatostatin precursors (PSS1 and PSS2) are differentially expressed in neurons [Trabucchi, M., Tostivint, H., Lihrmann, I., Sollars, C., Vallarino, M., Dores, R.M., Vaudry, H., 2002. Polygenic expression of somatostatin in the sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus: molecular cloning and distribution of the mRNAs encoding two somatostatin precursors. J. Comp. Neurol. 443, 332-345.]. However, neither the morphology of somatostatinergic neurons nor the patterns of innervation have yet been characterized. To gain further insight into the evolution of this system in primitive bony fishes, we studied the distribution of somatostatin-immunoreactive (SOM-ir) cells and fibres in the brain of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri). Most SOM-ir cells were found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus and abundant SOM-ir fibres coursed along the hypothalamic floor towards the median eminence, suggesting a hypophysiotrophic role for SOM in sturgeon. In addition, SOM-ir cells and fibres were observed in extrahypothalamic regions such as the telencephalon thalamus, rhombencephalon and spinal cord, which also suggests neuromodulatory and/or neurotransmitter functions for this peptide. Overall there was a good correlation between the distribution of SOM-ir neurons throughout the brain of A. baeri and that of PSS1 mRNA in Acipenser transmontanus. Comparative analysis of the results with those obtained in other groups of fishes and tetrapods indicates that widespread distribution of this peptide in the brain is shared by early vertebrate lines and that the general organization of the somatostatinergic systems has been well-conserved during evolution.

  10. Somatostatin Receptor 1 and 5 Double Knockout Mice Mimic Neurochemical Changes of Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Norman, Michael; Liu, Shi-He; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.; Brunicardi, Charles F.; Kumar, Ujendra

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST) positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5). Methods and Findings To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2). Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5−/− and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the pathophysiology of

  11. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  12. Reduction in size of a thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma treated with octreotide acetate (somatostatin analog).

    PubMed

    Lee, E J; Kim, K R; Lim, S K; Lee, H C; Kim, D I; Kim, S H; Huh, K B

    1994-07-01

    We present a 55-year-old female with a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma who had been treated with somatostatin analog octreotide acetate (SMS 201-995) for 4 months. Subcutaneous injection of 100 micrograms octreotide acetate twice daily resulted in significant reduction of the TSH, thyroid hormone, and tumor size. During the treatment, there was no evidence of any side effects. We may conclude that octreotide acetate administration is an effective treatment in patients with TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma for suppressing TSH hypersecretion and reducing the size of the tumor.

  13. Theranostics with Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT: monitoring response to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy involves selective targeting of neuroendocrine tumors through the somatostatin receptors, the aim being to increase radiation dose to the tumors and spare the normal tissue. The advantage of this internal radiation therapy is the ability to selectively target multiple metastases throughout the body. Early and accurate assessment of therapy response helps not only to identify the poor responders but also to personalize the treatment regimes with the aim of achieving maximum treatment benefit. This is the basis of theranostics. PMID:25029938

  14. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons provide subtractive inhibition and regulate sensory response fidelity in olfactory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, James F.; Isaacson, Jeffry S.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse types of local GABAergic interneurons shape the cortical representation of sensory information. Here we show how somatostatin-expressing interneurons (SOM cells) contribute to odor coding in mouse olfactory cortex. We find that odor-tuned SOM cells regulate principal cells through a purely subtractive operation that is independent of odor identity or intensity. This operation enhances the salience of odor-evoked activity without changing cortical odor tuning. SOM cells inhibit both principal cells and fast-spiking interneurons, indicating that subtractive inhibition reflects the interplay of multiple classes of interneurons. PMID:25751531

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of febrifugine analogues.

    PubMed

    Mai, Huong Doan Thi; Thanh, Giang Vo; Tran, Van Hieu; Vu, Van Nam; Vu, Van Loi; Le, Cong Vinh; Nguyen, Thuy Linh; Phi, Thi Dao; Truong, Bich Ngan; Chau, Van Minh; Pham, Van Cuong

    2014-12-01

    A series of febrifugine analogues were designed and synthesized. Antimalarial activity evaluation of the synthetic compounds indicated that these derivatives had a strong inhibition against both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Many of them were found to be more active than febrifugine hydrochloride. The tested analogues had also a significant cytotoxicity against four cancer cell lines (KB, MCF7, LU1 and HepG2). Among the synthetic analogues, two compounds 17b and 17h displayed a moderate cytotoxicity while they exhibited a remarkable antimalarial activity. PMID:25632466

  16. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  17. Space analogue studies in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lugg, D; Shepanek, M

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-06-10

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity.

  19. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  20. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  1. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  2. Sulfur analogues of psychotomimetic agents. Monothio analogues of mescaline and isomescaline.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Shulgin, A T

    1981-11-01

    Two monothio analogues of mescaline and three monothio analogues of 2,3,4-trimethoxyphenethylamine (isomescaline) have been synthesized and characterized. Only the two mescaline analogues (3-and 4-thiomescaline) were found to be psychotomimetics in man, being 6 and 12 times more potent than mescaline, respectively. All five compounds can serve as substrates for bovine plasma monoamine oxidase in vitro, but no positive correlation is apparent between the extent of enzymatic degradation and human psychotomimetic potency.

  3. The structure activity relationship of discodermolide analogues.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Simon J

    2008-03-01

    The marine polyketide discodermolide is a member of a class of natural products that stabilize microtubules. Many analogues have been synthesized suggesting that few changes can be made to the internal carbon backbone. Both ends of the molecule, however, can be modified. The majority of analogues have been generated via modification of the lactone region. This suggests that significant simplifications can be made in this region provided that the lactone moiety is maintained.

  4. Phosphorous-containing analogues of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V; Mastalerz, P

    1984-12-01

    Four analogues of aspartame (aspartylphenylalanine methyl ester) were prepared in which one of the carboxylate groups was replaced by a phosphonate group. None of the peptides so obtained was sweet, in contrast with the parent compound which is over 100 times sweeter than sucrose. These results contrast with several published reports of phosphonate analogues of amino acids and peptides which are potent inhibitors of enzymes containing acceptor sites for the parent compound.

  5. Honey Bee Allatostatins Target Galanin/Somatostatin-Like Receptors and Modulate Learning: A Conserved Function?

    PubMed Central

    Urlacher, Elodie; Soustelle, Laurent; Parmentier, Marie-Laure; Verlinden, Heleen; Gherardi, Marie-Julie; Fourmy, Daniel; Mercer, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the honeybee genome revealed many neuropeptides and putative neuropeptide receptors, yet functional characterization of these peptidic systems is scarce. In this study, we focus on allatostatins, which were first identified as inhibitors of juvenile hormone synthesis, but whose role in the adult honey bee (Apis mellifera) brain remains to be determined. We characterize the bee allatostatin system, represented by two families: allatostatin A (Apime-ASTA) and its receptor (Apime-ASTA-R); and C-type allatostatins (Apime-ASTC and Apime-ASTCC) and their common receptor (Apime-ASTC-R). Apime-ASTA-R and Apime-ASTC-R are the receptors in bees most closely related to vertebrate galanin and somatostatin receptors, respectively. We examine the functional properties of the two honeybee receptors and show that they are transcriptionally expressed in the adult brain, including in brain centers known to be important for learning and memory processes. Thus we investigated the effects of exogenously applied allatostatins on appetitive olfactory learning in the bee. Our results show that allatostatins modulate learning in this insect, and provide important insights into the evolution of somatostatin/allatostatin signaling. PMID:26741132

  6. Somatostatin can alter fertility genes expression, oocytes maturation, and embryo development in cattle.

    PubMed

    Moaeen-ud-Din, Muhammad; Malik, Nosheen; Yang, Li Guo

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of somatostatin on oocytes maturation and subsequent embryo development in cattle. Bovine granulosa cells separated from oocytes, cultured for 24 h and transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector with mouse SST gene (Experimental) and with out plasmid transfection (Control). RT-PCR and Real-Time PCR were used to estimate the expression of bovine receptors of androgen, estrogen beta, growth hormone, and follicular stimulating hormone. Culture media concentrations of hormones were measured by kits using radioimmunoassay. COCs aspirated from ovaries were co-cultured with granulosa cells layers (transfected or control) at 38.5 degrees C in CO(2) incubator for maturation. We found a significant (2.37X) increase in estrogen receptor beta expression in experimental group. There was a decrease in androgen receptor, growth hormone releasing hormone receptor, and follicular stimulating hormone receptor (P < 0.05). But, 96 h of post transfection, culture media concentration of estradiol-17beta was increased significantly (P < 0.05) and testosterone, growth hormone and follicular stimulating hormone showed opposite trend (P < 0.05) in experimental groups. Co-culture of somatostatin transfected granulosa cells with oocytes, reduced the maturation rate from 70% to 66% but had no effect on subsequent fertilization and embryo development.

  7. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  8. [Somatostatin analogs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer: utopia or feasible alternative?].

    PubMed

    Zalatnai, A; Pogány, V

    2000-10-22

    The authors give an overview on the clinical treatment results of pancreatic carcinoma with somatostatin analogs including octreotide, lanreotide and vapreotide. Numerous preclinical studies provided solid evidence that the growth of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma can successfully be inhibited using such synthetic analogs via direct (apoptosis-inducing) and various indirect mechanisms. In the clinical practice their role still remains contradictory. Monotherapy did not result in a prolongation of the survival, however, in 15-20% of patients the progression of the process has been halted for several months accompanied by a significant improvement of the clinical condition without notable side effects. Combination of octreotide with tamoxifen yielded a survival benefit in addition to the stabilization of the general condition, although reduction of the tumor mass has not been documented. Despite the modest results these finding reinforce the responsiveness of the pancreatic ductal cancer to the hormonal manipulations and further studies on optimization of the effects are of worth. While in the majority of cases the somatostatin receptors have been lost, hormonal control of the pancreatic cancer could be achieved by combination treatment modalities.

  9. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  10. Uptake Difference by Somatostatin Receptors in a Patient with Neuroendocrine Tumor: 99mTc-Octreotide Uptake in the Lung without Uptake in Liver Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pirayesh, Elahe; Amoui, Mahasti; Assadi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in detecting tumors has been assessed in a number of studies. We present a 30-year-old female with a history of eight months cough and left shoulder pain. Radiologic evaluation showed pulmonary mass and hepatic lesions, which were pathologically diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma. 99mTc-octreotide scan demonstrated that the pulmonary lesion was positive for somatostatin receptor (SSTR), while the liver metastases were SSTR negative. The present case highlights the significance of a differential uptake pattern by somatostatin receptors in SRS in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:27529888

  11. Uptake Difference by Somatostatin Receptors in a Patient with Neuroendocrine Tumor: 99mTc-Octreotide Uptake in the Lung without Uptake in Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Pirayesh, Elahe; Amoui, Mahasti; Assadi, Majid

    2015-10-01

    The diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in detecting tumors has been assessed in a number of studies. We present a 30-year-old female with a history of eight months cough and left shoulder pain. Radiologic evaluation showed pulmonary mass and hepatic lesions, which were pathologically diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma. 99mTc-octreotide scan demonstrated that the pulmonary lesion was positive for somatostatin receptor (SSTR), while the liver metastases were SSTR negative. The present case highlights the significance of a differential uptake pattern by somatostatin receptors in SRS in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:27529888

  12. Presence of cobalamin analogues in animal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Haruki; Kolhouse, Fred; Allen, Robert H.

    1980-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B-12) has been extracted and isolated from a number of animal tissues by using (i) reverse-affinity chromatography on R protein-Sepharose followed by adsorption to and elution from charcoal-coated agarose and (ii) paper chromatography. Radioisotope dilution assays showed that only 75-97% of the Cbl chromatographed in the position of crystalline Cbl. The remaining 3-25% was present in a number of slower and faster moving fractions. This suggested that Cbl analogues are present in animal tissues because appropriate controls ruled out the possibility that this material was artifactually derived from Cbl during the extraction and purification procedures. With a large-scale isolation from rabbit kidney, the material in five such fractions contained cobalt and had absorption spectra that were similar to but different from the spectrum of Cbl, indicating that they were Cbl analogues. Compared to Cbl, these Cbl analogues had decreased but definite affinities for Cbl-binding proteins with the following order of strength of binding: R protein > transcobalamin II > intrinsic factor. Compared to Cbl, they also had decreased but definite growth-promoting activity for two microorganisms, Euglena gracilis and Lactobacillus leichmannii, which require Cbl for growth. These Cbl analogues differed from each other and from 18 synthetic Cbl analogues, including the most common Cbl analogues synthesized by microorganisms, in at least one of the above features. These studies indicate that animal tissues contain a number of Cbl analogues whose origins, structures, and biologic activities remain to be determined. PMID:6928681

  13. Separate cell types that express two different forms of somatostatin in anglerfish islets can be immunohistochemically differentiated.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J K; Greiner, F; Bauer, G E; Elde, R P; Noe, B D

    1987-02-01

    The somatostatin-related peptides somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (aSS-28) are synthesized at the C-terminal end of two separate pre-pro-somatostatins in anglerfish pancreatic islets. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these peptides are expressed in the same or different cell types. Antisera R141 and R293, which recognize the central region of SS-14 and the C-terminal region of aSS-28 ([Tyr7,Gly10] SS-14), respectively, were used in an immunohistochemical examination of anglerfish islets. The R293 antiserum-labeled cells were distributed individually or in small clusters. These same cells, as well as a separate set of cells arranged in large clusters, were stained by the R141 antiserum. Pre-absorption of the R141 antiserum with [Tyr7,Gly10] SS-14 eliminated staining by R141 of only those cells also labeled by R293, whereas pre-absorption of R141 with SS-14 prevented all staining. Pre-absorption of R293 with [Tyr7,Gly10] SS-14 eliminated all staining, whereas pre-absorption with SS-14 had no effect on aSS-28-like immunoreactivity. These results suggest the existence of two separate cell types which express either SS-14 or aSS-28. The cells that contained the somatostatin-related peptides were found to be distinct from those cells that contained insulin, glucagon, or anglerfish peptide Y. However, the cells stained by the R293 antiserum were distributed in close association with glucagon-containing cells. The implications of the existence of separate cell types which express SS-14 or aSS-28 are discussed with regard to processing of the biosynthetic precursors to these peptides. PMID:2878951

  14. No difference in mortality between terlipressin and somatostatin treatments in cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding and renal functional impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Chih-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the differences in mortality between terlipressin and somatostatin treatments in cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) and renal functional impairment (RFI). Methods The National Health Insurance Database, part of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll cirrhotic patients who had received endoscopic variceal ligation plus somatostatin or terlipressin for EVB and who were hospitalized between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010. The differences in mortality between the two vasoactive agents were compared and the risk factors for 30-day mortality because of EVB were identified. Results A total of 2324 cirrhotic patients with EVB were enrolled. The 30-day mortality data showed no significant differences between the somatostatin and the terlipressin groups (P=0.232). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in male patients [hazard ratio (HR): 1.50, P=0.002] and patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 1.82, P<0.001), ascites (HR: 1.32, P=0.008), bacterial infections (HR: 2.10, P<0.001), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 2.09, P<0.001), and RFI (HR: 3.89, P<0.001). A subgroup analysis of cirrhotic patients with RFI was carried out. The overall 30-day mortality was higher in patients treated with somatostatin than in those treated with terlipressin (52.6 vs. 42.3%), but the difference failed to reach significance (adjust HR: 1.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.94–2.37, P=0.091). Conclusion RFI was the most important risk factor for 30-day mortality in EVB patients. Terlipressin and somatostatin had similar effects on 30-day mortality in cirrhotic patients with EVB and RFI. PMID:27455080

  15. ACT: Acting Out Central Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kise, Joan Duff

    1982-01-01

    The author describes ACT (Acting Out Central Theme), a method for dealing with psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains in slow readers. The ACT approach involves three sessions which focus on discussion of a theme such as friendship, presentaton of the theme as a skit, and assignment of topics to individual students. (SW)

  16. The Canadian Analogue Research Network (CARN): Opportunities for Mars Analogue Studies in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Berinstain, A.; Lebeuf, M.; Léveillé, R.

    2006-10-01

    The Canadian Analogue Research Network has been established by the Canadian Space Agency. This network of analogue sites, many of which are in the Arctic, provides a unique opportunity to further our understanding of the polar regions of Earth and Mars.

  17. Effects of cysteamine administration on the in vivo incorporation of (/sup 35/S)cysteine into somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin in rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, J.L.; Fernstrom, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of cysteamine injection on the in vivo incorporation of (/sup 35/S)cysteine into somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14), SRIF-28, arginine vasopressin (AVP), and oxytocin (OXT) in rat hypothalamus was studied. (/sup 35/S)Cysteine was injected into the third ventricle 1 h, 4 h, or 1 week after cysteamine (300 mg/kg, sc) injection; animals were killed 4 h later. The drug was found to substantially reduce immunoreactive SRIF levels, but not OXT or AVP, 4 h after its injection. Cysteamine also caused large reductions in label incorporation into SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and OXT 1 and 4 h after drug injection. However, (/sup 35/S)cysteine incorporation into AVP was increased substantially at these time points, while that into acid-precipitable protein was normal. One week after cysteamine injection, label incorporation into all hypothalamic peptides was normal. Cysteine specific activity was also measured after (/sup 35/S)cysteine injection and was found to be similar in treatment and control groups. The results suggest that cysteamine inhibits the syntheses of SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and OXT and stimulates that of AVP.

  18. High-resolution mass spectrometry analysis of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its analogues in puffer fish and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Bane, Vaishali; Brosnan, Brid; Barnes, Paul; Lehane, Mary; Furey, Ambrose

    2016-09-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is an emerging toxin in the European marine environment. It has various known structural analogues. It acts as a sodium channel blocker; the ability of each analogue to bind to the sodium channel varies with the particular structure of each analogue. Thus, each analogue will vary in its toxic potential. TTX analogues co-occur in food samples at variable concentrations. An LC-MS method was developed for the identification and quantitation of several analogues of TTX using an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer. The LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer facilitates high mass accuracy measurement up to 100,000 full width at half maximum (FWHM). Using high resolution at 100,000 FWHM allows for the identification of TTX and its analogues in various matrices, including puffer fish and molluscan shellfish samples (Δ ppm = 0.28-3.38). The confirmation of characteristic fragment ions of TTX and its analogues was achieved by determining their elemental formulae via high mass accuracy. A quantitative method was then developed and optimised using these characteristic fragment ions. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of the method was 0.136 µg g(-1) (S/N = 10) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.041 µg g(-1) (S/N = 3) spiking TTX standard into TTX-free mackerel fish extracts. The method was applied to naturally contaminated puffer fish and molluscan shellfish samples to confirm the presence of TTX and its analogues. PMID:27662433

  19. Evaluation of copper-64-labeled somatostatin agonists and antagonist in sstr2-transfected cell lines that are positive and negative for p53: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim; Parry, Jesse J.; Rogers, Buck E.; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs have become important agents for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Here we determine the effect of the tumor suppressor protein, p53, on trafficking 64Cu to tumor cell nuclei from DOTA vs.CB-TE2A-conjugated agonist Y3-TATE and the antagonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT in cell lines that are positive or negative for p53. Methods Receptor binding, internalization, cAMP and nuclear localization studies were performed with the SSTr2 agonists, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE and 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE vs. antagonist, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT, in SSTr2-transfected p53 +/+ and −/− HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. Results The antagonist, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT, bound 8-9-fold more SSTr2 binding sites than did the 64Cu-labeled agonists. 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE was more efficiently internalized than 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE, while 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT showed lower, yet significant levels of internalization. CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE acted as a full agonist, inhibiting cAMP production, whereas CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT showed no inhibition of cAMP production.The 64Cu from agonists 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE and 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE showed greater nuclear localization at 24 h in p53 +/+ vs. −/− cells; however, there was no difference in the levels of 64Cu from the antagonist based on p53 status. Surprisingly, the DOTA and CB-TE2A-conjugated agonists showed similar nuclear localization in the p53 +/+ and −/− cells, suggesting no difference in 64Cu release from these chelators in the HCT116 cell lines. Conclusion Based on thesein vitro data, the agonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE demonstrated the most promise as an agent for targeted radiotherapy in p53 positive, SSTr2-positive tumors. PMID:22056254

  20. Synthesis and anticancer evaluation of spermatinamine analogues.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Basem A; Sagar, Sunil; Li, Song; Esau, Luke; Kaur, Mandeep; Khashab, Niveen M

    2016-03-15

    Spermatinamine was isolated from an Australian marine sponge, Pseudoceratina sp. as an inhibitor of isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt), an attractive and novel anticancer target. Herein, we report the synthesis of spermatinamine analogues and their cytotoxic evaluation against three human cancer cell lines, that is, cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), and prostate carcinoma (DU145). Analogues 12, 14 and 15 were found to be the most potent against one or more cell lines with the IC50 values in the range of 5-10 μM. The obtained results suggested that longer polyamine linker along with aromatic oxime substitution provided the most potent analogue compounds against cancer cell lines. PMID:26874403

  1. Dolastatin 11 conformations, analogues and pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ahad; Bates, Robert B; Crane, Zackary D; Dicus, Christopher W; Gramme, Michelle R; Hamel, Ernest; Marcischak, Jacob; Martinez, David S; McClure, Kelly J; Nakkiew, Pichaya; Pettit, George R; Stessman, Chad C; Sufi, Bilal A; Yarick, Gayle V

    2005-07-01

    Twenty analogues of the natural antitumor agent dolastatin 11, including majusculamide C, were synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity against human cancer cells and stimulation of actin polymerization. Only analogues containing the 30-membered ring were active. Molecular modeling and NMR evidence showed the low-energy conformations. The amide bonds are all trans except for the one between the Tyr and Val units, which is cis. Since an analogue restricted to negative 2-3-4-5 angles stimulated actin polymerization but was inactive in cells, the binding conformation (most likely the lowest-energy conformation in water) has a negative 2-3-4-5 angle, whereas a conformation with a positive 2-3-4-5 angle (most likely the lowest energy conformation in chloroform) goes through cell walls. The highly active R alcohol from borohydride reduction of dolastatin 11 is a candidate for conversion to prodrugs.

  2. Evidence for a single class of somatostatin receptors in ground squirrel cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Krantic, S.; Petrovic, V.M.; Quirion, R.; Kordon, C.

    1989-01-01

    In the present study we characterized high-affinity somatostatin (SRIF) binding sites (Kd = 2.06 +/- 0.32 nM and Bmax = 295 +/- 28 fmol/mg protein) in cerebral cortex membrane preparations of European ground squirrel using /sup 125/I-(Tyr0-D-Trp8)-SRIF14 as a radioligand. The inhibition of radioligand specific binding by SRIF14, as well as by its agonists (SRIF28, Tyr0-D-Trp8-SRIF14, SMS 201 995) was complete and monophasic, thus revealing a single population of somatostatinergic binding sites. Radioautographic analysis of /sup 125/I-(Tyr0-D-Trp8)-SRIF14 labeled brain sections confirmed the results of our biochemical study. The homogeneity of SRIF binding sites in the ground squirrel neocortex was not dependent on the animal's life-cycle phase.

  3. Somatostatin analogs. Dissociation of brain receptor binding affinities and pituitary actions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1981-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for somatostatin (SRIF) in rat brain synaptosomal membranes which appear to mediate its action. Using this system as a radioreceptor assay, we have examined the ability of a wide range of SRIF analogs to interact with these receptors. Although structural modifications in the Trp8 moiety of SRIF resulted in significant enhancement of affinity for binding to the brain SRIF receptors, the different relative specificities of des AA1,2,4,5,12,13 D-Trp8 SRIF (oligo D-Trp8 SRIF), D-Trp8 SRIF and D-5-Br-Trp8 SRIF in the pituitary and the central nervous system (CNS) suggest that basic differences exist between SRIF receptors present in the brain and the pituitary.

  4. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  5. Anti-somatostatin antibody enhances the rate of hippocampal kindling in rats.

    PubMed

    Monno, A; Rizzi, M; Samanin, R; Vezzani, A

    1993-01-29

    A somatostatin-specific antibody (Ab) (1:250) was continuously infused into the stimulated dorsal hippocampus of rats from 4 days before to 26 days after the beginning of kindling or until the first stage 5. Controls received boiled Ab. The number of stimulations to the first stage 5 were reduced by 41 +/- 4% (P < 0.01, Student's t-test) in animals infused with the Ab compared to controls. The cumulative after-discharge in the stimulated hippocampus was slightly, although not significantly, reduced. Kindling was not affected when the Ab was infused only during the first 10 stimulations (stage 2). Histological analysis showed no neurotoxic effects in the hippocampus as a consequence of Ab infusion.

  6. Critical evaluation of cysteamine as a tool to deplete somatostatin in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, L.L.; Bissette, G.; Dole, K.; Nemeroff, C.B.

    1989-02-01

    The wide central nervous system (CNS) distribution of somatostatin (SRIF) as well as the well documented reduction in SRIF concentration in the cerebral cortex in patients with Alzheimer's disease have served as an impetus for studies of this peptide's neurobiological role in the brain. These studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy of centrally administered cysteamine (CYS) as a tool to deplete SRIF in the hypothalamus (HYP) and extrahypothalamic brain areas. Somatostatin was measured by RIA in the frontal cortex (COR), hippocampus (HIP), and HYP in rats after seven daily infusions of CYS into unilateral cannulae stereotaxically positioned into either the lateral ventricle (LV; 300 micrograms/2 microliters) or the dorsal HIP (100 micrograms/2 microliters), and after single (300 mg/kg) or daily (100 mg/kg) sc injections; rats were killed 4 or 24 h after the last injection. After LV infusions, the SRIF concentration was significantly reduced only in the HYP (35% at 4 h and 27% at 24 h). After HIP infusions, the SRIF concentration was significantly reduced only in the HYP at 4 h (23%); no reductions were observed at 24 h. Both a single and repeated sc administrations of CYS reduced SRIF in the HYP only 24 h after treatment (54% and 50%, respectively). Acute sc CYS reduced SRIF in the COR (23%) and the HYP (29%) 4 h after treatment; repeated sc CYS reduced SRIF in the COR (25%) and the HYP (63%). Although the reduction of SRIF in the HYP was increased by repeated sc dosing, the reduction of extrahypothalamic SRIF by sc CYS was relatively small in magnitude and was not enhanced by repeated dosing. These results suggest that CYS is not an ideal tool for depletion of extrahypothalamic SRIF after sc or CNS administration and, moreover, raise serious questions about studies in which behavioral or endocrine alterations after CYS treatment were attributed to specific actions on SRIF-containing neurons.

  7. Localization of somatostatin mRNAs in the brain and pancreas of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Alexander, L; Knutson, D; Kittilson, J D; Sheridan, M A

    2001-06-01

    Rainbow trout possess three distinct mRNAs, each encoding a separate precursor: PPSS I, which contains a 14-amino acid sequence at its C-terminus (somatostatin-14) that is highly conserved among vertebrates, as well as two others, PPSS II' and PPSS II", both containing [Tyr(7), Gly(10)]-somatostatin-14 at their C-terminus. In this study, we used RNA template-specific PCR and in situ hybridization to determine the distribution and cellular localization of PPSS mRNAs in the brain and Brockmann body of rainbow trout. PPSS I, PPSS II' and PPSS II" were expressed in the Brockmann body and pituitary; the expression of PPSS mRNAs in the brain was region specific. PPSS I mRNA was expressed in the Brockmann body predominantly by cells other than those that expressed PPSS IIs; however, there were several instances where PPSS I and PPSS IIs were co-expressed within the same cell. Of the PPSS II-expressing cells, many were observed to express both PPSS II' and PPSS II" mRNA; however, some cells expressed only PPSS II' mRNA, while other cells expressed only PPSS II" mRNA. In the brain, PPSS I mRNA was expressed in the optic tectum (OT) and in many hypothalamic nuclei, including the nucleus rotundus (NR), nucleus anterioris hypothalami (NAH), nucleus anterior tuberis (NAT), nucleus lateral tuberis (NLT), as well as in the pituitary (adenohypophysis). PPSS II" mRNA was present in the same regions as PPSS I mRNA; however, PPSS II' mRNA was present primarily in OT, NAT, NLT and adenohypohysis. These results indicate that PPSS mRNAs are expressed differently by different cells, suggesting that cell-specific mechanisms are involved with the control of PPSS expression and that particular biological responses may be associated with a specific SS isoform. PMID:11399453

  8. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  9. Capsaicin and its analogues: structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Huang, X-F; Xue, J-Y; Jiang, A-Q; Zhu, H-L

    2013-01-01

    Capsaicin, the main ingredient responsible for the hot pungent taste of chilli peppers, is an alkaloid found in the Capsicum family. Capsaicin was traditionally used for muscular pain, headaches, to improve circulation and for its gastrointestinal protective effects. It was also commonly added to herbal formulations because it acts as a catalyst for other herbs and aids in their absorption. In addition, capsaicin and other capsaicinoid compounds showed strong evidence of having promising potential in the fight against many types of cancer. The mechanism of action of capsaicin has been extensively studied over the past decade. It has been established that capsaicin binds to the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor which was expressed predominantly by sensory neurons. And many analogues of capsaicin have been synthesized and evaluated for diverse bioactivities. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the biology and structure-activity relationship of capsaicinoids.

  10. Global analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Navin, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    This thesis deals with a global analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect previously pointed out by other authors. The effect was not well understood because the pure Aharonov-Bohm cross section was thought to be merely an approximate low energy limit. This thesis provides a detailed analysis and reveals that in the particular model considered, there is an exact Aharonov-Bohm cross section over the energy range that a mass splitting occurs. At energies slightly above the mass splitting, the effect has completely disappeared and there is effectively no scattering at large distances. This is a curious observation as it was previously thought that a global theory would not act exactly like a local one over an extended range of energies. It begs the heretical speculation that experimentally observed forces modelled with Lagrangians possessing local symmetries may have an underlying global theory.

  11. Juggling Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudalevige, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Two education bills from George W. Bush's first term are long overdue for reauthorization. One, of course, is the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), passed in late 2001. The other is the Education Sciences Reform Act (ESRA), which in November 2002 replaced the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) with a new Institute of Education…

  12. Why homogeneous boundary conditions lead to heterogeneous internal strain in analogue simple shear experiments - explained by numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Ulrike; Frehner, Marcel; Mancktelow, Neil S.; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-05-01

    deformed during an experiment and represent boundary conditions in the third dimension (i.e the z-direction). In the two-dimensional numerical simulation, this viscous shear boundary condition is represented by a velocity-dependent traction force that acts on the analogue material. The numerical simple shear experiments including this traction force precisely reproduce the heterogeneous strain observed in analogue experiments. Therefore, we conclude that boundary effects in the third dimension of simple shear rigs (i.e. weak viscous layers) are the primary reason for the observed heterogeneous strain field. As the viscous stresses arising from deforming the weak boundary layers are velocity dependent, the deviation from a homogeneous strain pattern in the analogue material depends on the applied shear strain rate. We thus recommend to run analogue models in shear boxes at preferably low strain rates.

  13. Development of highly potent and selective dynorphin A analogues as new medicines.

    PubMed

    Lung, F-D T; Chen, C-H; Liu, J-H

    2005-11-01

    Dynorphin A (Dyn A), a 17 amino acid peptide H-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-Arg-Arg-Ile-Arg-Pro-Lys-Leu-Lys-Trp-Asp-Asn-Gln-OH, is a potent opioid peptide which interacts preferentially with kappa-opioid receptors. Research in the development of selective and potent opioid peptide ligands for the kappa-receptor is important in mediating analgesia. Several cyclic disulphide bridge-containing peptide analogues of Dyn A, which were conformationally constrained in the putative message or address segment of the opioid ligand, were designed, synthesized and assayed. To further investigate the conformational and topographical requirements for the residues in positions 5 and 11 of these analogues, a systematic series of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 cyclic analogues incorporating the sulphydryl-containing amino acids L- and D-Cys and L- and D-Pen in positions 5 and 11 were synthesized and assayed. Cyclic lactam peptide analogues were also synthesized and assayed. Several of these cyclic analogues, retained the same affinity and selectivity (vs. the mu- and delta-receptors) as the parent Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 peptide in the guinea-pig brain (GPB), but exhibited a much lower activity in the guinea-pig ileum (GPI), thus leading to centrally vs. peripherally selective peptides. Studies of the structure-activity relationship of Dyn A peptide provide new insights into the importance of each amino acid residue (and their configurations) in Dyn A analogues for high potency and good selectivity at kappa-opioid receptors. We report herein the progress towards the development of Dyn A peptide ligands, which can act as agonists or antagonists at cell surface receptors that modulate cell function and animal behaviour using various approaches to rational peptide ligand-based drug design.

  14. Polyamine metabolism in a member of the phylum Microspora (Encephalitozoon cuniculi): effects of polyamine analogues

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Cyrus J.; Rattendi, Donna; Faciane, Evangeline; Yarlett, Nigel; Weiss, Louis M.; Frydman, Benjamin; Woster, Patrick; Wei, Benjamin; Marton, Laurence J.; Wittner, Murray

    2011-01-01

    The uptake, biosynthesis and catabolism of polyamines in the microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi are detailed with reference to the effects of oligoamine and arylamine analogues of polyamines. Enc. cuniculi, an intracellular parasite of mammalian cells, has both biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes of polyamine metabolism, as demonstrated in cell-free extracts of mature spores. The uptake of polyamines was measured in immature, pre-emergent spores isolated from host cells by Percoll gradient. Spermine was rapidly taken up and metabolized to spermidine and an unknown, possibly acetamidopropanal, by spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and polyamine oxidase (PAO). Most of the spermidine and the unknown product were found in the cell incubation medium, indicating they were released from the cell. bis(Ethyl) oligoamine analogues of polyamines, such as SL-11144 and SL-11158, as well as arylamine analogues [BW-1, a bis(phenylbenzyl) 3-7-3 analogue] blocked uptake and interconversion of spermine at micromolar levels and, in the case of BW-1, acted as substrate for PAO. The Enc. cuniculi PAO activity differed from that found in mammalian cells with respect to pH optimum, substrate specificity and sensitivity to known PAO inhibitors. SL-11158 inhibited SSAT activity with a mixed type of inhibition in which the analogue had a 70-fold higher affinity for the enzyme than the natural substrate, spermine. The interest in Enc. cuniculi polyamine metabolism and the biochemical effects of these polyamine analogues is warranted since they cure model infections of Enc. cuniculi in mice and are potential candidates for human clinical trials. PMID:15133083

  15. Occurrence of two somatostatin variants in the frog brain: characterization of the cDNAs, distribution of the mRNAs, and receptor-binding affinities of the peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Tostivint, H; Lihrmann, I; Bucharles, C; Vieau, D; Coulouarn, Y; Fournier, A; Conlon, J M; Vaudry, H

    1996-01-01

    In tetrapods, only one gene encoding a somatostatin precursor has been identified so far. The present study reports the characterization of the cDNA clones that encode two distinct somatostatin precursors in the brain of the frog Rana ridibunda. The cDNAs were isolated by using degenerate oligonucleotides based on the sequence of the central region of somatostatin to screen a frog brain cDNA library. One of the cDNAs encodes a 115-amino acid protein (prepro-somatostatin-14; PSS1) that exhibits a high degree of structural similarity with the mammalian somatostatin precursor. The other cDNA encodes a 103-amino acid protein (prepro-[Pro2, Met13]somatostatin-14; PSS2) that contains the sequence of the somatostatin analog (peptide SS2) at its C terminus, but does not exhibit appreciable sequence similarity with PSS1 in the remaining region. In situ hybridization studies indicate differential expression of the PSS1 and PSS2 genes in the septum, the lateral part of the pallium, the amygdaloid complex, the posterior nuclei of the thalamus, the ventral hypothalamic nucleus, the torus semicircularis and the optic tectum. The somatostatin variant SS2 was significantly more potent (4-6 fold) than somatostatin itself in displacing [125I-Tyr0, D-Trp8] somatostatin-14 from its specific binding sites. The present study indicates that the two somatostatin variants could exert different functions in the frog brain and pituitary. These data also suggest that distinct genes encoding somatostatin variants may be expressed in the brain of other tetrapods. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8901629

  16. Acutely administered melatonin decreases somatostatin-binding sites and the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Claros, Rosa María; Boyano-Adánez Md, María del Carmen; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Melatonin is known to increase neuronal activity in the hippocampus, an effect contrary to that of somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF). Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the somatostatinergic system is implicated in the mechanism of action of melatonin in the rat hippocampus. One group of rats was injected a single dose of melatonin [25 microg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.)] or saline containing ethanol (0.5%, s.c.) and killed 5 hr later. Melatonin significantly decreased the SRIF-like immunoreactivity levels and induced a significant decrease in the density of SRIF receptors as well as in the dissociation constant (Kd). SRIF-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was markedly decreased in hippocampal membranes from melatonin-treated rats. The functional activity of Gi proteins was similar in hippocampal membranes from melatonin-treated and control rats. Western blot analyses revealed that melatonin administration did not alter Gialpha1 or Gialpha2 levels. To determine if the changes observed were related to melatonin-induced activation of central melatonin receptors, a melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, was administered prior to melatonin injection. Pretreatment with luzindole (10 mg/kg, s.c.) did not alter the melatonin-induced effects on the above-mentioned parameters and luzindole, alone, had no observable effect. The present results demonstrate that melatonin decreases the activity of the SRIF receptor-effector system in the rat hippocampus, an effect which is apparently not mediated by melatonin receptors. As SRIF exerts an opposite effect to that of melatonin on hippocampal neuronal activity, it is possible that the SRIFergic system could be implicated in the mechanism of action of melatonin in the rat.

  17. Expression of multiple somatostatin receptor genes in AtT-20 cells. Evidence for a novel somatostatin-28 selective receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Panetta, R; Escher, E; Greenwood, M; Srikant, C B

    1994-01-14

    The pattern of expression of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) genes and gene products in AtT-20 cells was characterized in an attempt to explain the SST-28 binding selectivity that typifies these cells. AtT-20 cells expressed multiple SSTR mRNAs. Paradoxically, this included mRNA for three of the four SST-14 selective receptors: SSTR2 ( +), SSTR1 (+), SSTR4 (+). The SST-28 selective SSTR5 was expressed as a 3.8-kilobase (kb) transcript of relatively low abundance (+) in contrast to normal mouse pituitary which displayed high levels ( ) of a 2.4-kb SSTR5 mRNA. Immunoblot analysis of solubilized membranes with an antipeptide SSTR2 antibody revealed a single SSTR2 protein of 72 +/- 2 kDa. Preincubation of AtT-20 cell membranes with SSTR2 antibody reduced 125I-[Leu8,D-Trp22,Tyr25]SST-28 binding sites by 38%. Residual binding sites exhibited a 4.9-fold increase in affinity for SST-28, a 2.6-fold decrease in affinity for SST-14, and an SST-28:SST-14 potency ratio of 40:1 compared with a potency ratio of 3.5:1 in control membranes. These results demonstrate the expression of four SSTR genes in AtT-20 cells of which SSTR2 predominates. Blockade of SSTR2 with antibody exposes high affinity SST-28 selective sites with comparable binding characteristics to those reported for cloned SSTR5. These SST-28 binding sites may arise from a SSTR5 variant encoded by a high molecular weight 3.8-kb transcript or more likely from another as yet undiscovered member of the SST-28 selective SSTR subfamily.

  18. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  19. Analogues of thiolactomycin as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon M; Urch, Jonathan E; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Harwood, John L; Berry, Colin; Gilbert, Ian H

    2005-09-22

    Analogues of the natural antibiotic thiolactomycin (TLM), an inhibitor of the condensing reactions of type II fatty acid synthase, were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Alkylation of the C4 hydroxyl group led to the most significant increase in growth inhibition (over a 100-fold increase in activity compared to TLM). To investigate the mode of action, the P. falciparum KASIII enzyme was produced for inhibitor assay. A number of TLM derivatives were identified that showed improved inhibition of this enzyme compared to TLM. Structure-activity relationships for enzyme inhibition were identified for some series of TLM analogues, and these also showed weak correlation with inhibition of parasite growth, but this did not hold for other series. On the basis of the lack of a clear correlation between inhibition of pfKASIII activity and parasite growth, we conclude that pfKASIII is not the primary target of TLM analogues. Some of the analogues also inhibited the growth of the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, T. brucei, and Leishmania donovani.

  20. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  1. Stilbenophane analogues of deoxycombretastatin A-4.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Carmen; Pérez-Melero, Concepción; Peláez, Rafael; Medarde, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    A new family of polyoxygenated stilbenophanes has been synthesized as conformationally restricted analogues of antimitotic combretastatins. By means of the McMurry olefination process, compounds derived from diethyleneglycol and 1,6-hexanediol were obtained, whereas Grubbs' catalyst failed in producing the ring-closing metathesis to this kind of macrocyclic products.

  2. Analogue Representations of Spatial Objects and Tranformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn A.

    Considerable discussion and debate have been devoted to the extent and nature of structural or functional correspondence between internal representations and their external visual counterparts. An analogue representation or process is one in which the relational structure of external events is preserved in the corresponding internal…

  3. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  4. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Choi, B S; Kwon, K C; Lee, S O; Kwak, H J; Lee, C H

    2000-08-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue 2 are reported. The synthesis of 2 was accomplished from bisnoralcohol 3. The spermidine moiety was introduced via reductive amination of an appropriately functionalized 3beta-aminosterol with spermidinyl aldehyde 17 utilizing sodium triacetoxyborohydride as the reducing agent. Compound 2 shows weaker antimicrobial activity than squalamine. PMID:11003150

  5. Somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, and prosomatostatin[1-10] are independently and efficiently processed from prosomatostatin in the constitutive secretory pathway in islet somatostatin tumor cells (1027B2).

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Galanopoulou, A S; Rabbani, S N; Liu, J L; Ravazzola, M; Amherdt, M

    1997-08-01

    We have characterized the biosynthetic origin of somatostatin-14 (SS-14), SS-28, and pro-SS[1-10] from pro-SS (PSS) in 1027B2 rat islet tumor cells. Because these cells lack regulated secretion and show unresponsiveness of the SS gene to cAMP, we have additionally carried out morphological and functional studies to elucidate the molecular defect in cAMP signalling and to localize the sites of PSS maturation along the secretory pathway. Cell extracts and secretion media were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography and specific C- and N-terminal radioimmunoassays. Electron microscopic sampling of 1027B2 cell cultures showed that most cells had very few dense core secretory granules for heterogeneous sizes. The cells expressed the endoproteases furin, PC1, and PC2 and contained large quantities of fully processed SS-14 and SS-28 with very little unprocessed PSS (ratio SS-14:SS-28:PSS = 39:51:10%). They secreted high concentrations of SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] constitutively along with PC1 and PC2. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that PSS is rapidly (within 15 min), and efficiently processed to SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] via separate biosynthetic pathways: PSS --> SS-14 + 8 kDa; PSS --> SS-28 + 7 kDa; PSS --> PSS[1-10]. Monensin reduced intracellular SS-like immunoreactivity without altering processing efficiency. Transfection with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-C) activated SS promoter-CAT activating indicating that the defect in cAMP-dependent signaling in 1027B2 cells lies at the level of PKA-C. PKA-C overexpression failed to alter the ratio of processed SS-14 and SS-28. These results demonstrate that SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] are independently synthesized from PSS and that efficient precursor processing can occur within the constitutive secretory pathway in the relative absence of dense core secretory vesicles. PMID:9296377

  6. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment.

  7. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27301366

  8. Somatostatin- and enkephalin-like immunoreactivities are frequently colocalized in neurons in the caudal brain stem of rat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Terenius, L; Buchan, A; Brown, J C

    1987-01-01

    The medulla oblongata and pons of colchicine treated rats were analyzed with a double-staining technique using mouse monoclonal antibodies to somatostatin and rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against methionine-enkephalin. Numerous cells reacted with both antisera but cells reacting with only one antiserum were also observed. Double-stained cells were most frequently encountered at all levels of the nucleus tractus solitarii, in a well defined group in the caudal medullary reticular formation, along the lateral ventral surface of the medulla oblongata, dorsolateral to the inferior olive and in the nucleus raphe magnus. These findings provide further examples of coexistence of two peptides and indicate the possibility that somatostatin- and enkephalin-like peptides are co-released. PMID:2887451

  9. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  10. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  11. Somatostatin-, vasoactive intestinal peptide-, and granulin-like peptides isolated from intestinal extracts of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, T; Yano, K; Yamasaki, M; Ando, M

    1995-09-01

    Three new peptides were originally isolated from intestinal extracts of goldfish. They were structurally related with somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and granulin (GRN) and thus termed goldfish somatostatin (gSS-28), gVIP, and gGRN, respectively. The primary structures of these peptides were determined as: SVESSNHLPA 10RERKAGCKNF20YWKGFTSC for the gSS-28; HSDAVFTDNY10SRYRKQMAAK20KYLNSVLA-NH2 for the gVIP, and VIHCDSSTIC10 PDGTTCCLSP20YGVWYCCPFS30MGQCCRDGIH40CCRHGYHCDS50TSTHCLR for the gGRN. The amino acid sequence of the gSS-28 was more similar (79-86% similarity) to somatostatins obtained in anglerfish, flounder, and sculpin, but far (21% similarity) from the catfish somatostatin, whereas goldfish and catfish belong to the same superorder. The structure of the gVIP was closely related to that of the cod VIP; only one residue (Tyr13) being substituted for Phe13 in the cod VIP. Comparing amino acid sequences of VIPs obtained in various vertebrates, the primary structure of this peptide was revealed to be relatively well conserved among vertebrates. In addition, the dose-response curve for the effect of gVIP on the short-circuit current (Isc) across the eel intestine was similar to that of human VIP, suggesting that VIPs in vertebrates have similar effect. The amino acid sequence of gGRN was 96% identical to that of carp GRN-1; only two residues (Ser6-Ser7) being substituted for Ala6-Ala7 in the carp GRN-1. The physiological significance of these peptides is discussed. PMID:8536941

  12. Effects of selective somatostatin analogs and cortistatin on cell viability in cultured human non-functioning pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Padova, H; Rubinfeld, H; Hadani, M; Cohen, Z R; Nass, D; Taylor, J E; Culler, M D; Shimon, I

    2008-05-14

    Clinically "non-functioning" human pituitary adenomas (NFPA) constitute about 35% of pituitary adenomas. Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) expression in these adenomas has previously been described both in vitro and in vivo, without evidence for a correlation with tumor volume or the therapeutic efficacy of somatostatin analogs. This study was performed on 13 surgically removed pituitary macroadenomas, diagnosed before surgery as "non-functioning". In addition, 3 growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas served as controls. A specimen from each tumor was dispersed and digested to isolate and culture the tumor cells, and the in vitro effects of SSTR2 and SSTR5 selective analogs and Cortistatin (CST) (100nM) on cell viability were studied. The quantity of viable cells was estimated using the XTT method. RNA purification of tumor samples and subsequent RT-PCR studies for SSTR2 and SSTR5 expression were performed. Somatostatin analog with high affinity for SSTR2 reduced cell viability by 20-80% in 8 of 13 NFPAs studied, all expressing the SSTR2. The inhibitory effect on cell viability of SSTR5-selective analog was 15-80% in 10 of 13 NFPAs studied, all but three expressing the SSTR5. CST, however, effectively reduced cell viability in only 6 NFPAs. Cell viability was inhibited by all peptides studied in 2 out of 3 GH-secreting adenomas, expressing both receptors. The third adenoma responded to SSTR2 analog and expressed only SSTR2. These results suggest the involvement of SSTR2 and SSTR5 in the anti-proliferative effects of somatostatin; however, CST is less potent in reducing cell viability in these tumors. PMID:18276067

  13. Allelic deletion of the MEN1 gene in duodenal gastrin and somatostatin cell neoplasms and their precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Anlauf, M; Perren, A; Henopp, T; Rudolph, T; Garbrecht, N; Schmitt, A; Raffel, A; Gimm, O; Weihe, E; Knoefel, W T; Dralle, H; Heitz, Ph U; Komminoth, P; Klöppel, G

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients with a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)‐associated Zollinger–Ellison syndrome (ZES) show multifocal duodenal gastrinomas and precursor lesions. Aims To test these lesions for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the MEN1 gene locus on chromosome 11q13, and to investigate whether the MEN1‐related endocrine cell changes also involved somatostatin cells. Material and methods Tissue specimens from six patients with MEN1 and ZES were analysed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. LOH analysis was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using probes containing the MEN1 gene locus and the centromere 11 (C11) region. For simultaneous analysis of hormones and allelic deletions, a combined FISH/immunofluorescence protocol was established. Results 28 of a total of 33 duodenal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) were gastrin‐producing tumours; 13/28 (46.4%) revealed LOH on 11q13 and/or C11. Five of the NETs were somatostatin‐expressing tumours, two revealing LOH. Allelic loss was detected in tumours as small as 300 μm (gastrin) and 400 μm (somatostatin) in diameter. The gastrin‐producing tumours showed different deletion/retention patterns. Hyperplastic somatostatin cell lesions, similar to those of the gastrin cells, were present in all patients. The hyperplastic lesions of both cell lines consistently retained both 11q13 alleles. Conclusions Allelic deletion of the MEN1 gene may reflect a pivotal event in the development of multifocal gastrin and somatostatin cell neoplasms in the duodenum of patients with MEN1. The observation of distinct deletion patterns in small synchronous tumours supports the concept that each gastrin‐producing tumour in an individual MEN1 patient arises from an independent cell clone. PMID:17135306

  14. Quantum dot immunocytochemical localization of somatostatin in somatostatinoma by Widefield Epifluorescence, super-resolution light, and immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Lai, Ken; Wu, Xiaojuan; Yong, Jim L C; Lee, C Soon

    2012-11-01

    Quantum dot nanocrystal probes (QDs) have been used for detection of somatostatin hormone in secretory granules of somatostatinoma tumor cells by immunofluorescence light microscopy, super-resolution light microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy. Immunostaining for all modalities was done using sections taken from an epoxy resin-embedded tissue specimen and a similar labeling protocol. This approach allowed assessment of labeling at light microscopy level before examination at super-resolution and electron microscopy level and was a significant aid in interpretation. Etching of ultrathin sections with saturated sodium metaperiodate was a critical step presumably able to retrieve some tissue antigenicity masked by processing in epoxy resin. Immunofluorescence microscopy of QD-immunolabeled sections showed somatostatin hormone localization in cytoplasmic granules. Some variable staining of tumor gland-like structures appeared related to granule maturity and dispersal of granule contents within the tumor cell cytoplasm. Super-resolution light microscopy demonstrated localization of somatostatin within individual secretory granules to be heterogeneous, and this staining pattern was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy.

  15. IDX-1: a new homeodomain transcription factor expressed in rat pancreatic islets and duodenum that transactivates the somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C P; McGehee, R E; Habener, J F

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning from a rat islet somatostatin-producing cell line of a 1.4 kb cDNA encoding a new homeoprotein, IDX-1 (islet/duodenum homeobox-1), with close sequence similarity to the Drosophila melanogaster homeobox protein Antennapedia (Antp) and the Xenopus laevis endoderm-specific homeoprotein XlHbox8. Analyses of IDX-1 mRNA and protein in rat tissues show that IDX-1 is expressed in pancreatic islets and ducts and in the duodenum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays IDX-1 binds to three sites in the 5' flanking region of the rat somatostatin gene. In co-transfection experiments IDX-1 transactivates reporter constructs containing somatostatin promoter sequences, and mutation of the IDX-1 binding sites attenuates transactivation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of islet RNA using degenerate amplimers for mRNAs encoding homeoproteins indicates that IDX-1 is the most abundant of 12 different Antp-like homeodomain mRNAs expressed in adult rat islets. The pattern of expression, relative abundance and transcriptional regulatory activity suggests that IDX-1 may be involved in the regulation of islet hormone genes and in cellular differentiation in the endocrine pancreas and the duodenum. Images PMID:7907546

  16. A 25-Year Experience of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Somatostatin (Congeners) Analogs: From Symptom Control to Antineoplastic Therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Anthony, Lowell B

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay technology was utilized in the discovery of somatostatin and was quickly brought into therapeutics; however, it took the development of somatostatin congeners to solve its limitations of a short half-life. Therapeutic medical control of hyperhormonal states such as acromegaly, carcinoid syndrome and VIPoma significantly advanced from a nonspecific approach to one that specifically and effectively targeted the underlying pathophysiology. Clinical care was transformed from nonspecific symptom control to one of a significant improvement in not only quality of life, but also quantity of life. These data submitted to US and European regulatory authorities for approval included many investigative sites with no uniform protocol and multiple investigational new drugs, and have not been previously published. This review includes the original data demonstrating the transformational impact this class of agents had on specific disease subsets resulting in regulatory approval 25 years ago. Autoradiography techniques using somatostatin resulted in identifying, localizing and characterizing its receptor subtypes. Translating in vitro data to in vivo resulted in scintigraphic whole body and SPECT scans with (111)In-pentetreotide and was incorporated into standard clinical care 20 years ago. (68)Ga-octreotide congeners using PET scanning offers a major imaging advance. Peptide receptor radiotherapy has evolved over the last 2 decades and utilizes several therapeutic isotopes, including (90)Y and (177)Lu. PMID:26303712

  17. Carboxyl-terminal receptor domains control the differential dephosphorylation of somatostatin receptors by protein phosphatase 1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β) as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs.

  18. The effects of somatostatin and metiamide on tachyphylaxis of pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretion in the conscious cat.

    PubMed Central

    Albinus, M; Blair, E L; Hirst, B H; Reed, J D; Schally, A V; Shaw, B

    1977-01-01

    1. Pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretions show parallel rates of tachyphylaxis in the conscious cat. The responses to histamine show only slight tachyphylaxis. 2. Somatostatin 10 microng.kg(-1).hr(-1) inhibits pentagastrin but not histamine stimulated acid secretion and inhibits pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 3. The inhibition of pentagastrin stimulated acid and pepsin secretion by Somatostatin delays the tachyphylaxis of these responses, but the rates of tachyphylaxis when they do subsequently occur are identical. 4. Metiamide 10 mg-kg(-1)-hr(-1) equally inhibits histamine and pentagastrin stimulated acid secretion but does not inhibit pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 5. Inhibiton of acid secretion during metiamide infusion neither prevents nor delays acid nor pepsin tachyphylaxis. 6. It is suggested that tachyphylaxis of acid and pepsin secretion is a gastrin receptor phenomenon and that Somatostatin occupies or modifies the behaviour of these receptors, preventing tachyphylaxis. Metiamide, however, exerts its action only on the histmine H2-receptor and not the gastrin receptor mechanism, and this apparently does not prevent or delay acid tachyphylaxis. PMID:325196

  19. The effects of somatostatin and metiamide on tachyphylaxis of pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretion in the conscious cat.

    PubMed

    Albinus, M; Blair, E L; Hirst, B H; Reed, J D; Schally, A V; Shaw, B

    1977-04-01

    1. Pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretions show parallel rates of tachyphylaxis in the conscious cat. The responses to histamine show only slight tachyphylaxis. 2. Somatostatin 10 microng.kg(-1).hr(-1) inhibits pentagastrin but not histamine stimulated acid secretion and inhibits pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 3. The inhibition of pentagastrin stimulated acid and pepsin secretion by Somatostatin delays the tachyphylaxis of these responses, but the rates of tachyphylaxis when they do subsequently occur are identical. 4. Metiamide 10 mg-kg(-1)-hr(-1) equally inhibits histamine and pentagastrin stimulated acid secretion but does not inhibit pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 5. Inhibiton of acid secretion during metiamide infusion neither prevents nor delays acid nor pepsin tachyphylaxis. 6. It is suggested that tachyphylaxis of acid and pepsin secretion is a gastrin receptor phenomenon and that Somatostatin occupies or modifies the behaviour of these receptors, preventing tachyphylaxis. Metiamide, however, exerts its action only on the histmine H2-receptor and not the gastrin receptor mechanism, and this apparently does not prevent or delay acid tachyphylaxis.

  20. Molecular design, synthesis and anticoagulant activity evaluation of fluorinated dabigatran analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Ren, Yu-Jie; Dong, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, a series of unreported fluorinated dabigatran analogues, which were based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran, were designed by computer-aided simulation. Fifteen fluorinated dabigatran analogues were screened and synthesized. All target compounds were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (19)F NMR and HRMS. According to the preliminary screening results of inhibition ratio, eleven analogues (inhibition ratio >90%) were evaluated for antithrombin activity in vitro (IC50). The test results expressed that all the analogues showed effective inhibitory activities against thrombin. Especially, compounds 8f, 8k and 8o, with IC50 values of 1.81, 3.21 and 2.16nM, respectively, showed remarkable anticoagulant activities which were in the range of reference drug dabigatran (IC50=1.23nM). Moreover, compounds 8k and 8o were developed to investigate their anticoagulant activities in vivo. In those part, compound 8o exhibited a fairly strong inhibitory action for arteriovenous thrombosis with inhibition ratio of 84.66%, which was comparable with that of dabigatran (85.07%). Docking simulations demonstrated that these compounds could act as candidates for further development of novel anticoagulant drugs. PMID:27166573

  1. Molecular design, synthesis and anticoagulant activity evaluation of fluorinated dabigatran analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Ren, Yu-Jie; Dong, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, a series of unreported fluorinated dabigatran analogues, which were based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran, were designed by computer-aided simulation. Fifteen fluorinated dabigatran analogues were screened and synthesized. All target compounds were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (19)F NMR and HRMS. According to the preliminary screening results of inhibition ratio, eleven analogues (inhibition ratio >90%) were evaluated for antithrombin activity in vitro (IC50). The test results expressed that all the analogues showed effective inhibitory activities against thrombin. Especially, compounds 8f, 8k and 8o, with IC50 values of 1.81, 3.21 and 2.16nM, respectively, showed remarkable anticoagulant activities which were in the range of reference drug dabigatran (IC50=1.23nM). Moreover, compounds 8k and 8o were developed to investigate their anticoagulant activities in vivo. In those part, compound 8o exhibited a fairly strong inhibitory action for arteriovenous thrombosis with inhibition ratio of 84.66%, which was comparable with that of dabigatran (85.07%). Docking simulations demonstrated that these compounds could act as candidates for further development of novel anticoagulant drugs.

  2. Cysteamine induces cholecystokinin release from the duodenum. Evidence for somatostatin as an inhibitory paracrine regulator of cholecystokinin secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Abucham, J.; Reichlin, S. )

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether cholecystokinin secretion is regulated by endogenous somatostatin, somatostatin deficiency was induced in vivo with cysteamine (250 mg/kg body wt, IV) or anti-somatostatin antiserum in anaesthetized rats and in vitro with cysteamine (30 micrograms/mL) in a rat duodenum-incubation system. Cholecystokinin secretion was assessed in vivo by measuring amylase in duodenal perfusates collected at 10-minute intervals for 1 hour and in vitro by a carboxy-terminal radioimmunoassay. Cysteamine induced a marked decrease in duodenal immunoreactive somatostatin both in vivo (50%) and in vitro (60%). The rate of amylase secretion increased from 9.7 +/- 2.1 U (mean +/- SE) to 28.0 +/- 4.8 U at 20 minutes (P less than 0.001). The cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist CR-1392 abolished amylase response for 30 minutes, whereas the more potent antagonists Asperlicin (18.0 mg/kg body wt, IV) and L-364,718 (0.25 mg/kg body wt, IV) caused prolonged blockade. The rate of amylase secretion in gastrectomized animals increased from 7.2 +/- 2.0 U to 15.0 +/- 2.2 U 20 minutes after cysteamine administration (P less than 0.01), indicating that the effect was not due to the presence of gastrin. In vitro, cysteamine caused a nearly fourfold increase in cholecystokinin secretion compared with controls (63.1 +/- 4.9 vs. 15.2 +/- 3.7, respectively; P less than 0.001). In vivo immunoneutralization of circulating somatostatin with a high-affinity and high-capacity antiserum produced no significant change in the rate of amylase secretion. These results suggest that cholecystokinin secretion is tonically inhibited by somatostatin and that this effect is mediated by locally secreted (paracrine) but not by circulating somatostatin.

  3. Somatostatin receptors in the rat adrenal cortex: characterization and comparison with brain and pituitary receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-05-01

    Specific receptors for tetradecapeptide somatostatin (S-14) in rat adrenal cortical membranes were quantitated by direct binding studies using [125I-Tyr11]S-14. Competitive inhibition of this radioligand by S-14 showed that these receptors constitute a single class of high affinity binding sites [dissociation constant (Kd) = 1.08 nM and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) = 0.35 pmol/mg membrane protein]. Structural analogs of S-14 with halogenated Trp8 moiety exhibited 4- to 46-fold greater binding affinity than S-14, [D-F5-Trp8]S-14 being the most potent. [Tyr11]S-14 and [des-Ala1]S-14 bound to these receptors with reduced affinity whereas [Phe4]S-14 exhibited 1.5-fold greater affinity than S-14. Somatostatin-28 (S-28) and S-14 were equipotent, whereas the N-terminal fragments of S-28 [S-28(1-14) and S-28(1-12)] were inactive. High affinity binding sites were also quantitated using a radioligand prepared from the tyrosinated S-28 analog, [Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25]S-28 (Kd = 1.2 nM; Bmax = 0.21 pmol/mg membrane protein). Both S-14 and S-28 exhibited comparable relative potencies for inhibiting the specific binding of this radioligand and [125I-Tyr11]S-14. Extracts of whole adrenal or the adrenal medulla and cortex contained very low levels of S-14-like immunoreactivity (2.4 pg/mg protein). These studies confirm the presence of specific receptors for S-14 in the adrenal cortex and suggest that 1) with respect to S-14 biological activity, Trp8-modified S-14 analogs should be more potent than S-14, S-28 equipotent with S-14, and N-terminal fragments of S-28 inactive in this tissue. 2) Direct binding studies using radioiodinated [Tyr11]S-14 and [Leu8,D-Trp22, Tyr25]S-28 appear to quantitate the same receptor sites in adrenocortical tissue. 3) The ligand specificity of the adrenocortical S-14 receptor differs from that previously reported for the pituitary and brain providing further evidence for the heterogeneity of the S-14 receptor. 4) In view of the very low concentrations

  4. Ligand binding pocket of the human somatostatin receptor 5: mutational analysis of the extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M T; Hukovic, N; Kumar, U; Panetta, R; Hjorth, S A; Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1997-11-01

    The ligand binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands consists of a pocket formed by extracellular and transmembrane domain (TM) residues. In the case of somatostatin (SRIF), however, previous studies have suggested that the binding cavity of the octapeptide analog SMS201-995 (SMS) is lined by residues in TMs III-VII. The additional involvement of the extracellular domains for binding SMS or the natural SRIF ligands (SRIF-14, SRIF-28) has not been clarified. Using a cassette construct cDNA for the human somatostatin 5 receptor (sst5R), we systematically examined the role of exofacial structures in ligand binding by creating a series of mutants in which the extracellular portions have been altered by conservative segment exchange (CSE) mutagenesis for the extracellular loops (ECLs) and by deletion (for the NH2-terminal segment) or truncation analysis (ECL3). CHO-K1 cells were stably transfected with wild type or mutant human sst5R constructs, and agonist binding was assessed using membrane binding assays with 125I-LTT SRIF-28 ligand. Deletion of the NH2 terminus or CSE mutagenesis of ECL1 and ECL3 produced minor 2-8-fold decreases in affinity for SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and SMS ligands. Truncation of ECL3 to mimic the size of this loop in sst1R and sst4R (the two subtypes that do not bind SMS) did not interfere with the binding of SMS, SRIF-14, or SRIF-28. In contrast, both ECL2 mutants failed to bind 125I-LTT SRIF-28. Immunocytochemical analysis of nonpermeabilized cells with a human sst5R antibody revealed that the mutant receptors were targeted to the plasma membrane. Labeled SMS (125I-Tyr3 SMS) also failed to bind to the mutant ECL2 receptors. These results suggest a potential contribution of ECL2 (in addition to the previously identified residues in TMs III-VII) to the SRIF ligand binding pocket.

  5. S-Ribosylhomocysteine analogues with the carbon-5 and sulfur atoms replaced by a vinyl or (fluoro)vinyl unit

    PubMed Central

    Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Lalama, Jennifer; Garmendia, Craig A.; Robert, Jenay; Zhu, Jinge; Pei, Dehua

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of the protected ribose or xylose 5-aldehyde with sulfonyl-stabilized fluorophosphonate gave (fluoro)vinyl sulfones. Stannyldesulfonylation followed by iododestannylation afforded 5,6-dideoxy-6-fluoro-6-iodo-d-ribo or xylo-hex-5-enofuranoses. Coupling of the hexenofuranoses with alkylzinc bromides gave ten-carbon ribosyl- and xylosylhomocysteine analogues incorporating a fluoroalkene. The fluoroalkenyl and alkenyl analogues were evaluated for inhibition of Bacillus subtilis S-ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS). One of the compounds, 3,5,6-trideoxy-6-fluoro-d-erythro-hex-5-enofuranose, acted as a competitive inhibitor of moderate potency (KI = 96 µM). PMID:18375129

  6. Triazolo-β-aza-ε-amino acid and its aromatic analogue as novel scaffolds for β-turn peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Yashmeen, Afsana; De, Suranjan

    2015-03-28

    Triazolo-β-aza-ε-amino acid and its aromatic analogue ((Al)TAA/(Ar)TAA) in the peptide backbone mark a novel class of conformationally constrained molecular scaffolds to induce β-turn conformations. This was demonstrated for (Al)TAA in a Leu-enkephalin analogue and in a designed pentapeptide wherein the FRET process was established. Restricted rotation induced chirality and turn conformation into the achiral aromatic amino acid scaffold, (Ar)TAA, which in a short tripeptide backbone acted as a β-turn mimic as a β-sheet folding nucleator.

  7. DNA information: from digital code to analogue structure.

    PubMed

    Travers, A A; Muskhelishvili, G; Thompson, J M T

    2012-06-28

    The digital linear coding carried by the base pairs in the DNA double helix is now known to have an important component that acts by altering, along its length, the natural shape and stiffness of the molecule. In this way, one region of DNA is structurally distinguished from another, constituting an additional form of encoded information manifest in three-dimensional space. These shape and stiffness variations help in guiding and facilitating the DNA during its three-dimensional spatial interactions. Such interactions with itself allow communication between genes and enhanced wrapping and histone-octamer binding within the nucleosome core particle. Meanwhile, interactions with proteins can have a reduced entropic binding penalty owing to advantageous sequence-dependent bending anisotropy. Sequence periodicity within the DNA, giving a corresponding structural periodicity of shape and stiffness, also influences the supercoiling of the molecule, which, in turn, plays an important facilitating role. In effect, the super-helical density acts as an analogue regulatory mode in contrast to the more commonly acknowledged purely digital mode. Many of these ideas are still poorly understood, and represent a fundamental and outstanding biological question. This review gives an overview of very recent developments, and hopefully identifies promising future lines of enquiry. PMID:22615471

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of hydrazidomycin analogues.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Florian; Ueberschaar, Nico; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-11-15

    Hydrazidomycin A is an unusual secondary metabolite of Streptomyces atratus that features a rare enehydrazide core. To learn more about structure-activity relationships of the reported cytotoxic and antiproliferative agent several synthetic routes were explored to synthesize a variety of hydrazidomycin derivatives. Specifically, the size of the side chains, the nature of the double bond and the polar head group were altered. Overall, fourteen analogues were tested for their cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects. Re-examination of synthetic hydrazidomycin A suggests that the antiproliferative activity is attributed to a yet unknown compound that results from degradation or rearrangement. Several of the less complex analogues, however, show antiproliferative activities against individual cancer cell lines and turned out to be more potent than hydrazidomycin A.

  9. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  10. Platinum analogues in preclinical and clinical development.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, T C; O'Dwyer, P J; Ozols, R F

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cisplatin on chemotherapy for solid tumors has led to the synthesis of many molecules with platinum as their central building block. These so-called platinum analogues have been developed with the obvious goals of improving the antitumor activity of cisplatin and hopefully, at the same time, altering the dose-limiting side effects of the prototype drug. At least 10 such molecules are in clinical development, whereas several others are at various stages of preclinical testing. PMID:8305533

  11. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  12. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  13. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss.

  14. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  15. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  16. Circadian Modulation of Anxiety: A Role for Somatostatin in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Anne; Thiere, Marlen; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge Ricardo; Poranzke, Janine; Müller, Bettina; Stork, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests that the neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) exerts anxiolytic action via the amygdala, but findings concerning the putative role of endogenous SST in the regulation of emotional responses are contradictory. We hypothesized that an endogenous regulation of SST expression over the course of the day may determine its function and tested both SST gene expression and the behavior of SST knock out (SST-/-) mice in different aversive tests in relation to circadian rhythm. In an open field and a light/dark avoidance test, SST-/- mice showed significant hyperactivity and anxiety-like behavior during the second, but not during the first half of the active phase, failing to show the circadian modulation of behavior that was evident in their wild type littermates. Behavioral differences occurred independently of changes of intrinsically motivated activity in the home cage. A circadian regulation of SST mRNA and protein expression that was evident in the basolateral complex of the amygdala of wild type mice may provide a neuronal substrate for the observed behavior. However, fear memory towards auditory cue or the conditioning context displayed neither a time- nor genotype-dependent modulation. Together this indicates that SST, in a circadian manner and putatively via its regulation of expression in the amygdala, modulates behavior responding to mildly aversive conditions in mice. PMID:24376834

  17. Subtype selectivity of peptide analogs for all five cloned human somatostatin receptors (hsstr 1-5).

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1994-12-01

    Recent reports (Raynor et al) have claimed the identification of potent somatostatin (SST) agonists exhibiting binding affinities of 1-2 pM and up to 30,000 fold binding selectivity for several of the 5 cloned sstr subtypes. These conclusions, however, are based on binding comparisons of sstr subtypes from different species expressed in different cell lines and studied with different radioligands. To eliminate the effect of species and/or methodological variations, we have investigated agonist selectivity of 32 synthetic SST analogs for all 5 hsstrs stably expressed in CHO-K1 cells under identical binding conditions. We show that hsstr2, 3, 5 react potently with hexapeptide as well as cyclic and linear octapeptide analogs and belong to a similar sstr subclass. hsstr1 and 4 react poorly with these analogs and belong to a separate subclass. The present generation of SST analogs exhibit a modest-50 fold increase in binding potency compared to SST-14 for 2 subtypes (hsstr2, 3), and relative selectivity for only 1 subtype (hsstr2) which is at best only 35 fold. The potency and degree of selectivity of these analogs is several orders of magnitude less than that reported earlier and suggests the need for caution in using these compounds as putative superagonists or subtype selective compounds for any of the individual sstrs.

  18. Radial glia-mediated up-regulation of somatostatin in the regenerating adult fish brain.

    PubMed

    Zupanc, G K; Clint, S C

    2001-08-31

    Adult teleost fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus, exhibit an enormous regenerative capability after application of mechanical lesions to the dorsalmost subdivision of the cerebellum, the corpus cerebelli. Restoration of the neural tissue is achieved by a cascade of processes, including the guidance of migrating new neurons to the site of injury by radial glial fibers. These fibers are characterised by the expression of immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein and by several morphological features. Within 12 h following the lesion, the fraction of radial glial fibers expressing the neuropeptide somatostatin (SRIF) dramatically increased from approximately 1%, as found in the intact brain, to roughly 27% 12-24 h post-lesion. Subsequently, the percentage of SRIF-expressing radial glial fibers gradually declined, until it reached background levels at about 10 days following the injury. We hypothesise that the expression of SRIF is related to the generation and/or differentiation of the new neurons produced in response to the lesion, rather than to the later guidance of these cells along their migratory pathway.

  19. The expression of somatostatin receptors in the hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Choi, Hui-Chul; Song, Hong-Ki; Kim, Yeong-In; Jo, Seung-Mook; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2008-01-01

    During the course of this study, we sought examine whether the expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) is altered in the hippocampus following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) in order to understand the role/function of SSTRs in the hippocampus after epileptogenic insults. SSTR1 and SSTR4 immunoreactivities were increased in the hippocampus at 1 week after SE. At 4 weeks after SE, SRIF1-family (SSTR 2A, SSTR2B, and SSTR5) immunoreactivity was increased only in neuropil. Both SSTR2A and 2B immunoreactivities were increased in CA2-3 pyramidal cells. However, SSTR3 and SSTR4 immunoreactivities were reduced in the CA1 pyramidal cells of epileptic rat due to neuronal loss. In addition, SSTR5 immunoreactivity was reduced in CA2 pyramidal cells and various interneurons. Both SSTR2B and SSTR4 immunoreactivities were increased within microglia following SE. Our findings suggest that increases in neuron-glial SSTR expressions may be closely related to the enhanced inhibition of the dentate gyrus and regulation of reactive microgliosis in the hippocampus of a pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  20. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  1. Somatostatin Receptor-1 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n=5, p<0.05, t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47%, (n=5, p<0.05, t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  2. Pathophysiology of GPCR Homo- and Heterodimerization: Special Emphasis on Somatostatin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Somvanshi, Rishi K.; Kumar, Ujendra

    2012-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are cell surface proteins responsible for translating >80% of extracellular reception to intracellular signals. The extracellular information in the form of neurotransmitters, peptides, ions, odorants etc is converted to intracellular signals via a wide variety of effector molecules activating distinct downstream signaling pathways. All GPCRs share common structural features including an extracellular N-terminal, seven-transmembrane domains (TMs) linked by extracellular/intracellular loops and the C-terminal tail. Recent studies have shown that most GPCRs function as dimers (homo- and/or heterodimers) or even higher order of oligomers. Protein-protein interaction among GPCRs and other receptor proteins play a critical role in the modulation of receptor pharmacology and functions. Although ~50% of the current drugs available in the market target GPCRs, still many GPCRs remain unexplored as potential therapeutic targets, opening immense possibility to discover the role of GPCRs in pathophysiological conditions. This review explores the existing information and future possibilities of GPCRs as tools in clinical pharmacology and is specifically focused for the role of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) in pathophysiology of diseases and as the potential candidate for drug discovery. PMID:24281555

  3. Postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of somatostatin interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex of mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Geng; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xing-Yue; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST)-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) play important roles in neuronal diseases, memory and cognitive functions. However, their development in the ACC remains unclear. Using postnatal day 3 (P3) to P45 GIN mice, we found that most of the intrinsic membrane properties of SST interneurons in the ACC were developmentally mature after the second postnatal week and that the development of these neurons differed from that of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, electrical coupling between SST interneurons appeared primarily between P12–14. The coupling probability plateaued at approximately P21–30, with a non-age-dependent development of coupling strength. The development of excitatory chemical afferents to SST interneurons occurred earlier than the development of inhibitory chemical afferents. Furthermore, eye closure attenuated the development of electrical coupling probability at P21–30 but had no effect on coupling strength. Eye closure also delayed the development of inhibitory chemical afferent frequency but had no effect on the excitatory chemical afferent amplitude, frequency or rise time. Our data suggest that SST interneurons in the ACC exhibit inherent developmental characteristics distinct from other interneuron subtypes, such as PV interneurons, and that some of these characteristics are subject to environmental regulation. PMID:27319800

  4. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  5. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  6. Involvement of prolactin and somatostatin in depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Faron-Górecka, Agata; Kuśmider, Maciej; Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Szafran, Kinga; Zurawek, Dariusz; Pabian, Paulina; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides have been implicated in the physiology and pathophysiology of stress responses and therefore may play an important role in the pathogenesis of affective disorders such as Major Depression Disorder (MDD). The data presented in this mini-review demonstrate the role of prolactin (PRL) and somatostatin (STT) in the pathology and pharmacotherapy of MDD, focusing particularly on the response to antidepressant treatment, and compare the available data with the results obtained in our laboratory using the well-validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of MDD. Despite the availability of many pharmacological therapies for depression, ca. 35% patients remain treatment resistant. This clinical situation is also true for rats subjected to CMS; some animals do not respond to antidepressant therapy and are considered treatment resistant. The most interesting results presented in this mini-review concern the changes in PRL and SST receptors in the brains of rats subjected to the full CMS procedure and IMI treatment and demonstrate the role of these receptors in the mechanisms of antidepressant action. The possible interaction between SST and PRL, the involvement of the D2 dopamine receptor, and their direct protein-protein interactions are also discussed, with the conclusion that these two neurohormones play an important role in the mechanism of resilience after stress as well as in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs.

  7. Target-Specific Effects of Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons on Neocortical Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Cottam, James C. H.

    2013-01-01

    A diverse array of interneuron types regulates activity in the mammalian neocortex. Two of the most abundant are the fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which target the axosomatic region of pyramidal cells, and the somatostatin-positive (SOM+) interneurons, which target the dendrites. Recent work has focused on the influence of PV+ and SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells. However, the connections among PV+ and SOM+ interneurons are poorly understood and could play an important role in cortical circuitry, since their interactions may alter the net influence on pyramidal cell output. We used an optogenetic approach to investigate the effect of SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells and PV+ interneurons during visual stimulation in mouse primary visual cortex. We find that SOM+ interneuron activation suppresses PV+ cell spiking at least twice as potently as pyramidal cell spiking during visual stimulation. This differential effect of SOM+ cell stimulation is detectable even when only two to three SOM+ cells are activated. Importantly, the remaining responses to oriented gratings in PV+ cells are more orientation tuned and temporally modulated, suggesting that SOM+ activity unmasks this tuning by suppressing untuned input. Our results highlight the importance of SOM+ inhibition of PV+ interneurons during sensory processing. This prominent competitive inhibition between interneuron types leads to a reconfiguration of inhibition along the somatodendritic axis of pyramidal cells, and enhances the orientation selectivity of PV+ cells. PMID:24336721

  8. Differential regulation of somatostatin receptor dephosphorylation by β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, Andrea; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is tightly regulated by coordinated phosphorylation of intracellular serine and threonine residues. Although the mechanisms of agonist-induced phosphorylation have been deciphered for many GPCRs, the regulation of their dephosphorylation remains poorly understood. Using a combination of siRNA knockdown screening and phosphosite-specific antibodies, we have recently identified the catalytic subunit β of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1β) as major constituent of the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of the sst2 somatostatin receptor. However, PP1-targeting subunits specifically required for GPCR dephosphorylation have not been identified so far. Here, we show that siRNA knockdown of β-arrestin1 strongly inhibits sst2 receptor dephosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that β-arrestin1 and PP1β exist as constitutive complex that mediates rapid dephosphorylation of sst2 receptors at or near the plasma membrane. By contrast, β-arrestin2 is not essential for rapid sst2 receptor dephosphorylation. Together, these findings reveal a novel scaffolding function of β-arrestin1 that facilitates efficient targeting of PP1β to phosphorylated GPCRs.

  9. Phosphonate analogues of dinucleotides as substrates for DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli in primed abortive initiation reaction.

    PubMed

    Cvekl, A; Horská, K; Sebesta, K; Rosenberg, I; Holý, A

    1989-02-01

    Dinucleotides (3'-5')-ApU and UpA and their 3'-O-phosphonylmethyl and 5'-O-phosphonylmethyl analogues were studied as substrates in the primed abortive synthesis catalysed by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase on poly[d(A-T)] template. All phosphonate analogues of dinucleotides containing the anomalous sugar-phosphate backbone are substrates for the holoenzyme as verified by RNase A and RNase T2 digestion of the trinucleotide analogues obtained. The finding that phosphonate dinucleotides act as primers for transcription indicates that steric requirements at the initiation site are not as specific as previously supposed. Analysis of kinetic constants of ordered bibi reaction Kia, KmA, KmB and Vmax suggests that the instability of short RNA-DNA hybrids contributes to the abortive release of trinucleotides formed.

  10. Synthetic analogues of the natural compound cryphonectric acid interfere with photosynthetic machinery through two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Róbson Ricardo; Pereira, Wagner Luiz; Tomaz, Deborah Campos; de Oliveira, Fabrício Marques; Giberti, Samuele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2013-06-12

    A series of isobenzofuran-1(3H)-ones (phthalides), analogues of the naturally occurring phytotoxin cryphonectric acid, were designed, synthesized, and fully characterized by NMR, IR, and MS analyses. Their synthesis was achieved via condensation, aromatization, and acetylation reactions. The measurement of the electron transport chain in spinach chloroplasts showed that several derivatives are capable of interfering with the photosynthetic apparatus. Few of them were found to inhibit the basal rate, but a significant inhibition was brought about only at concentrations exceeding 50 μM. Some other analogues acted as uncouplers or energy transfer inhibitors, with a remarkably higher effectiveness. Isobenzofuranone addition to the culture medium inhibited the growth of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus , with patterns consistent with the effects measured in vitro upon isolated chloroplasts. The most active derivatives, being able to completely suppress algal growth at 20 μM, may represent structures to be exploited for the design of new active ingredients for weed control.

  11. Can we predict long-term remission after somatostatin analog withdrawal in patients with acromegaly? Results from a multicenter prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Lucio; Fleseriu, Maria; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Albuquerque, José Luciano; Gadelha, Patrícia Sampaio; dos Santos Faria, Manuel; Nascimento, Gilvan Cortês; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães

    2014-08-01

    Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) represent the mainstay of therapy in acromegaly. One of the potential disadvantages is the expected need to maintain therapy indefinitely in previously non-irradiated patients. The aim of this multicenter prospective open trial was to evaluate the likelihood of successful discontinuation of SSA therapy in well-controlled acromegalic patients who fulfilled very strict criteria: two or more years of treatment with the long-acting SSA octreotide LAR (OCT-LAR), a stable dose and injections interval every 4 weeks or longer for the previous year, GH levels <2.5 ng/ml and normal IGF-1 levels for age, a tumor remnant <10 mm, no history of radiotherapy, and no use of cabergoline or pegvisomant over the previous 6 months. Disease recurrence was defined as an increase of IGF-1 to levels above 1.2-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN). Out of 220 patients, 20 patients (12 women and 8 men; mean age, 48.1 ± 10.3 years; age range, 27-64) treated for 2.74 ± 0.64 years (range, 2.0-4.4) were included in this prospective study and OCT-LAR therapy was stopped. Four patients (20 %) remained without clinical and biochemical/neuroradiological evidence of disease recurrence after 12-18 months of follow-up. Sixteen patients (80 %) relapsed biochemically within 9 months after drug withdrawal and restarted OCT-LAR at the same previous dose. Compared to recurring subjects, non-recurring patients had significantly lower mean IGF-1 (× ULN) levels but there were some overlapping values in both groups. No other characteristic could be identified as a predictor of successful OCT-LAR discontinuation. Our findings demonstrated that OCT-LAR withdrawal, though rare, is possible in well-selected acromegalic patients treated for at least 2 years and considered optimally controlled in hormonal and neuroradiological terms.

  12. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole Quinuclidine analogues

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Prather, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogues bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analogue exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogues acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogues demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. PMID:24858620

  13. Cost-effectiveness of lanreotide Autogel in treatment algorithms of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Biermasz, Nienke R; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Pereira, Alberto M; Romijn, Johannes A

    2009-06-01

    The introduction of effective pharmacological treatments has changed the management of acromegaly. However, chronic, life-long treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or growth hormone receptor antagonists is very expensive. We estimated the costs of treatment algorithms to control acromegaly from a Dutch perspective. We used the following assumptions: after the diagnosis of acromegaly there is a mean remaining lifespan of approximately 33 years; the success rates of surgery and somatostatin analogues in controlling the disease are approximately 60%; and the lifelong costs of different algorithms to control acromegaly in 100 patients ranged from 43 million euros (primary surgery and secondary somatostatin analogues) to 57 million euros (primary somatostatin analogues and secondary surgery) and even reached 95 million euros (medical treatment only). In algorithms that include trans-sphenoidal surgery, the lifetime treatment costs are almost 46-59% cheaper per 100 patients than in algorithms with medical treatment but without trans-sphenoidal surgery. Algorithms with primary surgery and secondary somatostatin analogs are 30% cheaper per 100 patients than algorithms with primary somatostatin analogues and secondary surgery. Per 100 patients, algorithms including lanreotide Autogel are 14-34% more expensive than algorithms including octreotide long-acting release. These life-long costs should be taken into consideration when making choices between treatment algorithms.

  14. The influence of ovarian factors on the somatostatin-growth hormone system during the postnatal growth and sexual development in lambs.

    PubMed

    Wańkowska, Marta; Polkowska, Jolanta; Misztal, Tomasz; Romanowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the effects of ovarian hormones on somatostatin in the hypothalamic neurons and growth hormone (GH) secretion during the postnatal growth and development of sheep. The study was performed on 9-week-old (infantile) lambs that were ovary-intact (OVI) or ovariectomized (OVX) at 39 days of age, and on 16-week-old (juvenile) lambs that were OVI or OVX at 88 days of age. Hormones in neurons and somatotropic cells were assayed with immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Following ovariectomy, immunoreactive somatostatin was more abundant (p<0.05) in the hypothalamus of infantile lambs, whereas in juvenile lambs it was more abundant (p<0.05) in the periventricular nucleus but reduced (p<0.01) in the median eminence. In contrast to somatostatin in the hypothalamus, the content of immunoreactive GH in the hypophysis was less in OVX infantile lambs, but greater in OVX juvenile lambs (p<0.05). Basal blood serum concentrations of GH were greater (p<0.05) in OVX infantile lambs, whereas in OVX juvenile lambs, mean and basal concentrations of GH and amplitude of GH pulses were less than in OVI lambs (p<0.05). The postnatal increase in body weight was greatest in middle-late infancy (p<0.01). The body weight did not differ (p>0.05) between OVI and OVX lambs. In conclusion, ovarian factors may inhibit the GH secretion in infantile lambs but enhance the GH secretion in juvenile lambs. Transition to puberty, as related to the growth rate, appears to be due mainly to change in gonadal influence on the somatostatin neurosecretion. A stimulation of somatostatin output in the median eminence by gonadal factors in infancy is followed by a stimulation of somatostatin accumulation after infancy. Thus, ovarian factors modulate mechanisms within the somatotropic system of lambs to synchronize the somatic growth with sexual development.

  15. Addition of Somatostatin After Successful Endoscopic Variceal Ligation Does not Prevent Early Rebleeding in Comparison to Placebo: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Jha, Sanjeev K.; Mittal, Vibhu V.; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh C.; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efficacy of endoscopic sclerotherapy in controlling acute variceal bleeding is significantly improved when vasoactive drug is added. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is superior to sclerotherapy. Whether efficacy of EVL will also improve with addition of somatostatin is not known. We compared EVL plus somatostatin versus EVL plus placebo in control of acute variceal bleeding. Methods Consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were enrolled. After emergency EVL, patients were randomized to receive either somatostatin (250 mcg/hr) or placebo infusion. Primary endpoint was treatment failure within 5 days. Treatment failure was defined as fresh hematemesis ≥2 h after start of therapy, or a 3 gm drop in Hb, or death. Results 61 patients were enrolled (EVL plus somatostatin group, n = 31 and EVL plus placebo group, n = 30). The baseline characteristics were similar. Within the initial 5-day period, the frequency of treatment failure was similar in both the groups (EVL plus somatostatin group 8/31 [26%] versus EVL plus placebo group 7/30 [23%]; P = 1.000). The mortality was also similar in the two groups (3/31 [10%] vs. 3/30 [10%]; P = 1.000). Baseline HVPG ≥19 mm Hg and active bleeding at index endoscopy were independent predictors of treatment failure. Conclusions Addition of somatostatin infusion to EVL therapy does not offer any advantage in control of acute variceal bleeding or reducing mortality. The reason for this may be its failure to maintain sustained reduction in portal pressure for five days. Active bleeding at index endoscopy and high baseline HVPG should help choose early alternative treatment options. Trial registered with ClincalTrials.gov vide NCT01267669. PMID:26628838

  16. Digitoxin Analogues with Improved Anticytomegalovirus Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth and possess antiviral activities at nanomolar concentrations. In this study we evaluated the anticytomegalovirus (CMV) activity of digitoxin and several of its analogues. We show that sugar type and sugar length attached to the steroid core structure affects its anticytomegalovirus activity. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies identified the l-sugar containing cardiac glycosides as having improved anti-CMV activity and may lead to better understanding of how these compounds inhibit CMV replication. PMID:24900847

  17. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  18. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datson, Juliet; Flynn, Chris; Portinari, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims: This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48 000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods: The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar analogues versus a reference solar reflection spectrum. Results: We derive spectroscopic parameters for 148 solar analogues (about 70 are new entries to the literature) and verify with a-posteriori differential tests that our values are well-centred on the solar values. We use our dataset to assess the two alternative calibrations of the GCS parameters; our methods favour the latest revision. We show that the choice of spectral line list or the choice of asteroid or time of observation does not affect the results. We also identify seven solar twins in our sample, three of which are published here for the first time. Conclusions: Our methods provide an independent means to differentially test the calibration of stellar catalogues around the values of a well-known benchmark star, which makes our work interesting for calibration tests of upcoming Galactic surveys. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory under programme ID 077.D

  19. Analogue models of pull-apart basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClay, Ken; Dooley, Tim

    1995-08-01

    Sandbox analogue models of pull-apart basins that developed in sedimentary strata above releasing steps in underlying basement faults are characterized by rhombic basins that are flat-bottomed box grabens with a subhorizontal synkinematic basin infill. Steep to nearly vertical, sigmoidal oblique-slip and segmented oblique-extensional faults are the dominant bounding structures of the pull-apart basins. Cross-basin, short-cut faults link the offset principal displacement zones that are characterized by flower structure development. The structural architectures of the physical models compare directly in form and dimensions to natural examples of strike-slip pull-apart basins.

  20. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Glioblastoma Multiforme—A Suitable Target for Somatostatin Receptor-Based Imaging and Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Linsenmann, Thomas; Lückerath, Katharina; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Stoffer, Carolin; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Buck, Andreas K.; Löhr, Mario; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN′,N″,N′″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE) labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM. Methods 15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68), proliferative activity (Ki67) as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry. Results The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from <10% to >50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns. Conclusion SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies

  1. Divergent role of (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs in the workup of patients with NETs: AIIMS experience.

    PubMed

    Naswa, Niraj; Bal, C S

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) encompass a wide range of rare and heterogeneous neoplasms arising from the neural crest. Diagnosis of NETs is conventionally done by a combination of common clinical symptoms and biochemical evidence of hormonal excess, which these tumors are known to secrete. After a diagnosis of NET is established, a search for its localization is carried out using common morphologic imaging methods such as ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The main problem with structural imaging is, however, its inability to distinguish between endocrine and exocrine lesions. Functional imaging of NETs started with use of iodine-131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((131)I-MIBG) and has come a long way since. From accurate demonstration of functioning tumors to detection of small and occult lesions, functional imaging has penetrated almost every aspect of NET management. Procedures such as (131/123)I-MIBG, (111)In-Octreoscan and others are rapidly giving way to use of PET/CT based on the superior resolution of the system and the availability of target-specific positron-emitting radiotracers. The availability of (68)Ga from generator-based radionuclide systems, namely (68)Ge/(68)Ga generators, opened up a new era of molecular imaging for NETs. A multitude of somatostatin analogs can be easily radioliganded with (68)Ga using heterocyclic macromolecular bifunctional chelating systems for targeted diagnosis of somatostatin receptor-expressing tumors, used most effectively to date for detection of NETs. This chapter focuses on our experience at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi regarding the divergent roles of (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs in the workup of patients with NETs.

  2. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  3. Suppression of Beta-cell secretion by somatostatin does not fully reverse the disproportionate proinsulinemia of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Røder, Michael E; Kahn, Steven E

    2004-12-01

    Disproportionate hyperproinsulinemia is a feature of beta-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. It has been hypothesized that this abnormality represents an intrinsic abnormality of the beta-cell and/or may result from an increase in beta-cell secretory demand. To address this, six patients with type 2 diabetes and six age- and BMI-matched normal subjects received a combined 3-h insulin and somatostatin clamp to decrease beta-cell secretory demand. An arginine stimulation test was performed before and at the end of the clamp to measure beta-cell peptide release. In keeping with the reduction in secretory demand, C-peptide levels were suppressed by 60-80% during the clamp, as were proinsulin (PI) levels. The arginine-stimulated PI/C-peptide ratio decreased in the diabetic subjects from 4.4 +/- 1.5% before to 1.8 +/- 0.5% after the clamp (P < 0.01). This latter ratio was similar to that observed in the normal subjects before the somatostatin infusion (1.5 +/- 0.3%). In the normal subjects, after the clamp the PI/C-peptide ratio had decreased to 0.8 +/- 0.3% (P <0.01). Thus, the postclamp PI/C-peptide ratio in the subjects with type 2 diabetes was elevated compared with that in the normal subjects (P <0.05). Based on these observations, while relief of secretory demand on beta-cells by somatostatin decreases the disproportionate elevation in PI levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, the failure to normalize this measure suggests that an intrinsic abnormality of beta-cell function exists in subjects with type 2 diabetes that may be aggravated by increased secretory demand.

  4. Proteomics Suggests a Role for APC-Survivin in Response to Somatostatin Analog Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kjellin, Hanna; Hashemi, Jamileh; Barriuso, Jorge; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Lu, Ming; Höög, Anders; Pastrián, Laura G.; Lamarca, Angela; Soto, Victoria Heredia; Zedenius, Jan; Mendiola, Marta; Lehtiö, Janne; Kjellman, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Context: Somatostatin analogs are established in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) including small intestinal NET; however, the molecular mechanisms are not well known. Here, we examined the direct effects of lanreotide in NET cell line models. Setting and Design: The cell lines HC45 and H727 were treated with 10nM lanreotide for different time periods and alterations of the proteome were analyzed by in-depth high-resolution isoelectric focusing tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We next investigated whether the observed suppression of survivin was mediated by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and possible effects on tumor proliferation in vitro. Expression of survivin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 112 NET cases and compared with patient outcome. Results: We quantified 6451 and 7801 proteins in HC45 and H727, respectively. After short time lanreotide treatment APC was increased and survivin reduced. Overexpression of APC in H727 cells decreased, and APC knock-down elevated the survivin level. The lanreotide regulation of APC-survivin could be suppressed by small interfering RNA against somatostatin receptor 2. Although lanreotide only gave slight inhibition of proliferation, targeting of survivin with the small molecule YM155 dramatically reduced proliferation. Moderate or high as compared with low or absent total survivin expression was associated with shorter progression-free survival, independent of tumor stage, grade, and localization. Conclusions: We report a proteome-wide analysis of changes in response to lanreotide in NET cell lines. This analysis suggests a connection between somatostatin analog, APC, and survivin levels. Survivin is a possible prognostic factor and a new potential therapeutic target in NETs. PMID:27459532

  5. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  6. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  7. Identification of a somatostatin-14-generating propeptide converting enzyme as a member of the kex2/furin/PC family.

    PubMed

    Mackin, R B; Noe, B D; Spiess, J

    1991-10-01

    A propeptide converting enzyme capable of producing somatostatin-14 has been identified and partially characterized from anglerfish pancreatic islets. Results from N-terminal protein sequence analysis indicate that this enzyme is a member of the kex2/furin/PC family. This observation provides strong corroborative evidence that the kex2/furin/PC protease family is involved in propeptide conversion. Comparison of the obtained protein sequence with the cDNA sequence of mammalian PC2 also suggests that the active enzyme is derived from a precursor by cleavage at a site containing four consecutive basic amino acids. PMID:1680673

  8. Diamine Derivatives as Novel Small-Molecule, Potent, and Subtype-Selective Somatostatin SST3 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel class of small-molecule, highly potent, and subtype-selective somatostatin SST3 agonists was discovered through modification of a SST3 antagonist. As an example, (1R,2S)-9 demonstrated not only potent in vitro SST3 agonist activity but also in vivo SST3 agonist activity in a mouse oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). These agonists may be useful reagents for studying the physiological roles of the SST3 receptor and may potentially be useful as therapeutic agents. PMID:24944745

  9. Tissue somatostatin levels in three models of genetic obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Voyles, N R; Bhathena, S J; Kennedy, B; Wilkins, S D; Michaelis, O E; Zalenski, C M; Timmers, K I; Recant, L

    1987-05-01

    A potential role for somatostatin (SRIF) in the pathogenesis of the hyperinsulinemia of obese rats was considered. SRIF like immunoreactivity (ng/mg protein) was therefore measured in hot 2 N acetic acid extracts of pancreas, stomach, pituitary, and hypothalamus in tissues obtained from three models of genetic obesity in rats. These models included the obese and lean controls of LA/N-cp, SHR/N-cp, and Zucker rats. To assess the effects of diet on SRIF levels, mixed diets were provided ad lib which contained a carbohydrate as either sucrose or starch. Some groups were fed chow diets. No significant dietary effects on tissue levels of SRIF were obtained. However, two of the three models (Zucker and SHR/N-cp) showed phenotypic effects on SRIF levels in pancreas; namely, obese rats showed a significantly greater concentration of SRIF (P less than 0.0005 and less than 0.0002, respectively) than did the lean littermates. These findings were confirmed by measurement of total pancreas SRIF content. Gastric levels were significantly altered only in the obese Zucker rats (P less than 0.005) where obese tissues had lower concentrations than those of lean animals. However similar directional changes in pancreas and stomach were observed in all models. It is concluded that the hyperinsulinemia of the obese animals studied is not due to absolute deficiency in pancreatic SRIF content. It is postulated however that decreased pancreatic SRIF secretion (paracrine or otherwise) relative to pancreatic insulin content could still play a role. PMID:2883660

  10. Testing the role of preBötzinger complex somatostatin neurons in respiratory and vocal behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Rieger, Michael A.; Ling, Guang-Yi; Park, Thomas J.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Goodchild, Ann K.; Gray, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying neurons essential for the generation of breathing and related behaviors such as vocalization is an important question for human health. The targeted loss of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) glutamatergic neurons, including those that express high levels of somatostatin protein (SST neurons), eliminates normal breathing in adult rats. Whether preBötC SST neurons represent a functionally specialized population is unknown. We tested the effects on respiratory and vocal behaviors of eliminating SST neuron glutamate release by Cre-Lox-mediated genetic ablation of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGlut2). We found the targeted loss of VGlut2 in SST neurons had no effect on viability in vivo, or on respiratory period or responses to neurokinin 1 or µ-opioid receptor agonists in vitro. We then compared medullary SST peptide expression in mice with that of two species that share extreme respiratory environments but produce either high or low frequency vocalizations. In the Mexican free-tailed bat, SST peptide-expressing neurons extended beyond the preBötC to the caudal pole of the VII motor nucleus. In the naked mole-rat, however, SST-positive neurons were absent from the ventrolateral medulla. We then analyzed isolation vocalizations from SST-Cre;VGlut2F/F mice and found a significant prolongation of the pauses between syllables during vocalization but no change in vocalization number. These data suggest that glutamate release from preBötC SST neurons is not essential for breathing but play a species- and behavior-dependent role in modulating respiratory networks. They further suggest that the neural network generating respiration is capable of extensive plasticity given sufficient time. PMID:25040660

  11. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors show positive staining for somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A).

    PubMed

    Houang, Michelle; Clarkson, Adele; Sioson, Loretta; Elston, Marianne S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Dray, Michael; Ranchere-Vince, Dominique; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valerie; de la Fouchardiere, Arnaud; Gill, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with tumors that secrete phosphaturic hormones, most notably fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). The majority of tumors associated with this syndrome show stereotypical histological features and are now known as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors (PMTs). We postulated that immunohistochemistry for somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) could be used to definitively identify PMTs or other tumors that cause TIO. Immunohistochemistry for FGF23 and SSTR2A was performed on 15 tumors from 14 patients with a definite diagnosis of TIO. All showed positive staining for both markers. While FGF23 staining was quite focal in some tumors, SSTR2A showed diffuse strong expression. In 40 control tumors not known to be associated with the clinical or biochemical features of TIO, FGF23 expression was found in 2 cases (one aneurysmal bone cyst and one osteosarcoma). SSTR2A expression was found in 9 control tumors (4 synovial sarcomas, 2 hemangiomas, 2 aneurysmal bone cysts and one osteosarcoma). Only one tumor (an aneurysmal bone cyst) showed positive staining for both FGF23 and SSTR2A. SSTR2A also commonly stained neoplastic and non-neoplastic endothelial cells. We conclude that neither FGF23 nor SSTR2A expression are specific for the diagnosis of PMT. However both stains are highly sensitive. Because of its diffuse strong expression and widespread availability, immunohistochemistry for SSTR2A is useful to confirm the diagnosis of PMT in an appropriate setting particularly if material is limited. Negative staining can serve as an excellent rule out test for this diagnosis. PMID:24060005

  12. A somatostatin analog improves tilt table tolerance by decreasing splanchnic vascular conductance.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, S S; Florian, J P; Curren, M J; Pawelczyk, J A

    2012-05-01

    Splanchnic hemodynamics and tilt table tolerance were assessed after an infusion of placebo or octreotide acetate, a somatostatin analog whose vascular effects are largely confined to the splanchnic circulation. We hypothesized that reductions in splanchnic blood flow (SpBF) and splanchnic vascular conductance (SpVC) would be related to improvements in tilt table tolerance. In randomized, double-blind, crossover trials, hemodynamic variables were collected in 14 women and 16 men during baseline, 70° head-up tilt (HUT), and recovery. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare changes from baseline with respect to sex and condition. HUT elicited an increase in heart rate and decreases in mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, stroke index, and systemic vascular conductance. Additionally, SpVC and non-SpVC were lower during HUT. Octreotide reduced SpBF and SpVC and increased systemic vascular conductance and non-SpVC. Changes in SpBF and SpVC between supine and HUT were smaller in women (P < 0.05). Tilt table tolerance was increased after administration of octreotide [median tilt time: 15.7 vs. 37.0 min (P < 0.05) and 21.8 vs. 45.0 min (P < 0.05) for women and men, respectively]. A significant relationship existed between change (Δ) in SpBF (placebo-octreotide) and Δtilt time in women (Δtilt time = 2.5-0.0083 ΔSpBF, P < 0.01), but not men (Δtilt time = 3.41-0.0008 ΔSpBF, P = 0.59). In conclusion, administration of octreotide acetate improved tilt table tolerance, which was associated with a decrease in SpVC. In women, but not men, the magnitude of reduction in SpBF was positively associated with improvements in tilt tolerance.

  13. Differentiation between meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous somatostatin receptor and brain scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haldemann, A.R.; Luescher, D.; Sulzer, M.

    1994-05-01

    Since the differentiation between meningiomas and some other CNS tumors may be difficult in certain localizations, biopsy is mandatory, even in patients with meningiomas who are to be treated with percutaneous radiotherapy alone. The high density of somatostatin receptors (SSR) in meningiomas has led us to compare patients with meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous SSR and brain scintigraphy (BS) using 74 MBq 111In octreotide and 740 MBq 99mTc DTPA injected two hours later. SPECT was performed on a 3-head gamma camera 4 hours after 111In octreotide injection in multiple peak acquisition mode in 35 patients with radiologically documented CNS tumors. In positive scans, a tumor ROI was defined manually in the transverse 111In slice with highest tumor contrast and the identical tumor ROI was transferred to the corresponding 99mTc slice. A SSR to BS index was then calculated from the ratio of 111In to 99mTc counts after normalizing for identical total counts in the slices. in negative scans, the SSR to BS index was set to be 1.0. In 7 meningiomas, the SSR to BS index was 2.64{plus_minus}0.76. In 28 other CNS tumors (7 gliomas I-111, 4 neurinomas, 3 glial reactions, 3 metastases, 3 gliomas IV, 2 ependymomas, 1 chordoma, 1 NHL; plus 4 inoperable, radiologically diagnosed glioblastomas) 1.06{plus_minus}0.13. Thus, a highly significant difference was found between these two groups (p<0.0001). It is concluded that combined SSR and BS allows excellent discrimination between meningiomas and other CNS tumors and may become a non-invasive alternative to biopsy in selected clinical situations.

  14. Somatostatin-28 inhibitory action on somatolactin-α and -β gene expression in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; Wong, Anderson O L

    2014-09-15

    Somatostain (SS) is known to inhibit growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion. Somatolactin (SL) is a member of the GH/PRL family, but its regulation by goldfish brain somatostatin-28 (gbSS-28) has not been examined. To this end, the structural identity of goldfish SLα was established by 5'/3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. As revealed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining, the expression of SL isoforms was detected in pituitary cells located in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL). The transcripts of goldfish SS receptor 5a (Sst5a) but not Sst1b, Sst2, or Sst3a were detected in the goldfish NIL cells by RT-PCR. In goldfish pituitary cells, gbSS-28 not only had an inhibitory effect on basal SLα and SLβ mRNA levels but also could abolish insulin-like growth factor-stimulated SL gene expression. In primary cultures of goldfish NIL cells, gbSS-28 reduced forskolin-stimulated total cAMP production. With the use of a pharmacological approach, the adenylate cyclase (AC)/cAMP and phospholipase C (PLC)/inositol trisphosphate (IP3)/protein kinase C (PKC) cascades were shown to be involved in gbSS-28-inhibited SLα mRNA expression. Similar postreceptor signaling cascades were also observed for gbSS-28-reduced SLβ mRNA expression, except that PKC coupling to PLC was not involved. These results provide evidence that gbSS-28 can inhibit SLα and SLβ gene expression at the goldfish pituitary level via Sst5 through differential coupling of AC/cAMP and PLC/IP3/PKC cascades.

  15. Radial and tangential migration of telencephalic somatostatin neurons originated from the mouse diagonal area.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Luis; Morales-Delgado, N; Merchán, P; Castro-Robles, B; Martínez-de-la-Torre, M; Díaz, C; Ferran, J L

    2016-07-01

    The telencephalic subpallium is the source of various GABAergic interneuron cohorts that invade the pallium via tangential migration. Based on genoarchitectonic studies, the subpallium has been subdivided into four major domains: striatum, pallidum, diagonal area and preoptic area (Puelles et al. 2013; Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas), and a larger set of molecularly distinct progenitor areas (Flames et al. 2007). Fate mapping, genetic lineage-tracing studies, and other approaches have suggested that each subpallial subdivision produces specific sorts of inhibitory interneurons, distinguished by differential peptidic content, which are distributed tangentially to pallial and subpallial target territories (e.g., olfactory bulb, isocortex, hippocampus, pallial and subpallial amygdala, striatum, pallidum, septum). In this report, we map descriptively the early differentiation and apparent migratory dispersion of mouse subpallial somatostatin-expressing (Sst) cells from E10.5 onward, comparing their topography with the expression patterns of the genes Dlx5, Gbx2, Lhx7-8, Nkx2.1, Nkx5.1 (Hmx3), and Shh, which variously label parts of the subpallium. Whereas some experimental results suggest that Sst cells are pallidal, our data reveal that many, if not most, telencephalic Sst cells derive from de diagonal area (Dg). Sst-positive cells initially only present at the embryonic Dg selectively populate radially the medial part of the bed nucleus striae terminalis (from paraseptal to amygdaloid regions) and part of the central amygdala; they also invade tangentially the striatum, while eschewing the globus pallidum and the preoptic area, and integrate within most cortical and nuclear pallial areas between E10.5 and E16.5.

  16. GABAergic Somatostatin-immunoreactive Neurons in the Amygdala Project to the Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Alexander J.; Zaric, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex and other hippocampal and parahippocampal cortices are interconnected by a small number of GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons in addition to glutamatergic pyramidal cells. Since the cortical and basolateral amygdalar nuclei have cortex-like cell types and have robust projections to the entorhinal cortex, we hypothesized that a small number of amygdalar GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons might participate in amygdalo-entorhinal projections. To test this hypothesis we combined Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tract tracing with immunohistochemistry for the amygdalar nonpyramidal cell markers glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and the m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2R). Injections of FG into the rat entorhinal cortex labeled numerous neurons that were mainly located in the cortical and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. Although most of these amygdalar FG+ neurons labeled by entorhinal injections were large pyramidal cells, 1–5% were smaller long-range nonpyramidal neurons (LRNP neurons) that expressed SOM, or both SOM and NPY. No amygdalar FG+ neurons in these cases were PV+ or VIP+. Cell counts revealed that LRNP neurons labeled by injections into the entorhinal cortex constituted about 10–20% of the total SOM+ population, and 20–40% of the total NPY population in portions of the lateral amygdalar nucleus that exhibited a high density of FG+ neurons. Sixty-two percent of amygdalar FG+/SOM+ neurons were GAD+, and 51% were M2R+. Since GABAergic projection neurons typically have low perikaryal levels of GABAergic markers, it is actually possible that most or all of the amygdalar LRNP neurons are GABAergic. Like GABAergic LRNP neurons in hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, amygdalar LRNP neurons that project to the entorhinal cortex are most likely involved in synchronizing oscillatory activity between the two regions. These oscillations could entrain

  17. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity. PMID:27010713

  18. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamical Analogue of a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, Nelson; Asenjo, Felipe

    2014-03-01

    We study the conditions that a plasma fluid and its container should meet to generate a magneto-acoustic horizon. This effect becomes an alternative to the analogue black hole found in a transonic fluid flow setting. In this context we use the magnetohydrodynamic formalism (MHD) to analyze the evolution of an irrotational plasma fluid interacting with an external constant magnetic field. Under certain plausible approximations, the dynamic of the field perturbations is described by a scalar field potential that follows a second order differential equation. As we prove here, this equation corresponds to the wave equation associated to a scalar field in a curved space-time. This horizon emerges when the local speed of the medium grows larger than the sound velocity. The magnetic field generates an effective pressure which contributes to the magneto-acoustic speed. We compare these results with the known physics of analogue black holes. We will also refer to our ongoing experiment that, in its first stage, attempts to reproduce the wave horizons found in an open channel with an obstacle: PRL 106, 021302 (2011).

  20. Bead-Based Microfluidic Sediment Analogues: Fabrication and Colloid Transport.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yang; Huang, Jingwei; Xiao, Feng; Yin, Xiaolong; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Neeves, Keith B; Wu, Ning

    2016-09-13

    Mobile colloids can act as carriers for low-solubility contaminants in the environment. However, the dominant mechanism for this colloid-facilitated transport of chemicals is unclear. Therefore, we developed a bead-based microfluidic platform of sediment analogues and measured both single and population transport of model colloids. The porous medium is assembled through a bead-by-bead injection method. This approach has the versatility to build both electrostatically homogeneous and heterogeneous media at the pore scale. A T-junction at the exit also allowed for encapsulation and enumeration of colloids effluent at single particle resolution to give population dynamics. Tortuosity calculated from pore-scale trajectory analysis and its comparison with lattice Boltzmann simulations revealed that transport of colloids was influenced by the size exclusion effect. The porous media packed by positively and negatively charged beads into two layers showed distinctive colloidal particle retention and significant remobilization and re-adsorption of particles during water flushing. We demonstrated the potential of our method to fabricate porous media with surface heterogeneities at the pore scale. With both single and population dynamics measurement, our platform has the potential to connect pore-scale and macroscale colloid transport on a lab scale and to quantify the impact of grain surface heterogeneities that are natural in the subsurface environment. PMID:27548505

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying a cellular analogue of operant reward learning

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Fred D.; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Operant conditioning is a ubiquitous but mechanistically poorly understood form of associative learning in which an animal learns the consequences of its behavior. Using a single-cell analogue of operant conditioning in neuron B51 of Aplysia, we examined second-messenger pathways engaged by activity and reward and how they may provide a biochemical association underlying operant learning. Conditioning was blocked by Rp-cAMP, a peptide inhibitor of PKA, a PKC inhibitor and by expressing a dominant negative isoform of Ca2+-dependent PKC (apl-I). Thus, both PKA and PKC were necessary for operant conditioning. Injection of cAMP into B51 mimicked the effects of operant conditioning. Activation of PKC also mimicked conditioning, but was dependent on both cAMP and PKA, suggesting that PKC acted at some point upstream of PKA activation. Our results demonstrate how these molecules can interact to mediate operant conditioning in an individual neuron important for the expression of the conditioned behavior. PMID:18786364

  2. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years.

    PubMed

    Werner, Haim; Chantelau, Ernst A

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined.

  3. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined. PMID:21714872

  4. Reduction in size of a thyrotropin- and gonadotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma treated with octreotide acetate (somatostatin analog).

    PubMed

    Sy, R A; Bernstein, R; Chynn, K Y; Kourides, I A

    1992-03-01

    TSH as well as alpha-subunit, secretion has been shown to decrease after the administration of the somatostatin analog octreotide acetate (SMS 201-995). We have studied a 59-yr-old, male patient with a TSH- and gonadotropin-secreting tumor who, because of severe cardiomyopathy, was treated with long-term somatostatin analog rather than surgical resection of the pituitary tumor. Thirteen weeks of treatment with thrice daily sc injection of 100 micrograms octreotide acetate resulted in decreased TSH and alpha-subunit secretion, normal serum thyroid hormone levels, reduction in LH and testosterone level, and significant tumor size reduction. Long-term treatment for 51 weeks has not been associated with any significant side effects. We have shown that octreotide acetate may be a therapeutically valuable modality for certain patients with neoplastic inappropriate secretion of TSH (NIST). A probable effect of octreotide acetate on neoplastic gonadotropes, as evidenced by the reduction of the LH level with a concomitant decrease in testosterone level, is, likewise, suggested.

  5. A topographical model of mu-opioid and brain somatostatin receptor selective ligands. NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, W M; Ferguson, R D; Lipkowski, A W; Hruby, V J

    1995-01-01

    We have refined the 1H NMR-based conformations of the mu-opioid receptor selective peptides related to somatostatin of general formula Xxx-Yyy1-Cys-Zzz-D-Trp-Lys(Orn)5-Thr-Pen-Thr8- NH2, where Xxx, Yyy, Zzz are 0, D-Phe and Tyr for 1; 0, D-Tic and Tyr for 2; Gly, D-Tic and Tyr for 3; and 0, D-Phe and Tic for 4, respectively, (Kazmierski et al., J. Am. Chem. 113, 2275-2283), using a molecular-dynamics approach. We present evidence that the NMR data are compatible with beta II'-, gamma- and gamma'-turns for the central tetrapeptide Tyr-D-Trp-Lys/Orn-Thr. Based on detailed structural and topographical considerations, we suggest that the mu-opioid receptor selectivity of 2 is due to a particular spatial arrangement of aromatic side chains of D-Tic1 and Tyr3 (7.5 A), and that the opioid receptor recognition domain is located in the N-terminal part of the peptide while the somatostatin receptor recognition domain is determined by the central, turn forming part of this class of cyclic peptides. A model for a mu-opioid selective ligand has emerged from these studies that shows excellent structural similarities to rigid opioid alkaloids. PMID:8537180

  6. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  7. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  8. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  9. Localization of human somatostatin receptor 5 gene (SSTR5) to chromosome band 16p13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, J.; Fernald, A.A.; Beau, M.L.

    1995-04-10

    Somatostatin is a 14-amino-acid polypeptide that is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. It potently inhibits basal and stimulated secretion from a wide variety of endocrine and exocrine cells and functions as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central nervous system with effects on locomotor activity and cognitive function. Somatostatin also has antiproliferative effects and may be an important hormonal regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies have shown that the physiological effects of somatostatin are mediated by a family of somatostatin receptors. They are all predicted to be membrane glycoproteins with seven {alpha}-helical membrane-spanning regions and members of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The receptors have been named, chronologically, sst{sub 1}, sst{sub 2}, and sst{sub 3}. However, the sequence of a fourth subtype was determined simultaneously by two different groups, and sst{sub 4} was assigned to two proteins of different sequence and functional properties. The nomenclature of these two proteins has been resolved, with the sst{sub 4} and the sst{sub 5} receptors denoting the proteins cloned by Bruno et. al. and O`Carroll et. al., respectively. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3',5'difluorophenyl)-alanine.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1-5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3',5'-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  11. Solution Processed PEDOT Analogues in Electrochemical Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Österholm, Anna M; Ponder, James F; Kerszulis, Justin A; Reynolds, John R

    2016-06-01

    We have designed fully soluble ProDOTx-EDOTy copolymers that are electrochemically equivalent to electropolymerized PEDOT without using any surfactants or dispersants. We show that these copolymers can be incorporated as active layers in solution processed thin film supercapacitors to demonstrate capacitance, stability, and voltage similar to the values of those that use electrodeposited PEDOT as the active material with the added advantage of the possibility for large scale, high-throughput processing. These Type I supercapacitors provide exceptional cell voltages (up to 1.6 V), highly symmetrical charge/discharge behavior, promising long-term stability exceeding 50 000 charge/discharge cycles, as well as energy (4-18 Wh/kg) and power densities (0.8-3.3 kW/kg) that are comparable to those of electrochemically synthesized analogues. PMID:27195798

  12. Jupiter analogues and planets of active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürster, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Endl, M.; Lo Curto, G.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Henning, T.; Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.

    2013-04-01

    Combined results are now available from a 15 year long search for Jupiter analogues around solar-type stars using the ESO CAT + CES, ESO 3.6 m + CES, and ESO 3.6 m + HARPS instruments. They comprise planet (co-)discoveries (ι Hor and HR 506) and confirmations (three planets in HR 3259) as well as non-confirmations of planets (HR 4523 and ɛ Eri) announced elsewhere. A long-term trend in ɛ Ind found by our survey is probably attributable to a Jovian planet with a period >30 yr, but we cannot fully exclude stellar activity effects as the cause. A 3.8 year periodic variation in HR 8323 can be attributed to stellar activity.

  13. Evaluation of analogues of GalNAc as substrates for enzymes of the mammalian GalNAc salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Pouilly, Sabrina; Bourgeaux, Vanessa; Piller, Friedrich; Piller, Véronique

    2012-04-20

    Changes in glycosylation are correlated to disease and associated with differentiation processes. Experimental tools are needed to investigate the physiological implications of these changes either by labeling of the modified glycans or by blocking their biosynthesis. N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) is a monosaccharide widely encountered in glycolipids, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins; once taken up by cells it can be converted through a salvage pathway to UDP-GalNAc, which is further used by glycosyltransferases to build glycans. In order to find new reporter molecules able to integrate into cellular glycans, synthetic analogues of GalNAc were prepared and tested as substrates of both enzymes acting sequentially in the GalNAc salvage pathway, galactokinase 2 (GK2) and uridylpyrophosphorylase AGX1. Detailed in vitro assays identified the GalNAc analogues that can be transformed into sugar nucleotides and revealed several bottlenecks in the pathway: a modification on C6 is not tolerated by GK2; AGX1 can use all products of GK2 although with various efficiencies; and all analogues transformed into UDP-GalNAc analogues except those with alterations on C4 are substrates for the polypeptide GalNAc transferase T1. Besides, all analogues that could be incorporated in vitro into O-glycans were also integrated into cellular O-glycans as attested by their detection on the cell surface of CHO-ldlD cells. Altogether our results show that GalNAc analogues can help to better define structural requirements of the donor substrates for the enzymes involved in GalNAc metabolism, and those that are incorporated into cells will prove valuable for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  14. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Harald G; Weise, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  15. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  16. Terrestrial Analogues for Lunar Impact Melt Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pahoehoe and ?a ?a lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pahoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pahoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  17. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  18. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  19. Analogues of uracil nucleosides with intrinsic fluorescence (NIF-analogues): synthesis and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Segal, Meirav; Fischer, Bilha

    2012-02-28

    Uridine cannot be utilized as fluorescent probe due to its extremely low quantum yield. For improving the uracil fluorescence characteristics we extended the natural chromophore at the C5 position by coupling substituted aromatic rings directly or via an alkenyl or alkynyl linker to create fluorophores. Extension of the uracil base was achieved by treating 5-I-uridine with the appropriate boronic acid under the Suzuki coupling conditions. Analogues containing an alkynyl linker were obtained from 5-I-uridine and the suitable boronic acid in a Sonogashira coupling reaction. The uracil fluorescent analogues proposed here were designed to satisfy the following requirements: a minimal chemical modification at a position not involved in base-pairing, resulting in relatively long absorption and emission wavelengths and high quantum yield. 5-((4-Methoxy-phenyl)-trans-vinyl)-2'-deoxy-uridine, 6b, was found to be a promising fluorescent probe. Probe 6b exhibits a quantum yield that is 3000-fold larger than that of the natural chromophore (Φ 0.12), maximum emission (478 nm) which is 170 nm red shifted as compared to uridine, and a Stokes shift of 143 nm. In addition, since probe 6b adopts the anti conformation and S sugar puckering favored by B-DNA, it makes a promising nucleoside analogue to be incorporated in an oligonucleotide probe for detection of genetic material.

  20. Three sequence-specific DNA-protein complexes are formed with the same promoter element essential for expression of the rat somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, O M; Pot, D A; Zhu, Z; Dixon, J E

    1988-01-01

    We identified three sequence-specific DNA-protein complexes which are formed after in vitro binding of nuclear extracts, derived from neuronal (CA-77, rat brain) or non-neuronal (HeLa) cells, to positions -70 to -29 of the rat somatostatin promoter. The protein(s) responsible for the formation of the three sequence-specific complexes was fractionated from rat brain whole cell extracts by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. The critical contact residues of the factor(s) in each complex, as determined by methylation interference analyses, are located within positions -59 to -35, which is protected from DNase I digestion; these include the G residues of a TGACGTCA consensus also found in the cAMP-responsive human enkephalin (positions -105 to -76) and E1A-inducible adenovirus type 5 E3 (positions -72 to -42) promoters. Competition assays with these heterologous promoters reveal that the factor(s) of each complex displays approximately 50-fold greater affinity for the somatostatin promoter-binding site. Synthetic oligonucleotides spanning positions -70 to -29 of the somatostatin promoter and containing single-base substitutions of the G residues in the TGACGTCA consensus were utilized in competition assays. The G residues located in the center of the module are the most critical determinants in the formation of the three sequence-specific complexes. Deletions disrupting the TGACGTCA consensus abolish not only formation of the three complexes in vitro but also expression of the somatostatin promoter in vivo, suggesting that formation of one or more of these complexes is essential for transcription of the rat somatostatin gene. Images PMID:2898727

  1. The 2-methoxy methyl analogue of salvinorin A attenuates cocaine-induced drug seeking and sucrose reinforcements in rats.

    PubMed

    Morani, Aashish S; Ewald, Amy; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Kivell, Bronwyn M

    2013-11-15

    κ Opioid receptor activation by traditional arylacetamide agonists and the novel neoclerodane diterpene κ opioid receptor agonist Salvinorin A (Sal A) results in attenuation of cocaine-seeking behavior in pre-clinical models of addiction. However, adverse effects such as sedation, depression and aversion limit their clinical utility. The Sal A analogue, 2-methoxy-methyl salvinorin B (MOM Sal B) is a longer acting Sal A analogue with high affinity for κ opioid receptors. In this study, we tested MOM Sal B for its ability to modulate cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. MOM Sal B (0.3mg/kg) successfully attenuated cocaine-seeking but also attenuated sucrose reinforcement. No change in activity was observed in either cocaine-induced hyperactivity or spontaneous open field activity tests but increased immobility and decreased swimming times in the forced swim test were observed. This study indicates that κ opioid receptor activation by more potent Sal A analogues modulates cocaine-seeking behavior non-selectively without causing sedation, suggesting an improved side effects profile. However, pro-depressive effects are seen, which may limit the therapeutic potential of this compound. Future studies with Sal A analogues having affinities at other opioid receptors are warranted as they have the potential to identify compounds having effective anti-addiction properties. PMID:24201308

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of In Vitro and In Vivo Profiles of Hydroxybupropion Analogues: Aids to Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Ronald J.; Muresan, Ana Z.; Damaj, M. Imad; Blough, Bruce E.; Huang, Xiaodong; Navarro, Hernán A.; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Eaton, J. Brek; Marxer-Miller, Syndia K.; Carroll, F. Ivy

    2010-01-01

    To create potentially superior aids to smoking cessation and/or antidepressants and to elucidate bupropion’s possible mechanisms of action(s), several analogues based on its active hydroxymetabolite (2S,3S)-4a were synthesized and tested for their abilities to inhibit monoamine uptake and nAChR subtype activities in vitro and acute effects of nicotine in vivo. The 3′,4′-dichlorophenyl [(±)-4n], naphthyl (4r), and 3-chlorophenyl or 3-propyl analogues 4s and 4t, respectively, had higher inhibitory potency and/or absolute selectivity than (2S,3S)-4a for inhibition of DA, NE, or 5HT uptake. The 3′-fluorophenyl, 3′-bromophenyl, and 4-biphenyl analogues 4c, 4d, and 4l, respectively, had higher potency for antagonism of α4β2-nAChR than (2S,3S)-4a. Several analogues also had higher potency than (2S,3S)-4a as antagonists of nicotine-mediated antinociception in the tail-flick assay. The results suggest that compounds acting via some combination of DA, NE, or 5HT inhibition and/or antagonism of α4β2-nAChR can potentially be new pharmacotherapeutics for treatment of nicotine dependence. PMID:20509659

  3. Chemical synthesis of a masked analogue of the fish antifreeze potentiating protein (AFPP).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Hyun; Wojnar, Joanna M; Harris, Paul W R; DeVries, Arthur L; Evans, Clive W; Brimble, Margaret A

    2013-08-14

    A recently identified Antarctic fish protein termed antifreeze potentiating protein (AFPP) is thought to act as an adjunct to the previously characterised antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), the two acting together to inhibit ice crystal growth in vivo. Elucidating the functional properties of the new AFPP requires access to large amounts of pure product, but the paucity of natural material necessitates alternative approaches. We therefore embarked on the total chemical synthesis of the AFPP, through a convergent ligation strategy. After many challenges, mostly due to the solubility issues of the peptide fragments, and several revisions of the original synthetic strategy, we have successfully synthesized a masked analogue of AFPP. The key to the successful synthesis was the use of a solubilising tag attached through a hydrolysable linker.

  4. Studies of inositol 1-phosphate analogues as inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate synthase in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroyuki; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Nomiya, Hiroki; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported a novel pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol in mycobacteria via phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) [Morii H., Ogawa, M., Fukuda, K., Taniguchi, H., and Koga, Y (2010) J. Biochem. 148, 593-602]. PIP synthase in the pathway is a promising target for the development of new anti-mycobacterium drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the characteristics of the PIP synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Four types of compounds were chemically synthesized based on the assumption that structural homologues of inositol 1-phosphate, a PIP synthase substrate, would act as PIP synthase inhibitors, and the results confirmed that all synthesized compounds inhibited PIP synthase activity. The phosphonate analogue of inositol 1-phosphate (Ino-C-P) had the greatest inhibitory effect among the synthesized compounds examined. Kinetic analysis indicated that Ino-C-P acted as a competitive inhibitor of inositol 1-phosphate. The IC(50) value for Ino-C-P inhibition of the PIP synthase activity was estimated to be 2.0 mM. Interestingly, Ino-C-P was utilized in the same manner as the normal PIP synthase substrate, leading to the synthesis of a phosphonate analogue of PIP (PI-C-P), which had a structure similar to that of the natural product, PIP. In addition, PI-C-P had high inhibitory activity against PIP synthase.

  5. Synthesis, antiarrhythmic activity, and toxicological evaluation of mexiletine analogues.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mariagrazia; Carocci, Alessia; Budriesi, Roberta; Micucci, Matteo; Toma, Maddalena; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lovece, Angelo; Catalano, Alessia; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; De Palma, Annalisa; Contino, Marialessandra; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Chiarini, Alberto; Franchini, Carlo; Ghelardini, Carla; Habtemariam, Solomon; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Four mexiletine analogues have been tested for their antiarrhythmic, inotropic, and chronotropic effects on isolated guinea pig heart tissues and to assess calcium antagonist activity, in comparison with the parent compound mexiletine. All analogues showed from moderate to high antiarrhythmic activity. In particular, three of them (1b,c,e) were more active and potent than the reference drug, while exhibiting only modest or no negative inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasorelaxant activity, thus showing high selectivity of action. All compounds showed no cytotoxicity and 1b,c,d did not impair motor coordination. All in, these new analogues exhibit an interesting cardiovascular profile and deserve further investigation. PMID:27267000

  6. Synthesis, antiarrhythmic activity, and toxicological evaluation of mexiletine analogues.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mariagrazia; Carocci, Alessia; Budriesi, Roberta; Micucci, Matteo; Toma, Maddalena; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lovece, Angelo; Catalano, Alessia; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; De Palma, Annalisa; Contino, Marialessandra; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Chiarini, Alberto; Franchini, Carlo; Ghelardini, Carla; Habtemariam, Solomon; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Four mexiletine analogues have been tested for their antiarrhythmic, inotropic, and chronotropic effects on isolated guinea pig heart tissues and to assess calcium antagonist activity, in comparison with the parent compound mexiletine. All analogues showed from moderate to high antiarrhythmic activity. In particular, three of them (1b,c,e) were more active and potent than the reference drug, while exhibiting only modest or no negative inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasorelaxant activity, thus showing high selectivity of action. All compounds showed no cytotoxicity and 1b,c,d did not impair motor coordination. All in, these new analogues exhibit an interesting cardiovascular profile and deserve further investigation.

  7. GH in the dwarf dopaminergic D2 receptor knockout mouse: somatotrope population, GH release, and responsiveness to GH-releasing factors and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    García-Tornadú, Isabel; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Hill, David; Arany, Edith; Low, Malcolm J; Díaz-Torga, Graciela; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2006-09-01

    Recently, the importance of the dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) subtype in normal body growth and neonatal GH secretion has been highlighted. Disruption of D2R alters the GHRH-GH-IGF-I axis and impairs body growth in adult male mice. The D2R knockout (KO) dwarf mouse has not been well characterized; we therefore sought to determine somatotrope function in the adult pituitary. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we found a significant decrease in the somatotrope population in pituitaries from KO mice (P=0.043), which was paralleled by a decreased GH output from pituitary cells cultured in vitro. In cells from adult mice the response amplitude to GHRH differed between genotypes (lower in KO), but this difference was less dramatic after taking into account the lower basal release and hormone content in the KO cells. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in cAMP generation in response to GHRH between genotypes. By Western blot, GHRH-receptor in pituitary membranes from KO mice was reduced to 46% of the level found in wildtype (WT) mice (P=0.016). Somatostatin induced a concentration-dependent decrease in GH and prolactin (PRL) secretion in both genotypes, and 1x10(-7) M ghrelin released GH in cells from both genotypes (P=0.017) in a proportionate manner to basal levels. These results suggest that KO somatotropes maintain a regulated secretory function. Finally, we tested the direct effect of dopamine on GH and PRL secretion in cells from both genotypes at 20 days and 6 months of life. As expected, we found that dopamine could reduce PRL levels at both ages in WT mice but not in KO mice, but there was no consistent effect of the neurotransmitter on GH release in either genotype at the ages studied. The present study demonstrates that in the adult male D2R KO mouse, there is a reduction in pituitary GH content and secretory activity. Our results point to an involvement of D2R signaling at the hypothalamic level as dopamine did not release GH

  8. Distribution of somatostatin in the frog brain, Rana catesbiana, in relation to location of catecholamine-containing neuron system.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, S; Shiosaka, S; Takatsuki, K; Sakanaka, M; Takagi, H; Senba, E; Matsuzaki, T; Tohyama, M

    1981-10-10

    The distribution of somatostatin (SRIF)-immunoreactive structures in the central nervous system of the bull frog (both with and without treatment of colchicine) was studied, using the indirect immunofluorescence technique of Coons and co-workers (Coons, '58). SRIF-containing cells were observed in more than ten areas including the spinal cord. These SRIF-positive cells showed segmental distribution, in that SRIF-positive neurons were identified in various areas at various brain levels. An extensive network of SRIF-positive fibers was found in most parts of the central nervous system. The distribution of a catecholamine (CA)-containing neuron system in the frog brain is also presented in this study. The possible interactions between SRIF and CA neurons systems are briefly discussed. PMID:6116726

  9. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in the study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different (significant increase only in the thalamus) in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  10. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouacil. [Propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in this study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  11. Chiral Effect of a Phe Residue in Position 3 of the Dmt(1)-L(or D)-Tic(2) Analogues on Opioid Functional Activities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon Sun; Qu, Hong Chang; Davis, Peg; Ma, Shou-Wu; Vardanyan, Ruben; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Hruby, Victor J

    2013-07-11

    In this letter, we describe a structure-activity relationships study, specifically related to the chirality of third amino acid residue in our H-Dmt-L(or D)-Tic analogues, of which C-terminus is attached to a piperidinyl moiety. Observed selectivities and functional activities of these analogues demonstrated that the chiralities of the second and third position residues are crucial for determining whether these ligands act as antagonists or agonists at the δ opioid receptor, but not at the μ opioid receptor.

  12. Insulin, insulin analogues and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst; Kimmerle, Renate; Meyer-Schwickerath, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    Insulin is absolutely vital for living beings. It is not only involved in metabolism, but also in the regulation of growth factors, e.g. IGF-1. In this review we address the role insulin has in the natural evolution of diabetic retinopathy. On the one hand, chronic deficiency of insulin and IGF-1 at the retina is thought to cause capillary degeneration, with subsequent ischaemia. On the other hand, acute abundance of (exogenously administered) insulin and IGF-1 enhances ischaemia-induced VEGF expression. A critical ratio of tissue VEGF-susceptibility: VEGF-availability triggers vascular proliferation (i.e. of micro-aneurysms and/or abnormal vessels). The patent-protected insulin analogues Lispro, Glulisine, Aspart, Glargine and Detemir are artificial insulin derivatives with altered biological responses compared to natural insulin (e.g. divergent insulin and /or IGF-1 receptor-binding characteristics, signalling patterns, and mitogenicity). Their safety profiles concerning diabetic retinopathy remain to be established by randomised controlled trials. Anecdotal reports and circumstantial evidence suggest that Lispro and Glargine might worsen diabetic retinopathy.

  13. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul J; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  14. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by benzoxathiolone analogues.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2016-02-15

    Inhibitors of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes are considered useful therapeutic agents, and are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease. In addition, MAO inhibitors are also under investigation for the treatment of certain cardiovascular pathologies and as possible aids to smoking cessation. In an attempt to discover novel classes of compounds that inhibit the MAOs, the current study examines the human MAO inhibitory properties of a small series of 2H-1,3-benzoxathiol-2-one analogues. The results show that the benzoxathiolones are potent MAO-B inhibitors with IC50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.051 μM. Although the benzoxathiolones are selective for the MAO-B isoform, two compounds display good MAO-A inhibition with IC50 values of 0.189 and 0.424 μM. Dialysis studies show that a selected compound inhibits the MAOs reversibly. It may thus be concluded that the benzoxathiolone class is suitable for the design and development of MAO-B inhibitors, and that in some instances good MAO-A inhibition may also be achieved.

  15. Fluorescent polyene ceramide analogues as membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Ingrid; Artetxe, Ibai; Abad, José Luis; Alonso, Alicia; Busto, Jon V; Fajarí, Lluís; Montes, L Ruth; Sot, Jesús; Delgado, Antonio; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-03-01

    Three ceramide analogues have been synthesized, with sphingosine-like chains containing five conjugated double bonds. Pentaene I has an N-palmitoyl acyl chain, while the other two pentaenes contain also a doxyl radical, respectively, at C5 (Penta5dox) and at C16 (Penta16dox) positions of the N-acyl chain. Pentaene I maximum excitation and emission wavelengths in a phospholipid bilayer are 353 and 478 nm, respectively. Pentaene I does not segregate from the other lipids in the way natural ceramide does, but rather mixes with them in a selective way according to the lipid phases involved. Fluorescence confocal microscopy studies show that when lipid domains in different physical states coexist, Pentaene I emission is higher in gel than in fluid domains, and in liquid-ordered than in liquid-disordered areas. Electron paramagnetic resonance of the pentaene doxyl probes confirms that these molecules are sensitive to the physical state of the bilayer. Calorimetric and fluorescence quenching experiments suggest that the lipids under study orient themselves in lipid bilayers with their polar moieties located at the lipid-water interface. The doxyl radical in the N-acyl chain quenches the fluorescence of the pentaene group when in close proximity. Because of this property, Penta16dox can detect gel-fluid transitions in phospholipids. The availability of probes for lipids in the gel phase is important in view of novel evidence for the existence of gel microdomains in cell membranes.

  16. Inhibition of firefly luciferase by alkane analogues.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Kô; Kamaya, Hiroshi; Ueda, Issaku

    2005-01-18

    We reported that anesthetics increased the partial molal volume of firefly luciferase (FFL), while long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) decreased it. The present study measured the actions of dodecanol (neutral), dodecanoic acid (negatively charged), and dodecylamine (positively charged) hydrophobic molecules on FFL. The interaction modes are measured by (1) ATP-induced bioluminescence of FFL and (2) fluorescence of 2-(p-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS). TNS fluoresces brightly in hydrophobic media. It competes with the substrate luciferin on the FFL binding. From the Scatchard plot of TNS titration, the maximum binding number of TNS was 0.83, and its binding constant was 8.27 x 10(5) M(-1). Job's plot also showed that the binding number is 0.89. From the TNS titration of FFL, the binding constant was estimated to be 8.8 x 10(5) M(-1). Dodecanoic acid quenched the TNS fluorescence entirely. Dodecanol quenched about 25% of the fluorescence, whereas dodecylamine increased it. By comparing the fluorescence of TNS and bioluminescence of FFL, the binding modes and the inhibition mechanisms of these dodecane analogues are classified in three different modes: competitive (dodecanoic acid), noncompetitive (dodecylamine), and mixed (dodecanol).

  17. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  18. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  19. Tissue-specific distribution of cross-linked somatostatin receptor proteins in the rat.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Murthy, K K; Patel, Y C

    1992-03-01

    Pharmacological studies have suggested that the somatostatin (SS) receptor is heterogeneous and exhibits SS-14-and SS-28-selective subtypes. Whether such subtypes arise from molecular heterogeneity of the receptor protein has not been definitively established. Previous reports characterizing the molecular properties of the SS receptor by the cross-linking approach have yielded divergent size estimates ranging from 27 kDa to 200 kDa. In order to resolve this discrepancy, as well as to determine whether SS-14 and SS-28 interact with specific receptor proteins, we have cross-linked radioiodinated derivatives of [125I-Tyr11]SS-14 (T*-SS-14) and [Leu8,D-Trp22,125I-Tyr25]SS-28 (LTT*-SS-28) to membrane SS receptors in rat brain, pituitary, exocrine pancreas and adrenal cortex using a number of chemical and photoaffinity cross-linking agents. The labelled cross-linked receptor proteins were analysed by SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions followed by autoradiography. Our findings indicate that the pattern of specifically labelled cross-linked SS receptor proteins is sensitive to the concentration of chemical cross-linking agents such as disuccinimidyl suberate and dithiobis-(succinimidyl propionate). Labelled high-molecular-mass complexes of cross-linked receptor-ligand proteins were observed only when high concentrations of these cross-linkers were employed. Using optimized low concentrations of cross-linkers, however, two major labelled bands of 58 +/- 3 kDa and 27 +/- 2 kDa were detected. These two bands were identified as specifically labelled SS receptor proteins subsequent to cross-linking with a number of photoaffinity cross-linking agents as well. We demonstrate here that the 58 kDa protein is the major SS receptor protein in the rat pituitary, adrenal and exocrine pancreas, whereas the 27 kDa moiety represents the principal form in the brain. Additionally, the presence of a minor specifically labelled band of 32 kDa was detected uniquely in the brain, and a minor

  20. Tissue-specific distribution of cross-linked somatostatin receptor proteins in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Srikant, C B; Murthy, K K; Patel, Y C

    1992-01-01

    Pharmacological studies have suggested that the somatostatin (SS) receptor is heterogeneous and exhibits SS-14-and SS-28-selective subtypes. Whether such subtypes arise from molecular heterogeneity of the receptor protein has not been definitively established. Previous reports characterizing the molecular properties of the SS receptor by the cross-linking approach have yielded divergent size estimates ranging from 27 kDa to 200 kDa. In order to resolve this discrepancy, as well as to determine whether SS-14 and SS-28 interact with specific receptor proteins, we have cross-linked radioiodinated derivatives of [125I-Tyr11]SS-14 (T*-SS-14) and [Leu8,D-Trp22,125I-Tyr25]SS-28 (LTT*-SS-28) to membrane SS receptors in rat brain, pituitary, exocrine pancreas and adrenal cortex using a number of chemical and photoaffinity cross-linking agents. The labelled cross-linked receptor proteins were analysed by SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions followed by autoradiography. Our findings indicate that the pattern of specifically labelled cross-linked SS receptor proteins is sensitive to the concentration of chemical cross-linking agents such as disuccinimidyl suberate and dithiobis-(succinimidyl propionate). Labelled high-molecular-mass complexes of cross-linked receptor-ligand proteins were observed only when high concentrations of these cross-linkers were employed. Using optimized low concentrations of cross-linkers, however, two major labelled bands of 58 +/- 3 kDa and 27 +/- 2 kDa were detected. These two bands were identified as specifically labelled SS receptor proteins subsequent to cross-linking with a number of photoaffinity cross-linking agents as well. We demonstrate here that the 58 kDa protein is the major SS receptor protein in the rat pituitary, adrenal and exocrine pancreas, whereas the 27 kDa moiety represents the principal form in the brain. Additionally, the presence of a minor specifically labelled band of 32 kDa was detected uniquely in the brain, and a minor

  1. Relationship between expression of gastrin, somatostatin, Fas/FasL and caspases in large intestinal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jia-Ding; Wu, Pei; Yang, Ying-Lin; Wu, Jian; Huang, He

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between the mRNAs and protein expression of gastrin (GAS), somatostatin (SS) and apoptosis index (AI), apoptosis regulation gene Fas/FasL and caspases in large intestinal carcinoma (LIC). METHODS: Expression of GAS and SS mRNAs were detected by nested RT-PCR in 79 cases of LIC. Cell apoptosis was detected by molecular biology in situ apoptosis detecting methods (TUNEL). Immunohistochemical staining for GAS, SS, Fas/FasL, caspase-3 and caspase-8 was performed according to the standard streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase (S-P) method. RESULTS: There was a significant positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression of GAS and SS (GASrs=0.99, P < 0.01; SSrs = 0.98, P < 0.01). There was significant difference in positive expression rates of GAS, SS mRNAs and protein among different histological differentiation, histological types and Dukes’ stage of LIC. The AI in GAS high and moderate expression groups was significantly lower than that in low expression groups (3.75 ± 2.38 vs 7.82 ± 2.38, P < 0.01; 5.51 ± 2.66 vs 7.82 ± 2.38, P < 0.01), and the AI in SS high and moderate expression groups was significantly higher than that in low expression groups (9.03 ± 1.76 vs 5.35 ± 3.00, P < 0.01; 7.44 ± 2.67 vs 5.35 ± 3.00, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between the integral ratio of GAS to SS and the AI (rs = -0.41, P < 0.01). The positive expression rate of FasL in GAS high and moderate expression groups was higher than that in low expression group (90.9% and 81.0% vs 53.2%, P < 0.05). The positive expression rates of Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 in SS high (90.0%, 90.0% and 100%) and moderate (80.0%, 70.0%, 75.0%) expression groups were higher than that in low expression group (53.1%, 42.9%, 49.0%) (90.0% and 80.0% vs 53.1%, P < 0.05; 90.0% and 70.0% vs 42.9%, P < 0.05; 100.0% and 75.0% vs 49.0%, P < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the integral ratio of GAS to SS and the

  2. Negative correlation between peripheral plasma somatostatin levels and GH responses to GH-RH stimulation tests in children.

    PubMed

    Liapi, C; Evain Brion, D; Argente, J; Vaudry, H; Donnadieu, M

    1986-09-01

    On forty-six fasting and resting children, aged 5-17 years, with short stature (below -2 SD) a growth hormone releasing hormone (GH-RH) stimulation test (2 micrograms/kg iv bolus, Sanofi) was performed. Twenty-two children were prepubertal, of which, 13 had a constitutional short stature (CSS), nine an idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (IGHD). Twenty-four subjects were pubertal, at the stage II or III of Tanner. Among them, six had a constitutional short stature (CSS) and 18 an idiopathic delayed puberty (IDP). Blood samples were taken for determination of plasma somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in chilled test tubes containing EDTA + aprotinin. Plasma SLI levels were measured after extraction and concentration on C18 Sep Pack columns by radioimmunoassay using an antibody against 1-14 somatostatin. The sensitivity of this assay is around 3 pg/ml. After GH-RH stimulation the peak of GH (mean +/- SEM) was in prepubertal subjects: 25.3 +/- 9.1 micrograms/l in CSS, and 18.6 +/- 10.3 micrograms/l in IGHD. In pubertal subjects GH peaks were 17.6 +/- 8.4 micrograms/l in CSS and 15.6 +/- 3.8 micrograms/l in children with IDP. No significant differences was found between basal plasma SLI levels in the four groups of subjects, being respectively (mean +/- SEM) 11.9 +/- 1.8 pg/ml in prepubertal subjects with CSS, 9.6 +/- 2.6 pg/ml in IGHD, 7.6 +/- 1.7 pg/ml in pubertal children with CSS and 6.6 +/- 1.5 pg/ml in children with IDP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. From BPA to its analogues: Is it a safe journey?

    PubMed

    Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most abundant synthetic chemicals in the world due to its uses in plastics. Its widespread exposure vis-a-vis low dose effects led to a reduction in its safety dose and imposition of ban on its use in infant feeding bottles. This restriction paved the way for the gradual market entry of its analogues. However, their structural similarity to BPA has put them under surveillance for endocrine disrupting potential. The application of these analogues is increasing and so are the studies reporting their toxicity. This review highlights the reasons which led to the ban of BPA and also reports the exposure and toxicological data available on its analogues. Hence, this compilation is expected to answer in a better way whether the replacement of BPA by these analogues is safer or more harmful?

  4. Cell-Cycle Analyses Using Thymidine Analogues in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2′-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry. PMID:24551125

  5. From BPA to its analogues: Is it a safe journey?

    PubMed

    Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most abundant synthetic chemicals in the world due to its uses in plastics. Its widespread exposure vis-a-vis low dose effects led to a reduction in its safety dose and imposition of ban on its use in infant feeding bottles. This restriction paved the way for the gradual market entry of its analogues. However, their structural similarity to BPA has put them under surveillance for endocrine disrupting potential. The application of these analogues is increasing and so are the studies reporting their toxicity. This review highlights the reasons which led to the ban of BPA and also reports the exposure and toxicological data available on its analogues. Hence, this compilation is expected to answer in a better way whether the replacement of BPA by these analogues is safer or more harmful? PMID:27262103

  6. Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Nelson S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most prevalent risk factor for glaucoma. All treatments, whether surgical or pharmaceutical, are aimed at lowering IOP. Prostaglandin analogues are a first line therapy for glaucoma due to their ability to reduce IOP, once-daily dosing, efficacy, and minimal side-effect profile. Whereas prostaglandin analogues have been known to alter aqueous humor outflow through the unconventional (uveoscleral) pathway, more recent evidence suggests their action also occurs through the conventional (trabecular) pathway. Understanding how prostaglandin analogues successfully lower IOP is important, as this information may lead to the discovery of new molecular targets for future therapeutic intervention. This review explores the current understanding of prostaglandin analogue biology as it pertains to IOP reduction and improved aqueous humor outflow facility. PMID:24359106

  7. Analogues for Wild2: Carbonaceous Chondrites Shot into Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; MacArthur, J. L.; Wickham-Eade, J. E.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Butterworth, A. L.; Baker, S. H.

    2016-08-01

    Comet Wild2 particles show similarities to carbonaceous chondrites. We compare Wild2 grains to analogue shots of CV3 and CR2 powders in aerogel tracks, using the same techniques, to make accurate comparisons.

  8. Mars Methane Analogue Mission (M3): Analytical Techniques and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E.; Vrionis, H.; Qadi, A.; Bell, J. F.; Berard, G.; Boivin, A.; Ellery, A.; Jamroz, W.; Kruzelecky, R.; Mann, P.; Samson, C.; Stromberg, J.; Strong, K.; Tremblay, A.; Whyte, L.; Wing, B.

    2011-03-01

    The Mars Methane Analogue Mission (M3) project is designed to simulate a rover-based search for, and analysis of, methane sources on Mars at a serpentinite open pit mine in Quebec, using a variety of instruments.

  9. Sulphur Spring: Busy Intersection and Possible Martian Analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nankivell, A.; Andre, N.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Allen, C.; McKay, D.

    2000-01-01

    Life in extreme environments exhibiting conditions similar to early Earth and Mars, such as Sulphur Spring, may harbor microbiota serving as both relics from the past as well as present day Martian analogues.

  10. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  11. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  12. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABAA receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABAA receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanol were investigated on recombinant human '-aminobutyric acid (GABAA, a1ß2'2s) r...

  13. Pregnancy and the long-acting insulin analogue: a case study.

    PubMed

    Caronna, Silvana; Cioni, Federico; Dall'Aglio, Elisabetta; Arsenio, Leone

    2006-04-01

    R.S. is a 22 years old Caucasian woman suffering from obesity, hypertension and Type I Diabetes Mellitus since the age of 6 years. Type I DM treatment includes 3 insulin injections at meal time and one glargine injection at bedtime. The insulin therapy regimen was prolonged during pregnancy and continued after childbirth. Optimal glycemic compensations were monitored throughout the pregnancy using HbA1c variations and other standard controls included in the OBG routine protocols, all within normal values. The pregnancy ended at the 38th week of gestation with a caesarean birth, during which a 3,54 Kg healthy boy with an APGAR of 9 was born. Both the mother and the newborn resulted in perfect health conditions confirming that the possibility of using glargine insulin profiles during pregnancy in selected cases with close monitoring may exist.

  14. Photochemical synthesis of nucleoside analogues from cyclobutanones: bicyclic and isonucleosides.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Mileina; Ebead, Abdelaziz; Lee-Ruff, Edward

    2010-05-26

    The preparation of two nucleoside analogues are reported. Both syntheses involve a key photochemical ring-expansion of cyclobutanones to an oxacarbene and its subsequent scavenging by 6-chloropurine. The synthesis of a bicyclic (locked) purine starts from a oxabicycloheptanone with a hydroxymethyl pendant. The preparation of an isonucleoside uses a cyclobutanone with an alpha-substituted 6-chloropurine. Irradiation of the latter produces an isonucleoside and acyclic nucleoside analogues.

  15. Analogue and digital linear modulation techniques for mobile satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, W. J.; Bateman, A.; Mcgeehan, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The choice of modulation format for a mobile satellite service is complex. The subjective performance is summarized of candidate schemes and voice coder technologies. It is shown that good performance can be achieved with both analogue and digital voice systems, although the analogue system gives superior performance in fading. The results highlight the need for flexibility in the choice of signaling format. Linear transceiver technology capable of using many forms of narrowband modulation is described.

  16. Carbacaprazamycins: Chemically Stable Analogues of the Caprazamycin Nucleoside Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Mayumi; Hsuan, Lee Shang; Kato, Yuta; Matsuda, Akira

    2015-04-10

    Carbacaprazamycins, which are chemically stable analogues of caprazamycins, were designed and synthesized. These analogues were active against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and their activities were comparable to those of the parent caprazamycins. The effect of treatment with carbacaprazamycin on morphological changes in S. aureus indicated that the mode of action was completely different from those of existing peptidoglycan inhibitors. PMID:27622529

  17. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches.

  18. Cladribine Analogues via O6-(Benzotriazolyl) Derivatives of Guanine Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Satishkumar, Sakilam; Vuram, Prasanna K.; Relangi, Siva Subrahmanyam; Gurram, Venkateshwarlu; Zhou, Hong; Kreitman, Robert J.; Montemayor, Michelle M. Martínez; Yang, Lijia; Kaliyaperumal, Muralidharan; Sharma, Somesh; Pottabathini, Narender; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Cladribine, 2-chloro-2′-deoxyadenosine, is a highly efficacious clinically used nucleoside for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia. It is also being evaluated against other lymphoid malignancies and has been a molecule of interest for well over half a century. In continuation of our interest on the amide bond-activation in purine nucleosides via the use of (benzotriazol-1yl-oxy)tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate, we have evaluated the use of O6-(benzotriazol-1-yl)-2′-deoxyguanosine as a potential precursor to cladribine and its analogues. These compounds, after appropriate deprotection, were assessed for their biological activities and the data are presented herein. Against hairy cell leukemia (HCL), T-cell lymphoma (TCL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cladribine was the most active against all. The bromo analogue of cladribine showed comparable activity to the ribose analogue of cladribine against HCL, but was more active against TCL and CLL. The bromo ribo analogue of cladribine possessed activity, but was least active among the C6-NH2-containing compounds. Substitution with alkyl groups at the exocyclic amino group appears detrimental to activity, and only the C6 piperidinyl cladribine analogue demonstrated any activity. Against adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, only cladribine and its ribose analogue were most active. PMID:26556315

  19. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates PXR and examined selected BPA analogues to determine whether they bind to and activate PXR. Methods: Cell-based reporter assays, in silico ligand–PXR docking studies, and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to study the interaction between BPA and PXR. We also investigated the influence of BPA and its analogues on the regulation of PXR target genes in human LS180 cells. Results: We found that BPA and several of its analogues are potent agonists for human PXR (hPXR) but do not affect mouse PXR activity. We identified key residues within hPXR’s ligand-binding pocket that constitute points of interaction with BPA. We also deduced the structural requirements of BPA analogues that activate hPXR. BPA and its analogues can also induce PXR target gene expression in human LS180 cells. Conclusions: The present study advances our understanding of the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates human PXR. Activation of PXR by BPA may explain some of the adverse effects of BPA in humans. PMID:22214767

  20. First cohomology of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1|1) acting on linear differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdouri, Imed; Boujelben, Maha; Derbali, Ammar

    2016-10-01

    We consider the 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-module structure on the spaces of differential operators acting on the spaces of weighted densities. We compute the first differential cohomology of the Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) with coefficients in differential operators acting on the spaces of weighted densities. We study also the super analogue of this problem getting the same results.

  1. Analogues to features and processes of a high-level radioactive waste repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Stuckless, John S.; with a Foreword by Abraham Van Luik, U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-01-01

    Natural analogues are defined for this report as naturally occurring or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have taken place over time periods of decades to millennia and on spatial scales as much as tens of kilometers. Analogues provide an important temporal and spatial dimension that cannot be tested by laboratory or field-scale experiments. Analogues provide one of the multiple lines of evidence intended to increase confidence in the safe geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Although the work in this report was completed specifically for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste under the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the applicability of the science, analyses, and interpretations is not limited to a specific site. Natural and anthropogenic analogues have provided and can continue to provide value in understanding features and processes of importance across a wide variety of topics in addressing the challenges of geologic isolation of radioactive waste and also as a contribution to scientific investigations unrelated to waste disposal. Isolation of radioactive waste at a mined geologic repository would be through a combination of natural features and engineered barriers. In this report we examine analogues to many of the various components of the Yucca Mountain system, including the preservation of materials in unsaturated environments, flow of water through unsaturated volcanic tuff, seepage into repository drifts, repository drift stability, stability and alteration of waste forms and components of the engineered barrier system, and transport of radionuclides through unsaturated and saturated rock zones.

  2. Habitability & Astrobiology Research in Mars Terrestrial Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    We performed a series of field research campaigns (ILEWG EuroMoonMars) in the extreme Utah desert relevant to Mars environments, and in order to help in the interpretation of Mars missions measurements from orbit (MEX, MRO) or from the surface (MER, MSL), or Moon geochemistry (SMART-1, LRO). We shall give an update on the sample analysis in the context of habitability and astrobiology. Methods & Results: In the frame of ILEWG EuroMoonMars campaigns (2009 to 2013) we deployed at Mars Desert Research station, near Hanksville Utah, a suite of instruments and techniques [A, 1, 2, 9-11] including sample collection, context imaging from remote to local and microscale, drilling, spectrometers and life sensors. We analyzed how geological and geochemical evolution affected local parameters (mineralogy, organics content, environment variations) and the habitability and signature of organics and biota. Among the important findings are the diversity in the composition of soil samples even when collected in close proximity, the low abundances of detectable PAHs and amino acids and the presence of biota of all three domains of life with significant heterogeneity. An extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles was observed [3,4,9]. A dominant factor seems to be soil porosity and lower clay-sized particle content [6-8]. A protocol was developed for sterile sampling, contamination issues, and the diagnostics of biodiversity via PCR and DGGE analysis in soils and rocks samples [10, 11]. We compare the 2009 campaign results [1-9] to new measurements from 2010-2013 campaigns [10-12] relevant to: comparison between remote sensing and in-situ measurements; the study of minerals; the detection of organics and signs of life. Keywords: field analogue research, astrobiology, habitability, life detection, Earth-Moon-Mars, organics References [A] Foing, Stoker & Ehrenfreund (Editors, 2011) "Astrobiology field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments", Special Issue of International

  3. Chemotactic peptide analogues. Synthesis and chemotactic activity of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe analogues containing (S)-phenylalaninol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zecchini, G P; Paradisi, M P; Torrini, I; Spisani, S

    1995-09-01

    The synthesis and the biological activity towards human neutrophils of some N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OMe analogues containing (S)-phenylalaninol (Pheol) or its derivatives in place of the native phenylalanine are reported. While the analogue containing Pheol (4) was found to be devoid of significant biological activity, its esters 3 and 5, although inactive as chemoattractants, are able to strongly stimulate superoxide production and are active with a lower efficacy in the lysozyme release. PMID:7487425

  4. Failure of human and mouse leptin to affect insulin, glucagon and somatostatin secretion by the perfused rat pancreas at physiological glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Leclercq-Meyer, V; Malaisse, W J

    1998-06-25

    In isolated perfused pancreas from normal rats, a rise in d-glucose concentration from 3.3 to 8.3 mM provoked a rapid phasic stimulation of both insulin and somatostatin secretion and rapid fall in glucagon output, these changes being reversed when the concentration of the hexose was brought back to its initial low level. In the presence of 8.3 mM d-glucose, the administration of either human or mouse leptin (10 nM in both cases) for 15 min failed to affect significantly the perfusion pressure and release of the three hormones. It is concluded that leptin does not exert any major immediate and direct effect upon pancreatic insulin, glucagon and somatostatin secretion, at least at the physiological concentration of d-glucose normally found in the plasma of fed rats. PMID:9723892

  5. Molecular cloning of the cDNAs and distribution of the mRNAs encoding two somatostatin precursors in the African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Trabucchi, M; Tostivint, H; Lihrmann, I; Jégou, S; Vallarino, M; Vaudry, H

    1999-08-01

    The occurrence of two somatostatin precursors, PSS1 and PSS2, yielding S-14 (SS1) and the variant [Pro2, Met13]S-14 (SS2), has been recently reported in the frog Rana ridibunda. The evolutionary significance of frog PSS2 is unclear because its sequence exhibits very little similarity with other known vertebrate somatostatin precursors. In the present study, we report on the characterization of two somatostatin precursor cDNAs from the brain of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens. One of the cDNAs encodes a 115-amino-acid protein that contains the SS1 sequence at its C-terminal extremity and thus is clearly homologous to PSS1. Comparison with other vertebrate PSS1 showed that lungfish PSS1 is more closely related to PSS1 from tetrapods than to PSS1 from fish. The other cDNA encodes a 109-amino-acid protein that contains a somatostatin variant [Pro2]S-14 at its C-terminal extremity. Sequence analysis of this second precursor indicated that it is the lungfish counterpart of frog PSS2. Northern blot analysis showed that lungfish PSS1 mRNA is widely distributed in the central nervous system and in peripheral organs, including the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract. In contrast, PSS2 mRNA was primarily found in the central nervous system but not in the pancreas or gut. In situ hybridization studies showed that the two genes are differentially expressed in various regions of the lungfish brain. The present data indicate that the PSS2 gene, initially discovered in frog, appeared early in vertebrate evolution, before the emergence of the tetrapod lineage. The recent isolation of a [Pro2]S-14 variant in the sturgeon, whose sequence is identical to that of lungfish SS2, suggests that the PSS2 gene may actually be present in the genome of all Osteichthyii.

  6. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  7. Mapping of tyrosine hydroxylase in the diencephalon of alpaca (Lama pacos) and co-distribution with somatostatin-28 (1-12).

    PubMed

    Marcos, P; Arroyo-Jiménez, M M; Lozano, G; González-Fuentes, J; Lagartos-Donate, M J; Aguilar, L A; Coveñas, R

    2013-05-01

    Based on previous work describing the distribution of somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the male alpaca (Lama pacos) diencephalon, and owing to the well known interactions between this peptide and the catecholaminergic system, the aims of this work are (1) to describe the distribution of putative catecholaminergic cell groups in the alpaca diencephalon and (2) to study the possible morphological basis of the interactions between these substances in the diencephalon of the alpaca by using double immunohistochemistry methods. Thus, the distribution of catecholaminergic cell groups in the alpaca diencephalon agrees with that previously described in the diencephalon of other mammalian species of the same order: the A11, A12, A13, A14 and A15d cell groups have been identified; however, we have observed an additional hitherto undescribed cell group containing tyrosine hydroxylase in the medial habenula. In addition, double-labelling procedures did not reveal neurons containing tyrosine hydroxylase and somatostatin, suggesting that the hypothalamic interactions between catecholamines and somatostatin at intra-cellular level must be carried out by a somatostatin molecule other than fragment (1-12). Otherwise, the overlapping distribution patterns of these substances would suggest some interconnections between groups of chemospecific neurons. These results could be the starting point for future studies on hypothalamic functions in alpacas, for example those concerning reproductive control, since other physiological studies have suggested that this species could have different regulatory mechanisms from other mammalian species. Our results support the Manger hypothesis that the same nuclear complement of neural systems exists in the brain of species of the same order.

  8. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [64Cu]Cu-/[177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F.; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [64Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome. PMID:27022413

  9. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [(64)Cu]Cu-/[(177)Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr(3))octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr(3))octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [(64)Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome. PMID:27022413

  10. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin.

  11. Exocrine pancreatic secretion and plasma levels of cholecystokinin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin after single and combined intraduodenal application of different bile salts in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Fiedler, F; Kowalski, C; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1996-01-01

    Bile salts are intraduodenal stimulants of basal pancreatic secretion. This study aims to show whether the three main bile salts of human bile differ in their action on pancreatic secretion, and whether they enhance or inhibit each other after combined use. Furthermore, the effect on gastroenteropancreatic peptide release is evaluated. Twelve subjects were provided with a gastroduodenal double-lumen tube. Equimolar doses (0.6 mmol) of taurocholate (322 mg), taurodeoxycholate (313 mg), and a combination of both stimuli were given intraduodenally. Another 12 subjects received taurochenodeoxycholate (313 mg) instead of taurocholate. Volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase were determined in duodenal aspirates. Cholecystokinin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin were measured radioimmunologically in plasma samples. All bile salts and combinations exerted a significant hydrokinetic and ecbolic effect. The hydrokinetic response of the combined stimuli was significantly higher as compared with taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate, respectively. As far as concerns the ecbolic response, the difference was significant only for trypsin output as compared with taurochenodeoxycholate. Plasma cholecystokinin rose significantly only after the combined stimuli. Pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin increased significantly after all stimuli, except pancreatic polypeptide after taurocholate. Combined use enhances the hydrokinetic and ecbolic effects of single bile salts. Cholecystokinin may, hereby, be involved as a mediator of the ecbolic effect. Pancreatic polypeptide release indicates cholinergic mechanisms as further mediators. As demonstrated by somatostatin release, counter-regulatory mechanisms are also triggered by intraduodenal bile salts.

  12. Exocrine pancreatic secretion and plasma levels of cholecystokinin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin after single and combined intraduodenal application of different bile salts in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Fiedler, F; Kowalski, C; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1996-01-01

    Bile salts are intraduodenal stimulants of basal pancreatic secretion. This study aims to show whether the three main bile salts of human bile differ in their action on pancreatic secretion, and whether they enhance or inhibit each other after combined use. Furthermore, the effect on gastroenteropancreatic peptide release is evaluated. Twelve subjects were provided with a gastroduodenal double-lumen tube. Equimolar doses (0.6 mmol) of taurocholate (322 mg), taurodeoxycholate (313 mg), and a combination of both stimuli were given intraduodenally. Another 12 subjects received taurochenodeoxycholate (313 mg) instead of taurocholate. Volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase were determined in duodenal aspirates. Cholecystokinin, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin were measured radioimmunologically in plasma samples. All bile salts and combinations exerted a significant hydrokinetic and ecbolic effect. The hydrokinetic response of the combined stimuli was significantly higher as compared with taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate, respectively. As far as concerns the ecbolic response, the difference was significant only for trypsin output as compared with taurochenodeoxycholate. Plasma cholecystokinin rose significantly only after the combined stimuli. Pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin increased significantly after all stimuli, except pancreatic polypeptide after taurocholate. Combined use enhances the hydrokinetic and ecbolic effects of single bile salts. Cholecystokinin may, hereby, be involved as a mediator of the ecbolic effect. Pancreatic polypeptide release indicates cholinergic mechanisms as further mediators. As demonstrated by somatostatin release, counter-regulatory mechanisms are also triggered by intraduodenal bile salts. PMID:9032583

  13. Serotonin-, somatostatin- and chromogranin A-containing cells of the urethro-prostatic complex in the sheep. An immunocytochemical and immunofluorescent study.

    PubMed Central

    Vittoria, A; La Mura, E; Cocca, T; Cecio, A

    1990-01-01

    The urethral and prostatic epithelial of the sheep contain a large number of amine- and/or peptide-producing neuroendocrine cells (NE), also called paraneurons. Four different cell types have been immunohistochemically recognised among them. The first contains the amine serotonin, the second the protein chromogranin A, the third the amine and the protein together and the fourth the hormone somatostatin. Serotonin-producing cells are elongated in shape and often show cytoplasmic dendrite-like processes directed towards the basal membrane and/or the lumen. Chromogranin A-containing cells are polymorphic and constitute the more numerous NE subpopulation. Cells containing both the bioactive substances seem to be less numerous than the chromogranin A cells and slightly more frequent than the serotonin cells. All these cell types are diffused along the whole urethro-prostatic complex and show their highest density in the collicular zone. Somatostatin-containing cells often show a unique cytoplasmic extension directed towards the basal membrane and are rare. It is supposed that the presence of serotonin in the urogenital tract is functionally correlated with the emission of urine and/or semen, while somatostatin is associated with the inhibition of local exocrine and/or endocrine secretions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1981998

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of analogues of HYNIC as bifunctional chelators for technetium.

    PubMed

    Meszaros, Levente K; Dose, Anica; Biagini, Stefano C G; Blower, Philip J

    2011-06-21

    6-Hydrazinonicotinic acid (HYNIC, 1) is a well-established bifunctional technetium-binding ligand often used to synthesise bioconjugates for radiolabelling with Tc-99m. It is capable of efficient capture of technetium at extremely low concentrations, but the structure of the labelled complexes is heterogeneous and incompletely understood. In particular, it is of interest to determine whether, at the no-carrier-added level, it acts in a chelating or non-chelating mode. Here we report two new isomers of HYNIC: 2-hydrazinonicotinic acid (2-HYNIC, 2), which (like 1) is capable of chelation through the mutually ortho hydrazine and pyridine nitrogens and 4-hydrazinonicotinic acid (4-HYNIC, 3), which is not (due to the para-relationship of the hydrazine and pyridine nitrogens). LC-MS shows that the coordination chemistry of 2 with technetium closely parallels that of conventional 1, and no advantages of one over the other in terms of potential labelling efficiency or isomerism were discernable. Both 1 and 2 formed complexes with the loss of 5 protons from the ligand set, whether the co-ligand was tricine or EDDA. Ligand 3, however, failed to complex technetium except at very high ligand concentration: the marked contrast with 1 and 2 suggests that chelation, rather than nonchelating coordination, is a key feature of technetium coordination by HYNIC. Two further new HYNIC analogues, 2-chloro-6-hydrazinonicotinic acid (2-chloro-HYNIC, 4a) and 2,6-dihydrazinonicotinic acid (diHYNIC, 5) were also synthesised. The coordination chemistry of 4a with technetium was broadly parallel to that of 1 and 2 although it was a less efficient chelator, while 5 also behaved as an efficient chelator of technetium, but its coordination chemistry remains poorly defined and requires further investigation before it can sensibly be adopted for (99m)Tc-labelling. The new analogues 4a and 5 present an opportunity to develop trifunctional HYNIC analogues for more complex bioconjugate synthesis.

  15. Dihydrobenzofuran analogues of hallucinogens. 4. Mescaline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Monte, A P; Waldman, S R; Marona-Lewicka, D; Wainscott, D B; Nelson, D L; Sanders-Bush, E; Nichols, D E

    1997-09-12

    hallucinogens, that such compounds must be full agonists at the 5-HT2A receptor subtype. In contrast to the 2,5-dimethoxy-substituted phenethylamines, where rigidification of the methoxy groups had no deleterious effect on activity, the loss of activity in the 3,4,5-trioxygenated mescaline analogues may suggest that the 3 and 5 methoxy groups must remain conformationally mobile to enable receptor activation.

  16. Terrestrial research in Mars analogue environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, G.

    Fatty acids (FA) content was measured by GC-MS SIM technique in Sulfide ores of present day (Mid-Atlantic Ridge and others) and ancient (Ural Paleocene, Russia) black smokers; Early Proterozoic kerites of Volyn; Siberian, Canadian and Antarctic permafrosts and also in rocks of East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement. Analysis was shown presence those and only those fatty acids which are specific to microorganisms. FA with 12 up 19 of carbon atoms are thought to be a bacterial biomass sign. 3-Hydroxy fatty acids also found in samples and are strong specific markers of gram-negative bacteria. Cultivation yield living bacteria in some cases. The East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement rocks opened by Vorotilov Deep Well (VDW) drilled through Puchezh-Katunski impact structure were studied within depths 2575 - 2805 m. 34 microbial lipid markers were detected by GC-MS and 22 species were identified. Bacteria of g. Bacillus reached 6,8 % in subsurface communities. However, members of gg. Clostridium (37,1 - 33,2 %) and Rhodococcus (27,6 - 33,7 %) were absolute dominants within studied depth interval. Some lipid patterns of kerite samples could be assessed to definite genera or, in special cases, to species of contemporary microorganisms. For instance, 2-hydroxylauric acid is specific to Pseudomonas putida group or Acinetobacter spp., and hydroxymyristic together with hydroxypalmitic are specific to P.cepacea and cyanobacteria. 3-hydroxystearic acid was known as component of Acetobacter diazothrophycus and Gloebacter violaceous cyanobacterium. 10-hydroxystearic acid associated with Nocardia spp., which oxidizes oleic acid in organic substrates. 10-methylhexadecanoic (10Me16) acid together with 10Me14, 10Me15 and 10Me17 analogues are markers of actinomycetes. Significant part of Black Smokers organic matter is probably biogenic. Fatty acid features strongly assigns it to bacterial, microeucariotic and planta cells. Par example 3-hydroxy acids are

  17. Spectral analysis of lunar analogue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Analyses of samples derived from terrestrial analogue sites are used to study lunar processes in their geological context (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). For this study samples from the volcanic region of the Eifel, Germany collected during field campaigns (Foing et al., 2010), are analyzed with a variety of spectrometers. The aim is to obtain a database of analyzed samples that could be used as a reference for future in situ measurements. Equipment used in the laboratory consists of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer, a Raman laser spectrometer, as well as UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers. The Raman, UV-VIS and NIR are also used in combination with the EXoGeoLab mock-up lander during field campaigns (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). Calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers is the main focus of this research in order to obtain the clearest spectra. The calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers requires the use of a good light source as well as suitable optical fibers to create a signal that covers the widest range in wavelengths available. To eliminate noise towards the edges of this range, multiple measurements are averaged and data is processed by dividing the signal by reference spectra. Calibration of the devices by creating a new dark and reference spectra has to take place after every sample measurement. In this way we take into account changes that occur in the signal due to the eating of the devices during the measurements. Moreover, the integration time is adjusted to obtain a clear signal without leading to oversaturation in the reflectance spectrum. The typical integration times for the UV-VIS reflectance spectrometer vary between 1 - 18 s, depending on the amount of daylight during experiments. For the NIR reflectance spectrometer the integration time resulting in the best signals is approximately 150 ms in combination with a broad spectrum light

  18. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  19. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  20. Central effects of angiotensin II, its fragment and analogues.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, V P; Klousha, V E; Petkov, V D; Markovska, V L; Svirskis, S V; Mountsinietse, R K; Anouans, Z E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the octapeptide angiotensin II (AT II), its fragment Ile8 AT3-8 and the analogues Sar1 Ala8 AT II, Ala8 AT II and Ile8 AT II were studied with respect to: the level of biogenic amines (DA, 5-HT and their metabolites HVA and 5-HIAA) in the forebrain; the behaviour of the animals--haloperidol catalepsy, apomorphine stereotypy, unconditioned jumping reaction (UJR), convulsive threshold. Good correlation was found between the biochemical and behavioural effects. The fragment of AT II where phenylalanine is substituted at the C-terminal by Ile reduces the haloperidol-increased content of HVA, potentiates apomorphine stereotypy and reduces catalepsy, whereas the AT II analogues (where the C-terminal phenylalanine is substituted by Ala, and the N-terminal--by Sar) potentiate the effect of haloperidol increasing the HVA content, reduce apomorphine stereotypy and potentiate catalepsy; saralasine independently applied induces brief catalepsy; AT II, its fragment and analogues inhibit UJR, in combination with amphetamine and PTZ this effect becomes deeper; the duration of hexobarbital sleep is increased. The peptides investigated increase the convulsive threshold. The results show that the hexapeptide fragment has preserved the effects of AT II, whereas in the analogues (with changed C- and N-terminals) they are changed. The results obtained may be explained with the modulating influence of AT II-receptors on the DA-ergic receptors in the brain structures with which AT II and its fragment and analogues enter in contact.

  1. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  2. Ionic liquids and eutectic mixtures as solvent and template in synthesis of zeolite analogues.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily R; Andrews, Christopher D; Wheatley, Paul S; Webb, Paul B; Wormald, Philip; Morris, Russell E

    2004-08-26

    The challenges associated with synthesizing porous materials mean that new classes of zeolites (zeotypes)-such as aluminosilicate zeolites and zeolite analogues-together with new methods of preparing known zeotypes, continue to be of great importance. Normally these materials are prepared hydrothermally with water as the solvent in a sealed autoclave under autogenous pressure. The reaction mixture usually includes an organic template or 'structure-directing agent' that guides the synthesis pathway towards particular structures. Here we report the preparation of aluminophosphate zeolite analogues by using ionic liquids and eutectic mixtures. An imidazolium-based ionic liquid acts as both solvent and template, leading to four zeotype frameworks under different experimental conditions. The structural characteristics of the materials can be traced back to the solvent chemistry used. Because of the vanishingly low vapour pressure of ionic liquids, synthesis takes place at ambient pressure, eliminating safety concerns associated with high hydrothermal pressures. The ionic liquid can also be recycled for further use. A choline chloride/urea eutectic mixture is also used in the preparation of a new zeotype framework. PMID:15329717

  3. Characterization of tiacumicin B biosynthetic gene cluster affording diversified tiacumicin analogues and revealing a tailoring dihalogenase.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Li, Sumei; Niu, Siwen; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Gaiyun; Ju, Jianhua; Zhang, Changsheng

    2011-02-01

    The RNA polymerase inhibitor tiacumicin B is currently undergoing phase III clinical trial for treatment of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea with great promise. To understand the biosynthetic logic and to lay a foundation for generating structural analogues via pathway engineering, the tiacumicin B biosynthetic gene cluster was identified and characterized from the producer Dactylosporangium aurantiacum subsp. hamdenensis NRRL 18085. Sequence analysis of a 110,633 bp DNA region revealed the presence of 50 open reading frames (orfs). Functional investigations of 11 orfs by in vivo inactivation experiments, preliminarily outlined the boundaries of the tia-gene cluster and suggested that 31 orfs were putatively involved in tiacumicin B biosynthesis. Functions of a halogenase (TiaM), two glycosyltransferases (TiaG1 and TiaG2), a sugar C-methyltransferase (TiaS2), an acyltransferase (TiaS6), and two cytochrome P450s (TiaP1 and TiaP2) were elucidated by isolation and structural characterization of the metabolites from the corresponding gene-inactivation mutants. Accumulation of 18 tiacumicin B analogues from 7 mutants not only provided experimental evidence to confirm the proposed functions of individual biosynthetic enzymes, but also set an example of accessing microbial natural product diversity via genetic approach. More importantly, biochemical characterization of the FAD-dependent halogenase TiaM reveals a sequentially acting dihalogenation step tailoring tiacumicin B biosynthesis.

  4. Positron emission tomography evaluation of somatostatin receptor targeted 64Cu-TATE-liposomes in a human neuroendocrine carcinoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Anncatrine L; Binderup, Tina; Jølck, Rasmus I; Rasmussen, Palle; Henriksen, Jonas R; Pfeifer, Andreas K; Kjær, Andreas; Andresen, Thomas L

    2012-06-10

    Targeted therapeutic and diagnostic nanocarriers functionalized with antibodies, peptides or other targeting ligands that recognize over-expressed receptors or antigens on tumor cells have potential in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are over-expressed in a variety of cancers, particularly neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and can be targeted with somatostatin peptide analogs such as octreotate (TATE). In the present study we investigate liposomes that target SSTR in a NET xenograft mouse model (NCI-H727) by use of TATE. TATE was covalently attached to the distal end of DSPE-PEG(2000) on PEGylated liposomes with an encapsulated positron emitter (64)Cu that can be utilized for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the (64)Cu-loaded PEGylated liposomes with and without TATE was investigated and their ability to image NETs was evaluated using PET. Additionally, the liposome accumulation and imaging capability was compared with free radiolabelled TATE peptide administered as (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE. The presence of TATE on the liposomes resulted in a significantly faster initial blood clearance in comparison to control-liposomes without TATE. PEGylated liposomes with or without TATE accumulated at significantly higher quantities in NETs (5.1±0.3 and 5.8±0.2 %ID/g, respectively) than the free peptide (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE (1.4±0.3 %ID/g) 24 h post-injection. Importantly, (64)Cu-loaded PEGylated liposomes with TATE showed significantly higher tumor-to-muscle (T/M) ratio (12.7±1.0) than the control-liposomes without TATE (8.9±0.9) and the (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE free peptide (7.2±0.3). The higher T/M ratio of the PEGylated liposomes with TATE suggests some advantage of active targeting of NETs, although no absolute benefit in tumor accumulation over the non-targeted liposomes was observed. Collectively, these data showed that (64)Cu-loaded PEGylated liposomes with TATE conjugated to the surface could be

  5. Analogue modelling of syntectonic leucosomes in migmatitic schists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Carreras, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Migmatites from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt display a wide variety of structures, from those formed when the leucosomes were melt-bearing, to those developed during solid-state deformation. The observed field structures have been modelled by means of analogue experiments. The materials used in the models are layered plasticine as a schist analogue, and chocolate as analogue of the crystallizing leucosome. A model for the development of syntectonic migmatites is proposed in which initial melt-bearing patches, preferentially formed within fertile pelitic layers, progressively evolve towards lens-shaped veins. Furthermore, heterogeneous deformation of anisotropic metasediments facilitates formation of extensional sites for further melt accumulation and transport. Melt crystallization implies a rapid increase in effective viscosity of leucosomes producing a reversal in competence contrast with respect to the enclosing schists. During the whole process, deformation localizes around crystallizing veins, giving rise to different and contrasting structures for melt-bearing and for solid-state stages.

  6. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Carbocyclic Analogues of Pachastrissamine

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yongseok; Song, Jayoung; Bae, Hoon; Kim, Woo-Jung; Lee, Joo-Youn; Han, Geun-Hee; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Sanghee

    2015-01-01

    A series of carbocyclic analogues of naturally-occurring marine sphingolipid pachastrissamine were prepared and biologically evaluated. The analogues were efficiently synthesized via a tandem enyne/diene-ene metathesis reaction as a key step. We found that the analogue 4b exhibited comparable cytotoxicity and more potent inhibitory activity against sphingosine kinases, compared to pachastrissamine. Molecular modeling studies were conducted to provide more detailed insight into the binding mode of 4b in sphingosine kinase. In our docking model, pachastrissamine and 4b were able to effectively bind to the binding pocket of sphingosine kinase 1 as co-crystalized sphingosine. However, 4b showed a hydrophobic interaction with Phe192, which suggests that it contributes to its increased inhibitory activity against sphingosine kinase 1. PMID:25654428

  7. Migrastatin analogues target fascin to block tumour metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Jakoncic, J.; Yang, S.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.Y.

    2010-04-15

    Tumour metastasis is the primary cause of death of cancer patients. Development of new therapeutics preventing tumour metastasis is urgently needed. Migrastatin is a natural product secreted by Streptomyces, and synthesized migrastatin analogues such as macroketone are potent inhibitors of metastatic tumour cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here we show that these migrastatin analogues target the actin-bundling protein fascin to inhibit its activity. X-ray crystal structural studies reveal that migrastatin analogues bind to one of the actin-binding sites on fascin. Our data demonstrate that actin cytoskeletal proteins such as fascin can be explored as new molecular targets for cancer treatment, in a similar manner to the microtubule protein tubulin.

  8. Synthesis and cytotoxic activities of semisynthetic zearalenone analogues.

    PubMed

    Tadpetch, Kwanruthai; Kaewmee, Benyapa; Chantakaew, Kittisak; Kantee, Kawalee; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Phongpaichit, Souwalak

    2016-08-01

    Zearalenone is a β-resorcylic acid macrolide with various biological activities. Herein we report the synthesis and cytotoxic activities of 34 zearalenone analogues against human oral epidermoid carcinoma (KB) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells as well as noncancerous Vero cells. Some zearalenone analogues showed moderately enhanced cytotoxic activities against the two cancer cell lines. We have discovered the potential lead compounds with diminished or no cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Preliminary structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the double bond at the 1' and 2' positions of zearalenone core was crucial for cytotoxic activities on both cell lines. In addition, for zearalenol analogues, the unprotected hydroxyl group at C-2 and an alkoxy substituent at C-4 played key roles on cytotoxic effects of both cell lines.

  9. Conception, synthesis, and biological evaluation of original discodermolide analogues.

    PubMed

    de Lemos, Elsa; Agouridas, Evangelos; Sorin, Geoffroy; Guerreiro, Antonio; Commerçon, Alain; Pancrazi, Ange; Betzer, Jean-François; Lannou, Marie-Isabelle; Ardisson, Janick

    2011-08-29

    Due to its intriguing biological activity profile and potential chemotherapeutic application discodermolide (DDM) proved to be an attractive target. Therefore, notable efforts have been carried out directed toward its total synthesis and toward the production and evaluation of synthetic analogues. Recently, we achieved the total synthesis of DDM. At the present, guided by the knowledge gained during our DDM total synthesis and by the requirement of keeping the bioactive "U" shape conformation, we report the convergent preparation of five original analogues. Three types of changes were realized through modification of the terminal (Z)-diene moiety, of the methyl group at the C14-position, and the lactone region. All analogues were active in the nanomolar range and two of them turned out to be equipotent to DDM.

  10. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New (-)-Englerin Analogues.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, Laura; Riesgo, Lorena; Bravo, Fernando; Ransom, Tanya T; Beutler, John A; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2016-05-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of (-)-englerin A analogues obtained along our previously reported synthetic route based on a stereoselective gold(I) cycloaddition process. This synthetic route is a convenient platform to access analogues with broad structural diversity and has led us to the discovery of unprecedented and easier-to-synthesize derivatives with an unsaturation in the cyclopentyl ring between C4 and C5. We also introduce novel analogues in which the original isopropyl motif has been substituted with cyclohexyl, phenyl, and cyclopropyl moieties. The high selectivity and growth-inhibitory activity shown by these new derivatives in renal cancer cell lines opens new ways toward the final goal of finding effective drugs for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

  11. Non-natural acetogenin analogues as potent Trypanosoma brucei inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Florence, Gordon J; Fraser, Andrew L; Gould, Eoin R; King, Elizabeth F B; Menzies, Stefanie K; Morris, Joanne C; Tulloch, Lindsay B; Smith, Terry K

    2014-11-01

    Neglected tropical diseases remain a serious global health concern. Here, a series of novel bis-tetrahydropyran 1,4-triazole analogues based on the framework of chamuvarinin, a polyketide natural product isolated from the annonaceae plant species are detailed. The analogues synthesized display low micromolar trypanocidal activities towards both bloodstream and insect forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, also known as Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT). A divergent synthetic strategy was adopted for the synthesis of the key tetrahydropyran intermediates to enable rapid access to diastereochemical variation either side of the 1,4-triazole core. The resulting diastereomeric analogues displayed varying degrees of trypanocidal activity and selectivity in structure-activity relationship studies. Together, the biological potency and calculated lipophilicity values indicate that while there is room for improvement, these derivatives may represent a promising novel class of anti-HAT agents.

  12. Comparison of the inhibitory action of synthetic capsaicin analogues with various NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Miyoshi, H; Sakamoto, K; Iwamura, H

    1996-01-11

    Capsaicin is a new naturally occurring inhibitor of proton-pumping NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1), that competitively acts against ubiquinone. A series of capsaicin analogues was synthesized to examine the structural factors required for the inhibitory action and to probe the structural property of the ubiquinone catalytic site of various NADH-ubiquinone reductases, including non-proton-pumping enzyme (NDH-2), from bovine heart mitochondria, potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum, L) mitochondria and Escherichia coli (GR 19N) plasma membranes. Some synthetic capsaicins were fairly potent inhibitors of each of the three NDH-1 compared with the potent rotenone and piericidin A. Synthetic capsaicin analogues inhibited all three NDH-1 activities in a competitive manner against an exogenous quinone. The modification both of the substitution pattern and of the number of methoxy groups on the benzene ring, which may be superimposable on the quinone ring of ubiquinone, did not drastically affect the inhibitory potency. In addition, alteration of the position of dipolar amide bond unit in the molecule and chemical modifications of this unit did not change the inhibitory potency, particularly with bovine heart and potato tuber NDH-1. These results might be explained assuming that the ubiquinone catalytic site of NDH-1 is spacious enough to accommodate a variety of structurally different capsaicin analogues in a dissimilar manner. Regarding the moiety corresponding to the alkyl side chain, a rigid diphenyl ether structure was more inhibitory than a flexible alkyl chain. Structure-activity studies and molecular orbital calculations suggested that a bent form is the active conformation of capsaicin analogues. On the other hand, poor correlations between the inhibitory potencies determined with the three NDH-1 suggested that the structural similarity of the ubiquinone catalytic sites of these enzymes is rather poor. The sensitivity to the inhibition by synthetic capsaicins

  13. The Object-analogue approach for probabilistic forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frediani, M. E.; Hopson, T. M.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hacker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The object-analogue is a new method to estimate forecast uncertainty and to derive probabilistic predictions of gridded forecast fields over larger regions rather than point locations. The method has been developed for improving the forecast of 10-meter wind speed over the northeast US, and it can be extended to other forecast variables, vertical levels, and other regions. The object-analogue approach combines the analog post-processing technique (Hopson 2005; Hamill 2006; Delle Monache 2011) with the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) for forecast verification (Davis et al 2006a, b). Originally, MODE is used to verify mainly precipitation forecasts using features of a forecast region represented by an object. The analog technique is used to reduce the NWP systematic and random errors of a gridded forecast field. In this study we use MODE-derived objects to characterize the wind fields forecasts into attributes such as object area, centroid location, and intensity percentiles, and apply the analogue concept to these objects. The object-analogue method uses a database of objects derived from reforecasts and their respective reanalysis. Given a real-time forecast field, it searches the database and selects the top-ranked objects with the most similar set of attributes using the MODE fuzzy logic algorithm for object matching. The attribute probabilities obtained with the set of selected object-analogues are used to derive a multi-layer probabilistic prediction. The attribute probabilities are combined into three uncertainty layers that address the main concerns of most applications: location, area, and magnitude. The multi-layer uncertainty can be weighted and combined or used independently in such that it provides a more accurate prediction, adjusted according to the application interest. In this study we present preliminary results of the object-analogue method. Using a database with one hundred storms we perform a leave-one-out cross-validation to

  14. Amido analogues of zincocenes and cadmocenes.

    PubMed

    Blake, Alexander J; Lewis, William; McMaster, Jonathan; Moorhouse, Rhiannon S; Moxey, Graeme J; Kays, Deborah L

    2011-02-28

    The synthesis and characterisation of low-coordinate zinc and cadmium complexes of the sterically demanding 1,3,6,8-tetra-tert-butylcarbazol-9-yl ligand ((t)Bu(4)carb(-)) are reported. ((t)Bu(4)carb)(2)M (M = Zn 1; M = Cd 2) are the first examples of formally two-coordinate bis-carbazol-9-yl complexes of the Group 12 metals and 2 is the first crystallographically characterised two-coordinate amido complex of cadmium. The structure and bonding within these complexes are explored via a combination of X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations. The solid state structures for these zinc and cadmium complexes differ greatly from each other; not only do the steric demands of the peripheral tert-butyl substituents in these systems act to inhibit solvent coordination, but they also influence the coordination geometry around the metal centres. PMID:21249248

  15. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  16. Five new discodermolide analogues from the marine sponge Discodermia species.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Sarath P; Paul, Gopal K; Longley, Ross E; Isbrucker, Richard A; Pomponi, Shirley A

    2002-11-01

    Discodermolide (1) and five new discodermolide analogues trivially named 2-epi-discodermolide (2), 2-des-methyldiscodermolide (3), 5-hydroxymethyldiscodermolate (4), 19-des-aminocarbonyldiscodermolide (5), and 9(13)-cyclodiscod