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Sample records for acting somatostatin analogue

  1. Short- and long-term effect of a long-acting somatostatin analogue, lanreotide (SR-L) on metastatic gastrinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaztambide, S; Vazquez, J A

    1999-02-01

    Medical treatment is the elective therapy for patients with gastrinoma when the tumor is not found at surgery or is unresectable or when there is a metastatic disease. H2-blockers and omeprazol are able to control gastric acid secretion and, in addition, somatostatin analogues decrease gastrin levels. A new long-acting and slow release formulation of a somatostatin analogue (lanreotide, SR-L) has been developed. We treated two patients suffering from gastrinoma, total gastrectomy and hepatic metastases with 30 mg intramuscular injections of SR-L every 15 and 10 days, respectively, for a seven-month period. After the treatment, gastrin levels decreased from 35,494 and 15,086 ng/l to 3,211 and 167 ng/l (92 and 98% below pre-treatment levels) in case 1 and 2 respectively, with a relief of symptoms and no side effects. PMID:10195383

  2. Long-acting somatostatin analogues provide significant beneficial effect in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia: Results from a proof of concept open label mono-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Barry; Breslin, Niall; McNamara, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel angiodysplasias account for over 50% of causes of small bowel bleeding and carry a worse prognosis than lesions located elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Re-bleeding rates are high even after first-line endoscopic therapy and are associated with high levels of morbidity for affected patients. Small trials of long-acting somatostatin analogues have shown promising results but have not yet been assessed in patients with refractory small bowel disease. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of long-acting somatostatin analogues in reducing re-bleeding rates and transfusion requirements, and improving haemoglobin levels in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia. Methods Patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia were treated with 20 mg of long-acting octreotide for a minimum of three months. Response was assessed according to: rates of re-bleeding, haemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, and side effects. Results A total of 24 patients were initially treated and 20 received at least three doses. Rates of complete, partial and non-response were 70%, 20% and 10% respectively. Average haemoglobin rates increased from 9.19 g/dl to 11.35 g/dl (p = 0.0027, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3.5 to −1.1) in the group overall and 70% remained transfusion-free after a mean treatment duration of 8.8 months. The rate of adverse events was higher than previously reported at 30%. Conclusion Long-acting somatostatin analogues offer a therapeutic advantage in a significant proportion of patients with small bowel angiodysplasia. With careful patient selection and close observation, a long-acting somatostatin analogue should be considered in all patients with persistent anaemia attributable to refractory disease in conjunction with other standard treatments. PMID:26966525

  3. Somatostatin and analogues in the treatment of cancer. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Parekh, D; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Somatostatin is a naturally occurring cyclic tetradecapeptide that inhibits release of growth hormone and all gastrointestinal hormones. The beneficial effect of somatostatin in the treatment of certain hypersecretory disorders of hormone excess in well recognized; however its clinical usefulness has been limited in the past by its extremely short plasma half-life. The development of long-acting somatostatin analogues has provided clinically useful agents for treatment of hormone-producing tumors. In addition to well-known inhibiting effects on hormone release and actions, recent studies using experimental tumor models have demonstrated an antiproliferative effect of somatostatin and its analogues on growth of a variety of neoplasms. The exact role of somatostatin analogues in cancer therapy has yet to be established; however studies suggest that these agents could provide a useful and relatively nontoxic adjuvant therapy in the treatment of certain tumors. In this review, the oncologic application of somatostatin and possible mechanism of action are examined and current clinical and experimental studies are summarized. PMID:1671812

  4. Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogue Therapy Of Gastroenteropancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M; Krenning, Eric P

    2016-05-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been utilized for more than two decades and has been accepted as an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of inoperable or metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) or neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The two most commonly used radiopeptides for PRRT, (90)Y-octreotide and (177)Lu-octreotate, produce disease-control rates of 68%-94%, with progression-free survival rates that compare favorably with chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, and newer targeted therapies. In addition, biochemical and symptomatic responses are commonly observed. In general, PRRT is well tolerated with only low to moderate toxicity in most individuals. In line with the need to place PRRT in the therapeutic sequence of gastroenteropancreatic NENs, a recently sponsored phase III randomized trial in small intestine NENs treated with (177)Lu-octreotate vs high-dose octreotide long-acting release demonstrated that (177)Lu-octreotate significantly improved progression-free survival. Other strategies that are presently being developed include combinations with targeted therapies or chemotherapy, intra-arterial PRRT, and salvage treatments. Sophisticated molecular tools need to be incorporated into the management strategy to more effectively define therapeutic efficacy and for an early identification of adverse events. The strategy of randomized controlled trials is a key issue to standardize the treatment and establish the position of PRRT in the therapeutic algorithm of NENs. PMID:27067503

  5. Phase III study of pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Edward M; Jarzab, Barbara; Eriksson, Barbro; Walter, Thomas; Toumpanakis, Christos; Morse, Michael A; Tomassetti, Paola; Weber, Matthias M; Fogelman, David R; Ramage, John; Poon, Donald; Gadbaw, Brian; Li, Jiang; Pasieka, Janice L; Mahamat, Abakar; Swahn, Fredrik; Newell-Price, John; Mansoor, Wasat; Öberg, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, we compared pasireotide long-acting release (pasireotide LAR) with octreotide long-acting repeatable (octreotide LAR) in managing carcinoid symptoms refractory to first-generation somatostatin analogues. Adults with carcinoid tumors of the digestive tract were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive pasireotide LAR (60 mg) or octreotide LAR (40 mg) every 28 days. Primary outcome was symptom control based on frequency of bowel movements and flushing episodes. Objective tumor response was a secondary outcome. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated in a post hoc analysis. Adverse events were recorded. At the time of a planned interim analysis, the data monitoring committee recommended halting the study because of a low predictive probability of showing superiority of pasireotide over octreotide for symptom control (n=43 pasireotide LAR, 20.9%; n=45 octreotide LAR, 26.7%; odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–1.97; P=0.53). Tumor control rate at month 6 was 62.7% with pasireotide and 46.2% with octreotide (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.89–4.32; P=0.09). Median (95% CI) PFS was 11.8 months (11.0 – not reached) with pasireotide versus 6.8 months (5.6 – not reached) with octreotide (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.20–0.98; P=0.045). The most frequent drug-related adverse events (pasireotide vs octreotide) included hyperglycemia (28.3% vs 5.3%), fatigue (11.3% vs 3.5%), and nausea (9.4% vs 0%). We conclude that, among patients with carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues, similar proportions of patients receiving pasireotide LAR or octreotide LAR achieved symptom control at month 6. Pasireotide LAR showed a trend toward higher tumor control rate at month 6, although it was statistically not significant, and was associated with a longer PFS than octreotide LAR. PMID:26366058

  6. Somatostatin Analogues for Receptor Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Hofland, Leo J.; De Bruijn, Henriette S.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; van der Wansem, Katy; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; van Koetsveld, Peter M.; Brugts, Michael P.; van der Lelij, Aart-Jan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.; van Hagen, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality, used mainly for anticancer therapy that relies on the interaction of photosensitizer, light and oxygen. For the treatment of pathologies in certain anatomical sites, improved targeting of the photosensitizer is necessary to prevent damage to healthy tissue. We report on a novel dual approach of targeted PDT (vascular and cellular targeting) utilizing the expression of neuropeptide somatostatin receptor (sst2) on tumor and neovascular-endothelial cells. We synthesized two conjugates containing the somatostatin analogue [Tyr3]-octreotate and Chlorin e6 (Ce6): Ce6-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (1) and Ce6-[Tyr3]-octreotate-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (2). Investigation of the uptake and photodynamic activity of conjugates in-vitro in human erythroleukemic K562 cells showed that conjugation of [Tyr3]-octreotate with Ce6 in conjugate 1 enhances uptake (by a factor 2) in cells over-expressing sst2 compared to wild-type cells. Co-treatment with excess free Octreotide abrogated the phototoxicity of conjugate 1 indicative of a specific sst2-mediated effect. In contrast conjugate 2 showed no receptor-mediated effect due to its high hydrophobicity. When compared with un-conjugated Ce6, the PDT activity of conjugate 1 was lower. However, it showed higher photostability which may compensate for its lower phototoxicity. Intra-vital fluorescence pharmacokinetic studies of conjugate 1 in rat skin-fold observation chambers transplanted with sst2+ AR42J acinar pancreas tumors showed significantly different uptake profiles compared to free Ce6. Co-treatment with free Octreotide significantly reduced conjugate uptake in tumor tissue (by a factor 4) as well as in the chamber neo-vasculature. These results show that conjugate 1 might have potential as an in-vivo sst2 targeting photosensitizer conjugate. PMID:25111655

  7. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  8. Combined treatment of somatostatin analogues with pegvisomant in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Franck, S E; Muhammad, A; van der Lely, A J; Neggers, S J C M M

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of acromegaly with monotherapy long-acting somatostatin analogues (LA-SSA) as primary treatment or after neurosurgery can only achieve complete normalization of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in roughly 40 % of patients. Recently, one of the acromegaly consensus groups has recommended switching to combined treatment of LA-SSA and pegvisomant (PEGV) in patients with partial response to LA-SSAs. This combination of LA-SSA and PEGV, a growth hormone receptor antagonist, can normalize IGF-I levels in virtually all patients, requiring that the adequate dose of PEGV is used. The required PEGV dose varies significantly between individual acromegaly patients. One of the advantages of the combination therapy is that tumor size control or even tumor shrinkage can be observed in a vast majority of patients. The main side effects of the combination treatment are gastrointestinal symptoms, lipohypertrophy and transient elevated liver transaminases. In this review we provide an overview of the efficacy and safety of the combined treatment of LA-SSAs with PEGV. PMID:26661938

  9. Tumor imaging and therapy using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marion; Breeman, Wout A P; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P

    2009-07-21

    Molecular imaging plays an essential role in balancing the clinical benefits and risks of radionuclide-based cancer therapy. To effectively treat individual patients, careful assessment of biodistribution, dosimetry, and toxicity is essential. In this Account, we describe advances that combine features of molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy to provide new avenues toward individualized cancer treatment. Selective receptor-targeting radiopeptides have emerged as an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy of tumors that overexpress peptide receptors on the cell membrane. After such peptides labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides bind to their receptors, they allow clinicians to visualize receptor-expressing tumors non-invasively. Peptides labeled with beta-particle emitters could also eradicate receptor-expressing tumors. The somatostatin receptors, which are overexpressed in a majority of neuroendocrine tumors, represent the first and best example of targets for radiopeptide-based imaging and radionuclide therapy. The somatostatin analogue (111)In-octreotide permits the localization and staging of neuroendocrine tumors that express the appropriate somatostatin receptors. Newer modified somatostatin analogues, including Tyr(3)-octreotide and Tyr(3)-octreotate, are successfully being used for tumor imaging and radionuclide therapy. Because there are few effective therapies for patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumors, this therapy is a promising novel treatment option for these patients. Peptide receptor imaging and radionuclide therapy can be combined in a single probe, called a "theranostic". To select patients who are likely to benefit from this type of intervention, we first use a peptide analogue labeled with a diagnostic radionuclide to obtain a scan. Selected patients will be treated using the same or a similar peptide analogue labeled with a therapeutic radionuclide. The development of such

  10. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) of Medullary and Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer Using Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Salavati, Ali; Puranik, Ameya; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Budiawan, Hendra; Baum, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    As therapeutic options in advanced medullary and non-iodine avid differentiated (nonmedullary) thyroid cancers are limited and associated with significant toxicity, targeting of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) for internal radiation therapy provides a promising option. Theranostics (therapy and diagnosis) using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues has proved to be a milestone in the management of SSTR-expressing tumors. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using (177)Lu-labeled or (90)Y-labeled somatostatin analogues may have a significant role in the management of medullary and nonmedullary thyroid cancers in those patients where PET/CT with (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues demonstrates significant SSTR expression. PMID:27067502

  11. Reversible lipidization of somatostatin analogues for the liver targeting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liyun; Wang, Jeff; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2008-10-01

    Tyr(3)-octreotide (TOC), a somatostatin analogue, is reversibly lipidized for passive delivery to the liver with the aim of increasing its association with hepatocytes. The reversibly lipidized TOC (REAL-TOC) was formed by the conjugation of the N-palmitoyl cysteinyl moiety to the cysteinyl residues of reduced TOC through disulfide linkages and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF) analysis. The measured mass of REAL-TOC (M+H)(+) is 1752.31 Da (calculated mass: 1752.78), confirming that two molecules of N-palmitoyl cysteines are linked to TOC via disulfide bonds. TOC and REAL-TOC were radioiodinated and administered to mice. Their biodistribution and intrahepatic distribution were subsequently investigated. The area under the curve (AUC) of (125)I-REAL-TOC in the liver was 3.8-fold greater than that of (125)I-TOC, with 20.5% and 5.8% of the injected dose (ID)/g of (125)I-REAL-TOC remaining in the liver at 2 and 24h post injection, respectively. Within the liver, TOC was primarily distributed to parenchymal cells (PC). Nevertheless, TOC was quickly excreted out and only 2.4% ID per 100mg protein remained in the PC at 2h post injection. (125)I-REAL-TOC was retained in PC for up to 2h with a constant concentration of around 6% ID/100mg protein. (125)I-REAL-TOC was also highly associated with nonparenchymal cells (NPC) at significantly higher levels than (125)I-TOC at 10min, 1h and 2h post injection. Since somatostatin analogues have been evaluated for treating late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the reversibly lipidized conjugates may possess enhanced therapeutic efficacy due to the liver-targeting effect. PMID:18614343

  12. Stability studies of a somatostatin analogue in biodegradable implants.

    PubMed

    Rothen-Weinhold, A; Besseghir, K; Vuaridel, E; Sublet, E; Oudry, N; Gurny, R

    1999-02-15

    In recent years, peptides and proteins have received much attention as drug candidates. For many polypeptides, particularly hormones, it is desirable to release the drug continuously at a controlled rate over a period of weeks or even months, and thus a controlled release system is needed. Polylactic acid (PLA) is a biocompatible and biodegradable material with wide utility for many applications, including the design of controlled release systems for pharmaceutical agents. Pharmaceutical development of these delivery systems presents new problems in the area of stability assessment, especially for peptide drugs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different steps, during the manufacturing of an implant, on peptide stability in the polymeric matrix. Polylactic acid implants containing vapreotide, a somatostatin analogue, were prepared by extrusion. The effects of time, extrusion and temperature on the peptide stability were studied. The influence of various gamma sterilization doses, as well as the conditions under which the implants were irradiated, were also investigated. Peptide stability in the polymeric matrix was evaluated at various temperatures and at various time intervals up to 9 months. PMID:10205641

  13. Evaluation of somatostatin analogues for the detection and treatment of gastrinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Altschul, M; Simpson, K W; Dykes, N L; Mauldin, E A; Reubi, J C; Cummings, J F

    1997-07-01

    Gastrinomas in dogs are difficult to diagnose, localise and treat. In humans, somatostatin analogues have improved localisation and treatment of gastrinomas. The somatostatin analogues pentetreotide and octreotide were evaluated for the detection and treatment of gastrinoma in a dog. 111indium-pentetreotide scintigraphy revealed multiple areas of activity in the patient's mid-ventral abdomen which were consistent with masses in the pancreas and liver at laparotomy. Immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and binding of 125I-[Tyr3]-octreotide in vitro confirmed the lesion as a gastrinoma which expressed somatostatin receptors. Octreotide at doses of 2, 4 and 8 micrograms/kg caused transient decreases in circulating gastrin. Plasma somatostatin peaked at one hour after octreotide and was still detectable at four and six hours after administration of octreotide. Combination therapy with famotidine, omeprazole, sucralfate and increasing doses of octreotide allowed patient survival for 14 months. PMID:9239629

  14. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  15. In vivo use of a radioiodinated somatostatin analogue: dynamics, metabolism, and binding to somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in man

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Breeman, W.A.; Kooij, P.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Koper, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Lameris, J.S.; Visser, T.J.; Lamberts, S.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues, labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides, are of potential value in the localization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors with gamma camera imaging. We investigated the application in man of a radioiodinated analogue of somatostatin, 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide, which has similar biologic characteristics as the native peptide. The radiopharmaceutical is cleared rapidly from the circulation (up to 85% of the dose after 10 min) mainly by the liver. Liver radioactivity is rapidly excreted into the biliary system. Until 3 hr after injection, radioactivity in the circulation is mainly in the form of 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide. Thereafter, plasma samples contain increasing proportions of free iodide. Similarly, during the first hours after injection, radioactivity in the urine exists mainly in the form of the unchanged peptide. Thereafter, a progressive increase in radioiodide excretion is observed, indicating degradation of the radiopharmaceutical in vivo. Fecal excretion of radioactivity amounts to only a few percent of the dose. The calculated median effective dose equivalent is comparable with values for applications of other 123I-radiopharmaceuticals (0.019 mSv/MBq).

  16. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Nicolas, Guillaume; Forrer, Flavio

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors with variable malignant behavior. The majority of NETs express increased levels of somatostatin (SST) receptors, particularly SST2 receptors. Radiolabeled peptides specific for the SST2 receptors may be used for diagnosis of NETs and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). [(111)In-DTPA(0)]-octreotide has been the first peptide used for PRRT. This radiolabeled peptide, emitting Auger electrons, often induced symptomatic relief, but objective morphological responses were rarely documented. After the introduction of the chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) other peptides, primarily [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) and [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC) were labeled with (90)Y or (177)Lu and used for therapy applications. The rate of objective response obtained with these radiolabeled peptides ranges between 6% and 46%, owing to differences in inclusion criteria adopted in different studies, length and type of therapy, and criteria of evaluation of the response. The present data in the literature do not allow defining the most suitable peptide and radionuclide for the treatment of NETs. Instead emerging evidence indicates that a combination of nuclides with different physical characteristics might be more effective than the use of a single nuclide. Kidney and bone marrow toxicity are the limiting factors for PRRT. Mild toxicity is often encountered while severe toxicity is rarer. Toxicity could be reduced and therapeutic efficacy enhanced by patient-specific dosimetry. Future directions include different issues of PRRT, such as defining the most suitable treatment scheme, evaluation of new peptides with different affinity profiles to other SST receptor subtypes, and reduction of toxicity. PMID:22292758

  17. Technetium-99m somatostatin analogues: effect of labelling methods and peptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Decristoforo, C; Mather, S J

    1999-08-01

    In this paper the preclinical evaluation of the somatostatin analogue RC160 labelled with technetium-99m using bifunctional chelators (BFCs) based on the hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) and N(3)S system is described and a comparison made with [Tyr(3)]-octreotide (TOC). Conjugates of both peptides with HYNIC, and of RC160 with benzoyl-MAG(3) and an N(3)S-adipate derivative were prepared and radiolabelling performed at high specific activities using tricine, tricine/nicotinic acid and ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) as co-ligands for HYNIC conjugates. All conjugates and (99m)Tc-labelled peptides showed preserved binding affinity for the somatostatin receptor (IC50, Kd<5 nM). The biodistribution was markedly dependent on the BFC and co-ligand used, with the amidothiol ligands showing a greater degree of hepatobiliary clearance, the HYNIC/tricine complex higher blood levels and the HYNIC/EDDA complex the highest level of renal excretion and lowest blood levels. All peptide conjugates showed receptor-mediated uptake in tumour xenografts, but tumour uptake was significantly lower for the (99m)Tc-RC160 derivatives compared with (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Tyr(3)]-octreotide (0.2%-3.5%ID/g vs 9.7%ID/g) and correlated well with the reduced internalisation rate for RC160 derivatives. Our results show that the selection of the labelling approach as well as the right choice of the peptide structure are crucial for labelling peptides with (99m)Tc to achieve complexes with favourable biodistribution. Despite the relatively low tumour uptake compared with (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Tyr(3)]-octreotide, (99m)Tc-RC160 could play a role in imaging tumours that do not bind octreotide derivatives. PMID:10436200

  18. [Efficacy of somatostatin analogues in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours based on the results of recent clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Igaz, Péter

    2014-11-30

    Due to their inhibitory effects on hormone secretion, somatostatin analogues are of pivotal importance in the symptomatic treatment of hormone-secreting neuroendocrine tumours. Although several earlier clinical observations supported the view that these biological agents are capable of inhibiting the growth of neuroendocrine tumours, the PROMID study published in 2009 was the first to confirm the inhibitory effect of octreotide on tumour growth and demonstrated the prolongation of progression free survival. These findings have been confirmed and extended by the most recent CLARINET trial with lanreotide published in 2014. Somatostatin analogues are capable of inhibiting tumour growth and stabilizing disease irrespective of the hormonal activity of the tumour and, therefore, their applicability is expected to be extended to the treatment of hormonally inactive neuroendocrine tumours, as well. PMID:25417137

  19. PET and PET/CT with 68Gallium-Labeled Somatostatin Analogues in Non GEP-NETs Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Erba, Paola Anna; Fraternali, Alessandro; Casali, Massimiliano; Di Paolo, Maria Liberata; Froio, Armando; Frasoldati, Andrea; Versari, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) is a 28-amino-acid cyclic neuropeptide mainly secreted by neurons and endocrine cells. A major interest for SST receptors (SSTR) as target for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic purposes was born since a series of stable synthetic SST-analouges PET became available, being the native somatostatin non feasible for clinical use due to the very low metabolic stability. The rationale for the employment of SST-analogues to image cancer is both based on the expression of SSTR by tumor and on the high affinity of these compounds for SSTR. The primary indication of SST-analogues imaging is for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), which usually express a high density of SSTR, so they can be effectively targeted and visualized with radiolabeled SST-analogues in vivo. Particularly, SST-analogues imaging has been widely employed in gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) NETs. Nevertheless, a variety of tumors other than NETs expresses SSTR thus SST-analogues imaging can also be used in these tumors, particularly if treatment with radiolabeled therapeutic SST-analouges PET is being considered. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise overview of the role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-radiolabeled SST-analouges PET in tumors other than GEP-NETs. PMID:24693229

  20. Somatostatin analogue, octreotide, reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Serri, O.; Beauregard, H.; Brazeau, P.; Abribat, T.; Lambert, J.; Harris, A.; Vachon, L. Sandoz Canada Inc., Dorval, Quebec )

    1991-02-20

    To determine whether treatment with a somatostatin analogue can reduce kidney hyperfiltration and hypertrophy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the authors studied 11 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and glomerular hyperfiltration. The patients were assigned randomly to receive continuous subcutaneous infusion of either octreotide, 300 {mu}g/24 h (five patients) or placebo (six patients) for 12 weeks. At baseline, mean glomerular filtration rate and mean total kidney volume were not significantly different in the two groups. However, after 12 weeks of treatment, the mean glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, the mean total kidney volume was significantly lower after treatment in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Glycemic control did not change significantly in either group. They conclude that subcutaneous infusion of octreotide for 12 weeks reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus despite the fact that glycemic control remains unchanged.

  1. Methods to assess the biodistribution of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and treatment response of neuroendocrine tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    Introduction: During the past decade, proof of the principle that somatostatin receptors can be successfully used for in vivo targeting of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has been provided. These tumours are imaged with 111Indium-pentetreotide and treated with 90Yttrium labeled somatostatin analogues. The aim of this study was to assess (a) the biodistribution and residency of 90Y labelled agents using the brehmsstrahlung imaging technique (b) the tumour response to various treatment modalities using a simplified scintigraphic method [Functional SPECT tumour volume (STV)]. Material and methods: 1) 19 patients with NETs were imaged with 111In-pentetreotide and 14 of them underwent treatment with 90Y-lanreotide. The rest underwent treatment with 90Y-SMT. All the patients were imaged 24 hours post-therapy. Brehmsstrahlung images obtained post therapies were used to assess the 90Y-lanreotide biodistribution in 14 patients and the 5 patients treated with 90Y-SMT, comparing them with 111In-pentetreotide. 2) In 42 patients with NETs a retrospective analysis was performed of the 111In-pentetreotide imaging and CT scan in patients treated with different therapies. A simplified scintigraphic method using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT liver imaging was used to monitor changes in tumour response and to determine how this correlates with CT scan and clinical response. Results: 1) 90Y-lanreotide and 90Y-SMT (with amino acids) have much lower uptake in the kidney (p 0.000 and 0.041 respectively) than 111In-pentetreotide. G Gnanasegaran MD 2 2) 22/42 patients had a good clinical response. A mean fall in total functional STV of 37% was seen in patients with symptomatic relief and a mean increase of 72 % was seen in patients with no symptomatic relief STV predicted the clinical outcome in 34 patients (81%) and CT predicted the outcome in 21 (50%) patients. Conclusion: There was a difference in biodistribution between 111In-pentetreotide and 90Y-lanreotide/ 90Y-SMT, especially in the

  2. Octreotide, a Somatostatin Analogue, Fails to Inhibit Hypoxia-induced Retinal Neovascularization in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Averbukh, Edward; Halpert, Michael; Yanko, Ravit; Yanko, Lutza; Peèr, Jacob; Levinger, Samuel; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to prevent angiogenesis in diverse in vitro models. We evaluated its effect on retinal neovascularization in vivo, using a neonatal rat retinopathy model. Methods: We used, on alternating days, hypoxia (10% O2) and hyperoxia (50% O2) during the first 14 days of neonatal rats, to induce retinal neovascularization. Half of the rats were injected subcutaneously with octreotide 0.7 μg/g BW twice daily. At day 18 the eyes were evaluated for the presence of epiretinal and vitreal hemorrhage, neovascularization and epiretinal proliferation. Octreotide pharmacokinetics and its effect on serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were examined in 28 rats. Results: Serum octreotide levels were 667 μg/1 two hours after injection, 26.4 μg/1 after nine hours and 3.2 μg/1 after 14 hours. GH levels were decreased by 40% (p = 0.002) two hours after injection but thereafter returned to baseline. IGF-I levels were unchanged two hours after injection and were elevated by 26% 14 hours after injection (p = 0.02). Epiretinal membranes were highly associated with epiretinal hemorrhages (p < 0.001), while retinal neovascularization was notably associated with vitreal hemorrhages (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Twice-daily injections of octreotide failed to produce sustained decrease in serum GH, but produced rebound elevation of serum IGF-I. Accordingly, no statistically significant effect of injections on retinal pathology was noted. This finding, however, does not contradict our assumption that GH suppression may decrease the severity of retinopathy. PMID:11469389

  3. Somatostatin Analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life

    PubMed Central

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  4. Somatostatin analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥ 5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  5. De novo design, synthesis, and pharmacology of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone analogues derived from somatostatin by a hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Han, Guoxia; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Kendall, Laura; Bonner, Gregg; Hadley, Mac E; Cone, Roger D; Hruby, Victor J

    2004-03-11

    A number of alpha-melanotropin (alpha-MSH) analogues have been designed de novo, synthesized, and bioassayed at different melanocortin receptors from frog skin (fMC1R) and mouse/rat (mMC1R, rMC3R, mMC4R, and mMC5R). These ligands were designed from somatostatin by a hybrid approach, which utilizes a modified cyclic structure (H-d-Phe-c[Cys---Cys]-Thr-NH(2)) related to somatostatin analogues (e.g. sandostatin) acting at somatostatin receptors, CTAP which binds specifically to micro opioid receptors, and the core pharmacophore of alpha-MSH (His-Phe-Arg-Trp). Ligands designed were H-d-Phe-c[XXX-YYY-ZZZ-Arg-Trp-AAA]-Thr-NH(2) [XXX and AAA = Cys, d-Cys, Hcy, Pen, d-Pen; YYY = His, His(1'-Me), His(3'-Me); ZZZ = Phe and side chain halogen substituted Phe, d-Phe, d-Nal(1'), and d-Nal(2')]. The compounds showed a wide range of bioactivities at the frog skin MC1R; e.g. H-d-Phe-c[Hcy-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (6, EC(50) = 0.30 nM) and H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-d-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (8, EC(50) = 0.10 nM). In addition, when a lactam bridge was used as in H-d-Phe-c[Asp-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-Thr-NH(2) (7, EC(50) = 0.10 nM), the analogue obtained is as potent as alpha-MSH in the frog skin MC1R assay. Interestingly, switching the bridge of 6 to give H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Phe-Arg-Trp-Hcy]-Thr-NH(2) (5, EC(50) = 1000 nM) led to a 3000-fold decrease in agonist activity. An increase in steric size in the side chain of d-Phe(7) reduced the bioactivity significantly. For example, H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Nal(1')-Arg-Trp-d-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (24) is 2000-fold less active than 9. On the other hand, H-d-Phe-c[Cys-His-d-Phe(p-I)-Arg-Trp-d-Cys]-Thr-NH(2) (23) lost all agonist activity and became a weak antagonist (IC(50) = 1 x 10(-5) M). Furthermore, the modified CTAP analogues with a d-Trp at position 7 all showed weak antagonist activities (EC(50) = 10(-6) to 10(-7) M). Compounds bioassayed at mouse/rat MCRs displayed intriguing results. Most of them are potent at all four receptors tested (m

  6. Dopamine and Somatostatin Analogues Resistance of Pituitary Tumors: Focus on Cytoskeleton Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Giardino, Elena; Vitali, Eleonora; Lania, Andrea G.; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary tumors, that origin from excessive proliferation of a specific subtype of pituitary cell, are mostly benign tumors, but may cause significant morbidity in affected patients, including visual and neurologic manifestations from mass-effect, or endocrine syndromes caused by hormone hypersecretion. Dopamine (DA) receptor DRD2 and somatostatin (SS) receptors (SSTRs) represent the main targets of pharmacological treatment of pituitary tumors since they mediate inhibitory effects on both hormone secretion and cell proliferation, and their expression is retained by most of these tumors. Although long-acting DA and SS analogs are currently used in the treatment of prolactin (PRL)- and growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors, respectively, clinical practice indicates a great variability in the frequency and entity of favorable responses. The molecular basis of the pharmacological resistance are still poorly understood, and several potential molecular mechanisms have been proposed, including defective expression or genetic alterations of DRD2 and SSTRs, or an impaired signal transduction. Recently, a role for cytoskeleton protein filamin A (FLNA) in DRD2 and SSTRs receptors expression and signaling in PRL- and GH-secreting tumors, respectively, has been demonstrated, first revealing a link between FLNA expression and responsiveness of pituitary tumors to pharmacological therapy. This review provides an overview of the known molecular events involved in SS and DA resistance, focusing on the role played by FLNA. PMID:26733942

  7. Chylous ascites after radical nephrectomy and inferior vena cava thrombectomy. Successful conservative management with somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Ilan; Mor, Yoram; Golomb, Jacob; Ramon, Jacob

    2002-02-01

    Postoperative chylous ascites is a rare complication of retroperitoneal surgery. The treatment of postoperative chylous ascites is primarily conservative, consisting of repeated paraceteses, medium chain triglyceride (MCT) diet, salt restriction, diuretics and bowel rest with total parenteral nutrition. Occasionally, chylous ascites may take a protracted course which may necessitate insertion of peritoneo-venous shunts or direct surgical lymphostasis. Recently, Somatostatin was shown to be highly effective in closure of refractory lymphatic fistulas. We present a case of refractory chylous ascites following radical nephrectomy with inferior vena caval thrombectomy that failed to respond to conventional conservative measures and resolved rapidly following the administration of Somatostatin. PMID:12074412

  8. Effects of combination therapy: somatostatin analogues and dopamine agonists on GH and IGF1 levels in acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    VALEA, ANA; GHERVAN, CRISTINA; CARSOTE, MARA; MORAR, ANDRA; IACOB, IULIA; TOMESC, FLORICA; POP, DAN DUMITRU; GEORGESCU, CARMEN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Acromegaly is a complex endocrine disorder caused by excessive secretion of GH, secondary to a GH secreting pituitary adenoma or a mixed pituitary adenoma secreting GH and PRL. Methods The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of combination therapy: dopamine agonist and somatostatin analogue on GH and IGF1 levels in a group of 30 patients with acromegaly. Cabergoline in a dose of 2 mg/week and 4 mg/week respectively was associated with Sandostatin LAR in a dose of 20 mg/month and 30 mg/months respectively. Eight patients were treated with Lanreotide 30 mg/week and Cabergoline 2 mg/week and 3 patients were treated with Bromocriptine 10 mg/day and Sandostatin LAR 30 mg/month. Results Combination therapy: Cabergoline and Sandostatin achieved normal levels of IGF1 in 32% of the patients, better results being obtained after 12 months of treatment in the group treated with 4 mg Cabergoline/week. In 37% of cases the levels of IGF1 decreased by 50% after 12 months of treatment. In the group treated with Cabergoline and Somatuline a normal level of IGF1 was achieved in 25% of patients after 12 months of treatment. The outcome for the group treated with Sandostatin and Bromocriptine was similar to that obtained under Cabergoline 2 mg/week. There was no significant correlation between the level of GH and the type or dose of dopamine agonist used. Conclusions In conclusion, combination therapy consisting of dopamine agonist and somatostatin analogue achieves a significant reduction of IGF1 levels in patients with mixed adenomas secreting GH and PRL. A decrease in IGF1 levels is directly correlated with the dose of Cabergoline used. PMID:26609262

  9. Role of somatostatin analogue-based therapy in unresponsive malignant thymomas.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, G; Lastoria, S; Montella, L; Martignetti, A; Lombardi, G; Salvatore, M; Bianco, A R

    1999-10-01

    Thymomas are rare neoplasms that are usually associated with parathymic syndromes, pure red cell aplasia, myasthenia gravis, hypogammaglobulinaemia and other mainly immunological disorders. Therefore, the management of thymoma patients is often complex and presents many diagnostic and therapeutic issues. Controversies concerning the definition of the histological subtypes and the role played by thymoma-associated syndromes are of primary importance in determining the oncological approach. Although low-stage thymomas have a high percentage of recovery, thymomas which are locally advanced, metastatic or previously treated with standard therapeutic options have no well-defined and effective treatment approaches. The data previously described by us on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy showing high uptake of indium-labelled octreotide by thymic masses and the successful treatment of a patient with thymoma and pure red cell aplasia with octreotide and prednisone has provided us the rationale for using such treatment in patients with advanced thymoma. PMID:10574161

  10. Somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 5 are associated with better survival in operable hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma following octreotide long-acting release treatment

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YAO; JIANG, LI; MU, YI

    2013-01-01

    Liver resections for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic livers are associated with early recurrence and poor survival. Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have been reported to inhibit cell proliferation by interacting with specific somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) 2 and 5. The present study investigated whether SSTR expression in HCC was associated with the clinical outcome following octreotide long-acting release (LAR) treatment. Paired tumor and cirrhotic liver samples were obtained following a liver resection from 99 patients with stage I–II HCC and HBV-related cirrhosis. The expression of SSTR2 and 5 was assessed using quantitative (q)PCR and immunohistochemistry. The patients were classified into two groups, the high expression (n=47) and low expression (n=52) groups, based on the gene expression levels. The clinicopathological data and survival results of the two groups were compared. When compared with the surrounding cirrhotic tissue, the SSTR2 and 5 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in the HCC tissue. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the baseline characteristics. The tumor recurrence rate was significantly lower in the high expression group compared with that of the low expression group (63.83% vs. 82.69%; P=0.033). The 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates of the high expression group were 97, 89 and 71% and 98, 89 and 74%, respectively. The survival time of the members of the high expression group was longer compared with that of the low expression group. The multivariate analysis revealed that the TNM-7 stage and SSTR2 expression were independent prognostic factors for survival. In conclusion, SSTR mRNA expression correlated with survival in patients with early-stage hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC who were treated with octreotide LAR following surgery. The inhibitory effects of SSAs on tumor growth may be mediated by SSTR expression. PMID:24137418

  11. Interim report on intrathoracic radiotherapy of human small-cell lung carcinoma in nude mice with Re-188-RC-160, a radiolabeled somatostatin analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, P.O. |; Bender, H.; Biersack, H.J.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of Re-188-RC-160 in experimental models of human small cell lung carcinomas which mimic the clinical presentation. In the experimental model, cells from the human small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H69 cells were inoculated into the thoracic cavity of athymic mice and rats. Subsequently, the biodistribution of Re-188-RC-160 after injection into the pleural cavity, a radiolabeled somatostatin analogue, was monitored as was the effect on the subsequent growth of tumors. The results presented here, and which are a part of a larger series of studies, suggest that Re-188-RC-160 can be effectively used in this animal model to restrict the growth of small cell lung carcinoma in the thoracic cavity.

  12. Effect of a somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995) on antral gastrin cell hyperplasia and hypergastrinemia induced by a histamine H2-receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K

    1993-05-01

    The effect of a somatostatin analogue, SMS 201-995 (SMS), on antral gastrin cell hyperplasia (AGH) and hypergastrinemia associated with 14-day administration of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2-RA) famotidine was studied in rats. When the famotidine group was compared with the control group, the antral gastrin cell (G-cell) number was significantly increased (P < 0.01) by approximately twofold, and the serum gastrin level was significantly increased (P < 0.01) by approximately sixfold. When the famotidine+SMS group was compared with the famotidine group, the G-cell number was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) by approximately 30%, and the serum gastrin level was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) by approximately 40%. These findings suggest that SMS may be useful for inhibiting AGH and hypergastrinemia induced by long-term H2-RA administration. PMID:8511502

  13. Effects of tamoxifen and somatostatin analogue on growth of human medullary, follicular, and papillary thyroid carcinoma cell lines: tissue culture and nude mouse xenograft studies.

    PubMed

    Weber, C J; Marvin, M; Krekun, S; Koschitzky, T; Karp, F; Benson, M; Feind, C R

    1990-12-01

    The knowledge that (1) the normal thyroid contains somatostatin, (2) polypeptide growth factors influence thyroid cell function, and (3) thyroid cells contain steroid hormone receptors prompted us to add somatostatin analogue No. 201-995 (SMS) (5 ng/ml) and/or tamoxifen citrate (TAM) (5 mumol/L) to 7-day monolayer cultures (50,000 cells/well) of three separate human thyroid carcinoma cell lines: DR081 (medullary), WR082 (follicular), and NPA'87 (papillary). Results, tabulated as cell numbers/well (X10(5) on day 7, revealed that TAM inhibited growth of medullary and follicular cells and that TAM plus SMS inhibited growth of papillary cells. In vivo studies of subcutaneous tumor cell xenografts in nude mice have documented that TAM (5 mg subcutaneous pellet) significantly inhibits the growth of medullary implants. Flow cytometric DNA studies of medullary cell cultures demonstrated a reduced G2 + M phase with TAM treatment. For papillary cell implants, TAM plus SMS (5 micrograms subcutaneously, twice daily) did not suppress tumor growth. All three cell lines were negative for estrogen receptor; addition of estradiol (5 ng/ml) to medullary cell cultures neither stimulated replication nor reversed the inhibitory effects of TAM in vitro. We conclude that (1) TAM slowed the growth of a cell line of human medullary carcinoma, both in vitro and in vivo; (2) this effect was not reversed by estradiol; (3) TAM plus SMS inhibited replication of a papillary carcinoma cell line in vitro, but not in vivo; and (4) TAM alone and TAM plus SMS inhibited replication of cultures of a human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. TAM and SMS may be useful in treatment of some human thyroid carcinomas. PMID:1978945

  14. Somatostatin receptor expression and biological functions in endocrine pancreatic cells: review based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-producing betacells within the pancreatic islets. Somatostatin acts as an inhibitor of hormone secretion through specific receptors (sst1-5). All ssts were expressed in normal rat and mouse pancreatic islets, although the expression intensity and the co-expression pattern varied between ssts as well as between species. This may reflect a difference in response to somatostatin in islet cells of the two species. The Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model is an experimental model of type 1 diabetes, with insulitis accompanied by spontaneous hyperglycaemia. Pancreatic specimens from NOD mice at different age and stage of disease were stained for ssts. The islet cells of diabetic NOD mice showed increased islet expression of sst2-5 compared to normoglycemic NOD mice. The increase in sst2-5 expression in the islets cells may suggest either a contributing factor in the process leading to diabetes, or a defense response against ongoing beta-cell destruction. Somatostatin analogues were tested on a human endocrine pancreatic tumour cell line and cultured pancreatic islets. Somatostatin analogues had an effect on cAMP accumulation, chromogranin A secretion and MAP kinase activity in the cell line. Treatment of rat pancreatic islets with somatostatin analogues with selective receptor affinity was not sufficient to induce an inhibition of insulin and glucagon secretion. However, a combination of selective analogues or non-selective analogues via costimulation of receptors can cause inhibition of hormone production. For insulin and glucagon, combinations of sst2 + sst5 and sst1 + sst2, respectively, showed a biological effect. In summary, knowledge of islet cell ssts expression and the effect of somatostatin analogues with high affinity to ssts may be valuable in the future attempts to influence beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes mellitus, since down-regulation of beta-cell function may promote survival of

  15. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  16. Application and dosimetric requirements for 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues in targeted radionuclide therapy for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Taïeb, David; Garrigue, Philippe; Bardiès, Manuel; Esmaeel, Abdullah Ahmad; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are associated with variable prognosis, with grade 1 and 2 NETs having a more favorable outcome than G3 ones (also called carcinoma). GEP-NET patients need highly individualized interdisciplinary evaluations and treatment. New treatment options have become available (i.e., sunitinib, mTOR inhibitors) with significant improvements in progression-free survival. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using 90Y or 177Lu-labeled somatostatin analogs has also shown promise in the treatment of advanced progressive NETs but randomized clinical trials comparing with other modalities are still lacking. SST-targeting represents the essence of theranostics. 68Ga-DOTA-SSTa can be used as companion imaging agents to assist in such a radionuclide therapy selection. 68Ga-DOTA-SSTa PET/CT might also provide critical information for prognosis, tumor response assessement to PRRT, and internal dosimetry. It is also expected that the development of novel receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals will contribute to the development of molecular-based personalized medicine approaches. PMID:26384594

  17. Somatostatin Analogue Treatment of a TSH-Secreting Adenoma Presenting With Accelerated Bone Metabolism and a Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Mousiolis, Athanasios C.; Rapti, Eleni; Grammatiki, Maria; Yavropoulou, Maria; Efstathiou, Maria; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Daniilidis, Michalis; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased bone turnover and other less frequent comorbidities of hyperthyroidism, such as heart failure, have only rarely been reported in association with central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma). Treatment is highly empirical and relies on eliminating the tumor and the hyperthyroid state. We report here an unusual case of a 39-year-old man who was initially admitted for management of pleuritic chest pain and fever of unknown origin. Diagnostic work up confirmed pericarditis and pleural effusion both refractory to treatment. The patient had a previous history of persistently elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), indicative of increased bone turnover. He had also initially been treated with thyroxine supplementation due to elevated TSH levels. During the diagnostic process a TSHoma was revealed. Thyroxine was discontinued, and resection of the pituitary tumor followed by treatment with a somatostatin analog led to complete recession of the effusions, normalization of ALP, and shrinkage of pituitary tumor. Accelerated bone metabolism and pericardial and pleural effusions attributed to a TSHoma may resolve after successful treatment of the tumor. The unexpected clinical course of this case highlights the need for careful long-term surveillance in patients with these rare pituitary adenomas. PMID:26765410

  18. 64Cu-labeled somatostatin analogues conjugated with cross-bridged phosphonate-based chelators via strain-promoted click chemistry for PET imaging: in silico through in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengxin; Ouyang, Qin; Zeng, Dexing; Nguyen, Kim N; Modi, Jalpa; Wang, Lirong; White, Alexander G; Rogers, Buck E; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2014-07-24

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sstr2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors. The homology model of sstr2 was built and was used to aid the design of new somatostatin analogues modified with phosphonate-containing cross-bridged chelators for evaluation of using them as PET imaging radiopharmaceuticals. The new generation chelators were conjugated to Tyr3-octreotate (Y3-TATE) through bioorthogonal, strain-promoted alkyne azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) to form CB-TE1A1P-DBCO-Y3-TATE (AP) and CB-TE1K1P-PEG4-DBCO-Y3-TATE (KP) in improved yields compared to standard direct conjugation methods of amide bond formation. Consistent with docking studies, the clicked bioconjugates showed high binding affinities to sstr2, with Kd values ranging from 0.6 to 2.3 nM. Selected isomers of the clicked products were used in biodistribution and PET/CT imaging. Introduction of the bulky dibenzocyclooctyne group in AP decreased clearance rates from circulation. However, the additional carboxylate group and PEG linker from the KP conjugate significantly improved labeling conditions and in vivo stability of the copper complex and ameliorated the slower pharmacokinetics of the clicked somatostatin analogues. PMID:24983404

  19. Somatostatin receptor expression, tumour response, and quality of life in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with long-acting octreotide.

    PubMed

    Cebon, J; Findlay, M; Hargreaves, C; Stockler, M; Thompson, P; Boyer, M; Roberts, S; Poon, A; Scott, A M; Kalff, V; Garas, G; Dowling, A; Crawford, D; Ring, J; Basser, R; Strickland, A; Macdonald, G; Green, M; Nowak, A; Dickman, B; Dhillon, H; Gebski, V

    2006-10-01

    Octreotide may extend survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Forty-one per cent of HCCs have high-affinity somatostatin receptors. We aimed to determine the feasibility, safety, and activity of long-acting octreotide in advanced HCC; to identify the best method for assessing somatostatin receptor expression; to relate receptor expression to clinical outcomes; and to evaluate toxicity. Sixty-three patients with advanced HCC received intramuscular long-acting octreotide 20 mg monthly until progression or toxicity. Median age was 67 years (range 28-81 years), male 81%, Child-Pugh A 83%, and B 17%. The aetiologies of chronic liver disease were alcohol (22%), viral hepatitis (44%), and haemochromatosis (6%). Prior treatments for HCC included surgery (8%), chemotherapy (2%), local ablation (11%), and chemoembolisation (6%). One patient had an objective partial tumour response (2%, 95% CI 0-9%). Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels decreased more than 50% in four (6%). Median survival was 8 months. Thirty four of 61 patients (56%) had receptor expression detected by scintigraphy; no clear relationship with clinical outcomes was identified. There were few grade 3 or 4 toxicities: hyperglycaemia (8%), hypoglycaemia (2%), diarrhoea (5%), and anorexia (2%). Patients reported improvements in some symptoms, but no major changes in quality of life were detected. Long-acting octreotide is safe in advanced HCC. We found little evidence of anticancer activity. A definitive randomised trial would identify whether patients benefit from this treatment in other ways. PMID:16953241

  20. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A. Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, CA Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels )

    1988-07-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 {plus minus} 20 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N{sub i} to inhibit adenylate cyclase.

  1. Early cerebral activities of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A appear to act via the somatostatin receptor subtype sst(2).

    PubMed Central

    Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Madeo, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been aroused by the specific actions of bisphenol A (BPA). The present investigation represents a first study dealing with the interaction of BPA with the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtype (sst(2)) in the rat limbic circuit. After treating pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats with two doses (400 microg/kg/day; 40 microg/kg/day) of BPA, the binding activity of the above receptor subtype was evaluated in some limbic regions of the offspring. The higher dose proved to be the more effective one, as demonstrated by the elevated affinity of sst(2) with its specific radioligand, [(125)I]-Tyr(0)somatostatin-14. The most dramatic effects of BPA on sst(2) levels occurred at the low-affinity states of such a subtype in some telencephalic limbic areas of postnatal rats (10 days of age; postnatal day [PND] 10). These included lower (p < 0.05) sst(2) levels in the gyrus dentate of the hippocampus and basomedial nucleus of the amygdala; significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels were observed only for the high-affinity states of the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. A similar trend was maintained in PND 23 rats with the exception of much lower levels of the high-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in the amygdala nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. However, greater changes produced by this environmental estrogen were reported when the binding activity of sst(2) was checked in the presence of the two more important selective agonists (zolpidem and Ro 15-4513) specific for the alpha-containing Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor complex. In this case, an even greater potentiating effect (p < 0.001) was mainly obtained for the low-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in PND 10 animals, with the exception of the high-affinity type in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and gyrus dentate. These results support the contention that an sst(2) subtype alpha-containing GABA type A receptor system might

  2. Somatostatin receptors as markers for endocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reubi, J.C.

    1987-06-19

    Endocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are relatively rare neoplasias that secrete large amounts of peptide hormones such as insulin, glucagon, gastrin, or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These substances are usually responsible for the distinct clinical features observed in patients with such tumors. Although most are relatively slow growing tumors, they may lead in early stages to dramatic symptoms such as hypoglycemia, gastric ulcerations, or watery diarrhea. Unfortunately they are often difficult to localize precisely at that stage. Somatostatin, a tetradecapeptide that inhibits peptide hormone release in various sites such as the pituitary, the pancreas, and the gastrointestinal tract, has been shown recently to have beneficial effects when given chronically in the form of a stable non-degradable octapeptide analogue (SMS 201-995) in such gastrointestinal endocrine tumors. This essay demonstrates with autoradiographic techniques the very high density of somatostatin receptors in one case of human gastrinoma. A hematoxylineosin-stained histologic section reveals a well-defined, 2-mm-long tumor surrounded by normal tissue. After incubation of the section with an iodinated somatostatin analogue (/sup 125/I-(Leu, D-Trp, Tyr)-somatostatin-28), the distribution of somatostatin receptors was visualized on tritium-sensitive films after a one-week exposure of the section in x-ray cassettes.

  3. Somatostatin and Somatostatin-Containing Neurons in Shaping Neuronal Activity and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery over four decades ago, somatostatin (SOM) receives growing scientific and clinical interest. Being localized in the nervous system in a subset of interneurons somatostatin acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and its role in the fine-tuning of neuronal activity and involvement in synaptic plasticity and memory formation are widely recognized in the recent literature. Combining transgenic animals with electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular methods allowed to characterize several subpopulations of somatostatin-containing interneurons possessing specific anatomical and physiological features engaged in controlling the output of cortical excitatory neurons. Special characteristic and connectivity of somatostatin-containing neurons set them up as significant players in shaping activity and plasticity of the nervous system. However, somatostatin is not just a marker of particular interneuronal subpopulation. Somatostatin itself acts pre- and postsynaptically, modulating excitability and neuronal responses. In the present review, we combine the knowledge regarding somatostatin and somatostatin-containing interneurons, trying to incorporate it into the current view concerning the role of the somatostatinergic system in cortical plasticity. PMID:27445703

  4. Somatostatin Analogue Treatment of a TSH-Secreting Adenoma Presenting With Accelerated Bone Metabolism and a Pericardial Effusion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mousiolis, Athanasios C; Rapti, Eleni; Grammatiki, Maria; Yavropoulou, Maria; Efstathiou, Maria; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Daniilidis, Michalis; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Increased bone turnover and other less frequent comorbidities of hyperthyroidism, such as heart failure, have only rarely been reported in association with central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma). Treatment is highly empirical and relies on eliminating the tumor and the hyperthyroid state.We report here an unusual case of a 39-year-old man who was initially admitted for management of pleuritic chest pain and fever of unknown origin. Diagnostic work up confirmed pericarditis and pleural effusion both refractory to treatment. The patient had a previous history of persistently elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), indicative of increased bone turnover. He had also initially been treated with thyroxine supplementation due to elevated TSH levels. During the diagnostic process a TSHoma was revealed. Thyroxine was discontinued, and resection of the pituitary tumor followed by treatment with a somatostatin analog led to complete recession of the effusions, normalization of ALP, and shrinkage of pituitary tumor.Accelerated bone metabolism and pericardial and pleural effusions attributed to a TSHoma may resolve after successful treatment of the tumor. The unexpected clinical course of this case highlights the need for careful long-term surveillance in patients with these rare pituitary adenomas. PMID:26765410

  5. Somatostatin inhibits exocytosis in rat pancreatic α-cells by Gi2-dependent activation of calcineurin and depriming of secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Gromada, Jesper; Høy, Marianne; Buschard, Karsten; Salehi, Albert; Rorsman, Patrik

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of cell capacitance were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which somatostatin inhibits Ca2+-induced exocytosis in single rat glucagon-secreting pancreatic α-cells. Somatostatin decreased the exocytotic responses elicited by voltage-clamp depolarisations by 80 % in the presence of cyclic AMP-elevating agents such as isoprenaline and forskolin. Inhibition was time dependent and half-maximal within 22 s. The inhibitory action of somatostatin was concentration dependent with an IC50 of 68 nm and prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. The latter effect was mimicked by intracellular dialysis with specific antibodies to Gi1/2 and by antisense oligonucleotides against G proteins of the subtype Gi2. Somatostatin lacked inhibitory action when applied in the absence of forskolin or in the presence of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine. The size of the ω-conotoxin-sensitive and forskolin-independent component of exocytosis was limited to 60 fF. By contrast, somatostatin abolished L-type Ca2+ channel-dependent exocytosis in α-cells exposed to forskolin. The magnitude of the latter pool amounted to 230 fF. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on exocytosis was mediated by activation of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase calcineurin and was prevented by pretreatment with cyclosporin A and deltamethrin or intracellularly applied calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide. Experiments using the stable ATP analogue AMP-PCP indicate that somatostatin acts by depriming of granules. We propose that somatostatin receptors associate with L-type Ca2+ channels and couple to Gi2 proteins leading to a localised activation of calcineurin and depriming of secretory granules situated close to the L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:11533141

  6. Somatostatin in rat tissues is depleted by cysteamine administration

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; Reichlin, S.

    1981-12-01

    Administration of cysteamine (mercaptoethylamine) induces in rats severe perforating duodenal ulcers. Because the ulcerogenic properties of cysteamine are markedly reduced by treatment with somatostatin, we considered the possibility that cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer might be mediated by depletion of tissue somatostatin, and thereby of its paracrine influences on gastrin and gastric acid secretion. To test this hypothesis, we measured the concentration of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-somatostatin) in stomach and duodenal mucosa at intervals after administration of a single ulcerogenic dose (30 mg/kg by stomach tube). IR-somatostatin in these tissues fell rapidly to reach a minimum at 4 h (stomach 31%, duodenum 60% of control respectively). IR-somatostatin in hypothalamus and pancreas decreased gradually to a minimum at 7 h. Another duodenal ulcerogen, propionitrile (10 mg/100 g bw, s.c.) which is more toxic than cysteamine, and several stressful procedures including ether anesthesia, restraint and s.c. formalin did not lower stomach or duodenal IR-somatostatin. Gut, pancreas and hypothalamic VIP levels were not influenced by cysteamine. These findings suggest that cysteamine is a relatively specific depletor of tissue somatostatin. Because blood levels of somatostatin fell, and only trivial amounts of the peptide were found in the stomach lumen after cysteamine administration, it appears likely that this agent acts at the cellular level to cause breakdown of preformed somatostatin and/or to acutely reduce its synthesis.

  7. Somatostatin, somatostatin receptors, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Fisher, William E; Kim, Hee Joon; Wang, Xiaoping; Brunicardi, Charles F; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-03-01

    Somatostatin may play an important role in the regulation of cancer growth including pancreatic cancer by interaction with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) on the cell surface. Five SSTRs were cloned, and the function of these SSTRs is addressed in this review. SSTR-2, SSTR-5, and SSTR-1 are thought to play major roles in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth both in vitro and in vivo. SSTR-3 may be involved in mediating apoptosis, but the role of SSTR-4 is not clear. In most pancreatic cancers, functional SSTRs are absent. Reintroduction of SSTR genes has been shown to inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in cell cultures and animal models. PMID:15706439

  8. Purification of a putative brain somatostatin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    He, Haitao; Johnson, K.; Thermos, K.; Reisine, T. )

    1989-03-01

    The brain somatostatin receptor was purified by affinity chromatographic techniques. A protein of 60 kDa could be purified from rat brain. The protein was eluted from a (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF affinity column with either sodium acetate (pH 5.5) or free (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF. The binding of the protein to the affinity column was prevented by free (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF or the stable SRIF analogue SMS 201-996 but not by the inactive somatostatin 28-(1-14). The purified receptor could be covalently labeled by the {sup 125}I-labeled SRIF analogue CGP 23996. Excess (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF blocked the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled CGP 23996 to the purified receptor, but somatostatin 28-(1-14) did not affect the binding. A 60-kDa protein was also purified from the anterior pituitary cell line AtT-20, which has a high expression of SRIF receptors. In contrast, no 60-kDa protein could be purified from CHO cells, which have no detectable SRIF receptors. These findings present evidence for the purification of the SRIF receptor.

  9. Long-term treatment of somatostatin analog-refractory growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors with pegvisomant alone or combined with long-acting somatostatin analogs: a retrospective analysis of clinical practice and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pegvisomant (PEGV) is widely used, alone or with somatostatin analogs (SSA), for GH-secreting pituitary tumors poorly controlled by SSAs alone. No information is available on specific indications for or relative efficacies of PEGV?+?SSA versus PEGV monotherapy. Aim of our study was to characterize real-life clinical use of PEGV vs. PEGV?+?SSA for SSA-resistant acromegaly (patient selection, long-term outcomes, adverse event rates, doses required to achieve control). Methods A retrospective analysis of data collected in 2005–2010 in five hospital-based endocrinology centers in Rome was performed. Sixty-two adult acromegaly patients treated ≥6 months with PEGV (Group 1, n?=?35) or PEGV?+?SSA (Group 2, n?=?27) after unsuccessful maximal-dose SSA monotherapy (≥12 months) were enroled. Groups were compared in terms of clinical/biochemical characteristics at diagnosis and before PEGV or PEGV?+?SSA was started (baseline) and end-of-follow-up outcomes (IGF-I levels, adverse event rates, final PEGV doses). Results Group 2 showed higher IGF-I and GH levels and sleep apnea rates, higher rates residual tumor tissue at baseline, more substantial responses to SSA monotherapy and worse outcomes (IGF-I normalization rates, final IGF-I levels). Tumor growth and hepatotoxicity events were rare in both groups. Final daily PEGV doses were similar and significantly increased with treatment duration in both groups. Conclusions PEGV and PEGV?+?SSA are safe, effective solutions for managing SSA-refractory acromegaly. PEGV?+?SSA tends to be used for more aggressive disease associated with detectable tumor tissue. With both regimens, ongoing monitoring of responses is important since PEGV doses needed to maintain IGF-I control are likely to increase over time. PMID:23799893

  10. Somatostatin receptors and somatostatin content in medullary thyroid carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Reubi, J.C.; Chayvialle, J.A.; Franc, B.; Cohen, R.; Calmettes, C.; Modigliani, E. )

    1991-04-01

    Human medullary thyroid carcinomas from 19 patients were analyzed for their content in somatostatin (SRIF) receptors using receptor autoradiography with a SRIF-28 analogue and the SRIF octapeptide (Tyr3)-SMS 201-995 as iodinated radioligands. Four out of 19 cases were SRIF receptor positive with the SRIF octapeptide radioligand. These cases as well as four additional tumors were also positive with the SRIF-28 radioligand 125I-(Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25)-SRIF-28. High affinity binding sites pharmacologically specific for bioactive SRIF analogues, specifically located on tumor tissue, were identified. In some cases the SRIF receptors were distributed in a non-homogeneous pattern, with labelling occurring preferentially in highly differentiated tumor regions. Numerous cases were shown to have a high tumoral SRIF content measured by radioimmunoassay or immunohistochemical technique. However, there was no correlation between SRIF receptor status and tumor levels of endogenous SRIF. No correlation was seen between the clinical outcome or the survival of the patients and their tumoral SRIF receptor content. Whereas some medullary thyroid carcinomas seem to be a target for SRIF, the SRIF function in these tumors remains unclear. SRIF receptors in a group of medullary thyroid carcinomas may be useful morphological marker of these tumors and of potential interest for their in vivo localization.

  11. EFFECT OF SOMATOSTATIN ON DENTAL PULP STEM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Avantaggiato, A; Candotto, V; Cura, F; Gaudio, R M; Scapoli, L; Palmieri, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent stem cells with the potential to differentiate into various cell types. For this reason, they have been proposed as an alternative source for mesenchymal stem cells. Somatostatin is a peptide hormone with an inhibitory effect on several endogenous hormones. The aim of our study is to investigate whether somatostatin can promote or inhibit differentiation of DPSCs in osteoblasts and bone tissue. DPSCs were extracted from third molars of healthy subjects, and were treated with somatostatin at the concentration of 100 ng/ml for 24 and 48 h. Gene expression in treated DPSCs was compared with untreated cells (control) in order to check the effect of somatostatin on stem cell differentiation. After 24 h of treatment many genes investigated were down-regulated in treated DPSCs vs untreated DPSCs. Significantly up-regulated gene (Fold change > 2) was the Bone Morphogenetic Protein BMP4. On the contrary somatostatin induced the over-expression of bone related genes after 48 h of treatment (i.e. BMPR1B and BMPR2). TGFB family genes and their receptors were also significantly up-regulated after 48 h of treatment. Somatostatin demonstrated to promote the self-renewal of DPSCs: in our experiments somatostatin mainly acted on TGFB family genes. Further studies are needed to explore this new way of creating bone tissue. PMID:26511170

  12. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors. PMID:27523384

  13. Pancreatic Polypeptide Inhibits Somatostatin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Fiori, Jennifer L.; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Okun, Eitan; Kim, Jung Seok; Rapp, Peter R.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a major agonist for neuropeptide Y4 receptors (NPY4R). While NPY4R has been identified in various tissues, the cells on which it is expressed and its function in those cells has not been clearly delineated. Here we report that NPY4R is present in all somatostatin-containing cells of tissues that we tested, including pancreatic islets, duodenum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. Its agonism by PP decreases somatostatin secretion from human islets. Mouse embryonic hippocampal (mHippo E18) cells expressed NPY4Rs and their activation by PP consistently decreased somatostatin secretion. Furthermore, central injection of PP in mice induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in somatostatin-containing cells in the hippocampus compared with PBS-injected mice. In sum, our results identify PP as a pivotal modulator of somatostatin secretion. PMID:25019573

  14. Molecular Characterisation of Long-Acting Insulin Analogues in Comparison with Human Insulin, IGF-1 and Insulin X10

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bo F.; Glendorf, Tine; Hegelund, Anne C.; Lundby, Anders; Lützen, Anne; Slaaby, Rita; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis There is controversy with respect to molecular characteristics of insulin analogues. We report a series of experiments forming a comprehensive characterisation of the long acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1, and the super-mitogenic insulin, X10. Methods We measured binding of ligands to membrane-bound and solubilised receptors, receptor activation and mitogenicity in a number of cell types. Results Detemir and glargine each displayed a balanced affinity for insulin receptor (IR) isoforms A and B. This was also true for X10, whereas IGF-1 had a higher affinity for IR-A than IR-B. X10 and glargine both exhibited a higher relative IGF-1R than IR binding affinity, whereas detemir displayed an IGF-1R:IR binding ratio of ≤1. Ligands with high relative IGF-1R affinity also had high affinity for IR/IGF-1R hybrid receptors. In general, the relative binding affinities of the analogues were reflected in their ability to phosphorylate the IR and IGF-1R. Detailed analysis revealed that X10, in contrast to the other ligands, seemed to evoke a preferential phosphorylation of juxtamembrane and kinase domain phosphorylation sites of the IR. Sustained phosphorylation was only observed from the IR after stimulation with X10, and after stimulation with IGF-1 from the IGF-1R. Both X10 and glargine showed an increased mitogenic potency compared to human insulin in cells expressing many IGF-1Rs, whereas only X10 showed increased mitogenicity in cells expressing many IRs. Conclusions Detailed analysis of receptor binding, activation and in vitro mitogenicity indicated no molecular safety concern with detemir. PMID:22590494

  15. Insulin degludec, a long-acting once-daily basal analogue for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Berard, Lori; MacNeill, Gail

    2015-02-01

    Here, we discuss certain practical issues related to use of insulin degludec, a new long-acting basal insulin analogue. Degludec provides uniform ("peakless") action that extends over more than 24 hours and is highly consistent from dose to dose. Like the 2 previously available basal analogues (detemir and glargine), degludec is expected to simplify dose adjustment and enable patients to reach their glycemic targets with reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Phase 3 clinical trials involving type 1 and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated that degludec was noninferior to glargine in allowing patients to reach a target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7%, and nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred significantly less frequently with degludec. In addition, when dosing intervals vary substantially from day to day, degludec continues to be effective and to maintain a low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Degludec thus has the potential to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, to enhance the flexibility of the dosing schedule and to improve patient and caregiver confidence in the stability of glycemic control. A dedicated injector, the FlexTouch prefilled pen, containing degludec 200 units/mL, will be recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Degludec will also be available as 100 units/mL cartridges, to be used in the NovoPen 4 by patients requiring smaller basal insulin doses, including most patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25065475

  16. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis, and pancreatic polypeptide hypersecretion: a new association and clinical and hormonal responses to long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, T W; Sacks, H S; O'Dorisio, T M; Tuttle, S; Solomon, S S

    1987-06-01

    We describe a 63-yr-old man with disseminated medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis with pancreatic polypeptide (PP) hypersecretion. His major symptoms were watery diarrhea, flushing, and abdominal bloating; these and the elevated plasma PP levels did not change after resection of the distal two thirds of the pancreas, which contained a 2-cm mass of nesidioblastotic tissue. Postoperatively, a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/day), normalized PP secretion acutely and chronically (7 months) and ameliorated his symptoms. The analog had no side-effects and did not alter glucose tolerance, calcitonin hypersecretion, or growth of the medullary carcinoma, but it did inhibit GH secretion. After withdrawal from therapy for 1 month, PP hypersecretion and all symptoms except diarrhea recurred. The coexistence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and PP cell nesidioblastosis represents a new variant of the overlap syndromes between multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and II. Patients with medullary carcinoma and unexplained watery diarrhea should have fasting gastroenteropancreatic hormone assays done to screen for a potential gastrointestinal or pancreatic origin for the diarrhea. PMID:2883196

  17. Fine-tuning somatostatin receptor signalling by agonist-selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation: IUPHAR Review 5

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Stefan; Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Nagel, Falko

    2014-01-01

    The biological actions of somatostatin are mediated by a family of five GPCRs, named sst1 to sst5. Somatostatin receptors exhibit equally high-binding affinities to their natural ligand somatostatin-14 and largely overlapping distributions. The overexpression of somatostatin receptors in human tumours is the molecular basis for diagnostic and therapeutic application of the stable somatostatin analogues octreotide, lanreotide and pasireotide. The efficiency of somatostatin receptor signalling is tightly regulated and ultimately limited by the coordinated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues. Here, we review and discuss recent progress in the generation and application of phosphosite-specific antibodies for human sst2 and sst5 receptors. These phosphosite-specific antibodies are unique tools to monitor the spatial and temporal dynamics of receptors phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Using a combined approach of phosphosite-specific antibodies and siRNA knock-down screening, relevant kinases and phosphatases were identified. Emerging evidence suggests distinct mechanisms of agonist-selective fine-tuning for individual somatostatin receptors. The recently uncovered differences in phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these receptors may hence be of physiological significance in mediating responses to acute, persistent or repeated stimuli in a variety of target tissues. PMID:24328848

  18. Subtype selective interactions of somatostatin and somatostatin analogs with sst1, sst2, and sst5 in BON-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Eva; Stridsberg, Mats; Taylor, John E; Culler, Michael D; Oberg, Kjell; Janson, Eva T

    2004-01-01

    Somatostatin is a polypeptide hormone acting as an inhibitor of pituitary, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal secretion through specific membrane receptors of which five subtypes have been cloned (sst(1-5)). Somatostatin analogs are used in the clinic to treat patients with excessive hormone production due to a neuroendocrine tumor. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological activity of three new somatostatin receptor subtype selective analogs (BIM-23926, sst(1)-selective; BIM-23120, sst(2)-selective; and BIM-23206, sst(5)-selective) in the human neuroendocrine tumor cell line, BON-1, which expresses sst(1), sst(2), and sst(5) natively. Somatostatin-14 and octreotide were used as reference substances. Forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation and chromogranin A (CgA) secretion were inhibited by BIM-23120, BIM-23206, and somatostatin-14 in a dose-dependent manner. Cholecystokinin (CCK-8) stimulated activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was inhibited by BIM-23120 and BIM-23206, while BIM-23926 stimulated the activity. Selective BIM analogs showed a more efficient inhibitory effect on cAMP accumulation, CgA secretion, and MAP kinase activity than octreotide in BON-1 cells. This may be explained by the differences in affinity of the ligand to the receptor or by interaction between different sst subtypes. We conclude that increasing knowledge about sst physiology and expression in malignant disease indicates a need for new analogs that can be incorporated into the therapeutic arsenal. PMID:15456957

  19. Sensitivity of rat pancreatic A and B cells to somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Schuit, F C; Derde, M P; Pipeleers, D G

    1989-03-01

    Islet A and B cells were purified from the rat pancreas and examined for their respective sensitivity to somatostatin. Both somatostatin-14 (S14) and -28 (S28) inhibited glucagon and insulin release through direct interactions with the corresponding cell types. A dose-dependent suppression of the secretory activities was paralleled by a reduction in cellular cyclic AMP formation with similar ED50 values for both actions. The somatostatin effects on pancreatic hormone release may thus be mediated via an inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. In pancreatic A cells, S14 and S28 were equally potent inhibitors with ED50 values ranging from 2 x 10(-12) to 2 x 10(-11) mol/l. Pancreatic B cells exhibited a similar sensitivity to S28 as the A cells (ED50 of 2 to 5 x 10(-11) mol/l), but not to S14 (ED50 of 2 x 10(-9) mol/l). Extrapolation of these in vitro sensitivities of islet A and B cells to the in vivo situation suggests that both cell types can respond to circulating S28 levels and that A cells are sensitive to both locally and distally released S14. Islet B cells appear insensitive to the normal peripheral S14 levels but could respond to locally released somatostatin. The marked difference in the sensitivities of islet A and B cells to S14 suggest that these cell types are equipped with different somatostatin receptors. This notion was further supported by the cell-selective actions of the synthetic S14 analogues [D-Trp8, D-Cys14]S14 and desAsn5[D-Trp8, D-Ser13]S14. PMID:2568961

  20. Can a new ultra-long-acting insulin analogue improve patient care? Investigating the potential role of insulin degludec.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Campbell, R Keith

    2012-12-24

    The basal-bolus concept of delivering insulin to diabetic patients makes physiological sense, as it mimics normal insulin release in people without diabetes. In line with this concept, a major effort put forth by insulin manufacturers has been to develop the ideal exogenous basal insulin product. The perfect basal insulin product would be injected into subcutaneous tissue without causing irritation, release insulin continuously at a constant rate for at least 24 hours, be stable, not contribute to weight gain, have a low risk of allergic reactions and, very importantly, minimize the risk of hypoglycaemia. While the perfect insulin has not yet been discovered, advancements are still being made. Insulin degludec is an ultra-long-acting basal insulin analogue that possesses a flat, stable glucose-lowering effect in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin degludec achieves these pharmacokinetic properties by forming soluble multihexamers upon subcutaneous injection, resulting in the formation of a depot in the subcutaneous tissue that is slowly released and absorbed into circulation. Insulin degludec has been associated with slightly less weight gain and fewer nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes when compared with insulin glargine in some, but not all, clinical studies. This article briefly reviews current evidence for the use of insulin degludec in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and discusses the potential impact of this new basal insulin on clinical practice. PMID:23145524

  1. Patient selection for personalized peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are malignant solid tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells dispersed throughout the body. Differentiated neuroendocrine tumors overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), which enable the diagnosis using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Internalization and retention within the tumor cell are important for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using the same peptide. The use of the same DOTA-peptide for SSTR PET/CT using (68)Ga and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using therapeutic radionuclides like (177)Lu and (90)Y offers a unique theranostic advantage. PMID:25029937

  2. 'Reverse discordance' between 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE posttherapy scan: the plausible explanations and its implications for high-dose therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogs.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit; Kand, Purushottam; Kumar, Rakesh; Asopa, Ramesh; Rajan, Mysore Govinda Ramakrishna; Nayak, Uday; Shimpi, Hemant; Das, Tapas; Venkatesh, Meera; Chakrabarty, Sudipta; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2011-07-01

    In this technical note, an unusual discordance between diagnostic and posttherapeutic scan resulting from the use of different somatostatin receptor ligands in two settings is described. Such observation, we believe, is multifactorial, but most importantly arises due to different receptor affinity profile of the ligands and different somatostatin receptor subtype expression in different tumors. It is important for the treating physician to be aware of this phenomenon that would aid in improving our understanding of complex ligand-receptor interactions in various somatostatin receptor-positive tumors with its possible implications for therapeutic decision making with radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogues. PMID:21654355

  3. Bombesin, somatostatin, and related peptides: actions on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.

    1981-11-01

    Bombesin acts within the anterior hypothalamic preoptic area to interfere with thermoregulation in the rat. The body temperature (T/sub b/) of animals receiving bombesin varies in parallel with ambient temperature (T/sub a/). Bombesin-induced reduction of T/sub b/ in animals at low T/sub a/ is associated with a marked reduction of oxygen consumption (Vo/sub 2/). Some somatostatin-related peptides, e.g., desAA/sup 1,2,4,5,12,13/ (D-Trp/sup 8/)-somatostatin (ODT8-SS), act within the brain to prevent bombesin-induced reduction of Vo/sub 2/ and T/sub b/. ODT8-SS also produces hyperthermia not associated with an increase in Vo/sub 2/.

  4. Fluoride complexes of aluminium or beryllium act on G-proteins as reversibly bound analogues of the gamma phosphate of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Bigay, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Chabre, M

    1987-01-01

    Fluoride activation of G proteins requires the presence of aluminium or beryllium and it has been suggested that AIF4- acts as an analogue of the gamma-phosphate of GTP in the nucleotide site. We have investigated the action of AIF4- or of BeF3- on transducin (T), the G protein of the retinal rods, either indirectly through the activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase, or more directly through their effects on the conformation of transducin itself. In the presence of AIF4- or BeF3-, purified T alpha subunit of transducin activates purified cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the absence of photoactivated rhodopsin. Activation is totally reversed by elution of fluoride or partially reversed by addition of excess T beta gamma. Activation requires that GDP or a suitable analogue be bound to T alpha: T alpha-GDP and T alpha-GDP alpha S are activable by fluorides, but not T alpha-GDP beta S, nor T alpha that has released its nucleotide upon binding to photoexcited rhodopsin. Analysis of previous works on other G proteins and with other nucleotide analogues confirm that in all cases fluoride activation requires that a GDP unsubstituted at its beta phosphate be bound in T alpha. By contrast with alumino-fluoride complexes, which can adopt various coordination geometries, all beryllium fluoride complexes are tetracoordinated, with a Be-F bond length of 1.55 A, and strictly isomorphous to a phosphate group. Our study confirms that fluoride activation of transducin results from a reversible binding of the metal-fluoride complex in the nucleotide site of T alpha, next to the beta phosphate of GDP, as an analogue of the gamma phosphate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2826123

  5. Somatostatin inhibits cANP-mediated cholinergic transmission in the myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which somatostatin acts to modulate cholinergic transmission is not clear. In this study the authors investigated the role of the adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in mediating cholinergic transmission in the guinea pig myenteric plexus and examined the ability of somatostatin to alter acetylcholine (ACh) release stimulated by various cAMP agonists. Forskolin, 8-bromo-cAMP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and cholera toxin each stimulated the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh in a dose-related manner. Addition of theophylline enhanced the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh stimulated by these cAMP agonists. The observations suggest that cAMP may serve as a physiological mediator for ACh release from myenteric neurons. Somatostatin inhibited release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by various cAMP agonists in a dose-related manner. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin antagonized the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by forskolin, VIP, or cholera toxin but had no effect on the inhibitory action of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by 8-bromo-cAMP. This suggests that the principal mechanism by which somatostatin inhibits cAMP-mediated cholinergic transmission is via activation of the inhibitory regulatory protein (N{sub i} subunit) of adenyalte cyclase.

  6. Correlation of monoclonal and polyclonal somatostatin receptor 5 antibodies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Lupp, Amelie; Peter, Luisa; Fischer, Elke; Schulz, Stefan; Klöppel, Günter; Hommann, Merten

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the frequency of somatostatin-receptor 5 (SSTR 5) in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors by using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Material and Method: we analyzed 66 proven pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors immunohistochemically with monoclonal (clone UMB-4) and polyclonal SSTR 5-antibodies. Immunoreactive score (IRS) and DAKO-score Her2/neu were evaluated. Results: Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated for the IRS a significant higher staining of all specimen using the monoclonal antibodies ( IRS SSTR5 poly vs IRS SSTR 5 mono; 20.0% vs 30.3% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.21; p = 0.04. For the HER2 score there was also a significant higher staining in the monoclonal group (Her2 SSTR 5 poly vs Her2 SSTR 5 mono; 21.5% vs 28.8% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.20; p = 0.08. Conclusion: Both antibodies are useful in staining of SSTR, although UMB-4 demonstrated a 10% higher SSTR 5 staining. Due to the previous underestimated expression rate of SSTR 5, current standards in diagnostics and therapy should be reconsidered. The increasing usage of long-acting pansomatostatin receptor analogues will rise the adverse effects connected to SSTR5 binding. PMID:23236542

  7. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABA(A) receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam C; Griffith, Theanne N; Tsikolia, Maia; Kotey, Francesca O; Gill, Nikhila; Humbert, Danielle J; Watt, Erin E; Yermolina, Yuliya A; Goel, Shikha; El-Ghendy, Bahaa; Hall, C Dennis

    2011-09-30

    GABA(A) receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanols were investigated on recombinant human γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A), α(1)β(2)γ(2s)) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and compared to the modulatory effects on GABA currents observed with exposures to the intravenous anaesthetic agent, propofol. Submaximal EC(20) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 μM cyclohexanols. For instance, at 30 μM 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol (a novel compound) GABA responses were increased ~3-fold (although similar enhancements were achieved at 3 μM propofol). As regards rank order for modulation by the cyclohexanol analogues at 30 μM, the % enhancements for 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol~2,6-di-sec-butylcyclohexanol ≫2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexanol~4-tert-butylcyclohexanol>cyclohexanol~cyclopentanol~2-methylcyclohexanol. We further tested the potencies of the cyclohexanol analogues as general anaesthetics using a tadpole in vivo assay. Both 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol and 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol were effective as anaesthetics with EC(50)s of 14.0 μM and 13.1 μM respectively, while other cyclohexanols with bulkier side chains were less potent. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyclohexanols are both positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors currents and anaesthetics. The positioning and size of the alkyl groups at the 2 and 6 positions on the cyclohexanol ring were critical determinants of activity. PMID:21658385

  8. In vivo application of ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide for detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Setyono-Han, B.; de Jong, M.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Bruns, C.; van Hagen, P.M.; Marbach, P.; Visser, T.J.; Pless, J.; Lamberts, S.W.J. Sandoz Research Inst., Berne Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, Rotterdam Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    In this study the authors investigated its in vivo application in the visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats. The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical was investigated after intravenous injection in normal rats and in rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic carcinoma CA 20948. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies showed that specific accumulation of radioactivity occurred in somatostatin receptor-containing tissue (anterior pituitary gland). However, in contrast to the adrenals and pituitary, the tracer accumulation in the kidneys was not mediated by somatostatin receptors. Increasing radioactivity over the somatostatin receptor-positive tumors was measured rapidly after injection and the tumors were clearly visualized by gamma camera scintigraphy. In rats pretreated with 1 mg octreotide accumulation of ({sup 111}In-DPTA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide in the tumors was prevented. Because of its relatively long effective half-life, ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a radionuclide-coupled somatostatin analogue which can be used to visualize somatostatin receptor-bearing tumors efficiently after 24 hr, when interfering background radioactivity is minimized by renal clearance.

  9. Somatostatin binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, B.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E. )

    1990-11-01

    A method has been developed for the study of somatostatin (SS) binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex. Binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS to cells obtained by mechanical dissociation of rat cerebral cortex was dependent on time and temperature, saturable, reversible and highly specific. Under conditions of equilibrium, i.e., 60 min at 25 degrees C, native SS inhibited tracer binding in a dose-dependent manner. The Scatchard analysis of binding data was linear and yielded a dissociation constant of 0.60 +/- 0.08 nM with a maximal binding capacity of 160 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein. The binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS was specific as shown in experiments on tracer displacement by the native peptides, SS analogues, and unrelated peptides.

  10. [Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in neuroendocrine tumors exemplified by a patient with hepatic metastases of gastrinoma].

    PubMed

    Behr, T; Becker, W; Koch, W; Grebmeier, J; Wolf, F

    1994-02-01

    In a 66-year old woman, who suffered from recurrent melena, diarrhea and hematemesis with multiple untreatable gastric and duodenal ulcers, a markedly increased basal and secretin-stimulated gastrin level, clinically a Zollinger-Ellison syndrome was assumed. The conventional diagnostic procedures (esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy, colonoscopy, endosonography, ERCP, abdominal CT and small bowel enema) had failed to reveal the localisation of any gastrinoma. The thereupon performed scintigraphy with In-111-pentetreotide showed four somatostatin receptor expressing liver lesions: two of them could be detected at first site in the consecutively performed MR scans, another retrospectively bearing in mind the scintigraphic images. Today, the somatostatin receptor imaging seems to be a highly sensitive procedure for detecting and localizing hormonally active gastroenteropancreatic tumors. At the same time it is a method for in vivo evaluation of the somatostatin receptor status of localized GEP tumors, thus delivering a decisive diagnostic step for the evaluation of the effectiveness of a therapy with somatostatin analogues before such an expensive therapy is started. PMID:7513113

  11. P10: Is the OctreoScan score a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogs treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Ottaviano, Margaret; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Segreto, Sabrina; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Pellegrino, Sara; De Placido, Sabino; Marino, Mirella; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background The somatostatin receptor expression in thymic neoplasms is assessed in vivo imaging by 111In-octreotide SPECT (OctreoScan). This retrospective study aimed to verify the predictive role of intensity expression of OctreoScan to somatostatin analogues treatment. Methods We evaluated 28 patients (14 male and 14 female with a median age of 54 years, range, 27–78 years) with thymic tumors candidated to somatostatine analogs therapy as second or third line of treatment or maintenance treatment. For this reason all of them performed OctreoScan of the thorax and tumor-to-background ratio was determined on the 24-h coronal sections. Thymic tumors were classified by WHO 2004 and staged according to Masaoka-Koga system. Specifically, AB three patients; B1 two patients; B2 five patients; B3 nine patients; B2/B3 three patients; thymic carcinoma five patients; B3/thymic carcinoma one patient. All the patients had a III of IV stage of disease. Lesions with pathologically increased tracer uptake were categorized according to the following 3-pointscore: equivocal, probably pathologic, and definitely pathologic. Results All patients were OctreoScan positive, four with an equivocal point score, nineteen and five with a probably and definitely pathological score respectively. Somatostatin analogs were administrated as second or third line of therapy in 10 patients, as maintenance therapy in 16 patients and as both of modality in two patients. Median time to progression was 16 months (range, 6–77 months) and it was not influenced by uptake pathological score. Conclusions The intensity of uptake of Indium-111-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in thymic tumors is not a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogues treatment. The OctreoScan positivity is the best rationale for treating thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) with somatostatin analogs.

  12. Somatostatin Receptor Based Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) belong to the typical 7-transmembrane domain family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Five distinct subtypes (termed SSTR1-5) have been identified, with SSTR2 showing the highest affinity for natural SST and synthetic SST analogs. Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have high expression levels of SSTRs, which opens the possibility for tumor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled SST analogs. A number of tracers have been developed for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of NETs with impressive results, which facilitates the applications of human SSTR subtype 2 (hSSTr2) reporter gene based imaging and therapy in SSTR negative or weakly positive tumors to provide a novel approach for the management of tumors. The hSSTr2 gene can act as not only a reporter gene for in vivo imaging, but also a therapeutic gene for local radionuclide therapy. Even a second therapeutic gene can be transfected into the same tumor cells together with hSSTr2 reporter gene to obtain a synergistic therapeutic effect. However, additional preclinical and especially translational and clinical researches are needed to confirm the value of hSSTr2 reporter gene based imaging and therapy in tumors. PMID:25879040

  13. Characterization of pancreatic somatostatin binding sites with a /sup 125/I-somatostatin 28 analog

    SciTech Connect

    Zeggari, M.; Viguerie, N.; Susini, C.; Esteve, J.P.; Vaysse, N.; Rivier, J.; Wunsch, E.; Ribet, A.

    1986-11-01

    Somatostatin binding to guinea pig pancreatic acinar cell plasma membranes was characterized with an iodinated stable analog of somatostatin 28 (S28): /sup 125/I-(Leu8,DTrp22,Tyr25)S28. The binding was highly dependent on calcium ions. In 0.2 mM free Ca2+ medium, binding at 37 degrees C was saturable, slowly reversible and exhibited a single class of high affinity binding sites (KD = 0.05 +/- 0.01 nM, Bmax = 157 +/- 33 fmol/mg protein). Dissociation of bound radioactivity occurred with biphasic kinetics. Rate of dissociation increased when dissociation was measured at a time before equilibrium binding was reached. In 30 nM free Ca2+ medium, binding affinity and maximal binding capacity were decreased by about 4-fold. Decreasing calcium concentrations increased the amount of rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Somatostatin 14 antagonist, Des AA1,2(AzaAla4-5,DTrp8, Phe12-13)-somatostatin was active at the membrane level in inhibiting the binding. We conclude that using /sup 125/I-(Leu8,DTrp22,Tyr25)S28 as radioligand allows us to characterize a population of specific somatostatin receptors which are not different from those we previously described with the radioligand /sup 125/I-(Tyr11)-somatostatin. Somatostatin receptors could exist in two interconvertible forms. Calcium ions are an essential component in the regulation of the conformational change of somatostatin receptors.

  14. N-Methyl scan of somatostatin octapeptide agonists produces interesting effects on receptor subtype specificity.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, W G; Hocart, S J; Murphy, W A; Taylor, J E; Coy, D H

    2001-04-26

    The search for synthetic analogues of somatostatin which exhibit selective affinities for the five receptor subtypes is of considerable basic and therapeutic interest and has generated a large number of potent agonist analogues with a wide spectrum of binding profiles. In the past, conformational restriction of side chain groups and the peptide backbone has yielded the most interesting results. Under the latter category and as part of the present study, we were interested in the potential effects of N-methylation of peptide bond NH groups on binding affinity since this approach had not been systematically examined with these peptides. This was aided by new chemistries for introducing an N-Me group during regular solid-phase peptide synthesis using Boc protection. A number of interesting effects were noted on relative binding affinities of the two series of agonist sequences chosen, DPhe(5)(or Tyr(5))-c[Cys(6)-Phe(7)-DTrp(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Cys(11)]Thr(12)-NH(2) (SRIF numbering), at the five known human somatostatin receptors transfected into and stably expressed by CHO cells. N-Methylation of residues 7 (Phe), 10 (Thr), 11 (Cys), and 12 (Thr) largely destroyed affinities for all five receptors. N-Methylation of DTrp in the DPhe series gave an analogue with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 5 receptor for which it was also quite selective. N-Methylation of Lys in both series resulted in retention of type 2 affinity despite this residue constituting the "active center" of somatostatin peptides. N-Methylation of either the N-terminal Tyr residue or of Cys(6) in the Tyr series resulted in analogues with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 3 receptor, also with a degree of specificity. N-Methylation of the peptide bond constrains the conformational space of the amino acid and eliminates the possibility of donor hydrogen bond formation from the amide linkage. The beta-bend conformation of the agonists around DTrp-Lys is stabilized by a transannular

  15. Huntington's disease: effect of cysteamine, a somatostatin-depleting agent.

    PubMed

    Shults, C; Steardo, L; Barone, P; Mohr, E; Juncos, J; Serrati, C; Fedio, P; Tamminga, C A; Chase, T N

    1986-08-01

    Somatostatin levels in the basal ganglia are elevated in Huntington's disease. A controlled therapeutic trial of the somatostatin-depleting agent, cysteamine, was therefore conducted in five patients, including one with the rigid-akinetic form. Maximum tolerated dosage for 2 weeks produced no consistent change in extrapyramidal or dementia scores. Somatostatin concentrations were not significantly altered in plasma or CSF. Growth hormone levels, on the other hand, more than doubled, suggesting a functionally significant decrease in central somatostatin levels. PMID:2874527

  16. Differential effects of somatostatin and angiopeptin on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, Forbes; Lauder, Heather; Feniuk, Wasyl; Fan, Tai-Ping D; Humphrey, Patrick P A

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) exerts antiproliferative effects, and angiopeptin (an sst2/sst5 receptor-selective analogue) has recently been evaluated in clinical trials for the prophylaxis of restenosis following coronary angioplasty. Using an in vitro model of cell growth we have examined the effects of SRIF and angiopeptin on cell proliferation in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the human or rat recombinant sst2 or sst5 receptor and compared these with their effects on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) expressing endogenous somatostatin receptors.In CHO-K1 cells, expressing either human or rat recombinant sst2 or sst5 receptors, or in rat aortic VSMC, SRIF and angiopeptin (0.1–1000 nM) had no effect on basal re-growth of cells into a denuded area of a previously confluent monolayer. In contrast, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, 10 ng ml−1) stimulated re-growth of these cells.SRIF (0.1–1000 nM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of the bFGF-stimulated re-growth in CHO-K1 cells expressing human sst2 (h sst2) or sst5 (h sst5) receptors (pIC50=8.05±0.03 and 8.56±0.12, respectively). In contrast, angiopeptin (0.1–1000 nM) acted as a partial agonist at the h sst2 receptor (44.6±2.7% inhibition of the bFGF-stimulated re-growth at 100 nM; pIC50=8.69±0.25) but was devoid of any agonist activity at the h sst5 receptor.In CHO-K1 cells stably expressing rat recombinant sst2 (r sst2) or sst5 (r sst5) receptors, SRIF (0.1–1000 nM) was able to inhibit the bFGF-stimulated re-growth (pIC50=7.98±24 and 8.50±0.12, respectively). Angiopeptin (0.1–1000 nM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of bFGF-stimulated re-growth at the r sst2 receptor (pIC50=8.08±0.24) but acted as a partial agonist at the r sst5 receptor (maximum response=57.7±3.6% inhibition of bFGF-stimulated re-growth at 100 nM; pIC50=8.60±0.16).Although angiopeptin was inactive as an agonist at the h sst5 receptor, 100

  17. Differential actions of the prostacyclin analogues treprostinil and iloprost and the selexipag metabolite, MRE-269 (ACT-333679) in rat small pulmonary arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Orie, N N; Ledwozyw, A; Williams, D J; Whittle, B J; Clapp, L H

    2013-10-01

    The prostacyclin (IP) receptor agonists, treprostinil, iloprost and the selexipag metabolite, MRE-269 (ACT-333679) were evaluated in rat distal pulmonary blood vessels. Small pulmonary arteries and veins were pre-contracted with the thromboxane mimetic, U46619 (25 and 100nM, respectively), and relaxation determined with and without IP receptor antagonists, RO1138452 and RO3244794. In arteries, treprostinil was a more potent vasorelaxant than iloprost, while the efficacy of iloprost was greater. In pulmonary arteries, treprostinil-induced relaxation was essentially abolished by both IP antagonists (1μM), while responses to iloprost were partially inhibited. Both treprostinil and iloprost were equipotent, prominently relaxing pulmonary veins with responses being similarly and partially sensitive to IP antagonists. In contrast, RO1138452 failed to inhibit relaxations to MRE-269 in either pulmonary arteries or veins, suggesting no involvement of typical IP receptors. Thus, rat pulmonary tissues cannot be considered appropriate to assess classical IP receptors using the proposed highly selective non-prostanoid agonist MRE-269, contrasting with the IP receptor agonism profile of prostacyclin analogues, iloprost and treprostinil. PMID:23872196

  18. PF-05231023, a long-acting FGF21 analogue, decreases body weight by reduction of food intake in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W Clayton; Zhou, Yingjiang; Talukdar, Saswata; Musante, Cynthia J

    2016-08-01

    PF-05231023, a long-acting FGF21 analogue, is a promising potential pharmacotherapy for the treatment of obesity and associated comorbidities. Previous studies have shown the potential of FGF21 and FGF21-like compounds to decrease body weight in mice, non-human primates, and humans; the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. In particular, there have been conflicting reports on the degree to which FGF21-induced weight loss in non-human primates is attributable to a decrease in food intake versus an increase in energy expenditure. Here, we present a semi-mechanistic mathematical model of energy balance and body composition developed from similar work in mice. This model links PF-05231023 administration and washout to changes in food intake, which in turn drives changes in body weight. The model is calibrated to and compared with recently published data from cynomolgus macaques treated with PF-05231023, demonstrating its accuracy in describing pharmacotherapy-induced weight loss in these animals. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PF-05231023 decreases body weight in cynomolgus macaques solely by a reduction in food intake, with no direct effect on energy expenditure. PMID:27405817

  19. Somatostatin-expressing neurons in cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Barth, Alison L

    2016-07-01

    Somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons constitute a major class of inhibitory neurons in the mammalian cortex and are characterized by dense wiring into the local network and high basal firing activity that persists in the absence of synaptic input. This firing provides both GABA type A receptor (GABAAR)- and GABABR-mediated inhibition that operates at fast and slow timescales. The activity of somatostatin-expressing neurons is regulated by brain state, during learning and in rewarded behaviour. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how this class of cells can control network activity, with specific reference to how this is constrained by their anatomical and electrophysiological properties. PMID:27225074

  20. Somatostatin-Like Immunoreactivity in Rat Blood

    PubMed Central

    Berelowitz, M.; Kronheim, S.; Pimstone, B.; Shapiro, B.

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) has been demonstrated by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in rat serum using an antiserum specific for somatostatin and cross-reacting maximally with the biologically important area on the peptide. The RIA has a sensitivity of 35 pg/ml. SLI dilutes in parallel with synthetic somatostatin standard in the RIA and shows characteristics similar to synthetic somatostatin on Sephadex G-25 (f) gel chromatography eluting largely as a single peak with 1 M acetic acid. Significant regional differences in serum SLI are present. A positive gradient was found in paired samples from aorta (mean±SEM, 0.304±0.024 ng/ml) and portal vein (0.495±0.047 ng/ml) consistent with the known presence of somatostatin in gut and pancreas, and a negative gradient was noted between paired samples from portal vein (0.523±0.076 ng/ml) and hepatic vein (0.290±0.048 ng/ml) indicating hepatic clearance. No significant differences were demonstrated between aorta and confluence of cerebral venous sinuses or between aorta and inferior vena cava (IVC). After intragastric glucose, a significant and marked elevation of portal SLI was observed, maximal at 5 min (0.416±0.137 vs. 1.55±0.30 ng/ml at 5 min). A significant biphasic elevation of portal SLI also occurred after intravenous glucose. After both routes of glucose administration, the patterns of portal SLI followed closely those of portal glucose and insulin. By contrast, IVC SLI failed to reflect these changes. Thus, SLI in the rat shows chromatographic similarity with synthetic somatostatin. Regional differences in serum levels are marked; the highest concentrations being found in the portal venous effluent of pancreas and gut. Furthermore, glucose causes elevation of portal SLI in a pattern similar to portal insulin and glucose and without concomitant elevation in IVC. This differential elevation of SLI after glucose is consistent with a hormonal action within the portal system as a direct effect of somatostatin

  1. Biotherapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin analogs.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Hisato; Hijioka, Masayuki; Lee, Lingaku; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-08-01

    Basically, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) should be treated surgically; however, in unresectable cases, a treatment that aims to improve the prognosis by inhibiting the growth of the tumor and control the clinical symptoms becomes necessary. In the case of functional tumors, the quality of life of patients is decreased by not only the symptoms with tumor invasion and/or metastasis but also by the symptoms of hormone excess. The efficacy of somatostatin analogs against the latter has been previously reported, and their sustained release formulations have been developed. Somatostatin analogs are recommended to treat the endocrine symptoms of functional PNET; however, in case they can cause hypoglycemia in patients with insulinoma. On the other hand, results from the PROMID study demonstrated a tumor-stabilizing effect when octreotide LAR (long acting repeatable) was used to treat patients with advanced midgut NET; however, there has been no consensus regarding its antitumor effect for PNET. Additionally, a recent result from the CLARINET study suggests that lanreotide autogel has an antitumor effect against nonfunctional NET including PNET. Further clinical study results are awaited. PMID:25689143

  2. Effect of a long acting GnRH analogue or placebo on plasma LH/FSH, urethral pressure profiles and clinical signs of urinary incontinence due to Sphincter mechanism incompetence in bitches.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Piché, Claude A; Roos, Malgorzata; Arnold, Susi

    2006-09-15

    In 23 bitches with urinary incontinence due to spaying, the effect of treatment with a long-acting formulation of leuprolide acetate on frequency of incontinence, plasma gonadotropin levels and urodynamic parameters was evaluated. In addition, the clinical effect was compared with that of treatment with alpha-adrenergics. Before treatment, the dogs' incontinent episodes occurred, on average, 4 times per day on up to 6 days per week. In the pre-trial after therapy with phenylpropanolamine (n=23) the episodes of incontinence decreased by 92%, in the double-blind study 5 weeks after GnRH-analogue (n=11) by 71%; and by 28% after the placebo (n=12). By the end of the study, nine of twenty-two leuprolide treated bitches responded completely to treatment and were continent for periods lasting 70-575 days after treatment. In another 10 dogs, response to therapy was partial and the frequency of incontinence was reduced by at least 50%. After therapy with placebo, one bitch had no episodes of incontinence for 412 days. Treatment with the GnRH-analogue significantly decreased the plasma gonadotropin levels but there was no correlation between the effect on gonadotropin levels and response to treatment. Treatment with leuprolide or placebo had no effect on urethral closure pressure regardless of the response to treatment. The hypothesis that the change of the plasma gonadotropin levels after spaying is the cause of reduced urethral closure function was not supported by the results of this study. A possible direct effect of GnRH-analogues on the bladder is discussed. Long acting GnRH analogues appear to be a well-tolerated alternative for urinary incontinence treatment, but they appear to be less effective than the alpha-adrenergics. PMID:16672159

  3. Novel sst(4)-selective somatostatin (SRIF) agonists. 4. Three-dimensional consensus structure by NMR.

    PubMed

    Grace, Christy Rani R; Koerber, Steven C; Erchegyi, Judit; Reubi, Jean Claude; Rivier, Jean; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-18

    The three-dimensional NMR structures of eight cyclic octapeptide analogues of somatostatin (SRIF) are described. These analogues, with the basic sequence H-c[Cys(3)-Phe(6)-Xxx(7)-Yyy(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Zzz(11)-Cys(14)]-OH (the numbering refers to the position in native SRIF), with Xxx(7) being Phe/Ala/Tyr, Yyy(8) being Trp/DTrp/D-threo-beta-Me2Nal/L-threo-beta-Me2Nal, and Zzz(11) being Phe/Ala, exhibit potent and highly selective binding to human SRIF type 4 (sst(4)) receptors. The conformations reveal that the backbones of these analogues do not have the usual type-II' beta-turn reported in the literature for sst(2)-subtype-selective analogues. Instead, the structures contain a unique arrangement of side chains of Yyy(8), Lys(9), and Phe(6) or Phe(11). The conformational preferences and results from biological analyses of these analogues (parts 1-3 of this series, Rivier et al., Erchegyi et al., and Erchegyi et al., J. Med. Chem. 2003, preceding papers in this issue) allow a detailed study of the structure-activity relationship of SRIF. The proposed consensus structural motif at the binding pocket for the sst(4)-selective analogues requires a unique set of distances between an indole/2-naphthyl ring, a lysine side chain, and another aromatic ring. This motif is necessary and sufficient to explain the binding affinities of all of the analogues studied and is distinct from the existing model suggested for sst(2)/sst(5) selectivity. PMID:14667215

  4. Structure Activity Relationship of (N)-Methanocarba Phosphonate Analogues of 5’-AMP as Cardioprotective Agents Acting Through a Cardiac P2X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, T. Santhosh; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Yang, Tiehong; Liang, Bruce T.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    P2X receptor activation protects in heart failure models. MRS2339 3, a 2-chloro-AMP derivative containing a (N)-methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) system, activates this cardioprotective channel. Michaelis–Arbuzov and Wittig reactions provided phosphonate analogues of 3, expected to be stable in vivo due to the C-P bond. After chronic administration via a mini-osmotic pump (Alzet), some analogues significantly increased intact heart contractile function in calsequestrin-overexpressing mice (genetic model of heart failure) compared to vehicle-infused mice (all inactive at the vasodilatory P2Y1 receptor). Two phosphonates, (1’S,2’R,3’S,4’R,5’S)-4’-(6-amino-2-chloropurin-9-yl)-2’,3’-(dihydroxy)-1’-(phosphonomethylene)-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane 4 and its homologue 9, both 5’-saturated, containing a 2-Cl substitution, improved echocardiography-derived fractional shortening (20.25% and 19.26%, respectively, versus 13.78% in controls), while unsaturated 5’-extended phosphonates, all 2-H analogues, and a CH3-phosphonate were inactive. Thus, chronic administration of nucleotidase-resistant phosphonates conferred a beneficial effect, likely via cardiac P2X receptor activation. Thus, we have greatly expanded the range of carbocyclic nucleotide analogues that represent potential candidates for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:20192270

  5. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  6. The expanding role of somatostatin analogs in gastroenteropancreatic and lung neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cives, Mauro; Strosberg, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) were initially developed as antisecretory agents used for the control of hormonal syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In recent years, accumulating evidence has also supported their role as antiproliferative agents in well or moderately differentiated NETs. The phase III PROMID trial demonstrated that octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) can significantly prolong time to progression among patients with metastatic midgut NETs. More recently, the randomized CLARINET trial reported a significant improvement in progression-free survival in a heterogeneous population of patients with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP)-NETs treated with depot lanreotide. Octreotide and lanreotide target somatostatin receptor subtypes in a similar fashion, and appear to be clinically interchangeable; however, comparative noninferiority trials have not been performed. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of novel SSAs such as pasireotide in the refractory setting, and the role of high-dose SSAs for symptom and tumor control. PMID:25911185

  7. Pituitary: Secretory Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much prolactin, the hormone that causes milk production. Prolactinomas affect both men and women. While excess ... acting somatostatin analogue, a drug that suppresses GH production. Somatostatin analogues are given by a monthly injection ...

  8. Promoter Hypermethylation-Related Reduced Somatostatin Production Promotes Uncontrolled Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leiszter, Katalin; Sipos, Ferenc; Galamb, Orsolya; Krenács, Tibor; Veres, Gábor; Wichmann, Barna; Fűri, István; Kalmár, Alexandra; Patai, Árpád V.; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Background Somatostatin (SST) has anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Our aims were to analyze and compare the SST expression during normal aging and colorectal carcinogenesis at mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, we tested the methylation status of SST in biopsy samples, and the cell growth inhibitory effect of the SST analogue octreotide in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line. Methods Colonic samples were collected from healthy children (n1 = 6), healthy adults (n2 = 41) and colorectal cancer patients (CRCs) (n3 = 34) for SST mRNA expression analysis, using HGU133 Plus2.0 microarrays. Results were validated both on original (n1 = 6; n2 = 6; n3 = 6) and independent samples ((n1 = 6; n2 = 6; n3 = 6) by real-time PCR. SST expressing cells were detected by immunohistochemistry on colonic biopsy samples (n1 = 14; n2 = 20; n3 = 23). The effect of octreotide on cell growth was tested on Caco-2 cell line. SST methylation percentage in biopsy samples (n1 = 5; n2 = 5; n3 = 9) was defined using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme digestion. Results In case of normal aging SST mRNA expression did not alter, but decreased in cancer (p<0.05). The ratio of SST immunoreactive cells was significantly higher in children (0.70%±0.79%) compared to CRC (0%±0%) (p<0.05). Octreotide significantly increased the proportion of apoptotic Caco-2 cells. SST showed significantly higher methylation level in tumor samples (30.2%±11.6%) compared to healthy young individuals (3.5%±1.9%) (p<0.05). Conclusions In cancerous colonic mucosa the reduced SST production may contribute to the uncontrolled cell proliferation. Our observation that in colon cancer cells octreotide significantly enhanced cell death and attenuated cell proliferation suggests that SST may act as a regulator of epithelial cell kinetics. The inhibition of SST expression in CRC can be epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation. PMID:25723531

  9. [Therapy with somatostatin analogs in patient with orbitopathy and positive Octreoscan].

    PubMed

    Pichler, R; Maschek, W; Holzinger, C

    2001-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated 28 persons with active endocrine ophthalmopathy and positive sonographic criteria (A-mode) on extraocular eye muscles. To evaluate somatostatin-receptor status SPECT of the orbits was performed with a double-headed rotating gamma camera after application of 110 MBq 111-In-Pentreotide. 9 patients (12/56 eyes respectively) showed a marked uptake ratio (> 2 in circular ROIs by semiquantitative calculation) and were selected for lanreotide (30 mg i.m. every 14 d) treatment. 5 individuals had control scan after clinical progression which became positive in two of them. All but one tolerated modest side-effects of lanreotide treatment (diarrhea). Therapy was discontinued after 3-10 months when thyroid eye disease had lead to fibrotic stage. This subgroup, with the exception of two women, who received corticosteroids additionally, presented stable disease. One of those had to be sent to surgery because of endangered optical nerve. Clinical ophthalmological control showed promising results in patients receiving somatostatin analogues at early stage when positive on octreo-scan. PMID:11593900

  10. Somatostatin modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in canine antral muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Koelbel, C.B.; van Deventer, G.; Khawaja, S.; Mogard, M.; Walsh, J.H.; Mayer, E.A. UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA )

    1988-02-01

    Somatostatin has been shown to inhibit antral motility in vivo. To examine the effect of somatostatin on cholinergic neurotransmission in the canine antrum, we studied the mechanical response of and the release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine from canine longitudinal antral muscle in response to substance P, gastrin 17, and electrical stimulation. In unstimulated tissues, somatostatin had a positive inotropic effect on spontaneous phasic contractions. In tissues stimulated with substance P and gastrin 17, but not with electrical stimulation, somatostatin inhibited the phasic inotropic response dose dependently. This inhibitory effect was abolished by indomethacin. Somatostatin stimulated the release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} radioimmunoreactivity, and prostaglandin E{sub 2} inhibited the release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. Somatostatin increased the release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine from unstimulated tissues by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive mechanism but inhibited the release induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. These results suggest that somatostatin has a dual modulatory effect on cholinergic neutrotransmission in canine longitudinal antral muscle. This effect is excitatory in unstimulated tissues and inhibitory in stimulated tissues. The inhibitory effect is partially mediated by prostaglandins.

  11. Immunoreactive and biologically active somatostatin in human and sheep milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Millar, R P; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1985-04-15

    The presence of immunoreactive and biologically active somatostatin in sheep and human milk has been demonstrated. Milk somatostatin exhibits similar chromatographic behavior to that of synthetic somatostatin-14 on both reversed-phase C18 and cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography columns. Milk, in contrast to plasma, contains only somatostatin-14-like material. Milk somatostatin was capable of inhibiting the basal and the prostaglandin-induced release of growth hormone from anterior pituitary cell cultures in a pattern similar to synthetic somatostatin-14. The concentrations of the peptide, as determined by radioimmunoassay, were found to be 113 pg/ml in human milk and 150 +/- 4.8 pg/ml (mean +/- range) in sheep milk. These values are severalfold higher than the corresponding concentration of the peptide in the plasma of these species. These findings are analogous to our previous observations concerning two other hypothalamic hormones, luliberin and thyroliberin [Baram, T., Koch, Y., Hazum, E. and Fridkin, M. (1977) Science (Wash. DC) 198, 300-302]. The high concentration of somatostatin and other neuropeptides in milk implies either an active concentrating mechanism in the mammary gland or an additional extrahypothalamic source for the synthesis and release of these peptides. PMID:2859195

  12. Evidence for selective release of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28(1-12) from rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhit, C.; Koda, L.; Benoit, R.; Morrison, J.H.; Bloom, F.E.

    1984-02-01

    Cysteamine administration to rats results in a marked depletion of hypothalamic somatostatin-14 (SS14) and a decrease of the potassium-evoked in vitro release of SS14 without a significant change in the content or release of somatostatin-28(1-12)-like immunoreactivity (SS28(1-12)-L1). Furthermore, cysteamine enhances the spontaneous release and markedly potentiates the potassium-evoked release of SS14 in the in vitro slice preparation. However, in vitro-administered cysteamine does not alter the spontaneous or potassium-evoked release of SS28(1-12)-LI. Immunohistochemical visualization of hypothalamic neuronal cell bodies and fibers following cysteamine administration shows a disappearance of the SS14 immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies with no apparent change in the SS28(1-12) immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies. These data suggest that, in rat hypothalamus, selective release of SS14 and SS28(1-12) can occur. The results are discussed in relation to possible sites of storage and release of the somatostatin-related peptides from synaptic nerve terminals.

  13. Detection of somatostatin receptors in surgical and percutaneous needle biopsy samples of carcinoids and islet cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Kvols, L K; Waser, B; Nagorney, D M; Heitz, P U; Charboneau, J W; Reading, C C; Moertel, C

    1990-09-15

    Somatostatin (SS) receptor status was investigated in the tumor tissues from 62 patients with carcinoid tumors and 15 patients with islet cell carcinomas using receptor autoradiography techniques with two different iodinated somatostatin analogues as radioligands, a [Leu8, DTrp22, Tyr25]somatostatin-28 and a somatostatin octapeptide, Tyr3-octreotide. The carcinoid tumors were either primaries (n = 32) or metastases (n = 43), sampled as surgical specimens or as small needle liver biopsies. Fifty-four of 62 carcinoid patients had SS receptor-positive tumors (87%). All 15 islet cell carcinoma patients had positive tumors (4 primaries, 11 metastases), i.e., 3 vipomas, 3 insulinomas, 2 glucagonomas, 1 gastrinoma, 2 polyfunctional tumors, and 4 nonfunctioning tumors. Saturation and competition experiments on tissue sections revealed saturable, high affinity binding sites pharmacologically specific for bioactive SS analogues. In a majority of the tumors, the receptors were densely distributed and were always homogeneously found in the whole tumor. All except two tumors were labeled with both radioligands. Multiple liver metastases (n = 16) from three different patients were all shown to contain a comparable amount of receptors. SS receptors could be demonstrated even in very small tissue samples of liver metastases obtained by percutaneous liver biopsies (mean weight, 6.8 mg). The majority of the eight SS receptor-negative carcinoids were mainly bronchial carcinoids (n = 5), usually poorly differentiated. On the contrary, SS receptor-positive cases were never found to be anaplastic. All tumors except one from patients pretreated with octreotide (3 days to 3.8 years) were SS receptor positive. In the majority of carcinoids or islet cell carcinomas, the SS receptor status correlated with the in vivo biochemical response (hormone inhibition) to octreotide. These data demonstrate (a) the high prevalence of SS receptors in the primary tumors of both carcinoids and islet cell

  14. Hyperactive somatostatin interneurons contribute to excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Lifeng; Liang, Bo; Schroeder, David; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Cox, Gregory A; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Using TDP-43(A315T) mice, an ALS and FTD model with marked cortical pathology, we found that hyperactive somatostatin interneurons disinhibited layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5-PNs) and contributed to their excitotoxicity. Focal ablation of somatostatin interneurons efficiently restored normal excitability of L5-PNs and alleviated neurodegeneration, suggesting a new therapeutic target for ALS and FTD. PMID:26900927

  15. [Insulin analogues: modifications in the structure, molecular and metabolic consequences].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Romero, E

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has provided insulin analogues for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, with an efficacy and safety that has improved the treatment of this disease. We briefly review the principal characteristics of the insulin analogues currently available. Both rapid-acting (lispro, aspart and glulisine) and long acting (glargine and determir) insulin analogues are included in this review. We describe the pharmacology of each insulin analogue, their differences with the human insulin, the administration, indication, efficacy and safety. In addition we discussed the main controversies of the use of these insulin analogues. In particular, those related with the risk of cancer and retinopathy, and their use in pregnant women. PMID:23517895

  16. Preservation of the Blood Brain Barrier and Cortical Neuronal Tissue by Liraglutide, a Long Acting Glucagon-Like-1 Analogue, after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hakon, Jakob; Ruscher, Karsten; Tomasevic, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common complication following moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and a significant risk factor for development of neuronal death and deterioration of neurological outcome. To this date, medical approaches that effectively alleviate cerebral edema and neuronal death after TBI are not available. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has anti-inflammatory properties on cerebral endothelium and exerts neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 on secondary injury after moderate and severe TBI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected either to TBI by Controlled Cortical Impact (CCI) or sham surgery. After surgery, vehicle or a GLP-1 analogue, Liraglutide, were administered subcutaneously twice daily for two days. Treatment with Liraglutide (200 μg/kg) significantly reduced cerebral edema in pericontusional regions and improved sensorimotor function 48 hours after CCI. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier was markedly preserved in Liraglutide treated animals, as determined by cerebral extravasation of Evans blue conjugated albumin. Furthermore, Liraglutide reduced cortical tissue loss, but did not affect tissue loss and delayed neuronal death in the thalamus on day 7 post injury. Together, our data suggest that the GLP-1 pathway might be a promising target in the therapy of cerebral edema and cortical neuronal injury after moderate and severe TBI. PMID:25822252

  17. Characterization of a somatostatin-28 containing the (Tyr-7, Gly-10) derivative of somatostatin-14: a terminal active product of prosomatostatin II processing in anglerfish pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Morel, A; Gluschankof, P; Gomez, S; Fafeur, V; Cohen, P

    1984-11-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius) Brockmann organs contain a form of somatostatin-14, identical to the hypothalamic tetradecapeptide, and two distinct forms of somatostatin-28, which can be separated by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analysis of the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and comparison of the ability to incorporate 125I indicate that one of these forms corresponds to an octacosapeptide including in its sequence the (Tyr-7, Gly-10) derivative of somatostatin-14 (somatostatin II). Exposure of this somatostatin-28 species to an endopeptidase activity from the rat brain cortex generates a peptide immunologically related to somatostatin and undistinguishable from synthetic (Tyr-7, Gly-10) somatostatin-14 II by HPLC. This somatostatin-28 II exhibits a potent inhibitory effect on growth hormone release by rat anterior pituitary cells, comparable to the other somatostatin-28 form. Since (Tyr-7, Gly-10) somatostatin-14 II cannot be detected in anglerfish pancreatic islets, these results indicate that somatostatin-28 II represents the terminal active product of prosomatostatin II processing, whose structure was predicted from the cDNA nucleotide sequence corresponding to the second mRNA cloned from anglerfish Brockmann organs [Hobart, P., Crawford, R., Shen, L. P., Pictet, R. & Rutter, W. J. (1980) Nature (London) 288, 137-141]. PMID:6150481

  18. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors. PMID:26084221

  19. Somatostatin, neuronal vulnerability and behavioral emotionality

    PubMed Central

    Lin, LC; Sibille, E

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) deficits are common pathological features in depression and other neurological disorders with mood disturbances, but little is known about the contribution of SST deficits to mood symptoms or causes of these deficits. Here we show that mice lacking Sst (SstKO) exhibit elevated behavioral emotionality, high basal plasma corticosterone and reduced gene expression of Bdnf, Cortistatin, and Gad67, together recapitulating behavioral, neuroendocrine and molecular features of human depression. Studies in SstKO and heterozygous (SstHZ) mice show that elevated corticosterone is not sufficient to reproduce the behavioral phenotype, suggesting a putative role for Sst cell-specific molecular changes. Using laser-capture microdissection, we show that cortical SST-positive interneurons display significantly greater transcriptome deregulations after chronic stress compared to pyramidal neurons. Protein translation through eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (EIF2) signaling, a pathway previously implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, was most affected and suppressed in stress-exposed SST neurons. We then show that activating EIF2 signaling through EIF2 kinase inhibition mitigated stress-induced behavioral emotionality in mice. Together, our data suggest that (1) low SST plays a causal role in mood-related phenotypes, (2) deregulated EIF2-mediated protein translation may represent a mechanism for vulnerability of SST neurons, and (3) that global EIF2 signaling has antidepressant/anxiolytic potential. PMID:25600109

  20. Impairment in motor learning of somatostatin null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zeyda, T; Diehl, N; Paylor, R; Brennan, M B; Hochgeschwender, U

    2001-07-01

    Somatostatin was first identified as a hypothalamic factor which inhibits the release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (somatotropin release inhibitory factor, SRIF). Both SRIF and its receptors were subsequently found widely distributed within and outside the nervous system, in the adult as well as in the developing organism. Reflecting this wide distribution, somatostatin has been implicated regulating a diverse array of biological processes. These include body growth, homeostasis, sensory perception, autonomous functions, rate of intestinal absorption, behavior, including cognition and memory, and developmental processes. We produced null mutant mice lacking somatostatin through targeted mutagenesis. The mutant mice are healthy, fertile, and superficially indistinguishable from their heterozygous and wildtype littermates. A 'first round' phenotype screen revealed that mice lacking somatostatin have elevated plasma growth hormone levels, despite normal body size, and have elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels. In order to uncover subtle and unexpected differences, we carried out a systematic behavioral phenotype screen which identified a significant impairment in motor learning revealed when increased demands were made on motor coordination. Motor coordination and motor learning require an intact cerebellum. While somatostatin is virtually absent from the adult cerebellum, the ligand and its receptor(s) are transiently expressed at high levels in the developing cerebellum. This result suggests the functional significance of transient expression of SRIF and its receptors in the development of the cerebellum. PMID:11430867

  1. Synthesis and radiolabeling of a somatostatin analog for multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    A new multimodal imaging agent for imaging the somatostatin receptor has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A somatostatin analog, conjugated to both 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaceticacid (DOTA) and cypate (BS-296), was synthesized entirely on the solid phase (Fmoc) and purified by RP-HPLC. DOTA was added as a ligand for radiometals such as 64Cu or 177Lu for either radio-imaging or radiotherapy respectively. Cytate, a cypatesomatostatin analog conjugate, has previously demonstrated the ability to visualize somatostatin receptor rich tumor xenografts and natural organs by optical imaging techniques. BS-296 exhibited low nanomolar inhibitory capacity toward the binding of radiolabeled somatostatin analogs in cell membranes enriched in the somatostatin receptor, demonstrating the high affinity of this multimodal imaging peptide and indicating its potential as a molecular imaging agent. 64Cu, an isotope for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy, was selected as the isotope for radiolabeling BS-296. BS-296 was radiolabeled with 64Cu in high specific activity (200 μCi/μg) in 90% radiochemical yield. Addition of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid) prevented radiolysis of the sample, allowing for study of the 64Cu -BS-296 the day following radiolabeling. Furthermore, inclusion of DMSO at a level of 20% was found not to interfere with radiolabeling yields and prevented the adherence of 64Cu -BS-296 to the walls of the reaction vessel.

  2. Comparative analysis of the river buffalo somatostatin gene.

    PubMed

    Stafuzza, N B; Borges, M M; Amaral, M E J

    2014-01-01

    The somatostatin protein plays a crucial role in the regulation of multiple biological functions, such as growth, fat deposition, and nutrient absorption in vertebrates. Polymorphisms in the somatostatin gene have been associated with growth traits in livestock species, including cattle and goat. In this study, we conducted complete molecular characterization of the somatostatin gene in Bubalus bubalis (Murrah breed) by sequencing a Murrah BAC clone spanning 72,489 base pairs (bp) in length. The buffalo somatostatin gene contains 1481 bp organized into a 5'-untranslated region (135 bp), exon 1 (139 bp), intron 1 (839 bp), exon 2 (212 bp), and 3'UTR (156 bp). Comparative analysis between the buffalo somatostatin DNA coding sequence and the amino acid sequence with other bovids (cattle, goat, and sheep), horse, pig, human, rodents (mouse and rat), and chicken. Identity varied from 83-99% on the DNA sequence level and 88-100% on the protein level. In addition, a comparison of gene sequences between Murrah and Mediterranean breeds revealed 6 potential single-nucleotide polymorphisms (1 in exon 1 and 5 in intron 1), which were validated in different buffalo populations. This comparative analysis provides basic information for future studies of different buffalo herds using the position candidate gene approach, quantitative trait loci analysis, and polymorphisms associated with growth traits. PMID:25501213

  3. P12: Somatostatin analogs as maintenance therapy in heavily pretreated thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giovannella; Ottaviano, Margaret; Nappi, Lucia; Rescigno, Pasquale; Tucci, Irene; Marino, Mirella; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Damiano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare neoplasms with a particular biological behavior, treated with a combination of therapeutic strategies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and target agents. No continuation maintenance therapy exists for these rare tumors. A high uptake of indium-labeled octreotide (111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide) and curative application of somatostatin analogs in thymic tumors have been widely demonstrated. Methods Eighteen patients (nine women and nine men, median age 54.5 years; range, 32–78 years) with advanced thymic tumors (seven patients with stage III; seven with IVa; four with IVb according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system), histotype sec. WHO revised by central review (three AB, two B1, three B2, five B3, three B2/B3, two thymic carcinoma) with a partial response or stable disease to conventional chemotherapeutic regimens platinum or not platinum-based, after performed OctreoScan, were enrolled in this monocentric referral center study. The schedule includes administration of long-acting analog octreotide (30 mg/every 28 days intramuscularly), until progression of disease was documented. Median time to progression and toxicity were evaluated. Results Median follow-up was of 43 months with a median time to progression of 14.5 months (range, 2–77 months). Treatment was generally well tolerated with acceptable toxicity: grade 1 diarrhea (five patients), grade 2 hyperglycemia (four patients). No patients interrupted treatment because of toxicity. Conclusions The current study indicates that single-agent somatostatin analogs maintenance therapy is a potential treatment strategy for advanced TETs OctreoScan positive which respond to previous conventional chemotherapy. In particular, somatostatin analogs may provide effective maintenance treatment duration regardless of histotype and stage of disease with an acceptable toxicity and an improved patients’ compliance.

  4. Evidence that somatostatin is localized and synthesized in lymphoid organs

    SciTech Connect

    Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Dees, W.L.; Haensly, W.E. )

    1991-12-15

    Because several peptides originally found in the pituitary as within the central nervous system have been localized in lymphoid tissues and because somatostatin (somatotropin-release-inhibiting hormone, SRIH) can act on cells of the immune system, the authors searched for this peptide in lymphoid organs. The authors demonstrated that SRIH mRNA exists in lymphoid tissue, albeit in smaller levels that in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus, the brain region that contains the highest level of this mRNA. SRIH mRNA was found in the spleen and thymus of male rats and in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius of the chicken. Its localization in the Bursa indicates that the peptide must be present in B lymphocytes since this is the site of origin of B lymphocytes in birds. The SRIH concentration in these lymphoid organs as determined by radioimmunoassay was greater in the thymus than in the spleen of the rat. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of SRIH-positive cells in clusters inside the white pulp and more dispersed within the red pulp of the spleen of both the rat and the chicken. The thymus from these species also contained SRIH-positive cells within the medulla and around the corticomedullary junction. In the chicken, there were large cluster of SRIH-positive cells in the medullary portion of each nodule of the bursa of Fabricius. The results indicate that SRIH is synthesized and stored in cells of the immune system. SRIH may be secreted from these cells to exert paracrine actions that alter the function of immune cells in spleen and thymus.

  5. Positron emission tomographic imaging of copper 64- and gallium 68-labeled chelator conjugates of the somatostatin agonist tyr3-octreotate.

    PubMed

    Nedrow, Jessie R; White, Alexander G; Modi, Jalpa; Nguyen, Kim; Chang, Albert J; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional chelator and radiometal have been shown to have a direct effect on the pharmacokinetics of somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-targeted imaging agents. We evaluated three Y3-TATE analogues conjugated to NOTA-based chelators for radiolabeling with 64Cu and 68Ga for small-animal positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging. Two commercially available NOTA analogues, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and NODAGA, were evaluated. The p-SCN-Bn-NOTA analogues were conjugated to Y3-TATE through β-Ala and PEG8 linkages. The NODAGA chelator was directly conjugated to Y3-TATE. The analogues labeled with 64Cu or 68Ga were analyzed in vitro for binding affinity and internalization and in vivo by PET/CT imaging, biodistribution, and Cerenkov imaging (68Ga analogues). We evaluated the effects of the radiometals, chelators, and linkers on the performance of the SSTR subtype 2--targeted imaging agents and also compared them to a previously reported agent, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE. We found that the method of conjugation, particularly the length of the linkage between the chelator and the peptide, significantly impacted tumor and nontarget tissue uptake and clearance. Among the 64Cu- and 68Ga-labeled NOTA analogues, NODAGA-Y3-TATE had the most optimal in vivo behavior and was comparable to 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE. An advantage of NODAGA-Y3-TATE is that it allows labeling with 64Cu and 68Ga, providing a versatile PET probe for imaging SSTr subtype 2-positive tumors. PMID:25060207

  6. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin peptides on the rat anococcygeus muscle in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, T.; Woodruff, G. N.

    1988-01-01

    1. Electrically evoked contractions of the rat anococcygeus muscle were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by somatostatin-14 (SS14), -28 (SS28) and two synthetic hexapeptide analogues: L-363,301 (Pro-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Phe) and L-363,586 (N-Me-Ala-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Phe), with pIC50 values of 7.41, 7.38, 7.07 and 8.34, respectively. 2. The inhibitory effects of SS14 were dependent on stimulation frequency and external calcium ion concentration. Calcium behaved as a non-competitive antagonist of SS14, it reduced the maximal inhibitory effect of the peptide and at a concentration of 5.08 mM it significantly affected the pIC50 value. 3. SS14 (3 x 10(-7) M) did not affect the tonic actions of bath-applied noradrenaline in the absence of field stimulation. 4. The effects of SS14 persisted in naloxone (10(-5) M) and were, therefore, not due to an action at opiate receptors. Furthermore, experiments involving the lyophilization of bath contents, showed no evidence to support an indirect mechanism involving the release of an endogenous inhibitory substance. 5. High concentrations (10(-5) M) of SS14 or L-363,301 inhibited the relaxation response evoked by electrical stimulation of guanethidine (3 x 10(-4) M)-treated preparations. 6. These results are consistent with similar actions of SS14 on other smooth muscle preparations and are presumed to reflect a presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release by a direct action on somatostatin receptors. The antagonistic effect of calcium on this response is discussed with reference to a possible role in receptor desensitization. PMID:2900039

  7. Long-acting insulin analogues (insulin glargine or determir) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in the paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Barrio Castellanos, Raquel

    2005-12-01

    Despite many improvements in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1), the non-physiological time-action profiles of conventional insulins remain a significant obstacle. In recent years, recombinant DNA technology has been used to design insulin molecules that overcome the limitations of regular and NPH insulin. The rapid insulin analogs used as prandial and the long-acting insulin analogs used as basal simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. The efficacy of insulin analogs now available for multiple daily injection (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy in DM1 has been established in pediatric patients. Insulin pumps have improved since they were first introduced. CSII therapy may provide an effective alternative for selected pediatric patients with DM1. In most studies at pediatric age, CSII therapy resulted in a improvement in HbA1c, a decreased rate of hypoglycemia without an abnormal increase in BMI, and without adversely affecting psychosocial outcomes in children and adolescents with DM1. PMID:16398447

  8. Discovery of carbohybrid-based 2-aminopyrimidine analogues as a new class of rapid-acting antimalarial agents using image-based cytological profiling assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukjun; Lim, Donghyun; Lee, Eunyoung; Lee, Nakyung; Lee, Hong-Gun; Cechetto, Jonathan; Liuzzi, Michel; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Song, Jin Sook; Bae, Myung Ae; Oh, Sangmi; Ayong, Lawrence; Park, Seung Bum

    2014-09-11

    New antimalarial agents that exhibit multistage activities against drug-resistant strains of malaria parasites represent good starting points for developing next-generation antimalarial therapies. To facilitate the progression of such agents into the development phase, we developed an image-based parasitological screening method for defining drug effects on different asexual life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. High-throughput screening of a newly assembled diversity-oriented synthetic library using this approach led to the identification of carbohybrid-based 2-aminopyrimidine compounds with fast-acting growth inhibitory activities against three laboratory strains of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum. Our structure-activity relationship study led to the identification of two derivatives (8aA and 11aA) as the most promising antimalarial candidates (mean EC50 of 0.130 and 0.096 μM against all three P. falciparum strains, selectivity indices >600, microsomal stabilities >80%, and mouse malaria ED50 values of 0.32 and 0.12 mg/kg/day, respectively), targeting all major blood stages of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum parasites. PMID:25137549

  9. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  10. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Large, Adam M; Kunz, Nicholas A; Mielo, Samantha L; Oswald, Anne-Marie M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  11. Functional and cooperative interactions between the homeodomain PDX1, Pbx, and Prep1 factors on the somatostatin promoter.

    PubMed

    Goudet, G; Delhalle, S; Biemar, F; Martial, J A; Peers, B

    1999-02-12

    Expression of the somatostatin gene in endocrine pancreatic cells is controlled by several regulatory cis-elements located in the promoter region. Among these, the adjacent UE-A and TSEI elements, located from -113 to -85 relative to the transcription initiation site, function in combination and act as a pancreas-specific mini-enhancer. The TSEI element is recognized by the pancreatic homeodomain factor PDX1. In the present study, we show that the UE-A element binds a heterodimeric complex composed of a Pbx factor and the Prep1 protein, both belonging to the atypical three-amino acid loop extension homeodomain family. Recombinant Pbx1 and Prep1 proteins bind cooperatively to the UE-A site, whereas neither protein can bind this site alone. Transient transfection experiments reveal that both Pbx1 and Prep1 are required to generate a strong transcriptional activation from the UE-A element when this element is inserted close to the TATA box. In contrast, in the context of the intact somatostatin promoter or mini-enhancer, Pbx1 and Prep1 alone have no effect, but they produce a drastic activation when the pancreatic homeodomain factor PDX1 is also coexpressed. Thus, the activity of the somatostatin mini-enhancer is mediated by a cooperative interaction between the Pbx-Prep1 heterodimeric complex and the pancreatic factor PDX1. PMID:9933599

  12. Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside, a novel salicylic acid analogue, acts as an anti-inflammatory agent on microglia and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation has been known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of microglia and astrocytes is a characteristic of brain inflammation. Epidemiological studies have shown that long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) delays the onset of AD and suppresses its progression. Methyl salicylate-2-O-β-D-lactoside (DL0309) is a new molecule chemically related to salicylic acid. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of DL0309. Findings Our studies show that DL0309 significantly inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and the expression of the inflammation-related proteins iNOS, COX-1, and COX-2 by microglia and astrocytes. At a concentration of 10 μM, DL0309 prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB in glial cells by blocking phosphorylation of IKK and p65, and by blocking IκB degradation. Conclusions We demonstrate here for the first time that DL0309 exerts anti-inflammatory effects in glial cells by suppressing different pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS/NO. Furthermore, it also regulates the NF-κB signaling pathway by blocking IKK and p65 activation and IκB degradation. DL0309 also acts as a non-selective COX inhibitor in glial cells. These studies suggest that DL0309 may be effective in the treatment of neuroinflammatory disorders, including AD. PMID:21831328

  13. Effects of somatostatin and related peptides on the membrane potential and input resistance of rat ventral subicular neurons, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Greene, J R; Mason, A

    1996-02-01

    The effects of bath-applied somatostatin (SS), and related peptides on the membrane potential and input resistance of 117 ventral subicular neurons were investigated by intracellular recording in rat brain slices. Electrophysiological properties, which included burst-firing in response to depolarizing current pulses, indicated that the neurons studied were of the pyramidal type. For the 89 cells analyzed quantitatively, membrane potential was -69.1 +/- 0.3 mV (mean +/- S.E.) and input resistance was 23.9 +/- 0.5 megohms. SS (5 microM) caused a hyperpolarization of 3.4 +/- 0.3 mV (n = 9) and reduced input resistance by 16 +/- 3.1% (n = 6). SS D-Trp8, somatostatin, octreotide, CGP 23996 and MK 678 shared these effects, but somatostatin was inactive. SS effects persisted when bathing solutions contained tetrodotoxin, reduced calcium and elevated magnesium concentrations and when both of these treatments were combined. They were unaltered by antagonists at gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors or at ionotropic glutamate receptors. The effects of MK 678, SS, SS D-Trp8 and somatostatin were concentration-dependent, and these peptides were equipotent at 500 nM and at 5 microM. For MK 678, the EC50 was 316 nM for the hyperpolarization and 90 nM for the reduction in input resistance. We conclude that SS acts directly on pyramidal neurons of the rat subiculum to cause a hyperpolarization and a decrease in input resistance. We suggest that these effects are mediated by the SSTR2 receptor subtype. PMID:8632306

  14. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  15. Pros and cons in endocrine practice: pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogues in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Bollerslev, Jens

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this commentary is to balance the pros and cons for pre-surgical SSA treatment in a modern perspective ending up with a pragmatic recommendation for treatment based on the current evidence and expertise of the authors. Even though prospective and randomized studies in this particular area are hampered by obvious limitations, the interpretation of the four published trials has in general been in favor of pre-treatment with SSA, showing a better outcome following surgery. However, major drawbacks of these studies, such as non-optimal diagnostic criteria for cure, potential selection bias, and timing of the postoperative evaluation in SSA pre-treated patients, limit their overall interpretation. Three matched-controlled studies showed remarkably similar results with no apparent beneficial effect of SSA pre-treatment on surgical outcome. Both prospective, randomized studies and retrospective studies did not find any significant difference in the rate of endocrine and non-endocrine complications related to surgery, despite the beneficial clinical effects of SSA treatment in most acromegalic patients. The newly diagnosed patient with acromegaly should be carefully evaluated in the trans-disciplinary neuroendocrine team and treatment individualized accordingly. The issue of SSA pre-treatment to improve surgical outcome is yet to be settled and further methodologically sound studies are probably necessary to clarify this point. PMID:26785848

  16. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor. PMID:27101376

  17. Heterocyclic chalcone analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Vipin; Kumar, Pradeep

    2013-03-01

    Chalcones, aromatic ketones and enones acting as the precursor for flavonoids such as Quercetin, are known for their anticancer effects. Although, parent chalcones consist of two aromatic rings joined by a three-carbon α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system, various synthetic compounds possessing heterocyclic rings like pyrazole, indole etc. are well known and proved to be effective anticancer agents. In addition to their use as anticancer agents in cancer cell lines, heterocyclic analogues are reported to be effective even against resistant cell lines. In this connection, we hereby highlight the potential of various heterocyclic chalcone analogues as anticancer agents with a brief summary about therapeutic potential of chalcones, mechanism of anticancer action of various chalcone analogues, and current and future prospects related to the chalcones-derived anticancer research. Furthermore, some key points regarding chalcone analogues have been reviewed by analyzing their medicinal properties. PMID:22721390

  18. Processing of receptor-bound somatostatin: internalization and degradation by pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1987-04-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated the presence of specific binding sites for somatostatin on plasma membranes from pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study they attempted to characterize the fate of receptor-bound /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin. Internalization of somatostatin was rapid (reaching a plateau at 20% of the cell-associated specific radioactivity) and temperature dependent. To follow the processing of bound somatostatin, acini were incubated with /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin at 5/sup 0/C during 16 h then, after washing, incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min in fresh medium. Surface-bound somatostatin decreased rapidly, whereas radioactivity increased in the cell interior and the incubation medium. Intracellular and membrane-bound radioactivity was mainly intact /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin. Degradation occurred at the plasma membrane level and led to iodotyrosine production. After 15 min of incubation, 15% of the initially surface-bound /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin was compartmentalized within the cell, mainly in the microsomal fraction. After 30 min, a significant increase in radioactivity appeared in the nuclear fraction. These results indicate that the major part of somatostatin cellular degradation takes place at the plasma membrane level. Within the cell, somatostatin is routed to the nucleus via particular fractions sedimenting with microsomal vesicles.

  19. Somatostatin analog (SMS 201-995) inhibits the basal and angiotensin II-stimulated sup 3 H-thymidine uptake by rat adrenal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlikowski, M.; Lewinski, A.; Sewerynek, E.; Szkudlinski, M.; Kunert-Radek, J.; Wajs, E. )

    1990-02-14

    The effects of a long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995 injections on the basal and angiotensin II-stimulated ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake by the rat adrenal glands incubated in vitro were examined. It was shown that SMS 201-995 significantly inhibited the ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake and, additionally, suppressed the stimulatory effect of a single angiotensin II injection.

  20. Pharmacological characterisation of the goldfish somatostatin sst5 receptor.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Caroline; Feuerbach, Dominik; Lin, Xinwei; Peter, Richard; Hoyer, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release inhibiting factor, SRIF), exerts its effects via specific G protein coupled receptors of which five subtypes have been cloned (sst1-5). Recently, SRIF receptors have also been cloned from fish tissues. In this study, goldfish sst5 receptors (gfsst5) were expressed and characterised in the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line, that harbours the luciferase reporter gene driven by the serum responsive element (CCL39-SRE-Luci). The agonist radioligands [125I]-LTT-SRIF-28 ([Leu8, DTrp22, 125I-Tyr25]SRIF-28) and [125I][Tyr10]cortistatin-14 labelled similar receptor densities with high affinity and in a saturable manner (pKd: 9.99-9.71; Bmax: 300-350 fmol mg-1). 5'-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate inhibited radioligand binding to some degree (38.5-57.9%). In competition binding studies, the pharmacological profile of SRIF binding sites defined with [125I]LTT-SRIF-28 and [125I][Tyr10]cortistatin-14 correlated significantly (r2=0.97, n=20). Pharmacological profiles of human and mouse sst5 receptors expressed in CCL39 cells correlated markedly less with those of the gfsst5 profile (r2=0.52-0.78, n > or = b16). Functional expression of the gfsst5 receptor was examined by measurement of agonist-induced luciferase expression and stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS ([35S]guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) binding. Profiles were similar to those achieved in radioligand binding studies (r2=0.81-0.93, n=20), although relative potency (pEC50) was reduced compared to pKd values. Relative efficacy profiles of luciferase expression and [35S]GTPgammaS binding, were rather divergent (r2=0.48, n=20) with peptides showing full agonism at one pathway and absence of agonism at the other. BIM 23056 (D-Phe-Phe-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Phe-D-Nal-NH2) acted as an antagonist on the effects of SRIF-14 (pKB=6.74 +/- 0.23) on stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Pertussis toxin abolished the effect of SRIF-14 on luciferase expression and [35S]GTPgammaS binding suggesting

  1. Research Resource: Real-Time Analysis of Somatostatin and Dopamine Receptor Signaling in Pituitary Cells Using a Fluorescence-Based Membrane Potential Assay.

    PubMed

    Günther, Thomas; Culler, Michael; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Stable somatostatin analogues and dopamine receptor agonists are the mainstay for the pharmacological treatment of functional pituitary adenomas; however, only a few cellular assays have been developed to detect receptor activation of novel compounds without disrupting cells to obtain the second messenger content. Here, we adapted a novel fluorescence-based membrane potential assay to characterize receptor signaling in a time-dependent manner. This minimally invasive technique provides a robust and reliable read-out for ligand-induced receptor activation in permanent and primary pituitary cells. The mouse corticotropic cell line AtT-20 endogenously expresses both the somatostatin receptors 2 (sst2) and 5 (sst5). Exposure of wild-type AtT-20 cells to the sst2- and sst5-selective agonists BIM-23120 and BIM-23268, respectively, promoted a pertussis toxin- and tertiapin-Q-sensitive reduction in fluorescent signal intensity, which is indicative of activation of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels. After heterologous expression, sst1, sst3, and sst4 receptors also coupled to GIRK channels in AtT-20 cells. Similar activation of GIRK channels by dopamine required overexpression of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). Interestingly, the presence of D2Rs in AtT-20 cells strongly facilitated GIRK channel activation elicited by the sst2-D2 chimeric ligand BIM-23A760, suggesting a synergistic action of sst2 and D2Rs. Furthermore, stable somatostatin analogues produced strong responses in primary pituitary cultures from wild-type mice; however, in cultures from sst2 receptor-deficient mice, only pasireotide and somatoprim, but not octreotide, induced a reduction in fluorescent signal intensity, suggesting that octreotide mediates its pharmacological action primarily via the sst2 receptor. PMID:26967369

  2. Reduced Numbers of Somatostatin Receptors in the Cerebral Cortex in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint Beal, M.; Mazurek, Michael F.; Tran, Vinh T.; Chattha, Geetinder; Bird, Edward D.; Martin, Joseph B.

    1985-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor concentrations were measured in patients with Alzheimer's disease and controls. In the frontal cortex (Brodmann areas 6, 9, and 10) and temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21), the concentrations of somatostatin in receptors in the patients were reduced to approximately 50 percent of control values. A 40 percent reduction was seen in the hippocampus, while no significant changes were found in the cingulate cortex, postcentral gyrus, temporal pole, and superior temporal gyrus. Scatchard analysis showed a reduction in receptor number rather than a change in affinity. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in both the frontal and temporal cortex. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was linearly related to somatostatin-receptor binding in the cortices of Alzheimer's patients. These findings may reflect degeneration of postsynaptic neurons or cortical afferents in the patients' cerebral cortices. Alternatively, decreased somatostatinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease might indicate increased release of somatostatin and down regulation of postsynaptic receptors.

  3. Gastrointestinal somatostatin: extraction and radioimmunoassay in different species.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, C; Arnold, R; Bothe, E; Becker, H; Köbberling, J; Creutzfeldt, W

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay capable of detecting 300 fg somatostatin has been developed and levels of the polypeptide in gastrointestinal tissues from man, dog, and rat have been measured. Rapid freezing of collected samples and careful control of extraction is necessary. Concentrations in different regions of dog antrum (425 +/- 50 to 773 +/- 254 ng/g tissue) are similar to those in antrum from duodenal ulcer patients and control subjects: 614 +/- 125 and 465 +/- 104 ng/g tissue respectively. Levels in histologically normal human pancreas (253 +/- 43 ng/g tissue) are comparable with those in dog pancreas (333 +/- 66 ng/g tissue), whereas in two cases of neonatal hypoglycaemia the concentration exceeded 3000 ng/g tissue. On gel chromatography the majority of immunoreactive somatostatin elutes as the synthetic tetradecapeptide and a small fraction as a larger species. PMID:680597

  4. Electrophysiological actions of somatostatin on the atrioventricular junction in sinus rhythm and reentry tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S C; Krikler, D M; Hendry, W G; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1986-01-01

    Because somatostatin, a neuroregulatory peptide, is found in abundance in the atria and atrioventricular node, its electrophysiological and antiarrhythmic properties were compared with those of verapamil in ten patients with paroxysmal atrioventricular tachycardia. During sinus rhythm, intravenous somatostatin slowed the heart rate whereas verapamil increased it. Though both agents prolonged atrioventricular conduction time and refractoriness, verapamil was more potent. They were equally effective at terminating reentry atrioventricular tachycardia, restoring sinus rhythm in six of seven patients. Whereas verapamil consistently blocked conduction in the atrioventricular node, somatostatin usually induced ventricular extrasystoles at the time of conversion. Somatostatin may have physiological importance in the neurohumoral control of cardiac impulse formation and conduction. PMID:2875723

  5. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Schaer, J. C.; Markwalder, R.; Waser, B.; Horisberger, U.; Laissue, J.

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9825475

  6. Down-regulation of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 by somatostatin receptor subtype 5: a novel mechanism for inhibition of cellular proliferation and insulin secretion by somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guisheng; Sinnett-Smith, Jim; Liu, Shi-He; Yu, Juehua; Wu, James; Sanchez, Robbi; Pandol, Stephen J.; Abrol, Ravinder; Nemunaitis, John; Rozengurt, Enrique; Brunicardi, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) is a regulatory peptide and acts as an endogenous inhibitory regulator of the secretory and proliferative responses of target cells. SST’s actions are mediated by a family of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors that comprise five distinct subtypes (SSTR1-5). SSTR5 is one of the major SSTRs in the islets of Langerhans. Homeodomain-containing transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) is essential for pancreatic development, β cell differentiation, maintenance of normal β cell functions in adults and tumorigenesis. Recent studies show that SSTR5 acts as a negative regulator for PDX-1 expression and that SSTR5 mediates somatostatin’s inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and insulin expression/excretion through down-regulating PDX-1 expression. SSTR5 exerts its inhibitory effect on PDX-1 expression at both the transcriptional level by down-regulating PDX-1 mRNA and the post-translational level by enhancing PDX-1 ubiquitination. Identification of PDX-1 as a transcriptional target for SSTR5 may help in guiding the choice of therapeutic cancer treatments. PMID:25009500

  7. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use SST analogs or radiolabeled SST analogs in the treatment of SCLC patients. In the current review, we would focus on the possible role of SST analogs in SCLC. PMID:27067504

  8. Multiple G-protein-dependent pathways mediate the antisecretory effects of somatostatin and clonidine in the HT29-19A colonic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, G; Turnberg, L A; Higgs, N B; Tonge, A; Grundy, J; Fogg, K E

    1993-01-01

    Using the functionally differentiated colonic cell line, HT29-19A, we have examined sites at which inhibitory G-proteins mediate the antisecretory actions of somatostatin (SST) and the alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, clonidine (CLON) at the epithelial level. Both agents caused a dose-dependent inhibition (EC50:SST 35 nM; CLON 225 nM) of Cl- secretion (assessed by changes in short circuit current) activated by cAMP-mediated agonists, PGE2 and cholera toxin. Inhibition was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular cAMP accumulation and could be blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin at a concentration (200 ng/ml) which activated ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kD inhibitory G protein in HT29-19A membranes. Secretion stimulated by the permeant cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP, was also inhibited by SST and CLON (30-50%; P < 0.005), indicating additional inhibitory sites located distal to cAMP production. Both agents were effective inhibitors of secretion mediated through the Ca2+ signaling pathway. SST (1 microM) and CLON (10 microM) reduced the Isc response to the muscarinic agonist, carbachol, by 60-70%; inhibition was reversed in pertussis toxin-treated cells. These effects did not, however, involve inhibition of the carbachol-induced increase in cellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate levels or the rise in cytosolic calcium, [Ca]i. Inhibition by SST of secretion induced by phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate but not by the calcium agonist, thapsigargin, suggests that SST may act at a distal inhibitory site in the Ca(2+)-dependent secretory process activated by protein kinase C. We conclude that SST and alpha 2-adrenergic agonists can act directly on intestinal epithelial cells to exert a comprehensive inhibition of Cl- secretion mediated through both cAMP and Ca2+/protein kinase C signaling pathways. Inhibition is mediated via pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins at sites located both proximal and distal to the production of second messengers. Images PMID:8102378

  9. Novel gold nanoparticles coated with somatostatin as a potential delivery system for targeting somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed A H; Zayed, Gamal; El-Bakry, Asmaa; Zaky, Alaa; Saleem, Imran Y; Tawfeek, Hesham M

    2016-11-01

    Targeting of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) like somatostatin-14 (SST-14) could have a potential interest in delivery of anti-cancer agents to tumor cells. Attachment of SST to different nano-carriers e.g. polymeric nanoparticles is limited due to the difficulty of interaction between SST itself and those nano-carriers. Furthermore, the instability problems associated with the final formulation. Attaching of SST to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using the positive and negative charge of SST and citrate-AuNPs could be considered a new technique to get stable non-aggregated AuNPs coated with SST. Different analyses techniques have been performed to proof the principle of coating between AuNPs and SST. Furthermore, cellular uptake studies on HCC-1806, HELA and U-87 cell lines has been investigated to show the ability of AuNPs coated SST to enter the cells via SST receptors. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated a successful coating of SST on the MUA-AuNPs surface. Furthermore, all the performed analysis including DLS, SDS-PAGE and UV-VIS absorption spectra indicated a successful coating of AuNPs with SST. Cellular uptake studies on HCC-1806, HELA and U-87 cell lines showed that the number of AuNPs-SST per cell is signiflcantly higher compared to citrate-AuNPs when quantified using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Moreover, the binding of AuNPs-SST to cells can be suppressed by addition of antagonist, indicating that the binding of AuNPs-SST to cells is due to receptor-specific binding. In conclusion, AuNPs could be attached to SST via adsorption to get stable AuNPs coated SST. This new formulation has a potential to target SST receptors localized in many normal and tumor cells. PMID:27032509

  10. The complete amino-acid sequence of anglerfish somatostatin-28 II. A new octacosapeptide containing the (Tyr7, Gly10) derivative of somatostatin-14 I.

    PubMed

    Morel, A; Chang, J Y; Cohen, P

    1984-09-17

    A new somatostatin-28 has been isolated from the Teleostean fish (Lophius piscatorius) Brockmann organs. Determination of its aminoacid sequence indicates that it corresponds to an octacosapeptide containing in its C-terminal end the Tyr-7 Gly-10 derivative of somatostatin-14 I. This structure is in agreement with the one predicted by Hobart et al. (Nature (1980) 288, 137-141) from a cDNA nucleotide sequence. It demonstrates that, since the corresponding somatostatin-14 II cannot be detected in this organ, S-28 II is a terminal product of prosomatostatin II processing in anglerfish pancreatic islets. PMID:6148264

  11. GH and IGF-I induction by passive immunization of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum using a somatostatin 14 antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of the growth axis by somatostatin was studied in juvenile rainbow trout using passive immunization with a previously isolated somatostatin antibody (antiSS-14). Upon subcutaneously injection of laying hens (Gallus domesticus) with conjugated somatostatin-14 (SS-14), the antiSS-14 was iso...

  12. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-09-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p)>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/. When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor.

  13. Somatostatin immunoreactive cells in lesional psoriatic human skin during peptide T treatment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Talme, T; Marcusson, J A; Wetterberg, L

    1994-03-01

    Peptide T has been shown to be an effective treatment in psoriasis. The mechanism through which peptide T works in psoriasis is at present unknown. Furthermore, a clearance of psoriasis has also been registered using the inhibitory peptide somatostatin. These observations all focus on the fact that peptide T, somatostatin, and/or other peptides, might provide a clue to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis. Therefore, the effect of peptide T administration on somatostatin containing cutaneous cell populations was investigated. Ten psoriatic patients were treated with peptide T (D-Ala-peptide T amide; 2 mg/day i.v.) for 28 days. Serial biopsies were obtained from the psoriatic lesions before, once weekly during and 4 weeks after discontinuation of the peptide T treatment. An indirect immunofluorescence procedure was performed using a polyclonal antiserum against somatostatin. Clinically, most of the patients responded successfully to the treatment. Immunohistochemical investigations of the serial biopsies revealed the appearance of extensive changes in the number of dermal somatostatin immunoreactive dendritic cells. We believe that peptide T may stimulate the local synthesis and/or release of somatostatin, or proliferation and/or migration of certain dendritic cell populations in psoriatic lesions during healing. Since the benefits of peptide T treatment of psoriatic patients parallel earlier investigations using somatostatin infusions, it is likely that somatostatin given exogenously or synthesized/released endogenously plays a vital role in inducing the healing process.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7911613

  14. Activation of a protein tyrosine phosphatase and inactivation of Raf-1 by somatostatin.

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, D B; Wood, S L; Brautigan, D L; Bell, G I; Dent, P; Sturgill, T W

    1996-01-01

    Human somatostatin receptor 3 ('hsstr3') was transiently expressed in NIH 3T3 cells stably transformed with Ha-Ras (G12V). Somatostatin activated a protein tyrosine phosphatase and inactivated the constitutively active, membrane-associated form of the Raf-1 serine kinase present in these cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:8670047

  15. Reduced brain somatostatin in mood disorders: a common pathophysiological substrate and drug target?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Chun; Sibille, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of affect dysregulation has progressively increased, but the pharmacological treatments remain inadequate. Here, we summarize the current literature on deficits in somatostatin, an inhibitory modulatory neuropeptide, in major depression and other neurological disorders that also include mood disturbances. We focus on direct evidence in the human postmortem brain, and review rodent genetic and pharmacological studies probing the role of the somatostatin system in relation to mood. We also briefly go over pharmacological developments targeting the somatostatin system in peripheral organs and discuss the challenges of targeting the brain somatostatin system. Finally, the fact that somatostatin deficits are frequently observed across neurological disorders suggests a selective cellular vulnerability of somatostatin-expressing neurons. Potential cell intrinsic factors mediating those changes are discussed, including nitric oxide induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, high inflammatory response, high demand for neurotrophic environment, and overall aging processes. Together, based on the co-localization of somatostatin with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its presence in dendritic-targeting GABA neuron subtypes, and its temporal-specific function, we discuss the possibility that deficits in somatostatin play a central role in cortical local inhibitory circuit deficits leading to abnormal corticolimbic network activity and clinical mood symptoms across neurological disorders. PMID:24058344

  16. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity is found in dendritic guard cells of human sweat ducts.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Wang, L

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin is reported in a new population of human sweat duct cells. The epithelial content of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in normal human skin from various sites of the body was investigated using indirect immunofluorescence. With this methodology we found round-to-oval somatostatin-immunoreactive cells situated outside the lining sweat duct cells at the level of the stratum spinosum. The cells had processes that were clearly directed towards the duct lumen, passing between the lining duct cells. This finding raises new questions and ideas about somatostatin's role in the skin, and could point to a possible involvement of somatostatin in immune defense, sweat secretion modification, antiproliferation, or other actions. PMID:8097870

  17. Early Somatostatin Interneuron Connectivity Mediates the Maturation of Deep Layer Cortical Circuits.

    PubMed

    Tuncdemir, Sebnem N; Wamsley, Brie; Stam, Floor J; Osakada, Fumitaka; Goulding, Martyn; Callaway, Edward M; Rudy, Bernardo; Fishell, Gord

    2016-02-01

    The precise connectivity of somatostatin and parvalbumin cortical interneurons is generated during development. An understanding of how these interneuron classes incorporate into cortical circuitry is incomplete but essential to elucidate the roles they play during maturation. Here, we report that somatostatin interneurons in infragranular layers receive dense but transient innervation from thalamocortical afferents during the first postnatal week. During this period, parvalbumin interneurons and pyramidal neurons within the same layers receive weaker thalamocortical inputs, yet are strongly innervated by somatostatin interneurons. Further, upon disruption of the early (but not late) somatostatin interneuron network, the synaptic maturation of thalamocortical inputs onto parvalbumin interneurons is perturbed. These results suggest that infragranular somatostatin interneurons exhibit a transient early synaptic connectivity that is essential for the establishment of thalamic feedforward inhibition mediated by parvalbumin interneurons. PMID:26844832

  18. Somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with indium-111 pentetreotide (Octreoscan).

    PubMed

    Olsen, J O; Pozderac, R V; Hinkle, G; Hill, T; O'Dorisio, T M; Schirmer, W J; Ellison, E C; O'Dorisio, M S

    1995-07-01

    Somatostatin, a naturally occurring 14-amino acid peptide, can be thought of as an anti-growth hormone and functional down-regulator of sensitive tissue. Most neuroendocrine tumors seem to possess somatostatin receptors in sufficient abundance to allow successful scintigraphic imaging with radiolabeled somatostatin congeners. Several of these, including Indium-III-DTPA Pentetreotide (Octreoscan [Mallinckrodt Medical, St. Louis, MO]), which was approved for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration in June 1994, have been of considerable value in scintigraphically identifying various neuroendocrine tumors. The Octreoscan compares favorably with other imaging modalities. The success of somatostatin receptor imaging in evaluating patients with suspected neuroendocrine tumors, including identifying otherwise radiographically occult lesions, has resulted in ranking somatostatin receptor imaging as the prime imaging procedure in patients with suspected neuroendocrine tumors at The Ohio State University. PMID:7570044

  19. The role of brain somatostatin receptor 2 in the regulation of feeding and drinking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Taché, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin was discovered four decades ago as hypothalamic factor inhibiting growth hormone release. Subsequently, somatostatin was found to be widely distributed throughout the brain and to exert pleiotropic actions via interaction with five somatostatin receptors (sst1-5) that are also widely expressed throughout the brain. Interestingly, in contrast to the predominantly inhibitory actions of peripheral somatostatin, the activation of brain sst2 signaling by intracerebroventricular injection of stable somatostatin agonists potently stimulates food intake and independently, drinking behavior in rodents. The orexigenic response involves downstream orexin-1, neuropeptide Y1 and μ receptor signaling while the dipsogenic effect is mediated through the activation of the brain angiotensin 1 receptor. Brain sst2 activation is part of mechanisms underlying the stimulation of feeding and more prominently water intake in the dark phase and is able to counteract the anorexic response to visceral stressors. PMID:26026616

  20. Cysteamine normalizes cerebral somatostatin level and binding in pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Ozo, E.; Lopez-Ruiz, M.P.; Gonzalez-Guijarro, L.; Arilla, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Rats were kindled by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) every 48 h. Once kindled, some of the animals received a single injection of cysteamine. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) and {sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 11} -somatostatin binding were measured in the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus of the two experimental groups and the control rats. After PTZ kindling the following was observed: (1) SLI content was increased int he two areas; (2) Somatostatin receptor affinity decreased in the frontoparietal cortex and was unaltered in the hippocampus; (3) The number of somatostatin receptors decreased in the hippocampus and was unaltered in the frontoparietal cortex. Cysteamine, an agent which depletes brain somatostatin and suppresses kindled seizures in PTZ-treated rats, revered the altered SLI levels and binding in these rats.

  1. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  2. Ontogeny of somatostatin mRNA-containing perikarya in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick-McElligott, S.; Card, J.P.; O'Kane, T.M.; Baldino, F. Jr. )

    1991-02-01

    The distribution of neuronal perikarya containing somatostatin mRNA in the developing rat brain was investigated with in situ hybridization histochemistry. This study describes the expression of somatostatin mRNA during selected perinatal stages and demonstrates regional changes in somatostatin mRNA expression at the single cell level. The mRNA expression closely parallels previously reported developmental localization of the peptide. As early as embryonic day 13 (E13), somatostatin mRNA was observed in discrete spinal cord and brainstem regions. At birth, densely hybridized somata could be seen primarily in ventral and caudal brain areas with small scattered neurons in the hippocampus and dorsal neocortex. After birth, somatostatin mRNA increased in forebrain regions, such as the hippocampus, dorsal neocortex, and caudate. By postnatal day 14 (P14), the distribution in the telencephalic and diencephalic regions approached that of the adult brain. Several brain regions manifested large changes in the density of somatostatin mRNA hybridization during development. For example, the cerebellar vermis and brainstem contained somatostatin mRNA perikarya during early postnatal development but decreased in these regions in the adult. During perinatal development, increases in somatostatin mRNA content were the results of increases in both the number of neurons containing somatostatin mRNA as well as in the amount of this mRNA expressed in each cell. As the brain differentiates, the apparent numbers of somatostatin mRNA containing neurons in certain brain regions are reduced. These data provide evidence for transient somatostatinergic neurons during early development in discrete areas of the occipital cortex, pyriform cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem and suggest that this peptide may play a role in the development of these regions.

  3. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Catriona; Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  4. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  5. Somatostatin-receptor positive brain stem glioma visualized by octreoscan.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Pichler, Josef; Mustafa, Hamdy; Nussbaumer, Karin; Zaunmüller, Thomas; Topakian, Raffi

    2007-06-01

    In diffuse brainstem gliomas often surgical biopsies cannot be obtained. The diagnosis relies upon imaging criteria, first line being MRI. Gliomas generally express somatostatin receptors (SSTR), which might enable receptor imaging. We present the case of a female adolescent with acute onset of hallucinations, dysphagia and diplopia. MRI detected a suggestive large pontine glioma. This lesion presented with marked In-111-pentreotide tracer uptake. SSTR-scan provided information about SSTR-expression, tumour viability and extension. Radiopeptide therapy for selected patients might be discussed. PMID:17627256

  6. Hippocampal Somatostatin Interneurons Control the Size of Neuronal Memory Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Thomas; Bertollini, Cristina; Lüscher, Christian; Muller, Dominique; Mendez, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal neurons activated during encoding drive the recall of contextual fear memory. Little is known about how such ensembles emerge during acquisition and eventually form the cellular engram. Manipulating the activity of granule cells (GCs) of the dentate gyrus (DG), we reveal a mechanism of lateral inhibition that modulates the size of the cellular engram. GCs engage somatostatin-positive interneurons that inhibit the dendrites of surrounding GCs. Our findings reveal a microcircuit within the DG that controls the size of the cellular engram and the stability of contextual fear memory. PMID:26875623

  7. Clearance of Immunoreactive Somatostatin by Perfused Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Harold; Terry, L. Cass

    1981-01-01

    Other investigators have demonstrated that concentrations of immunoreactive somatostatin (IRS) are higher in blood from the hepatic portal vein or its tributaries than in blood from the hepatic or peripheral systemic veins of man and animals. This suggests that there is hepatic extraction of IRS from the portal system in vivo. In the rat, portal vein plasma IRS is reported to be heterogeneous and to contain, in part, a 1,600 mol wt form of IRS which is immunochemically similar to synthetic somatostatin and not significantly bound to high molecular weight plasma protein. Our study was undertaken to determine directly whether unbound synthetic cyclic somatostatin was cleared by the rat liver perfused through the hepatic portal vein in vitro with a recirculating, plasma-free, erythrocyte-containing perfusate. At 37°C and pH 7.40, perfusate IRS, at initial concentrations (1,728 pg/ml) within the range previously reported in rat portal venous blood, was removed by the liver at a rate commensurate with first-order kinetics. Hepatic clearance was 0.84±0.04 ml/min per g postperfusion wet weight (SE). Hepatic extraction was 36±2%, and t½ was 20.0±1.3 min. Recovery of IRS from the perfusate without the liver was >85%, excluding significant degradation by the medium. Clearance, extraction, and t½ of IRS were not changed by an unphysiologic IRS concentration (621,500 pg/ml), or by pharmacologic concentrations of insulin (8.2 μM) or glucagon (2.9 μM). The t½ was prolonged significantly to 28.2±1.9 and 45.6±4.7 min during perfusions at liver temperatures of 25° and 16°C, respectively. At 37°C, the t½ was also significantly increased to 28.7±3.2 and 24.2±1.1 min at perfusate pH 7.06 and 6.78, respectively. These studies indicate that the rat liver clears unbound IRS from the perfusate by a first-order kinetic process that is (a) unsaturable at pharmacologic concentrations, (b) temperature-sensitive and, to a lesser extent, influenced by lowered pH, and (c) not

  8. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells.

    PubMed

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L; Grunddal, Kaare V; Zhao, Mirabella; Barir-Jensen, Dominique; Nygaard, Eva B; Petersen, Natalia; Holst, Jens J; Schwartz, Thue W

    2015-11-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly expressed and/or enriched. 1) The metabolite receptors calcium-sensing receptor and free fatty acid receptor 4 (GPR120) functioned as positive and negative regulators, respectively. 2) Among the neurotransmitter receptors, adrenergic receptors α1a, α2a, α2b, and β1 were all highly expressed, with norepinephrine and isoproterenol acting as positive regulators. The muscarinic receptor M3 acted as a positive regulator, whereas M4 was conceivably a negative regulator. 3) Of the hormone receptors, the GLP-1 and GIP receptors, CCKb (stimulated by both CCK and gastrin) and surprisingly the melanocortin MC1 receptor were all positive regulators. 4) The neuropeptide receptors for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide acted as positive regulators, no effect was observed using galanin and nociceptin although transcripts for the corresponding receptors appeared highly expressed. 5) The SST receptors 1 and 2 functioned in an autocrine negative feedback loop. Thus, the article provides a comprehensive map of receptors through which SST secretion is regulated by hormones, neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and metabolites that act directly on the SST cells in the gastric mucosa. PMID:26181106

  9. A phase 2 trial of everolimus and pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shoushtari, Alexander N; Ong, Leonard T; Schoder, Heiko; Singh-Kandah, Shahnaz; Abbate, Kelly T; Postow, Michael A; Callahan, Margaret K; Wolchok, Jedd; Chapman, Paul B; Panageas, Katherine S; Schwartz, Gary K; Carvajal, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor would be efficacious in metastatic uveal melanoma. This was a phase 2 trial of everolimus 10 mg daily plus pasireotide long-acting release 60 mg every 28 days enrolling patients with progressive, metastatic uveal melanoma to treatment until progression by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate, defined as any objective response or RECIST 1.1 stable disease at 16 weeks. A subset of patients underwent baseline indium-111-octreotide scans. A total of 14 patients were enrolled, of which 13 were evaluable for the primary endpoint, before the study was terminated due to poor accrual. Three of 13 (26%) patients obtained clinical benefit. Seven of 13 (54%) had stable disease lasting for a median of 8 weeks (range: 8-16 weeks). Grade 3 adverse events deemed at least possibly related to study drugs were hyperglycemia (n=7), oral mucositis (n=2), diarrhea (n=1), hypophosphatemia (n=1), and anemia (n=1). Seven of 14 (50%) patients required at least one dose reduction due to toxicity. Seven of eight (88%) patients with baseline indium-111-octreotide scans had at least one avid lesion, with significant intrapatient heterogeneity. There was a trend toward an association between octreotide avidity and cytostatic response to therapy (P=0.078). The combination of everolimus and pasireotide has limited clinical benefit in this small metastatic uveal melanoma cohort. Dose reductions for side effects were common. Further investigation into the relationship between somatostatin receptor expression and cytostatic activity of somatostatin analogues is warranted. PMID:26795274

  10. [Thymoma and somatostatin analogs. Biology, diagnostic and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Palmieri, G; Montella, L; Lastoria, S

    2001-09-01

    Thymic tumours are rare neoplasms which generally follow a slow pattern of growth, showing their aggressiveness locally through the infiltration of adjacent organs and they rarely metastasise hematogenically. In the presence of locally advanced, metastatic or inoperable disease, combined strategies including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery are now being evaluated. Scintigraphy with 111In DTPA-D-Phe 1 octreotide was used for the first time in a relevant series of patients with thymic tumour (13 cases) by our research group. The presence of somatostatin receptors (ss-R) assayed in vivo provided the rationale for the use of a treatment based on the octreotide analog in a patient with thymoma and aplasia of the erythroid series (pure red cell aplasia, PRCA) in whom a complete response for the tumour and the remission of anemia was obtained. The efficacy of this treatment was confirmed by our series of patients with chemoresistant thymic tumour and by national and international confirmations. These data, ranging from in vivo diagnosis to treatment and the in vitro study of receptor expression, confirm that somatostatin plays a major role in thymic tumours. PMID:11753243

  11. Expression of Somatostatin Receptor Type 2A and PTEN in Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Is Associated with Tumor Grade but Not with Site of Origin.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Matsuda, Katsuya; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Miura, Shiro; Ueki, Nozomi; Kinoshita, Akira; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are derived from endocrine cells in various organs and share common morphological features. This study aimed to clarify whether NENs of different organs are comparable at the molecular pathologic level. We retrospectively collected 99 cases of NENs from gastro-entero-pancreatic, lung, and other organs and reclassified these according to identical criteria. Grade, site, and molecular expression profile including NE markers, Ki-67, p53, somatostatin receptor type 2A (SSTR2A), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were compared. PTEN immunoreactivity was also compared with genomic copy number by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). No significant differences were observed in the immunoreactivities of NE markers, p53, SSTR2A, or PTEN expression in NENs between the different organ sites. PTEN and p53 functional inactivation along with the loss of membranous SSTR2A expression appeared to be commonly involved in high-grade NEN. FISH results were significantly correlated with the level of PTEN immunoreactivity and with the findings of ddPCR analyses. The demonstration that these tumors are comparable at the molecular level will likely contribute to the broadening of therapeutic options such as the use of somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors against NENs regardless of the affected organ, whereas molecular characterization of tumor grade will be useful for determining treatment strategy. PMID:27256098

  12. The synergistic inhibitory effect of somatostatin-doxorubicin co-treatment on gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Yu; Quan, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Background Gallbladder cancer is the most common billiary tract malignancy and carries a very poor prognosis. Somatostatin was recently shown to play an important role in the development of various tumors. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of doxorubicin on the chemosensitivity of gallbladder cancer cells and xenograft growth after treatment with somatostatin. Methods Twenty-four hours after somatostatin treatment, doxorubicin was gradually added and the growth curve of gallbladder cancer cells was determined. Exponential-phase gallbladder cancer cells were treated with doxorubicine or co-treated with doxorubicine and somastatine and the respective IC50 values were determined. In addition, the inhibitory effect on the growth of gallbladder cancer xenograft on nude mice was evaluated using the same treatments as those described above. Results Treatment of gallbladder cancer cells with somatostatin led to a block in the cell cycle at the S phase. Growth inhibition of gallbladder cancer cells by doxorubicin was concentration-dependent (P < 0.05). However, upon co-treatment with doxorubicin and somatostatin, the IC50 value significantly decreased as compared to that of cells treated with doxorubicine alone (P < 0.05). Interestingly, treatment with either doxorubicin or somatostatin did not significantly inhibit xenograft growth on nude mice, in contrast to a co-treatment with both drugs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Somatostatin most likely sensitizes the chemotherapeutic effect and diminishes the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in a gallbladder cancer cell line and in mouse gallbladder cancer xenografts. PMID:17617924

  13. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a brain-specific somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J F; Xu, Y; Song, J; Berelowitz, M

    1992-01-01

    The PCR and conventional library screening were used to clone the brain-specific somatostatin receptor rSSTR-4 from a rat genomic library. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 384 amino acids and displays structural and sequence homologies with members of the G protein-receptor superfamily. The amino acid sequence of rSSTR-4 is 60% and 48% identical to that of somatostatin receptors SSTR-1 and SSTR-2, respectively, two recently cloned subtypes. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor transiently expressed in COS-1 cells revealed a higher apparent affinity for somatostatin 14 than for somatostatin 28. In contrast, the somatostatin analogs SMS 201-995, IM 4-28, and MK-678 failed to displace specific binding in transfected cells. These characteristics resemble the pharmacological binding properties of the previously described brain-specific somatostatin-receptor subtype. Examination of the tissue distribution of mRNA for rSSTR-4 revealed expression limited to various brain regions with highest levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Thus, based on the pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor, we conclude that rSSTR-4 represents a brain-specific somatostatin receptor. Images PMID:1360663

  14. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of multiply-tyrosinated, multiply-iodinated somatostatin analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Woltering, E A.; O'Dorisio, M S.; Murphy, W A.; Chen, F; Drouant, G J.; Espenan, G D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Sharma, C; Diaco, D S.; Maloney, T M.; Fuselier, J A.; Nelson, J A.; O'Dorisio, T M.; Coy, D H.

    1999-02-01

    Radio-labeled somatostatin analogs have recently gained popularity as agents useful in intraoperative tumor localization, external scintigraphy and in situ radiotherapy. We have synthesized and characterized a series of novel N-terminally extended multiply-tyrosinated somatostatin analogs that possess high binding affinity for somatostatin receptors, exhibit biological activity comparable to the native peptide and retain these characteristics after iodination. These analogs can be radio-iodinated to high specific activities. Following radio-iodination, these analogs exhibit minimal radiolysis and may be clinically useful for tumor localization, scanning and therapy.

  16. [Somatostatin-producing endocrine pancreatic tumor in Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Saurenmann, P; Binswanger, R; Maurer, R; Stamm, B; Hegglin, J

    1987-07-25

    Somatostatin-producing tumors of the pancreas were first described in 1977. In 1983 a syndrome involving multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN) was named type III A. This syndrome consists of carcinoid of the duodenum, often producing somatostatin, and von Recklinghausen's disease (neurofibromatosis) or pheochromocytoma. The case is reported of a 62-year-old man with familial neurofibromatosis and a tumor of the head of the pancreas spreading into pars II of the duodenum. After Whipple's duodenopancreatectomy the patient exhibited no further symptoms. Immunohistochemistry served to prove the production of somatostatin and small amounts of calcitonin in the tumor. PMID:2890200

  17. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in aqueous media. V. The effect of the disulfide bridge on the structural features of the peptide hormone somatostatin-14.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Carelli, Claude; Coïc, Yves-Marie; De Coninck, Joël; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2009-09-24

    To emphasize the role played by the S-S bridge in the structural features of somatostatin-14 (SST-14), newly recorded CD and Raman spectra of this cyclic peptide and its open analogue obtained by Cys-->Ser substitution are presented. CD spectra of both peptides recorded in aqueous solutions in the 100-500 microM concentration range are strikingly similar. They reveal principally that random conformers constitute the major population in both peptides. Consequently, the S-S bridge has no structuring effect at submillimolar concentrations. In methanol, the CD spectrum of somatostatin-14 keeps globally the same spectral shape as that observed in water, whereas its open analogue presents a major population of helical conformers. Raman spectra recorded as a function of peptide concentration (5-20 mM) and also in the presence of 150 mM NaCl provide valuable conformational information. All Raman spectra present a mixture of random and beta-hairpin structures for both cyclic and open peptides. More importantly, the presence or the absence of the disulfide bridge does not seem to influence considerably different populations of secondary structures within this range of concentrations. CD and Raman data obtained in the submillimolar and millimolar ranges of concentrations, respectively, lead us to accept the idea that SST-14 monomers aggregate upon increasing concentration, thus stabilizing beta-hairpin conformations in solution. However, even at high concentrations, random conformers do not disappear. Raman spectra of SST-14 also reveal a concentration effect on the flexibility of the S-S linkage and consequently on that of its cyclic part. In conclusion, although the disulfide linkage does not seem to markedly influence the SST-14 conformational features in aqueous solutions, its presence seems to be necessary to ensure the flexibility of the cyclic part of this peptide and to maintain its closed structure in lower dielectric constant environments. PMID:19708669

  18. Inhibitory effects of somatostatin on tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-6 secretion in human pancreatic periacinar myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Akira; Hata, Kazunori; Shimada, Mitsue; Fujino, Sanae; Tasaki, Kazuhito; Bamba, Shigeki; Araki, Yoshio; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Bamba, Tadao

    2002-07-01

    Pancreatic periacinar myofibroblasts are considered to be therapeutic targets for the suppression of acute pancreatitis. To elucidate the mechanisms mediating the therapeutic actions of somatostatin on acute pancreatitis, we investigated how somatostatin affects the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion from pancreatic myofibroblasts. Cytokine secretion was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Northern blotting. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB DNA-binding activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSAs). The expression of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) mRNA was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Somatostatin dose-dependently inhibited the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 secretion. In comparison, the effects on IL-8 secretion were modest. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that somatostatin decreased the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 mRNA expression, and that this effect was completely blocked by the somatostatin antagonist cyclo-somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin suppressed TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activation. These cells bear SSTR subtypes 1 and 2. Somatostatin down-regulated the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 secretion in human pancreatic periacinar myofibroblasts. These findings suggest that some of the therapeutic actions of somatostatin on acute pancreatitis might be mediated by reducing local IL-6 secretion in the pancreas. PMID:12060857

  19. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  20. Tetrahydro-β-carboline-based spirocyclic lactam as type II' β-turn: application to the synthesis and biological evaluation of somatostatine mimetics.

    PubMed

    Lesma, Giordano; Cecchi, Roberto; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Gobbi, Marco; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Musolino, Manuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Silvani, Alessandra

    2013-03-15

    The synthesis of novel spirocyclic lactams, embodying D-tryptophan (Trp) amino acid as the central core and acting as peptidomimetics, is presented. It relies on the strategic combination of Seebach's self-reproduction of chirality chemistry and Pictet-Spengler condensation as key steps. Investigation of the conformational behavior by molecular modeling, X-ray crystallography, and NMR and IR spectroscopies suggests very stable and highly predictable type II' β-turn conformations for all compounds. Relying on this feature, we also pursued their application to two potential mimetics of the hormone somatostatin, a pharmaceutically relevant natural peptide, which contains a Trp-based type II' β-turn pharmacophore. PMID:23409740

  1. Cysteamine effects on somatostatin, catecholamines, pineal NAT and melatonin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.M.; Champney, T.H.; Steger, R.W.; Vaughan, M.K.; Reiter, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The thiol reagent cysteamine was administered to adult male rats with the aim of investigating its effect on different neural and pineal components. As expected, immunoreactive somatostatin decreased in the median eminence (ME) (p less than 0.05) and gastric antrum (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine; however, no significant change was observed in the pineal IRS content after drug treatment. A decrease in norepinephrine was observed in the ME (p less than 0.001), hypothalamus (p less than 0.001) and pineal gland (p less than 0.05), together with a rise in ME (p less than 0.005) and hypothalamic dopamine (p less than 0.005) content; these results are consistent with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibiting effect of cysteamine. No effect was observed on hypothalamic serotonin and 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid content. Pineal N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine than after saline, but no statistically significant effect was observed on pineal melatonin content. The mechanism involved in the NAT rise is presumably not related to the known stimulatory effect of norepinephrine, which fell after cysteamine. It is suggested that cysteamine may act at an intracellular level, inhibiting NAT degradation, an effect demonstrated in vitro and thought to be related to a thiol:disulfide exchange mechanism.

  2. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences with novel somatostatin ligands: advantages, disadvantages and new prospects.

    PubMed

    Hofland, L J; van der Hoek, J; Feelders, R; van der Lely, A J; de Herder, W; Lamberts, S W J

    2005-01-01

    Since the cloning and characterization of the five human somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes, our understanding of the expression and functional role of the five SSTR subtypes in human (neuro-)endocrine tumors has increased significantly. The majority of human (neuro-)endocrine tumors express multiple SSTR. GH-secreting pituitary adenomas preferentially express SSTR2 and SSTR5, prolactinomas SSTR1 and SSTR5, and corticotroph adenomas express SSTR2 (low number) and predominantly SSTR5s. In addition, gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors frequently express multiple SSTR as well, with SSTR2 being expressed at the highest level. Treatment with the current generation of octapeptide somatostatin-analogs, e.g. octreotide and lanreotide, normalizes circulating GH- and IGF-I levels in approximately 60-70% of acromegalic patients, thereby remaining about one-third of patients uncontrolled. In patients with GEP neuroendocrine tumors, both somatostatin-analogs effectively suppress the production of bioactive peptides and hormones by the tumor cells, resulting in an important improvement of the related clinical symptomatology. However, a considerable proportion of patients experience an escape from treatment within months to several years. Altogether, the current generation of somatostatin analogs are effective medical tools in the treatment of acromegalic patients and of patients with neuroendocrine GEP tumors, but there is certainly a need for novel somatostatin analogs. In recent years, a significant number of novel somatostatin-ligands has been developed. These ligands include SSTR selective-, bi-specific, universal, as well as chimeric dopamine (DA)-somatostatin ligands. In vitro studies using human pituitary adenoma cells demonstrate a more profound inhibition of GH, PRL and ACTH secretion by somatostatin-analogs targeting both SSTR2s and SSTR5s, compared with SSTR2-preferential somatostatin-analogs. This likely reflects the SSTR subtype expression pattern

  3. DNA Double Strand Breaks as Predictor of Efficacy of the Alpha-Particle Emitter Ac-225 and the Electron Emitter Lu-177 for Somatostatin Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. Methods To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Results Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5–10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). Conclusion γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and

  4. Successful treatment of persistent chylopericardium with somatostatin after operation on ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Saziye; Rager, Olivier; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2014-04-01

    Chylopericardium after intrathoracic surgical procedures rarely occurs. Optimal guidelines for the management of chylopericardium are lacking. In this case report, we describe our experience in treating chylopericadium with somatostatin in a 47-year-old man who underwent replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valvuloplasty after aortic rupture. Postoperatively, a late tamponade was drained, and microbiologic analyses confirmed chyle. Conservative treatment including total parental nutrition failed, so we initiated somatostatin treatment as a continuous perfusion, with good results. PMID:24694457

  5. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  6. Somatostatin signaling system as an ancestral mechanism: Myoregulatory activity of an Allatostatin-C peptide in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2016-08-01

    The coordination of physiological processes requires precise communication between cells. Cellular interactions allow cells to be functionally related, facilitating the maintaining of homeostasis. Neuropeptides functioning as intercellular signals are widely distributed in Metazoa. It is assumed that neuropeptides were the first intercellular transmitters, appearing early during the evolution. In Cnidarians, neuropeptides are mainly involved in neurotransmission, acting directly or indirectly on epithelial muscle cells, and thereby controlling coordinated movements. Allatostatins are a group of chemically unrelated neuropeptides that were originally characterized based on their ability to inhibit juvenil hormone synthesis in insects. Allatostatin-C has pleiotropic functions, acting as myoregulator in several insects. In these studies, we analyzed the myoregulatory effect of Aedes aegypti Allatostatin-C in Hydra sp., a member of the phylum Cnidaria. Allatostatin-C peptide conjugated with Qdots revealed specifically distributed cell populations that respond to the peptide in different regions of hydroids. In vivo physiological assays using Allatostatin-C showed that the peptide induced changes in shape and length in tentacles, peduncle and gastrovascular cavity. The observed changes were dose and time dependent suggesting the physiological nature of the response. Furthermore, at highest doses, Allatostatin-C induced peristaltic movements of the gastrovascular cavity resembling those that occur during feeding. In silico search of putative Allatostatin-C receptors in Cnidaria showed that genomes predict the existence of proteins of the somatostatin/Allatostatin-C receptors family. Altogether, these results suggest that Allatostatin-C has myoregulatory activity in Hydra sp, playing a role in the control of coordinated movements during feeding, indicating that Allatostatin-C/Somatostatin based signaling might be an ancestral mechanism. PMID:27288244

  7. In vivo somatostatin, vasopressin, and oxytocin synthesis in diabetic rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Fernstrom, J.D.; Fernstrom, M.H.; Kwok, R.P. )

    1990-04-01

    The in vivo labeling of somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin was studied in rat hypothalamus after third ventricular administration of (35S)cysteine to streptozotocin-diabetic and normal rats. Immunoreactive somatostatin levels in hypothalamus were unaffected by diabetes, as was the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into hypothalamic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. In contrast, immunoreactive vasopressin levels in hypothalamus and posterior pituitary (and oxytocin levels in posterior pituitary) were below normal in diabetic rats. Moreover, (35S)cysteine incorporation into hypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin (probably mainly in the paraventricular nucleus because of its proximity to the third ventricular site of label injection) was significantly above normal. The increments in vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were reversed by insulin administration. In vivo cysteine specific activity and the labeling of acid-precipitable protein did not differ between normal and diabetic animals; effects of diabetes on vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were therefore not caused by simple differences in cysteine specific activity. These results suggest that diabetes (1) does not influence the production of somatostatin peptides in hypothalamus but (2) stimulates the synthesis of vasopressin and oxytocin. For vasopressin at least, the increase in synthesis may be a compensatory response to the known increase in its secretion that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes.

  8. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  9. Structural Analogues of Selfotel.

    PubMed

    Dziuganowska, Zofia A; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Volle, Jean-Noël; Virieux, David; Pirat, Jean-Luc; Kafarski, Paweł

    2016-06-17

    A small library of phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids, analogues of NMDA antagonist selfotel (CGS 19755), was synthesized. First, the series of aromatic esters was obtained via a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction (Hirao coupling) of dialkyl phosphites with bromopyridinecarboxylates, followed by their hydrolysis. Then, hydrogenation of the resulting phosphonopyridylcarboxylic acids over PtO2 yielded the desired phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids. NMR studies indicated that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds predominantly by cis addition. Several compounds were obtained as monocrystal structures. Preliminary biological studies performed on cultures of neurons suggest that the obtained compounds possess promising activity toward NMDA receptors. PMID:27187758

  10. Radioiodine and 211At-labeled guanidinomethyl halobenzoyl octreotate conjugates: potential peptide radiotherapeutics for somatostatin receptor-positive cancers.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Boskovitz, Abraham; Shankar, Sriram; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2004-12-01

    Derivatives of the somatostatin analogues octreotide and octreotate labeled with radioiosotopes are used in the diagnosis and therapy of somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-positive tumors. A method has been devised to synthesize {N-(4-guanidinomethyl-3-iodobenzoyl)-Phe1-octreotate (GMIBO). Receptor binding assay and scatchard analysis yielded a Kd of 4.83 +/- 0.19 nM for this peptide. Derivatives of this peptide labeled with radioiodine ([*I]GMIBO) and the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen 211At N-(3-[211At]astato-4-guanidinomethylbenzoyl)-Phe1-octreotate; [211At]AGMBO} were prepared in a single step from a tin precursor in radiochemical yields of 30-35% and 15-20%, respectively. Paired-label internalization assays performed with the SSTR-positive D341 Med human medulloblastoma cell line demonstrated that [125I]GMIBO and [211At]AGMBO were specifically internalized 20-40% more than Nalpha-(1-deoxy-D-fructosyl)-[131I]I-Tyr3-octreotate ([131I]I-Glu-TOCA), the radioiodinated octreotide derivative previously shown to exhibit maximum internalization in this cell line. Uptake of [131I]GMIBO in D341 Med subcutaneous xenografts in a murine model (8.34 +/- 1.82 versus 8.10 +/- 2.23% ID/g at 1h) and SSTR-expressing normal tissues was comparable to that of [125I]I-Glu-TOCA and was shown to be specific. However, the uptake of [131I]GMIBO also was substantially higher in liver (16.9 +/- 3.15 versus 1.39 +/- 0.45% ID/g at 1 h) and in kidneys (44.33 +/- 6.47 versus 3.44 +/- 0.68% ID/g at 1h) compared to that of [125I]I-Glu-TOCA. These data suggest that these novel peptide conjugates retain their specificity for SSTR both in vitro and in vivo; however, because of their higher accumulation in normal tissues they would be best applied in settings amenable to loco-regional administration such as medulloblastoma neoplastic meningitis. PMID:15572196

  11. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  12. Serial follow-up of presurgical treatment using pasireotide long-acting release with or without octreotide long-acting release for naïve active acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Tseng, Ham-Min; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the serial changes of GH and IGF-1 in seven patients with naïve, active acromegaly following presurgical treatment of the somatostatin analog pasireotide long-acting release (LAR) and octreotide LAR. The patients were treated with pasireotide LAR with or without octreotide LAR for two years and underwent transsphenoidal adenomectomy. After treatment with the somatostatin analogs, the surgical cure rate was similar to that in patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery alone. Diabetes insipidus was not identified in any patients after the operation. Pasireotide LAR was effective on GH as well as IGF-1 suppression and tumor size decreasing when used as the primary therapy. Future large-population studies to investigate the surgical curative rate after presurgical treatment with somatostatin analogs in patients with acromegaly and macroadenomas close to the cavernous sinus are warranted. However, that hyperglycemia developed following pre-surgical treatment with pasireotide should take into consideration. PMID:27117887

  13. Expression of the somatostatin gene in human astrocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, L; Tannenbaum, G S; Schipper, H M; Phaneuf, D; Wainberg, M A

    1996-01-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting hormone; SRIH) has been demonstrated in neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in endocrine cells of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract and can suppress various immune functions including lymphocyte proliferation, immunoglobulin synthesis, and cytokine production. Since astrocytes possess antigen-presenting activity and can secrete a wide array of immunoregulatory and inflammatory cytokines, we studied SRIH gene expression in both astrocyte cell lines and mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from healthy donors. We now report by means of a complementary DNA-based reverse transcription PCR that differential levels of SRIH mRNA were expressed in 9 of 11 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but were undetectable in activated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes as well as in a variety of human lymphocyte and monocyte cell lines. The synthesis and secretion of SRIH protein by astrocytoma cells that expressed SRIH transcripts were confirmed by specific radioimmunoassay of cell culture fluids. These findings support the notion that SRIH gene expression occurs in human astrocytoma cells but not in mature lymphoid cells of the immune system. PMID:8991628

  14. Somatostatin triggers rhythmic electrical firing in hypothalamic GHRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Guillaume; Mitutsova, Violeta; Barre, Alexander; Granier, Manon; Fontanaud, Pierre; Chazalon, Marine; Carmignac, Danielle; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Low, Malcolm J.; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Hodson, David J.; Mollard, Patrice; Méry, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons orchestrate body growth/maturation and have been implicated in feeding responses and ageing. However, the electrical patterns that dictate GHRH neuron functions have remained elusive. Since the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is considered to be a primary oscillator of the GH axis, we examined its acute effects on GHRH neurons in brain slices from male and female GHRH-GFP mice. At the cellular level, SST irregularly suppressed GHRH neuron electrical activity, leading to slow oscillations at the population level. This resulted from an initial inhibitory action at the GHRH neuron level via K+ channel activation, followed by a delayed, sst1/sst2 receptor-dependent unbalancing of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The oscillation patterns induced by SST were sexually dimorphic, and could be explained by differential actions of SST on both GABAergic and glutamatergic currents. Thus, a tripartite neuronal circuit involving a fast hyperpolarization and a dual regulation of synaptic inputs appeared sufficient in pacing the activity of the GHRH neuronal population. These “feed-forward loops” may represent basic building blocks involved in the regulation of GHRH release and its downstream sexual specific functions. PMID:27072430

  15. Inhibition by somatostatin (growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone, GH-RIH) of gastric acid and pepsin and G-cell release of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Barros D'sa, A A; Bloom, S R; Baron, J H

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin (cyclic growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone--GH-RIH) was infused into dogs with gastric fistulae. Somatostatin inhibited gastric acid response to four gastric stimulants--insulin, food, histamine, and pentagastrin. Histamine- and pentagastrin-stimulated pepsins were inhibited similarly to inhibition of acid. Somatostatin inhibited the gastrin response to insulin and food. PMID:348581

  16. Phosphonate analogues of aminoacyl adenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, C C; Dixon, H B

    1978-01-01

    Phosphonomethyl analogues of glycyl phosphate and valyl phosphate, i.e. NH2-CHR-CO-CH2-PO(OH)2, were synthesized and esterified with adenosine to give analogues of aminoacyl adenylates. The interaction of these adenylate analogues with valyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli was studied by fluorescence titration. The analogue of valyl phosphate has an affinity for the enzyme comparable with that of valine, but that of valyl adenylate is bound much less tightly than either valyl adenylate or corresponding derivative of valinol. The affinity of the analogue of glycyl adenylate was too low to be measured. We conclude that this enzyme interacts specifically with both the side chain and the anhydride linkage of the adenylate intermediate. PMID:743207

  17. Pertussis toxin inhibits somatostatin-induced K/sup +/ conductance in human pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, N.; Kojima, I.; Shibuya, N.; Ogata, E.

    1987-07-01

    The effect of pertussis toxin on somatostatin-induced K/sup +/ current was examined in dissociated human pituitary tumor cells obtained from two acromegalic patients. Somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization or K/sup +/ current was observed in 20 of 23 cells in adenoma 1 and 10 of 11 cells in adenoma 2. After treatment with pertussis toxin for 24 h, these responses were completely suppressed (0/14 in adenoma, 1, 0/10 in adenoma 2). Spontaneous action potentials, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/ currents were well preserved after pertussis toxin treatment. When crude membrane fraction was incubated with (/sup 32/P)NAD, a 41K protein was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin. Hormone release was inhibited by somatostatin and this inhibition was blocked by pertussis toxin treatment.

  18. Mapping of somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the alpaca (Lama pacos) brainstem.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Eliana; Sánchez, Manuel Lisardo; Aguilar, Luís Ángel; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Ángel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the distribution of cell bodies and fibers containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the alpaca brainstem. Immunoreactive fibers were widely distributed throughout the whole brainstem: 34 brainstem nuclei/regions showed a high or a moderate density of these fibers. Perikarya containing the peptide were widely distributed throughout the mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata. Cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) were observed in the lateral and medial divisions of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, reticular formation (mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata), inferior colliculus, periaqueductal gray, superior colliculus, pericentral division of the dorsal tegmental nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, nucleus of the trapezoid body, vestibular nucleus, motor dorsal nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, nucleus praepositus hypoglossi, and in the substantia nigra. This widespread distribution indicates that somatostatin-28 (1-12) is involved in multiple physiological actions in the alpaca brainstem. PMID:25754727

  19. Neuronostatin Encoded by the Somatostatin Gene Regulates Neuronal, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Functions*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Willis K.; Zhang, Jian V.; Avsian-Kretchmer, Orna; Cui, Kai; Yosten, Gina L. C.; Klein, Cindy; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Wang, Yong Xiong; Chen, Xiang Qun; Yang, Jun; Price, Christopher J.; Hoyda, Ted D.; Ferguson, Alastair V.; Yuan, Xiao-bin; Chang, Jaw Kang; Hsueh, Aaron J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin is important in the regulation of diverse neuroendocrine functions. Based on bioinformatic analyses of evolutionarily conserved sequences, we predicted another peptide hormone in pro-somatostatin and named it neuronostatin. Immuno-affinity purification allowed the sequencing of an amidated neuronostatin peptide of 13 residues from porcine tissues. In vivo treatment with neuronostatin induced c-Fos expression in gastrointestinal tissues, anterior pituitary, cerebellum, and hippocampus. In vitro treatment with neuronostatin promoted the migration of cerebellar granule cells and elicited direct depolarizing actions on paraventricular neurons in hypothalamic slices. In a gastric tumor cell line, neuronostatin induced c-Fos expression, stimulated SRE reporter activity, and promoted cell proliferation. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular treatment with neuronostatin increased blood pressure but suppressed food intake and water drinking. Our findings demonstrate diverse neuronal, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular actions of a somatostatin gene-encoded hormone and provide the basis to investigate the physiological roles of this endogenously produced brain/gut peptide. PMID:18753129

  20. Developmental change and molecular properties of somatostatin receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.

    1989-04-14

    The postnatal development and molecular properties of somatostatin receptor were studied in rat cerebral cortex. With (/sup 125/I-Tyr11)SRIF as a radiolabeled ligand, the specific ligand binding to crude membrane increased transiently in the early phase of postnatal development and then decreased. This increase of somatostatin binding was mainly due to the increased number of binding sites. The two subtypes classified by Tran et al., SSA and SSB, were confirmed and the studies on the relative amount of the subtypes revealed that more SSA subtype was expressed compared with SSB subtype during a week after birth, but, thereafter, both subtypes were almost equally expressed throughout the developmental stages tested. Molecular weight of the covalently labeled somatostatin receptor (SSA subtype), which was determined with the aid of the cross-linking agents, was estimated to be approximately 71,000 with no intramolecular disulfide bond.

  1. Somatostatin and counterregulatory hormone responses to hypoglycaemia in diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Castaner, M; Webb, S; Levy, I; Rios, M; Casamitjana, R; Bergua, M; Figuerola, D; Rivera, F

    1985-04-01

    Blood glucose, somatostatin and counterregulatory hormone responses to an i.v. bolus of insulin were studied in insulin-dependent diabetics with different degrees of autonomic neuropathy, after 24 hours of optimised control with an artificial pancreas. There was no plasma catecholamine response in patients with a sympathetic autonomic neuropathy. A normal somatostatin response to hypoglycemia was absent in patients with autonomic neuropathy. Glucagon did not respond in diabetics, independently of the degree of neuropathy. In all diabetics, cortisol and GH were stimulated. Absence of warning symptoms was observed in patients with catecholamine deficiency. Despite different hormone behaviour, blood glucose fall and recovery were similar in all diabetic groups. It is concluded that the glucagon response to insulin hypoglycaemia is reduced in all type 1 longstanding diabetics, whereas catecholamine and somatostatin responses are only abolished in those with autonomic neuropathy. Patients with sympathetic neuropathy would be considered at increased risk severe hypoglycaemia. PMID:2861121

  2. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  3. Two amino acids, located in transmembrane domains VI and VII, determine the selectivity of the peptide agonist SMS 201-995 for the SSTR2 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaupmann, K; Bruns, C; Raulf, F; Weber, H P; Mattes, H; Lübbert, H

    1995-01-01

    Human somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) bind their natural ligands SRIF-14 and SRIF-28 with high affinity. By contrast, short synthetic SRIF analogues such as SMS 201-995, a peptide agonist used for the treatment of various endocrine and malignant disorders, display sub-nanomolar affinity only for the receptor subtype SSTR2. To understand the molecular nature of selective peptide agonist binding to somatostatin receptors we have now, by site-directed mutagenesis, identified amino acids mediating SMS 201-995 specificity for SSTR2. Sequentially, amino acids in SSTR1, a receptor subtype exhibiting low affinity for SMS 201-995, were exchanged for the corresponding SSTR2 residues. After three consecutive steps, in which eight amino acids were exchanged, a SSTR1 mutant receptor with high affinity for SMS 201-995 was obtained. Receptor mutants with different combinations of these eight amino acids were then constructed. A single Ser305 to Phe mutation in TM VII increased the affinity of SSTR1 for SMS 201-995 nearly 100-fold. When this mutation was combined with an exchange of Gln291 to Asn in TM VI, almost full susceptibility to SMS 201-995 was obtained. Thus, it is concluded that the specificity of SMS 201-995 for SSTR2 is mainly defined by these two amino acids in transmembrane domains VI and VII. Using the conjugate gradient method we have, by analogy to the well established structure of bacteriorhodopsin, built a model for SRIF receptor-ligand interactions that explains the importance of Gln291 and Ser305 for the selectivity of agonists. Images PMID:7882976

  4. Inhomogeneous activity distribution of 177Lu-DOTA0-Tyr3-octreotate and effects on somatostatin receptor expression in human carcinoid GOT1 tumors in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Oddstig, Jenny; Bernhardt, Peter; Lizana, Helena; Nilsson, Ola; Ahlman, Håkan; Kölby, Lars; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the activity distribution in neouroendocrine tumors after diagnostic, or therapeutic, amounts of [(177)Lu-DOTA(0)-Tyr(3)]-octreotate and to investigate how the activity distribution influences the absorbed dose. Furthermore, the activity distribution of a second administration of radiolabeled octreotate was studied. Nude mice with subcutaneously grown human midgut carcinoid (GOT1) were injected intravenously with different amounts of (177)Lu-octreotate. At different time points thereafter (4 h to 13 days), a second injection of [(111)In-DOTA(0)-Tyr(3)]-octreotate was given to estimate the somatostatin receptor (sstr) expression. The activity distribution in the tumors was then determined. Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE were performed for dosimetry. Fifty-one out of 58 investigated tumors showed a lower activity concentration in the peripheral part than in the central part of the tumor. The amount of activity injected, or time after administration, did neither influence the relative activity nor the sstr distribution in the tumor. After an initial down-regulation (at 4-24 h), there was an up-regulation of sstr (1.5-2 times, at 7-14 days). Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated an inhomogeneous absorbed dose distribution in the tumor using (177)Lu, with twice as high absorbed dose centrally than peripherally. The high activity concentration centrally and the up-regulation of sstr demonstrated will facilitate fractionated therapy using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues if similar results will be obtained also in patients. The inhomogeneous activity distribution in the tumor has to be taken into account when the absorbed dose distribution in tumor is calculated. PMID:22108870

  5. Chroman-4-one and chromone based somatostatin β-turn mimetics.

    PubMed

    Fridén-Saxin, Maria; Seifert, Tina; Malo, Marcus; da Silva Andersson, Krystle; Pemberton, Nils; Dyrager, Christine; Friberg, Annika; Dahlén, Kristian; Wallén, Erik A A; Grøtli, Morten; Luthman, Kristina

    2016-05-23

    A scaffold approach has been used to develop somatostatin β-turn mimetics based on chroman-4-one and chromone ring systems. Such derivatives could adopt conformations resembling type II or type II' β-turns. Side chain equivalents of the crucial Trp8 and Lys9 in somatostatin were introduced in the 2- and 8-positions of the scaffolds using efficient reactions. Interestingly, this proof-of-concept study shows that 4 and 9 have Ki-values in the low μM range when evaluated for their affinity for the sst2 and sst4 receptors. PMID:26974375

  6. An in vivo OctreoScan-negative adrenal pheochromocytoma expresses somatostatin receptors and responds to somatostatin analogs treatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, M C; Piccin, D; Bondanelli, M; Tagliati, F; De Carlo, E; Culler, M D; Uberti, E C degli

    2003-06-01

    A 52-yr-old woman presented with hypertension, elevated urinary vanillylmandelic acid, metanephrines, normetanephrines, and plasma chromogranin A (CgA), but normal urinary catecholamine levels. Abdominal ultrasonography and subsequent MRI imaging showed a 3 cm nodular lesion of the right adrenal gland also visualized by 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy consistent with a pheochromocytoma (PC). Her OctreoScan was negative. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy and histological examination showed a PC. The adrenal medulla tissue was examined for somatostatin (SRIH) receptor subtypes 1 to 5 (SSTR1 to 5) expression by RT-PCR. Cultured tumor cells were treated with either SRIH, Lanreotide (Lan), or an SSTR2 (BIM-23 120) or SSTR5 (BIM-23 206) selective agonist. CgA secretion was measured in the medium by ELISA and catecholamine levels by HPLC after 6h. Cell viability was assessed after 48h. RT-PCR analysis showed that SSTR1, 2, 3 and 4 were expressed. CgA secretion was significantly reduced by SRIH (- 80 %), Lan (- 35 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 65 %). Norepinephrine secretion was reduced by SRIH (- 66 %), Lan (- 40 %), and BIM-23 120 (- 70 %). Epinephrine and dopamine secretion was also inhibited by treatment with SRIH (- 90 % and - 93 %, respectively) and BIM-23 120 (- 33 % and - 75 %, respectively) but not by Lan. Cell viability was also significantly reduced by SRIH (- 30 %), Lan (- 10 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 20 %). The SSTR5 selective agonist did not modify either CgA and catecholamine secretion or cell viability. Our data show that SSTRs may be present in a PC although OctreoScan is negative in vivo, and that SRIH and its analogs may reduce both differentiated and proliferative functions in chromaffin cells in vitro. These findings suggest that SRIH analogs with enhanced SSTR2 affinity might be useful in the medical therapy of PC, even when an OctreoScan is negative. PMID:12920656

  7. [Preoperative administration of a slow releasing somatostatin analog (SR-lanreotide, BIM 23014) in patients with acromegaly in the course of GH-releasing adenoma].

    PubMed

    Zieliński, G; Podgórski, J K; Koziarski, A; Siwik, J; Zgliczyński, W; Wieliczko, W

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of slow releasing analogue of somatostatin (SR-Lanreotide) in the pretreatment for GH-releasing adenomas, especially macroadenomas. During the last four years (between January 1996 and December 1999) the authors carried out 382 transsphenoidal operations for to various lesions. There were 169 acromegalic patients in this group. 82 of them received, as pretreatment, the slow releasing analogue of somatostatin (SR-Lanreotide, BIM 23014) in a dose of 30 mg every 14 days for 3 months (6 injections). There were 55 women and 27 men (range 25-68, mean age 44.8 years, SD +/- 10 years) operated on by one experienced neurosurgeon. The concentrations of serum GH--70.5 micrograms/l (range 5.3-500 micrograms/l, SD +/- 83.9 micrograms/l) and IGF-I--1302 micrograms/l (range 610-2030 micrograms/l, SD +/- 360.7 micrograms/l) were high. Out of these 82 patients 79 had macroadenomas with suprasellar and parasellar extension. The volume of the tumours was calculated according to the formula of Di Chiro-Nelson. The mean volume of the tumour was 4146.9 mm3 (range 213.5-38595.3 mm3, SD +/- 5675.9 mm3). The response to the pretreatment suppression of the serum GH, IGF-I level and shrinkage of the tumours--were evaluated before surgery. Second MR examination was performed in 38 pretreated patients. During the Lanreotide treatment mean serum GH level decreased from 70.5 to 15.6 micrograms/l (p < 0.0001), mean serum IGF-I concentration decreased from 1302 to 787 micrograms/l and mean volume of the tumour decreased from 5662 to 2326 mm3 (p < 0.0001). During surgery, tumours were observed to be softer, had liquid consistency and were easier removed. 57 patient (69.5%) who underwent surgery had GH below 5 micrograms/l and were cured. Transsphenoidal microsurgical resection of pituitary adenomas is the primary treatment for acromegaly. Lanreotide pretreatment significantly decreased mean serum GH and IGF-I level, shrinks the tumour and make it much softer and

  8. Somatostatin regulates dopamine release in rat striatal slices and cat caudate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, M.F.; Reisine, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on the release of tritiated dopamine (DA) formed continuously from tritiated tyrosine were studied in vitro in superfused striatal slices and in vivo in both caudate nuclei and both substantiae nigrae of halothane-anesthetized cats using a push-pull cannula technique. Somatostatin (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-7) M) increased the spontaneous tritiated dopamine release from rat striatal slices. This effect was dose dependent and was completely prevented by tetrodotoxin (5 X 10(-7) M). When applied for 30 min in one cat caudate nucleus, somatostatin (10(-7) M) immediately increased the local release of tritiated DA, while a gradual inhibition of the tritiated amine's efflux was observed in the contralateral caudate nucleus. No changes in tritiated dopamine were seen in either substantia nigra during or after the peptide's application in the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that somatostatin in the striatum may play a role in the local and the distal control of dopamine release from the terminals of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons.

  9. Effects of ethanol and nicotine on gastrin and somatostatin release in rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, C H; Ogle, C W; Wong, S H; Lam, S K

    1987-01-01

    An intravenous bolus injection of nicotine (1 mg/kg) markedly elevated gastric acid secretion; oral administration of ethanol (40%, 10 ml/kg) significantly increased arterial serum gastrin and somatostatin levels. Chronic pretreatment with oral nicotine (5 or 25 micrograms/ml in drinking tap water, for 10 days), but not acute pretreatment with a single oral dose of nicotine (2 or 4 mg/kg), inhibited the nicotine-induced gastric acid secretion and ethanol-induced gastrin and somatostatin release. Pretreatment subcutaneously with a ganglion-blocking dose of hexamethonium (10 mg/kg), however, inhibited nicotine-stimulated acid output and ethanol-evoked somatostatin secretion but not ethanol-induced gastrin release. It is concluded that ethanol-evoked gastrin secretion could be due to activation of specific sites which are not nicotinic receptors, but which are depressed by chronic nicotine pretreatment. On the other hand, the release of somatostatin by ethanol appears to be controlled by ganglionic receptors in the gut. PMID:2883103

  10. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J.; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E.; Cowing–Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D.; Adams, Michael W.; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L.; Huising, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone Urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co–released with insulin and potentiates glucose–stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptor on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 demonstrate fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque diabetes models and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:26076035

  11. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  12. Growth enhancement of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by passive immunisation against somatostatin-14

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were passively immunised against somatostatin-14 (SS-14) using an antibody originating from egg laying chicken (Gallus domesticus). Fish were immunised weekly (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 d) with chicken egg yolk derived immunoglobulin (IgY) against SS-14 (1:25 ...

  13. Predator stress induces behavioral inhibition and amygdala somatostatin receptor 2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, S. A.; Qi, C.; Roseboom, P. H.; Kalin, N. H.

    2009-01-01

    Psychological stressors precipitate and maintain stress-induced psychopathology, and it is likely that altered amygdala function underlies some of the deleterious effects of psychological stress. To understand the mechanisms underlying the linkage between the response to psychological stressors and maladaptive or psychopathological responses, we have focused on amygdala responsivity in animal models employing species-specific psychological stressors. In the present study, we characterized the effects of a 15-min exposure to a natural predator, the ferret, on rat behavior and the expression of the somatostatin family of genes in the amygdala. We examined the somatostatin family of genes because substantial evidence shows that central somatostatin systems are altered in various neuropsychiatric illnesses. We report that rats respond to acute ferret exposure with a significant increase in fearful and anxious behaviors that is accompanied by robust amygdala activation and an increase in somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2) messenger RNA expression within the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These studies are the first to show stress-induced changes in amygdala sst2 expression and may represent one mechanism by which psychological stress is linked to adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses. PMID:18363859

  14. Pantethine, a somatostatin depleting agent, increases food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Abucham, J; Bollinger-Gruber, J; Reichlin, S

    1989-07-01

    During the course of studies of the effects of pantethine, a cysteamine precursor known to deplete tissue concentration of immunoreactive somatostatin, we observed that the subject rats continued to eat despite marked distension of the stomach. To determine whether this effect was caused by drug-altered food intake, we have measured food and water intake in pantethine-injected rats in the fed and fasting state. In three separate experiments, rats allowed free access to food until the morning of study showed significant increased food intake accompanied by an increased stomach content (at 4 hr) of both food and water following the IP injection of pantethine. In one experiment, intake at 3 hours was 0.60 g/100 g b.wt. (pantethine dose 0.74 g/kg b.wt.) and 0.64 g/100 g b.wt. (pantethine dose 1.47 g/kg b.wt.) compared with 0.24 g/100 g b.wt. in saline-treated animals (p less than 0.05). In contrast, pantethine, 1.47 g/kg b.wt., when administered to overnight-fasted rats, significantly inhibited food intake (3-hr intake 1.54 +/- 0.16 g/100 g b.wt. in rats injected with pantethine 1.47 g/kg b.wt. as compared with 3.3 +/- 0.21 g/100 g b.wt. in saline-injected controls). The intake-stimulating effect of pantethine in ad lib-fed rats was not demonstrable when the drug was administered shortly before the "lights out"-induced feeding at night. These findings indicate that pantethine, a cysteamine precursor, stimulates food intake in satiated rats, depending upon the stage of circadian rhythm, but is inhibitory to intake in fasted animals. We postulate that the effects are mediated directly or indirectly through the disinhibition of central appetite-regulating somatostatinergic pathways but, since cysteamine also inhibits dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, an effect on depletion of appetite-regulating central catecholamines cannot be excluded. PMID:2587601

  15. OLD AND NEW NEUROENDOCRINE MOLECULES: SOMATOSTATIN, CYSTEAMINE, PANTETHINE AND KYNURENINE.

    PubMed

    Vécsei, László; Horváth, Zoltán; Tuka, Bernadett

    2014-03-30

    The aim of this review is to commemorate Hans Selye, endocrinologist, the most famous researchers of stress and to briefly summarize the major features of somatostatin (SST), cysteamine (CysA) and patethine (PAN) in neuroendocrinological aspect, which are closely related to his scientific work. In addition, some metabolites of kynurenine pathway (KP) were also mentioned in this paper, as new, possible target molecules in neuroendocrinology. R. Guillemin and A. V. Schally were the main pioneers of the discovery of SST in the 1970's. SST primarily is known as an inhibitor of growth hormone secretion and additionally reduces the gastric acid and pepsin release and also the gastroduodenal mucosal blood flow. These effects are very important in the pathophysiology of peptic ulcer bleeding, which is related to the CysA-evoked perforating duodenal ulcer experimental stress model in rats developed by Selye and Szabo. CysA is a naturally occurring duodenal ulcerogen, which depletes SST in the gastric mucosa and certain brain regions. Furthermore, in addition to depleting SST, CysA also causes adrenocortical necrosis, suggesting an interaction between the central/peripheral nervous system and the neuroendocrine system. The antioxidant PAN, formulated besides the CysA, has similar effects: it attenuates the levels of SST and prolactin in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus through the accumulation of CysA within cells throughout the body. As new perspectives the KP may be involved in the modulation of neuroendrocrine processes: different agonists and antagonists of glutamate receptors regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and kynurenic acid augments the anxiolytic stress responses in neonatal chicks. The pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced and the toxic heavy oil contaminations-evoked alterations in the KP indirectly contribute to the development of neuroendocrine disorders. In summary, there have been highly important developments in neuroendocrinology since the

  16. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: the NBF1+R (nucleotide-binding fold 1 and regulatory domain) segment acting alone catalyses a Co2+/Mn2+/Mg2+-ATPase activity markedly inhibited by both Cd2+ and the transition-state analogue orthovanadate.

    PubMed

    Annereau, Jean Philippe; Ko, Young Hee; Pedersen, Peter L

    2003-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), a regulated anion channel and member of the ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABC transporter) superfamily. Of CFTR's five domains, the first nucleotide-binding fold (NBF1) has been of greatest interest both because it is the major 'hotspot' for mutations that cause CF, and because it is connected to a unique regulatory domain (R). However, attempts have failed to obtain a catalytically active NBF1+R protein in the absence of a fusion partner. Here, we report that such a protein can be obtained following its overexpression in bacteria. The pure NBF1+R protein exhibits significant ATPase activity [catalytic-centre activity (turnover number) 6.7 min(-1)] and an apparent affinity for ATP ( K (m), 8.7 microM) higher than reported previously for CFTR or segments thereof. As predicted, the ATPase activity is inhibited by mutations in the Walker A motif. It is also inhibited by vanadate, a transition-state analogue. Surprisingly, however, the best divalent metal activator is Co(2+), followed by Mn(2+) and Mg(2+). In contrast, Ca(2+) is ineffective and Cd(2+) is a potent inhibitor. These novel studies, while demonstrating clearly that CFTR's NBF1+R segment can act independently as an active, vanadate-sensitive ATPase, also identify its unique cation activators and a new inhibitor, thus providing insight into the nature of its active site. PMID:12523935

  17. Review of insulin and its analogues in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mane, Krishnappa; Chaluvaraju, Kc; Niranjan, Ms; Zaranappa, Tr; Manjuthej, Tr

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where in human body does not produce or properly uses insulin, a hormone that is required to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy. Diabetes finally leads to more complications and to prevent these complications insulin and its analogues are used. After more than half a century of treating diabetics with animal insulin's, recombinant DNA technologies and advanced protein chemistry made human insulin preparations available in the early 1980s. As the next step, over the last decade, insulin analogues were constructed by changing the structure of the native protein with the goal of improving the therapeutic properties of it, because the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rapid, intermediate and long-acting preparations of human insulin make it almost impossible to achieve sustained normoglycemia. The first clinically available insulin analogue, lispro, confirmed the hopes by showing that improved glycaemic control can be achieved without an increase in hypoglycaemic events. Two new insulin analogues, insulin glargine and insulin aspart, have recently been approved for clinical use in the United States and several other analogues are being intensively tested. PMID:24826038

  18. Phosphonomethyl analogues of hexose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Webster, D; Jondorf, W R; Dixon, H B

    1976-05-01

    The analogue of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in which the phosphate group, -O-PO3H2, on C-6 is replaced by the phosphonomethyl group, -CH2-PO3H2, was made enzymically from the corresponding analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate. It was a substrate for aldolase, which was used to form it, but not for fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase. It was hydrolysed chemically to yield the corresponding analogue of fructose 6-phosphate [i.e. 6-deoxy-6-(phosphonomethyl)-D-fructose, or, more strictly, 6,7-dideoxy-7-phosphono-D-arabino-2-heptulose]. This proved to be a substrate for the sequential actions of glucose 6-phosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Thus seven out of the nine enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways so far tested catalyse the reactions of the phosphonomethyl isosteres of their substrates. PMID:7247

  19. P08: Somatostatin analogs plus prednisone in aggressive histotype and advanced stage of thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviano, Margaret; Damiano, Vincenzo; Nappi, Lucia; Rescigno, Pasquale; Marino, Mirella; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare neoplasms characterized by histological variability and different expression at the molecular level. Several biological agents have been evaluated in TETs in small phase II trials. Efficacy of octreotide/lanreotide with or without prednisone in TETs OctreoScan positive has been widely demonstrated in thymoma, but no clearly in thymic carcinoma. Methods Twelve patients (five men, seven women; median age 47 years; range, 27–70 years) with advanced stage disease according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system (seven with IVa stage; five with IVb stage), and aggressive histotype according to WHO classification, revised by central review (two B2/B3; five B3; one B3/thymic carcinoma; four thymic carcinoma) were enrolled in this monocentric referral study. All the patients showed a progressive disease according to RECIST 1.1 criteria to previous conventional chemotherapeutic regimens platinum or not platinum-based. All the patients performed OctreoScan. The schedule includes administration of long-acting analog octreotide (30 mg/every 28 days intramuscularly) plus prednisone 0.2 mg/kg/day until progression of disease was documented. Overall response rate and toxicity were evaluated. Results The median time to progression was 6 months (range, 3–24 months), the overall response rate was 74.9%, particularly three patients (25%) obtained stable disease; four patients (33.3%) partial response; two patients (16.6%) complete response; three patients (25%) progression disease. One patient with Good Syndrome interrupted treatment after 6 months for infection disease. One patient has been lost to follow-up after 24 months of treatment. One patient died after progression disease for PRCA. Treatment was generally well tolerated with acceptable toxicity: no symptomatic cholelithiasis (one patient), grade 1 diarrhea (two patients) hyperglycemia (one patient). One patient with thymic carcinoma and IVB stage had PS improvement from 2

  20. Structure-Activity Relationships of Somatostatin Analogs in the Rabbit Ileum and the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Linda E.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Rivier, Jean; Vale, Wylie; Brown, Marvin; Dharmsathaphorn, Kiertisin

    1983-01-01

    Somatostatin increases absorption of electrolytes and inhibits diarrhea in patients with endocrine tumors and short bowel syndrome. In an attempt to develop a gut-specific somatostatin analog, each amino acid in the somatostatin molecule was replaced with L-alanine, deleted, or substituted with its D-isomer. The potency of each analog to stimulate ion transport in the rabbit ileum was then determined using the modified Ussing chamber technique. The results were compared to the ability of each analog to inhibit the stimulated release of growth hormone from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and to inhibit the arginine-stimulated release of insulin and glucagon in the rat in vivo. Analogs that showed gut selectivity were then tested for their ion transport properties in the rat colon. Results: (a) Substitution with L-alanine or deletion of the amino acid at position 6, 7, 8, or 9 and deletion of Threonine10-produced analogs with significantly reduced ion transport properties to <4% of somatostatin's action. The substitution also markedly reduced the ability of the compounds to inhibit the release of growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon. (b) Selectivity of intestinal ion transport was achieved by any one of the following alterations: L-alanine substitution at Phenylalanine11, deletion of Phenylalanine11, substitution with D-lysine at Lysine4, or substitution with L-alanine at Lysine4. These compounds had intestinal ion transport properties of 52, 34, 139, and 94%, respectively, while demonstrating little or no inhibition of growth hormone, insulin or glucagon release. Conclusions: (a) Phenylalanine6, Phenylalanine7, Tryptophan8, and Lysine9 are required for the ion transport and other biologic actions of somatostatin, whereas Threonine10 serves as an essential spacer. (b) Alteration at Phenylalanine11 or Lysine4 yields analogs that are selective for ion transport in the rabbit ileum and rat colon. These findings should be taken into consideration when developing a

  1. Acute effect of prostaglandins and somatostatin on thymidine uptake of gastric mucosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alino, S.F.; Hilario, E. )

    1988-12-01

    This study compares the in vivo effect of exogenous administration of prostaglandin E2 (30 {mu}g/kg) and its precursor, arachidonic acid (30 {mu}g/kg), with the effect of indomethacin (5 mg/kg) on the 6-({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake of antral mucosa of mice by autoradiographical methods. Likewise, the effect of somatostatin (30 {mu}g/kg) on 6-({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake is studied. Evaluation of the number of labeled cells, in the histological sections of the gastric mucosa, showed that arachidonic acid, prostaglandin E2, and somatostatin induced an increase in the number of labeled cells (107, 44, and 45%, respectively), while indomethacin induced a decrease of 32% compared to the control group. These results suggest that prostaglandins may mediate stimulatory effects on thymidine uptake of gastric mucosa cells in the first step after drug administration.

  2. Can somatostatin antagonism prevent hypoglycaemia during exercise in type 1 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Taleb, Nadine; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2016-08-01

    The prevention and management of exercise-induced hypoglycaemia remains a challenge for patients with type 1 diabetes. Strategies involving changes to insulin dosing and/or carbohydrate consumption in anticipation of or during different types of exercise have proved to be helpful but not sufficient to fully prevent the hypoglycaemic risk. Meanwhile, the defect in glucagon secretion in response to hypoglycaemia in diabetes and the contributory role of somatostatin to this dysregulation constitute an important therapeutic target. In this issue of Diabetologia (DOI 10.1007/s00125-016-3953-0 ), Leclair et al show that selective somatostatin receptor 2 antagonists can enhance glucagon secretion in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes during exercise. The implications of their interesting findings are discussed, as well as limitations and potential for clinical applications, together with other glucagon-based options for tackling exercise-induced hypoglycaemia in diabetes. PMID:27153841

  3. Lanreotide-conjugated PEG-DSPE micelles: an efficient nanocarrier targeting to somatostatin receptor positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nan; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Kun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Lanreotide is an octapeptide analog of endogenous somatostatin, specifically binding with tumors over-express somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2). In this study, we conjugated lanreotide to 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (poly-(ethylene glycol))-2000] (PEG-DSPE), constructed active targeted micelles (lanreotide-PM), characterized their in vitro and in vivo targeting effect, and explored the receptor mediated transportion. The uptake of lanreotide-PM was found to be related to the expression level of SSTR2 in different cell lines and the competitive inhibition phenomenon indicated that the cellular uptake of lanreotide-PM was via a receptor meditated mechanism. In vivo, more lanreotide-PM accumulated in SSTR2 high expression tumor xenografts, endocytosed by the tumor cells, induced more apoptosis of tumor cells, and suppressed tumor growth efficiently. In conclusion, lanreotide-modified micelles containing antitumor drugs provide a promising strategy for the treatment of SSTR-expressing tumors. PMID:25366085

  4. Somatostatin Interneurons Control a Key Component of Mismatch Negativity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with schizophrenia have deficient sensory processing, undermining how they perceive and relate to a changing environment. This impairment can be captured by the reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) index, an electroencephalographic biomarker of psychosis. The biological factors contributing to MMN are unclear, though mouse research, in which genetic and optical methods could be applied, has given some insight. Using fast two-photon calcium imaging and multielectrode recordings in awake mice, we find that visual cortical circuits display adapted (decreased) responses to repeated stimuli and amplified responses to a deviant stimulus, the key component of human MMN. Moreover, pharmacogenetic silencing of somatostatin-containing interneurons specifically eliminated this amplification, along with its associated theta/alpha-band response, leaving stimulus-specific adaption and related gamma-band modulations intact. Our results validate a mouse model of MMN and suggest that abnormalities in somatostatin-containing interneurons cause sensory deficits underlying MMN and schizophrenia. PMID:27396334

  5. A Patient With Metastatic Sarcoma was Successfully Treated With Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Jara, Aurora; González Manzano, Ramón; Lopera Sierra, Maribel; Redal Peña, María Carmen; Brugarolas Masllorens, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present a sarcoma patient with a tumor reduction of more than 50% in lung metastasis after 2 single courses of the investigational medical product Lutathera (177Lu-DOTA0-Tyr3-octreotate). She was resistant to more than 6 lines of therapy including all the available active drugs in soft tissue sarcomas. The high expression of somatostatin receptors was shown by microarrays and Octreoscan. The overall duration of response exceeded 1 year. PMID:27355848

  6. No Mortality Difference Following Treatment with Terlipressin or Somatostatin in Cirrhotic Patients with Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of terlipressin versus somatostatin as adjuvants to endoscopic treatment in cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Patients and Methods: The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll patients who were discharged with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses of cirrhosis and who underwent gastric variceal sclerotherapy for gastric variceal bleeding between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2007. We observed treatment outcomes and identified clinical factors associated with mortality. Results: In total, we enrolled 311 cirrhosis patients who underwent sclerotherapy for active gastric variceal bleeding. Among them, 218 patients received terlipressin, and 93 patients received somatostatin. The overall 30 day mortality rate was 13.2% (41/311). A total of 78 (25.1%) patients underwent second-look endoscopy, but only 12 (7%) needed a second course of gastric variceal sclerotherapy. The overall 30-day mortality rates for patients treated with terlipressin and somatostatin were 13.3% and 12.9%, respectively, showing no statistically significant differences between outcomes in the two treatment groups (P = 0.672). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 3.257, 95% CI: 1.640-6.469, P= 0.001), acute renal failure (HR: 6.261, 95% CI: 2.376-16.499, P < 0.001), or hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 3.091, 95% CI: 1.430-6.680, P= 0.004). Conclusions: Mortality rates did not differ significantly between cirrhosis patients with acute gastric variceal bleeding who received somatostatin or terlipressin as adjuvants to endoscopy. PMID:27184641

  7. Quantitative Electron Microscopic Autoradiography of Insulin, Glucagon, and Somatostatin Binding Sites on Islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Yogesh C.; Amherdt, Mylene; Orci, Lelio

    1982-09-01

    After monolayer cultures of rat islets were exposed to [125I]insulin, [125I]glucagon, and [125I]tyrosinyl somatostatin, specific autoradiographic grains associated with each radioactively labeled ligand were found on B, A, and D cells. The density of labeling of the B, A, and D cells with each labeled ligand correlated well with the known actions of the three hormones on each of the islet cells.

  8. Somatostatin-14-like immunoreactive neurons and fibres in the human olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Ohm, T G; Braak, E; Probst, A

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the morphological features and the distribution pattern of neurons in the human olfactory bulb which are immunoreactive for an antiserum against the neuropeptide somatostatin-14. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were mainly found in the white matter surrounding the cell clusters of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Some immunoreactive neurons were also found scattered throughout the anterior olfactory nucleus and the deeper parts of the inner granule cell layer. Only a few immunoreactive neurons were localized in the glomerular layer and the outer granule cell layer. Immunoreactive fibres were found in all layers of the olfactory bulb. In addition, an impressive number of coiled and kinked immunoreactive fibres were localized within the anterior olfactory nucleus forming a dense plexus. Accumulations of twisted and coiled branches of immunoreactive fibres were rarely found either surrounding or within the olfactory glomerula. The characteristics of somatostatin-14 immunoreactive neurons as seen in the combined pigment-Nissl preparation were studied after decolourizing the chromogen and restaining the preparations with aldehydefuchsin in order to demonstrate the lipofuscin pigment and gallocyanin chrome alum for Nissl material. About 90% of the immunoreactive neurons studied in this manner turned out to be devoid of lipofuscin granules. The remaining 10% displayed different patterns of pigmentation. These findings suggest the presence of different types of somatostatin-14-like immunoreactive neurons in the olfactory bulb of the human adult. PMID:2906788

  9. Hydrolysis of somatostatin by human tissue kallikrein after the amino acid pair phe-Phe.

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, D C; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L

    1997-01-01

    Somatostatin-(1-14) was hydrolysed by human tissue kallikrein at the Phe7-Trp8 bond, after a Phe-Phe pair of amino acids, with similar kinetic parameters to those described for human high- and low-molecular-mass kininogens. Substance P and human insulin, which also contain a Phe-Phe pair in their sequences, were both resistant. More details of this hydrolytic specificity of human tissue kallikrein were obtained by synthesizing and assaying internally quenched fluorescent peptides containing the sequence of somatostatin-(1-14), as well as the reactive-centre loop of human kallikrein-binding protein (kallistatin). We also observed that human tissue kallikrein hydrolysed growth hormone-releasing hormone at the Arg11-Lys12 bond, although this peptide contains in its structure a pair of leucines (Leu22-Leu23), in contrast with the Phe-Phe pair in somatostatin. We have also demonstrated the susceptibility to human tissue kallikrein of some chromogenic peptide s with the general structure of X-Phe-Phe-p-nitroanilide and D-Pro-Phe-Phe-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide. PMID:9355730

  10. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  11. Insulin analogues in pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Morgan, Margery; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Insulin analogues are commonly used in pregnant women with diabetes. It is not known if the use of insulin analogues in pregnancy is associated with any higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring compared with use of human insulin. We performed a literature search for studies of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes using insulin analogues in the first trimester and information on congenital anomalies. The studies were analysed to compare the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses of mothers using insulin analogues with foetuses of mothers using human insulin. Of 29 studies, we included 1286 foetuses of mothers using short-acting insulin analogues with 1089 references of mothers using human insulin and 768 foetuses of mothers using long-acting insulin analogues with 685 references of mothers using long-acting human insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn). The congenital anomaly rate was 4.84% and 4.29% among the foetuses of mothers using lispro and aspart. For glargine and detemir, the congenital anomaly rate was 2.86% and 3.47%, respectively. No studies on the use of insulin glulisine and degludec in pregnancy were found. There was no statistically significant difference in the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses exposed to insulin analogues (lispro, aspart, glargine or detemir) compared with those exposed to human insulin or Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin. The total prevalence of congenital anomalies was not increased for foetuses exposed to insulin analogues. The small samples in the included studies provided insufficient statistical power to identify a moderate increased risk of specific congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26431249

  12. Muscarinic interactions of bisindolylmaleimide analogues.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    1998-11-01

    We have used radioligand binding studies to determine the affinities of seven bisindolylmaleimide analogues, six of which are selective inhibitors of protein kinase C, at human muscarinic M1-M4 receptors. The compounds were most potent at M1 receptors, and Ro-31-8220 was the most potent analogue, with a Kd of 0.6 microM at M1 receptors. The weakest compounds, bisindolylmaleimide IV and bisindolylmaleimide V, had Kd values of 100 microM. If it is necessary to use protein kinase C inhibitors at concentrations of 10 microM or more in studies involving muscarinic receptors then bisindolylmaleimide IV may be the most appropriate inhibitor to use. PMID:9851596

  13. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  14. Policy issues in space analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Robin N.; Facktor, Debra D.

    Space mission planning is increasingly focusing on destinations beyond Earth orbit. Advancements in technology will inevitably be required to enable long-duration human spaceflight missions, and breakthroughs in the policy arena will also be needed to achieve success in such missions. By exploring how policy issues have been addressed in analogous extreme environments, policymakers can develop a framework for addressing these issues as they apply to long-term human spaceflight. Policy issues that need to be addressed include: crew selection, training, organization, and activities, medical testing, illness, injury, and death; communication; legal accountability and liability; mission safety and risk management; and environmental contamination. This paper outlines the approach of a study underway by The George Washington University and ANSER to examine how these policy issues have been addressed in several analogues and how the experiences of these analogues can help formulate policies for long-duration human spaceflight missions. Analogues being studied include Antarctic bases, submarine voyages, undersea stations, Biosphere 2, and the U.S. Skylab and Russian Mir space stations.

  15. Phosphonate analogue substrates for enolase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V E; Cleland, W W

    1990-11-20

    Phosphonate analogues in which the bridge between C-2 and phosphorus is a CH2 group are slow substrates for yeast enolase. The pH variation of the kinetic parameters for the methylene analogue of 2-phosphoglycerate suggests that the substrate binds as a dianion and that Mg2+ can bind subsequently only if a metal ligand and the catalytic base are unprotonated. Primary deuterium isotope effects of 4-8 on V/KMg, but ones of only 1.15-1.32 on V for dehydration, show that proton removal to give the carbanion intermediate largely limits V/KMg and that a slow step follows which largely limits V (presumably carbanion breakdown). Since there is a D2O solvent isotope effect on V for the reverse reaction of 5, but not an appreciable one on the forward reaction, it appears that the slow rates with phosphonate analogues result from the fact that the carbanion intermediate is more stable than that formed from the normal substrates, and its reaction in both directions limits V. Increased stability as a result of replacement of oxygen by carbon at C-2 of the carbanion is the expected chemical behavior. PMID:2271661

  16. Effects of cysteamine on dopamine-mediated behaviors: evidence for dopamine-somatostatin interactions in the striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Iverson, M.T.; Radke, J.M.; Vincent, S.R.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of prior treatment with cysteamine, a drug which appears to deplete selectively the neuropeptide somatostatin, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preferences were investigated. Twelve hours following systemic cysteamine injections apomorphine-induced stereotypy was attenuated and striatal somatostatin levels were reduced by half. Systemic cysteamine also decreased the motor stimulant effects of amphetamine, without influencing the rewarding properties as determined by the conditioned place preference procedure. Direct injections of cysteamine into the nucleus accumbens also decreased the locomotor response to amphetamine, and produced a local reduction in somatostatin levels in the accumbens. Cysteamine did not appear to alter monoamine turnover in the striatum after either systemic or intra-accumbens injections. These results suggest that somatostatin in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen modulates the motor, but not the reinforcing properties of dopaminergic drugs, possibly via an action postsynaptic to dopamine-releasing terminals. Furthermore, it is evident from these results that cysteamine is an important tool with which to study the central actions of somatostatin.

  17. Efficacy of octreotide long-acting repeatable in neuroendocrine tumors: RADIANT-2 placebo arm post hoc analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R; Yao, James C; Bajetta, Emilio; Aout, Mounir; Bakker, Bert; Hainsworth, John D; Ruszniewski, Philippe B; Van Cutsem, Eric; Öberg, Kjell; Pavel, Marianne E

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) have demonstrated antiproliferative activity in addition to efficacy for carcinoid symptom control in functional neuroendocrine tumors (NET). A post hoc analysis of the placebo arm of the RAD001 In Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors-2 (RADIANT-2) study was conducted to assess the efficacy of octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Out of 213 patients randomized to placebo plus octreotide LAR in RADIANT-2, 196 patients with foregut, midgut, or hindgut NET were considered for present analysis. Of these, 41 patients were SSA-treatment naïve and 155 had received SSA therapy before study entry. For SSA-naïve patients, median PFS by adjudicated central review was 13.6 (95% CI 8.2–22.7) months. For SSA-naïve patients with midgut NET (n=24), median PFS was 22.2 (95% CI 8.3–29.5) months. For patients who had received SSA previously, the median PFS was 11.1 (95% CI 8.4–14.3) months. Among the SSA-pretreated patients who had midgut NET (n=119), the median PFS was 12.0 (95% CI 8.4–19.3) months. Median OS was 35.8 (95% CI 32.5–48.9) months for patients in the placebo plus octreotide LAR arm; 50.6 (36.4 – not reached) months for SSA-naïve patients and 33.5 (95% CI 27.5–44.7) months for those who had received prior SSA. This post hoc analysis of the placebo arm of the large phase 3 RADIANT-2 study provides data on PFS and OS among patients with progressive NET treated with octreotide therapy. PMID:26373569

  18. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K sup + channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    De Weille, J.R.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4{beta}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels are discussed.

  19. Small Mouse Islets Are Deficient in Glucagon-Producing Alpha Cells but Rich in Somatostatin-Secreting Delta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grapengiesser, Eva; Hellman, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Small and big mouse islets were compared with special reference to their content of glucagon-producing α-cells and somatostatin-producing δ-cells. Areas stained for glucagon and somatostatin were measured in the largest cross section of small (diameter < 60 μm) and big (diameter > 100 μm) islets. Comparison of the areas indicated proportionally more δ- than α-cells in the small islets. After isolation with collagenase these islets were practically devoid of α-cells. We evaluated the functional importance of the islet size by measuring the Ca2+ signal for insulin release. A majority of the small islets responded to the hyperpolarization action of somatostatin with periodic decrease of cytoplasmic Ca2+ when glucose was elevated after tolbutamide blockade of the KATP channels. PMID:27504459

  20. Somatostatin inhibits the effect of secretin on bile flow and on hepatic bilirubin transport in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, G L; Fevery, J

    1989-01-01

    Increasing amounts of porcine secretion (0.05 to 2.00 clinical units/h/100 g body wt) given to rats during a continuous infusion of bilirubin, increased bile flow and the apparent maximal biliary excretion of bilirubin ('Tm'). This increment was caused by an enhanced biliary output of bilirubin monoconjugates. The effect was dose dependent but maximal at a secretin infusion of 0.80 CU. Somatostatin 0.2 and 0.8 microgram/h/100 g body wt caused a dose related inhibition of the hepatic effects of secretin both on bile flow and on biliary output of bilirubin conjugates. As secretin elicits the release of somatostatin, a feed-back system could be envisaged whereby the somatostatin released stops the effects of secretin. PMID:2572517

  1. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  2. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs." PMID:18720674

  3. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in non-pyramidal neurons of the human isocortex.

    PubMed

    Braak, E; Braak, H; Weindl, A

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of somatostatin-immunoreactive cell bodies and axons throughout the human isocortex and subjacent white matter was examined. Vibratome sections of cortical tissue (30-40 micrometers thick) obtained at surgery were treated to reveal the antigen by the unlabelled antibody enzyme method. Two types of somatostatin-immunoreactive axons were present: short, coiled axons and extended ones that follow a straight course in various directions. Somatostatin immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were encountered in layers II-VI and in the subjacent white matter. The majority of labelled cells were found in the white matter and layer VI, and then in layers II and III. The immunoreactive perikarya were fusiform, triangular or multipolar in shape and did not show preferential orientation of their long axis. Frequently, the fusiform neurons in layer VI and in the white matter were aligned parallel to radiate bundles of myelinated fibres. The immunoreactive neurons gave rise to a few thick dendrites. Often thin axon-like processes could also be recognized, originating either from the cell body or from a thicker dendrite. After destaining of the chromogen and counterstaining with aldehydefuchsin and gallocyanin chromealum, the formerly immunoreactive neurons displayed a light and eccentrically located nucleus. The soma contained only a sparse amount of basophilic substance and was nearly devoid of lipofuscin granules. In electron micrographs, the cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were localized near the periphery of the soma. Immunoreactivity occurred along membranes of the RER cistern, outer mitochondrial membrane, and in particles 120-150 micrometers in diameter. Rounded areas (up to a diameter of 1 micrometer) lacked immunoreactivity. Furthermore, there were a few tiny lysosomes. PMID:2867717

  4. Theranostics with Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT: monitoring response to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy involves selective targeting of neuroendocrine tumors through the somatostatin receptors, the aim being to increase radiation dose to the tumors and spare the normal tissue. The advantage of this internal radiation therapy is the ability to selectively target multiple metastases throughout the body. Early and accurate assessment of therapy response helps not only to identify the poor responders but also to personalize the treatment regimes with the aim of achieving maximum treatment benefit. This is the basis of theranostics. PMID:25029938

  5. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  6. Anisotropic metamaterial as an analogue of a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Núñez, Isabel; Bulashenko, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of light in a metamaterial medium which mimics curved spacetime and acts like a black hole is studied. We show that for a particular type of spacetimes and wave polarization, the time dilation appears as dielectric permittivity, while the spatial curvature manifests as magnetic permeability. The optical analogue to the relativistic Hamiltonian which determines the ray paths (null geodesics) in the anisotropic metamaterial is obtained. By applying the formalism to the Schwarzschild metric, we compare the ray paths with full-wave simulations in the equivalent optical medium.

  7. Inhibition of receptor/G protein coupling by suramin analogues.

    PubMed

    Beindl, W; Mitterauer, T; Hohenegger, M; Ijzerman, A P; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M

    1996-08-01

    Suramin analogues act as direct antagonists of heterotrimeric G proteins because they block the rate-limiting step of G protein activation (i.e., the dissociation of GDP prebound to the G protein alpha subunit). We have used the human brain A1 adenosine receptor and the rat striatal D2 dopamine receptor, two prototypical Gi/G(o)-coupled receptors, as a model system to test whether the following analogues suppress the receptor-dependent activation of G proteins: 8-(3-nitrobenzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF007), 8-(3-(3-nitrobenzamido)-benzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF018); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene))bis-(1,3,5-naphthalenetr isulfonic acid) (NF023); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene)carbonylimino-(3,1- phenylene)) bis(1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid) (NF037); and suramin. Suramin and its analogues inhibit the formation of the agonist-specific ternary complex (agonist/receptor/G protein). This inhibition is (i) quasicompetitive with respect to agonist binding in that it can be overcome by increasing receptor occupancy but (ii) does not result from an interaction of the analogues with the ligand binding pocket of the receptors because the binding of antagonists or of agonists in the absence of functional receptor/G protein interaction is not affected. In addition to suppressing the spontaneous release of GDP from defined G protein alpha subunits, suramin and its analogues reduce receptor-catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange. The site, to which suramin analogues bind, overlaps with the docking site for the receptor on the G protein alpha subunit. The structure-activity relationships for inhibition of agonist binding to the A1 adenosine receptor (suramin > NF037 > NF023) and of agonist binding to the inhibition D2 dopamine receptor (suramin = NF037 > NF023 > NF018) differ. Thus, NF037 discriminates between the ternary complexes formed by the agonist-liganded D2 dopamine receptors and those formed by the A1 adenosine

  8. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R). One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species. PMID:23194088

  9. Honey Bee Allatostatins Target Galanin/Somatostatin-Like Receptors and Modulate Learning: A Conserved Function?

    PubMed Central

    Urlacher, Elodie; Soustelle, Laurent; Parmentier, Marie-Laure; Verlinden, Heleen; Gherardi, Marie-Julie; Fourmy, Daniel; Mercer, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the honeybee genome revealed many neuropeptides and putative neuropeptide receptors, yet functional characterization of these peptidic systems is scarce. In this study, we focus on allatostatins, which were first identified as inhibitors of juvenile hormone synthesis, but whose role in the adult honey bee (Apis mellifera) brain remains to be determined. We characterize the bee allatostatin system, represented by two families: allatostatin A (Apime-ASTA) and its receptor (Apime-ASTA-R); and C-type allatostatins (Apime-ASTC and Apime-ASTCC) and their common receptor (Apime-ASTC-R). Apime-ASTA-R and Apime-ASTC-R are the receptors in bees most closely related to vertebrate galanin and somatostatin receptors, respectively. We examine the functional properties of the two honeybee receptors and show that they are transcriptionally expressed in the adult brain, including in brain centers known to be important for learning and memory processes. Thus we investigated the effects of exogenously applied allatostatins on appetitive olfactory learning in the bee. Our results show that allatostatins modulate learning in this insect, and provide important insights into the evolution of somatostatin/allatostatin signaling. PMID:26741132

  10. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  11. Ultrastructural autoradiographic localization of somatostatin-28 in the rat pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, G.; Leroux, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1985-04-01

    To identify the anterior pituitary cell type(s) containing somatostatin-28 (SS-28)-binding sites and to study the internalization processes of this peptide by the target cells, autoradiography was performed on rat anterior pituitaries removed at specific intervals (2-60 min) after iv injection of the (/sup 125/I)iodo-SS-28 agonist (Leu8,D-Trp22,Tyr25)SS-28 into intact, adrenalectomized, or castrated male rats. At the light microscopic level, the silver grains were found in 75% of cells. Concomitant injection of an excess of unlabeled peptide prevented the binding of label, verifying the specificity of binding. No specific labeling could be detected in the adrenocorticotrophs of adrenalectomized rats or gonadotrophs (castration cells) of castrated rats. At the electron microscopic level, three cell types (somatotrophs, thyrotrophs, and mammotrophs) appear to contain radiolabeled SS-28. The time-course study in somatotrophs of intact animals showed that 2 min after injection, most silver grains were associated with the plasma membrane. Five to 15 min after injection, label was found over both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic organelles, especially the Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and secretory granules. At the longest time interval (60 min), labeling was mostly associated with the cytoplasmic organelles. These results indicate that SS-28-binding sites are present only in those cell types in which somatostatin is known to regulate secretory functions. The present data also show that a rapid internalization of the radiolabeled peptide occurs.

  12. Treatment of enterocutaneous fistulas with TPN and somatostatin, compared with patients who received TPN only.

    PubMed

    Spiliotis, J; Vagenas, K; Panagopoulos, K; Kalfarentzos, F

    1990-12-01

    Eighteen patients with post-operative enterocutaneous fistulas were treated with total parenteral nutrition (TPN), skin care, infection control and intravenous somatostatin (SMS) 250 micrograms/h. This group was compared with 30 patients treated with standard medical treatment (total parenteral nutrition (TPN), skin care and infection control). In the SMS group the fistula output was reduced to 50% in three days and spontaneous closure was observed in 14 patients after a mean of 6.1 +/- 3.1 days of treatment with SMS, and in 18.2 +/- 6.3 days after the TPN administration. In the control group the fistula output was reduced by up to 50% after a week and spontaneous closure occurred in 20 patients in a mean of 27.4 +/- 8.7 days after the start of treatment. These results are statistically significant. There was one (5.5%) death in the SMS group compared with three (10%) deaths in the other, and glucose intolerance was observed in two (11%) patients in the SMS group. Somatostatin has been shown to be useful in the conservative treatment of enterocutaneous fistulas because of its ability to reduce output and accelerate closure. PMID:1983231

  13. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  14. [Significance of insulin analogues in the treatment of people with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gallwitz, B; Westrup, D; Schmeisl, G-W

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of the significance of the different insulins used in type 2 diabetes mellitus is of fundamental importance for routine treatment. Compared with human insulin, rapid acting insulin analogues have a faster uptake and a higher peak effect as well as a shorter duration of action. Long acting insulin analogues have a flatter action profile and a longer duration of action than NPH insulin. Consequently, insulin analogues generally allow an improved glycaemic control to be achieved. Moreover, differences relating to practical aspects are of importance (snacks and interval between injection and meals in the case of short acting insulin as well as mixing of suspensions and number of injections in the case of long acting insulins). The consequences for clinical practice are seen differently by countries as shown by a prescription rate of 50 % for insulin analogues in Germany compared with approximately 90 % in certain other European countries. One of the main reasons why questions remain is the lack of meaningful long-term studies on diabetes-related complications. PMID:25317651

  15. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  16. An analogue study of intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

    2006-07-01

    According to cognitive theorists, intrusive trauma memories have their origin in how information during the event is processed. Two studies investigated functional cognitive strategies during medical crises that might protect against intrusions. In Study 1, interviews with health-care professionals were used to identify cognitive strategies judged to be effective in controlling emotions and dealing with medical crises. Study 2 systematically manipulated the use of those strategies in a trauma analogue film paradigm. Experimental participants reported fewer intrusions, and less fear and avoidance of film-related stimuli during the subsequent week than controls. The manipulation did not affect anxiety during the film or memory disorganization. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusion development are discussed. PMID:16125135

  17. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  18. Laboratory study of cometary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Brucato, J.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    In situ exploration (e.g., GIOTTO mission) and astronomical observations (e.g., ISO) of comets have provided fundamental information about the structure, chemistry and physical properties of materials present in such primordial bodies of the Solar System. Moreover, it is known that cosmic materials evolve, depending on the efficiency of active processes (e.g., thermal annealing, UV irradiation, ion bombardment, gassolid interactions) in different space environments. Thus, the properties of cometary constituents must be considered in a wider perspective, including cosmic dust formation around cold stars and evolution in the interstellar medium until the formation of proto-planetary nebulae. In this scenario, laboratory experiments provide important hints to clarify the status of cometary compounds. The laboratory work is aimed at both reproducing material properties and at simulating their evolution based on the most effective mechanisms active in space. Several techniques are used to synthesise "analogues" of cometary compounds with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. The study of optical properties, complemented by other analytical techniques, is applied to investigate the products of synthesis in the experiments. The monitoring of the effects produced by processing methods, similar to those active in space, provides information both on the reactivity of materials and on the efficiency of treatments. Such an approach is able to provide quantitative information on chemical and structural modifications produced on organic and refractory materials. The comparison of laboratory results with data coming from space observations and in situ measurements provides a powerful tool to understand the real nature of comets and to place constraints on formation and evolution pathways. The laboratory experiments on analogues gain even more relevance as a sort of training in the future perspective of analysing cometary samples returned to Earth by space missions (e

  19. Relapsed High-Risk Medulloblastoma: Stable Disease after Two Years of Treatment with Somatostatin Analog - Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Diego; Bonilla, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar medulloblastoma in adults is an uncommon disease. Therefore, most information comes from the pediatric population, and the treatment for relapses is based on series and case reports. The expression of somatostatin receptors has been identified in most medulloblastoma patients, and preclinical experience has shown a promissory response to somatostatin analogs. This report presents a female patient with a high-risk left cerebellar medulloblastoma diagnosed at age 16 years old who was treated with complete resection, cranial-spinal radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. She presented again at 18 years of age with a sustained progression of her tumor, despite radiosurgery and another line of chemotherapy. Octreotide scintigraphy at that time showed a moderate to high expression of somatostatin receptors; thus, the patient was started on monthly octreotide. She is now 20 and has achieved stable disease over more than two years of active treatment without any drug-related toxicity. Somatostatin analogs could be considered as a treatment option in selected cases of medulloblastoma. Review of the literature is presented for this unusual response. PMID:26918214

  20. A critical appraisal of the role of insulin analogues in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oiknine, Ralph; Bernbaum, Marla; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2005-01-01

    Insulin is one of the oldest and best studied treatments for diabetes mellitus. Despite many improvements in the management of diabetes, the nonphysiological time-action profiles of conventional insulins remain a significant obstacle. However, the advent of recombinant DNA technology made it possible to overcome these limitations in the time-action profiles of conventional insulins. Used as prandial (e.g. insulin lispro or insulin aspart) and basal (e.g. insulin glargine) insulin, the analogues simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. If rapid-acting insulin analogues are used in the hospital, healthcare providers will need a new mind-set. Any error in coordination between timing of rapid-acting insulin administration and meal ingestion may result in hypoglycaemia. However, guidelines regarding in-hospital use of insulin analogues are few. The safety profile of insulin analogues is still not completely established in long-term clinical studies. Several studies have shown conflicting results with respect to the tumourigenic potential of this new class of agents. The clinical implications of these findings are not clear. Although novel insulin analogues are promising 'designer drugs' in our armamentarium to overcome some of the limitations of conventional insulin therapy, cost may be a limiting factor for some patients. PMID:15669878

  1. [Rational use of insulin analogues in the treatment of type 1 diabetic children and adolescents: personal experience].

    PubMed

    Dorchy, H

    2006-09-01

    In the last decade, four fast- and long-acting insulin analogues have been created. Due to the pharmacokinetic characteristics of insulin analogues, they provide an insulin profile closer to normal physiology than can be achieved with human insulins. However, they do not necessarily improve glycated haemoglobin, but they allow better quality of life. In the two daily insulin injection regime, fast-acting analogues are very useful to rapidly correct hyperglycaemia, to allow sleeping in and eating something sweet. In the basal-bolus regime (> or =4 insulin injections), long-acting analogues reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemias and improve fasting blood glucose. In the two insulin regime (2 or > or =4 injections), rapid-acting human insulin must not be systematically replaced by a fast-acting analogue. On the other hand, insulin dose alteration must be triple: retrospective, according to numerous previous experiments, in order to enjoy more freedom for meals, sports, etc.; prospective according to programmed changes in meals and sports; with only a "touch" of compensatory adaptation according to actual glycaemia. PMID:16920339

  2. Uptake Difference by Somatostatin Receptors in a Patient with Neuroendocrine Tumor: 99mTc-Octreotide Uptake in the Lung without Uptake in Liver Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pirayesh, Elahe; Amoui, Mahasti; Assadi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in detecting tumors has been assessed in a number of studies. We present a 30-year-old female with a history of eight months cough and left shoulder pain. Radiologic evaluation showed pulmonary mass and hepatic lesions, which were pathologically diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma. 99mTc-octreotide scan demonstrated that the pulmonary lesion was positive for somatostatin receptor (SSTR), while the liver metastases were SSTR negative. The present case highlights the significance of a differential uptake pattern by somatostatin receptors in SRS in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:27529888

  3. Plant volatile analogues strengthen attractiveness to insect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  4. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  5. Effects of cysteamine administration on the in vivo incorporation of (/sup 35/S)cysteine into somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin in rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, J.L.; Fernstrom, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of cysteamine injection on the in vivo incorporation of (/sup 35/S)cysteine into somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14), SRIF-28, arginine vasopressin (AVP), and oxytocin (OXT) in rat hypothalamus was studied. (/sup 35/S)Cysteine was injected into the third ventricle 1 h, 4 h, or 1 week after cysteamine (300 mg/kg, sc) injection; animals were killed 4 h later. The drug was found to substantially reduce immunoreactive SRIF levels, but not OXT or AVP, 4 h after its injection. Cysteamine also caused large reductions in label incorporation into SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and OXT 1 and 4 h after drug injection. However, (/sup 35/S)cysteine incorporation into AVP was increased substantially at these time points, while that into acid-precipitable protein was normal. One week after cysteamine injection, label incorporation into all hypothalamic peptides was normal. Cysteine specific activity was also measured after (/sup 35/S)cysteine injection and was found to be similar in treatment and control groups. The results suggest that cysteamine inhibits the syntheses of SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and OXT and stimulates that of AVP.

  6. Construction and immunogenicity of recombinant porcine circovirus-like particles displaying somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenliang; Wang, Xianwei; Bai, Juan; Ma, Tao; Li, Zhijun; Li, Yufeng; Jiang, Ping

    2013-04-12

    In order to obtain a virus-like particles (VLPs) vaccine both for porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) prevention and growth-promotion, somatostatin (SS) gene was fused to the 3'-terminal of ORF2 gene of PCV2 with PCR, and a recombinant baculovirus (rAc-Cap-SS) was constructed. The expression of fusion protein Cap-SS (rCap-SS) with molecular weight of approximately 32kDa was identified by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay in Sf9 cells. The self-assembled VLPs were observed under electron microscopy, which being morphologically similar to the recombinant Cap protein (rCap) expressed in the same baculovirus expressing system. Ninety four-week-old mice were immunized with the recombinant proteins twice. The results showed that mice immunized with rCap-SS protein developed antibody against Cap, which levels being similar to those immunized with rCap protein. The body weight gain and anti-SS antibody in rCap-SS group was higher than those of rCap and negative control groups during 28 and 42 days post inoculation (dpi). Furthermore, twenty 28-day-old piglets were vaccinated twice subcutaneously with the recombinant proteins. The results indicated that PCV2-specific antibody could be induced after vaccination with rCap-SS or rCap protein. Anti-SS antibody could be induced after rCap-SS vaccination and was higher than other groups at 14 and 28 dpi. The level of somatostatin concentration in the blood of pigs in rCap-SS group was significantly decreased at 14 dpi than other groups (P<0.05). The relative daily weight gain (RDWG) of pigs in rCap-SS group was obviously higher than that in other groups at 28 dpi. After challenge with PCV2, pigs in the vaccinated groups had no clearly clinical signs, and the RDWG was significantly higher than that in the challenge control group (CC) (P<0.05). The pathological lesions, viremia and viral load presented in the vaccinated groups were milder than those in challenge control group. It suggested that the recombinant porcine

  7. Inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the basal and TSH-stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into rat thyroid lobes incubated in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zerek-Melen, G.; Lewinski, A.

    1988-07-15

    The effects of somatostatin on the spontaneous and TSH--stimulated incorporation of tritiated thymidine into the rat thyroid lobes incubated in vitro were investigated. The rate of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was used as an index of thyroid follicular cells (TFC) proliferation. It was shown that: 1) somatostatin, at a concentration of 10(-7)M, decreased /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of TFC, 2) the highest somatostatin concentration, as tested in this study (10(-6)M), produced a similar decreasing effect; the decrease, in this case, did not attain significance vs. controls, 3) somatostatin, when employed together with TSH, suppressed the stimulatory effect of the latter hormone on /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of thyroid lobes.

  8. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  9. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  10. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  11. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  12. Evaluation of copper-64-labeled somatostatin agonists and antagonist in sstr2-transfected cell lines that are positive and negative for p53: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim; Parry, Jesse J.; Rogers, Buck E.; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs have become important agents for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Here we determine the effect of the tumor suppressor protein, p53, on trafficking 64Cu to tumor cell nuclei from DOTA vs.CB-TE2A-conjugated agonist Y3-TATE and the antagonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT in cell lines that are positive or negative for p53. Methods Receptor binding, internalization, cAMP and nuclear localization studies were performed with the SSTr2 agonists, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE and 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE vs. antagonist, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT, in SSTr2-transfected p53 +/+ and −/− HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. Results The antagonist, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT, bound 8-9-fold more SSTr2 binding sites than did the 64Cu-labeled agonists. 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE was more efficiently internalized than 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE, while 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT showed lower, yet significant levels of internalization. CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE acted as a full agonist, inhibiting cAMP production, whereas CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT showed no inhibition of cAMP production.The 64Cu from agonists 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE and 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE showed greater nuclear localization at 24 h in p53 +/+ vs. −/− cells; however, there was no difference in the levels of 64Cu from the antagonist based on p53 status. Surprisingly, the DOTA and CB-TE2A-conjugated agonists showed similar nuclear localization in the p53 +/+ and −/− cells, suggesting no difference in 64Cu release from these chelators in the HCT116 cell lines. Conclusion Based on thesein vitro data, the agonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE demonstrated the most promise as an agent for targeted radiotherapy in p53 positive, SSTr2-positive tumors. PMID:22056254

  13. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  14. Evidence for a single class of somatostatin receptors in ground squirrel cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Krantic, S.; Petrovic, V.M.; Quirion, R.; Kordon, C.

    1989-01-01

    In the present study we characterized high-affinity somatostatin (SRIF) binding sites (Kd = 2.06 +/- 0.32 nM and Bmax = 295 +/- 28 fmol/mg protein) in cerebral cortex membrane preparations of European ground squirrel using /sup 125/I-(Tyr0-D-Trp8)-SRIF14 as a radioligand. The inhibition of radioligand specific binding by SRIF14, as well as by its agonists (SRIF28, Tyr0-D-Trp8-SRIF14, SMS 201 995) was complete and monophasic, thus revealing a single population of somatostatinergic binding sites. Radioautographic analysis of /sup 125/I-(Tyr0-D-Trp8)-SRIF14 labeled brain sections confirmed the results of our biochemical study. The homogeneity of SRIF binding sites in the ground squirrel neocortex was not dependent on the animal's life-cycle phase.

  15. Effect of somatostatin on 45Ca fluxes in guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Díez, J.; Tamargo, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of somatostatin (SS, 10(-6) M and 5 X 10(-6) M) was studied on 45Ca fluxes in guinea-pig isolated atria. SS produced a dose-dependent decrease in 45Ca uptake, this effect being dependent on the stimulation rate and Ca concentration in the bathing media. The decrease in 45Ca uptake was more evident at faster (60 and 180 beats min-1) than at slower frequencies (15 beats min-1) and was less evident in high Ca (5.4 mM). SS had no effect on 45Ca efflux. These results suggest that SS inhibits the slow inward Ca current in guinea-pig atrial fibres. PMID:2435352

  16. Measles virus modulates human T-cell somatostatin receptors and their coupling to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Krantic, S; Enjalbert, A; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1997-01-01

    The possible role of immunomodulatory peptide somatostatin (SRIF) in measles virus (MV)-induced immunopathology was addressed by analysis of SRIF receptors and their coupling to adenylyl cyclase in mitogen-stimulated Jurkat T cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). SRIF-specific receptors were assayed in semipurified membrane preparations by using SRIF14 containing iodinated tyrosine at the first position in the amino acid chain ([125I]Tyr1) as a radioligand. A determination of receptor number by saturation of radioligand binding at equilibrium showed that in Jurkat cells, MV infection led to a dramatic decrease in the total receptor number. The virus-associated disappearance of one (Ki2 = 12 +/- 4 nM [mean +/- standard error of the mean [SEM

  17. A gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma expressing somatostatin in a bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jeremiah A; Newman, Shelley J; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Dunlap, John

    2010-03-01

    A metastatic gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma in a 2.5-year-old inland bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) with a chronic history of anorexia, weight loss, depression, and acute melena is described. Histologic examination of the gastric mass revealed a densely cellular tumor arranged in nests and occasional rosettes of hyperchromatic cells with oval to spindle-shaped nuclei and minimal cytoplasm; the tumor was supported by a moderate fibrovascular stroma. Similar cells invaded through the gastric mucosa, and there were multiple hepatic metastases. The neoplastic cells were weakly immunopositive for neuron-specific enolase and moderately positive for somatostatin but were negative for chromogranin AB and gastrin. Ultrastructural studies revealed scattered neurosecretory granules in the neoplastic cells, confirming the diagnosis of a neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:20224102

  18. Expression cloning of a rat brain somatostatin receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kluxen, F W; Bruns, C; Lübbert, H

    1992-01-01

    We have used an expression-cloning strategy to isolate a cDNA encoding a somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF) receptor from rat cortex and hippocampus. A positive clone was identified by autoradiography after binding of radiolabeled SRIF to COS-1 cells previously transfected with pools of cDNA clones. The deduced amino acid sequence of the receptor displays sequence and structural homology to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors. The affinity of various SRIF analogs to the expressed receptor resembles their effects on growth hormone release from pituitary cells. In addition, the distribution of the mRNA in various tissues corresponds to that described for native SRIF receptors. Therefore, we conclude that we have isolated a rat brain SRIF receptor cDNA. Images PMID:1374909

  19. Beta-endorphin, somatostatin, and prolactin levels in cerebrospinal fluid of epileptic patients after generalised convulsion.

    PubMed Central

    Pitkänen, A; Jolkkonen, J; Riekkinen, P

    1987-01-01

    The possible role of different peptidergic systems in the postictal stage of human epilepsy was studied by measuring beta-endorphin, somatostatin, and prolactin levels by radioimmunoassay of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from nine epileptic patients. The first sample was taken within 2 hours after generalised tonic-clonic convulsion, and the second sample was obtained interictally after 1-4 days without any kind of clinically observable seizures. beta-endorphin was elevated postictally (p = 0.044) compared with interictal levels. SLI and PROL were similar in both samples. The present study suggests that in humans beta-endorphin is released into CSF during generalised seizures. This may indicate that neurons containing beta-endorphin are activated during a seizure. PMID:2890716

  20. Elucidating the Role of Disulfide Bond on Amyloid Formation and Fibril Reversibility of Somatostatin-14

    PubMed Central

    Anoop, Arunagiri; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Dhaked, Bhagwan Das; Jha, Narendra Nath; Pratihar, Supriya; Ghosh, Saikat; Sahay, Shruti; Kumar, Santosh; Das, Subhadeep; Kombrabail, Mamata; Agarwal, Kumud; Jacob, Reeba S.; Singru, Praful; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of protein/peptide hormones within subcellular compartments and subsequent release are crucial for their native function, and hence these processes are intricately regulated in mammalian systems. Several peptide hormones were recently suggested to be stored as amyloids within endocrine secretory granules. This leads to an apparent paradox where storage requires formation of aggregates, and their function requires a supply of non-aggregated peptides on demand. The precise mechanism behind amyloid formation by these hormones and their subsequent release remain an open question. To address this, we examined aggregation and fibril reversibility of a cyclic peptide hormone somatostatin (SST)-14 using various techniques. After proving that SST gets stored as amyloid in vivo, we investigated the role of native structure in modulating its conformational dynamics and self-association by disrupting the disulfide bridge (Cys3–Cys14) in SST. Using two-dimensional NMR, we resolved the initial structure of somatostatin-14 leading to aggregation and further probed its conformational dynamics in silico. The perturbation in native structure (S-S cleavage) led to a significant increase in conformational flexibility and resulted in rapid amyloid formation. The fibrils formed by disulfide-reduced noncyclic SST possess greater resistance to denaturing conditions with decreased monomer releasing potency. MD simulations reveal marked differences in the intermolecular interactions in SST and noncyclic SST providing plausible explanation for differential aggregation and fibril reversibility observed experimentally in these structural variants. Our findings thus emphasize that subtle changes in the native structure of peptide hormone(s) could alter its conformational dynamics and amyloid formation, which might have significant implications on their reversible storage and secretion. PMID:24782311

  1. Critical evaluation of cysteamine as a tool to deplete somatostatin in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, L.L.; Bissette, G.; Dole, K.; Nemeroff, C.B.

    1989-02-01

    The wide central nervous system (CNS) distribution of somatostatin (SRIF) as well as the well documented reduction in SRIF concentration in the cerebral cortex in patients with Alzheimer's disease have served as an impetus for studies of this peptide's neurobiological role in the brain. These studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy of centrally administered cysteamine (CYS) as a tool to deplete SRIF in the hypothalamus (HYP) and extrahypothalamic brain areas. Somatostatin was measured by RIA in the frontal cortex (COR), hippocampus (HIP), and HYP in rats after seven daily infusions of CYS into unilateral cannulae stereotaxically positioned into either the lateral ventricle (LV; 300 micrograms/2 microliters) or the dorsal HIP (100 micrograms/2 microliters), and after single (300 mg/kg) or daily (100 mg/kg) sc injections; rats were killed 4 or 24 h after the last injection. After LV infusions, the SRIF concentration was significantly reduced only in the HYP (35% at 4 h and 27% at 24 h). After HIP infusions, the SRIF concentration was significantly reduced only in the HYP at 4 h (23%); no reductions were observed at 24 h. Both a single and repeated sc administrations of CYS reduced SRIF in the HYP only 24 h after treatment (54% and 50%, respectively). Acute sc CYS reduced SRIF in the COR (23%) and the HYP (29%) 4 h after treatment; repeated sc CYS reduced SRIF in the COR (25%) and the HYP (63%). Although the reduction of SRIF in the HYP was increased by repeated sc dosing, the reduction of extrahypothalamic SRIF by sc CYS was relatively small in magnitude and was not enhanced by repeated dosing. These results suggest that CYS is not an ideal tool for depletion of extrahypothalamic SRIF after sc or CNS administration and, moreover, raise serious questions about studies in which behavioral or endocrine alterations after CYS treatment were attributed to specific actions on SRIF-containing neurons.

  2. Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to death ligand-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guillermet, Julie; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Rochaix, Philippe; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry; Schally, Andrew V; Pradayrol, Lucien; Buscail, Louis; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) gene expression is lost in 90% of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We previously demonstrated that stable sst2 transfection of human pancreatic BxPC-3 cells, which do not endogenously express sst2, inhibits cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. These sst2 effects occur as a consequence of an autocrine sst2-dependent loop, whereby sst2 induces expression of its own ligand, somatostatin. Here we investigated whether sst2 induces apoptosis in sst2-transfected BxPC-3 cells. Expression of sst2 induced a 4.4- +/- 0.05-fold stimulation of apoptosis in BxPC-3 through the activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. sst2 also sensitized these cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), enhancing it 4.1- +/- 1.5-fold. Apoptosis in BxPC-3 cells mediated by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD95L was likewise increased 2.3- +/- 0.5-fold and 7.4- +/- 2.5-fold, respectively. sst2-dependent activation and cell sensitization to death ligand-induced apoptosis involved activation of the executioner caspases, key factors in both death ligand- or mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. sst2 affected both pathways: first, by up-regulating expression of TRAIL and TNFalpha receptors, DR4 and TNFRI, respectively, and sensitizing the cells to death ligand-induced initiator capase-8 activation, and, second, by down-regulating expression of the antiapoptotic mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein. These results are of interest for the clinical management of chemoresistant pancreatic adenocarcinoma by using a combined gene therapy based on the cotransfer of genes for both the sst2 and a nontoxic death ligand. PMID:12490654

  3. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog (125I)CGP 23996. (125I)CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity (125I)CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of (125I)CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect (125I)CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with (125I) CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to (125I)CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors.

  4. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  5. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  6. Occurrence of two somatostatin variants in the frog brain: characterization of the cDNAs, distribution of the mRNAs, and receptor-binding affinities of the peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Tostivint, H; Lihrmann, I; Bucharles, C; Vieau, D; Coulouarn, Y; Fournier, A; Conlon, J M; Vaudry, H

    1996-01-01

    In tetrapods, only one gene encoding a somatostatin precursor has been identified so far. The present study reports the characterization of the cDNA clones that encode two distinct somatostatin precursors in the brain of the frog Rana ridibunda. The cDNAs were isolated by using degenerate oligonucleotides based on the sequence of the central region of somatostatin to screen a frog brain cDNA library. One of the cDNAs encodes a 115-amino acid protein (prepro-somatostatin-14; PSS1) that exhibits a high degree of structural similarity with the mammalian somatostatin precursor. The other cDNA encodes a 103-amino acid protein (prepro-[Pro2, Met13]somatostatin-14; PSS2) that contains the sequence of the somatostatin analog (peptide SS2) at its C terminus, but does not exhibit appreciable sequence similarity with PSS1 in the remaining region. In situ hybridization studies indicate differential expression of the PSS1 and PSS2 genes in the septum, the lateral part of the pallium, the amygdaloid complex, the posterior nuclei of the thalamus, the ventral hypothalamic nucleus, the torus semicircularis and the optic tectum. The somatostatin variant SS2 was significantly more potent (4-6 fold) than somatostatin itself in displacing [125I-Tyr0, D-Trp8] somatostatin-14 from its specific binding sites. The present study indicates that the two somatostatin variants could exert different functions in the frog brain and pituitary. These data also suggest that distinct genes encoding somatostatin variants may be expressed in the brain of other tetrapods. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8901629

  7. Somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, and prosomatostatin[1-10] are independently and efficiently processed from prosomatostatin in the constitutive secretory pathway in islet somatostatin tumor cells (1027B2).

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Galanopoulou, A S; Rabbani, S N; Liu, J L; Ravazzola, M; Amherdt, M

    1997-08-01

    We have characterized the biosynthetic origin of somatostatin-14 (SS-14), SS-28, and pro-SS[1-10] from pro-SS (PSS) in 1027B2 rat islet tumor cells. Because these cells lack regulated secretion and show unresponsiveness of the SS gene to cAMP, we have additionally carried out morphological and functional studies to elucidate the molecular defect in cAMP signalling and to localize the sites of PSS maturation along the secretory pathway. Cell extracts and secretion media were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography and specific C- and N-terminal radioimmunoassays. Electron microscopic sampling of 1027B2 cell cultures showed that most cells had very few dense core secretory granules for heterogeneous sizes. The cells expressed the endoproteases furin, PC1, and PC2 and contained large quantities of fully processed SS-14 and SS-28 with very little unprocessed PSS (ratio SS-14:SS-28:PSS = 39:51:10%). They secreted high concentrations of SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] constitutively along with PC1 and PC2. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that PSS is rapidly (within 15 min), and efficiently processed to SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] via separate biosynthetic pathways: PSS --> SS-14 + 8 kDa; PSS --> SS-28 + 7 kDa; PSS --> PSS[1-10]. Monensin reduced intracellular SS-like immunoreactivity without altering processing efficiency. Transfection with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-C) activated SS promoter-CAT activating indicating that the defect in cAMP-dependent signaling in 1027B2 cells lies at the level of PKA-C. PKA-C overexpression failed to alter the ratio of processed SS-14 and SS-28. These results demonstrate that SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] are independently synthesized from PSS and that efficient precursor processing can occur within the constitutive secretory pathway in the relative absence of dense core secretory vesicles. PMID:9296377

  8. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities. PMID:25752982

  9. Somatostatin- and enkephalin-like immunoreactivities are frequently colocalized in neurons in the caudal brain stem of rat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Terenius, L; Buchan, A; Brown, J C

    1987-01-01

    The medulla oblongata and pons of colchicine treated rats were analyzed with a double-staining technique using mouse monoclonal antibodies to somatostatin and rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against methionine-enkephalin. Numerous cells reacted with both antisera but cells reacting with only one antiserum were also observed. Double-stained cells were most frequently encountered at all levels of the nucleus tractus solitarii, in a well defined group in the caudal medullary reticular formation, along the lateral ventral surface of the medulla oblongata, dorsolateral to the inferior olive and in the nucleus raphe magnus. These findings provide further examples of coexistence of two peptides and indicate the possibility that somatostatin- and enkephalin-like peptides are co-released. PMID:2887451

  10. Counteraction by combined treatment with high dose of oestrogen and somatostatin of mammary growth suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H; Koshimizu, U; Sakagami, N

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between somatostatin (SMS) and high doses of oestrogen on mammary gland growth was examined in C3H/He virgin mice. Mammary gland growth was significantly suppressed by the subcutaneous implantation of pellets of oestradiol benzoate diluted to 1/1000 or 1/500 or by injection twice daily of 50ng SMS 201-995 between 25 and 55 days of age. However, the mammary gland growth of mice receiving SMS and oestrogen in combination was markedly stimulated compared to that of mice given the respective agents. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of somatostatin and oestrogen on mammary growth were apparently counteracted by the treatment in combination. PMID:2908772

  11. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  12. Somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons contribute to lateral inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus of control and epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Boyett, J M; Buckmaster, P S

    2001-01-01

    Lateral inhibition, a feature of neuronal circuitry that enhances signaling specificity, has been demonstrated in the rat dentate gyrus. However, neither the underlying neuronal circuits, nor the ways in which these circuits are altered in temporal lobe epilepsy, are completely understood. This study examines the potential contribution of one class of inhibitory interneurons to lateral inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus of both control and epileptic rats. The retrograde tracer wheat germ ag-glutinin-apo-horse radish peroxidase-gold (WGA-apo-HRP-gold) was injected into the septal dentate gyrus. Neurons double-labeled for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the retrograde tracer are concentrated in the hilus and may contribute to lateral inhibition. Neurons double-labeled for somatostatin and the retrograde tracer account for at least 28% of GAD-positive neurons with axon projections appropriate for generating lateral inhibition in control rats. Despite an overall loss of somatostatin-expressing cells in epileptic animals, the number of somatostatin-positive interneurons with axon projections appropriate for generating lateral inhibition is similar to that seen in controls. These findings suggest that somatostatinergic interneurons participate in lateral inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus of both control and epileptic rats, and that surviving somatostatinergic interneurons might sprout new axon collaterals in epileptic animals. PMID:11530846

  13. Carboxyl-Terminal Receptor Domains Control the Differential Dephosphorylation of Somatostatin Receptors by Protein Phosphatase 1 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β) as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs. PMID:24637622

  14. Convergent syntheses of LeX analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Hendel, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of three Lex derivatives from one common protected trisaccharide is reported. These analogues will be used respectively for competitive binding experiments, conjugation to carrier proteins and immobilization on gold. An N-acetylglucosamine monosaccharide acceptor was first glycosylated at O-4 with a galactosyl imidate. This coupling was performed at 40 °C under excess of BF3·OEt2 activation and proceeded best if the acceptor carried a 6-chlorohexyl rather than a 6-azidohexyl aglycon. The 6-chlorohexyl disaccharide was then converted to an acceptor and submitted to fucosylation yielding the corresponding protected 6-chlorohexyl Lex trisaccharide. This protected trisaccharide was used as a precursor to the 6-azidohexyl, 6-acetylthiohexyl and 6-benzylthiohexyl trisaccharide analogues which were obtained in excellent yields (70–95%). In turn, we describe the deprotection of these intermediates in one single step using dissolving metal conditions. Under these conditions, the 6-chlorohexyl and 6-azidohexyl intermediates led respectively to the n-hexyl and 6-aminohexyl trisaccharide targets. Unexpectedly, the 6-acetylthiohexyl analogue underwent desulfurization and gave the n-hexyl glycoside product, whereas the 6-benzylthiohexyl analogue gave the desired disulfide trisaccharide dimer. This study constitutes a particularly efficient and convergent preparation of these three Lex analogues. PMID:20485599

  15. Dolastatin 11 conformations, analogues and pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ahad; Bates, Robert B; Crane, Zackary D; Dicus, Christopher W; Gramme, Michelle R; Hamel, Ernest; Marcischak, Jacob; Martinez, David S; McClure, Kelly J; Nakkiew, Pichaya; Pettit, George R; Stessman, Chad C; Sufi, Bilal A; Yarick, Gayle V

    2005-07-01

    Twenty analogues of the natural antitumor agent dolastatin 11, including majusculamide C, were synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity against human cancer cells and stimulation of actin polymerization. Only analogues containing the 30-membered ring were active. Molecular modeling and NMR evidence showed the low-energy conformations. The amide bonds are all trans except for the one between the Tyr and Val units, which is cis. Since an analogue restricted to negative 2-3-4-5 angles stimulated actin polymerization but was inactive in cells, the binding conformation (most likely the lowest-energy conformation in water) has a negative 2-3-4-5 angle, whereas a conformation with a positive 2-3-4-5 angle (most likely the lowest energy conformation in chloroform) goes through cell walls. The highly active R alcohol from borohydride reduction of dolastatin 11 is a candidate for conversion to prodrugs. PMID:15878670

  16. Screening of bromotyramine analogues as antifouling compounds against marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andjouh, Sofyane; Blache, Yves

    2016-09-01

    Rapid and efficient synthesis of 23 analogues inspired by bromotyramine derivatives, marine natural products, by means of CuSO4-catalysed [3+2] alkyne-azide cycloaddition is described. The final target was then assayed for anti-biofilm activity against three Gram-negative marine bacteria, Pseudoalteromonas ulvae (TC14), Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica (TC8) and Paracoccus sp. (4M6). Most of the synthesised bromotyramine/triazole derivatives are more active than the parent natural products Moloka'iamine (A) and 3,5-dibromo-4-methoxy-β-phenethylamine (B) against biofilm formation by the three bacterial strains. Some of these compounds were shown to act as non-toxic inhibitors of biofilm development with EC50 < 200 μM without any effect on bacterial growth even at high concentrations (200 μM). PMID:27450150

  17. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  18. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  19. Target-Specific Effects of Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons on Neocortical Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Cottam, James C. H.

    2013-01-01

    A diverse array of interneuron types regulates activity in the mammalian neocortex. Two of the most abundant are the fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which target the axosomatic region of pyramidal cells, and the somatostatin-positive (SOM+) interneurons, which target the dendrites. Recent work has focused on the influence of PV+ and SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells. However, the connections among PV+ and SOM+ interneurons are poorly understood and could play an important role in cortical circuitry, since their interactions may alter the net influence on pyramidal cell output. We used an optogenetic approach to investigate the effect of SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells and PV+ interneurons during visual stimulation in mouse primary visual cortex. We find that SOM+ interneuron activation suppresses PV+ cell spiking at least twice as potently as pyramidal cell spiking during visual stimulation. This differential effect of SOM+ cell stimulation is detectable even when only two to three SOM+ cells are activated. Importantly, the remaining responses to oriented gratings in PV+ cells are more orientation tuned and temporally modulated, suggesting that SOM+ activity unmasks this tuning by suppressing untuned input. Our results highlight the importance of SOM+ inhibition of PV+ interneurons during sensory processing. This prominent competitive inhibition between interneuron types leads to a reconfiguration of inhibition along the somatodendritic axis of pyramidal cells, and enhances the orientation selectivity of PV+ cells. PMID:24336721

  20. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  1. Differential Receptive Field Properties of Parvalbumin and Somatostatin Inhibitory Neurons in Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-yun; Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Ibrahim, Leena A.; Yuan, Wei; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory circuits play important roles in shaping sensory processing. In auditory cortex, however, functional properties of genetically identified inhibitory neurons are poorly characterized. By two-photon imaging-guided recordings, we specifically targeted 2 major types of cortical inhibitory neuron, parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) expressing neurons, in superficial layers of mouse auditory cortex. We found that PV cells exhibited broader tonal receptive fields with lower intensity thresholds and stronger tone-evoked spike responses compared with SOM neurons. The latter exhibited similar frequency selectivity as excitatory neurons. The broader/weaker frequency tuning of PV neurons was attributed to a broader range of synaptic inputs and stronger subthreshold responses elicited, which resulted in a higher efficiency in the conversion of input to output. In addition, onsets of both the input and spike responses of SOM neurons were significantly delayed compared with PV and excitatory cells. Our results suggest that PV and SOM neurons engage in auditory cortical circuits in different manners: while PV neurons may provide broadly tuned feedforward inhibition for a rapid control of ascending inputs to excitatory neurons, the delayed and more selective inhibition from SOM neurons may provide a specific modulation of feedback inputs on their distal dendrites. PMID:24425250

  2. A subpopulation of itch-sensing neurons marked by Ret and somatostatin expression.

    PubMed

    Stantcheva, Kalina K; Iovino, Loredana; Dhandapani, Rahul; Martinez, Concepcion; Castaldi, Laura; Nocchi, Linda; Perlas, Emerald; Portulano, Carla; Pesaresi, Martina; Shirlekar, Kalyanee S; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Paparountas, Triantafillos; Bilbao, Daniel; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2016-04-01

    Itch, the unpleasant sensation that elicits a desire to scratch, is mediated by specific subtypes of cutaneous sensory neuron. Here, we identify a subpopulation of itch-sensing neurons based on their expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. We apply flow cytometry to isolate Ret-positive neurons from dorsal root ganglia and detected a distinct population marked by low levels of Ret and absence of isolectin B4 binding. We determine the transcriptional profile of these neurons and demonstrate that they express neuropeptides such as somatostatin (Sst), the NGF receptor TrkA, and multiple transcripts associated with itch. We validate the selective expression of Sst using an Sst-Cre driver line and ablated these neurons by generating mice in which the diphtheria toxin receptor is conditionally expressed from the sensory neuron-specific Avil locus. Sst-Cre::Avil(iDTR) mice display normal nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli. However, scratching behavior evoked by interleukin-31 (IL-31) or agonist at the 5HT1F receptor is significantly reduced. Our data provide a molecular signature for a subpopulation of neurons activated by multiple pruritogens. PMID:26929027

  3. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  4. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  5. Somatostatin Receptor-1 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n=5, p<0.05, t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47%, (n=5, p<0.05, t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  6. Antiulcerogenic activity of Alchornea castaneaefolia: effects on somatostatin, gastrin and prostaglandin.

    PubMed

    Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Calvo, Tamara Roberta; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; Andrade, Fábio Donizete Pezzuto; Vilegas, Wagner; Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro Souza

    2006-03-01

    The hydroethanolic extract of the leaves (HEL) and bark (HEB) obtained from Alchornea castaneaefolia (Euphorbiaceae) were investigated for their ability to prevent ulceration of the gastric mucosa in animal models. HEL (500 and 1000 mg/kg) and HEB (1000 mg/kg) significantly reduced the gastric injuries induced by the combination of HCl/ethanol and lowered the severity of gastric damage formation induced by indomethacin/bethanechol in mice. Further investigation showed that HEL also inhibited formation of ulcers in mice submitted to stress and pylorus ligature, but HEL did not modify gastric juice parameters in Shay mice. HEL was also effective in promoting the healing process in chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid in rats. An enriched flavonoidic fraction (EFF at dose of 100mg/kg) obtained from HEL reduced gastric lesions induced by HCl/ethanol and indomethacin/bethanechol in mice. Although EFF did not modify the amount of free mucus production by gastric mucosa, it was able to increase prostaglandin production. When administered to rats submitted to ethanol-induced gastric lesions, EFF increased the somatostatin serum levels, while the gastrin serum levels were proportionally decreased. Phytochemical investigation on HEL and EFF led to the isolation of flavonoids glycosides as the main compounds, thus suggesting that these substances may be involved in the observed antiulcer activity. PMID:16253451

  7. Localization of Neuroendocrine Tumors Using Somatostatin Receptor Imaging With Indium-111-Pentetreotide (OctreoScan).

    PubMed

    Ellison; Schirmer; Olsen; Pozderac; Hinkle; Hill; O'Dorisio; O'Dorisio

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many imaging methods have been used to detect neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal system. There is no gold standard for identifying the location of primary tumors and their potential metastases, and most conventional imaging techniques cannot detect tumors less than 1.0 cm in size. METHODS: The authors have investigated the use of 111-In-pentetreotide as an imaging agent for abdominal neuroendocrine tumors. RESULTS: The agent is cleared rapidly by the kidneys and is primarily excreted intact with a biologic half-life of six hours. The largest radiation burden is to the spleen and kidneys. A nine-center study conducted in Europe involved 365 patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that were also imaged by other methods. The results of 111-In-pentetreotide were in agreement with those obtained by other methods for 79% of tumor locations. An additional 110 tumor localizations were detected that were not seen with conventional methods. The smallest gastrinoma imaged by 111-In-pentetreotide was a 4-mm duodenal tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Scintigraphy with 111-In-pentetreotide is effective in visualizing various somatostatin receptors characteristic of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Insulinomas, however, are not well imaged. Concurrent computed tomography scanning is advised to minimize the risk of missing liver metastases. PMID:10763002

  8. The role of vasopressin, somatostatin and GABA in febrile convulsion in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, S; Nagaki, S; Minatogawa, Y; Sadamatsu, M; Kato, N; Osawa, M; Fukuyama, Y

    1996-01-01

    In order to further elucidate a possible role of neuropeptides and GABA in the pathogenesis of febrile convulsions, we studied changes of immunoreactive-arginine vasopressin (IR-AVP), IR-somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the rat brain after febrile convulsions induced by ultra-red light (UR). Male Wistar rats at 16 days of age irradiated with UR developed generalized convulsions after 4.9 +/- 0.5 min irradiation. Six rats were killed by microwave irradiation 3 min after UR irradiation prior to convulsion development, and 29 rats were killed either 0 min, 2 h, 6 h, 24 h or 48 h after febrile convulsions. Non-irradiated rats served as controls. The rat brain was dissected into 4 regions; amygdala, hypothalamus, cortex and hippocampus, and subjected to radioimmunoassays. IR-AVP levels in hypothalamus were increased 3 min after UR and decreased at 2 h and 6 h after the convulsions. IR-SRIF levels were increased in cortex and hippocampus at 3 min after UR and 0 min after the convulsions. The GABA content increased in all regions tested at 2 h and 6 h after the convulsions. These results suggest that AVP, SRIF and GABA may be involved in the pathogenesis of febrile convulsions in different ways. PMID:8649210

  9. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor activity of new octapeptide analogs of somatostatin containing unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Staykova, Svetlana Ts; Wesselinova, Diana W; Vezenkov, Lyubomir T; Naydenova, Emilia D

    2015-05-01

    Some modified octapeptide analogs of somatostatin with the following structure D-Phe-c(Cys-Phe-D-Trp-Xxx-Yyy-Cys)-Thr-NH2, where Xxx is Lys or Orn and Yyy is Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid), Ac5c (1-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid) or Ac6c (1-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid) have been synthesized. The peptides were prepared by standard Fmoc-solid phase peptide chemistry method. The direct disulphide bond formation has been employed on the solid phase by Tl(CF3CO2)3. The cytotoxic effects of the compounds were tested in vitro against a panel of tumor cell lines: HT-29 (human colorectal cancer cell line), MDA-MB-23 (human breast cancer cell line), Hep-G2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line), HeLa (cervical cancer cell line) and normal human diploid cell line Lep-3. The new peptides exhibited different concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect against the tumor cell lines after 24 h treatment. The compounds were most effective to the HT-29 tumor cells. The compound 4C (Orn(5), Aib(6)) demonstrated the most pronounced antiproliferative effects on HT-29 cells with the IC50 = 0.0199 μM. PMID:25655387

  10. Postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of somatostatin interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Geng; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xing-Yue; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST)-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) play important roles in neuronal diseases, memory and cognitive functions. However, their development in the ACC remains unclear. Using postnatal day 3 (P3) to P45 GIN mice, we found that most of the intrinsic membrane properties of SST interneurons in the ACC were developmentally mature after the second postnatal week and that the development of these neurons differed from that of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, electrical coupling between SST interneurons appeared primarily between P12-14. The coupling probability plateaued at approximately P21-30, with a non-age-dependent development of coupling strength. The development of excitatory chemical afferents to SST interneurons occurred earlier than the development of inhibitory chemical afferents. Furthermore, eye closure attenuated the development of electrical coupling probability at P21-30 but had no effect on coupling strength. Eye closure also delayed the development of inhibitory chemical afferent frequency but had no effect on the excitatory chemical afferent amplitude, frequency or rise time. Our data suggest that SST interneurons in the ACC exhibit inherent developmental characteristics distinct from other interneuron subtypes, such as PV interneurons, and that some of these characteristics are subject to environmental regulation. PMID:27319800

  11. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  12. Postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of somatostatin interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex of mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Geng; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xing-Yue; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST)-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) play important roles in neuronal diseases, memory and cognitive functions. However, their development in the ACC remains unclear. Using postnatal day 3 (P3) to P45 GIN mice, we found that most of the intrinsic membrane properties of SST interneurons in the ACC were developmentally mature after the second postnatal week and that the development of these neurons differed from that of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, electrical coupling between SST interneurons appeared primarily between P12–14. The coupling probability plateaued at approximately P21–30, with a non-age-dependent development of coupling strength. The development of excitatory chemical afferents to SST interneurons occurred earlier than the development of inhibitory chemical afferents. Furthermore, eye closure attenuated the development of electrical coupling probability at P21–30 but had no effect on coupling strength. Eye closure also delayed the development of inhibitory chemical afferent frequency but had no effect on the excitatory chemical afferent amplitude, frequency or rise time. Our data suggest that SST interneurons in the ACC exhibit inherent developmental characteristics distinct from other interneuron subtypes, such as PV interneurons, and that some of these characteristics are subject to environmental regulation. PMID:27319800

  13. Role of endogenous somatostatin in postprandial hypersecretion of neurotensin in patients after gastrectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Miyata, M; Izukura, M; Tanaka, Y; Iwase, K; Imabun, S; Matsuda, H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to elucidate the mechanism of the hypersecretion of neurotensin (NT) after gastrectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: NT secretion induced by fat ingestion is increased after pancreatoduodenectomy or distal gastrectomy. The hypersecretion of NT in the patients undergoing resection of the upper gastrointestinal tract is suppressed by an exogenous somatostatin (SST) analog. METHODS: We observed simultaneously the secretion of NT and SST in the same patients before and after gastrectomy (n = 7). We also observed the secretion of these hormones induced by intraduodenal (ID) fat infusion in the normal volunteers (n = 6). RESULTS: The response of plasma NT to fat ingestion was significantly increased after gastrectomy compared with that before gastrectomy. The response of plasma SST after gastrectomy was significantly suppressed. The response of plasma NT and SST after ID fat infusion in the normal volunteers was similar to the gastrectomized state. CONCLUSION: Diminution of SST secretion, probably caused by the lack of SST cells in the distal part of the stomach, may play a role in augmenting NT secretion after gastrectomy. PMID:9114796

  14. Distribution of Neurotensin and Somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the Minipig Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M L; Vecino, E; Coveñas, R

    2016-08-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, an in depth study has been carried out for the first time on the distribution of fibres and cell bodies containing neurotensin and somatostatin-28 (1-12) (SOM) in the minipig brainstem. The animals used were not treated with colchicine. The distribution of neurotensin- and SOM-immunoreactive fibres was seen to be quite similar and was moderate in the minipig brainstem: a close anatomical relationship between both neuropeptides was observed. The distribution of cell bodies containing neurotensin or SOM was quite different and restricted. Cell bodies containing neurotensin were found in four brainstem nuclei: nucleus centralis raphae, nucleus dorsalis raphae, in the pars centralis of the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini and in the nucleus ventralis raphae. Cell bodies containing SOM were found in six nuclei/regions of the brainstem: nucleus ambiguus, nucleus dorsalis motorius nervi vagus, formatio reticularis, nucleus parabrachialis medialis, nucleus reticularis lateralis and nucleus ventralis raphae. According to the observed anatomical distribution of the immunoreactive structures containing neurotensin or SOM, the peptides could be involved in sleep-waking, nociceptive, gustatory, motor, respiratory and autonomic mechanisms. PMID:26250798

  15. Somatostatin expression in human hair follicles and its potential role in immune privilege.

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Trisia; Lo, Blanche K K; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Yu, Mei; Carr, Nicholas; Zloty, David; Cowan, Bryce; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J

    2013-07-01

    Immune privilege (IP) is believed to exist in the anagen hair follicle (HF). Studies have shown that downregulation of major histocompatibility complex Class I occurs and immunosuppressive factors are expressed in the HF bulb and bulge. However, demonstration and quantification of functional IP in HF cells are required. We examined the middle (sheath) and lower (bulb) portions of the human HF using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), immunohistology, ELISA, in vitro coculture with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and flow cytometry. We found that HF cells, relative to non-follicular epidermal cells, failed to promote allogeneic PBMC proliferation and CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFNγ production. By qPCR, we found significant downregulation of Class I and Class II HLA alleles in both the bulb and sheath, and upregulation of multiple immunoregulatory genes. It is noteworthy that somatostatin (SST) was significantly upregulated relative to epidermis. By immunohistochemistry, SST was most strongly expressed in the HF outer root sheath, and, by ELISA, cultured sheath cells secreted SST. PBMCs, cultured with stimulatory allogeneic epidermal cells and SST, secreted significantly less IFNγ than controls. Addition of SST antagonists to PBMCs cocultured with allogeneic HF cells increased IFNγ secretion. The data identify SST as a secretory factor potentially contributing to the HF IP repertoire. PMID:23370538

  16. Somatostatin Analogs and Tumor Localization Do Not Influence Vitamin D Concentration in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Motylewska, Ewelina; Gawronska, Joanna; Niedziela, Agata; Melen-Mucha, Gabriela; Lawnicka, Hanna; Komorowski, Jan; Swietoslawski, Jacek; Stepien, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), malignancies of rare but still rising incidence, may be a group at higher risk of vitamin D insufficiency. The gastrointestinal tumor prevalence and somatostatin analog (SSA) therapy may cause vitamin D malabsorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum level of vitamin D in NET patients. A total of 36 NET patients were enrolled into the experimental group and 16 individuals were enrolled into the control group. All patients were further classified into subgroups according to primary tumor localization (gastropancreatic, lung, and other NETs) or therapy (with or without SSA treatment). The concentrations of total 25(OH)D were assayed with Electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). Serum concentration of 25(OH)D in NET patients did not differ significantly from that of the control group. However, the average level of 25(OH)D in both groups met the criteria of vitamin D deficiency. Importantly, SSA therapy did not aggravate vitamin D deficiency. Moreover, the concentration of 25(OH)D in the studied group was not significantly influenced by primary tumor localization, patient age, or season. Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread disorder affecting both NET patients and individuals without other health problems, and SSA and gastrointestinal tumor localization do not exacerbate this condition. PMID:27028957

  17. The effect of somatostatin 201-995 on the early course of porcine pancreaticoduodenal allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, C P; Barr, D; Oeltjen, M R; Munn, S R; DiMagno, E P; Carpenter, H A; Sarr, M G; Perkins, J D

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of somatostatin 201-995 (SMS) on the maintenance dose of intravenous cyclosporine and on graft blood flow, exocrine secretion, and rejection after porcine pancreaticoduodenal allotransplantation (PDA). For seven days, 12 pigs (6 control, 6 SMS-treated) were studied to determine the effects of SMS on serum CsA concentrations. Twenty-six pigs (14 control, 12 SMS) with streptozocin-induced diabetes underwent PDA. Blood flow was measured through graft celiac and superior mesenteric arteries 15 and 60 min after reperfusion. SMS (75 micrograms s.c.) was given after the 15-min blood-flow measurement in the SMS group. Sixteen pigs (8 control, 8 SMS) were followed postoperatively with daily measurements of serum glucose and amylase concentrations, and urine amylase and trypsin activities. All pigs were immunosuppressed with azathioprine, prednisone, and i.v. CsA. SMS pigs also received SMS (75 micrograms s.c.) every 8 hr. SMS had no effect on maintenance dose of CsA or on serum amylase, urine amylase, or urine trypsin activities. Mean days to rejection were also not affected. Intraoperative graft blood flow was significantly decreased by SMS, but incidence of graft thrombosis was unchanged. These results suggest that in the porcine PDA model, SMS does not appear to inhibit exocrine secretion and potentially may adversely affect the early course of PDA by decreasing graft blood flow. PMID:1670973

  18. Effects of cysteamine and pantethine on open-field behavior, hypothalamic catecholamine concentrations, and somatostatin-induced barrel rotation in rats.

    PubMed

    Vécsei, L; Alling, C; Heilig, M; Widerlöv, E

    1989-03-01

    Cysteamine administered in a dose of 1.95 mM/kg subcutaneously (SC) markedly reduced several open-field behaviors (locomotion, rearing, grooming and defecation), while pantethine, administered in an equimolar dose, reduced the locomotion only. However, administered in a dose of 3.90 mM/kg (SC), pantethine also markedly reduced all open-field parameters. Cysteamine, and to less extent pantethine, reduced noradrenaline, and increased dopamine and DOPAC concentrations in the hypothalamus. It is discussed whether the lower potency of pantethine on open-field behaviors and hypothalamic catecholaminergic neurotransmission is connected with the limited activity of pantetheinase, the cysteamine-generating enzyme. Intracerebroventricularly (ICV) administered somatostatin did not influence the pantethine-induced (1.95 mM/kg SC) behavioral changes in the open-field test. It is possible that the peptide did not reach at the receptor sites in a sufficient concentration because of the reduced endogenous somatostatin content, or that the pantethine-induced noradrenaline depletion is connected with the ineffectiveness of somatostatin. Furthermore, pretreatment with cysteamine (1.95 mM/kg SC) or pantethine (1.95 mM/kg or 3.90 mM/kg SC) attenuated the somatostatin-induced (10 micrograms ICV) barrel rotation, suggesting that the level of endogenous somatostatin may play a role in the pathogenesis of this motor disturbance. PMID:2568000

  19. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). It involves simulated trips down the ...

  20. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  1. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  2. D-luciferin analogues: a multicolor toolbox for bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Qiang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jingyu; Guo, Wei

    2012-08-20

    Colorful mixture: Three types of luciferin analogues, that is, alkylaminoluciferins, aminoselenoluciferin, and luciferins with a benzimidazole scaffold, have been reported. These analogues show excellent bioluminescent properties and great potential in bioluminescence imaging. PMID:22807027

  3. Synthesis and Cytoxicity of Sempervirine and Analogues.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Yang, Chunying; Cleveland, John L; Bannister, Thomas D

    2016-03-01

    Sempervirine and analogues were synthesized using a route featuring Sonogashira and Larock Pd-catalyzed reactions. Structure-activity relationships were investigated using three human cancer cell lines. 10-Fluorosempervirine is the most potently cytotoxic member of the family yet described. PMID:26828413

  4. Solanapyrone analogues from a Hawaiian fungicolous fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new solanayrone analogues (solanapyrones J-M; 1-4) have been isolated from an unidentified fungicolous fungus collected in Hawaii. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by analysis of ID NMR, 2D NMR, and MS data. Solanapyrone J(1) showed antifungal acti...

  5. New cytotoxic analogues of annonaceous acetogenins.

    PubMed

    Rodier, S; Le Huerou, Y; Renoux, B; Doyon, J; Renard, P; Pierré, A; Gesson, J P; Grée, R

    2001-01-01

    A series of new acetogenin analogues incorporating a central catechol moiety instead of the tetrahydrofuran ring(s) have been prepared and tested against L1210 leukemia cells. Although less potent than bullatacinone, which has the same terminal lactone, these compounds display interesting cell cycle effects. PMID:11962508

  6. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  7. Synthesis of lipid II phosphonate analogues.

    PubMed

    Borbás, Anikó; Herczegh, Pál

    2011-09-01

    Simple analogues of lipid II were synthesized from 3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-thio-β-D-glucopyranose using conjugate addition onto ethylidene bisphosphonate and subsequent Wadsworth-Horner-Emmons reaction with long chain aliphatic aldehydes. PMID:21600568

  8. The arsonomethyl analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, S R; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1983-01-01

    4-Arsono-2-hydroxybutanoic acid, the analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate in which -CH2-AsO3H2 replaces -O-PO3H2, was synthesized. It proved to be a substrate for phosphoglycerate kinase. Its Michaelis constant was only slightly higher than that of the natural substrate, but its catalytic constant was about 1300 times smaller. PMID:6615422

  9. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Choi, B S; Kwon, K C; Lee, S O; Kwak, H J; Lee, C H

    2000-08-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue 2 are reported. The synthesis of 2 was accomplished from bisnoralcohol 3. The spermidine moiety was introduced via reductive amination of an appropriately functionalized 3beta-aminosterol with spermidinyl aldehyde 17 utilizing sodium triacetoxyborohydride as the reducing agent. Compound 2 shows weaker antimicrobial activity than squalamine. PMID:11003150

  10. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27301366

  11. Can we predict long-term remission after somatostatin analog withdrawal in patients with acromegaly? Results from a multicenter prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Lucio; Fleseriu, Maria; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Albuquerque, José Luciano; Gadelha, Patrícia Sampaio; dos Santos Faria, Manuel; Nascimento, Gilvan Cortês; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães

    2014-08-01

    Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) represent the mainstay of therapy in acromegaly. One of the potential disadvantages is the expected need to maintain therapy indefinitely in previously non-irradiated patients. The aim of this multicenter prospective open trial was to evaluate the likelihood of successful discontinuation of SSA therapy in well-controlled acromegalic patients who fulfilled very strict criteria: two or more years of treatment with the long-acting SSA octreotide LAR (OCT-LAR), a stable dose and injections interval every 4 weeks or longer for the previous year, GH levels <2.5 ng/ml and normal IGF-1 levels for age, a tumor remnant <10 mm, no history of radiotherapy, and no use of cabergoline or pegvisomant over the previous 6 months. Disease recurrence was defined as an increase of IGF-1 to levels above 1.2-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN). Out of 220 patients, 20 patients (12 women and 8 men; mean age, 48.1 ± 10.3 years; age range, 27-64) treated for 2.74 ± 0.64 years (range, 2.0-4.4) were included in this prospective study and OCT-LAR therapy was stopped. Four patients (20 %) remained without clinical and biochemical/neuroradiological evidence of disease recurrence after 12-18 months of follow-up. Sixteen patients (80 %) relapsed biochemically within 9 months after drug withdrawal and restarted OCT-LAR at the same previous dose. Compared to recurring subjects, non-recurring patients had significantly lower mean IGF-1 (× ULN) levels but there were some overlapping values in both groups. No other characteristic could be identified as a predictor of successful OCT-LAR discontinuation. Our findings demonstrated that OCT-LAR withdrawal, though rare, is possible in well-selected acromegalic patients treated for at least 2 years and considered optimally controlled in hormonal and neuroradiological terms. PMID:24272601

  12. Recent advances in topoisomerase I-targeting agents, camptothecin analogues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Lee, Namkyu

    2002-12-01

    The present review concentrates on camptothecin (CPT) analogues, the most extensively studied topoisomerase I (topo I) inhibitors, and provides concise information on the structural features of human topo I enzyme, mechanisms of interaction of CPT with topo I, structure-activity relationship study of CPT analogues including the influence of lactone stability on antitumor activity, and recent updates of valuable CPT analogues. PMID:12370044

  13. Molecular design, synthesis and anticoagulant activity evaluation of fluorinated dabigatran analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Ren, Yu-Jie; Dong, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, a series of unreported fluorinated dabigatran analogues, which were based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran, were designed by computer-aided simulation. Fifteen fluorinated dabigatran analogues were screened and synthesized. All target compounds were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (19)F NMR and HRMS. According to the preliminary screening results of inhibition ratio, eleven analogues (inhibition ratio >90%) were evaluated for antithrombin activity in vitro (IC50). The test results expressed that all the analogues showed effective inhibitory activities against thrombin. Especially, compounds 8f, 8k and 8o, with IC50 values of 1.81, 3.21 and 2.16nM, respectively, showed remarkable anticoagulant activities which were in the range of reference drug dabigatran (IC50=1.23nM). Moreover, compounds 8k and 8o were developed to investigate their anticoagulant activities in vivo. In those part, compound 8o exhibited a fairly strong inhibitory action for arteriovenous thrombosis with inhibition ratio of 84.66%, which was comparable with that of dabigatran (85.07%). Docking simulations demonstrated that these compounds could act as candidates for further development of novel anticoagulant drugs. PMID:27166573

  14. [Reflections of a clinician on the switch from human to analogue insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Deák, László

    2012-10-01

    The development of insulin therapy has not been stopped since the manufacturing of human insulin, because better mimic of physiological insulin response made it necessary to modify the human insulin molecule in order to create rapidly absorbing insulin analogues and 24-hour acting basal insulin analogues. Clinical observations indicate that the complete switch from human basal-bolus therapy to insulin analogues means not only "unit-for-unit" switch but it represents a transfer to an insulin therapy with different basal/bolus ratio as a result of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of insulin and the level of insulin resistance of the patient. With reference to a case-history, the author presents his experience on a switch from human insulin to insulin analogue. Furthermore, the author summarizes data obtained from a few cases reported in international literature which draw the attention to the fact that the basal/bolus ratio should be adjusted individually, which may be the key for the success in the therapy in these cases. PMID:23022882

  15. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  16. Proteolytic events in the post-translational processing of somatostatin precursors from rat brain cortex and anglerfish pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P; Morel, A; Gluschankof, P; Gomez, S; Nicolas, P

    1985-01-01

    An Arg-Lys esteropeptidase which converts somatostatin-28 (S-28) into somatostatin-14 (S-14) was detected in rat brain cortical extracts using a synthetic undecapeptide substrate mimicking the octacosapeptide sequence at the restriction site. This enzyme system was unable to release either the octacosapeptide or S-14 from the 15,000 mol wt (15K) rat hypothalamic precursor. This argues in favor of sequential degradation of the precursor into S-14 via S-28 as an obligatory intermediate. Another in vivo processing system was analyzed in the anglerfish pancreatic Brockmann organs. Here, cloning of two cDNA corresponding to two mRNA species predicts two distinct somatostatins precursors, called prosomatostatins I and II (Hobart et al., Nature 288:137, 1980). While a single S-14 can be detected in extracts made from this pancreatic tissue, indistinguishable from the mammalian species, two S-28 species could be separated by HPLC. Immunochemical and biochemical evidence indicates that the second species should correspond to anglerfish S-28 (AF S-28), the product of prosomatostatin-II processing in vivo. Amino acid analysis, together with the determined complete amino acid sequence of this peptide, demonstrates that this is indeed the case and that AF S-28 contains in its C-terminal half the [Tyr7, Gly10] derivative of S-14. These observations give an example of a AF S-28 being a terminal active product of prosomatostatin processing. They suggest that this octacosapeptide, which is potent on the inhibition of growth hormone release by anterior pituitary cells, may play such a role in the gastrointestinal tract of the anglerfish. These results, while not excluding alternative routes, give support to a sequential processing of the 15 K precursor----S-28----S-14. PMID:2863926

  17. Topography of Somatostatin Gene Expression Relative to Molecular Progenitor Domains during Ontogeny of the Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Delgado, Nicanor; Merchan, Paloma; Bardet, Sylvia M.; Ferrán, José L.; Puelles, Luis; Díaz, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus comprises alar, basal, and floor plate developmental compartments. Recent molecular data support a rostrocaudal subdivision into rostral (terminal) and caudal (peduncular) halves. In this context, the distribution of neuronal populations expressing somatostatin (Sst) mRNA was analyzed in the developing mouse hypothalamus, comparing with the expression pattern of the genes Orthopedia (Otp), Distal-less 5 (Dlx5), Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), and Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2.1). At embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5), Sst mRNA was first detectable in the anterobasal nucleus, a Nkx2.1-, Shh-, and Otp-positive basal domain. By E13.5, nascent Sst expression was also related to two additional Otp-positive domains within the alar plate and one in the basal plate. In the alar plate, Sst-positive cells were observed in rostral and caudal ventral subdomains of the Otp-positive paraventricular complex. An additional basal Sst-expressing cell group was found within a longitudinal Otp-positive periretromamillary band that separates the retromamillary area from tuberal areas. Apart of subsequent growth of these initial populations, at E13.5 and E15.5 some Sst-positive derivatives migrate tangentially into neighboring regions. A subset of cells produced at the anterobasal nucleus disperses ventralward into the shell of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and the arcuate nucleus. Cells from the rostroventral paraventricular subdomain reach the suboptic nucleus, whereas a caudal contingent migrates radially into lateral paraventricular, perifornical, and entopeduncular nuclei. Our data provide a topologic map of molecularly defined progenitor areas originating a specific neuron type during early hypothalamic development. Identification of four main separate sources helps to understand causally its complex adult organization. PMID:21441981

  18. Activation of brain somatostatin2 receptors stimulates feeding in mice: analysis of food intake microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Rivier, Jean; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that the oligosomatostatin receptor agonist, ODT8-SST increases food intake in rats via the somatostatin2 receptor (sst2). We characterized ingestive behavior following intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a selective sst2 agonist in freely fed mice during the light phase. The sst2 agonist (0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 or 1µg/mouse) injected icv under short inhalation anesthesia dose-dependently increased cumulative light phase food intake over 4h compared to vehicle with a 3.1-times increase at 1µg/mouse (p<0.05). Likewise, the sst2,3,5 agonist octreotide (0.3 or 1µg/mouse) dose-dependently increased 4-h food intake, whereas selective sst1 or sst4 agonists at 1µg/mouse did not. In vehicle-treated mice, high fat diet increased caloric intake/4h by 2.8-times compared to regular diet (p<0.05) and values were further increased 1.4-times/4h by the sst2 agonist. Automated continuous assessment of food intake established a 6.6-times higher food intake during the dark phase due to increased number of meals, meal size, meal duration and rate of ingestion compared to non-treated mice during the light phase. During the first 4h post icv sst2 agonist injection, mice had a 57% increase in number of meals with a 60% higher rate of ingestion, and a 61% reduction in inter-meal intervals, whereas meal sizes were not altered compared to vehicle. These data indicate that activation of brain sst2 receptors potently stimulates ingestive behavior under basal or high fat diet-stimulated conditions in mice. The shortened inter-meal interval suggests an inhibitory effect of the sst2 agonist on “satiety”, whereas “satiation” is not altered as indicated by normal meal size. PMID:20851136

  19. GABAergic somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons in the amygdala project to the entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A J; Zaric, V

    2015-04-01

    The entorhinal cortex and other hippocampal and parahippocampal cortices are interconnected by a small number of GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons in addition to glutamatergic pyramidal cells. Since the cortical and basolateral amygdalar nuclei have cortex-like cell types and have robust projections to the entorhinal cortex, we hypothesized that a small number of amygdalar GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons might participate in amygdalo-entorhinal projections. To test this hypothesis we combined Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tract tracing with immunohistochemistry for the amygdalar nonpyramidal cell markers glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and the m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2R). Injections of FG into the rat entorhinal cortex labeled numerous neurons that were mainly located in the cortical and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. Although most of these amygdalar FG+ neurons labeled by entorhinal injections were large pyramidal cells, 1-5% were smaller long-range nonpyramidal neurons (LRNP neurons) that expressed SOM, or both SOM and NPY. No amygdalar FG+ neurons in these cases were PV+ or VIP+. Cell counts revealed that LRNP neurons labeled by injections into the entorhinal cortex constituted about 10-20% of the total SOM+ population, and 20-40% of the total NPY population in portions of the lateral amygdalar nucleus that exhibited a high density of FG+ neurons. Sixty-two percent of amygdalar FG+/SOM+ neurons were GAD+, and 51% were M2R+. Since GABAergic projection neurons typically have low perikaryal levels of GABAergic markers, it is actually possible that most or all of the amygdalar LRNP neurons are GABAergic. Like GABAergic LRNP neurons in hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, amygdalar LRNP neurons that project to the entorhinal cortex are most likely involved in synchronizing oscillatory activity between the two regions. These oscillations could entrain

  20. Tissue somatostatin levels in three models of genetic obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Voyles, N R; Bhathena, S J; Kennedy, B; Wilkins, S D; Michaelis, O E; Zalenski, C M; Timmers, K I; Recant, L

    1987-05-01

    A potential role for somatostatin (SRIF) in the pathogenesis of the hyperinsulinemia of obese rats was considered. SRIF like immunoreactivity (ng/mg protein) was therefore measured in hot 2 N acetic acid extracts of pancreas, stomach, pituitary, and hypothalamus in tissues obtained from three models of genetic obesity in rats. These models included the obese and lean controls of LA/N-cp, SHR/N-cp, and Zucker rats. To assess the effects of diet on SRIF levels, mixed diets were provided ad lib which contained a carbohydrate as either sucrose or starch. Some groups were fed chow diets. No significant dietary effects on tissue levels of SRIF were obtained. However, two of the three models (Zucker and SHR/N-cp) showed phenotypic effects on SRIF levels in pancreas; namely, obese rats showed a significantly greater concentration of SRIF (P less than 0.0005 and less than 0.0002, respectively) than did the lean littermates. These findings were confirmed by measurement of total pancreas SRIF content. Gastric levels were significantly altered only in the obese Zucker rats (P less than 0.005) where obese tissues had lower concentrations than those of lean animals. However similar directional changes in pancreas and stomach were observed in all models. It is concluded that the hyperinsulinemia of the obese animals studied is not due to absolute deficiency in pancreatic SRIF content. It is postulated however that decreased pancreatic SRIF secretion (paracrine or otherwise) relative to pancreatic insulin content could still play a role. PMID:2883660

  1. Regulation of colonic apical potassium (BK) channels by cAMP and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Perry, M D; Sandle, G I

    2009-07-01

    High-conductance apical K+ (BK) channels are present in surface colonocytes of mammalian (including human) colon. Their location makes them well fitted to contribute to the excessive intestinal K(+) losses often associated with infective diarrhea. Since many channel proteins are regulated by phosphorylation, we evaluated the roles of protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatases in the modulation of apical BK channel activity in surface colonocytes from rat distal colon using patch-clamp techniques, having first increased channel abundance by chronic dietary K+ enrichment. We found that PKA activation using 50 micromol/l forskolin and 5 mmol/l 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine stimulated BK channels in cell-attached patches and the catalytic subunit of PKA (200 U/ml) had a similar effect in excised inside-out patches. The antidiarrheal peptide somatostatin (SOM; 2 micromol/l) had a G protein-dependent inhibitory effect on BK channels in cell-attached patches, which was unaffected by pretreatment with 10 micromol/l okadaic acid (an inhibitor of protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A) but completely prevented by pretreatment with 100 micromol/l Na+ orthovanadate and 10 micromol/l BpV (inhibitors of phosphoprotein tyrosine phosphatase). SOM also inhibited apical BK channels in surface colonocytes in human distal colon. We conclude that cAMP-dependent PKA activates apical BK channels and may enhance colonic K+ losses in some cases of secretory diarrhea. SOM inhibits apical BK channels through a phosphoprotein tyrosine phosphatase-dependent mechanism, which could form the basis of new antidiarrheal strategies. PMID:19407217

  2. Radial and tangential migration of telencephalic somatostatin neurons originated from the mouse diagonal area.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Luis; Morales-Delgado, N; Merchán, P; Castro-Robles, B; Martínez-de-la-Torre, M; Díaz, C; Ferran, J L

    2016-07-01

    The telencephalic subpallium is the source of various GABAergic interneuron cohorts that invade the pallium via tangential migration. Based on genoarchitectonic studies, the subpallium has been subdivided into four major domains: striatum, pallidum, diagonal area and preoptic area (Puelles et al. 2013; Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas), and a larger set of molecularly distinct progenitor areas (Flames et al. 2007). Fate mapping, genetic lineage-tracing studies, and other approaches have suggested that each subpallial subdivision produces specific sorts of inhibitory interneurons, distinguished by differential peptidic content, which are distributed tangentially to pallial and subpallial target territories (e.g., olfactory bulb, isocortex, hippocampus, pallial and subpallial amygdala, striatum, pallidum, septum). In this report, we map descriptively the early differentiation and apparent migratory dispersion of mouse subpallial somatostatin-expressing (Sst) cells from E10.5 onward, comparing their topography with the expression patterns of the genes Dlx5, Gbx2, Lhx7-8, Nkx2.1, Nkx5.1 (Hmx3), and Shh, which variously label parts of the subpallium. Whereas some experimental results suggest that Sst cells are pallidal, our data reveal that many, if not most, telencephalic Sst cells derive from de diagonal area (Dg). Sst-positive cells initially only present at the embryonic Dg selectively populate radially the medial part of the bed nucleus striae terminalis (from paraseptal to amygdaloid regions) and part of the central amygdala; they also invade tangentially the striatum, while eschewing the globus pallidum and the preoptic area, and integrate within most cortical and nuclear pallial areas between E10.5 and E16.5. PMID:26189100

  3. Differentiation between meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous somatostatin receptor and brain scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haldemann, A.R.; Luescher, D.; Sulzer, M.

    1994-05-01

    Since the differentiation between meningiomas and some other CNS tumors may be difficult in certain localizations, biopsy is mandatory, even in patients with meningiomas who are to be treated with percutaneous radiotherapy alone. The high density of somatostatin receptors (SSR) in meningiomas has led us to compare patients with meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous SSR and brain scintigraphy (BS) using 74 MBq 111In octreotide and 740 MBq 99mTc DTPA injected two hours later. SPECT was performed on a 3-head gamma camera 4 hours after 111In octreotide injection in multiple peak acquisition mode in 35 patients with radiologically documented CNS tumors. In positive scans, a tumor ROI was defined manually in the transverse 111In slice with highest tumor contrast and the identical tumor ROI was transferred to the corresponding 99mTc slice. A SSR to BS index was then calculated from the ratio of 111In to 99mTc counts after normalizing for identical total counts in the slices. in negative scans, the SSR to BS index was set to be 1.0. In 7 meningiomas, the SSR to BS index was 2.64{plus_minus}0.76. In 28 other CNS tumors (7 gliomas I-111, 4 neurinomas, 3 glial reactions, 3 metastases, 3 gliomas IV, 2 ependymomas, 1 chordoma, 1 NHL; plus 4 inoperable, radiologically diagnosed glioblastomas) 1.06{plus_minus}0.13. Thus, a highly significant difference was found between these two groups (p<0.0001). It is concluded that combined SSR and BS allows excellent discrimination between meningiomas and other CNS tumors and may become a non-invasive alternative to biopsy in selected clinical situations.

  4. Inverse expression of somatostatin and CXCR4 chemokine receptors in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms of different malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Träger, Tina; Hoffmeister, Maike; Sipos, Bence; Hommann, Merten; Sänger, Järg; Schulz, Stefan; Lupp, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are widely distributed in well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) and serve as primary targets for diagnostics and treatment. An overexpression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, in contrast, is considered to be present mainly in highly proliferative and advanced tumors. Comparative data are still lacking, however, for neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Methods SSTR subtype (1, 2A, 3, 5) and CXCR4 expression was evaluated in G1 (n = 31), G2 (n = 47), and low (G3a; Ki-67: 21–49%; n = 21) and highly proliferative (G3b; Ki-67: >50%, n = 22) G3 (total n = 43) gastroenteropancreatic NEN samples by performing immunohistochemistry with monoclonal rabbit anti-human anti-SSTR and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively, and was correlated with clinical data. Results Both CXCR4 and SSTR were widely expressed in all tumors investigated. CXCR4 expression differed significantly between the G1 and G3 specimens and within the G3 group (G3a to G3b), and was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression. SSTR2A, in contrast, exhibited an inverse association with Ki-67. SSTR2A was highly expressed in G1 and G2 tumors, but was significantly less abundant in G3 carcinomas. Additionally, SSTR1 expression was higher in G3a than in G3b tumors. Conclusion We observed an elevation in CXCR4 and a decrease in SSTR2A expression with increasing malignancy. Interestingly, 23% of the G3 specimens had strong SSTR2A expression. Because CXCR4 was strongly expressed in highly proliferative G3 carcinomas, it is an interesting new target and needs to be validated in larger studies. PMID:26259237

  5. Signalling mechanism for somatostatin receptor 5-mediated suppression of AMPA responses in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qin-Qin; Sheng, Wen-Long; Zhang, Gong; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is involved in a variety of physiological functions via the activation of five subtypes of specific receptors (sst1-5). Here, we investigated the effects of SRIF on AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated currents (AMPA currents) in isolated rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) using patch-clamp techniques. Immunofluorescence double labelling demonstrated the expression of sst5 in rat GCs. Consistent to this, whole cell AMPA currents of GCs were dose-dependently suppressed by SRIF, and the effect was reversed by the sst5 antagonist BIM-23056. Intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S or pre-incubation with the Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) abolished the SRIF effect. The SRIF effect was mimicked by the administration of either 8-Br-cAMP or forskolin, but was eliminated by the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonists H-89/KT5720/Rp-cAMP. Moreover, SRIF increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels and did not suppress the AMPA currents when GCs were infused with an intracellular Ca(2+)-free solution or in the presence of ryanodine receptor modulators caffeine/ryanodine. Furthermore, the SRIF effect was eliminated when the activity of calmodulin (CaM), calcineurin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was blocked with W-7, FK-506 and okadaic acid, respectively. SRIF persisted to suppress the AMPA currents when cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-/phosphatidylcholine (PC)-phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways were blocked. In rat flat-mount retinas, SRIF suppressed AMPAR-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) in GCs. We conclude that a distinct Gi/o/cAMP-PKA/ryanodine/Ca(2+)/CaM/calcineurin/PP1 signalling pathway comes into play due to the activation of sst5 to mediate the SRIF effect on GCs. PMID:26969240

  6. Testing the role of preBötzinger complex somatostatin neurons in respiratory and vocal behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Rieger, Michael A.; Ling, Guang-Yi; Park, Thomas J.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Goodchild, Ann K.; Gray, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying neurons essential for the generation of breathing and related behaviors such as vocalization is an important question for human health. The targeted loss of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) glutamatergic neurons, including those that express high levels of somatostatin protein (SST neurons), eliminates normal breathing in adult rats. Whether preBötC SST neurons represent a functionally specialized population is unknown. We tested the effects on respiratory and vocal behaviors of eliminating SST neuron glutamate release by Cre-Lox-mediated genetic ablation of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGlut2). We found the targeted loss of VGlut2 in SST neurons had no effect on viability in vivo, or on respiratory period or responses to neurokinin 1 or µ-opioid receptor agonists in vitro. We then compared medullary SST peptide expression in mice with that of two species that share extreme respiratory environments but produce either high or low frequency vocalizations. In the Mexican free-tailed bat, SST peptide-expressing neurons extended beyond the preBötC to the caudal pole of the VII motor nucleus. In the naked mole-rat, however, SST-positive neurons were absent from the ventrolateral medulla. We then analyzed isolation vocalizations from SST-Cre;VGlut2F/F mice and found a significant prolongation of the pauses between syllables during vocalization but no change in vocalization number. These data suggest that glutamate release from preBötC SST neurons is not essential for breathing but play a species- and behavior-dependent role in modulating respiratory networks. They further suggest that the neural network generating respiration is capable of extensive plasticity given sufficient time. PMID:25040660

  7. S-Ribosylhomocysteine analogues with the carbon-5 and sulfur atoms replaced by a vinyl or (fluoro)vinyl unit

    PubMed Central

    Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Lalama, Jennifer; Garmendia, Craig A.; Robert, Jenay; Zhu, Jinge; Pei, Dehua

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of the protected ribose or xylose 5-aldehyde with sulfonyl-stabilized fluorophosphonate gave (fluoro)vinyl sulfones. Stannyldesulfonylation followed by iododestannylation afforded 5,6-dideoxy-6-fluoro-6-iodo-d-ribo or xylo-hex-5-enofuranoses. Coupling of the hexenofuranoses with alkylzinc bromides gave ten-carbon ribosyl- and xylosylhomocysteine analogues incorporating a fluoroalkene. The fluoroalkenyl and alkenyl analogues were evaluated for inhibition of Bacillus subtilis S-ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS). One of the compounds, 3,5,6-trideoxy-6-fluoro-d-erythro-hex-5-enofuranose, acted as a competitive inhibitor of moderate potency (KI = 96 µM). PMID:18375129

  8. DNA information: from digital code to analogue structure.

    PubMed

    Travers, A A; Muskhelishvili, G; Thompson, J M T

    2012-06-28

    The digital linear coding carried by the base pairs in the DNA double helix is now known to have an important component that acts by altering, along its length, the natural shape and stiffness of the molecule. In this way, one region of DNA is structurally distinguished from another, constituting an additional form of encoded information manifest in three-dimensional space. These shape and stiffness variations help in guiding and facilitating the DNA during its three-dimensional spatial interactions. Such interactions with itself allow communication between genes and enhanced wrapping and histone-octamer binding within the nucleosome core particle. Meanwhile, interactions with proteins can have a reduced entropic binding penalty owing to advantageous sequence-dependent bending anisotropy. Sequence periodicity within the DNA, giving a corresponding structural periodicity of shape and stiffness, also influences the supercoiling of the molecule, which, in turn, plays an important facilitating role. In effect, the super-helical density acts as an analogue regulatory mode in contrast to the more commonly acknowledged purely digital mode. Many of these ideas are still poorly understood, and represent a fundamental and outstanding biological question. This review gives an overview of very recent developments, and hopefully identifies promising future lines of enquiry. PMID:22615471

  9. Design and synthesis of new fluconazole analogues.

    PubMed

    Pore, Vandana S; Agalave, Sandip G; Singh, Pratiksha; Shukla, Praveen K; Kumar, Vikash; Siddiqi, Mohammad I

    2015-06-21

    We have synthesized new fluconazole analogues containing two different 1,2,3-triazole units in the side chain. The synthesis of new amide analogues using a variety of acids is also described. All the compounds showed very good antifungal activity. A hemolysis study of the most active compounds 6e and 13j showed that both compounds did not cause any hemolysis at the dilutions tested. These compounds did not exhibit any toxicity to L929 cells at MIC and lower concentrations. In the docking study, the overall binding mode of 6e and 13j appeared to be reasonable and provided a good insight into the structural basis of inhibition of Candida albicans Cyp51 by these compounds. PMID:25975803

  10. Efficient synthesis of esermethole and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongyun; Zhao, Yuanhong; Dai, Xiaoyong; Liu, Jianping; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hongbin

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a general and flexible synthetic route towards the synthesis of pyrroloindoline alkaloids was developed. This new strategy features with a palladium mediated sequential arylation-allylation of o-bromoanilides and leads to the construction of oxindoles bearing a full carbon quaternary center. The cheap triphenylphosphine was proved to be a highly effective ligand for this one pot transformation. On the basis of this new method, esermethole and its analogues were synthesized. PMID:21472186

  11. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  12. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of acetogenin analogues.

    PubMed

    Rodier, S; Le Huérou, Y; Renoux, B; Doyon, J; Renard, P; Pierré, A; Gesson, J P; Grée, R

    2000-06-19

    A set of 16 new simplified analogues of acetogenins has been designed based on: (i) the replacement of the bis THF moiety of these natural products by an ethylene glycol bis ether unit; (ii) the introduction of different lipophilic side chains (alkyl, aryl, dialkylamino, O-cholesteryl); (iii) the presence of the same terminal isolactone. In vitro cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia is reported. PMID:10890167

  13. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  14. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  15. A topographical model of mu-opioid and brain somatostatin receptor selective ligands. NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, W M; Ferguson, R D; Lipkowski, A W; Hruby, V J

    1995-01-01

    We have refined the 1H NMR-based conformations of the mu-opioid receptor selective peptides related to somatostatin of general formula Xxx-Yyy1-Cys-Zzz-D-Trp-Lys(Orn)5-Thr-Pen-Thr8- NH2, where Xxx, Yyy, Zzz are 0, D-Phe and Tyr for 1; 0, D-Tic and Tyr for 2; Gly, D-Tic and Tyr for 3; and 0, D-Phe and Tic for 4, respectively, (Kazmierski et al., J. Am. Chem. 113, 2275-2283), using a molecular-dynamics approach. We present evidence that the NMR data are compatible with beta II'-, gamma- and gamma'-turns for the central tetrapeptide Tyr-D-Trp-Lys/Orn-Thr. Based on detailed structural and topographical considerations, we suggest that the mu-opioid receptor selectivity of 2 is due to a particular spatial arrangement of aromatic side chains of D-Tic1 and Tyr3 (7.5 A), and that the opioid receptor recognition domain is located in the N-terminal part of the peptide while the somatostatin receptor recognition domain is determined by the central, turn forming part of this class of cyclic peptides. A model for a mu-opioid selective ligand has emerged from these studies that shows excellent structural similarities to rigid opioid alkaloids. PMID:8537180

  16. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes. PMID:23566555

  17. Synthetic analogues of the natural compound cryphonectric acid interfere with photosynthetic machinery through two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Róbson Ricardo; Pereira, Wagner Luiz; Tomaz, Deborah Campos; de Oliveira, Fabrício Marques; Giberti, Samuele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2013-06-12

    A series of isobenzofuran-1(3H)-ones (phthalides), analogues of the naturally occurring phytotoxin cryphonectric acid, were designed, synthesized, and fully characterized by NMR, IR, and MS analyses. Their synthesis was achieved via condensation, aromatization, and acetylation reactions. The measurement of the electron transport chain in spinach chloroplasts showed that several derivatives are capable of interfering with the photosynthetic apparatus. Few of them were found to inhibit the basal rate, but a significant inhibition was brought about only at concentrations exceeding 50 μM. Some other analogues acted as uncouplers or energy transfer inhibitors, with a remarkably higher effectiveness. Isobenzofuranone addition to the culture medium inhibited the growth of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus , with patterns consistent with the effects measured in vitro upon isolated chloroplasts. The most active derivatives, being able to completely suppress algal growth at 20 μM, may represent structures to be exploited for the design of new active ingredients for weed control. PMID:23678958

  18. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  19. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3',5'difluorophenyl)-alanine.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1-5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3',5'-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  20. Parallel in vivo and in vitro detection of functional somatostatin receptors in human endocrine pancreatic tumors: Consequences with regard to diagnosis, localization, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberts, S.W.; Hofland, L.J.; van Koetsveld, P.M.; Reubi, J.C.; Bruining, H.A.; Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P. )

    1990-09-01

    The effects of octreotide in vivo and in vitro on hormone release, in vivo ({sup 123}I)Tyr3-octreotide scanning, and in vitro ({sup 125}I)Tyr3-octreotide autoradiography were compared in five patients with endocrine pancreatic tumors. ({sup 123}I)Tyr3-octreotide scanning localized the primary tumor and/or previously unknown metastases in four of the five patients. The patient with a negative scan had an insulinoma that did not respond to octreotide in vivo. No Tyr3-octreotide-binding sites were subsequently found at autoradiography of the tumor, whereas somatostatin-14 receptors were present at a high density. In parallel, culture studies with the cells prepared from this adenoma showed that insulin release was not affected by octreotide, while both somatostatin-14 and -28 significantly suppressed hormone release. Culture studies of the tumor cells from two gastrinomas showed a dose-dependent inhibition of gastrin release by octreotide. Octreotide exerted direct antiproliferative effects in one of these gastrinomas, which had been shown to be rapidly growing in vivo. Both gastrinomas had specific somatostatin receptors, as measured by in vitro receptor autoradiography. Somatostatin release by the cultured somatostatinoma cells from one of these patients was suppressed by octreotide.

  1. Novel synergistic mechanism for sst2 somatostatin and TNFalpha receptors to induce apoptosis: crosstalk between NF-kappaB and JNK pathways.

    PubMed

    Guillermet-Guibert, J; Saint-Laurent, N; Davenne, L; Rochaix, P; Cuvillier, O; Culler, M D; Pradayrol, L; Buscail, L; Susini, C; Bousquet, C

    2007-02-01

    Somatostatin is a multifunctional hormone that modulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Mechanisms for somatostatin-induced apoptosis are at present mostly unsolved. Therefore, we investigated whether somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) induces apoptosis in the nontransformed murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 cells. Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 expression induced an executioner caspase-mediated apoptosis through a tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 (Src homology domain phosphatase-1)-dependent stimulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity and subsequent inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase JNK. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) stimulated both NF-kappaB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activities, which had opposite action on cell survival. Importantly, sst2 sensitized NIH3T3 cells to TNFalpha-induced apoptosis by (1) upregulating TNFalpha receptor protein expression, and sensitizing to TNFalpha-induced caspase-8 activation; (2) enhancing TNFalpha-mediated activation of NF-kappaB, resulting in JNK inhibition and subsequent executioner caspase activation and cell death. We have here unraveled a novel signaling mechanism for a G protein-coupled receptor, which directly triggers apoptosis and crosstalks with a death receptor to enhance death ligand-induced apoptosis. PMID:16645635

  2. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole Quinuclidine analogues

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Prather, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogues bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analogue exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogues acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogues demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. PMID:24858620

  3. Definition of the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumor localization.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, R. T.; Gibril, F.; Termanini, B.

    1997-01-01

    There are six major steps in the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) (carcinoids and pancreatic endocrine tumors). One of the steps that is increasing in its importance is the need to assess primary tumor location and tumor extent in these patients. Without such information, it is not possible to adequately manage these patients. Conventional imaging studies (CT scan, MRI, ultrasound, angiography), functional localization studies measuring hormonal gradients, endoscopic ultrasound, and most recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with [125I-DTPA-DPhe1]-octreotide have all been advocated to localize NETs in different studies. Whereas it is now established that for all NETs, except insulinomas, SRS has the greatest sensitivity, it remains unclear whether this increased sensitivity translates into increased clinical usefulness. It, therefore, remains unclear based on fiscal and clinical considerations what should be the recommended algorithm for the use of the different localization methods. To address this issue, we have recently performed two prospective studies on patients with gastrinomas. In this paper, the methods and results of each are summarized and based on these results, an algorithm for localization studies in NETs is proposed. One study assessed the role of SRS in management in 122 patients and shows that the use of SRS changed management in 47 percent of patients according to six different criteria when the patients were stratified according to their principal management problem. Determining whether liver metastases were present is one of the major goals of tumor localization studies and is frequently a source of confusion because of the difficulty in distinguishing small NETs liver metastases from hemangiomas. In the second study, the ability of SRS and other tumor localization methods to distinguish these two possibilities was assessed in 15 patients with small hemangiomas and 15 patients with small hepatic metastases

  4. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  5. Interest of somatostatin receptors scintigraphy for imaging differentiated thyroid carcinoma tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Giammarile, F.; Lumbroso, J.; Schlumberger, M.

    1995-05-01

    Despite the fact that differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is not classified as a neuroendocrine tumor, there is an increasing interest for the use of somatostatin receptors scintigraphy (SRS) in this disease. We evaluated SRS in DTC patients having no or a poor radioiodine uptake at the level of their tumor sites. Nine patients (pts) (7 men, 2 women; aged from 52 to 65 years) were previously treated (surgery of the primary: 9/9pts; followed by cervical radiotherapy: 4/9pts; radioiodine therapy: 8/9pts; surgery or radiotherapy to bone metastases: 2/9 pts) for DTC (papillary form: 6 pts; follicular; 1 pts; insular: 2 pts). They were explored by conventional imaging modalities (CIM) including Tc-99m MDP bone scans. High activity radioiodine scans were obtained 5 days after I-131 therapy. SRS was carried out during thyroxine therapy using Indium-111 pentetreotide (120 MBq) with imaging at 4 and 24 hours after injection (whole body scans and, when necessary, SPECT). Thyroglobulin blood level ranged from 120 to 60,000ng/ml. SRS was positive at the level of all tumor sites in 8/9 pts; radioiodine scans were negative in 4 pts (1pt with an insular DTC, 3 pt with a papillary DTC), slightly positive in 2 pts (papillary DTC), positive only on part of tumor sites in 1 pts (insular DTC), positive in 1 pt (follicular DTC) and not done in 1 pt. SRS demonstrated 3 new tumor sites (1 to bone, 1 to lung and 1 to mediastinal lymph nodes) in 2 pts; in an other pt, SRS clarified out a doubtful Tc-99m bone scan result and led to definitive confirmation of bone metastases. We had only 1 false negative result in 1 pt having pulmonary metastases (slightly positive radioiodine scan) which had been stable in size on CT for 6 years. These results indicate that, when radioiodine scans are ineffective, SRS is a powerful modality for imaging DTC tumor sites.

  6. Human brain somatostatin release from isolated cortical nerve endings and its modulation through GABAB receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, G.; Gemignani, A.; Schmid, G.; Severi, P.; Cavazzani, P.; Raiteri, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SRIF-LI) in the human brain was studied in synaptosomal preparations from fresh neocortical specimens obtained from patients undergoing neurosurgery to remove deeply sited tumours. 2. The basal outflow of SRIF-LI from superfused synaptosomes was increased about 3 fold during exposure to a depolarizing medium containing 15 mM KCl. The K(+)-evoked overflow of SRIF-LI was almost totally dependent on the presence of Ca2+ in the superfusion medium. 3. The GABAB receptor agonist, (-)-baclofen (0.3 - 100 microM), inhibited the overflow of SRIF-LI in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 1.84 +/- 0.20 microM; maximal effect: about 50%). The novel GABAB receptor ligand, 3-aminopropyl(difluoromethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP 47656) mimicked (-)-baclofen in inhibiting the SRIF-LI overflow (EC50 = 3.06 +/- 0.52 microM; maximal effect: about 50%), whereas the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol, was ineffective up to 100 microM. 4. The inhibition by 10 microM (-)-baclofen of the K(+)-evoked SRIF-LI overflow was concentration-dependently prevented by two selective GABAB receptor antagonists, 3-amino-propyl (diethoxymethyl)-phosphinic acid (CGP 35348) (IC50 = 24.40 +/- 2.52 microM) and [3-[[(3,4-dichlorophenyl) methyl]amino]propyl] (diethoxymethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP 52432) (IC50 = 0.06 +/- 0.005 microM). 5. The inhibition of SRIF-LI overflow caused by 10 microM CGP 47656 was abolished by 1 microM CGP 52432. 6. When human synaptosomes were labelled with [3H]-GABA and depolarized in superfusion with 15 mM KCl, the inhibition by 10 microM (-)-baclofen of the depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA overflow was largely prevented by 10 microM CGP 47656 which therefore behaved as an autoreceptor antagonist. 7. In conclusion: (a) the characteristics of SRIF-LI release from synaptosomal preparations of human neocortex are compatible with a neuronal origin; (b) the nerve terminals releasing the neuropeptide possess inhibitory receptors of the

  7. Three Efficient Methods for Preparation of Coelenterazine Analogues.

    PubMed

    Shakhmin, Anton; Hall, Mary P; Walker, Joel R; Machleidt, Thomas; Binkowski, Brock F; Wood, Keith V; Kirkland, Thomas A

    2016-07-18

    The growing popularity of bioluminescent assays has highlighted the need for coelenterazine analogues possessing properties tuned for specific applications. However, the structural diversity of known coelenterazine analogues has been limited by current syntheses. Known routes for the preparation of coelenterazine analogues employ harsh reaction conditions that limit access to many substituents and functional groups. Novel synthetic routes reported here establish simple and robust methods for synthesis and investigation of structurally diverse marine luciferase substrates. Specifically, these new routes allow synthesis of coelenterazine analogues containing various heterocyclic motifs and substituted aromatic groups with diverse electronic substituents at the R(2) position. Interesting analogues described herein were characterized by their physicochemical properties, bioluminescent half-life, light output, polarity and cytotoxicity. Some of the analogues represent leads that can be utilized in the development of improved bioluminescent systems. PMID:27305599

  8. Effects of somatostatin-14 and the receptor-specific somatostatin analogs on chromogranin A and alpha-subunit (alpha-SU) release from "clinically nonfunctioning" pituitary adenoma cells incubated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Lawnicka, H; Pisarek, H; Kunert-Radek, J; Radek, M; Culler, M D

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of somatostatin (SST) and its analogs on the release of chromogranin A (CgA) and alpha-subunit (alpha-SU) from clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas incubated in vitro. Seven pituitary macroadenomas surgically removed were investigated. All of the tumors were diagnosed before surgery as non-functioning, but they expressed either gonadotropins or their subunits as detected by immunohistochemistry. Two tumors additionally expressed prolactin and growth hormone. All adenomas also expressed chromogranin A (CgA) and at least 3 of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors. The cells isolated from the examined tumors were exposed in vitro to either native SST-14 or the following receptor-specific SST analogs: BIM-23926 (agonist of sst1 receptor), BIM-23120 (agonist of sst2 receptor), BIM-23206 (agonist of sst5 receptor) and BIM23A387 (somatostatin/dopamine chimera). The concentration of CgA was measured by means of ELISA method and of alpha-SU was measured by an immunoradiometric method. It was found that the exposure on SST-14 resulted in the decrease of CgA and alpha-SU release from tumor cells in majority of samples, and the effect on CgA was positively correlated with the expression of sst3 and also with the sst2A/sst2B expressions ratio. The inhibitory effect of SST-14 on CgA and alpha-SU seems also to correlate negatively with the expression of sst2B. CgA inhibition also correlates positively with sst5 expression. Among the other compounds studied, only the sst2 agonist decreased the release in all the investigated samples. The remaining substances (agonists of sst1 and sst5 and SST/DA chimera) produced the divergent changes (increased or decreased release, depending on the sample). The data suggest that the inhibition of CgA (and possibly of alpha-SU) release by SST is mediated via subtypes sst2A, sst3 and sst5, whereas sst2B subtype may induce the opposite effect. PMID:17440235

  9. Increased perinatal remodelling of the pancreas in somatostatin-deficient mice: potential role of transforming growth factor-beta signalling in regulating beta cell growth in early life.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C C; To, K; Foot, V L; Hauge-Evans, A C; Carmignac, D; Christie, M R

    2015-01-01

    Early postnatal life is a critical period for development of the endocrine pancreas, involving remodelling of islet cells and maturation of secretory responses. Factors that regulate these processes are undefined. Somatostatin-secreting delta-cells are abundant in the developing pancreas and, because somatostatin inhibits growth, the hormone may regulate islet expansion in early life. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of somatostatin-deficiency on proliferation, apoptosis and pancreas expansion in the first 3 weeks of life in mice. Pancreases from control or somatostatin-knockout mice were analysed for beta cell, alpha cell and pancreatic volumes by morphometry, proliferation by BrdU incorporation and apoptosis by TUNEL labelling. Signalling pathways associated with proliferation and apoptosis were studied by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Knockout mice grew normally in the first 3 weeks of life, but had high circulating insulin that normalised by day 21. Beta cell, alpha cell and pancreatic volumes were decreased in knockout mice, accompanied by reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis in the pancreas. Decreased growth was not due to impaired Akt signalling, as Akt phosphorylation and nuclear cyclin-D2 increased in the knockout pancreas. Levels of TGF-β1, a factor implicated in tissue remodelling, together with SMAD phosphorylation through which TGF-β mediates its effects, were increased in the knockout pancreas. Beta cell expansion was impaired in knockout mice, potentially compensating for increased insulin secretion from islets lacking inhibitory effects of somatostatin, and was associated with increased TGF-β1 levels. TGF-β1 may represent an important regulator of beta cell mass in early life. PMID:25350519

  10. Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Premixed Insulin Analogues in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Rehan; Bolen, Shari; Maruthur, Nisa; Feldman, Leonard; Wilson, Lisa M.; Marinopoulos, Spyridon S.; Ranasinghe, Padmini; Amer, Muhammed; Bass, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence comparing premixed insulin analogues with other antidiabetic agents is urgently required to guide appropriate therapy. Purpose To summarize the English-language literature on the effectiveness and safety of premixed insulin analogues as compared with other antidiabetic agents in adults with type 2 diabetes. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception to February 2008, and unpublished data from U.S. Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and industry. Study Selection Studies with control arms that compared premixed insulin analogues to another antidiabetic medication in adults with type 2 diabetes Data Extraction Serial abstraction by 2 reviewers using standardized protocols Data Synthesis Evidence from clinical trials was inconclusive for clinical outcomes, such as mortality. Therefore, the review focused on intermediate outcomes. Premixed analogues were similar to premixed human insulin in lowering fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and the incidence of hypoglycemia but were more effective in lowering postprandial glucose (mean difference = -1.1 mmol/L; 95% CI = -1.4 to -0.7 mmol/L [-19.2 mg/dL; 95% CI=-25.9 to -12.5 mg/dL]). As compared to long-acting insulin analogues, premixed analogues were superior in lowering postprandial glucose (mean difference= -1.5 mmol/L; 95%CI = -1.9 to -1.2 mmol/L [-27.9 mg/dL; 95% CI=-34.3 to -21.5 mg/dL]) and hemoglobin A1c (mean difference=-0.39%; 95% CI=-0.50% to -0.28%) but inferior in lowering fasting glucose (mean difference=0.7 mmol/L; 95%CI = 0.3 to 1.0 mmol/L [12.0 mg/dL; 95% CI=6.0 to 18.1 mg/dL]) and had higher incidence of hypoglycemia. When compared to noninsulin antidiabetic agents, premixed analogues were more effective in lowering fasting glucose (mean difference= -1.1mmol/L; 95%CI = -1.7 to 0.6 mmol/L [-20.5 mg/dL; 95% CI=-29.9 to -11.2 mg/dL]), postprandial glucose (mean difference= -2.1 mmol/L; 95%CI

  11. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  12. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  13. Conformationally restrained aromatic analogues of fosmidomycin and FR900098.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Schlüter, Katrin; Pein, Miriam; Behrendt, Christoph; Bergmann, Bärbel; Walter, Rolf D

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis and in-vitro antimalarial activity of conformationally restrained bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) ester analogues of the natural product fosmidomycin is presented. In contrast to alpha-aryl-substituted analogues, conformationally restrained aromatic analogues exhibit only moderate in-vitro antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum. The most active derivative displays an IC(50) value of 47 microM. PMID:17611943

  14. Phonon analogue of topological nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Hoi Chun; Bahri, Yasaman; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Kane and Lubensky proposed a mapping between bosonic phonon problems on isostatic lattices to chiral fermion systems based on factorization of the dynamical matrix [Nat. Phys. 10, 39 (2014)]. The existence of topologically protected zero modes in such mechanical problems is related to their presence in the fermionic system and is dictated by a local index theorem. Here we adopt the proposed mapping to construct a two-dimensional mechanical analogue of a fermionic topological nodal semimetal that hosts a robust bulk node in its linearized phonon spectrum. Such topologically protected soft modes with tunable wavevector may be useful in designing mechanical structures with fault-tolerant properties.

  15. Digitoxin Analogues with Improved Anticytomegalovirus Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth and possess antiviral activities at nanomolar concentrations. In this study we evaluated the anticytomegalovirus (CMV) activity of digitoxin and several of its analogues. We show that sugar type and sugar length attached to the steroid core structure affects its anticytomegalovirus activity. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies identified the l-sugar containing cardiac glycosides as having improved anti-CMV activity and may lead to better understanding of how these compounds inhibit CMV replication. PMID:24900847

  16. Analogue factoring algorithm based on polychromatic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Vincenzo; Garuccio, Augusto; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-08-01

    We present a novel factorization algorithm which can be computed using an analogue computer based on a polychromatic source with a given wavelength bandwidth, a multi-path interferometer and a spectrometer. The core of this algorithm stands on the measurement of the periodicity of a "factoring" function given by an exponential sum at continuous argument by recording a sequence of interferograms associated with suitable units of displacement in the inteferometer. A remarking rescaling property of such interferograms allows, in principle, the prime number decomposition of several large integers. The information about factors is encoded in the location of the inteferogram maxima.

  17. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datson, Juliet; Flynn, Chris; Portinari, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims: This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48 000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods: The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar analogues versus a reference solar reflection spectrum. Results: We derive spectroscopic parameters for 148 solar analogues (about 70 are new entries to the literature) and verify with a-posteriori differential tests that our values are well-centred on the solar values. We use our dataset to assess the two alternative calibrations of the GCS parameters; our methods favour the latest revision. We show that the choice of spectral line list or the choice of asteroid or time of observation does not affect the results. We also identify seven solar twins in our sample, three of which are published here for the first time. Conclusions: Our methods provide an independent means to differentially test the calibration of stellar catalogues around the values of a well-known benchmark star, which makes our work interesting for calibration tests of upcoming Galactic surveys. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory under programme ID 077.D

  18. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  19. The electrical properties of Mars analogue dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J.; Jensen, J.; Kinch, K.; Mugford, R.; Nørnberg, P.

    2004-03-01

    Dust is a major environmental factor on the surface and in the atmosphere of Mars. Knowing the electrical charge state of this dust would be of both scientific interest and important for the safety of instruments on the Martian surface. In this study the first measurements have been performed of dust electrification using suspended Mars analogue material. This has been achieved by attracting suspended dust onto electrodes placed inside a Mars simulation wind tunnel. The Mars analogue used was from Salten Skov in Denmark, this contained a high concentration of ferric oxide precipitate. Once suspended, this dust was found to consist of almost equal quantities of negatively (46±6%) and positively (44±15%) charged grains. These grains were estimated to typically carry a net charge of around 10 5e, this is sufficient to dominate the processes of adhesion and cohesion of this suspended dust. Evidence is presented for electrostatic aggregation of the dust while in suspension. Development of a simple instrument for measuring electrical charging of the suspended dust on Mars will be discussed.

  20. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  1. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity. PMID:27010713

  2. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined. PMID:21714872

  3. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouacil. [Propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in this study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  4. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in the study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different (significant increase only in the thalamus) in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  5. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  6. Synthesis and Cytostatic Evaluation of 4-N-Alkanoyl and 4-N-Alkyl Gemcitabine Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jesse; Sobczak, Adam J.; Balzarini, Jan; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2014-01-01

    Couplings of gemcitabine with the functionalized carboxylic acids (C9-C13) or reactions of 4-N-tosylgemcitabine with the corresponding alkyl amines afforded 4-N-alkanoyl and 4-N-alkyl gemcitabine derivatives. The analogues with a terminal hydroxyl group on the alkyl chain were efficiently fluorinated under conditions that are compatible with protocols for 18F labeling. The 4-N-alkanoylgemcitabines showed potent cytostatic activities in the low nM range against a panel of tumor cell lines while cytotoxicity of the 4-N-alkylgemcitabines were in the low μM range. The cytotoxicity for the 4-N-alkanoylgemcitabine analogues were reduced approximately by two orders of magnitude in the 2′-deoxycytidine kinase (dCK)-deficient CEM/dCK- cell line whereas cytotoxicity of the 4-N-alkylgemcitabines were only 2-5 times lower. None of the compounds acted as efficient substrates for cytosolic dCK, and therefore, the 4-N-alkanoyl analogues need to be converted first to gemcitabine to display a significant cytostatic potential, while 4-N-alkyl derivatives attain the modest activity without “measurable” conversion to gemcitabine. PMID:24341356

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of clitocine analogues as adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Daanen, J F; Jiang, M; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K; Jarvis, M F; Kowaluk, E L; Bhagwat, S S

    2001-09-17

    Adenosine kinase (AK) is the primary enzyme responsible for adenosine metabolism. Inhibition of AK effectively increases extracellular adenosine concentrations and represents an alternative approach to enhance the beneficial actions of adenosine as compared to direct-acting receptor agonists. Clitocine (3), isolated from the mushroom Clitocybe inversa, has been found to be a weak inhibitor of AK. We have prepared a number of analogues of clitocine in order to improve its potency and demonstrated that 5'-deoxy-5'-amino-clitocine (7) improved AK inhibitory potency by 50-fold. PMID:11549437

  8. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.F.; Wu, M.; Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP. PMID:25387675

  9. OctreoScan 111 for imaging of a somatostatin receptor-positive islet cell tumor in rat.

    PubMed

    Bruns, C; Stolz, B; Albert, R; Marbach, P; Pless, J

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) receptors are present in a variety of human tumors such as pituitary and endocrine pancreatic tumors, brain tumors, small cell lung cancers and malignant breast tumors. The 111In-labeled SRIF analog SDZ 215-811 (OctreoScan 111) binds with a high affinity to somatostatin receptors and exhibits SRIF-like biological properties, as demonstrated by the inhibition of growth hormone release from pituitary cells. We report here the in vitro characterization of SDZ 215-811 and the in vivo imaging of an islet cell tumor grown in rats using [111In]SDZ 215-811. In vitro autoradiographies revealed a high density of SRIF receptors on the pancreatic tumor tissue. As early as 5 min after intravenous injection of [111In]SDZ 215-811 into tumor-bearing rats, the tumors were clearly localized by gamma-camera scintigraphy. Even 24 h post injection, the islet cell tumor was still detectable. The radioligand was mainly cleared from the circulation via the kidneys, with a rapid alpha-phase (t1/2 = 5.6 min) and a slow elimination phase (t1/2 = 7.3 h). Biodistribution studies revealed a relatively high accumulation of radioactivity in the kidneys, but low uptake into the liver and the intestine. High uptake of [111In]SDZ 215-811 was observed for the tumor tissue (0.92 +/- 0.07% ID/g; 1 h post injection). Interestingly, a tumor load of 0.14 +/- 0.01% ID/g was still measured after 24 h. The tumor/blood ratio was 4.93 after 24 h, indicating specific accumulation of radioactivity in the islet cell tumor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8392488

  10. Functional Analysis: The Use of Analogues in Applied Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine Peck

    2001-01-01

    This article suggests possible applications of experimental analyses using analogues to empirically verify results of functional assessments in classrooms for students with autism and related disabilities. Analogue assessments involve creating conditions in which antecedents and consequences are held constant and specific variables suspected to…

  11. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  12. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  13. Development of new mitomycin C and porfiromycin analogues.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, B S; Lin, H J; Cheng, L; Remers, W A; Bradner, W T

    1981-08-01

    New mitomycin C and porfiromycin analogues were prepared by treating mitomycin A and N-methylmitomycin A with a variety of amines, including aziridines, allylamines, propargylamines, chloroalkylamines, hydroxyalkylamines, glycine derivatives, aralkylamines, and heterocyclic amines. All analogues were evaluated against P-388 murine leukemia and selected ones were examined for their leukopenic properties. Certain analogues were found to be superior to mitomycin C in potency, efficacy, and therapeutic ratio in the P-388 assay. The most active substituents at the mitosane 7 position included aziridine, 2-methylaziridine, propargylamine, furfurylamine, methyl glycinate, and 3-aminopyridine. Mitomycin A and the 7-aziridino, 7-(2-methylaziridino), and 3-aminopyridine analogues were less leukopenic than mitomycin C. Certain other analogues, including propargylamino and methyl glycinate, were highly leukopenic. The three compounds tested against B-16 melanoma in mice were significantly more effective than mitomycin C in this assay. Previously established structure--activity relationships were found inadequate to account for all of the new data. PMID:7328599

  14. Synthesis and biological activity of tetralone abscisic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Nyangulu, James M; Nelson, Ken M; Rose, Patricia A; Gai, Yuanzhu; Loewen, Mary; Lougheed, Brenda; Quail, J Wilson; Cutler, Adrian J; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2006-04-01

    Bicyclic analogues of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were designed to incorporate the structural elements and functional groups of the parent molecule that are required for biological activity. The resulting tetralone analogues were predicted to have enhanced biological activity in plants, in part because oxidized products would not cyclize to forms corresponding to the inactive catabolite phaseic acid. The tetralone analogues were synthesized in seven steps from 1-tetralone and a range of analogues were accessible through a second route starting with 2-methyl-1-naphthol. Tetralone ABA 8 was found to have greater activity than ABA in two bioassays. The absolute configuration of (+)-8 was established by X-ray crystallography of a RAMP hydrazone derivative. The hydroxymethyl compounds 10 and 11, analogues for studying the roles of 8- and 9-hydroxy ABA 3 and 6, were also synthesized and found to be active. PMID:16557330

  15. Derivatisable Cyanobactin Analogues: A Semisynthetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oueis, Emilia; Adamson, Catherine; Mann, Greg; Ludewig, Hannes; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many natural cyclic peptides have potent and potentially useful biological activities. Their use as therapeutic starting points is often limited by the quantities available, the lack of known biological targets and the practical limits on diversification to fine‐tune their properties. We report the use of enzymes from the cyanobactin family to heterocyclise and macrocyclise chemically synthesised substrates so as to allow larger‐scale syntheses and better control over derivatisation. We have made cyclic peptides containing orthogonal reactive groups, azide or dehydroalanine, that allow chemical diversification, including the use of fluorescent labels that can help in target identification. We show that the enzymes are compatible and efficient with such unnatural substrates. The combination of chemical synthesis and enzymatic transformation could help renew interest in investigating natural cyclic peptides with biological activity, as well as their unnatural analogues, as therapeutics. PMID:26507241

  16. Solution Processed PEDOT Analogues in Electrochemical Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Österholm, Anna M; Ponder, James F; Kerszulis, Justin A; Reynolds, John R

    2016-06-01

    We have designed fully soluble ProDOTx-EDOTy copolymers that are electrochemically equivalent to electropolymerized PEDOT without using any surfactants or dispersants. We show that these copolymers can be incorporated as active layers in solution processed thin film supercapacitors to demonstrate capacitance, stability, and voltage similar to the values of those that use electrodeposited PEDOT as the active material with the added advantage of the possibility for large scale, high-throughput processing. These Type I supercapacitors provide exceptional cell voltages (up to 1.6 V), highly symmetrical charge/discharge behavior, promising long-term stability exceeding 50 000 charge/discharge cycles, as well as energy (4-18 Wh/kg) and power densities (0.8-3.3 kW/kg) that are comparable to those of electrochemically synthesized analogues. PMID:27195798

  17. Interactions of vasopressin and oxytocin receptors with vasopressin analogues substituted in position 2 with 3,3'-diphenylalanine--a molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Slusarz, Magdalena J; Sikorska, Emilia; Slusarz, Rafał

    2013-02-01

    Vasopressin and oxytocin receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors and play an important role in many physiological functions. They are also involved in a number of pathological conditions being important drug targets. In this work, four vasopressin analogues substituted at position 2 with 3,3'-diphenylalanine have been docked into partially flexible vasopressin and oxytocin receptors. The bulky residue at position 2 acts as a structural restraint much stronger in the oxytocin receptor (OTR) than in the vasopressin V2 receptor (V2R), resulting in a different location of the analogues in these receptors. This explains the different, either agonistic or antagonistic, activities of the analogues in V2R and OTR, respectively. In all complexes, the conserved polar residues serve as anchor points for the ligand both in OTR and V2R. Strong interactions of the C-terminus of analogue II ([Mpa(1) ,d-Dpa(2) ,Val(4) ,d-Arg(8) ]VP) with extracellular loop 3 may be responsible for its highest activity at V2R. It also appears that V2R adapts more readily to the docking analogues by conformational changes in the aromatic side chains triggering receptor activation. A weak activity at V1a vasopressin receptor appears to be caused by weak receptor-ligand interactions. Results of this study may facilitate a rational design of new analogues with the highest activity/selectivity at vasopressin and OTRs. PMID:23303737

  18. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  19. Evolving a polymerase for hydrophobic base analogues.

    PubMed

    Loakes, David; Gallego, José; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Kool, Eric T; Holliger, Philipp

    2009-10-21

    Hydrophobic base analogues (HBAs) have shown great promise for the expansion of the chemical and coding potential of nucleic acids but are generally poor polymerase substrates. While extensive synthetic efforts have yielded examples of HBAs with favorable substrate properties, their discovery has remained challenging. Here we describe a complementary strategy for improving HBA substrate properties by directed evolution of a dedicated polymerase using compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) with the archetypal HBA 5-nitroindole (d5NI) and its derivative 5-nitroindole-3-carboxamide (d5NIC) as selection substrates. Starting from a repertoire of chimeric polymerases generated by molecular breeding of DNA polymerase genes from the genus Thermus, we isolated a polymerase (5D4) with a generically enhanced ability to utilize HBAs. The selected polymerase. 5D4 was able to form and extend d5NI and d5NIC (d5NI(C)) self-pairs as well as d5NI(C) heteropairs with all four bases with efficiencies approaching, or exceeding, those of the cognate Watson-Crick pairs, despite significant distortions caused by the intercalation of the d5NI(C) heterocycles into the opposing strand base stack, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Unlike Taq polymerase, 5D4 was also able to extend HBA pairs such as Pyrene: varphi (abasic site), d5NI: varphi, and isocarbostyril (ICS): 7-azaindole (7AI), allowed bypass of a chemically diverse spectrum of HBAs, and enabled PCR amplification with primers comprising multiple d5NI(C)-substitutions, while maintaining high levels of catalytic activity and fidelity. The selected polymerase 5D4 promises to expand the range of nucleobase analogues amenable to replication and should find numerous applications, including the synthesis and replication of nucleic acid polymers with expanded chemical and functional diversity. PMID:19778048

  20. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Harald G; Weise, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  1. Administration of somatostatin analog octreotide in the ventrolateral orbital cortex produces sex-related antinociceptive effects on acute and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chao-Ling; Dang, Yong-Hui; Tang, Jing-Shi

    2015-08-01

    The present study was designed to examine whether somatostatin analog octreotide (OCT) was involved in antinociception in the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO) and determine whether this effect had a sex difference between male and female rats. The radiant heat-evoked tail flick (TF) reflex was used as an index of acute nociceptive response in lightly anesthetized rats. The number of flinches evoked by formalin injection into the hindpaw was used to evaluate inflammatory persistent pain in conscious rats. Administration of OCT (2.0, 5.0 10.0 ng in 0.5 µl) into the VLO depressed the TF reflex in a dose-dependent manner only in female rats, but not male rats. Pretreatment with a nonselective somatostatin receptor antagonist cyclo-somatostatin (c-SOM) (25.0 µg in 0.5 µl) into the VLO antagonized 10.0 ng OCT-induced inhibition of the TF reflex in female rats. Similarly, application of high dose of OCT (10.0 ng in 0.5 µl) into the VLO depressed formalin-induced flinching response in the early and late phases only in female rats, and had no any effects in male rats. Pretreatment with c-SOM (25.0 µg in 0.5 µl) into the VLO totally antagonized the 10 ng OCT-induced inhibition of the flinches in both phases in female rats. Additionally, single administration of c-SOM into the VLO failed to alter tail reflex latencies and formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in female rats. The results provide the first valuable evidence that somatostatin and its receptors are involved in antinociception in acute heat-evoked nociception and inflammatory persistent pain only in female rats, not male rats, in the VLO. PMID:26055971

  2. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [(64)Cu]Cu-/[(177)Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr(3))octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr(3))octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [(64)Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [(177)Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome. PMID:27022413

  3. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [64Cu]Cu-/[177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F.; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [64Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome. PMID:27022413

  4. The Somatostatin 2A Receptor Is Enriched in Migrating Neurons during Rat and Human Brain Development and Stimulates Migration and Axonal Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Le Verche, Virginia; Kaindl, Angela M.; Verney, Catherine; Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Olivier, Paul; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Leterrier, Christophe; Vitalis, Tania; Renaud, Julie; Dargent, Bénédicte; Gressens, Pierre; Dournaud, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The neuropeptide somatostatin has been suggested to play an important role during neuronal development in addition to its established modulatory impact on neuroendocrine, motor and cognitive functions in adults. Although six somatostatin G protein-coupled receptors have been discovered, little is known about their distribution and function in the developing mammalian brain. In this study, we have first characterized the developmental expression of the somatostatin receptor sst2A, the subtype found most prominently in the adult rat and human nervous system. In the rat, the sst2A receptor expression appears as early as E12 and is restricted to post-mitotic neuronal populations leaving the ventricular zone. From E12 on, migrating neuronal populations immunopositive for the receptor were observed in numerous developing regions including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and ganglionic eminences. Intense but transient immunoreactive signals were detected in the deep part of the external granular layer of the cerebellum, the rostral migratory stream and in tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin- positive neurons and axons. Activation of the sst2A receptor in vitro in rat cerebellar microexplants and primary hippocampal neurons revealed stimulatory effects on neuronal migration and axonal growth, respectively. In the human cortex, receptor immunoreactivity was located in the preplate at early development stages (8 gestational weeks) and was enriched to the outer part of the germinal zone at later stages. In the cerebellum, the deep part of the external granular layer was strongly immunoreactive at 19 gestational weeks, similar to the finding in rodents. In addition, migrating granule cells in the internal granular layer were also receptor-positive. Together, theses results strongly suggest that the somatostatin sst2A receptor participates in the development and maturation of specific neuronal populations during rat and human brain ontogenesis. PMID:19434240

  5. Functionalized Congener Approach to Muscarinic Antagonists: Analogues of Pirenzepine

    PubMed Central

    Karton, Yishai; Bradbury, Barton J.; Baumgold, Jesse; Paek, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine (5,11-dihydro-11-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)acetyl]-6H-pyrido[2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one) was derivatized to explore points of attachment of functionalized side chains for the synthesis of receptor probes and ligands for affinity chromatography. The analogues prepared were evaluated in competitive binding assays versus [3H]-N-methylscopolamine at four muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1AChR-m4AChR) in membranes from rat heart tissue and transfected A9L cells. 9-(Hydroxymethyl)pirenzepine, 8-(methylthio)pirenzepine, and a series of 8-aminosulfonyl derivatives were synthesized. Several 5-substituted analogues of pirenzepine also were prepared. An alternate series of analogues substituted on the 4-position of the piperazine ring was prepared by reaction of 4-desmethylpirenzepine with various electrophiles. An N-chloroethyl analogue of pirenzepine was shown to form a reactive aziridine species in aqueous buffer yet failed to affinity label muscarinic receptors. Within a series of aminoalkyl analogues, the affinity increased as the length of the alkyl chain increased. Shorter chain analogues were generally much less potent than pirenzepine, and longer analogues (7–10 carbons) were roughly as potent as pirenzepine at m1 receptors, but were nonselective. Depending on the methylene chain length, acylation or alkyl substitution of the terminal amine also influenced the affinity at muscarinic receptors. PMID:2066986

  6. The 2-methoxy methyl analogue of salvinorin A attenuates cocaine-induced drug seeking and sucrose reinforcements in rats.

    PubMed

    Morani, Aashish S; Ewald, Amy; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Kivell, Bronwyn M

    2013-11-15

    κ Opioid receptor activation by traditional arylacetamide agonists and the novel neoclerodane diterpene κ opioid receptor agonist Salvinorin A (Sal A) results in attenuation of cocaine-seeking behavior in pre-clinical models of addiction. However, adverse effects such as sedation, depression and aversion limit their clinical utility. The Sal A analogue, 2-methoxy-methyl salvinorin B (MOM Sal B) is a longer acting Sal A analogue with high affinity for κ opioid receptors. In this study, we tested MOM Sal B for its ability to modulate cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. MOM Sal B (0.3mg/kg) successfully attenuated cocaine-seeking but also attenuated sucrose reinforcement. No change in activity was observed in either cocaine-induced hyperactivity or spontaneous open field activity tests but increased immobility and decreased swimming times in the forced swim test were observed. This study indicates that κ opioid receptor activation by more potent Sal A analogues modulates cocaine-seeking behavior non-selectively without causing sedation, suggesting an improved side effects profile. However, pro-depressive effects are seen, which may limit the therapeutic potential of this compound. Future studies with Sal A analogues having affinities at other opioid receptors are warranted as they have the potential to identify compounds having effective anti-addiction properties. PMID:24201308

  7. Changes in tissue levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and somatostatin in the femurs of hind-limb immobilized rats.

    PubMed

    Suliman, I A; Elhassan, A M; Adem, A; El-Bakri, N K; Lindgren, J U

    2001-04-01

    Immobilization of an extremity causes skeletal muscle atrophy and a dramatic increase in bone resorption. Growth hormone (GH) is known to play an important role in bone remodeling mediated in part by local insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). In this study, we investigated changes in the levels of GH and IGF-I peptide in bone extracts from the femur after hind-limb immobilization for 5 days, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The levels of somatostatin, which interacts with GH, were also measured in the bone extracts. GH levels increased after 8 weeks of hind-limb immobilization whereas the IGF-I concentrations increased after 2 weeks, but returned to control levels at 4 weeks, and decreased after 8 weeks of immobilization. The somatostatin levels in the bone extracts increased only after 8 weeks of hind-limb immobilization. Our findings suggest that, after hind-limb immobilization, changes in the concentrations of GH, IGF-I, and somatostatin in bone may mediate bone resorption either directly or through interaction with other factors. PMID:11372951

  8. Serotonin-, somatostatin- and chromogranin A-containing cells of the urethro-prostatic complex in the sheep. An immunocytochemical and immunofluorescent study.

    PubMed Central

    Vittoria, A; La Mura, E; Cocca, T; Cecio, A

    1990-01-01

    The urethral and prostatic epithelial of the sheep contain a large number of amine- and/or peptide-producing neuroendocrine cells (NE), also called paraneurons. Four different cell types have been immunohistochemically recognised among them. The first contains the amine serotonin, the second the protein chromogranin A, the third the amine and the protein together and the fourth the hormone somatostatin. Serotonin-producing cells are elongated in shape and often show cytoplasmic dendrite-like processes directed towards the basal membrane and/or the lumen. Chromogranin A-containing cells are polymorphic and constitute the more numerous NE subpopulation. Cells containing both the bioactive substances seem to be less numerous than the chromogranin A cells and slightly more frequent than the serotonin cells. All these cell types are diffused along the whole urethro-prostatic complex and show their highest density in the collicular zone. Somatostatin-containing cells often show a unique cytoplasmic extension directed towards the basal membrane and are rare. It is supposed that the presence of serotonin in the urogenital tract is functionally correlated with the emission of urine and/or semen, while somatostatin is associated with the inhibition of local exocrine and/or endocrine secretions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1981998

  9. The preparation of zaragozic acid A analogues by directed biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, T S; Petuch, B; MacConnell, J; White, R; Dezeny, G; Arison, B; Bergstrom, J D; Colwell, L; Huang, L; Monaghan, R L

    1994-11-01

    Zaragozic acid A analogues are produced by an unidentified sterile fungus when it is exogenously supplied with 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid, 3-thiophenecarboxylic acid, 2-furoic acid, 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 3-fluorobenzoic acid, or 4-fluorobenzoic acid. The analogues carry 2-thiophenyl, 3-thiophenyl, 2-furyl, o-fluorophenyl, m-fluorophenyl, or p-fluorophenyl group, respectively, at C-6' of the C-1 alkyl side chain replacing the phenyl group of natural zaragozic acid A. All the new analogues of zaragozic acid A possess picomolar inhibitory activity against squalene synthase in vitro. PMID:8002393

  10. Recent developments in naturally derived antimalarials: cryptolepine analogues.

    PubMed

    Wright, Colin W

    2007-06-01

    Increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to commonly used antimalarial drugs has made the need for new agents increasingly urgent. In this paper, the potential of cryptolepine, an alkaloid from the West African shrub Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, as a lead towards new antimalarial agents is discussed. Several cryptolepine analogues have been synthesized that have promising in-vitro and in-vivo antimalarial activity. Studies on the antimalarial modes of action of these analogues indicate that they may have different or additional modes of action to the parent compound. Elucidation of the mode of action may facilitate the development of more potent antimalarial cryptolepine analogues. PMID:17637183

  11. Synthesis, antiarrhythmic activity, and toxicological evaluation of mexiletine analogues.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mariagrazia; Carocci, Alessia; Budriesi, Roberta; Micucci, Matteo; Toma, Maddalena; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lovece, Angelo; Catalano, Alessia; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; De Palma, Annalisa; Contino, Marialessandra; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Chiarini, Alberto; Franchini, Carlo; Ghelardini, Carla; Habtemariam, Solomon; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Four mexiletine analogues have been tested for their antiarrhythmic, inotropic, and chronotropic effects on isolated guinea pig heart tissues and to assess calcium antagonist activity, in comparison with the parent compound mexiletine. All analogues showed from moderate to high antiarrhythmic activity. In particular, three of them (1b,c,e) were more active and potent than the reference drug, while exhibiting only modest or no negative inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasorelaxant activity, thus showing high selectivity of action. All compounds showed no cytotoxicity and 1b,c,d did not impair motor coordination. All in, these new analogues exhibit an interesting cardiovascular profile and deserve further investigation. PMID:27267000

  12. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  13. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul J; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  14. Radiolabeled new somatostatin analogs conjugated to DOMA chelator used as targeted tumor imaging agent: synthesis and radiobiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    De, Kakali; Banerjee, Indranil; Misra, Mridula

    2015-06-01

    Several receptor-specific radiopeptides have been developed and effective in the diagnosis of malignant diseases. Among them, somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy with (111)In-DTPA-octreotide has become a tumor diagnostic radiopharmaceutical in nuclear medicine. However, it suffers some drawbacks concerning the imaging properties and elevated radiation burden of (111)In. Here, we report the synthesis of radiolabeled two new octapeptides with improved uptake in SSTR2-positive tumors in comparison with (99m)Tc-HYNIC-Tyr(3)-octreotide (HYNIC-TOC). Octapeptides were synthesized in high yield by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis and coupling the macrocyclic chelator DOMA(1,4,7-Tri-Boc-10-(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazocyclododecane-1-yl-monoacetic acid) to these peptides for (99m)Tc labeling. New peptides DOMA-Asn(3)-octreotate(DOMA-AATE) and DOMA-Pro(3)-octreotate(DOMA-PATE) were purified, characterized by RP-HPLC, MALDI-mass, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR. Labeling was performed by SnCl2 method to get products with excellent radiochemical purity (97 %). Radiopeptides were found to be substantially stable under physiological condition for 24 h. Internalization and receptor-binding studies were determined in somatostatin receptor-expressing C6-glioma cell line and rat brain cortex membrane and the results compared with HYNIC-TOC as standard. The IC50 values of (99m)Tc-DOMA-AATE(1.10 ± 0.48 nM) and (99m)Tc-DOMA-PATE(1.76 ± 0.06 nM) showed high affinity binding for SSTR2 receptor and they internalized rapidly in C6 cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies were performed in C6 tumor-bearing rat under gamma camera showing significant uptake in kidney, urine and C6 tumor. Radiopeptides exhibited fast blood clearance and rapid elimination through the urinary systems. However, (99m)Tc-DOMA-AATE exhibited the highest tumor to muscle and tumor to blood uptake ratios among three. These favorable characteristics validate (99m)Tc-DOMA-AATE as a more promising (99m)Tc-radiotracer than (99

  15. Impact of pre-treatment with somatostatin analogs on surgical management of acromegalic patients referred to a single center.

    PubMed

    Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Gatto, Federico; Anania, Pasquale; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rossi, Diego Criminelli; Benvegnu, Giulia; Nazzari, Elena; Spaziante, Renato; Giusti, Massimo; Ferone, Diego; Zona, Gianluigi

    2016-03-01

    First-line treatment of patients with growth hormone secreting adenomas is surgical resection. Disease control can be obtained by surgery (one or multiple steps), in case followed by medical treatment or adjuvant radiation therapy (radiosurgery or radiotherapy). The impact of pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) on surgical outcome is still controversial. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the impact of SSA pre-treatment on biochemical outcome and post-surgical hypopituitarism in a consecutive surgical series from a single referral centre, with data covering 17 years' experience and to investigate the possible predictive value of early postoperative insulin-like factor 1 (IGF-I) on long-term biochemical control. Data from 68 acromegalic patients were revised. Endocrinological long-term follow-up (minimum 6 months) was available for 57 patients. Eighty-eight percent of patients received a single-step surgical treatment (single surgery, with or without adjuvant medical therapy). The remaining 12% underwent a multi-step strategy: redo-surgery (three macroadenomas) and/or radiation (four macro- and two microadenomas). Pre-surgical SSA treatment was performed in 77.9% and resulted in a significant lowering of basal IGF-I values (p = 0.0001). Early post-surgical IGF-I was significantly lower in patients biochemically controlled with single surgery alone (p = 0.016) and after overall treatment strategies (p = 0.005). Normalization of GH and IGF-I was obtained in 56.1%, and normalization of either one of them in 27.8% of patients. No major surgery-related complications occurred. Post-treatment hypopituitarism occurred in 11.9% and was lower in SSA pre-treated patients. Our results well compare with other recently published series. Very early post-surgical IGF-I improvement might be a useful predictor for biochemical disease control. Moreover, our results suggest that pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogs seems to prevent

  16. Somatostatin 2a receptors are not expressed on functionally identified respiratory neurons in the ventral respiratory column of the rat.

    PubMed

    Le, Sheng; Turner, Anita J; Parker, Lindsay M; Burke, Peter G; Kumar, Natasha N; Goodchild, Ann K; McMullan, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Microinjection of somatostatin (SST) causes site-specific effects on respiratory phase transition, frequency, and amplitude when microinjected into the ventrolateral medulla (VLM) of the anesthetized rat, suggesting selective expression of SST receptors on different functional classes of respiratory neurons. Of the six subtypes of SST receptor, somatostatin 2a (sst2a ) is the most prevalent in the VLM, and other investigators have suggested that glutamatergic neurons in the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) that coexpress neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R), SST, and sst2a are critical for the generation of respiratory rhythm. However, quantitative data describing the distribution of sst2a in respiratory compartments other than preBötC, or on functionally identified respiratory neurons, is absent. Here we examine the medullary expression of sst2a with particular reference to glycinergic/expiratory neurons in the Bötzinger Complex (BötC) and NK1R-immunoreactive/inspiratory neurons in the preBötC. We found robust sst2a expression at all rostrocaudal levels of the VLM, including a large proportion of catecholaminergic neurons, but no colocalization of sst2a and glycine transporter 2 mRNA in the BötC. In the preBötC 54% of sst2a -immunoreactive neurons were also positive for NK1R. sst2a was not observed in any of 52 dye-labeled respiratory interneurons, including seven BötC expiratory-decrementing and 11 preBötC preinspiratory neurons. We conclude that sst2a is not expressed on BötC respiratory neurons and that phasic respiratory activity is a poor predictor of sst2a expression in the preBötC. Therefore, sst2a is unlikely to underlie responses to BötC SST injection, and is sparse or absent on respiratory neurons identified by classical functional criteria. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1384-1398, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26470751

  17. Cell-Cycle Analyses Using Thymidine Analogues in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2′-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry. PMID:24551125

  18. Synthesis of a stable and orally bioavailable englerin analogue.

    PubMed

    Fash, David M; Peer, Cody J; Li, Zhenwu; Talisman, Ian J; Hayavi, Sima; Sulzmaier, Florian J; Ramos, Joe W; Sourbier, Carole; Neckers, Leonard; Figg, W Douglas; Beutler, John A; Chain, William J

    2016-06-01

    Synthesis of analogues of englerin A with a reduced propensity for hydrolysis of the glycolate moiety led to a compound which possessed the renal cancer cell selectivity of the parent and was orally bioavailable in mice. PMID:27107948

  19. Efficient total syntheses and biological activities of two teixobactin analogues.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Anish; Iyer, Abhishek; Vincent, Charlotte S; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Prior, Stephen H; Madder, Annemieke; Taylor, Edward J; Singh, Ishwar

    2016-04-26

    The discovery of the new antibiotic teixobactin has been timely in the race for unearthing novel antibiotics wherein the emergence of drug resistant bacteria poses a serious threat worldwide. Herein, we present the total syntheses and biological activities of two teixobactin analogues. This approach is simple, efficient and has several advantages: it uses commercially available building blocks (except AllocHN-d-Thr-OH), has a single purification step and a good recovery (22%). By using this approach we have synthesised two teixobactin analogues and established that the d-amino acids are critical for the antimicrobial activity of these analogues. With continuing high expectations from teixobactin, this work can be regarded as a stepping stone towards an in depth study of teixobactin, its analogues and the quest for synthesising similar molecules. PMID:26984316

  20. Defining Analytical Strategies for Mars Sample Return with Analogue Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Sapers, H. M.; Francis, R.; Pontefract, A.; Tornabene, L. L.; Haltigin, T.

    2016-05-01

    The characterization of biosignatures in MSR samples will require integrated, cross-platform laboratory analyses carefully correlated and calibrated with Rover-based technologies. Analogue missions provide context for implementation and assessment.

  1. Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Nelson S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most prevalent risk factor for glaucoma. All treatments, whether surgical or pharmaceutical, are aimed at lowering IOP. Prostaglandin analogues are a first line therapy for glaucoma due to their ability to reduce IOP, once-daily dosing, efficacy, and minimal side-effect profile. Whereas prostaglandin analogues have been known to alter aqueous humor outflow through the unconventional (uveoscleral) pathway, more recent evidence suggests their action also occurs through the conventional (trabecular) pathway. Understanding how prostaglandin analogues successfully lower IOP is important, as this information may lead to the discovery of new molecular targets for future therapeutic intervention. This review explores the current understanding of prostaglandin analogue biology as it pertains to IOP reduction and improved aqueous humor outflow facility. PMID:24359106

  2. Practical enantiospecific syntheses of lysobisphosphatidic acid and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guowei; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2006-02-01

    We describe a versatile, efficient, and practical method for the preparation of enantiomerically pure lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), bisether analogues, and phosphorothioate analogues of LBPA from solketal. Phosphorylation of a protected sn-2-O-oleoyl glycerol with 2-cyanoethyl bis(N,N-diisopropylamino)phosphite, followed by oxidation and deprotection, generated the enantiomers of 2,2'-LBPA. The corresponding phosphorothioate analogues were obtained by oxidation with sulfur. The (R,R) and (S,S) enantiomers of both LBPA and phosphorothioate LBPA were synthesized from (S)- and (R)-solketal, respectively. The ether analogue of (S,S)-lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and its enantiomer were synthesized from the same enantiomer (S)-solketal by simply changing the sequence of deprotection steps. PMID:16438504

  3. From BPA to its analogues: Is it a safe journey?

    PubMed

    Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most abundant synthetic chemicals in the world due to its uses in plastics. Its widespread exposure vis-a-vis low dose effects led to a reduction in its safety dose and imposition of ban on its use in infant feeding bottles. This restriction paved the way for the gradual market entry of its analogues. However, their structural similarity to BPA has put them under surveillance for endocrine disrupting potential. The application of these analogues is increasing and so are the studies reporting their toxicity. This review highlights the reasons which led to the ban of BPA and also reports the exposure and toxicological data available on its analogues. Hence, this compilation is expected to answer in a better way whether the replacement of BPA by these analogues is safer or more harmful? PMID:27262103

  4. Structural analogues of diosgenyl saponins: synthesis and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kaskiw, Matthew J; Tassotto, Mary Lynn; Mok, Mac; Tokar, Stacey L; Pycko, Roxanne; Th'ng, John; Jiang, Zi-Hua

    2009-11-15

    Saponins display various biological activities including anti-tumor activity. Recently intensive research has been focused on developing saponins for tumor therapies. The diosgenyl saponin dioscin is one of the most common steroidal saponins and exhibits potent anticancer activity in several human cancer cells through apoptosis-inducing pathways. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of several diosgenyl saponin analogues containing either a 2-amino-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl residue or an alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-2-amino-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl residue with different acyl substituents on the amino group. The cytotoxic activity of these compounds was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Structure-activity relationship studies show that the disaccharide saponin analogues are in general less active than their corresponding monosaccharide analogues. The incorporation of an aromatic nitro functionality into these saponin analogues does not exhibit significant effect on their cytotoxic activity. PMID:19819703

  5. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABAA receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABAA receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanol were investigated on recombinant human '-aminobutyric acid (GABAA, a1ß2'2s) r...

  6. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches. PMID:21571459

  7. Carbacaprazamycins: Chemically Stable Analogues of the Caprazamycin Nucleoside Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Mayumi; Hsuan, Lee Shang; Kato, Yuta; Matsuda, Akira

    2015-04-10

    Carbacaprazamycins, which are chemically stable analogues of caprazamycins, were designed and synthesized. These analogues were active against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and their activities were comparable to those of the parent caprazamycins. The effect of treatment with carbacaprazamycin on morphological changes in S. aureus indicated that the mode of action was completely different from those of existing peptidoglycan inhibitors. PMID:27622529

  8. Analogue and digital linear modulation techniques for mobile satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, W. J.; Bateman, A.; Mcgeehan, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The choice of modulation format for a mobile satellite service is complex. The subjective performance is summarized of candidate schemes and voice coder technologies. It is shown that good performance can be achieved with both analogue and digital voice systems, although the analogue system gives superior performance in fading. The results highlight the need for flexibility in the choice of signaling format. Linear transceiver technology capable of using many forms of narrowband modulation is described.

  9. Amphiphilic Tobramycin Analogues as Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Fosso, Marina Y.; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal activities, cytotoxicities, and membrane-disruptive actions of amphiphilic tobramycin (TOB) analogues. The antifungal activities were established by determination of MIC values and in time-kill studies. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in mammalian cell lines. The fungal membrane-disruptive action of these analogues was studied by using the membrane-impermeable dye propidium iodide. TOB analogues bearing a linear alkyl chain at their 6″-position in a thioether linkage exhibited chain length-dependent antifungal activities. Analogues with C12 and C14 chains showed promising antifungal activities against tested fungal strains, with MIC values ranging from 1.95 to 62.5 mg/liter and 1.95 to 7.8 mg/liter, respectively. However, C4, C6, and C8 TOB analogues and TOB itself exhibited little to no antifungal activity. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the most potent TOB analogues (C12 and C14) against A549 and Beas 2B cells were 4- to 64-fold and 32- to 64-fold higher, respectively, than their antifungal MIC values against various fungi. Unlike conventional aminoglycoside antibiotics, TOB analogues with alkyl chain lengths of C12 and C14 appear to inhibit fungi by inducing apoptosis and disrupting the fungal membrane as a novel mechanism of action. Amphiphilic TOB analogues showed broad-spectrum antifungal activities with minimal mammalian cell cytotoxicity. This study provides novel lead compounds for the development of antifungal drugs. PMID:26033722

  10. The Four Master Tropes: Analogues of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses a rhetorical competence theory that is primarily concerned with an abstract understanding of the rhetorical and cognitive processes that underlie rhetorical acts. Presents the theory as an analogical system based on the four master tropes: metaphor, metonymy, synecdoche, and irony. Draws upon the systems of analogical reasoning, problem…

  11. Analogue gravitational phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finazzi, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Analogue gravity is based on the simple observation that perturbations propagating in several physical systems can be described by a quantum field theory in a curved spacetime. While phenomena like Hawking radiation are hardly detectable in astrophysical black holes, these effects may be experimentally tested in analogue systems. In this Thesis, focusing on Bose-Einstein condensates, we present our recent results about analogue models of gravity from three main perspectives: as laboratory tests of quantum field theory in curved spacetime, for the techniques that they provide to address various issues in general relativity, and as toy models of quantum gravity. The robustness of Hawking-like particle creation is investigated in flows with a single black hole horizon. Furthermore, we find that condensates with two (white and black) horizons develop a dynamical instability known in general relativity as black hole laser effect. Using techniques borrowed from analogue gravity, we also show that warp drives, which are general relativistic spacetimes allowing faster-than-light travel, are unstable. Finally, the cosmological constant issue is investigated from an analogue gravity perspective and relativistic Bose-Einstein condensates are proposed as new analogue systems with novel interesting properties.

  12. Cladribine Analogues via O6-(Benzotriazolyl) Derivatives of Guanine Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Satishkumar, Sakilam; Vuram, Prasanna K.; Relangi, Siva Subrahmanyam; Gurram, Venkateshwarlu; Zhou, Hong; Kreitman, Robert J.; Montemayor, Michelle M. Martínez; Yang, Lijia; Kaliyaperumal, Muralidharan; Sharma, Somesh; Pottabathini, Narender; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Cladribine, 2-chloro-2′-deoxyadenosine, is a highly efficacious clinically used nucleoside for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia. It is also being evaluated against other lymphoid malignancies and has been a molecule of interest for well over half a century. In continuation of our interest on the amide bond-activation in purine nucleosides via the use of (benzotriazol-1yl-oxy)tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate, we have evaluated the use of O6-(benzotriazol-1-yl)-2′-deoxyguanosine as a potential precursor to cladribine and its analogues. These compounds, after appropriate deprotection, were assessed for their biological activities and the data are presented herein. Against hairy cell leukemia (HCL), T-cell lymphoma (TCL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cladribine was the most active against all. The bromo analogue of cladribine showed comparable activity to the ribose analogue of cladribine against HCL, but was more active against TCL and CLL. The bromo ribo analogue of cladribine possessed activity, but was least active among the C6-NH2-containing compounds. Substitution with alkyl groups at the exocyclic amino group appears detrimental to activity, and only the C6 piperidinyl cladribine analogue demonstrated any activity. Against adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, only cladribine and its ribose analogue were most active. PMID:26556315

  13. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates PXR and examined selected BPA analogues to determine whether they bind to and activate PXR. Methods: Cell-based reporter assays, in silico ligand–PXR docking studies, and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to study the interaction between BPA and PXR. We also investigated the influence of BPA and its analogues on the regulation of PXR target genes in human LS180 cells. Results: We found that BPA and several of its analogues are potent agonists for human PXR (hPXR) but do not affect mouse PXR activity. We identified key residues within hPXR’s ligand-binding pocket that constitute points of interaction with BPA. We also deduced the structural requirements of BPA analogues that activate hPXR. BPA and its analogues can also induce PXR target gene expression in human LS180 cells. Conclusions: The present study advances our understanding of the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates human PXR. Activation of PXR by BPA may explain some of the adverse effects of BPA in humans. PMID:22214767

  14. Analogues to features and processes of a high-level radioactive waste repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Stuckless, John S.; with a Foreword by Abraham Van Luik, U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-01-01

    Natural analogues are defined for this report as naturally occurring or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have taken place over time periods of decades to millennia and on spatial scales as much as tens of kilometers. Analogues provide an important temporal and spatial dimension that cannot be tested by laboratory or field-scale experiments. Analogues provide one of the multiple lines of evidence intended to increase confidence in the safe geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Although the work in this report was completed specifically for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste under the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the applicability of the science, analyses, and interpretations is not limited to a specific site. Natural and anthropogenic analogues have provided and can continue to provide value in understanding features and processes of importance across a wide variety of topics in addressing the challenges of geologic isolation of radioactive waste and also as a contribution to scientific investigations unrelated to waste disposal. Isolation of radioactive waste at a mined geologic repository would be through a combination of natural features and engineered barriers. In this report we examine analogues to many of the various components of the Yucca Mountain system, including the preservation of materials in unsaturated environments, flow of water through unsaturated volcanic tuff, seepage into repository drifts, repository drift stability, stability and alteration of waste forms and components of the engineered barrier system, and transport of radionuclides through unsaturated and saturated rock zones.

  15. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  16. Identification, structural and pharmacological characterization of τ-CnVA, a conopeptide that selectively interacts with somatostatin sst3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Petrel, C; Hocking, H G; Reynaud, M; Upert, G; Favreau, Ph; Biass, D; Paolini-Bertrand, M; Peigneur, S; Tytgat, J; Gilles, N; Hartley, O; Boelens, R; Stocklin, R; Servent, D

    2013-06-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse array of small linear and reticulated peptides that interact with high potency and selectivity with a large diversity of receptors and ion channels. They are used by cone snails for prey capture or defense. Recent advances in venom gland transcriptomic and venom peptidomic/proteomic technologies combined with bioactivity screening approaches lead to the identification of new toxins with original pharmacological profiles. Here, from transcriptomic/proteomic analyses of the Conus consors cone snail, we identified a new conopeptide called τ-CnVA, which displays the typical cysteine framework V of the T1-conotoxin superfamily. This peptide was chemically synthesized and its three-dimensional structure was solved by NMR analysis and compared to that of TxVA belonging to the same family, revealing very few common structural features apart a common orientation of the intercysteine loop. Because of the lack of a clear biological function associated with the T-conotoxin family, τ-CnVA was screened against more than fifty different ion channels and receptors, highlighting its capacity to interact selectively with the somatostatine sst3 receptor. Pharmacological and functional studies show that τ-CnVA displays a micromolar (Ki of 1.5μM) antagonist property for the sst3 receptor, being currently the only known toxin to interact with this GPCR subfamily. PMID:23567999

  17. Signal transduction in human pancreatic cancer: roles of transforming growth factor beta, somatostatin receptors, and other signal intermediates.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Becnel, Lauren S; Li, Wei; Fisher, William E; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease because of the lack of early detection markers and effective treatments. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in western countries, including the United States. The mechanisms of pancreatic cancer progression remain unknown. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, regulates cell growth and differentiation in healthy tissues, yet fails to do so in pancreatic cancer. Alterations of the TGF-beta and TGF-beta receptor/Smad signal transduction pathway have been implicated in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, both the TGF-beta receptor and Smad proteins interact with a variety of cellular signal pathways, such as the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), ERK1/2, and Wnt signal transduction cascades. This suggests that pancreatic cancer is a multi-gene-controlled malignancy and that effective treatments for pancreatic cancer should be aimed at multiple targets. In this review, we summarized the major signal intermediates involved in pancreatic cancer signal transduction pathways and specifically discussed how alterations in the regulatory functions of TGF-beta and Smad proteins allow for pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:16314822

  18. Cholescintigraphic study of effect of somatostatin analog, octreotide, on bile secretion and gallbladder emptying in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, C; Darcourt, J; Harris, A G; Lebot, E; Lapalus, F; Delmont, J

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of a single intravenous injection of the somatostatin analog octreotide on hepatic bile secretion and gallbladder emptying with a quantitative scintigraphic technique. Twelve healthy volunteers received, in a double-blind randomized fashion, either octreotide, 100 micrograms intravenously, or placebo. Ten minutes later, [99mTc]PBIDA was administered intravenously (50 microCi/kg) (time = 0) followed, 60 min later, by the ingestion of a standardized fatty meal. In the liver area, the relative decrease per minute of tracer activity from the time of maximal activity to 60 min was significantly lower in the octreotide group (P = 0.02). In the gallbladder area, after the fatty meal, the ratio of tracer activity at 60 and 90 min (A90/A60) was significantly (P = 0.01) higher in the octreotide group. Our study demonstrates that octreotide slows down liver release of the radiopharmaceutical, probably reflecting decreased bile secretion, and inhibits postprandial gallbladder contraction. PMID:8359086

  19. Intraoperative detection of somatostatin-receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumours using indium-111-labelled DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide.

    PubMed Central

    Wangberg, B.; Forssell-Aronsson, E.; Tisell, L. E.; Nilsson, O.; Fjalling, M.; Ahlman, H.

    1996-01-01

    After injection of 111In-labelled DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide, intraoperative tumour localisation was performed using a scintillation detector in 23 patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Count rates from suspect tumour lesions and adjacent normal tissue were expressed as a ratio before (Rin situ) and after (Rex vivo) excision. 111In activity concentration ratios of tumour tissue to blood (T/B) were determined in a gamma counter. In patients with midgut carcinoids, (all scintigraphy positive), false Rin situ recordings were found in 4/29 macroscopically identified tumours. T/B ratios were all high (27-650). In patients with medullary thyroid carcinomas (eight out of ten scintigraphy positive), misleading Rin situ results were found in 4/37 macroscopically identified tumours. T/B ratios were lower (3-39) than those seen in midgut carcinoids. Two out of four patients with endocrine pancreatic tumours had positive scintigraphy, reliable intraoperative measurements and very high T/B ratios (910-1500). One patient with a gastric carcinoid had correct measurements in situ and ex vivo with high T/B ratios (71-210). In situ measurements added little information to preoperative scintigraphy and surgical findings using the present detection system. Rex vivo measurements were more reliable. The very high T/B ratios seen in midgut carcinoids and some endocrine pancreatic tumours would be favourable for future radiation therapy via somatostatin receptors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8611378

  20. Cysteamine and pantethine effects on passive avoidance behavior, shuttle box learning, open-field activity, striatal catecholamines and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Vécsei, L; Widerlöv, E; Ekman, R; Alling, C

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cysteamine and pantethine were compared on different behavioral tests and neurochemical parameters in rats. Cysteamine, administered in high dose (3.90 mM/kg s.c.), decreased the locomotor and rearing activities of rats, while it slightly but not significantly increased the avoidance latency in a passive avoidance test. Pantethine, 24 hr after its administration, significantly increased the dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) levels in the striatum. Cysteamine slightly reduced the DOPAC level without influencing the catecholamine levels in this brain area. The striatal somatostatin concentration was reduced 24 hr after the administration of cysteamine, while pantethine did not influence it. After repeated daily injections of pantethine, the drug facilitated the shuttle box learning process and increased the intertrial and open-field activities of the animals. Cysteamine only slightly increased the locomotion and rearing and did not influence the shuttle box learning. Both pantethine and cysteamine slowed the rate of the "body weight increase" of the animals when compared to a saline-treated group. These findings suggest that the locomotor activation induced by pantethine 24 hr after its administration plays an important role in its behavioral effects. It might be that the striatal dopaminergic transmission, modified by administration of pantethine, plays some role in the higher locomotor activity induced by the substance. PMID:2570553

  1. Effects of somatostatin and some of its tetrapeptide fragments on ethanol - induced gastric mucosal erosion in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Laszlo, F.; Pavo, I.; Penke, B.; Balint, G.A.

    1987-08-31

    A study was made of the cytoprotective effects of somatostatin (SRIF) and its 3-6, 5-8, 7-10, 9-12 and 11-14 tetrapeptide fragments on absolute ethanol-induced hemorrhagic erosions in the stomach of rat. The SRIF molecule was found to prevent the gastric erosions induced by ethanol. The 7-10 and 11-14 fragments exhibited similar properties. There are two peaks in the cytoprotective dose-response curves. It is concluded that various fragments of SRIF can also exert cytoprotective effects. SRIF is superior to cimetidine in the therapy of bleeding duodenal and gastric ulcers in humans. It prevents the duodenal ulcer produced by cysteamine and the gastric ulcer caused by stress. According to Szabo and Usadel, SRIF has a cytoprotective property, i.e. it decreases the harmful effects of absolute ethanol on the stomach of rat. The aim of this study was to establish whether various SRIF fragment have protective effects, and how the cytoprotection depends on the doses applied. 18 references, 1 figure.

  2. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Sherman, Mark A; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Gordon, Larry M

    2007-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and four surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). Its major function in the lung alveolus is to reduce surface tension at the air-water interface in the terminal airways by the formation of a surface-active film enriched in surfactant lipids, hence preventing cellular collapse during respiration. Surfactant therapy using bovine or porcine lung surfactant extracts, which contain only polar lipids and native SP-B and SP-C, has dramatically improved the therapeutic outcomes of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). One important goal of surfactant researchers is to replace animal-derived therapies with fully synthetic preparations based on SP-B and SP-C, produced by recombinant technology or peptide synthesis, and reconstituted with selected synthetic lipids. Here, we review recent research developments with peptide analogues of SP-B and SP-C, designed using either the known primary sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the native proteins or, alternatively, the known 3D structures of closely homologous proteins. Such SP-B and SP-C mimics offer the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of the respective native proteins, and may allow the design of optimized surfactant formulations for specific pulmonary diseases (e.g., acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). These synthetic surfactant preparations may also be a cost-saving therapeutic approach, with better quality control than may be obtained with animal-based treatments. PMID:17575474

  3. Vascular disrupting activity of combretastatin analogues.

    PubMed

    Porcù, Elena; Salvador, Alessia; Primac, Irina; Mitola, Stefania; Ronca, Roberto; Ravelli, Cosetta; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Vedaldi, Daniela; Romagnoli, Romeo; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-08-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are drugs commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. In the last years it has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also vascular disrupting activity and among its derivatives we identified three analogues endowed with potent microtubule depolymerizing activity, higher than that of the lead compound. In this paper we have investigated the anti-vascular activity of these derivatives. We tested the anti-angiogenic effects in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in vivo in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM), and in a syngeneic tumor mouse model. The three molecules, compound 1: 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole; compound 2: (1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1H-tetrazole, compound-3 (4-amino-2-p-tolylaminothiazol-5-yl)-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-methanone) showed a moderate effect on the growth of HUVEC cells at concentrations below 200nM. At lower concentrations (5-20nM), in particular compound 2, they induced inhibition of capillary tube formation, inhibition of endothelial cell migration and affected endothelial cell morphology as demonstrated by the alteration of the microfilaments network. Moreover, they also increased permeability of HUVEC cells in a time dependent manner. In addition, compounds 1 and 3, as well as the reference compound CA-4, inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and in addition compound 3 prevented the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of FAK. In CAM assay, both compounds 2 and 3 efficiently counteracted the strong angiogenic response induced by bFGF, even at the lowest concentration used (1pmol/egg). Moreover in a syngenic mouse model, compounds 1-3 after a single i.p. injection (30mg/kg), showed a stronger reduction of microvascular density. Altogether our results identified these derivatives as potential new vascular disrupting agents candidates. PMID:27235861

  4. Habitability & Astrobiology Research in Mars Terrestrial Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    We performed a series of field research campaigns (ILEWG EuroMoonMars) in the extreme Utah desert relevant to Mars environments, and in order to help in the interpretation of Mars missions measurements from orbit (MEX, MRO) or from the surface (MER, MSL), or Moon geochemistry (SMART-1, LRO). We shall give an update on the sample analysis in the context of habitability and astrobiology. Methods & Results: In the frame of ILEWG EuroMoonMars campaigns (2009 to 2013) we deployed at Mars Desert Research station, near Hanksville Utah, a suite of instruments and techniques [A, 1, 2, 9-11] including sample collection, context imaging from remote to local and microscale, drilling, spectrometers and life sensors. We analyzed how geological and geochemical evolution affected local parameters (mineralogy, organics content, environment variations) and the habitability and signature of organics and biota. Among the important findings are the diversity in the composition of soil samples even when collected in close proximity, the low abundances of detectable PAHs and amino acids and the presence of biota of all three domains of life with significant heterogeneity. An extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles was observed [3,4,9]. A dominant factor seems to be soil porosity and lower clay-sized particle content [6-8]. A protocol was developed for sterile sampling, contamination issues, and the diagnostics of biodiversity via PCR and DGGE analysis in soils and rocks samples [10, 11]. We compare the 2009 campaign results [1-9] to new measurements from 2010-2013 campaigns [10-12] relevant to: comparison between remote sensing and in-situ measurements; the study of minerals; the detection of organics and signs of life. Keywords: field analogue research, astrobiology, habitability, life detection, Earth-Moon-Mars, organics References [A] Foing, Stoker & Ehrenfreund (Editors, 2011) "Astrobiology field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments", Special Issue of International

  5. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin. PMID:26872656

  6. Phosphonate analogues of carboxypeptidase A substrates are potent transition-state analogue inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J E; Kaplan, A P; Bartlett, P A

    1989-07-25

    Analogues of tri- and tetrapeptide substrates of carboxypeptidase A in which the scissile peptide linkage is replaced with a phosphonate moiety (-PO2--O-) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of the enzyme. The inhibitors terminated with either L-lactate or L-phenyllactate [designated (O) Ala and (O) Phe, respectively] in the P1' position. Transition-state analogy was shown for a series of 14 tri- and tetrapeptide derivatives containing the structure RCO-AlaP-(O)Ala [RCO-AP(O)A, AP indicates the phosphonic acid analogue of alanine] by the correlation of the Ki values for the inhibitors and the Km/kcat values for the corresponding amide substrates. This correlation supports a transition state for the enzymatic reaction that resembles the tetrahedral intermediate formed upon addition of water to the scissile carbonyl group. The inhibitors containing (O) Phe at the P1' position proved to be the most potent reversible inhibitors of carboxypeptidase A reported to date: the dissociation constants of ZAFP(O)F, ZAAP(O)F, and ZFAP(O)F are 4, 3, and 1 pM, respectively. Because of the high affinity of these inhibitors, their dissociation constants could not be determined by steady-state methods. Instead, the course of the association and dissociation processes was monitored for each inhibitor as its equilibrium with the enzyme was established in both the forward and reverse directions. A phosphonamidate analogue, ZAAPF, in which the peptide linkage is replaced with a -PO2-NH- moiety, was prepared and shown to hydrolyze rapidly at neutral pH (t1/2 = 20 min at pH 7.5). This inhibitor is bound an order of magnitude less tightly than the corresponding phosphonate, ZAAP(O)F, a result that contrasts with the 840-fold higher affinity of phosphonamidates for thermolysin [Bartlett, P. A., & Marlowe, C. K. (1987) Science 235, 569-571], a zinc peptidase with a similar arrangement of active-site catalytic residues. PMID:2790000

  7. Terrestrial research in Mars analogue environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, G.

    Fatty acids (FA) content was measured by GC-MS SIM technique in Sulfide ores of present day (Mid-Atlantic Ridge and others) and ancient (Ural Paleocene, Russia) black smokers; Early Proterozoic kerites of Volyn; Siberian, Canadian and Antarctic permafrosts and also in rocks of East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement. Analysis was shown presence those and only those fatty acids which are specific to microorganisms. FA with 12 up 19 of carbon atoms are thought to be a bacterial biomass sign. 3-Hydroxy fatty acids also found in samples and are strong specific markers of gram-negative bacteria. Cultivation yield living bacteria in some cases. The East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement rocks opened by Vorotilov Deep Well (VDW) drilled through Puchezh-Katunski impact structure were studied within depths 2575 - 2805 m. 34 microbial lipid markers were detected by GC-MS and 22 species were identified. Bacteria of g. Bacillus reached 6,8 % in subsurface communities. However, members of gg. Clostridium (37,1 - 33,2 %) and Rhodococcus (27,6 - 33,7 %) were absolute dominants within studied depth interval. Some lipid patterns of kerite samples could be assessed to definite genera or, in special cases, to species of contemporary microorganisms. For instance, 2-hydroxylauric acid is specific to Pseudomonas putida group or Acinetobacter spp., and hydroxymyristic together with hydroxypalmitic are specific to P.cepacea and cyanobacteria. 3-hydroxystearic acid was known as component of Acetobacter diazothrophycus and Gloebacter violaceous cyanobacterium. 10-hydroxystearic acid associated with Nocardia spp., which oxidizes oleic acid in organic substrates. 10-methylhexadecanoic (10Me16) acid together with 10Me14, 10Me15 and 10Me17 analogues are markers of actinomycetes. Significant part of Black Smokers organic matter is probably biogenic. Fatty acid features strongly assigns it to bacterial, microeucariotic and planta cells. Par example 3-hydroxy acids are

  8. Spectral analysis of lunar analogue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Analyses of samples derived from terrestrial analogue sites are used to study lunar processes in their geological context (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). For this study samples from the volcanic region of the Eifel, Germany collected during field campaigns (Foing et al., 2010), are analyzed with a variety of spectrometers. The aim is to obtain a database of analyzed samples that could be used as a reference for future in situ measurements. Equipment used in the laboratory consists of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer, a Raman laser spectrometer, as well as UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers. The Raman, UV-VIS and NIR are also used in combination with the EXoGeoLab mock-up lander during field campaigns (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). Calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers is the main focus of this research in order to obtain the clearest spectra. The calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers requires the use of a good light source as well as suitable optical fibers to create a signal that covers the widest range in wavelengths available. To eliminate noise towards the edges of this range, multiple measurements are averaged and data is processed by dividing the signal by reference spectra. Calibration of the devices by creating a new dark and reference spectra has to take place after every sample measurement. In this way we take into account changes that occur in the signal due to the eating of the devices during the measurements. Moreover, the integration time is adjusted to obtain a clear signal without leading to oversaturation in the reflectance spectrum. The typical integration times for the UV-VIS reflectance spectrometer vary between 1 - 18 s, depending on the amount of daylight during experiments. For the NIR reflectance spectrometer the integration time resulting in the best signals is approximately 150 ms in combination with a broad spectrum light

  9. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  10. Release of somatostatin and its role in the mediation of the anti-inflammatory effect induced by antidromic stimulation of sensory fibres of rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, J; Helyes, Z; Oroszi, G; Németh, J; Pintér, E

    1998-03-01

    1. The effect of antidromic stimulation of the sensory fibres of the sciatic nerve on inflammatory plasma extravasation in various tissues and on cutaneous vasodilatation elicited in distant parts of the body was investigated in rats pretreated with guanethidine (8 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and pipecuronium (200 microg kg(-1), i.v.). 2. Antidromic sciatic nerve stimulation with C-fibre strength (20 V, 0.5 ms) at 5 Hz for 5 min elicited neurogenic inflammation in the innervated area and inhibited by 50.3 +/- 4.67% the development of a subsequent plasma extravasation in response to similar stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve. Stimulation at 0.5 Hz for 1 h also evoked local plasma extravasation and inhibited the carrageenin-induced (1%, 100 microl s.c.) cutaneous inflammation by 38.5 +/- 10.0% in the contralateral paw. Excitation at 0.1 Hz for 4 h elicited no local plasma extravasation in the stimulated hindleg but still reduced the carrageenin-induced oedema by 52.1 +/- 9.7% in the paw on the contralateral side. 3. Plasma extravasation in the knee joint in response to carrageenin (2%, 200 microl intra-articular injection) was diminished by 46.1 +/- 12.69% and 40.9 +/- 4.93% when the sciatic nerve was stimulated in the contralateral leg at 0.5 Hz for 1 h or 0.1 Hz for 4 h, respectively. 4. Stimulation of the peripheral stump of the left vagal nerve (20 V, 1 ms, 8 Hz, 10 min) elicited plasma extravasation in the trachea, oesophagus and mediastinal connective tissue in rats pretreated with atropine (2 mg kg(-1), i.v.), guanethidine (8 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and pipecuronium (200 microg kg(-1), i.v.). These responses were inhibited by 37.8 +/- 5.1%, 49.7 +/- 9.9% and 37.6 +/- 4.2%, respectively by antidromic sciatic nerve excitation (5 Hz, 5 min) applied 5 min earlier. 5. Pretreatment with polyclonal somatostatin antiserum (0.5 ml/rat, i.v.) or the selective somatostatin depleting agent cysteamine (280 mg kg(-1), s.c.) prevented the anti-inflammatory effect of sciatic nerve

  11. Development and Characterization of Potent Cyclic Acyldepsipeptide Analogues with Increased Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Goodreid, Jordan D; Janetzko, John; Santa Maria, John P; Wong, Keith S; Leung, Elisa; Eger, Bryan T; Bryson, Steve; Pai, Emil F; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Walker, Suzanne; Houry, Walid A; Batey, Robert A

    2016-01-28

    The problem of antibiotic resistance has prompted the search for new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action. Analogues of the A54556 cyclic acyldepsipeptides (ADEPs) represent an attractive class of antimicrobial agents that act through dysregulation of caseinolytic protease (ClpP). Previous studies have shown that ADEPs are active against Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., MRSA, VRE, PRSP (penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae)); however, there are currently few studies examining Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the synthesis and biological evaluation of 14 novel ADEPs against a variety of pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms is outlined. Optimization of the macrocyclic core residues and N-acyl side chain culminated in the development of 26, which shows potent activity against the Gram-negative species Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrheae and improved activity against the Gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis in comparison with known analogues. In addition, the co-crystal structure of an ADEP-ClpP complex derived from N. meningitidis was solved. PMID:26818454

  12. Therapeutics of Diabetes Mellitus: Focus on Insulin Analogues and Insulin Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Valla, Vasiliki

    2010-01-01

    Aim. Inadequately controlled diabetes accounts for chronic complications and increases mortality. Its therapeutic management aims in normal HbA1C, prandial and postprandial glucose levels. This review discusses diabetes management focusing on the latest insulin analogues, alternative insulin delivery systems and the artificial pancreas. Results. Intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections (MDI) allows better imitation of the physiological rhythm of insulin secretion. Longer-acting, basal insulin analogues provide concomitant improvements in safety, efficacy and variability of glycaemic control, followed by low risks of hypoglycaemia. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides long-term glycaemic control especially in type 1 diabetic patients, while reducing hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic variability. Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems provide information on postprandial glucose excursions and nocturnal hypo- and/or hyperglycemias. This information enhances treatment options, provides a useful tool for self-monitoring and allows safer achievement of treatment targets. In the absence of a cure-like pancreas or islets transplants, artificial “closed-loop” systems mimicking the pancreatic activity have been also developed. Conclusions. Individualized treatment plans for insulin initiation and administration mode are critical in achieving target glycaemic levels. Progress in these fields is expected to facilitate and improve the quality of life of diabetic patients. PMID:20589066

  13. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  14. Ionic liquids and eutectic mixtures as solvent and template in synthesis of zeolite analogues.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily R; Andrews, Christopher D; Wheatley, Paul S; Webb, Paul B; Wormald, Philip; Morris, Russell E

    2004-08-26

    The challenges associated with synthesizing porous materials mean that new classes of zeolites (zeotypes)-such as aluminosilicate zeolites and zeolite analogues-together with new methods of preparing known zeotypes, continue to be of great importance. Normally these materials are prepared hydrothermally with water as the solvent in a sealed autoclave under autogenous pressure. The reaction mixture usually includes an organic template or 'structure-directing agent' that guides the synthesis pathway towards particular structures. Here we report the preparation of aluminophosphate zeolite analogues by using ionic liquids and eutectic mixtures. An imidazolium-based ionic liquid acts as both solvent and template, leading to four zeotype frameworks under different experimental conditions. The structural characteristics of the materials can be traced back to the solvent chemistry used. Because of the vanishingly low vapour pressure of ionic liquids, synthesis takes place at ambient pressure, eliminating safety concerns associated with high hydrothermal pressures. The ionic liquid can also be recycled for further use. A choline chloride/urea eutectic mixture is also used in the preparation of a new zeotype framework. PMID:15329717

  15. Small Cell Carcinomas of the Bladder Highly Express Somatostatin Receptor Type 2A: Impact on Prognosis and Treatment-A Multicenter Study of Urooncology Society, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Neşe, Nalan; Kumbaraci, Banu S; Baydar, Dilek E; Kiliçaslan, Işin; Sari, Ayşegül A; Şen, Sait; Gönül, Ipek I; Kankaya, Duygu; Özlük, Yasemin; Ermete, Murat; Özağari, Ayşim; Bal, Nebil; Kiremitçi, Saba; Yildiz, Kürşat; Tuna, Burçin; Şen, Nilay; Yörükoğlu, Kutsal

    2016-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) is a rare and aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder. Neuroendocrine carcinomas expressing somatostatin receptors (SSTR) in other viscera such as lung, pancreas, and gastrointestinal system respond to therapy with somatostatin analogs. In the present study, expressions of SSTRs 1 to 5 including type 2A are investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and their relationship with clinicopathologic factors was evaluated. Hundred primary bladder SmCC cases were collected from 12 centers in Turkey. Forty-three cases were pure SmCC. Other cases had mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma as a second component. The percentage of the SmCC component ranged from 5% to 100%. SSTR-2A expression was membranous, whereas the other receptors showed cytoplasmic staining. The percentages of positive cases for SSTR-1, SSTR-2A, SSTR-3, SSTR-4, and SSTR-5 were 4% (3/75), 61.4% (54/88), 2.4% (2/84), 24.4% (20/82), and 6.25% (5/80), respectively. The percentage of SmCC component was positively correlated with the percentage of SSTR-2A expression (P=0.003) while negatively correlated with patient age (P=0.032). SSTR-2A expression was correlated with survival as a bad prognostic factor (P=0.018). SSTR-1, SSTR-3, SSTR-4, and SSTR-5 expressions did not show any statistical significance with any parameter. In conclusion, although the limited number of cases with adequate term follow-up, SSTR-2A expression could be a prognostic factor and somatostatin analogs therapeutic candidate for SmCCs of the bladder as these tumors show high percentage of SSTR-2A expression. PMID:25906124

  16. Growth hormone-secreting macroadenoma of the pituitary gland successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE: case report.

    PubMed

    Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Gut, Paweł; Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Liebert, Włodzimierz; Gryczyńska, Maria; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Blanco-Gangoo, Al Ricardo; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Pituitary tumors causing acromegaly are usually macroadenomas at the time of diagnosis, and they can grow aggressively, infiltrating surrounding tissues. Difficulty in achieving complete tumor removal at surgery can lead toward a strong tendency for recurrence, making it necessary to consider a means of treatment other than those currently used such as somatostatin analogs (SSAs), growth hormone (GH) receptor antagonist, surgical removal, and radiotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to describe a patient diagnosed with an aggressive, giant GH-secreting tumor refractory to medical therapy but ultimately treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE. A 26-year-old male with an invasive macroadenoma of the pituitary gland (5.6 × 2.5 × 3.6 cm) and biochemically confirmed acromegaly underwent 2 partial tumor resections: the first used the transsphenoidal approach and the second used the transcranial method. The patient received SSAs pre- and postoperatively. Because of the progression in pituitary tumor size, he underwent classic irradiation of the tumor (50 Gy). One and a half years later, the patient presented with clinically and biochemically active disease, and the tumor size was still 52 mm in diameter (height). Two neurosurgeons disqualified him from further surgical procedures. After confirming the presence of somatostatin receptors in the pituitary tumor by using (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, we treated the patient 4 times with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE. After this treatment, the patient attained partial biochemical remission and a reduction in the tumor mass for the first time. Treatment with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE may be a promising option for some aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenomas when other methods have failed. PMID:26636388

  17. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of treatment-refractory metastatic thyroid cancer using 90Yttrium and 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs: toxicity, response and survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Budiawan, Hendra; Salavati, Ali; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The overall survival rate of non-radioiodine avid differentiated (follicular, papillary, medullary) thyroid carcinoma is significantly lower than for patients with iodine-avid lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate toxicity and efficacy (response and survival) of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in non-radioiodine-avid or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients. Sixteen non-radioiodine-avid and/or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, including follicular thyroid carcinoma (n = 4), medullary thyroid carcinoma (n = 8), Hürthle cell thyroid carcinoma (n = 3), and mixed carcinoma (n = 1) were treated with PRRT by using 90Yttrium and/or 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs. 68Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT was used to determine the somatostatin receptor density in the residual tumor/metastatic lesions and to assess the treatment response. Hematological profiles and renal function were periodically examined after treatment. By using fractionated regimen, only mild, reversible hematological toxicity (grade 1) or nephrotoxicity (grade 1) were seen. Response assessment (using EORTC criteria) was performed in 11 patients treated with 2 or more (maximum 5) cycles of PRRT and showed disease stabilization in 4 (36.4%) patients. Two patients (18.2%) showed partial remission, in the remaining 5 patients (45.5%) disease remained progressive. Kaplan-Meier analysis resulted in a mean survival after the first PRRT of 4.2 years (95% CI, range 2.9-5.5) and median progression free survival of 25 months (inter-quartiles: 12-43). In non-radioiodine-avid/radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, PRRT is a promising therapeutic option with minimal toxicity, good response rate and excellent survival benefits. PMID:24380044

  18. Somatostatin receptor expression in small cell lung cancer as a prognostic marker and a target for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Hänscheid, Heribert; Wild, Vanessa; Pelzer, Theo; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Droll, Sabine; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial responsiveness to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) commonly relapses within months. Although neuroendocrine characteristics may be difficult to demonstrate in individual cases, a relevant expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on the cell surface has been described. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of SSTR-expression in advanced SCLC. We further examined pre-requisites for successful peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). 21 patients with extensive stage SCLC were enrolled. All patients underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-DOTATATE to select patients for SSTR-directed therapy. PET scans were visually and semi-quantitatively assessed and compared to SSTR2a and SSTR5 expression in biopsy samples. Peak standardized uptake values (SUVpeak) of tumors as well as tumor-to-liver ratios were correlated to progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In 4/21 patients all SCLC lesions were PET-positive. 6/21 subjects were rated “intermediate” with the majority of lesions positive, the remaining 11/21 patients were PET-negative. PET-positivity correlated well with histologic SSTR2a, but not with SSTR5 expression. Neither PET-positivity nor SUVpeak were predictors of PFS or OS. In 4 patients with intensive SSTR2a-receptor expression, PRRT was performed with one partial response and one stable disease, respectively. SSTR-expression as detected by 68Ga-DOTATATE-PET and/or histology is not predictive of PFS or OS in patients with advanced SCLC. However, in patients exhibiting sufficient tracer uptake, PRRT might be a treatment option given its low toxicity and the absence of effective alternatives. PMID:26936994

  19. Association between a polymorphic poly-T repeat sequence in the promoter of the somatostatin gene and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Monique; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Despite the numerous common pathways connecting blood pressure regulation to somatostatin (SST) metabolism, the SST gene has never been seen as a significant blood pressure modulator. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between a poly-T repeat sequence (rs34872250) in the promoter of the SST gene and blood pressure, according to the obesity status. We genotyped 1918 French-Canadian subjects from a founder population. Analyses were performed according to the length of the poly-T repeat sequence on both alleles and divided into two groups, the 13/13-13/14 group and the 13/15-13/16 group. The effect of age, gender, body mass index, antihypertensive drugs and diabetic status were considered. Systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures are significantly higher among the 13/15-13/16 group in the whole sample (P<0.05). Whereas the differences remain significant in women, they turn to be non-significant when men are considered alone. The risk of hypertension is increased in the 13/15-13/16 group, particularly among overweight/obese subjects. Systolic blood pressure is significantly higher among overweight/obese carriers of the 13/15-13/16 alleles in the whole sample (P<0.001), in men (P=0.006) and in women (P=0.002), even after correction for age and antihypertensive drugs. These results suggest that the poly-T repeat sequence polymorphism in the promoter of the SST gene is associated with significant variations of blood pressure and could modulate the risk of hypertension, particularly among women. PMID:26818653

  20. A Transcriptome-Led Exploration of Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Somatostatin-Producing D-Cells in the Gastric Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Adriaenssens, Alice; Lam, Brian Yee Hong; Billing, Lawrence; Skeffington, Katie; Sewing, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The stomach epithelium contains a myriad of enteroendocrine cells that modulate a range of physiological functions, including postprandial secretion of regulatory peptides, gastric motility, and nutrient absorption. Somatostatin (SST)-producing D-cells are present in the oxyntic and pyloric regions of the stomach, and provide a tonic inhibitory tone that regulates activity of neighboring enteroendocrine cells and gastric acid secretion. Cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of regulatory factors on gastric D-cells are poorly defined due to problems in identifying primary D-cells, and uncertainty remains about which stimuli influence D-cells directly. In this study, we introduce a transgenic mouse line, SST-Cre, which upon crossing with Cre reporter strains, facilitates the identification and purification of gastric D-cells, or cell-specific expression of genetically encoded calcium indicators. Populations of D-cells from the gastric antrum and corpus were isolated and analyzed by RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of hormones, hormone receptors, neurotransmitter receptors, and nutrient receptors was quantified. Pyy, Gipr, Chrm4, Calcrl, Taar1, and Casr were identified as genes that are highly enriched in D-cells compared with SST-negative cells. Hormone secretion assays performed in mixed gastric epithelial cultures confirmed that SST secretion is regulated by incretin hormones, cholecystokinin, acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related polypeptide, oligopetides, and trace amines. Cholecystokinin and oligopeptides elicited increases in intracellular calcium in single-cell imaging experiments performed using cultured D-cells. Our data provide the first transcriptomic analysis and functional characterization of gastric D-cells, and identify regulatory pathways that underlie the direct detection of stimuli by this cell type. PMID:26241122

  1. Somatostatin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced tight junction damage via the ERK-MAPK pathway in Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shan; Cheng, Tianming; Guo, Yandong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Wendi; Zhi, Fachao

    2014-07-01

    Dysfunction of the epithelial barrier is an important pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions of the gut. Somatostatin (SST) has been demonstrated to reduce local and systemic inflammation reactions and maintain the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To determine the beneficial effect of SST on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced damage of the tight junction (TJ) and its mechanisms, Caco2 cells pretreated with SST (1nM) or MEK inhibitor U0126 (10μM) were exposed to LPS. LPS significantly reduced the expression of TJ proteins in a dose-dependent way. LPS (100μg/ml) greatly induced Caco2 monolayer barrier dysfunction by decreasing transepithelial resistance and increasing epithelial permeability. Pretreatment with SST effectively improved the barrier dysfunction of Caco2 cells. SST significantly increased the expression of TJ proteins occludin and ZO-1 and inhibited the redistribution of TJ proteins due to LPS stimulation. Furthermore, SST decreased the LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and a selective MEK inhibitor markedly protected the barrier function against LPS disturbance by blocking the activation of the ERK-MAPK pathway in Caco2 cells. Besides, LPS significantly increased the mRNA level of SSTR5, which was partly inhibited by pretreatment with SST. In conclusion, the present study indicates that SST protects the Caco2 monolayer barrier against LPS-induced tight junction breakdown by down-regulating the activation of the ERK-MAPK pathway and suppression the activation of SSTR5. PMID:24950815

  2. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  3. A Reorganized GABAergic Circuit in a Model of Epilepsy: Evidence from Optogenetic Labeling and Stimulation of Somatostatin Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Wei, Weizheng; Huang, Christine S.; Cetina, Yliana; Otis, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Axonal sprouting of excitatory neurons is frequently observed in temporal lobe epilepsy, but the extent to which inhibitory interneurons undergo similar axonal reorganization remains unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether somatostatin (SOM)-expressing neurons in stratum (s.) oriens of the hippocampus exhibit axonal sprouting beyond their normal territory and innervate granule cells of the dentate gyrus in a pilocarpine model of epilepsy. To obtain selective labeling of SOM-expressing neurons in s. oriens, a Cre recombinase-dependent construct for channelrhodopsin2 fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-eYFP) was virally delivered to this region in SOM-Cre mice. In control mice, labeled axons were restricted primarily to s. lacunosum-moleculare. However, in pilocarpine-treated animals, a rich plexus of ChR2-eYFP-labeled fibers and boutons extended into the dentate molecular layer. Electron microscopy with immunogold labeling demonstrated labeled axon terminals that formed symmetric synapses on dendritic profiles in this region, consistent with innervation of granule cells. Patterned illumination of ChR2-labeled fibers in s. lacunosum-moleculare of CA1 and the dentate molecular layer elicited GABAergic inhibitory responses in dentate granule cells in pilocarpine-treated mice but not in controls. Similar optical stimulation in the dentate hilus evoked no significant responses in granule cells of either group of mice. These findings indicate that under pathological conditions, SOM/GABAergic neurons can undergo substantial axonal reorganization beyond their normal territory and establish aberrant synaptic connections. Such reorganized circuitry could contribute to functional deficits in inhibition in epilepsy, despite the presence of numerous GABAergic terminals in the region. PMID:24005292

  4. Distribution of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the caecilian Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): comparative aspects in amphibians.

    PubMed

    López, Jesús M; Moreno, Nerea; Morona, Ruth; Muñoz, Margarita; Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín

    2007-03-20

    The organization of the somatostatin-like-immunoreactive (SOM-ir) structures in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians has been well documented, and significant differences were noted between the two amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the gymnophionans (caecilians). In the present study, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of SOM-ir cells and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. In addition, because of its known relationship with catecholamines in other vertebrates, double immunostaining for SOM and tyrosine hydroxylase was used to investigate this situation in the gymnophionan. Abundant SOM-ir cell bodies and fibers were widely distributed throughout the brain. In the telencephalon, pallial and subpallial cells were labeled, being most numerous in the medial pallium and amygdaloid region. Most of the SOM-ir neurons were found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus and showed a clear projection to the median eminence. Less conspicuously, SOM-ir structures were found in the thalamus, tectum, tegmentum, and reticular formation. Both SOM-ir cells and fibers were demonstrated in the spinal cord. The double-immunohistofluorescence technique revealed that catecholaminergic neurons and SOM-ir cells are largely intermingled in many brain regions but form totally separated populations. Many differences were found between the distribution of SOM-ir structures in Dermophis and that in anurans or urodeles. Some features were shared only with anurans, such as the abundant pallial SOM-ir cells, whereas others were common only to urodeles, such as the organization of the hypothalamohypophysial SOM-ir system. In addition, some characteristics were found only in Dermophis, such as the localization of the SOM-ir spinal cells and the lack of colocalization of catecholamines and SOM throughout the brain. Therefore, any conclusions concerning the SOM system in amphibians are incomplete without

  5. Comparison of the inhibitory action of synthetic capsaicin analogues with various NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Miyoshi, H; Sakamoto, K; Iwamura, H

    1996-01-11

    Capsaicin is a new naturally occurring inhibitor of proton-pumping NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1), that competitively acts against ubiquinone. A series of capsaicin analogues was synthesized to examine the structural factors required for the inhibitory action and to probe the structural property of the ubiquinone catalytic site of various NADH-ubiquinone reductases, including non-proton-pumping enzyme (NDH-2), from bovine heart mitochondria, potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum, L) mitochondria and Escherichia coli (GR 19N) plasma membranes. Some synthetic capsaicins were fairly potent inhibitors of each of the three NDH-1 compared with the potent rotenone and piericidin A. Synthetic capsaicin analogues inhibited all three NDH-1 activities in a competitive manner against an exogenous quinone. The modification both of the substitution pattern and of the number of methoxy groups on the benzene ring, which may be superimposable on the quinone ring of ubiquinone, did not drastically affect the inhibitory potency. In addition, alteration of the position of dipolar amide bond unit in the molecule and chemical modifications of this unit did not change the inhibitory potency, particularly with bovine heart and potato tuber NDH-1. These results might be explained assuming that the ubiquinone catalytic site of NDH-1 is spacious enough to accommodate a variety of structurally different capsaicin analogues in a dissimilar manner. Regarding the moiety corresponding to the alkyl side chain, a rigid diphenyl ether structure was more inhibitory than a flexible alkyl chain. Structure-activity studies and molecular orbital calculations suggested that a bent form is the active conformation of capsaicin analogues. On the other hand, poor correlations between the inhibitory potencies determined with the three NDH-1 suggested that the structural similarity of the ubiquinone catalytic sites of these enzymes is rather poor. The sensitivity to the inhibition by synthetic capsaicins

  6. Migrastatin analogues target fascin to block tumour metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Jakoncic, J.; Yang, S.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.Y.

    2010-04-15

    Tumour metastasis is the primary cause of death of cancer patients. Development of new therapeutics preventing tumour metastasis is urgently needed. Migrastatin is a natural product secreted by Streptomyces, and synthesized migrastatin analogues such as macroketone are potent inhibitors of metastatic tumour cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here we show that these migrastatin analogues target the actin-bundling protein fascin to inhibit its activity. X-ray crystal structural studies reveal that migrastatin analogues bind to one of the actin-binding sites on fascin. Our data demonstrate that actin cytoskeletal proteins such as fascin can be explored as new molecular targets for cancer treatment, in a similar manner to the microtubule protein tubulin.

  7. Membrane-permeable Triphosphate Prodrugs of Nucleoside Analogues.

    PubMed

    Gollnest, Tristan; Dinis de Oliveira, Thiago; Rath, Anna; Hauber, Ilona; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Meier, Chris

    2016-04-18

    The metabolic conversion of nucleoside analogues into their triphosphates often proceeds insufficiently. Rate-limitations can be at the mono-, but also at the di- and triphosphorylation steps. We developed a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) delivery system (TriPPPro-approach). In this approach, NTPs are masked by two bioreversible units at the γ-phosphate. Using a procedure involving H-phosphonate chemistry, a series of derivatives bearing approved, as well as potentially antivirally active, nucleoside analogues was synthesized. The enzyme-triggered delivery of NTPs was demonstrated by pig liver esterase, in human T-lymphocyte cell extracts and by a polymerase chain reaction using a prodrug of thymidine triphosphate. The TriPPPro-compounds of some HIV-inactive nucleoside analogues showed marked anti-HIV activity. For cellular uptake studies, a fluorescent TriPPPro-compound was prepared that delivered the triphosphorylated metabolite to intact CEM cells. PMID:27008042

  8. The metabolic and mitogenic properties of basal insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Context Retrospective, observational studies have reported an association between diabetes treatment with insulin and a higher incidence of cancer. Objective Overview the literature for in vitro and in vivo studies of the metabolic and mitogenic properties of basal insulin analogues and assess the implications for clinical use. Methods Relevant studies were identified through PubMed and congress abstract database searches; data on metabolic and mitogenic signalling in relation to insulin treatment of diabetes are included in this review. Results The balance of evidence shows that although some analogues have demonstrated mitogenic potency in some in vitro studies in cancer cell lines, these findings do not translate to the in vivo setting in animals or to the clinical setting in humans. Conclusions The current consensus is that there is no clinical or in vivo evidence to indicate that any commercially available insulin analogue has carcinogenic effects. Large-scale, prospective clinical and observational studies will further establish any potential link. PMID:23373726

  9. Synthesis and cytotoxic activities of semisynthetic zearalenone analogues.

    PubMed

    Tadpetch, Kwanruthai; Kaewmee, Benyapa; Chantakaew, Kittisak; Kantee, Kawalee; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Phongpaichit, Souwalak

    2016-08-01

    Zearalenone is a β-resorcylic acid macrolide with various biological activities. Herein we report the synthesis and cytotoxic activities of 34 zearalenone analogues against human oral epidermoid carcinoma (KB) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells as well as noncancerous Vero cells. Some zearalenone analogues showed moderately enhanced cytotoxic activities against the two cancer cell lines. We have discovered the potential lead compounds with diminished or no cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Preliminary structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the double bond at the 1' and 2' positions of zearalenone core was crucial for cytotoxic activities on both cell lines. In addition, for zearalenol analogues, the unprotected hydroxyl group at C-2 and an alkoxy substituent at C-4 played key roles on cytotoxic effects of both cell lines. PMID:27311894

  10. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New (-)-Englerin Analogues.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, Laura; Riesgo, Lorena; Bravo, Fernando; Ransom, Tanya T; Beutler, John A; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2016-05-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of (-)-englerin A analogues obtained along our previously reported synthetic route based on a stereoselective gold(I) cycloaddition process. This synthetic route is a convenient platform to access analogues with broad structural diversity and has led us to the discovery of unprecedented and easier-to-synthesize derivatives with an unsaturation in the cyclopentyl ring between C4 and C5. We also introduce novel analogues in which the original isopropyl motif has been substituted with cyclohexyl, phenyl, and cyclopropyl moieties. The high selectivity and growth-inhibitory activity shown by these new derivatives in renal cancer cell lines opens new ways toward the final goal of finding effective drugs for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). PMID:27005578

  11. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies. PMID:26438084

  12. Nicorandil analogues containing NO-donor furoxans and related furazans.

    PubMed

    Boschi, D; Cena, C; Di Stilo, A; Fruttero, R; Gasco, A

    2000-07-01

    The synthesis and in vitro vasodilating properties of hybrid compounds in which furoxan (1,2,5-oxadiazole 2-oxide) moieties, endowed with different NO-donor properties, were substituted for the nitroxy function of Nicorandil are reported. The corresponding cyanoguanidine analogues are also considered. This approach has led to a series of vasorelaxing compounds devoid of affinity for K(ATP) channels, whose activity is prevalently due to their ability to activate sGC, at the concentrations of the experiments. Related furazan (1,2,5-oxadiazole) derivatives, unable to release nitric oxide were also prepared and studied for control. The amide analogues of Nicorandil display feeble vasorelaxing action not involving the activation of K+ channels, while in the guanidine analogues, this mechanism seems to underlie this action. PMID:10976520

  13. Analogue modelling of syntectonic leucosomes in migmatitic schists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Carreras, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Migmatites from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt display a wide variety of structures, from those formed when the leucosomes were melt-bearing, to those developed during solid-state deformation. The observed field structures have been modelled by means of analogue experiments. The materials used in the models are layered plasticine as a schist analogue, and chocolate as analogue of the crystallizing leucosome. A model for the development of syntectonic migmatites is proposed in which initial melt-bearing patches, preferentially formed within fertile pelitic layers, progressively evolve towards lens-shaped veins. Furthermore, heterogeneous deformation of anisotropic metasediments facilitates formation of extensional sites for further melt accumulation and transport. Melt crystallization implies a rapid increase in effective viscosity of leucosomes producing a reversal in competence contrast with respect to the enclosing schists. During the whole process, deformation localizes around crystallizing veins, giving rise to different and contrasting structures for melt-bearing and for solid-state stages.

  14. Relative benefits of linear analogue and advanced digital hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Wood, Sally A; Lutman, Mark E

    2004-03-01

    Speech recognition performance and self-reported benefit from linear analogue and advanced (digital) hearing aids were compared in 100 first-time hearing aid users with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss fitted monaurally with a behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid in a single-blind randomized crossover trial. Subjects used each aid for 5 weeks in turn, with aid order balanced across subjects. Three alternative models of digital hearing aid were assigned to subjects according to a balanced design. Aid type was disguised to keep subjects blind within practical limitations. Aided speech recognition performance in noise was measured at speech levels of 65 and 75dB at a speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) of +2dB for closed sets of single words. Self-rated benefit was measured using the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP). Quality of life, hearing aid use and user preferences were also assessed. Speech recognition scores with the digital aids were significantly better at 75dB than with the analogue aids Self-reported benefit (APHAB, GHABP) and improvement in quality of life were generally not significantly different between analogue and digital aids, although aversiveness measured with the APHAB was significantly lower with digital aids, and satisfaction measured with the GHABP was greater. The digital aids were preferred significantly more often than the analogue aids, with 61 subjects choosing their digital aid, 26 choosing the analogue aid, and nine being equivocal. Overall, this study shows advantages for advanced digital over simple linear analogue aids in terms of both objective and subjective outcomes, although average differences are not large. PMID:15198378

  15. The Object-analogue approach for probabilistic forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frediani, M. E.; Hopson, T. M.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hacker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The object-analogue is a new method to estimate forecast uncertainty and to derive probabilistic predictions of gridded forecast fields over larger regions rather than point locations. The method has been developed for improving the forecast of 10-meter wind speed over the northeast US, and it can be extended to other forecast variables, vertical levels, and other regions. The object-analogue approach combines the analog post-processing technique (Hopson 2005; Hamill 2006; Delle Monache 2011) with the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) for forecast verification (Davis et al 2006a, b). Originally, MODE is used to verify mainly precipitation forecasts using features of a forecast region represented by an object. The analog technique is used to reduce the NWP systematic and random errors of a gridded forecast field. In this study we use MODE-derived objects to characterize the wind fields forecasts into attributes such as object area, centroid location, and intensity percentiles, and apply the analogue concept to these objects. The object-analogue method uses a database of objects derived from reforecasts and their respective reanalysis. Given a real-time forecast field, it searches the database and selects the top-ranked objects with the most similar set of attributes using the MODE fuzzy logic algorithm for object matching. The attribute probabilities obtained with the set of selected object-analogues are used to derive a multi-layer probabilistic prediction. The attribute probabilities are combined into three uncertainty layers that address the main concerns of most applications: location, area, and magnitude. The multi-layer uncertainty can be weighted and combined or used independently in such that it provides a more accurate prediction, adjusted according to the application interest. In this study we present preliminary results of the object-analogue method. Using a database with one hundred storms we perform a leave-one-out cross-validation to

  16. A thermographic assessment of three intra-articular prednisolone analogues given in rheumatoid synovitis.

    PubMed Central

    Esselinckx, W; Bacon, P A; Ring, E F; Crooke, D; Collins, A J; Demottaz, D

    1978-01-01

    1 Three intra-articular prednisolone analogues have been studied in a group of forty-six rheumatoid arthritic subjects. Each compound was tested at 50 mg and 100 mg dose over 3 weeks. 2 The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed by quantitative thermography. Systemic escape of the drug was monitored by plasma prednisolone and cortisol levels. 3 Both the systemic escape from the joint and the duration of effect on injected and uninjected knees were related to drug solubility. 4 Depression of plasma cortisol occurred with all three preparations and was most prolonged with the long-acting preparation. 5 Increasing the dose from 50 mg to 100 mg increased the antiflammatory effect only with the soluble acetate preparation. PMID:656284

  17. [Clinical importance of basal insulin analogues and insulin Toujeo® 300 units/ml].

    PubMed

    Adamíková, Alena

    2015-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous disease that requires a personalized approach to treatment with goals tailored to capabilities and abilities of the patient, his other diseases so as to ensure good diabetes control without the risk of hypoglycemic events and the development or progression of late diabetic complications. Recommendations for treatment of diabetes is classified in second-line as a one of the possibilities of treatment of basal insulin immediately after the failure of therapy with metformin and diet. The new generation of basal insulin analogues provides its effect profile and features a completely new quality to the treatment of diabetes. Toujeo® 300 units/ml is a new long-acting basal insulin glargine concentration of 300 units/ ml with a low glycemic variability, which in studies has demonstrated consistent control of diabetes in a significant reduction in the risk of hypoglycemia especially at night compared with insulin glargin of concentration 100 units/ml. PMID:26652788

  18. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  19. Halogenase Engineering for the Generation of New Natural Product Analogues.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephanie; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-10-12

    Halogenases catalyze the incorporation of halogen atoms into organic molecules. Given the importance that halogenation has on the biological activity of small molecules, these enzymes have been subjected to intense engineering efforts to make them more suitable for biotechnology applications. The ability to biohalogenate complex molecules provides, in principle, the opportunity for rapid generation of a series of analogues with new or improved properties. Here we discuss the potential and limitations of using halogenases as biocatalysts, including recent advances in engineering halogenases to generate halogenated natural product analogues. PMID:26256103

  20. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  1. 12-Amino-andrographolide analogues: synthesis and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Kasemsuk, Sakkasem; Sirion, Uthaiwan; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Saeeng, Rungnapha

    2013-12-01

    Andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone of the plant Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to be cytotoxic against various cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, a series of β-amino-γ-butyrolactone analogues has been synthesized from naturally occurring andrographolide via one pot tandem aza-conjugate addition-elimination reaction. By using economic procedure without any base or catalyst at room temperature, the products obtained were in fair to excellent yields with high stereoselectivity. The cytotoxicity of all new amino analogues were evaluated against six cancer cell lines and revealed their potential for being developed as promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:23709127

  2. Concise synthesis of ether analogues of lysobisphosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guowei; Xu, Yong; Falguières, Thomas; Gruenberg, Jean; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2005-09-01

    We describe a versatile, efficient method for the preparation of ether analogues of (S,S)-lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and its enantiomer from (S)-solketal. Phosphorylation of a protected sn-2-O-octadecenyl glyceryl ether with 2-cyanoethyl bis-N,N-diisopropylamino phosphine and subsequent deprotection generated the bisether LBPA analogues. By simply changing the sequence of deprotection steps, we obtained the (R,R)- and (S,S)-enantiomers of 2,2'-bisether LBPA. An ELISA assay with anti-LBPA monoclonal antibodies showed that the bisether LBPAs were recognized with the same affinity as the natural 2,2'-bisoleolyl LBPA. [reaction: see text] PMID:16119911

  3. Synthesis of Conformationally Locked Versions of Puromycin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Saneyoshi, Hisao; Michel, Benoît Y.; Choi, Yongseok; Strazewski, Peter; Marquez, Victor E.

    2009-01-01

    Conformationally locked North and South versions of puromycin analogues built on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane pseudosugar template were synthesized. The final assembly of the products was accomplished by the Staudinger-Vilarrasa coupling of the corresponding North (2 and 3) and South (6 and 7) 3′-azidopurine carbanucleosides with the Fmoc-protected 1-hydroxybenzotriazole ester of 4-methoxy-L-tyrosine. North azides 2 and 3 were reported earlier. The 3′-azido intermediates 6 and 7 that are necessary for the synthesis of the South puromycin analogues are described herein for the first time. PMID:18991379

  4. Synthesis and Cytotoxicity of Semisynthetic Withalongolide A Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The natural product withaferin A exhibits potent antitumor activity and other diverse pharmacological activities. The recently discovered withalongolide A, a C-19 hydroxylated congener of withaferin A, was recently reported to possess cytotoxic activity against head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Semisynthetic acetylated analogues of withalongolide A were shown to be considerably more cytotoxic than the parent compound. To further explore the structure–activity relationships, 20 new semisynthetic analogues of withalongolide A were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic activity against four different cancer cell lines. A number of derivatives were found to be more potent than the parent compound and withaferin A. PMID:24273633

  5. Non-natural acetogenin analogues as potent Trypanosoma brucei inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Gordon J.; Fraser, Andrew L.; Gould, Eoin R.; King, Elizabeth F.; Menzies, Stefanie K.; Morris, Joanne C.; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Smith, Terry K.

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel bis-tetrahydropyran 1,4-triazole analogues based on the acetogenin framework display low micromolar trypanocidal activities towards both bloodstream and insect forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. A divergent synthetic strategy was adopted for the synthesis of the key tetrahydropyran intermediates to enable rapid access to diastereochemical variation either side of the 1,4-triazole core. The resulting diastereomeric analogues displayed varying degrees of trypanocidal activity and selectivity in structure activity relationship studies. PMID:25145275

  6. Identification of small peptide analogues having agonist and antagonist activity at the platelet thrombin receptor.

    PubMed

    Ruda, E M; Petty, A; Scrutton, M C; Tuffin, D P; Manley, P W

    1988-06-15

    phosphatidylethanolamine. SC40476 causes no detectable hydrolysis of glycoprotein V as detected by release of the proteolytic product (glycoprotein VFR). The results indicate that SC40476 and SC42619 interact selectively with the platelet thrombin receptor. Both peptide analogues act as effective antagonists for this receptor but also possess weak agonist activity which may also result from interaction with the thrombin receptor. The molecular basis for this latter activity has not been defined. SC42619 non-selectively inhibits Ca2+ influx induced by several agonists but this effect does not appear to contribute to the observed inhibition of the aggregatory and secretory responses. PMID:2839193

  7. Curcumin and Its Analogue Induce Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Have Additive Effects with Bortezomib in Cellular and Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, L. I.; Fehér, L. Z.; Szebeni, G. J.; Gyuris, M.; Sipos, P.; Alföldi, R.; Ózsvári, B.; Hackler, L.; Balázs, A.; Batár, P.; Kanizsai, I.; Puskás, L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy of bortezomib with other chemotherapeutics is an emerging treatment strategy. Since both curcumin and bortezomib inhibit NF-κB, we tested the effects of their combination on leukemia cells. To improve potency, a novel Mannich-type curcumin derivative, C-150, was synthesized. Curcumin and its analogue showed potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on the human leukemia cell line, HL60, with different potency but similar additive properties with bortezomib. Additive antiproliferative effects were correlated well with LPS-induced NF-κB inhibition results. Gene expression data on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes, obtained by high-throughput QPCR, showed that curcumin and its analogue act through similar signaling pathways. In correlation with in vitro results similar additive effect could be obsereved in SCID mice inoculated systemically with HL60 cells. C-150 in a liposomal formulation given intravenously in combination with bortezomib was more efficient than either of the drugs alone. As our novel curcumin analogue exerted anticancer effects in leukemic cells at submicromolar concentration in vitro and at 3 mg/kg dose in vivo, which was potentiated by bortezomib, it holds a great promise as a future therapeutic agent in the treatment of leukemia alone or in combination. PMID:26075279

  8. Effect of chirality and lipophilicity in the functional activity of evodiamine and its analogues at TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Fontana, Gabriele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Passarella, Daniele; Appendino, Giovanni; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evodiamine, a racemic quinazolinocarboline alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Evodiae fructus, has been reported to act as an agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) cation channel both in vitro and in vivo. Evodiamine is structurally different from all known TRPV1 activators, and has significant clinical potential as a thermogenic agent. Nevertheless, the molecular bases for its actions are still poorly understood. Experimental Approach To investigate the structure-activity relationships of evodiamine, the natural racemate was resolved, and a series of 23 synthetic analogues was prepared, using as the end point the intracellular Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing either the human or the rat recombinant TRPV1. Key Results S-(+) evodiamine was more efficacious and potent than R-(−) evodiamine, and a new potent lead (Evo30) was identified, more potent than the reference TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin. In general, potency and efficacy correlated with the lipophilicity of the analogues. Like other TRPV1 agonists, several synthetic analogues could efficiently desensitize TRPV1 to activation by capsaicin. Conclusions and Implications Evodiamine qualifies as structurally unique lead structure to develop new potent TRPV1 agonists/desensitizers. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:23902373

  9. Basal insulin analogues in the management of diabetes mellitus: What progress have we made?

    PubMed

    Owens, David R; Matfin, Glenn; Monnier, Louis

    2014-02-01

    Insulin remains the most effective and consistent means of controlling blood glucose levels in diabetes. Since 1946, neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) has been the predominant basal insulin in clinical use. However, absorption is variable due to the need for resuspension and the time-action profile (peak activity 4-6 h after subcutaneous administration) confers an increased propensity for between-meal and nocturnal hypoglycaemia. In the 1980s, recombinant DNA technology enabled modifications to the insulin molecule resulting in the soluble long-acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir. Both exhibit a lower risk of hypoglycaemia compared with neutral protamine Hagedorn due to improved time-action profiles and reduced day-to-day glucose variability. Glargine is indicated for administration once daily and detemir once or twice daily. Degludec is the latest prolonged-acting insulin which forms long subcutaneous multi-hexamers that delay absorption. Recent phase III trials in type 1 and type 2 diabetes show that degludec was non-inferior to comparators (predominantly glargine) with a minimal although inconsistent reduction in overall hypoglycaemia and a small absolute difference in nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Newer developmental agents include LY2605541 and glargine U300. LY2605541 comprises insulin lispro combined with polyethylene glycol, thereby increasing its hydrodynamic size and retarding absorption from the subcutaneous tissue. Glargine U300 is a new formulation of glargine resulting in a flatter and more prolonged time-action profile than its predecessor. This article reviews recent advances in basal insulin analogues, including a critical appraisal of the degludec trials. PMID:24026961

  10. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  11. ACTS data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-08-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  12. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  13. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  14. Development of octreotide-conjugated polymeric prodrug of bufalin for targeted delivery to somatostatin receptor 2 overexpressing breast cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Jia, Tingting; Yuan, Xia; Liu, Cheng; Sun, Jian; Ni, Zhenhua; Xu, Jian; Wang, Xuhui; Yuan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background Development of polymeric prodrugs of small molecular anticancer drugs has become one of the most promising strategies to overcome the intrinsic shortcomings of small molecular anticancer drugs and improve their anticancer performance. Materials and methods In the current work, we fabricated a novel octreotide (Oct)-modified esterase-sensitive tumor-targeting polymeric prodrug of bufalin (BUF) and explored its anticancer performance against somatostatin receptor 2 overexpressing breast cancer. Results The obtained tumor-targeting polymeric prodrug of BUF, P(oligo[ethylene glycol] monomethyl ether methacrylate [OEGMA]-co-BUF-co-Oct), showed a nanosize dimension and controlled drug release features in the presence of esterase. It was demonstrated by in vitro experiment that P(OEGMA-co-BUF-co-Oct) showed enhanced cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and apoptosis in comparison with those of free BUF. In vivo experiment further revealed the improved accumulation of drugs in tumor tissues and enhanced anticancer performance of P(OEGMA-co-BUF-co-Oct). Conclusion Taken together, this study indicated that polymeric prodrug of BUF holds promising potential toward the treatment of somatostatin receptor 2 overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:27284243

  15. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET and gene expression profile in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas: strong correlation between PET tracer uptake and gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingrid H; Langer, Seppo W; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Oxbøl, Jytte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor expression on both protein and gene expression level was compared with in vivo (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Twenty-one patients with verified NEC who underwent a (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT between November 2012 and May 2014, were retrospectively included. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, we quantitatively determined the gene expression of several genes and compared with (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET uptake. By immunohistochemistry we qualitatively studied the expression of assorted proteins in NEC. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range 41-84) years. All patients had WHO performance status 0-1. Median Ki67 index was 50% (range 20-100%). Gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype (SSTR) 2 and Ki67 were both positively correlated to the (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake (r=0.89; p<0.0001 and r=0.5; p=0.021, respectively). Furthermore, SSTR2 and SSTR5 gene expression were strongly and positively correlated (r=0.57; p=0.006). This study as the first verifies a positive and close correlation of (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake and gene expression of SSTR2 in NEC. SSTR2 gene expression has a stronger correlation to (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake than SSTR5. In addition, the results indicate that the gene expression levels of SSTR2 and SSTR5 at large follow one another. PMID:27069766

  16. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET and gene expression profile in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas: strong correlation between PET tracer uptake and gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid H; Langer, Seppo W; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Oxbøl, Jytte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor expression on both protein and gene expression level was compared with in vivo 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Twenty-one patients with verified NEC who underwent a 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT between November 2012 and May 2014, were retrospectively included. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, we quantitatively determined the gene expression of several genes and compared with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET uptake. By immunohistochemistry we qualitatively studied the expression of assorted proteins in NEC. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range 41-84) years. All patients had WHO performance status 0-1. Median Ki67 index was 50% (range 20-100%). Gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype (SSTR) 2 and Ki67 were both positively correlated to the 68Ga-DOTATOC uptake (r=0.89; p<0.0001 and r=0.5; p=0.021, respectively). Furthermore, SSTR2 and SSTR5 gene expression were strongly and positively correlated (r=0.57; p=0.006). This study as the first verifies a positive and close correlation of 68Ga-DOTATOC uptake and gene expression of SSTR2 in NEC. SSTR2 gene expression has a stronger correlation to 68Ga-DOTATOC uptake than SSTR5. In addition, the results indicate that the gene expression levels of SSTR2 and SSTR5 at large follow one another. PMID:27069766

  17. Autoradiographic localization of a non-reducible somatostatin analog (/sup 125/I-CGP 23996) binding sites in the rat brain: comparison with membrane binding

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, J.; Dussaillant, M.; Enjalbert, A.; Kordon, C.; Rostene, W.

    1985-07-01

    The regional distribution of somatostatin binding sites in the rat brain was determined by quantitative autoradiography, using /sup 125/I-CGP 23996, a non-reducible somatostatin analog. In preliminary experiments, kinetic properties of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding to rat brain membranes and slide mounted frozen brain sections were compared and found similar. In addition, distribution of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 and /sup 125/I-N-Tyr-SRIF14 binding sites on membrane prepared from 10 different rat brain structures were closely correlated (r = 0.91, 2 p less than 0.01), indicating that the non-reducible analog recognizes the same binding site as the Tyr-extended native peptide. Highest levels of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding sites were found in anterior temporal, frontal and cingular cortex as well as hippocampus. Moderate levels were found in the remaining part of the limbic system including amygdala, olfactory tubercles and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In the brain stem, nuclei involved in the auditory system such as the ventral cochlear nucleus and the superior olive nucleus, contained high levels of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding sites. The distribution of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding sites roughly correlated with that of the endogenous peptide in most structures, except in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

  18. Isolation, Characterization, and Biological Evaluation of Syn and Anti Diastereomers of [99mTc]Technetium Depreotide: a Somatostatin Receptor Binding Tumor Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, John E.; Pearson, Daniel A.; Nelson, Carol A.; Lyons, Barbara A.; Zheng, Yongyong; Bartis, Judit; He, Jiafang; Cantorias, Melchor V.; Howell, Robertha C.; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2007-01-01

    The early and later eluting [99mTcO]depreotide products on RP-HPLC were confirmed to be the anti and syn diastereomers, respectively, based on proton NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy. NMR provided evidence of a folded, conformationally constrained structure for the syn diastereomer. The syn diastereomer is predominant (anti/syn ~ 10:90) in the [99mTcO]depreotide preparation and shows a slightly higher affinity (IC50 = 0.15 nM) for the somatostatin receptor than the anti diastereomer (IC50 = 0.89 nM). Both diastereomers showed higher binding affinities than the free peptide (IC50 = 7.4 nM). Biodistribution studies in AR42J tumor xenograft nude mice also showed higher tumor uptake for syn [99mTcO]depreotide (6.58% ID/g) than for the anti [99mTcO]depreotide (3.38% ID/g). Despite the differences in biological efficacy, the favorable binding affinity, tumor uptake, and tumor-to-background ratio results for both diastereomeric species predict that both are effective for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in vivo. PMID:17691760

  19. In vivo biosynthesis of L-(/sup 35/S)Cys-arginine vasopressin, -oxytocin, and -somatostatin: rapid estimation using reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Bourland, R.E.; Fernstrom, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    L(/sup 35/S)Cys-arginine vasopressin, -oxytocin, and -somatostatin were purified from hypothalami and neurohypophyses 4 h after rats received L(/sup 35/S)Cys via the third ventricle. After acetic acid extraction, Sephadex G-25 filtration, and chemoadsorption to C18-silica (Sep-Pak cartridges), the labeled peptides were rapidly separated by gradient elution, reversed phase, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identity and isotopic purity of the labeled peptides were determined by several reversed phase HPLC procedures in conjunction with chemical modification. The labeled peptide fractions were at least 50% radiochemically pure. Using this HPLC isolation procedure, incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)Cys into each peptide was determined in hydrated and dehydrated rats. Label incorporation into arginine vasopressin and oxytocin in the hypothalamus and the neurohypophysis of dehydrated rats was 2-3 times greater than that in hydrated rats. Incorporation of label into hypothalamic and neurohypophyseal somatostatin was unaffected by the hydration state of the animal. This procedure thus provides a very rapid, but sensitive, set of techniques for studying the control of small peptide biosynthesis in the brain.

  20. Novel silicon-containing analogues of the retinoid agonist bexarotene: syntheses and biological effects on human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jennifer B; Lippert, W Peter; Dörrich, Steffen; Tebbe, David; Burschka, Christian; Christie, Victoria B; Tams, Daniel M; Henderson, Andrew P; Murray, Bridgid A; Marder, Todd B; Przyborski, Stefan A; Tacke, Reinhold

    2011-08-01

    Twofold sila-substitution (C/Si exchange) of the clinically used RXR-selective retinoid agonist bexarotene leads to disila-bexarotene, which displays pharmacological potency similar to that of the parent carbon compound, as shown in a HeLa-cell-based RXR assay. Formal exchange of the SiCH₂CH₂ Si group in disila-bexarotene with a SiCH₂Si or SiOSi moiety leads to the disila-bexarotene analogues 8 and 9. The silicon compounds 8 and 9 were synthesized in multistep syntheses, starting from HC≡C(CH₃)₂SiCH₂Si(CH₃)₂C≡CH and HC≡C(CH₃)₂SiOSi(CH₃)₂C≡CH, respectively. The key step in the syntheses of 8 and 9 is a cobalt-catalyzed [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction that affords the 1,3-disilaindane and 2-oxa-1,3-disilaindane skeletons. Disila-bexarotene and its analogues 8 and 9 were studied for their biological effects relative to all-trans retinoic acid in cultured human pluripotent stem cells. The parent carbon compound bexarotene was included in some of these biological studies. Although the silicon-containing bexarotene analogues disila-bexarotene, 8, and 9 appear not to regulate the differentiation of TERA2.cl.SP12 stem cells, preliminary evidence indicates that these compounds may possess enhanced functions over the parent compound bexarotene, such as induction and regulation of cell death and cell numbers. The biological data obtained indicate that bexarotene, contrary to the silicon-containing analogues disila-bexarotene, 8, and 9, may partially act to induce cell differentiation. PMID:21726055

  1. Facile Synthesis of Natural Alkoxynaphthalene Analogues from Plant Alkoxybenzenes.

    PubMed

    Tsyganov, Dmitry V; Krayushkin, Mikhail M; Konyushkin, Leonid D; Strelenko, Yuri A; Semenova, Marina N; Semenov, Victor V

    2016-04-22

    Analogues of the bioactive natural alkoxynaphthalene pycnanthulignene D were synthesized by an efficient method. The starting plant allylalkoxybenzenes (1) are easily available from the plant essential oils of sassafras, dill, and parsley. The target 1-arylalkoxynaphthalenes (5) exhibited antiproliferative activity in a phenotypic sea urchin embryo assay. PMID:26910798

  2. Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Hilde L.; Ljungkvist, Anna S.; Rijken, Paul F.; Sprong, Debbie; Bussink, Jan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Haustermans, Karin M.; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Methods and Materials: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. Results: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. Conclusions: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation.

  3. Synthesis, reactivity and biological activity of 5-alkoxymethyluracil analogues

    PubMed Central

    Brulikova, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    Summary This review article summarizes the results of a long-term investigation of 5-alkoxymethyluracil analogues and is aimed, in particular, at methods of syntheses. Most of the presented compounds were synthesized in order to evaluate their biological activity, therefore, a brief survey of biological activity, especially antiviral, cytotoxic and antibacterial, is also reported. PMID:21804865

  4. A Macroscopic Analogue of the Nuclear Pairing Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    A macroscopic system involving permanent magnets is used as an analogue to nucleons in a nucleus to illustrate the significance of the pairing interaction. This illustrates that the view of the total nuclear energy based only on the nucleon occupancy of the energy levels can yield erroneous results and it is only when the pairing interaction is…

  5. Charged Analogues of Henning Knutsen Type Solutions in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. K.; Kumar, Sachin; Pratibha

    2011-11-01

    In the present article, we have found charged analogues of Henning Knutsen's interior solutions which join smoothly to the Reissner-Nordstrom metric at the pressure free interface. The solutions are singularity free and analyzed numerically with respect to pressure, energy-density and charge-density in details. The solutions so obtained also present the generalization of A.L. Mehra's solutions.

  6. Synthesis of 4” manipulated Lewis X trisaccharide analogues

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Three analogues of the Lex trisaccharide antigen (β-D-Galp(1→4)[α-L-Fucp(1→3)]-D-GlcNAcp) in which the galactosyl residue is modified at O-4 as a methyloxy, deoxychloro or deoxyfluoro, were synthesized. We first report the preparation of the modified 4-OMe, 4-Cl and 4-F trichloroacetimidate galactosyl donors and then report their use in the glycosylation of an N-acetylglucosamine glycosyl acceptor. Thus, we observed that the reactivity of these donors towards the BF3·OEt2-promoted glycosylation at O-4 of the N-acetylglucosamine glycosyl acceptors followed the ranking 4-F > 4-OAc ≈ 4-OMe > 4-Cl. The resulting disaccharides were deprotected at O-3 of the glucosamine residue and fucosylated, giving access to the desired protected Lex analogues. One-step global deprotection (Na/NH3) of the protected 4”-methoxy analogue, and two-step deprotections (removal of a p-methoxybenzyl with DDQ, then Zemplén deacylation) of the 4”-deoxychloro and 4”-deoxyfluoro protected Lex analogues gave the desired compounds in good yields. PMID:23019441

  7. ON A p-ADIC ANALOGUE OF TATE HEIGHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzin'sh, A. A.

    1983-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the Tate height of an elliptic curve and its p-adic analogue. The main result is a series of explicit formulas for computing the local archimedean part of the Tate height. These results are used to obtain a new method for constructing the p-adic Tate height. Bibliography: 5 titles.

  8. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production

    PubMed Central

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-d-galactopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. “Greener” alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis. PMID:26084050

  9. A new analogue of fatty alcohol from Tamarix hampeana L.

    PubMed

    Aykac, Ahmet; Akgül, Yurdanur

    2010-01-01

    New analogues of a long-chain secondary alcohol (1) and laserine (2) were isolated from the flowers of Tamarix hampeana L. The isolated compounds were identified using 1D and 2D NMR, LCMS/APCI, and chemical methods. Laserine was isolated for the first time from T. hampeana L. PMID:20013470

  10. Cellular Cations Control Conformational Switching of Inositol Pyrophosphate Analogues.

    PubMed

    Hager, Anastasia; Wu, Mingxuan; Wang, Huanchen; Brown, Nathaniel W; Shears, Stephen B; Veiga, Nicolás; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2016-08-22

    The inositol pyrophosphate messengers (PP-InsPs) are emerging as an important class of cellular regulators. These molecules have been linked to numerous biological processes, including insulin secretion and cancer cell migration, but how they trigger such a wide range of cellular responses has remained unanswered in many cases. Here, we show that the PP-InsPs exhibit complex speciation behaviour and propose that a unique conformational switching mechanism could contribute to their multifunctional effects. We synthesised non-hydrolysable bisphosphonate analogues and crystallised the analogues in complex with mammalian PPIP5K2 kinase. Subsequently, the bisphosphonate analogues were used to investigate the protonation sequence, metal-coordination properties, and conformation in solution. Remarkably, the presence of potassium and magnesium ions enabled the analogues to adopt two different conformations near physiological pH. Understanding how the intrinsic chemical properties of the PP-InsPs can contribute to their complex signalling outputs will be essential to elucidate their regulatory functions. PMID:27460418

  11. Synthesis of monophytanyl ether analogues of lysophosphatidic and lysophosphatidyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kates, M; Hancock, A J

    1976-10-01

    The chemical synthesis of 3-O-phytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phosphoric acid (monophytanyl ether analogue of lysophosphatidic acid) was effected by condensation of 1-iodo-2-O-benzyl-3-O-phytanyl-sn-glycerol with silver di-p-nitrobenzyl phosphate in anhydrous toluene followed by catalytic hydrogenolysis of the resulting phosphotriester to remove the benzyl and p-nitrobenzyl groups. Synthesis of 3-O-phytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phosphoryl-1'-sn-glycerol (monophytanyl ether analogue of lysophosphatidyl glycerol) was carried out by conversion of the above phosphotriester to the monosilver salt of the suitably blocked lysophosphatidic acid which was condensed with 1-iodo-2-O-t-butyl-3-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol. Removal of the protecting aromatic and t-butyl groups from the resulting blocked triester intermediate gave the desired phytanyl ether analogue of lysophosphatidyl glycerol. Both lyso analogues were isolated as analytically and chromatographically pure potassium salts. Their physical properties and behavior towards acid hydrolysis are described. PMID:991376

  12. New phosphorus analogues of nitrogen classics--no carbon copies.

    PubMed

    Gudat, Dietrich

    2014-05-01

    Getting heavy: The recently prepared phosphorus analogues of two old acquaintances, urea and dinitrogen tetroxide, bear some structural resemblance to their archetypes but are no carbon copies. Their syntheses and chemical properties reveal rather certain peculiarities, which back the doctrine that the electronic properties of the heavier elements in a group differ from those of the lightest congener. PMID:24718995

  13. Synthesis of glycophostones: cyclic phosphonate analogues of biologically relevant sugars

    PubMed

    Hanessian; Rogel

    2000-05-01

    Analogues of L-fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-mannosamine, and N-acetyl neuraminic acid in which the anomeric carbon atom was replaced by a phosphonyl group (phostones or cyclic phosphonates) were synthesized by stereocontrolled methods relying on the Abramov reaction. PMID:10808439

  14. An Analysis of an Autoclitic Analogue in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuroda, Toshikazu; Lattal, Kennon A.; García-Penagos, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Using a conditional discrimination procedure, pigeons were exposed to a nonverbal analogue of qualifying autoclitics such as "definitely" and "maybe." It has been suggested that these autoclitics are similar to tacts except that they are under the control of private discriminative stimuli. Instead of the conventional assumption…

  15. q-bosons and the q-analogue quantized field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    The q-analogue coherent states are used to identify physical signatures for the presence of a 1-analogue quantized radiation field in the q-CS classical limits where the absolute value of z is large. In this quantum-optics-like limit, the fractional uncertainties of most physical quantities (momentum, position, amplitude, phase) which characterize the quantum field are O(1). They only vanish as O(1/absolute value of z) when q = 1. However, for the number operator, N, and the N-Hamiltonian for a free q-boson gas, H(sub N) = h(omega)(N + 1/2), the fractional uncertainties do still approach zero. A signature for q-boson counting statistics is that (Delta N)(exp 2)/ (N) approaches 0 as the absolute value of z approaches infinity. Except for its O(1) fractional uncertainty, the q-generalization of the Hermitian phase operator of Pegg and Barnett, phi(sub q), still exhibits normal classical behavior. The standard number-phase uncertainty-relation, Delta(N) Delta phi(sub q) = 1/2, and the approximate commutation relation, (N, phi(sub q)) = i, still hold for the single-mode q-analogue quantized field. So, N and phi(sub q) are almost canonically conjugate operators in the q-CS classical limit. The q-analogue CS's minimize this uncertainty relation for moderate (absolute value of z)(exp 2).

  16. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production.

    PubMed

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose (α-D-glucopyranosyl α-D-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-D-glucopyranosyl α-D-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-D-galactopyranosyl α-D-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. "Greener" alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis. PMID:26084050

  17. Forgetting ACT UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    When ACT UP is remembered as the pinnacle of postmodern activism, other forms and forums of activism that were taking place during that time--practices that were linked, related, just modern, in dialogue or even opposition to ACT UP's "confrontational activism"--are forgotten. In its time, ACT UP was embedded in New York City, and a larger world,…

  18. Non-robust numerical simulations of analogue extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerical and analogue models of lithospheric deformation provide significant insight into the tectonic processes that lead to specific structural and geophysical observations. As these two types of models contain distinct assumptions and tradeoffs, investigations drawing conclusions from both can reveal robust links between first-order processes and observations. Recent studies have focused on detailed comparisons between numerical and analogue experiments in both compressional and extensional tectonics, sometimes involving multiple lithospheric deformation codes and analogue setups. While such comparisons often show good agreement on first-order deformation styles, results frequently diverge on second-order structures, such as shear zone dip angles or spacing, and in certain cases even on first-order structures. Here, we present finite-element experiments that are designed to directly reproduce analogue "sandbox" extension experiments at the cm-scale. We use material properties and boundary conditions that are directly taken from analogue experiments and use a Drucker-Prager failure model to simulate shear zone formation in sand. We find that our numerical experiments are highly sensitive to numerous numerical parameters. For example, changes to the numerical resolution, velocity convergence parameters and elemental viscosity averaging commonly produce significant changes in first- and second-order structures accommodating deformation. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations to small parameter changes likely reflects a number of factors, including, but not limited to, high angles of internal friction assigned to sand, complex, unknown interactions between the brittle sand (used as an upper crust equivalent) and viscous silicone (lower crust), highly non-linear strain weakening processes and poor constraints on the cohesion of sand. Our numerical-analogue comparison is hampered by (a) an incomplete knowledge of the fine details of sand failure and sand

  19. Metric optimisation for analogue forecasting by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliefernicht, J.; Bárdossy, A.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that weather patterns tend to recur from time to time. This property of the atmosphere is used by analogue forecasting techniques. They have a long history in weather forecasting and there are many applications predicting hydrological variables at the local scale for different lead times. The basic idea of the technique is to identify past weather situations which are similar (analogue) to the predicted one and to take the local conditions of the analogues as forecast. But the forecast performance of the analogue method depends on user-defined criteria like the choice of the distance function and the size of the predictor domain. In this study we propose a new methodology of optimising both criteria by minimising the forecast error with simulated annealing. The performance of the methodology is demonstrated for the probability forecast of daily areal precipitation. It is compared with a traditional analogue forecasting algorithm, which is used operational as an element of a hydrological forecasting system. The study is performed for several meso-scale catchments located in the Rhine basin in Germany. The methodology is validated by a jack-knife method in a perfect prognosis framework for a period of 48 years (1958-2005). The predictor variables are derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set. The Brier skill score and the economic value are determined to evaluate the forecast skill and value of the technique. In this presentation we will present the concept of the optimisation algorithm and the outcome of the comparison. It will be also demonstrated how a decision maker should apply a probability forecast to maximise the economic benefit from it.

  20. Biological evaluation of a novel sorafenib analogue, t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Wecksler, Aaron T; Hwang, Sung Hee; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wettersten, Hiromi I; Morisseau, Christophe; Wu, Jian; Weiss, Robert H; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar®) is currently the only FDA-approved small molecule targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The use of structural analogues and derivatives of sorafenib has enabled the elucidation of critical targets and mechanism(s) of cell death for human cancer lines. We previously performed a structure-activity relationship study on a series of sorafenib analogues designed to investigate the inhibition overlap between the major targets of sorafenib Raf-1 kinase and VEGFR-2, and an enzyme shown to be a potent off-target of sorafenib, soluble epoxide hydrolase. In the current work, we present the biological data on our lead sorafenib analogue, t-CUPM, demonstrating that this analogue retains cytotoxicity similar to sorafenib in various human cancer cell lines and strongly inhibits growth in the NCI-60 cell line panel. Co-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, failed to rescue the cell viability responses of both sorafenib and t-CUPM, and immunofluorescence microscopy shows similar mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis-inducing factor release for both compounds. These data suggest that both compounds induce a similar mechanism of caspase-independent apoptosis in hepatoma cells. In addition, t-CUPM displays anti-proliferative effects comparable to sorafenib as seen by a halt in G0/G1 in cell cycle progression. The structural difference between sorafenib and t-CUPM significantly reduces inhibitory spectrum of kinases by this analogue, and pharmacokinetic characterization demonstrates a 20-fold better oral bioavailability of t-CUPM than sorafenib in mice. Thus, t-CUPM may have the potential to reduce the adverse events observed from the multikinase inhibitory properties and the large dosing regimens of sorafenib. PMID:25413440