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Sample records for actinic flux measurements

  1. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  2. Actinic flux measurements and photolysis frequencies enhancements near clouds during DC3 and TORERO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Schmidt, S.; Kindel, B. C.; Hair, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Spectrally resolved up and down-welling actinic flux was measured from aircraft during the Deep Convective Clouds & Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and Tropical Ocean Troposphere Exchange of reactive halogen species and oxygenated VOC (TORERO) field campaigns. The measurements were made on the NASA DC-8 and NSF/NCAR G-V aircraft with the Charged coupled device Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer (CAFS)and the HIAPER Airborne Radiation Package (HARP), respectively. Improvements in this instrumentation and the data analysis provide for fast, accurate measurements from the aircraft. Photolysis frequencies calculated from the actinic flux show significant enhancements above clouds. The upwelling signal is enhanced by the high reflectivity of the cloud below. The downwelling is also enhanced due to backscatter of reflected light from the cloud top. Under specific conditions, including high sun and highly reflective clouds, upwelling actinic radiation may exceed the downwelling even with clear skies above. These conditions may have occurred during TORERO and DC3 resulting in regions of highly active photochemistry.

  3. Aerosol, surface, and cloud optical parameters derived from airborne spectral actinic flux: measurement comparison with other methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Bierwirth, E.; Schmidt, S.; Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Lack, D. A.; Madronich, S.; Parrish, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Optical parameters of aerosols, surfaces, and clouds are essential for an accurate description of Earth’s radiative balance. We will present values for such parameters derived from spectral actinic flux measured on board the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) study in April 2008. We will compare these measurements to results obtained from other instruments on board the same aircraft, such as the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) for irradiance measurements and aerosol extinction and absorption measurements by cavity ring-down and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Actinic flux is sensitive to these parameters and can be used to measure them directly in the atmosphere without in-situ sampling methods required. We will describe the specifics of the actinic flux measurements, show advantages and disadvantages of this measurement technique, and compare results with other techniques. Furthermore, we will compare our measurements with model calculations from radiative transfer models such as the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiation model, the widely used library of radiative transfer (libradtran) model, and a Monte-Carlo radiation model (GRIMALDI). Also, we will investigate satellite measurements to constrain the radiation measurements to general radiation conditions in the arctic and to compare the results to aerosol optical depth retrievals. In particular, we will show results for surface albedo of the Arctic Ocean ice surface, extinction and absorption of Arctic haze layers, and optical thickness and albedo measurements of clouds.

  4. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2012-08-01

    Urban air pollution absorbs and scatters solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus has a potentially large effect on tropospheric photochemical rates. We present the first detailed comparison between UV actinic fluxes (AF) measured in highly polluted conditions and simulated with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measured AF values are typically smaller than the model by up to 25% in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, for pollution-free and cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 67% and NO2 for 25% of AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the AF perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols enhance AF above the PBL and reduce AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA < 0.6) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the AF.

  5. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2013-01-01

    Urban air pollution absorbs and scatters solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus has a potentially large effect on tropospheric photochemical rates. We present the first detailed comparison between actinic fluxes (AF) in the wavelength range 330-420 nm measured in highly polluted conditions and simulated with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measured AF values are typically smaller than the model by up to 25% in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, for pollution-free and cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68% and NO2 for 25% of AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the AF perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols enhance AF above the PBL and reduce AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA < 0.6) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the AF.

  6. Investigation of spectrally resolved actinic flux in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. E.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, J. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Rieder, H. E.; Simic, S.; Webb, A.; Weihs, P.

    2009-09-01

    Since the discovery of anthropogenic ozone depletion more than 30 year ago, the scientific community has shown an increasing interest in UV radiation. However for photochemical reactions and various biological processes actinic flux is more important. Therefore, three measurement campaigns had been conducted in alpine areas of Austria (Innsbruck and Hoher Sonnblick). The goal was to investigate the impact of alpine terrain in combination with snow cover on spectral actinic flux under clear sky conditions. This contribution uses the ground-based UV actinic flux measurements to evaluate two different calculation methods. The modified (with topography) 3-D radiative transfer model GRIMALDI was used to calculate the distribution of actinic flux at the ground for selected clear sky situations. To estimate the impact of 3-D effects on actinic flux, the measurement results are also compared with the output of 1-D-model (SDISORT) runs. Apart from border problems due to periodic boundary conditions the spatial distribution of actinic flux is well reproduced by the 3-D-model. Shadowing effects and increasing actinic flux with altitude are realistically reproduced in the calculated 3-D-radiation field.

  7. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2013-01-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic fluxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Finally, additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  8. Actinic Flux Calculations: A Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Flittner, D.; Ahmad, Z.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    calculate direct and diffuse surface irradiance and actinic flux (downwelling (2p) and total (4p)) for the reference model. Sensitivity analysis has shown that the accuracy of the radiative transfer flux calculations for a unit ETS (i.e. atmospheric transmittance) together with a numerical interpolation technique for the constituents' vertical profiles is better than 1% for SZA less than 70(sub o) and wavelengths longer than 310 nm. The differences increase for shorter wavelengths and larger SZA, due to the differences in pseudo-spherical correction techniques and vertical discretetization among the codes. Our sensitivity study includes variation of ozone cross-sections, ETS spectra and the effects of wavelength shifts between vacuum and air scales. We also investigate the effects of aerosols on the spectral flux components in the UV and visible spectral regions. The "aerosol correction factors" (ACFs) were calculated at discrete wavelengths and different SZAs for each flux component (direct, diffuse, reflected) and prescribed IPMMI aerosol parameters. Finally, the sensitivity study was extended to calculation of selected photolysis rates coefficients.

  9. Investigation of the 3-D actinic flux field in mountainous terrain

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J.E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G.P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Rieder, H.E.; Simic, S.; Webb, A.; Weihs, P.

    2011-01-01

    During three field campaigns spectral actinic flux was measured from 290–500 nm under clear sky conditions in Alpine terrain and the associated O3- and NO2-photolysis frequencies were calculated and the measurement products were then compared with 1-D- and 3-D-model calculations. To do this 3-D-radiative transfer model was adapted for actinic flux calculations in mountainous terrain and the maps of the actinic flux field at the surface, calculated with the 3-D-radiative transfer model, are given. The differences between the 3-D- and 1-D-model results for selected days during the campaigns are shown, together with the ratios of the modeled actinic flux values to the measurements. In many cases the 1-D-model overestimates actinic flux by more than the measurement uncertainty of 10%. The results of using a 3-D-model generally show significantly lower values, and can underestimate the actinic flux by up to 30%. This case study attempts to quantify the impact of snow cover in combination with topography on spectral actinic flux. The impact of snow cover on the actinic flux was ~ 25% in narrow snow covered valleys, but for snow free areas there were no significant changes due snow cover in the surrounding area and it is found that the effect snow-cover at distances over 5 km from the point of interest was below 5%. Overall the 3-D-model can calculate actinic flux to the same accuracy as the 1-D-model for single points, but gives a much more realistic view of the surface actinic flux field in mountains as topography and obstruction of the horizon are taken into account. PMID:26412915

  10. Improved modeling of cloudy-sky actinic flux using satellite cloud retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Young-Hee; Hodzic, Alma; Descombes, Gael; Hall, Samuel; Minnis, Patrick; Spangenberg, Douglas; Ullmann, Kirk; Madronich, Sasha

    2017-02-01

    Clouds play a critical role in modulating tropospheric radiation and thus photochemistry. We develop a methodology for calculating the vertical distribution of tropospheric ultraviolet (300-420 nm) actinic fluxes using satellite cloud retrievals and a radiative transfer model. We demonstrate that our approach can accurately reproduce airborne-measured actinic fluxes from the 2013 Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign as a case study. The results show that the actinic flux is reduced below moderately thick clouds with increasing cloud optical depth and can be enhanced by a factor of 2 above clouds. Inside clouds, the actinic flux can be enhanced by up to 2.4 times in the upper part of clouds or reduced up to 10 times in the lower parts of clouds. Our study suggests that the use of satellite-derived actinic fluxes as input to chemistry-transport models can improve the accuracy of photochemistry calculations.

  11. Pulse flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Riggan, William C.

    1985-01-01

    A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of actin-phalloidin interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, Michael K.; French, Todd E.

    2000-03-01

    Compounds that interact with the cytoskeleton affect mobility and division, making them useful for treatment of certain types of cancer. Actin binding drugs such as the phallotoxins (small, bicyclic peptides) bind to and stabilize actin polymers (F-actin) without binding to actin monomers (G-actin). It has been shown that the intensity of fluorescently labeled phallotoxins such as fluorescein- phalloidin and rhodamine-phalloidin increases upon bind F- actin. We used LJL BioSystems' new FLAReTM technology to measure excited state lifetime changes of fluorescein- phalloidin and rhodamine-phalloidin upon binding to F- actin.

  13. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  14. Intercomparison between actinic flux measurements during ICARTT 2004 on board the NOAA W-P3 and R.H. Brown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Lerner, B. M.; Jakoubek, R.; Sommariva, R.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2005-12-01

    Tropospheric chemistry depends critically on photochemistry. Therefore, accurate measurement of all important photolysis rates are required to improve our understanding. We deployed two sets of instruments to measure photolysis rates during ICARTT 2004. On the NOAA aircraft W-P3, we measured photolysis rates using two spectroradiometers consisting of one single- and one dual-grating spectrometer and radiometer heads specifically designed to be independent of the incident light angle. On the NOAA research vessel R.H. Brown, we used filter radiometers that were specifically designed to measure individual photolysis rates of O3, NO2, and NO3 photolysis. We calibrated these filter radiometers before and after the campaign using the spectroradiometers described above. During the campaign, the aircraft and the ship were close enough together on 5 occasions to allow field-intercomparison. When the cloud conditions were comparable for the ship and the aircraft, the photolysis rates compared well. In other situations, the influence of clouds and aerosols were clearly noticeable in different photolysis rates. It is also desirable to retrieve other photolysis rates from the ship than those measured directly by the filter radiometers. Since the filter radiometers measure wavelength bands from the UV to the visible, simple mathematical combinations can be used to derive other photolysis rates than those directly measured. We will show results for HCO production from formaldehyde photolysis, and discuss the improvements that can be made on the accurate determination of this important photolysis rate. The method used to derive formaldehyde photolysis rates will also be employed for other molecules.

  15. Mast cell desensitization inhibits calcium flux and aberrantly remodels actin

    PubMed Central

    Ang, W.X. Gladys; Church, Alison M.; Kulis, Mike; Choi, Hae Woong; Burks, A. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Rush desensitization (DS) is a widely used and effective clinical strategy for the rapid inhibition of IgE-mediated anaphylactic responses. However, the cellular targets and underlying mechanisms behind this process remain unclear. Recent studies have implicated mast cells (MCs) as the primary target cells for DS. Here, we developed a murine model of passive anaphylaxis with demonstrated MC involvement and an in vitro assay to evaluate the effect of DS on MCs. In contrast with previous reports, we determined that functional IgE remains on the cell surface of desensitized MCs following DS. Despite notable reductions in MC degranulation following DS, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI was still capable of transducing signals in desensitized MCs. Additionally, we found that displacement of the actin cytoskeleton and its continued association with FcεRI impede the capacity of desensitized MCs to evoke the calcium response that is essential for MC degranulation. Together, these findings suggest that reduced degranulation responses in desensitized MCs arise from aberrant actin remodeling, providing insights that may lead to improvement of DS treatments for anaphylactic responses. PMID:27669462

  16. Quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (QFSM) to Measure Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Michelle C.; Besson, Sebastien; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (QFSM) is a live cell imaging method to analyze the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its greatest successes were in the analysis of actin filament and adhesion dynamics in the context of cell migration and microtubule dynamics in interphase and the meotic/mitotic spindle. Here, we focus on the former application to illustrate the procedures of FSM imaging and the computational image processing that extracts quantitative information from these experiments. QFSM is advantageous over other methods because it measures the movement and turnover kinetics of the actin filament (F-actin) network in living cells across the entire field of view. Experiments begin with microinjection of fluorophore-labeled actin into cells, which generate a low ratio of fluorescently-labeled:endogenous unlabeled actin monomers. Spinning disk confocal or wide-field imaging then visualizes fluorophore clusters (2–8 actin monomers) within the assembled F-actin network as speckles. QFSM software identifies and computationally tracks and utilizes the location, appearance, and disappearance of speckles to derive network flows and maps of the rate of filament assembly and disassembly. PMID:23042526

  17. Fast two-stream method for computing diurnal-mean actinic flux in vertically inhomogeneous atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filyushkin, V. V.; Madronich, S.; Brasseur, G. P.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    1994-01-01

    Based on a derivation of the two-stream daytime-mean equations of radiative flux transfer, a method for computing the daytime-mean actinic fluxes in the absorbing and scattering vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is suggested. The method applies direct daytime integration of the particular solutions of the two-stream approximations or the source functions. It is valid for any duration of period of averaging. The merit of the method is that the multiple scattering computation is carried out only once for the whole averaging period. It can be implemented with a number of widely used two-stream approximations. The method agrees with the results obtained with 200-point multiple scattering calculations. The method was also tested in runs with a 1-km cloud layer with optical depth of 10, as well as with aerosol background. Comparison of the results obtained for a cloud subdivided into 20 layers with those obtained for a one-layer cloud with the same optical parameters showed that direct integration of particular solutions possesses an 'analytical' accuracy. In the case of the source function interpolation, the actinic fluxes calculated above the one-layer and 20-layer clouds agreed within 1%-1.5%, while below the cloud they may differ up to 5% (in the worst case). The ways of enhancing the accuracy (in a 'two-stream sense') and computational efficiency of the method are discussed.

  18. Aluminum modifies the viscosity of filamentous actin solutions as measured by optical displacement microviscometry.

    PubMed

    Arnoys, E J; Schindler, M

    2000-01-01

    A microtechnique has been developed that is capable of measuring the viscosity of filamentous actin (F-actin) solutions. This method, called optical displacement microviscometry (ODM), was utilized to determine the changes in viscosity of solutions of rabbit muscle, human platelet, and maize pollen actin when measured in the absence and presence of aluminum. Measurements demonstrated that the viscosity of the different actin solutions decreased with aluminum concentration. In contrast, increases in viscosity were observed when aluminum was added to F-actin solutions containing filamin (chicken gizzard), a protein that bundles actin filaments. Confocal fluorescence imaging of pure actin solutions in the presence of aluminum showed a disrupted actin network composed of fragmented actin filaments in the form of small aggregates. In contrast, in the presence of filamin, aluminum promoted the formation of thicker actin filaments. These measurements demonstrate that aluminum can affect actin filaments differentially depending on the presence of an actin-binding protein. In addition, a strong correlation is observed between the changes in viscosity as measured by ODM and the thickness and assembled state of bundles of actin filaments.

  19. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Impink, Jr., Albert J.; Goldstein, Norman P.

    1990-01-01

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  20. The influence of snow grain size and impurities on the vertical profiles of actinic flux and associated NOx emissions on the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, M. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Alexander, B.; Doherty, S. J.; Thomas, J. L.; Yang, X.

    2013-04-01

    We use observations of the absorption properties of black carbon and non-black carbon impurities in near-surface snow collected near the research stations at South Pole and Dome C, Antarctica, and Summit, Greenland, combined with a snowpack actinic flux parameterization to estimate the vertical profile and e-folding depth of ultraviolet/near-visible (UV/near-vis) actinic flux in the snowpack at each location. We have developed a simple and broadly applicable parameterization to calculate depth and wavelength dependent snowpack actinic flux that can be easily integrated into large-scale (e.g., 3-D) models of the atmosphere. The calculated e-folding depths of actinic flux at 305 nm, the peak wavelength of nitrate photolysis in the snowpack, are 8-12 cm near the stations and 15-31 cm away (>11 km) from the stations. We find that the e-folding depth is strongly dependent on impurity content and wavelength in the UV/near-vis region, which explains the relatively shallow e-folding depths near stations where local activities lead to higher snow impurity levels. We calculate the lifetime of NOx in the snowpack interstitial air produced by photolysis of snowpack nitrate against wind pumping (τwind pumping) from the snowpack, and compare this to the calculated lifetime of NOx against chemical conversion to HNO3 (τchemical) to determine whether the NOx produced at a given depth can escape from the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Comparison of τwind pumping and τchemical suggests efficient escape of photoproduced NOx in the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere throughout most of the photochemically active zone. Calculated vertical actinic flux profiles and observed snowpack nitrate concentrations are used to estimate the potential flux of NOx from the snowpack. Calculated NOx fluxes of 4.4 × 108-3.8 × 109 molecules cm-2 s-1 in remote polar locations and 3.2-8.2 × 108 molecules cm-2 s-1 near polar stations for January at Dome C and South Pole and June at Summit

  1. The influence of snow grain size and impurities on the vertical profiles of actinic flux and associated NOx emissions on the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, M. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Alexander, B.; Doherty, S. J.; Thomas, J. L.; Yang, X.

    2012-06-01

    We use observations of the absorption properties of black carbon and non-black-carbon impurities in near-surface snow collected near the research stations at South Pole and Dome C, Antarctica and Summit, Greenland combined with a snowpack actinic flux parameterization to estimate the vertical profile and e-folding depth of ultraviolet/near-visible (UV/near-vis) actinic flux in the snowpack at each location. We have developed a simple and broadly applicable parameterization to calculate depth and wavelength dependent snowpack actinic flux that can be easily integrated into large scale (e.g. 3-D) models of the atmosphere. The calculated e-folding depths of actinic flux at 305 nm, the peak wavelength of nitrate photolysis in the snowpack, are 8-12 cm near the stations and 15-31 cm away (>11 km) from the stations. We find that the e-folding depth is strongly dependent on impurity content and wavelength in the UV/near-vis region, which explains the relatively shallow e-folding depths near stations where local activities lead to higher impurity levels. We calculate the lifetime of NOx in the snowpack interstitial air produced by photolysis of snowpack nitrate against escape (τescape) from the snowpack via diffusion and windpumping and compare this to the calculated lifetime of NOx against chemical conversion to HNO3 (τchemical) to determine whether the NOx produced at a given depth can escape from the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Comparison of τescape and τchemical suggests efficient escape of photoproduced NOx in the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Calculated vertical actinic flux profiles and observed snowpack nitrate concentrations are used to determine the flux of NOx from the snowpack. Calculated NOx fluxes of 4.4 × 108-2.8 × 109 molecules cm-2 s7-1 in remote polar locations and 3.2-8.2 × 108 molecules cm-2 s-1 near polar stations for January at Dome C and South Pole and June at Summit suggest that NOx flux measurements near stations are likely

  2. Instrumentation for Surface Flux Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-10

    National Park , she used the sonic and a Li-Cor C02-H20 analyzer at a height of 3 m to measure the vertical turbulent flux of C02 downwind of...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U. S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 3. REPORT TYPE...and subgrid-scale array measurements In summer 2000 we lent 7 of the CSAT3 sonics to the National Center for Atmo- spheric Research (NCAR) for use in

  3. The influence of the spatial resolution of topographic input data on the accuracy of 3-D UV actinic flux and irradiance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Schreier, S. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Simic, S.; Webb, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of a digital elevation map (DEM) on the three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer performance for both spectral ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and actinic flux at 305 nm. Model simulations were performed for clear sky conditions for three case studies: the first and second one using three sites in the Innsbruck area and the third one using three sites at the Sonnblick Observatory and surrounding area. It was found that DEM resolution may change the altitude at some locations by up to 500 m, resulting in changes in the sky obscured by the horizon of up to 15%. The geographical distribution of UV irradiance and actinic flux shows that with larger pixel size, uncertainties in UV irradiance and actinic flux determination of up to 100% are possible. These large changes in incident irradiance and actinic flux with changing pixel size are strongly connected to shading effects. The effect of DEM pixel size on irradiance and actinic flux was studied at the six locations, and it was found that significant increases in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM pixel size occurred at one valley location at high solar zenith angles in the Innsbruck area as well as for one steep valley location in the Sonnblick area. This increase in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM resolution is most likely to be connected to shading effects affecting the reflections from the surroundings.

  4. The influence of the spatial resolution of topographic input data on the accuracy of 3-D UV actinic flux and irradiance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Schreier, S. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Simic, S.; Webb, A. R.

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of a digital elevation map (DEM) on the three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer performance for both spectral ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and actinic flux at 305 nm. Model simulations were performed for clear sky conditions for three case studies: the first and second one using three sites in the Innsbruck area and the third one using three sites at the Sonnblick observatory and surrounding area. It was found that the DEM resolution may change the altitude at some locations by up to 500 m, resulting in changes in the sky obscured by the horizon of up to 15%. The geographical distribution of UV irradiance and actinic flux shows that with larger pixel size, uncertainties in UV irradiance and actinic flux determination of up to 100% are possible. These large changes in incident irradiance and actinic flux with changing pixel size are strongly connected to shading effects. The effect of the DEM pixel size on irradiance and actinic flux was studied at the six locations, and it was found that significant increases in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM pixel size occurred at one valley location at high solar zenith angles in the Innsbruck area as well as for one steep valley location in the Sonnblick area. This increase in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM resolution is most likely to be connected to shading effects affecting the reflections from the surroundings.

  5. Cosmic Ray Neutron Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayananda, Mathes

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energetic particles originating from outer space that bombard the upper atmosphere of the Earth. Almost 90% of cosmic ray particles consist of protons, electrons and heavy ions. When these particles hit the Earth's atmosphere, cascade of secondary particles are formed. The most abundant particles reach to the surface of the Earth are muons, electrons and neutrons. In recent years many research groups are looking into potential applications of the effects of cosmic ray radiation at the surface of the Earth [1, 2]. At Georgia State University we are working on a long-term measurement of cosmic ray flux distribution. This study includes the simultaneous measurement of cosmic ray muons, neutrons and gamma particles at the Earth surface in downtown Atlanta. The initial effort is focusing on the correlation studies of the cosmic ray particle flux distribution and the atmospheric weather conditions. In this presentation, I will talk about the development of a cosmic ray detector using liquid scintillator and the preliminary results. [4pt] [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, ``Radiographic imaging with cosmic-ray muons'', Nature, Vol.422, p.277, Mar.2003[0pt] [2] Svensmark Henrik, Physical Review 81, 3, (1998)

  6. Measuring actin dynamics during phagocytosis using photo-switchable fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovari, Daniel T.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2013-03-01

    Phagocytosis has traditionally been investigated in terms of the relevant biochemical signaling pathways. However, a growing number of studies investigating the physical aspects of phagocytosis have demonstrated that several distinct forces are exerted throughout particle ingestion. We use variations on FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching) in combination with photo-switchable fluorescent protein to investigate actin dynamics as a phagocyte attempts to engulf its prey. The goal of our actin studies are to determine the recruitment and polymerization rate of actin in the forming phagosome and whether an organized contractile actin ring is present and responsible for phagosome closure, as proposed in the literature. These experiments are ongoing and contribute to our long term effort of developing a physics based model of phagocytosis.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  8. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  9. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  10. Force-Velocity Measurements of a Few Growing Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Brangbour, Coraline; du Roure, Olivia; Helfer, Emmanuèle; Démoulin, Damien; Mazurier, Alexis; Fermigier, Marc; Carlier, Marie-France; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point. PMID:21541364

  11. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  12. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  13. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M. V.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  14. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M V; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  15. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  16. A human CXCL13-induced actin polymerization assay measured by fluorescence plate reader.

    PubMed

    Alley, Jennifer; Bloom, Laird; Kasaian, Marion; Gao, Huilan; Berstein, Gabriel; Clark, James D; Miao, Wenyan

    2010-02-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR5 is predominantly expressed on mature B cells and follicular T-helper cells. CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13 participate in ectopic germinal center formation at the inflammatory sites of multiple immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Therefore, disrupting CXCL13-induced chemotaxis may be a fruitful approach for developing therapeutics in treating these diseases. Cells undergo cytoskeletal rearrangement prior to chemotaxis, and therefore actin polymerization can be used as a surrogate readout more proximal to chemokine receptor activation than chemotaxis. Conventionally, actin polymerization is measured by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry, which are either of low throughput or in need of special instruments. We developed a 96-well actin polymerization assay that can process 1,000 to 1,500 samples a day. This assay uses a standard laboratory fluorescence microplate reader as the detection instrument and was optimized for various experimental conditions such as cell density, actin filament staining reagent, staining buffer, and cell culture conditions. We demonstrate that this actin polymerization assay in 96-well format exhibits the expected pharmacology for human CXCR5 and is suitable as a primary functional assay to screen neutralizing scFv in crude bacterial peri-preps and a secondary assay for small compound collections.

  17. Direct measurement of VDAC-actin interaction by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Roman, Inge; Figys, Jurgen; Steurs, Griet; Zizi, Martin

    2006-04-01

    VDAC--a mitochondrial channel involved in the control of aerobic metabolism and apoptosis--interacts in vitro and in vivo with a wide repertoire of proteins including cytoskeletal elements. A functional interaction between actin and Neurospora crassa VDAC was reported, excluding other VDAC isoforms. From a recent genome-wide screen of the VDAC interactome, we found that human actin is a putative ligand of yeast VDAC. Since such interaction may have broader implications for various mitochondrial processes, we probed it with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology using purified yeast VDAC (YVDAC) and rabbit muscle G-actin (RGA). We show that RGA binds to immobilized YVDAC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner with saturating kinetics and an apparent K(D) of 50 microg/ml (1.2 microM actin). BSA does not bind VDAC regardless of the concentrations. Alternatively, VDAC binds similarly to immobilized RGA but without saturating kinetics. VDAC being known to interact with itself, this latter interaction was directly measured to interpret the RGA signals. VDAC could bind to VDAC without saturating kinetics as expected if higher order binding occurred, and could account for maximally 66% of the non-saturating behavior of VDAC binding onto RGA. Hence, actin-VDAC interactions are not a species-specific oddity and may be a more general phenomenon, the role of which ought to be further investigated.

  18. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  19. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  20. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  1. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  2. Instruments for measuring radiant thermal fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashenko, O. A.; Sazhina, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    An absolute two-sided radiometer, designed on the principle of replacing absorbed radiant energy with electrical energy, is described. The sensitive element of the detector is a thermoelectric transducer of thermal flux. The fabrication technology, methods of measurement, technical characteristics, and general operation of the instrument are presented.

  3. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  4. Interactive Database of Pulsar Flux Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, O.; Krzeszowski, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The number of astronomical observations is steadily growing, giving rise to the need of cataloguing the obtained results. There are a lot of databases, created to store different types of data and serve a variety of purposes, e. g. databases providing basic data for astronomical objects (SIMBAD Astronomical Database), databases devoted to one type of astronomical object (ATNF Pulsar Database) or to a set of values of the specific parameter (Lorimer 1995 - database of flux density measurements for 280 pulsars on the frequencies up to 1606 MHz), etc. We found that creating an online database of pulsar flux measurements, provided with facilities for plotting diagrams and histograms, calculating mean values for a chosen set of data, filtering parameter values and adding new measurements by the registered users, could be useful in further studies on pulsar spectra.

  5. Flexural rigidity of microtubules and actin filaments measured from thermal fluctuations in shape

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Microtubules are long, proteinaceous filaments that perform structural functions in eukaryotic cells by defining cellular shape and serving as tracks for intracellular motor proteins. We report the first accurate measurements of the flexural rigidity of microtubules. By analyzing the thermally driven fluctuations in their shape, we estimated the mean flexural rigidity of taxol-stabilized microtubules to be 2.2 x 10(-23) Nm2 (with 6.4% uncertainty) for seven unlabeled microtubules and 2.1 x 10(-23) Nm2 (with 4.7% uncertainty) for eight rhodamine-labeled microtubules. These values are similar to earlier, less precise estimates of microtubule bending stiffness obtained by modeling flagellar motion. A similar analysis on seven rhodamine-phalloidin- labeled actin filaments gave a flexural rigidity of 7.3 x 10(-26) Nm2 (with 6% uncertainty), consistent with previously reported results. The flexural rigidity of these microtubules corresponds to a persistence length of 5,200 microns showing that a microtubule is rigid over cellular dimensions. By contrast, the persistence length of an actin filament is only approximately 17.7 microns, perhaps explaining why actin filaments within cells are usually cross-linked into bundles. The greater flexural rigidity of a microtubule compared to an actin filament mainly derives from the former's larger cross-section. If tubulin were homogeneous and isotropic, then the microtubule's Young's modulus would be approximately 1.2 GPa, similar to Plexiglas and rigid plastics. Microtubules are expected to be almost inextensible: the compliance of cells is due primarily to filament bending or sliding between filaments rather than the stretching of the filaments themselves. PMID:8432732

  6. The Qdot-labeled actin super-resolution motility assay measures low-duty cycle muscle myosin step size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Burghardt, Thomas P

    2013-03-05

    Myosin powers contraction in heart and skeletal muscle and is a leading target for mutations implicated in inheritable muscle diseases. During contraction, myosin transduces ATP free energy into the work of muscle shortening against resisting force. Muscle shortening involves relative sliding of myosin and actin filaments. Skeletal actin filaments were fluorescently labeled with a streptavidin conjugate quantum dot (Qdot) binding biotin-phalloidin on actin. Single Qdots were imaged in time with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and then spatially localized to 1-3 nm using a super-resolution algorithm as they translated with actin over a surface coated with skeletal heavy meromyosin (sHMM) or full-length β-cardiac myosin (MYH7). The average Qdot-actin velocity matches measurements with rhodamine-phalloidin-labeled actin. The sHMM Qdot-actin velocity histogram contains low-velocity events corresponding to actin translation in quantized steps of ~5 nm. The MYH7 velocity histogram has quantized steps at 3 and 8 nm in addition to 5 nm and larger compliance compared to that of sHMM depending on the MYH7 surface concentration. Low-duty cycle skeletal and cardiac myosin present challenges for a single-molecule assay because actomyosin dissociates quickly and the freely moving element diffuses away. The in vitro motility assay has modestly more actomyosin interactions, and methylcellulose inhibited diffusion to sustain the complex while preserving a subset of encounters that do not overlap in time on a single actin filament. A single myosin step is isolated in time and space and then characterized using super-resolution. The approach provides a quick, quantitative, and inexpensive step size measurement for low-duty cycle muscle myosin.

  7. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  8. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  9. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  10. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  11. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  12. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  13. AmeriFlux Measurement Component (AMC) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Reichl, K.; Biraud, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    An AMC system was installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope Alaska (NSA) Barrow site, also known as NSA C1 at the ARM Data Archive, in August 2012. A second AMC system was installed at the third ARM Mobile Facility deployment at Oliktok Point, also known as NSA M1. This in situ system consists of 12 combination soil temperature and volumetric water content (VWC) reflectometers and one set of upwelling and downwelling PAR sensors, all deployed within the fetch of the Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System. Soil temperature and VWC sensors placed at two depths (10 and 30 cm below the vegetation layer) at six locations (or microsites) allow soil property inhomogeneity to be monitored across a landscape. The soil VWC and temperature sensors used at NSA C1 are the Campbell Scientific CS650L and the sensors at NSA M1 use the Campbell Scientific CS655. The two sensors are nearly identical in function, and vendor specifications are based on the CS650 unless otherwise stated.

  14. Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan

    2008-11-07

    We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

  15. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  16. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  17. Visualization and force measurement of branching by Arp2/3 complex and N-WASP in actin filament.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Suetsugu, Shiro; Uemura, Sotaro; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2002-05-24

    To determine whether the Arp2/3 complex activated by N-WASP (VCA) branches actin filaments at the side (side branching), or at the barbed (B-)end (end branching) of the mother filaments, we have directly observed the branching process of actin filaments and examined single-molecule unbinding under optical microscope. We found that side branching was predominant, though not exclusive. At the initial stage of polymerization, the branching at the B-end occurred and subsequently the side branching started to occur. In either type of branching, the mother and daughter filaments elongated at nearly the same rate (growing type). Independently of the stage of polymerization, branching due to the direct coupling of filaments with an acute angle to the mother filaments (a coupling type) occurred. Phalloidin suppressed the growing type of branching but not the coupling type, implying that actin monomers are required for the former but not the latter. We found, by single molecule measurements using optical tweezers, that the Arp2/3 complex attaches to the side of actin filaments and the N-WASP appears to detach from the actin-Arp2/3 complex at 6-7 pN.

  18. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-11-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  19. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  20. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-01-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  1. Bisphenol A affects germination and tube growth in Picea meyeri pollen through modulating Ca2+ flux and disturbing actin-dependent vesicular trafficking during cell wall construction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tongjie; Fan, Chengyu; Man, Yi; Zhou, Junhui; Jing, Yanping

    2015-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a widespread pollutant, is reportedly harmful to humans, animals and plants. However, the effect of BPA on plant pollen tube growth, as well as the mechanism involved, remains unclear. Here, we report that BPA significantly inhibited Picea meyeri pollen germination and tube elongation in a dose-dependent manner. Transmission electron microscopy showed that BPA was detrimental to organelles such as mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. Non-invasive detection revealed that BPA inhibited extracellular Ca(2+) influx and promoted intracellular Ca(2+) efflux at the pollen tube tip, thereby inducing a dissipated Ca(2+) gradient. Fluorescence labeling showed that BPA disorganized actin filaments (AFs), which subsequently led to abnormal vesicle trafficking. Furthermore, BPA reduced the activity of acid phosphatase, a typical exocytosis enzyme. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis and subsequent fluorescence labeling revealed that BPA induced an abnormal deposition of cell wall components, including pectins and callose. Taken together, our results indicate that BPA, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, disturbs Ca(2+) flux in P. meyeri pollen tubes, thus disrupting AF organization, resulting in abnormal actin-dependent vesicle trafficking and further affecting the deposition of cell wall components. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism of BPA toxicity in pollen tube tip growth.

  2. The Measurement of Air-Sea Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-09

    induced by the motion of the wave (in a wave following coordinate system the rotor appears as an eddy in the wave trough). Strictly speaking, this is a...Droplet distribution and dispersion processes on breaking wind waves . jai. e . Tohoku University er. , Geophysics, 21, 1-25. Lai R.J. and O.H. Shemdin ...seaspray, Chapter 10 in Surface Waves and Fluxes: Current Theory ana Remote Sensing, G. Geernaert and W. Plant, Ed., Reidel, Holland. -4- 1 I 3. Fairall

  3. Flux measurements of greenhouse gases: A review and needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Batterman, S. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the theory and application of the major approaches used to measure emissive and depositional fluxes of greenhouse gases. Strengths, weaknesses and applications of the major approaches are discussed. Studies are proposed which would help validate the measurement approaches. A monitoring program and measurement strategy to measure regional and global fluxes is suggested. The major gases related to global warming are carbon dioxide and methane. Other gases, including water vapor, chlorofluorocarbons, nitrous oxide and some hydrocarbons are also radiatively important, as are ambient particulates, including carbon. The net vertical transfer or flux of chemicals from the atmosphere to the biosphere is referred to as deposition, while emission fluxes refer to transfers from surfaces to the atmosphere. The prediction and possible mitigation of climatic changes requires an understanding and quantification of both types of fluxes.

  4. Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Giannone, L; Geiger, B; Bilato, R; Maraschek, M; Odstrčil, T; Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McCarthy, P J; Mertens, V; Schuhbeck, K H

    2016-05-01

    Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements are now available on ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to the majority of diamagnetic flux measurements on other tokamaks, no analog summation of signals is necessary for measuring the change in toroidal flux or for removing contributions arising from unwanted coupling to the plasma and poloidal field coil currents. To achieve the highest possible sensitivity, the diamagnetic measurement and compensation coil integrators are triggered shortly before plasma initiation when the toroidal field coil current is close to its maximum. In this way, the integration time can be chosen to measure only the small changes in flux due to the presence of plasma. Two identical plasma discharges with positive and negative magnetic field have shown that the alignment error with respect to the plasma current is negligible. The measured diamagnetic flux is compared to that predicted by TRANSP simulations. The poloidal beta inferred from the diamagnetic flux measurement is compared to the values calculated from magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes. The diamagnetic flux measurement and TRANSP simulation can be used together to estimate the coupled power in discharges with dominant ion cyclotron resonance heating.

  5. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar); Skin lesion - actinic keratosis ... likely to develop it if you: Have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red ...

  6. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  7. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  8. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  9. Metabolic flux analysis using 13C peptide label measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate cellular metabolism. MFA has established flux maps of central metabolism for dozens of microbes, cell cultures, and plant seeds. Steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtai...

  10. Real-Time Measurements of Actin Filament Polymerization by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Jeffrey R.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of actin polymerization and its regulation by associated proteins requires an assay to monitor polymerization dynamics and filament topology simultaneously. The only assay meeting these criteria is total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (Amann and Pollard, 2001; Fujiwara et al., 2002). The fluorescence signal is fourfold stronger with actin labeled on Cys-374 with Oregon green rather than rhodamine. To distinguish growth at barbed and pointed ends we used image drift correction and maximum intensity projections to reveal points where single N-ethylmaleimide inactivated myosins attach filaments to the glass coverslip. We estimated association rates at high actin concentrations and dissociation rates near and below the critical actin concentration. At the barbed end, the association rate constant for Mg-ATP-actin is 7.4 μM−1 s−1 and the dissociation rate constant is 0.89 s−1. At the pointed end the association and dissociation rate constants are 0.56 μM−1 s−1 and 0.19 s−1. When vitamin D binding protein sequesters all free monomers, ADP-actin dissociates from barbed ends at 1.4 s−1 and from pointed ends at 0.16 s−1 regardless of buffer nucleotide. PMID:15556992

  11. Advances in the Surface Renewal Flux Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapland, T. M.; McElrone, A.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of ecosystem-scale energy and mass fluxes between the planetary surface and the atmosphere is crucial for understanding geophysical processes. Surface renewal is a flux measurement technique based on analyzing the turbulent coherent structures that interact with the surface. It is a less expensive technique because it does not require fast-response velocity measurements, but only a fast-response scalar measurement. It is therefore also a useful tool for the study of the global cycling of trace gases. Currently, surface renewal requires calibration against another flux measurement technique, such as eddy covariance, to account for the linear bias of its measurements. We present two advances in the surface renewal theory and methodology that bring the technique closer to becoming a fully independent flux measurement method. The first advance develops the theory of turbulent coherent structure transport associated with the different scales of coherent structures. A novel method was developed for identifying the scalar change rate within structures at different scales. Our results suggest that for canopies less than one meter in height, the second smallest coherent structure scale dominates the energy and mass flux process. Using the method for resolving the scalar exchange rate of the second smallest coherent structure scale, calibration is unnecessary for surface renewal measurements over short canopies. This study forms the foundation for analysis over more complex surfaces. The second advance is a sensor frequency response correction for measuring the sensible heat flux via surface renewal. Inexpensive fine-wire thermocouples are frequently used to record high frequency temperature data in the surface renewal technique. The sensible heat flux is used in conjunction with net radiation and ground heat flux measurements to determine the latent heat flux as the energy balance residual. The robust thermocouples commonly used in field experiments

  12. Radon fluxes measured with the MANOP bottom lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, W. M.; Buchholtz, M. R.; Hammond, D. E.; Santschi, P. H.

    1987-07-01

    At five Pacific Ocean sites, radon fluxes were determined from water samples collected by the MANOP Lander, from measurements of 222Rn and 226Ra concentrations in Lander-collected box core sediments, and from measurements of excess radon in the water column. At MANOP sites H and M, fluxes (all in atoms m -2 s -1) determined with Lander water samples (2200 and 1540 ± 480) agree within the measurement uncertainty with water column standing crop measurements (2220 ± 450, 2040 ± 470). At MANOP site C, the diffusive flux calculated from measurements of 226Ra in box core sediments (550 ± 20), the integrated deficiency of 222Rn in the sediments (720 ± 90), and the water column standing crop (500 ± 160) are in agreement, but all are about twice as large as the single Lander water measurement of the radon flux (330). At MANOP site S radon fluxes from measurements of Lander water (3000 ± 260) are in agreement with the predicted diffusive flux from site S sediments (2880), and both fluxes are close to the lower end of the range of water column standing crop measurements (3000-5170). In San Clemente Basin, California, the Lander water flux measurements at four different sites vary by a factor of 3 due to variability in the sediment radium distribution, but the average (1030 ± 190) is close to the water column standing crop value (780 ± 230). Because there is excellent agreement between the fluxes measured with Lander water samples and the predicted diffusive fluxes in most cases, diffusion must be the primary process controlling benthic exchange of radon at the sites studied. The agreement between the Lander water flux estimates and the water column standing crop estimates indicates that the MANOP Lander functions as an accurate benthic flux chamber in water depths ranging from 1900 to 4900 m. In San Clemente Basin, surficial sediments are enriched in manganese and radium, due to manganese cycling near the sediment-water interface. Molecular diffusion of radon from

  13. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Westberg, Halvor; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

    2005-10-19

    Direct measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that include all anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to evaluate emission inventories and constrain current photochemical modelling practices. Here we demonstrate the use of micrometeorological techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure urban VOC fluxes from a neighborhood of Mexico City, where the spatial variability of surface cover and roughness is high. Fluxes of olefins, methanol, acetone, toluene and C2-benzenes were measured and compared with the local gridded emission inventory. VOC fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal pattern with a strong relationship to vehicular traffic. Recent photochemical modeling results suggest that VOC emissions are significantly underestimated in Mexico City1, but the measured VOC fluxes described here indicate that the official emission inventory2 is essentially correct. Thus, other explanations are needed to explain the photochemical modelling results.

  14. A Preliminary Study of CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, T.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the global carbon cycle requires quantification of terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes at regional scales. In this paper, we analyze the potential of a Doppler DIAL system to make flux measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the eddy-covariance and boundary layer budget methods and present results from a ground based experiment. The goal of this study is to put CO2 flux point measurements in a mesoscale context. In June 2007, a field experiment combining a 2-m Doppler Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL) and in-situ sensors of a 447-m tall tower (WLEF) took place in Wisconsin. The HDIAL measures simultaneously: 1) CO2 mixing ratio, 2) atmosphere structure via aerosol backscatter and 3) radial velocity. We demonstrate how to synthesize these data into regional flux estimates. Lidar-inferred fluxes are compared with eddy-covariance fluxes obtained in-situ at 396m AGL from the tower. In cases where the lidar was not yet able to measure the fluxes with acceptable precision, we discuss possible modifications to improve system performance.

  15. A calorimeter for neutron flux measurement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1993-04-01

    A calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement has been built and tested. The calorimeter measures the heat produced in a 10{degrees}K thick LiPb target when neutrons are captured via the {sup 6}Li(n,{sup 3}H){sup 4}He reaction. The sensitivity achieved was 1.3x10{sup 6} n/s for a 1 hour measurement. Separate flux measurements with the calorimeter and a {sup 238}U fission chamber are in agreement and show that systematic errors are less than 3%. An improved calorimeter has been built which is sensitive to 10{sup 5} n/s for a 1 hour measurement.

  16. Error Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Aerodynamic Flux Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide volatilization fluxes were calculated for a tarped and a nontarped field using 2 and 4 hour sampling periods. These field measurements were averaged in 8, 12, and 24 hour increments to simulate longer sampling periods. The daily flux profiles were progressively smoothed and the cumulative volatility losses increased by 20 to 30% with each longer sampling period. Error associated with the original flux measurements was determined from linear regressions of measured wind speed and air concentration as a function of height, and averaged approximately 50%. The high errors resulted from long application times, which resulted in a nonuniform source strength; and variable tarp permeability, which is influenced by temperature, moisture, and thickness. The increase in cumulative volatilization losses that resulted from longer sampling periods were within the experimental error of the flux determination method.

  17. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  18. Attenuation of Scalar Fluxes Measured with Spatially-displaced Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Lenschow, D. H.

    2009-02-01

    Observations from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program are used to examine the attenuation of measured scalar fluxes caused by spatial separation between the vertical velocity and scalar sensors. The HATS data show that flux attenuation for streamwise, crosswind, and vertical sensor displacements are each a function of a dimensionless, stability-dependent parameter n m multiplied by the ratio of sensor displacement to measurement height. The scalar flux decays more rapidly with crosswind displacements than for streamwise displacements and decays more rapidly for stable stratification than for unstable stratification. The cospectral flux attenuation model of Kristensen et al. agrees well with the HATS data for streamwise sensor displacements, although it is necessary to include a neglected quadrature spectrum term to explain the observation that flux attenuation is often less with the scalar sensor downwind of the anemometer than for the opposite configuration. A simpler exponential decay model provides good estimates for crosswind sensor displacements, as well as for streamwise sensor displacements with stable stratification. A model similar to that of Lee and Black correctly predicts flux attenuation for a combination of streamwise and crosswind displacements, i.e. as a function of wind direction relative to the sensor displacement. The HATS data for vertical sensor displacements extend the near-neutral results of Kristensen et al. to diabatic stratification and confirm their finding that flux attenuation is less with the scalar sensor located below the anemometer than if the scalar sensor is displaced an equal distance either horizontally or above the anemometer.

  19. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  20. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  1. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  2. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  3. FluxPro: Real time monitoring and simulation system for eddy covariance flux measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Seo, H.; Mano, M.; Ono, K.; Miyata, A.; Yokozawa, M.

    2010-12-01

    To cope with unusual weather changes on crop cultivation in a field level, prompt and precise monitoring of photosynthesis and evapotranspiration, and those fast and reliable forecasting are indispensable. So we have developed FluxPro which is simultaneous operating system of the monitoring and the forecasting. The monitoring subsystem provides vapor and CO2 fluxes with uncertainty to understand the live condition of photosynthesis and evapotranspiration by open-path eddy covariance flux measurement (EC) system and self-developed EC tolerance analysis scheme. The forecasting subsystem serves the predicted fluxes with anomaly based on model parameter assimilation to estimate the hourly or daily water consumption and carbon assimilation during a week by multi-simulation package consisting of various models from simple to complicate. FluxPro is helpful not only to detect a critical condition of growing crop in terms of photosynthesis and evapotranspiration but also to decide time and amount of launching control for keeping those optimization condition when an unusual weather event is arisen. In our presentation, we will demonstrate the FluxPro operated at tangerine orchard in Jeju, Korea.

  4. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) Arctic Campaign (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kohnert, K.; Sachs, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most pressing questions with regard to climate feedback processes in a warming Arctic is the regional-scale methane release from Arctic permafrost areas. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaign is designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this question. Ground-based eddy covariance (EC) measurements provide continuous in-situ observations of the surface-atmosphere exchange of methane. However, these observations are rare in the Arctic permafrost zone and site selection is bound by logistical constraints among others. Consequently, these observations cover only small areas that are not necessarily representative of the region of interest. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. Here, we present the potential of environmental response functions (ERFs) for quantitatively linking methane flux observations in the atmospheric surface layer to meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. For this purpose thousands of kilometers of AIRMETH data across the Alaskan North Slope are utilized, with the aim to extrapolate the airborne EC methane flux observations to the entire North Slope. The data were collected aboard the research aircraft POLAR 5, using its turbulence nose boom and fast response methane and meteorological sensors. After thorough data pre-processing, Reynolds averaging is used to derive spatially integrated fluxes. To increase spatial resolution and to derive ERFs, we then use wavelet transforms of the original high-frequency data. This enables much improved spatial discretization of the flux observations, and the quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation. A machine learning technique is then employed to extract and quantify the functional relationships between the methane flux observations and the meteorological and

  5. Distributed Sensible Heat Flux Measurements for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwald, H.; Brauchli, T.; Lehning, M.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance is typically computed using eddy covariance or two point profile measurements while alternative approaches such as the flux variance method based on convective scaling has been much less explored and applied. Flux variance (FV) certainly has a few limitations and constraints but may be an interesting and competitive method in low-cost and power limited wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the advantage of providing spatio-temporal sensible heat flux over the domain of the network. In a first step, parameters such as sampling frequency, sensor response time, and averaging interval are investigated. Then we explore the applicability and the potential of the FV method for use in WSN in a field experiment. Low-cost sensor systems are tested and compared against reference instruments (3D sonic anemometers) to evaluate the performance and limitations of the sensors as well as the method with respect to the standard calculations. Comparison experiments were carried out at several sites to gauge the flux measurements over different surface types (gravel, grass, water) from the low-cost systems. This study should also serve as an example of spatially distributed sensible heat flux measurements.

  6. Flux measurement and modeling in a typical mediterranean vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, Serena; Bellucco, Veronica; Pyles, David R.; Falk, Matthias; Sirca, Costantino; Duce, Pierpaolo; Snyder, Richard L.; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Vineyard ecosystems are typical in the Mediterranean area, since wine is one of the most important economic sectors. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the interactions between this kind of vegetation and the atmosphere. These information are important both to understand the behaviour of such ecosystems in different environmental conditions, and are crucial to parameterize crop and flux simulation models. Combining direct measurements and modelling can obtain reliable estimates of surface fluxes and crop evapotranspiration. This study would contribute both to (1) directly measure energy fluxes and evapotranspiration in a typical Mediterranean vineyard, located in the South of Sardinia (Italy), through the application of the Eddy Covariance micrometeorological technique and to (2) evaluate the land surface model ACASA (Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm) in simulating energy fluxes and evapotranspiration over vineyard. Independent datasets of direct measurements were used to calibrate and validate model results during the growing period. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate model performance and accuracy in predicting surface fluxes. Results will be showed as well as the model capability to be used for future studies to predict energy fluxes and crop water requirements under actual and future climate.

  7. Measuring flux of soil fumigants using the aerodynamic and dynamic flux chamber methods.

    PubMed

    van Wesenbeeck, I J; Knuteson, J A; Barnekow, D E; Phillips, A M

    2007-01-01

    Methods for measuring and estimating flux density of soil fumigants under field conditions are important for the purpose of providing inputs to air dispersion models and for comparing the effects of management practices on emission reduction. The objective of this study was to measure the flux of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin at a site in Georgia (GA) using the aerodynamic method and the dynamic flux chamber (FC) method. A secondary objective was to compare the effects of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and virtually impermeable film (VIF) tarps on fumigant flux at a site in Florida (FL). Chloropicrin and 1,3-D were applied by surface drip application of In-Line soil fumigant on vegetable beds covered by low density polyethylene (LDPE), HDPE, or VIF. The surface drip fumigation using In-Line and LDPE tarp employed in this study resulted in volatilization of 26.5% of applied 1,3-D and 11.2% of the applied chloropicrin at the GA site, as determined using the aerodynamic method. Estimates of mass loss obtained from dynamic FCs were 23.6% for 1,3-D and 18.0% for chloropicrin at the GA site. Flux chamber trials at the FL site indicate significant additional reduction in flux density, and cumulative mass loss when VIF tarp is used. This study supports the use of dynamic FCs as a valuable tool for estimating gas flux density from agricultural soils, and evaluating best management practices for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere.

  8. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  9. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  10. Constraining isoprene emission factors using airborne flux measurements during CABERNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Jiang, X.; Avise, J. C.; Scott, K.; Jonsson, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    An aircraft flux study was conducted to assess biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from California ecosystems targeting oak woodlands and isoprene for most transects. The direct eddy covariance approach featured high speed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry onboard a CIRPAS (Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies) Twin Otter aircraft during June 2011 as part of the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects) project. Isoprene fluxes were calculated using wavelet analysis and scaled to surface fluxes using a divergence term obtained by measuring fluxes at multiple altitudes over homogenous oak terrain. By normalization of fluxes to standard temperature and photosynthetically active radiation levels using standard BVOC modeling equations, the resulting emission factors could be directly compared with those used by MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) and BEIGIS (Biogenic Emission Inventory Geographic Information System) models which are the most commonly used BVOC emission models for California. As expected, oak woodlands were found to be the dominant source of isoprene in all areas surrounding and in the Central Valley of California. The airborne fluxes averaged to 2 km spatial resolution matched remarkably well with current oak woodland distributions driving the models and hence the correspondence of modeled and aircraft derived emission factors was also good, although quantitative differences were encountered depending on the region and driving variables used. Fluxes measured from aircraft proved to be useful for the improvement of the accuracy of modeled predictions for isoprene and other important ozone and aerosol precursor compounds. These are the first regional isoprene flux measurements using direct eddy covariance on aircraft.

  11. Uncertainties Associated with Flux Measurements Due to Heterogeneous Contaminant Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass flux and mass discharge measurements at contaminated sites have been applied to assist with remedial management, and can be divided into two broad categories: point-scale measurement techniques and pumping methods. Extrapolation across un-sampled space is necessary when usi...

  12. A REVIEW OF FLUX CONSIDERATIONS FOR IN VIVO NEUROCHEMICAL MEASUREMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David W.; Stenken, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    The mass transport or flux of neurochemicals in the brain and how this flux affects chemical measurements and their interpretation is reviewed. For all endogenous neurochemicals found in the brain, the flux of each of these neurochemicals exists between sources that produce them and the sites that consume them all within μm distances. Principles of convective-diffusion are reviewed with a significant emphasis on the tortuous paths and discrete point sources and sinks. The fundamentals of the primary methods of detection, microelectrodes and microdialysis sampling of brain neurochemicals are included in the review. Special attention is paid to the change in the natural flux of the neurochemicals caused by implantation and consumption at microelectrodes and uptake by microdialysis. The detection of oxygen, nitric oxide, glucose, lactate, and glutamate, and catecholamines by both methods are examined and where possible the two techniques (electrochemical vs. microdialysis) are compared. Non-invasive imaging methods: magnetic resonance, isotopic fluorine MRI, electron paramagnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography are also used for different measurements of the above-mentioned solutes and these are briefly reviewed. Although more sophisticated, the imaging techniques are unable to track neurochemical flux on short time scales, and lack spatial resolution. Where possible, determinations of flux using imaging are compared to the more classical techniques of microdialysis and microelectrodes. PMID:25977941

  13. Bacterial nucleators: actin' on actin

    PubMed Central

    Bugalhão, Joana N.; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target of numerous microbial pathogens, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses. In particular, bacterial pathogens produce and deliver virulence effector proteins that hijack actin dynamics to enable bacterial invasion of host cells, allow movement within the host cytosol, facilitate intercellular spread or block phagocytosis. Many of these effector proteins directly or indirectly target the major eukaryotic actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, by either mimicking nucleation promoting factors or activating upstream small GTPases. In contrast, this review is focused on a recently identified class of effector proteins from Gram-negative bacteria that function as direct actin nucleators. These effector proteins mimic functional activities of formins, WH2-nucleators and Ena/VASP assembly promoting factors demonstrating that bacteria have coopted the complete set of eukaryotic actin assembly pathways. Structural and functional analyses of these nucleators have revealed several motifs and/or mechanistic activities that are shared with eukaryotic actin nucleators. However, functional effects of these proteins during infection extend beyond plain actin polymerization leading to interference with other host cell functions such as vesicle trafficking, cell cycle progression and cell death. Therefore, their use as model systems could not only help in the understanding of the mechanistic details of actin polymerization but also provide novel insights into the connection between actin dynamics and other cellular pathways. PMID:26416078

  14. Heat flux measurement in a high enthalpy plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Jullien, Pierre; van Ootegem, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    It is a widely used approach to measure heat flux in harsh environments like high enthalpy plasma flows, fusion plasma and rocket motor combustion chambers based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite environment. This approach strongly depends on model parameters and geometrical aspects of the sensor design. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using an identified system as a direct model. The identification of the system is performed using calibration measurements with modern laser technique and advanced data handling. The results of the identified thermo-physical system show that a non-integer model appears most adapted to this particular problem. It is concluded that the new method improves the heat flux sensor significantly and furthermore extend its application to very short measurement times.

  15. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  16. Actinous enigma or enigmatic actin

    PubMed Central

    Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    Being the most abundant protein of the eukaryotic cell, actin continues to keep its secrets for more than 60 years. Everything about this protein, its structure, functions, and folding, is mysteriously counterintuitive, and this review represents an attempt to solve some of the riddles and conundrums commonly found in the field of actin research. In fact, actin is a promiscuous binder with a wide spectrum of biological activities. It can exist in at least three structural forms, globular, fibrillar, and inactive (G-, F-, and I-actin, respectively). G-actin represents a thermodynamically instable, quasi-stationary state, which is formed in vivo as a result of the energy-intensive, complex posttranslational folding events controlled and driven by cellular folding machinery. The G-actin structure is dependent on the ATP and Mg2+ binding (which in vitro is typically substituted by Ca2+) and protein is easily converted to the I-actin by the removal of metal ions and by action of various denaturing agents (pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants). I-actin cannot be converted back to the G-form. Foldable and “natively folded” forms of actin are always involved in interactions either with the specific protein partners, such as Hsp70 chaperone, prefoldin, and the CCT chaperonin during the actin folding in vivo or with Mg2+ and ATP as it takes place in the G-form. We emphasize that the solutions for the mysteries of actin multifunctionality, multistructurality, and trapped unfolding can be found in the quasi-stationary nature of this enigmatic protein, which clearly possesses many features attributed to both globular and intrinsically disordered proteins.

  17. Long Term Isoprene Flux Measurements Above a Northern Hardwood Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressley, S. N.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.; Hatten, G.; Flaherty, J.

    2002-12-01

    Canopy scale emissions of isoprene from a northern hardwood forest in Michigan were measured using the eddy covariance technique during the summer growing periods from 1999 through 2001. The goal of this work was to improve our understanding of isoprene emissions from forest ecosystems to better describe the role of isoprene in local and regional atmospheric chemical cycles. A second objective of this work was to contribute to the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions, and Transport (PROPHET) goal of characterizing the role of biogenic emissions in processing atmospheric nitrogen. Isoprene is one of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, and it is very reactive in the atmosphere. Long-term flux measurements are important for investigating the interannual variability in emissions due to interannual variability in climate. In addition, continuous flux data are useful for verifying canopy scale models that are used to generate emission inventories for regional photochemical models. Measurements were made in collaboration with the AmeriFlux site located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) and the (PROPHET) site located within 100 m of the AmeriFlux Tower. The site is a 90-year old stand classified as mid-aged conifer and deciduous, with aspen and oak two of the dominant species. Fluxes of isoprene, CO2, H2O, and sensible heat were measured using a fast response isoprene sensor (FIS), an open-path infrared gas analyzer, and a 3-D sonic anemometer. Concurrent measurements of these canopy scale fluxes are useful for understanding the physiological controls on isoprene emissions and potential links between isoprene emissions and other forest ecosystem dynamics. The multi-year data set will be presented and year-to-year variations in isoprene emissions will be explored in the context of interannual variations among the other canopy scale parameters.

  18. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman,; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  19. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; ...

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9%more » to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  20. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  1. SO2 flux measurements at Mount Etna (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Caltabiano, T.; Romano, R.; Budetta, G.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1987, over 220 measurements of the SO2 flux at Mount Etna have been carried out using a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) with different measuring techniques (mainly with COSPEC mounted on ground-based vehicle). This paper reports and analyzes the data obtained between October 1987 and December 1991. During this period, three distinct time intervals characterized by particular SO2 emission patterns were identified. The first interval (A) showed a mean SO2 flux of 5500 t/d associated with relatively quiet summit crater eruptive activity. The second interval (B) included two eruptive periods, September-October 1989 and January-February 1990, associated with high fluxes reaching 10,000-25,000 t/d. The third interval (C) started in concert with a regional earthquake (December 13, 1990) and showed first a decrease and then an increase of SO2 emissions before the onset of the major 1991-1993 flank eruption. Analysis of the data reveals a cyclic pattern to the SO2 emissions over prolonged periods; a nearly constant supply of SO2 from the volcano`s main feeder system, especially evident in the long term; a two- to fivefold increase above mean flux values (from 10,000 to 25,000 t/d) when occurring with paroxysmal eruptive activity; and minimal flux values (approximately 1000 t/d) about 1 month prior to important eruptive events.

  2. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  3. Evapotranspiration: Mass balance measurements compared with flux estimation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be measured by mass balance methods and estimated by flux sensing methods. The mass balance methods are typically restricted in terms of the area that can be represented (e.g., surface area of weighing lysimeter (LYS) or equivalent representative area of neutron probe (NP...

  4. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  5. Corrections for heat flux measurements taken on launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Matson, Monique L.; Walls, Laurie K.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of aerothermally induced convective heat transfer and plume induced radiative heat transfer loads is essential to the design of thermal protection systems for launch vehicles. Aerothermal and radiative models are typically calibrated via the data from cylindrical, in-flight, flush-mounted surface heat flux gauges that are exposed to the external thermal and velocity boundary layers as well as thermal radiation. Typically, Schmidt-Boelter gauges, taking advantage of the 1-Dimensional Fourier's law, measure the incident heat flux. This instrumentation, when surrounded by low-conductivity insulation, has an exposed surface temperature significantly lower than the insulation. As a result of this substantial disturbance to the thermal boundary layer, the heat flux incident on the gauge tends to be considerably higher (potentially by factors of 2 or more) than it would have been on the insulation had the calorimeter not been there. In addition, the gauge can receive energy radially from the hotter insulation, contributing to the increase of the indicated heat flux. This paper will present an overview of an effort to model the heat flux gauge under typical flight conditions that includes an installation surrounded by high temperature insulation. The goal is to correct the measurements to reflect the local heat flux on the insulation had the instrument not been present. The three major components of this effort include: 1) a 3-Dimensional computational thermal math model including the internal conduction heat transfer details of a Schmidt-Boelter gauge. 2) a CFD analysis to determine the effects on measurement of the rapidly changing thermal boundary layer over the near step changes in wall temperature, and 3) testing performed on flat plates exposed to an aerothermal environment in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF). A summary of the analytical efforts will be presented, as well as early testing results and preliminary model

  6. Suggestions for the measurement and derivation of fluxes and flux divergences from a satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Man-Li C. Wu )

    1990-04-15

    The theoretical studies shown here indicate that the best bands to measure and derive the total outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), surface downward flux (SDF), and cooling rates (CRs) using linear regression are (1) the band between 800 and 1,200 cm{sup {minus}1} for OLR, (2) the band between 500 and 660 cm{sup {minus}1} or 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for SDF, and (3) the band between 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for CRs. These results are obtained from scatter plots of total fluxes and cooling rates associated with the various bands. The advanced very high resolution radiometer OLR is damped compared with the Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) OLR, which is derived from the broadband, narrow field of view ERB instrument, owing to its use of only one narrow band (centered around the 11-{mu}m window region) measurement.

  7. Measurement of the cosmic ray flux with the ANITA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fernández, Daniel; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Carvalho, Washington R.; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Zas, Enrique

    2017-03-01

    The ANITA experiment consists on an aerostatic balloon flying over Antarctica and carrying a payload with antennas. Although ANITA was designed to detect the electric field of netrino-induced showers in the ice cap, it has also detected 16 radio pulses coming from extensive air showers, and the ANITA collaboration has used these data to produce the first cosmic ray flux measurement obtained by employing radio as a stand-alone technique. We review the experimental results and its interpretation. We also focus on the simulations and the method used for obtaining the cosmic ray flux.

  8. Optimization of measurements of the Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Podzolko, M. V.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Brilkov, I. A.; Vlasova, N. A.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Osedlo, V. I.; Tulupov, V. I.; Yashin, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    The Earth's radiation belts discovered at the end of the 1950s have great scientific and practical interest. Their main characteristics in magnetically quiet periods are well known. However, the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts during magnetic storms and substorms, particularly the dynamics of relativistic electrons of the outer belt, when Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes undergo significant time variations, is studied insufficiently. At present, principally new experiments have been performed and planned with the intention to better study the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts and to operationally control the space-energy distributions of the Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes. In this paper, for spacecraft designed to measure the fluxes of electrons and protons of the Earth's radiation belts at altitudes of 0.5-10000 km, the optimal versions for detector orientation and orbital parameters have been considered and selected.

  9. High-Fidelity Measurements of Long-Lived Flux Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hover, David; Macklin, Chris; O'Brien, Kevin; Sears, Adam; Yoder, Jonilyn; Gudmundsen, Ted; Kerman, Jamie; Bolkhovsky, Vladimir; Tolpygo, Sergey; Fitch, George; Weir, Terry; Kamal, Archana; Gustavsson, Simon; Yan, Fei; Birenbaum, Jeff; Siddiqi, Irfan; Orlando, Terry; Clarke, John; Oliver, Will

    2015-03-01

    We report on high-fidelity dispersive measurements of a long-lived flux qubit using a Josephson superconducting traveling wave parametric amplifier (JTWPA). A capacitively shunted flux qubit that incorporates high-Q MBE aluminum will have longer relaxation and dephasing times when compared to a conventional flux qubit, while also maintaining the large anharmonicity necessary for complex gate operations. The JTWPA relies on a Josephson junction embedded transmission line to deliver broadband, nonreciprocal gain with large dynamic range. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of

  10. Ecosystem photosynthesis inferred from measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaf, David; Rotenberg, Eyal; Tatarinov, Fyodor; Dicken, Uri; Montzka, Stephen A.; Yakir, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Limited understanding of carbon dioxide sinks and sources on land is often linked to the inability to distinguish between the carbon dioxide taken up by photosynthesis, and that released by respiration. Carbonyl sulphide, a sulphur-containing analogue of carbon dioxide, is also taken up by plants, and could potentially serve as a powerful proxy for photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake, which cannot be directly measured above the leaf scale. Indeed, variations in atmospheric concentrations of carbonyl sulphide are closely related to those of carbon dioxide at regional, local and leaf scales. Here, we use eddy covariance and laser spectroscopy to estimate the net exchange of carbon dioxide and carbonyl sulphide across three pine forests, a cotton field and a wheat field in Israel. We estimate gross primary productivity--a measure of ecosystem photosynthesis--directly from the carbonyl sulphide fluxes, and indirectly from carbon dioxide fluxes. The two estimates agree within an error of +/-15%. The ratio of carbonyl sulphide to carbon dioxide flux at the ecosystem scale was consistent with the variability in mixing ratios observed on seasonal timescales in the background atmosphere. We suggest that atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux could provide an independent constraint on estimates of gross primary productivity, key to projecting the response of the land biosphere to climate change.

  11. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengcheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Chen, Hao; Hu, Zhaokun; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2017-01-25

    Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS) is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities) in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO₂ emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30-40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO₂ and NO₂ emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy.

  12. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengcheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Chen, Hao; Hu, Zhaokun; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS) is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities) in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO2 emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30–40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO2 and NO2 emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy. PMID:28125054

  13. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  14. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  15. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  16. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  17. Suggestions for the measurement and derivation of fluxes and flux divergences from a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man-Li C.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the determination of the optimal bands for measuring and deriving the total outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), surface downward flux (SDF), and cooling rates (CRs) using linear regression. The optimal bands are determined from scatter plots of total fluxes and cooling rates associated with the various bands. It is found that the best band for OLR is between 800 and 1200/cm, while the best band for SDF is between 500 and 660/cm or between 660 and 800/cm. For CRs, it is shown that the best band is also between 660 and 800/cm. It is noted that the AVHRR OLR is damped compared with the Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget (ERB) OLR derived from the broadband, narrow FOV ERB instrument.

  18. Dual pools of actin at presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Bleckert, Adam; Photowala, Huzefa; Alford, Simon

    2012-06-01

    We investigated actin's function in vesicle recycling and exocytosis at lamprey synapses and show that FM1-43 puncta and phalloidin-labeled filamentous actin (F-actin) structures are colocalized, yet recycling vesicles are not contained within F-actin clusters. Additionally, phalloidin also labels a plasma membrane-associated cortical actin. Injection of fluorescent G-actin revealed activity-independent dynamic actin incorporation into presynaptic synaptic vesicle clusters but not into cortical actin. Latrunculin-A, which sequesters G-actin, dispersed vesicle-associated actin structures and prevented subsequent labeled G-actin and phalloidin accumulation at presynaptic puncta, yet cortical phalloidin labeling persisted. Dispersal of presynaptic F-actin structures by latrunculin-A did not disrupt vesicle clustering or recycling or alter the amplitude or kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). However, it slightly enhanced release during repetitive stimulation. While dispersal of presynaptic actin puncta with latrunculin-A failed to disperse synaptic vesicles or inhibit synaptic transmission, presynaptic phalloidin injection blocked exocytosis and reduced endocytosis measured by action potential-evoked FM1-43 staining. Furthermore, phalloidin stabilization of only cortical actin following pretreatment with latrunculin-A was sufficient to inhibit synaptic transmission. Conversely, treatment of axons with jasplakinolide, which induces F-actin accumulation but disrupts F-actin structures in vivo, resulted in increased synaptic transmission accompanied by a loss of phalloidin labeling of cortical actin but no loss of actin labeling within vesicle clusters. Marked synaptic deficits seen with phalloidin stabilization of cortical F-actin, in contrast to the minimal effects of disruption of a synaptic vesicle-associated F-actin, led us to conclude that two structurally and functionally distinct pools of actin exist at presynaptic sites.

  19. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic isoprene over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Biogenic isoprene fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene over 7400 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes of isoprene over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate instantaneous isoprene fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 m ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence determined in the racetrack-stacked profiles. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to basal emission factor (BEF) land-cover data sets used to drive BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. Even though the isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, observations at the Walnut Grove tower south of Sacramento demonstrate that isoprene oxidation products from the high emitting regions in the surrounding oak woodlands accumulate at night in

  20. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  1. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  2. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Dye, Stephen T; Guillian, Eugene H

    2008-01-08

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth.

  3. Measurements of ocean surface kinematics and heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Melville, Ken

    2003-11-01

    The top few meters of the oceanic boundary layer play a critical role in the transfers of momentum, gas, mass and heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. These exchanges must necessarily transfer through the surface, and presumably, the rates at which they do are influence by the dynamics of the surface layer. Heat flux in particular is regulated by the thin surface thermal layer which, at most, is only a few millimeter thick. We are specifically interested in the structure of the thermal layer and the influence of the surface turbulence on the flux of heat through the air-sea boundary. Using active and passive infrared imaging, we were able to collect high temporal and spatial resolution images, yielding the Lagrangian surface velocity and temperature fields over small areas of a few square meters. We have applied cross-correlation techniques (typically used for Particle Image Velocimetry) on the passive infrared images and obtained high-resolution surface velocity fields. Using the displacement and the distortion of the actively laid down heat pattern, we also have been able to recover the surface velocity, shear strain, vorticity, and divergence. In addition, the data show that the heat flux appears to be correlated the surface vorticity. With the penetration depth of infrared radiation at these wavelengths being a few microns, these techniques appear to be extremely promising for measuring ocean surface turbulence confined within the thermal boundary layer. We will discuss the results in the context of air sea heat flux and ocean surface turbulence.

  4. Soil heat flux measurements in an open forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meulen, M. W. J.; Klaassen, W.

    1996-05-01

    The soil surface heat flux in an open oak forest was determined at four locations to account for the heterogeneity of the forest. Soil temperatures and soil water content were measured at several depths and an integration method with three layers was used. The thickness of the bottom layer was determined with a spectral method. The soil surface heat flux was compared with the net radiation above the canopy for four typical days in 1995. These data were fitted linearly. The slope of this parameterisation was 0.092, with a leaf area index of 2.5 (fully-leafed canopy). This result was compared with four other studies. To produce an exponential fit of the slope against the leaf area index the Beer-Bouguer law for radiation extinction in canopies and a soil surface heat flux proportional to the net radiation at the forest floor was used. An extinction coefficient of 0.36 was found. This result is recommended for future studies, if soil surface heat flux is requested and net radiation data above the canopy as well as leaf area index are available.

  5. Fluxes through plant metabolic networks: measurements, predictions, insights and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George

    2015-01-01

    Although the flows of material through metabolic networks are central to cell function, they are not easy to measure other than at the level of inputs and outputs. This is particularly true in plant cells, where the network spans multiple subcellular compartments and where the network may function either heterotrophically or photoautotrophically. For many years, kinetic modelling of pathways provided the only method for describing the operation of fragments of the network. However, more recently, it has become possible to map the fluxes in central carbon metabolism using the stable isotope labelling techniques of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), and to predict intracellular fluxes using constraints-based modelling procedures such as flux balance analysis (FBA). These approaches were originally developed for the analysis of microbial metabolism, but over the last decade, they have been adapted for the more demanding analysis of plant metabolic networks. Here, the principal features of MFA and FBA as applied to plants are outlined, followed by a discussion of the insights that have been gained into plant metabolic networks through the application of these time-consuming and non-trivial methods. The discussion focuses on how a system-wide view of plant metabolism has increased our understanding of network structure, metabolic perturbations and the provision of reducing power and energy for cell function. Current methodological challenges that limit the scope of plant MFA are discussed and particular emphasis is placed on the importance of developing methods for cell-specific MFA.

  6. Corrections of Heat Flux Measurements on Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Matson, Monique L.; Walls, Laurie K.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of aerothermally induced convective heat transfer is important in the design of thermal protection systems for launch vehicles. Aerothermal models are typically calibrated via the data from circular, in-flight, flush-mounted surface heat flux gauges exposed to the thermal and velocity boundary layers of the external flow. Typically, copper or aluminum Schmidt- Boelter gauges, which take advantage of the one-dimensional Fourier's law of heat conduction, are used to measure the incident heat flux. This instrumentation, when surrounded by low-conductivity insulation, has a wall temperature significantly lower than the insulation. As a result of this substantial disturbance to the thermal boundary layer, the heat flux incident on the gauge tends to be considerably higher than it would have been on the insulation had the calorimeter not been there. In addition, radial conductive heat transfer from the hotter insulation can cause the calorimeter to indicate heat fluxes higher than actual. An overview of an effort to develop and calibrate gauge correction techniques for both of these effects will be presented.

  7. Estimation of rainfall interception in grassland using eddy flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, A.; Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall interception plays an important role in the water cycle in natural ecosystems. Interception by the forest canopies have been widely observed or estimated over various ecosystems, such as tropical rainforest, evergreen forest and deciduous forest. However interception by the short canopies, e.g. shrubby plant, grassland and crop, has been rarely observed since it has been difficult to obtain reliable precipitation measurements under the canopy. In this study, we estimated monthly and annual rainfall interception in grassland using evapotranspiration data of eddy flux measurements. Experiments were conducted in grassland (Italian ryegrass) from 2010 to 2012 growing season in Kumamoto, Japan. Evapotranspiration (latent heat flux) were observed throughout the year based on the eddy covariance technique. A three dimensional sonic anemometer and an open path CO2/H2O analyzer were used to calculate 30 min flux. Other meteorological factors, such as air temperature, humidity and solar radiation, were also observed. Rainfall interception was estimated as follows. 1) Using evapotranspiration data during dry period, environmental response of surface conductance (gc) was inversely calculated based on the big-leaf model. 2) Evapotranspiration without interception during precipitation period was estimated using above model and environmental response of gc. 3) Assuming that evaporation of intercepted rainfall is equal to the difference in evapotranspiration between above estimation and actual measurements, rainfall interception was estimated over experimental period. The account of rainfall interception in grassland using this technique will be presented at the meeting.

  8. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  9. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  10. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  11. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  12. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; ...

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis ofmore » the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be

  13. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, G; Amelynck, C; Ammann, C; Arneth, A; Bamberger, I; Goldstein, A H; Gu, L; Guenther, A; Hansel, A; Heinesch, B; Holst, T; Hörtnagl, L; Karl, T; Laffineur, Q; Neftel, A; McKinney, K; Munger, J W; Pallardy, S G; Schade, G W; Seco, R; Schoon, N

    2015-01-27

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  14. Measuring the flexural rigidity of actin filaments and microtubules from their thermal fluctuating shapes: A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Kangyu; Liu, Xiaohu

    Actin filaments and microtubules are important components of cytoskeletal networks and show both active and passive dynamic mechanical behaviors. Measuring the mechanical properties of individual filament can not only help us understand the mechanisms behind the complex dynamic behaviors, but also provide parameters that are needed to calibrate biological piconewton forcemeters. Although many methods have been proposed, the values of flexural rigidity reported in literature are still quite different for both actin filaments and microtubules. In this paper, a new formulation based on mode analysis of the thermal fluctuating shapes and principle of virtual work has been proposed, where both the linear and nonlinear assumptions are considered. What's more, following previous inspiring works, both the effects of sampling time interval and hydrodynamics are taken into account in our model. When applied to the experiment data in literature and the simulation data generated by finite element method software, our method gives good results and show an advantage over the previous methods. Besides, we suggest that the inconformity of the flexural rigidity in literature might be caused by the different sampling time intervals and hydrodynamic wall effects in experiments.

  15. Corrections for Heat Flux Measurements Taken on Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Ford, Danielle M.

    2004-02-01

    Knowledge of aerothermally induced convective heat transfer and plume induced radiative heat transfer loads is essential to the design of thermal protection systems (TPS) for launch vehicles. Aerothermal and radiative models are typically calibrated via the data from cylindrical, in-flight, flush-mounted surface heat flux gauges that are exposed to the external thermal and velocity boundary layers as well as thermal radiation. Typically, Schmidt-Boelter gauges, taking advantage of the 1-Dimensional Fourier's law, measure the incident heat flux. This instrumentation, when surrounded by low-conductivity insulation, has an exposed surface temperature significantly lower than the insulation. As a result of this substantial disturbance to the thermal boundary layer, the heat flux incident on the gauge tends to be considerably higher (potentially by factors of 2 or more) than it would have been on the insulation had the calorimeter not been there. In addition, the gauge can receive energy radially from the hotter insulation, contributing to the increase of the indicated heat flux. This paper will present an overview of an effort to model the heat flux gauge under typical flight conditions that includes an installation surrounded by high temperature insulation. The goal is to correct the measurements to reflect the local heat flux on the insulation had the instrument not been present. The three major components of this effort include: 1) a three-dimensional computational thermal math model including the internal conduction heat transfer details of a Schmidt-Boelter gauge, 2) a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to determine the effects on measurement of the rapidly changing thermal boundary layer over the near step changes in wall temperature, and 3) testing performed on flat plates exposed to an aerothermal environment in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF). A brief summary of calibration issues

  16. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  17. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  18. Eddy covariance measurements in screenhouses: turbulence characteristics and flux gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, U.; Cohen, S.; Tanny, J.

    2012-04-01

    Shading banana and other orchard crops with screens is popular in arid and semi-arid regions for decreasing water use and increasing fruit quality. However, crop water use within this unique environment is much less studied than for canopies in the open. Previous studies of our research group have established the use of the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique for reliable evapotranspiration and sensible heat flux measurements within screenhouses. These studies focused on operating conditions of the system. The present paper is a comprehensive study which examined the performance of the EC system in different types of screenhouses (shading and insect-proof), different crops (banana and pepper) at different development stages (small and large plants) and different climatic regions in Israel. The main goal was to establish guidelines for optimal application of the EC technique in screenhouses. The research consisted of 6 field campaigns: in 3 campaigns two EC systems were simultaneously deployed either vertically or horizontally, and in 3 other campaigns a single EC system was deployed at one measurement height. EC systems were deployed at different normalized system heights, Zs, which define the relative measurement heights within the air gap between the canopy top and the horizontal screened roof. System performance was examined using quality tests like energy balance closure, flux variance similarity, friction velocity, footprint modeling, energy spectrum, turbulence intensity and vertical and horizontal flux gradient analyses. Resulting energy balance closure slopes averaged 0.81±0.08 and 0.91±0.08 for the smaller and larger plants, respectively. Turbulent flows were found to be marginally developed within the air gap between the top of the plants and the horizontal screened roof. Turbulence intensity, flux variance similarity test, energy spectrum decay rate and friction velocity were essentially independent of the measurement height and were within the common range

  19. Optimizing laboratory-based radon flux measurements for sediments.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan; Lane-Smith, Derek; Burnett, William C

    2016-07-01

    Radon flux via diffusion from sediments and other materials may be determined in the laboratory by circulating air through the sample and a radon detector in a closed loop. However, this approach is complicated by the necessity of having to determine the total air volume in the system and accounting for any small air leaks that can arise if using extended measurement periods. We designed a simple open-loop configuration that includes a measured mass of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight reaction flask connected to a drying system and a radon-in-air analyzer. Ambient air flows through two charcoal columns before entering the reaction vessel to eliminate incoming radon. After traveling through the reaction flask, the air passes the drier and the radon analyzer and is then vented. After some time, the radon activity will reach a steady state depending upon the airflow rate. With this approach, the radon flux via diffusion is simply the product of the steady-state radon activity (Bq/m(3)) multiplied by the airflow rate (mL/min). We demonstrated that this setup could produce good results for materials that produce relatively high radon fluxes. We also show that a modified closed system approach, including radon removal of the incoming air by charcoal filtration in a bypass, can produce very good results including samples with very low emission rates.

  20. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  1. Measuring Longwave Radiative Flux Divergence in an Urban Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soux, A.; Oke, T. R.; Nunez, M.; Wilson, M.

    2003-12-01

    There has been very little measurement of longwave radiation divergence since the urban studies of Fuggle, Oke and Nunez in the mid 1970's or the rural work of Funk in the early 1960's. Although radiative divergence has been widely ignored for sometime there is the belief that it may play an important role in balancing nocturnal energy budgets in a range of environments. For example, in urban environments surface temperature relates well to the energy balance whereas air temperature does not, even in non-turbulent conditions. This is probably due at least in part to the effects of longwave divergence. To help answer issues related to longwave divergence a new dual-channel infrared radiometer (DCIR) has been developed. The DCIR, as the name implies, measures the directional infrared radiation in two wavebands and can, through differencing of the signals and further signal processing, give a direct measurement of longwave radiative flux divergence. The DCIR was deployed for the first time as part of a larger study (BUBBLE) of the urban boundary layer of Basel, Switzerland. The objective is to further study the thermal regime of a city at the canyon scale. To this end, a street canyon was carefully selected, in the city of Basel. The canyon surface and air volume were instrumented, including turbulent and conductive fluxes, and standard meteorological variables in addition to radiation. A unique data set was obtained to allow the complete energy balance of the canyon system to be evaluated without the need to resort to using residuals to quantify the magnitude of the longwave radiative flux divergence. Measured values of longwave flux-divergence are converted to cooling rates to compare with measured air temperature cooling. Preliminary results show that at the onset of canyon air-volume cooling, measured cooling rates are slightly lower than radiative cooling rates. The differences are less than 0.5° C. This contrasts sharply with previously measured above roof

  2. Momentum Flux Measurements Using an Impact Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily exhausted and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

  3. Assessment of CO2 flux measurements in different soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Szlavecz, K.; Musaloiu, R.; Cupchup, J.; Pitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate measurements of soil CO2 efflux are extraordinarily challenging due to the very properties of CO2 transport in a porous medium of soil. The most commonly used method today is the chamber method, which provides direct measurements of CO2 efflux at the soil surface, but it can not measure the soil CO2 flux continuously. In order to develop new measurement methods in soil CO2 efflux, small solid-state CO2 sensors have been used to continuously to monitor soil CO2 profiles by burying these sensors at different soil depths. Using this method we compared soil CO2 efflux of four different soil types: forests soil, grassland soil (collected in Maryland) commercial potting soil and pure sand as control. CO2 concentration varied between 500 ppm in sand and 8000 ppm in forest soil at depth 12 cm. CO2 flux had the following order: Forest (0.3~0.4 mg CO2 m-2 s-1), potting soil (0.1~0.14 mg CO2 m-2 s-1 ), grassland (0.03~0.05 mg CO2 m-2 s-1), sand ( 0 mg CO2 m-2 s-1 ). Exponential relationship between temperature and CO2 flux was established for forest soil and potting soil only. Leaf litter, often thick layer in many terrestrial ecosystems and a significant source of CO2 production, is not part of the of the diffusivity models. We are currently conducting experiments which include the effect of leaf litter and soil invertebrates into soil respiration.

  4. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  5. SIERRA-Flux: Measuring Regional Surface Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Water Vapor from an Unmanned Aircraft System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland; Yates, Emma Louise; Bui, Thaopaul Van; Dean-Day, Jonathan; Kolyer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the most frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft.

  6. Design and measurement of improved capacitively-shunted flux qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Adam; Birenbaum, Jeffrey; Hover, David; Gudmundsen, Theodore; Kerman, Andrew; Welander, Paul; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Gustavsson, Simon; Jin, Xiaoyue; Kamal, Archana; Clarke, John; Oliver, William

    2014-03-01

    The addition of a capacitive or inductive shunt across one of the junctions can alter the coherence properties of a classic flux or RF-SQUID qubit. We have studied the performance of capacitively shunted flux qubits fabricated with MBE aluminum, starting from a 2D coplanar waveguide geometry used in similar high-performance transmon qubits, and measured dispersively. We will detail the importance of design parameters that preserve the flux qubit's anharmonicity and discuss conclusions about materials quality based on calculations of the participation of junction, dielectric, and superconductor components. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of IARPA, the ODNI, or the U.S. Government Present address: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA.

  7. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  8. The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

    2003-05-20

    A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

  9. Wind tunnel measurements of pollutant turbulent fluxes in urban intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been carried out at the EnFlo laboratory to measure mean and turbulent tracer fluxes in geometries of real street canyon intersections. The work was part of the major DAPPLE project, focussing on the area surrounding the intersection between Marylebone Road and Gloucester Place in Central London, UK. Understanding flow and dispersion in urban streets is a very important issue for air quality management and planning, and turbulent mass exchange processes are important phenomena that are very often neglected in urban modelling studies. The adopted methodology involved the combined use of laser Doppler anemometry and tracer concentration measurements. This methodology was applied to quantify the mean and turbulent flow and dispersion fields within several street canyon intersections. Vertical profiles of turbulent tracer flux were also measured. The technique, despite a number of limitations, proved reliable and allowed tracer balance calculations to be undertaken in the selected street canyon intersections. The experience gained in this work will enable much more precise studies in the future as issues affecting the accuracy of the experimental technique have been identified and resolved.

  10. Measurement of autophagy flux in the nervous system in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, K; Valenzuela, V; Matus, S; Nassif, M; Oñate, M; Fuentealba, Y; Encina, G; Irrazabal, T; Parsons, G; Court, F A; Schneider, B L; Armentano, D; Hetz, C

    2013-01-01

    Accurate methods to measure autophagic activity in vivo in neurons are not available, and most of the studies are based on correlative and static measurements of autophagy markers, leading to conflicting interpretations. Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process involved in the degradation of diverse cellular components including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy impairment is emerging as a relevant factor driving neurodegeneration in many diseases. Moreover, strategies to modulate autophagy have been shown to provide protection against neurodegeneration. Here we describe a novel and simple strategy to express an autophagy flux reporter in the nervous system of adult animals by the intraventricular delivery of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into newborn mice. Using this approach we efficiently expressed a monomeric tandem mCherry-GFP-LC3 construct in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system, allowing the measurement of autophagy activity in pharmacological and disease settings. PMID:24232093

  11. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and inaccuracy caused by inappropriate air velocity or sweep air flow...

  12. Measuring the Sources of the Intergalactic Ionizing Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Trouille, L.

    2009-02-01

    We use a wide-field (0.9 deg2) X-ray sample with optical and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet observations to measure the contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the ionizing flux as a function of redshift. Our analysis shows that the AGN contribution to the metagalactic ionizing background peaks at around z = 2. The measured values of the ionizing background from the AGNs are lower than previous estimates and confirm that ionization from AGNs is insufficient to maintain the observed ionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z > 3. We show that only X-ray sources with broad lines in their optical spectra have detectable ionizing flux and that the ionizing flux seen in an AGN is not correlated with its X-ray color. We also use the GALEX observations of the GOODS-N region to place a 2σ upper limit of 0.008 on the average ionization fraction f ν(700 Å)/f ν(1500 Å) for 626 UV selected galaxies in the redshift range z = 0.9-1.4. We then use this limit to estimate an upper bound to the galaxy contribution in the redshift range z = 0-5. If the z ~ 1.15 ionization fraction is appropriate for higher-redshift galaxies, then contributions from the galaxy population are also too low to account for the IGM ionization at the highest redshifts (z > 4). Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Flux measurements of benzene and toluene from landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Morandi, Andrea; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Nisi, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and CH(4), C(6)H(6) and C(7)H(8) fluxes from the soil cover of Case Passerini landfill site (Florence, Italy) were measured using the accumulation and static closed chamber methods, respectively. Results show that the CH(4)/CO(2), CH(4)/C(6)H(6) and CH(4)/C(7)H(8) ratios of the flux values are relatively low when compared with those of the 'pristine' biogas produced by degradation processes acting on the solid waste material disposed in the landfill. This suggests that when biogas transits through the cover soil, CH(4) is affected by degradation processes activated by oxidizing bacteria at higher extent than both CO(2) and mono-aromatics. Among the investigated hydrocarbons, C(6)H(6) has shown the highest stability in a wide range of redox conditions. Toluene behaviour only partially resembles that of C(6)H(6), possibly because de-methylation processes require less energy than that necessary for the degradation of C(6)H(6), the latter likely occurring via benzoate at anaerobic conditions and/or through various aerobic metabolic pathways at relatively shallow depth in the cover soil where free oxygen is present. According to these considerations, aromatics are likely to play an important role in the environmental impact of biogas released into the atmosphere from such anthropogenic emission sites, usually only ascribed to CO(2) and CH(4). In this regard, flux measurements using accumulation and static closed chamber methods coupled with gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis may properly be used to obtain a dataset for the estimation of the amount of volatile organic compounds dispersed from landfills.

  14. Measurement of Urban fluxes of CO2 and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmond, S.; Crawford, B.; Offerle, B.; Hom, J.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of surface-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide (FCO2) and latent heat in urban environments are rare even though cities are a major source of atmospheric CO2 and users of water. In this paper, an overview of urban FCO2 measurements will be presented to illustrate how and where such measurements are being conducted and emerging results to date. Most of these studies have been conducted over short periods of time; few studies have considered annual sources/sinks. More investigations have been conducted, and are planned, in European cities than elsewhere, most commonly in areas of medium density urban development. The most dense urban sites are significant net sources of carbon. However, in areas where there is large amounts of vegetation present, there is a net sink of carbon during the summertime. In the second part of the presentation, more detailed attention will be directed to an ongoing measurement program in Baltimore, MD (part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study). Eddy covariance instrumentation mounted on a tall-tower at 41.2 m has continuously measured local-scale fluxes of carbon dioxide from a suburban environment since 2001. Several features make this particular study unique: 1) for an urban area, the study site is extensively vegetated, 2) the period of record (2001-2005) is among the longest available for urban FCO2 measurements, 3) both closed-path and open-path infrared gas analyzers are used for observations, and 4) several unique data quality control and gap-filling methods have been developed for use in an urban environment. Additionally, detailed surface datasets and GIS software are used to perform flux source area analysis. Results from Baltimore indicate that FCO2 is very dependent on source area land-cover characteristics, particularly the proportion of vegetated and built surfaces. Over the course of a year, the urban surface is a strong net source of CO2, though there is considerable inter-annual variability depending on

  15. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research.

    PubMed

    Niedermann, R; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

  16. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, R.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

  17. The measurement of heat flux from initiators in solid propellant rocket igniters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subba Rao, S. V.; Ramesh, N.; Pillai, B. C.

    The use of ribbon thermocouples to measure the heat flux from the initiator jet of a solid propellant rocket igniter and received by the booster charge is reported. Heat flux histories are given. All the heat flux curves showed a sharp peak within a short operation of 1 ms. Peak heat flux values extended up to 16,000 W/sq cm.

  18. Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

  19. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Veselinović, N. Dragić, A. Maletić, D. Joković, D. Savić, M. Banjanac, R. Udovičić, V. Aničin, I.

    2015-02-24

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations.

  20. Measuring fast-neutron flux by track-etch technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the measurement of neutron flux by the use of fissionable materials. Fission fragments emitted by the fissionable materials during neutron bombardment penetrate a suitable recording medium, such as plastic, glass, or mica, that is in contact with the fissionable material. Appropriate etching techniques render the path of the fragment in the recording medium visible under an optical microscope. Since measurement of the decay of radioisotopes is not involved in this method, irradiation times are limited only by the maximum number of fission fragment tracks that can be clearly distinguished without pile up: approximately 2 x 10/sup 5//cm/sup 2/. The method includes a discussion of apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, precision, and accuracy. (JMT)

  1. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  2. Eddy covariance measurements of methane fluxes over grazed native and improved prairies in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although several studies have reported eddy covariance (EC) measurements at several tallgrass prairie sites to investigate the dynamics of carbon and water vapor fluxes, the EC measurements of methane (CH4) fluxes over grazed tallgrass prairie sites are lacking. CH4 fluxes were measured during the 2...

  3. Local Heat Flux Measurements with Single Element Coaxial Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregg; Protz, Christopher; Bullard, Brad; Hulka, James

    2006-01-01

    To support the mission for the NASA Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a program in 2005 to improve the capability to predict local thermal compatibility and heat transfer in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. The ultimate objective was to predict and hence reduce the local peak heat flux due to injector design, resulting in a significant improvement in overall engine reliability and durability. Such analyses are applicable to combustion devices in booster, upper stage, and in-space engines, as well as for small thrusters with few elements in the injector. In this program, single element and three-element injectors were hot-fire tested with liquid oxygen and ambient temperature gaseous hydrogen propellants at The Pennsylvania State University Cryogenic Combustor Laboratory from May to August 2005. Local heat fluxes were measured in a 1-inch internal diameter heat sink combustion chamber using Medtherm coaxial thermocouples and Gardon heat flux gauges. Injectors were tested with shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements, including recessed, flush and scarfed oxidizer post configurations, and concentric and non-concentric fuel annuli. This paper includes general descriptions of the experimental hardware, instrumentation, and results of the hot-fire testing for three of the single element injectors - recessed-post shear coaxial with concentric fuel, flush-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel, and scarfed-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel. Detailed geometry and test results will be published elsewhere to provide well-defined data sets for injector development and model validatation.

  4. Measurements for the JASPER Program Flux Monitor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Hunter, H.T.; Hull, J.L.; Shono, A.

    1993-02-01

    The Flux Monitor Experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) during the months of May and June 1992, as part of the continuing series of eight experiments planned for the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER) program that was started in 1986. This series of experiments was designed to examine shielding concerns and radiation transport effects pertaining to in-vessel flux monitoring systems (FMS) in current reactor shield designs proposed for both the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) design and the Japanese loop-type design. The program is a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) and the Japanese Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). The Tower Shielding Reactor H (TSR-II) neutron source was altered by the spectrum modifier (SM) used previously in the Axial Shield Experiment, and part of the Japanese Removable Radial Shield (RRS) before reaching the axial shield. In the axial shield were placed six homogeneous boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) hexagons around a center hexagon of aluminum used to represent sodium. Shield designs to be studied were placed beyond the axial shield, each design forming a void directly behind the axial shield. Measurements were made in the void and behind each slab as successive slabs were added.

  5. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  6. Controlling quantum flux through measurement: An idealised example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, A.; Bauer, M.; Bernard, D.

    2014-07-01

    Classically, no transfer occurs between two equally filled reservoirs, no matter how one looks at them, but the situation can be different quantum-mechanically. This paradoxically surprising phenomenon rests on the distinctive property of the quantum world that one cannot stare at a system without disturbing it. It was recently discovered that this seemingly annoying feature could be harnessed to control small quantum systems using weak measurements. Here we present one of the simplest models —an idealised double quantum dot—where by toying with the dot measurement strength, i.e. the intensity of the look, it is possible to create a particle flux in an otherwise completely symmetric system. The basic property underlying this phenomena is that measurement disturbances are very different on a system evolving unitarily and a system evolving dissipatively. This effect shows that adaptive measurements can have dramatic effects enabling transport control but possibly inducing biases in the measurement of macroscopic quantities if not handled with care.

  7. Measurement of particulate matter emission fluxes from a beef cattle feedlot using Flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on air emissions from open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas using the flux-gradient technique, a widely-used micrometeorological method for gaseous emissions from open sources. V...

  8. Reentrant albedo proton fluxes measured by the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Donato, C. De; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-05-01

    We present a precise measurement of downward going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ˜70 MeV performed by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and untrapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudotrapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high-energy albedo proton populations at low-Earth orbits.

  9. Yeast dynamic metabolic flux measurement in nutrient-rich media by HPLC and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Benjamin J; Navid, Ali; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Bench, Graham

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic flux, the flow of metabolites through networks of enzymes, represents the dynamic productive output of cells. Improved understanding of intracellular metabolic fluxes will enable targeted manipulation of metabolic pathways of medical and industrial importance to a greater degree than is currently possible. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a constraint-based approach to modeling metabolic fluxes, but its utility is limited by a lack of experimental measurements. Incorporation of experimentally measured fluxes as system constraints will significantly improve the overall accuracy of FBA. We applied a novel, two-tiered approach in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure nutrient consumption rates (extracellular fluxes) and a targeted intracellular flux using a (14)C-labeled precursor with HPLC separation and flux quantitation by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The use of AMS to trace the intracellular fate of (14)C-glutamine allowed the calculation of intracellular metabolic flux through this pathway, with glutathione as the metabolic end point. Measured flux values provided global constraints for the yeast FBA model which reduced model uncertainty by more than 20%, proving the importance of additional constraints in improving the accuracy of model predictions and demonstrating the use of AMS to measure intracellular metabolic fluxes. Our results highlight the need to use intracellular fluxes to constrain the models. We show that inclusion of just one such measurement alone can reduce the average variability of model predicted fluxes by 10%.

  10. Careful Measurements and Energy Balance Closure - The Case of Soil Heat Flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An area of persistent concern in micrometeorological measurements is the failure to close the energy balance at surface flux stations. While most attention has focused on corrections associated with the eddy fluxes, none of the energy balance terms are measured without error. The flux plate method i...

  11. Standardization of flux chambers and wind tunnels for area source emission measurements at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used many varied designs of wind tunnels and flux chambers to measure the flux of volatile organic compounds, odor, and ammonia from area sources at animal feeding operations. The measured fluxes are used to estimate emission factors or compare treatments. We sho...

  12. On-line measurements of ozone surface fluxes: Part II. Surface-level ozone fluxes onto the Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güsten, Hans; Heinrich, Günther; Mönnich, Erbo; Sprung, Detlev; Weppner, Joseph; Ramadan, Abou Bakr; Ezz El-Din, Mohammed R. M.; Ahmed, Darwish M.; Hassan, Galal K. Y.

    Surface-level ozone concentrations, the vertical turbulent ozone flux as well as the fluxes of sensible and latent heat were continuously monitored by the eddy covariance method in the Lybian desert, 30 km south of the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt, from 23 March until 9 April 1993. An automatic station powered by a photovoltaics generator system was used to measure the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert ecosystem. Fairly high ozone volume fractions up to 60 ppb were recorded when northerly winds prevailed. When southerly winds were blowing, the ozone volume fractions were lower and reached maximum values slightly above 40 ppb. On-line eddy correlation measurements of the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert were performed with a novel fast-response ozone sensor. The fairly small ozone fluxes were corrected for effects of micro-turbulent density fluctuations caused by the concomitant fluxes of heat and water vapour in the air volume (Webb correction). While ozone fluxes to the desert ecosystem are below 2 ppb cm s - in the night, maximum daytime ozone fluxes of 20 ppb cm s -1 were measured which yielded a maximum daily dry deposition velocity of 0.15 cm s -1. During the whole measurement campaign of 16 d a mean deposition velocity of Vd = 0.065 cm s -1 for ozone is calculated. For global numerical models in which the sources and sinks of ozone in the troposphere are taken into account, a daytime Vdof 0.1 cm s -1 and a nighttime value of 0.04 cm s -1 are recommended for the desert ecosystem.

  13. Measurements of Magnetic Helicity within Two Interacting Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaas, Timothy; Gekelman, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic helicity (HM) has become a useful tool in the exploration of astrophysical plasmas. Its conservation in the MHD limit (and even some fluid approaches) constrains the global behavior of large plasma structures. One such astrophysical structure is a magnetic flux rope: a rope-like, current-carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. Bundles of these ropes are commonly observed extending from the solar surface and can be found in the near-earth environment. In this well-diagnosed experiment (3D measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) , two magnetic flux ropes were generated in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. These ropes were driven kink-unstable, commencing complex motion. As they interact, helicity conservation is broken in regions of reconnection, turbulence, and instabilities. The changes in helicity can be visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB +E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity (-2EB). Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These qualities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak. As the ropes move and the topology of the field lines change, a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is formed. The volume averaged HM and the largest value of Q both oscillate but not in phase. In addition to magnetic helicity, similar quantities such as self-helicity, mutual-helicity, vorticity, and canonical helicity are derived and will be presented. This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  14. A highly portable, rapidly deployable system for eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Billesbach, David P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Torn, Margaret S.; Berry, Joe A.

    2001-09-19

    To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed, built, and field-tested a highly portable, rapidly deployable, eddy covariance CO{sub 2} flux measurement system. The system is built from off-the-shelf parts and was assembled at a minimal cost. The unique combination of features of this system allow for a very rapid deployment with a minimal number of field personnel. The system is capable of making high precision, unattended measurements of turbulent CO{sub 2} fluxes, latent heat (LE) fluxes, sensible heat fluxes (H), and momentum transfer fluxes. In addition, many of the meteorological and ecosystem variables necessary for quality control of the fluxes and for running ecosystem models are measured. A side-by-side field comparison of the system at a pair of established AmeriFlux sites has verified that, for single measurements, the system is capable of CO{sub 2} flux accuracy of about {+-} 1.2 {micro}mole/m{sup 2}/sec, LE flux accuracy of about {+-} 15 Watts/m{sup 2}, H flux accuracy of about {+-} 7 Watts/m{sup 2}, and momentum transfer flux accuracy of about {+-} 11 gm-m/sec/sec. System deployment time is between 2 and 4 hours by a single person. The system was measured to draw between 30 and 35 Watts of power and may be run from available line power, storage batteries, or solar panels.

  15. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, F.; Helmig, D.; van Dam, B. A.; Fairall, C. W.

    2011-10-01

    A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain five months (April-August 2004) of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a) ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b) ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c) wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of ∼8 × 10-3μg m-2 s-1, respectively ∼0.01 cm s-1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach) was on the order of 10-2 cm s-1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20-100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and spring-versus-summer dependencies.

  16. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, F.; Helmig, D.; van Dam, B. A.; Fairall, C. W.

    2011-02-01

    A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain four months of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the aerodynamic gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a) ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b) ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c) wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of -8 × 10-3 μg m-2 s-1, respectively ~0.01 cm s-1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach) was on the order of 10-2 cm s-1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20-100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment, deployed at Summit for a period of four months, allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and seasonal dependencies.

  17. Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. O.

    1983-03-01

    This report recommends instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two month measurement methodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

  18. Fluorescence measurements of the binding of cations to high-affinity and low-affinity sites on ATP-G-actin.

    PubMed

    Carlier, M F; Pantaloni, D; Korn, E D

    1986-08-15

    The binding of cations to ATP-G-actin has been assessed by measuring the kinetics of the increase in fluorescence of N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine-labeled actin. Ca2+ and Mg2+ compete for a single high-affinity site on ATP-G-actin with KD values of 1.5-15 nM for Ca2+ and 0.1-1 microM for Mg2+, i.e. with affinities 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported (Frieden, C., Lieberman, D., and Gilbert, H. R. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 8991-8993). As proposed by Frieden (Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886), the Mg-actin complex undergoes a slow isomerization (Kis = 0.03-0.1) to a higher affinity state (K'D = 4-40 nM). The replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at this high-affinity site causes a slow 10% increase in fluorescence that is 90% complete in about 200 s at saturating concentrations of Mg2+. Independently, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ bind to low-affinity sites (KD values of 0.15 mM for Ca2+ and Mg2+ and 10 mM for K+) which causes a rapid 6-8% increase in fluorescence (complete in less than 5 s). We propose that the activation step that converts Ca-G-actin to a polymerizable species upon addition of Mg2+ is the binding of Mg2+ to the low-affinity sites and not the replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at the high-affinity site.

  19. Actinic Prurigo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Georgina; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Mancheno-Valencia, Alexandra; Solís-Arias, Martha Patricia; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, María Teresa; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis that affects the skin, as well as the labial and conjunctival mucosa in indigenous and mestizo populations of Latin America. It starts predominantly in childhood, has a chronic course, and is exacerbated with solar exposure. Little is known of its pathophysiology, including the known mechanisms of the participation of HLA-DR4 and an abnormal immunologic response with increase of T CD4+ lymphocytes. The presence of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells suggests that it is a hypersensitivity reaction (likely type IVa or b). The diagnosis is clinical, and the presence of lymphoid follicles in the mucosal histopathologic study of mucosa is pathognomonic. The best available treatment to date is thalidomide, despite its secondary effects.

  20. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nuñez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  1. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  2. On-board Direct Eddy Flux Measurements of Heat, Water Vapor and Co2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Takahashi, S.; Kono, T.; Yamashita, E.; Ishida, H.

    Direct eddy fluxes of heat(sensible and latent), water vapor and CO2 were measuted with on-board eddy flux system over the Pacific. Present authors are continueing direct eddy flux measurement on R/V MIRAI(JAMSTEC) cruising the Pacific. I addition to these routine heat flux evaluation, direct CO2 flux measurements were applied with LI- 7500 (Licor) and Kaijo sonic anemometer. The eddy flux system including CO2 sensor worked very well even in the moving ship. Small amplitude of turbulent fluctuations of CO2 were measured and it is found that CO2 was transported downward to sea surface during a month(Nov-Dec 2001) around 2N,138E. CO2 concentrations in the air and sea water were also measured and they also confirmed the CO2 sink. The automated real-time eddy flux system including ship motion correction has started and this can be applied to other cruising ships.

  3. Long-term measurements of CO2 flux and evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan desert grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured CO2 and evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes above a Chihuahuan desert grassland from 1996 through 2001. Averaged across six years, this ecosystem was a source (positive flux)of CO2 in every month. Over that period, sustained periods of carbon uptake (negative flux)were rare. Averaged across a...

  4. In Situ Measurement of Energetic Electron Fluxes Inside Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is now well established that high-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

  5. Balloon-borne measurement of energetic electron fluxes inside thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, Shahab; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Dwyer, Joseph; Rassoul, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    High-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. We transmit data at 900MHz, ISM band, with 115.2 kb/s transmission rate. This would provide us a high resolution radiation profile over a relatively large distance. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

  6. Mass Flux Measurements of Arsenic in Groundwater (Battelle Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentration trends of arsenic are typically used to evaluate the performance of remediation efforts designed to mitigate arsenic contamination in groundwater. A complementary approach would be to track changes in mass flux of the contaminant through the subsurface, for exampl...

  7. Comparison of floating chamber and eddy covariance measurements of lake greenhouse gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgrajsek, E.; Sahlée, E.; Bastviken, D.; Holst, J.; Lindroth, A.; Tranvik, L.; Rutgersson, A.

    2013-11-01

    Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from lakes may have a large impact on the magnitude of the terrestrial carbon sink. Traditionally lake fluxes have been measured using the floating chambers (FC) technique, however, several recent studies use the eddy covariance (EC) method. We present simultaneous flux measurements using both methods at the lake Tämnaren in Sweden during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. Only very few similar studies exist. For CO2 flux, the two methods agree relatively well during some periods, but deviate substantially at other times. The large discrepancies might be caused by heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2w) in the EC flux footprint. The methods agree better for CH4 fluxes, it is, however, clear that short-term discontinuous FC measurements are likely to miss important high flux events.

  8. Comparison of floating chamber and eddy covariance measurements of lake greenhouse gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgrajsek, E.; Sahlée, E.; Bastviken, D.; Holst, J.; Lindroth, A.; Tranvik, L.; Rutgersson, A.

    2014-08-01

    Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from lakes may have a large impact on the magnitude of the terrestrial carbon sink. Traditionally lake fluxes have been measured using the floating chamber (FC) technique; however, several recent studies use the eddy covariance (EC) method. We present simultaneous flux measurements using both methods at lake Tämnaren in Sweden during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. Only very few similar studies exist. For CO2 flux, the two methods agree relatively well during some periods, but deviate substantially at other times. The large discrepancies might be caused by heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2w) in the EC flux footprint. The methods agree better for CH4 fluxes. It is, however, clear that short-term discontinuous FC measurements are likely to miss important high flux events.

  9. Actin Dynamics: From Nanoscale to Microscale

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic nature of actin in cells manifests itself in many ways: Polymerization near the cell edge is balanced by depolymerization in the interior, externally induced actin polymerization is followed by depolymerization, and spontaneous oscillations of the cell periphery are frequently seen. I discuss how mathematical modeling relates quantitative measures of actin dynamics to the rates of underlying molecular level processes. The rate of actin incorporation at the leading edge of a moving cell is roughly consistent with existing theories, and the factors determining the characteristic time of actin polymerization are fairly well understood. However, our understanding of actin disassembly is limited, in particular the interplay between severing and depolymerization and the role of specific combinations of proteins in implementing disassembly events. The origins of cell-edge oscillations, and their possible relation to actin waves, are a fruitful area of future research. PMID:20462375

  10. Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

  11. Measuring the biomechanical properties of the actin in MCF-7 breast cancer cell with a combined system of AFM and SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Minghai; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Biomechanics of cell plays an important role in the behavior and development of diseases, which has a profound influence on the health, structural integrity, and function of cells. In this study, we proposed a method to assess the biomechanical properties in single breast cancer cell line MCF-7 by combining structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with atomic force microscopy (AFM). High resolution optical image of actin in MCF-7 cell and its elastography were obtained. The result shows that the quantitative resolution was improved by SIM, with 490 nm of conventional fluorescence image and 285 nm of reconstructed SIM image, which could give a precise location for AFM measurement. The elasticity of actin is about in the range of 10 1000 kPa. The proposed methods will be helpful in the understanding and clinical diagnosis of diseases at single cell level.

  12. Comparison of eddy covariance and modified Bowen ratio methods for measuring gas fluxes and implications for measuring fluxes of persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinius, D. J.; Jahnke, A.; MacLeod, M.

    2015-11-01

    Semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cycle between the atmosphere and terrestrial surfaces, however measuring fluxes of POPs between the atmosphere and other media is challenging. Sampling times of hours to days are required to accurately measure trace concentrations of POPs in the atmosphere, which rules out the use of eddy covariance techniques that are used to measure gas fluxes of major air pollutants. An alternative, the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, has been used instead. In this study we used data from FLUXNET for CO2 and water vapor (H2O) to compare fluxes measured by eddy covariance to fluxes measured with the MBR method using vertical concentration gradients in air derived from averaged data that simulates the long sampling times typically required to measure POPs. When concentration gradients are strong and fluxes are unidirectional, the MBR method and the eddy covariance method agree within a factor of 3 for CO2, and within a factor of 10 for H2O. To remain within the range of applicability of the MBR method field, studies should be carried out under conditions such that the direction of net flux does not change during the sampling period. If that condition is met then the performance of the MBR method is not strongly affected by the length of sample duration nor the use of a fixed value for the transfer coefficient.

  13. Comparison of eddy covariance and modified Bowen ratio methods for measuring gas fluxes and implications for measuring fluxes of persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinius, Damien Johann; Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cycle between the atmosphere and terrestrial surfaces; however measuring fluxes of POPs between the atmosphere and other media is challenging. Sampling times of hours to days are required to accurately measure trace concentrations of POPs in the atmosphere, which rules out the use of eddy covariance techniques that are used to measure gas fluxes of major air pollutants. An alternative, the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, has been used instead. In this study we used data from FLUXNET for CO2 and water vapor (H2O) to compare fluxes measured by eddy covariance to fluxes measured with the MBR method using vertical concentration gradients in air derived from averaged data that simulate the long sampling times typically required to measure POPs. When concentration gradients are strong and fluxes are unidirectional, the MBR method and the eddy covariance method agree within a factor of 3 for CO2, and within a factor of 10 for H2O. To remain within the range of applicability of the MBR method, field studies should be carried out under conditions such that the direction of net flux does not change during the sampling period. If that condition is met, then the performance of the MBR method is neither strongly affected by the length of sample duration nor the use of a fixed value for the transfer coefficient.

  14. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  15. Solid He: Progress, Status, and Outlook for Mass Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, R. B.

    2015-07-01

    After a brief introduction, what is provided there is brief summary of work with solid He done at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and an outlook for future work. What is presented here is based on a presentation made at the Quantum Gases Fluids and Solids Workshop in Sao Paulo, Brazil in August of 2014. Our work with solid He is aimed at the question: Can a sample cell filled with solid He support a mass flux through the cell? The answer, as will be shown here, is yes. Evidence for this from several types of experiments will be reviewed. There will be an emphasis on more recent work, work that explores how the flux observed depends on temperature and on the He impurity level. The behavior observed suggests that solid He may be an example of a material that demonstrates Bosonic Luttinger liquid behavior. The normalized He flux has a universal temperature dependence. The presence of He at different impurity levels shows that the He blocks the flux at a characteristic temperature. The behavior appears to be consistent with the cores of dislocations as the entity that carries the flux, but it is clear that more work needs to be done to fully understand solid He.

  16. New technique of the local heat flux measurement in combustion chambers of steam boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Sobota, Tomasz; Dzierwa, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    A new method for measurement of local heat flux to water-walls of steam boilers was developed. A flux meter tube was made from an eccentric tube of short length to which two longitudinal fins were attached. These two fins prevent the boiler setting from heating by a thermal radiation from the combustion chamber. The fins are not welded to the adjacent water-wall tubes, so that the temperature distribution in the heat flux meter is not influenced by neighbouring water-wall tubes. The thickness of the heat flux tube wall is larger on the fireside to obtain a greater distance between the thermocouples located inside the wall which increases the accuracy of heat flux determination. Based on the temperature measurements at selected points inside the heat flux meter, the heat flux absorbed by the water-wall, heat transfer coefficient on the inner tube surface and temperature of the water-steam mixture was determined.

  17. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Verma, Shashi B.; Starks, Patrick; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations to model fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation using routine weather data collected by automated weather stations was tested and the estimated fluxes were compared with fluxes measured over wheat. The model Cupid was used to model the fluxes. Two or more automated weather stations, interrogated by radio frequency and other means, were utilized to examine some of the climatic variability of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) site, to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams from various locations at the site and to compare modeled latent and sensible heat fluxes with measured values. Some bidirectional reflected and emitted radiation data were collected from 23 locations throughout the FIFE site. Analysis of these data along with analysis of the measured sensible and latent heat fluxes is just beginning.

  18. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  19. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes on the Bakchar bog in warm season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Oleg A.; Maksyutov, Shamil S.; Davydov, Denis K.; Fofonov, Aleksander V.; Glagolev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-01

    Data terrain-atmosphere fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide overseen for measurement campaign Plotnikovo-2014 on the bog's Flux-NIES automatic complex (N56°51.29' E82° 50.91') in the warn season. Six vegetative groups on the bog's surface were taken in comparison. Improvement precise method used to determinate the sensitivity for the gases analyzers and calculating of the CO2 and CH4 fluxes measured by automated chamber-based technique.

  20. Eddy covariance flux measurements of gaseous elemental mercury using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Ashley M; Moore, Christopher W; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Kljun, Natascha; Obrist, Daniel

    2015-02-03

    A newly developed pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentrations at high temporal resolution (25 Hz) was used to successfully conduct the first eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of GEM. GEM is the main gaseous atmospheric form, and quantification of bidirectional exchange between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere is important because gas exchange is important on a global scale. For example, surface GEM emissions from natural sources, legacy emissions, and re-emission of previously deposited anthropogenic pollution may exceed direct primary anthropogenic emissions. Using the EC technique for flux measurements requires subsecond measurements, which so far has not been feasible because of the slow time response of available instrumentation. The CRDS system measured GEM fluxes, which were compared to fluxes measured with the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) and a dynamic flux chamber (DFC). Measurements took place near Reno, NV, in September and October 2012 encompassing natural, low-mercury (Hg) background soils and Hg-enriched soils. During nine days of measurements with deployment of Hg-enriched soil in boxes within 60 m upwind of the EC tower, the covariance of GEM concentration and vertical wind speed was measured, showing that EC fluxes over an Hg-enriched area were detectable. During three separate days of flux measurements over background soils (without Hg-enriched soils), no covariance was detected, indicating fluxes below the detection limit. When fluxes were measurable, they strongly correlated with wind direction; the highest fluxes occurred when winds originated from the Hg-enriched area. Comparisons among the three methods showed good agreement in direction (e.g., emission or deposition) and magnitude, especially when measured fluxes originated within the Hg-enriched soil area. EC fluxes averaged 849 ng m(-2) h(-1), compared to DFC fluxes of 1105 ng m(-2) h(-1) and MBR fluxes

  1. MARIE Dose and Flux Measurements in Mars Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L. S.; Turner, R.; Atwell, W.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft in orbit around Mars. MARIE operated successfully from March 2002 through October 2003. At the time of this writing, the instrument is off due to a loss of communications during an extremely intense Solar Particle Event. Efforts to revive MARIE are planned for Spring 2004, when Odyssey's role as a communications relay for the MER rovers is completed. During the period of successful operation, MARIE returned the first detailed energetic charged particle data from Mars. Due to limitations of the instrument, normalizing MARIE data to flux or dose is not straightforward - several large corrections are needed. Thus normalized results (like dose or flux) have large uncertainties and/or significant model-dependence. The problems in normalization are mainly due to inefficiency in detecting high-energy protons (signal-to-noise problems force the trigger threshold to be higher than optimal), to the excessively high gains employed in the signal processing electronics (many ions deposit energy sufficient to saturate the electronics, and dE/dx information is lost), and to artifacts associated with the two trigger detectors (incomplete registration of dE/dx). Despite these problems, MARIE is efficient for detecting helium ions with kinetic energies above about 30 MeV/nucleon, and for detecting high-energy ions (energies above about 400 MeV/nucleon) with charges from 5 to 10. Fluxes of these heavier ions can be compared to fluxes obtained from the ACE/CRIS instrument, providing at least one area of direct comparison between data obtained at Earth and at Mars; this analysis will be presented as a work in progress. We will also present dose-rate data, with a detailed explanation of the many sources of uncertainty in normalization. The results for both flux and dose will be compared to predictions of the HZETRN model of the GCR.

  2. LEAF, BRANCH, STAND & LANDSCAPE SCALE MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXES FROM U.S. WOODLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural volatile organic compounds (VOC) fluxes were measured in three U.S. woodlands in summer 1993. Fluxes from individual leaves and branches were estimated with enclosure techniques and used to initialize and evaluate VOC emission model estimates. Ambient measurements were us...

  3. Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamber-based measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from soil is a common technique. However, when changes in chamber headspace gas concentrations are small over time, determination of the flux can be problematic. Several factors contribute to the reliability of measured fluxes, including: samplin...

  4. A bottom-up perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of global eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Amelynck, Crist; Ammann, Christof; Arneth, Almut; Bamberger, Ines; Goldstein, Allen; Hansel, Armin; Heinesch, Bernhard; Holst, Thomas; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Karl, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; McKinney, Karena; Munger, William; Schade, Gunnar; Schoon, Niels

    2014-05-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) is, after methane, the second most abundant VOC in the troposphere and globally represents nearly 20% of the total biospheric VOC emissions. With typical concentrations of 1-10 ppb in the continental boundary layer, methanol plays a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry, which needs to be evaluated in the light of ongoing changes in land use and climate. Previous global methanol budgets have approached the net land flux by summing up the various emission terms (namely primary biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, plant decay and biomass burning) and by subtracting dry and wet deposition, resulting in a net land flux in the range of 75-245 Tg y-1. The data underlying these budget calculations largely stem from small-scale leaf gas exchange measurements and while recently column-integrated remotely sensed methanol concentrations have become available for constraining budget calculations, there have been few attempts to contrast model calculations with direct net ecosystem-scale methanol flux measurements. Here we use eddy covariance methanol flux measurements from 8 sites in Europe and North America to study the magnitude of and controls on the diurnal and seasonal variability in the net ecosystem methanol flux. In correspondence with leaf-level literature, our data show that methanol emission and its strong environmental and biotic control (by temperature and stomatal conductance) prevailed at the more productive (agricultural) sites and at a perturbed forest site. In contrast, at more natural, less productive sites substantial deposition of methanol occurred, in particular during periods of surface wetness. These deposition processes are poorly represented by currently available temperature/light and/or production-driven modelling algorithms. A new framework for modelling the bi-directional land-atmosphere methanol exchange is proposed which accounts for the production of methanol in leaves, the regulation of leaf methanol emission by stomatal

  5. Chemically-resolved aerosol eddy covariance flux measurements in urban Mexico City during MILAGRO 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalakeviciute, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Allwine, E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jobson, B. T.; Molina, L. T.; Nemitz, E.; Pressley, S. N.; VanReken, T. M.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Velasco, E.; Lamb, B. K.

    2012-08-01

    As part of the MILAGRO 2006 field campaign, the exchange of atmospheric aerosols with the urban landscape was measured from a tall tower erected in a heavily populated neighborhood of Mexico City. Urban submicron aerosol fluxes were measured using an eddy covariance method with a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer during a two week period in March, 2006. Nitrate and ammonium aerosol concentrations were elevated at this location near the city center compared to measurements at other urban sites. Significant downward fluxes of nitrate aerosol, averaging -0.2 μg m-2 s-1, were measured during daytime. The urban surface was not a significant source of sulfate aerosols. The measurements also showed that primary organic aerosol fluxes, approximated by hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA), displayed diurnal patterns similar to CO2 fluxes and anthropogenic urban activities. Overall, 47% of submicron organic aerosol emissions were HOA, 35% were oxygenated (OOA) and 18% were associated with biomass burning (BBOA). Organic aerosol fluxes were bi-directional, but on average HOA fluxes were 0.1 μg m-2 s-1, OOA fluxes were -0.03 μg m-2 s-1, and BBOA fluxes were -0.03 μg m-2 s-1. After accounting for size differences (PM1 vs PM2.5) and using an estimate of the black carbon component, comparison of the flux measurements with the 2006 gridded emissions inventory of Mexico City, showed that the daily-averaged total PM emission rates were essentially identical for the emission inventory and the flux measurements. However, the emission inventory included dust and metal particulate contributions, which were not included in the flux measurements. As a result, it appears that the inventory underestimates overall PM emissions for this location.

  6. Temperature and heat flux measurement techniques for aeroengine fire test: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, I.; Abu Talib, A. R.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Saadon, S.

    2016-10-01

    This review is made of studies whereby some types of fire test measuring instrument were compared based on their mode of operation, sensing ability, temperature resistance and their calibration mode used for aero-engine applications. The study discusses issues affecting temperature and heat flux measurement, methods of measurement, calibration and uncertainties that occur in the fire test. It is found that the temperature and heat flux measurements of the flame from the standard burner need to be corrected and taken into account for radiation heat loss. Methods for temperature and heat flux measurements, as well as uncertainties analysis, were also discussed.

  7. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  8. Operation TEAPOT. Project 2.2. Neutron Flux Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    fissionable materials used were K plutonium-239, neptunium - 237 , and uranium-238. Approximate thresholds, cross sections, and sample weights were: Approximate...Shots 9 and 10 and on weapons of essentially new design, -~ Detectors employing gold, sulfur, plutonium, neptunium , and uranium-238 were employed...calibrated in terms of the integrated flux interacting with the sample. Neptunium has a neutron fission threshold in the region of 700 key. Samples are

  9. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, R.V.

    1993-03-16

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

  10. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

  11. Improved radon-flux-measurement system for uranium-tailings pile measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.

    1981-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing cover technology for uranium mill tailings that will inhibit the diffusion of radon to the atmosphere. As part of this cover program, an improved radon flux measurement system has been developed. The radon measurement system is a recirculating, pressure-balanced, flow-through system that uses activated carbon at ambient temperatures to collect the radon. With the system, an area of 0.93 m/sup 2/ is sampled for periods ranging from 1 to 12 h. The activated carbon is removed from the radon trap and the collected radon is determined by counting the /sup 214/Bi daughter product. Development of the system included studies to determine the efficiency of activated carbon, relative calibration measurements and field measurements made during 1980 at the inactive tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado. Results of these studies are presented.

  12. Research on effects of baffle position in an integrating sphere on the luminous flux measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fangsheng; Li, Tiecheng; Yin, Dejin; Lai, Lei; Xia, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In the field of optical metrology, luminous flux is an important index to characterize the quality of electric light source. Currently, the majority of luminous flux measurement is based on the integrating sphere method, so measurement accuracy of integrating sphere is the key factor. There are plenty of factors affecting the measurement accuracy, such as coating, power and the position of light source. However, the baffle which is a key part of integrating sphere has important effects on the measurement results. The paper analyzes in detail the principle of an ideal integrating sphere. We use moving rail to change the relative position of baffle and light source inside the sphere. By experiments, measured luminous flux values at different distances between the light source and baffle are obtained, which we used to take analysis of the effects of different baffle position on the measurement. By theoretical calculation, computer simulation and experiment, we obtain the optimum position of baffle for luminous flux measurements. Based on the whole luminous flux measurement error analysis, we develop the methods and apparatus to improve the luminous flux measurement accuracy and reliability. It makes our unifying and transferring work of the luminous flux more accurate in East China and provides effective protection for our traceability system.

  13. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  14. Air-Sea Fluxes in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica from In Situ Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, S. L.; Cassano, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2009, the first unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) were flown over Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica to collect information regarding air-sea interactions over a wintertime coastal polynya. The UAVs measured wind, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity in flights parallel to the downslope wind flow over the polynya, and in a series of vertical profiles at varying distances from the coast. During three flights on three different days, sufficient measurements were collected to calculate sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum fluxes over varying oceanic surface states, including frazil, pancake, and rafted ice, with background winds greater than 15 ms-1. During the three flights, sensible heat fluxes upwards of 600 Wm-2 were estimated near the coast, with maximum latent heat fluxes near 160 Wm-2 just downwind of the coast. The calculated accelerations due to the momentum flux divergence were on the order of 10-3 ms-2. In addition to the fluxes, changes in the overall momentum budget, including the horizontal pressure gradient force, were also calculated during the three flights. This presentation will summarize the methodology for calculating the fluxes from the UAV data, present the first ever in situ estimates of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum fluxes and overall momentum budget estimates over Terra Nova Bay, and compare the UAV flux calculations to flux measurements taken during other field campaigns in other regions of the Antarctic, as well as to model estimates over Terra Nova Bay.

  15. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods.

  16. Evaluation of Heat Flux Measurement as a New Process Analytical Technology Monitoring Tool in Freeze Drying.

    PubMed

    Vollrath, Ilona; Pauli, Victoria; Friess, Wolfgang; Freitag, Angelika; Hawe, Andrea; Winter, Gerhard

    2017-01-04

    This study investigates the suitability of heat flux measurement as a new technique for monitoring product temperature and critical end points during freeze drying. The heat flux sensor is tightly mounted on the shelf and measures non-invasively (no contact with the product) the heat transferred from shelf to vial. Heat flux data were compared to comparative pressure measurement, thermocouple readings, and Karl Fischer titration as current state of the art monitoring techniques. The whole freeze drying process including freezing (both by ramp freezing and controlled nucleation) and primary and secondary drying was considered. We found that direct measurement of the transferred heat enables more insights into thermodynamics of the freezing process. Furthermore, a vial heat transfer coefficient can be calculated from heat flux data, which ultimately provides a non-invasive method to monitor product temperature throughout primary drying. The end point of primary drying determined by heat flux measurements was in accordance with the one defined by thermocouples. During secondary drying, heat flux measurements could not indicate the progress of drying as monitoring the residual moisture content. In conclusion, heat flux measurements are a promising new non-invasive tool for lyophilization process monitoring and development using energy transfer as a control parameter.

  17. Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aharmim, B.; Farine, J.; Fleurot, F.; Hallman, E. D.; Krueger, A.; Luoma, S.; Schwendener, M. H.; Virtue, C. J.; Ahmed, S. N.; Cai, B.; Chen, M.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Guillian, E.; Harvey, P. J.; Kos, M.; Kraus, C.; Leslie, J. R.; MacLellan, R.; Mak, H. B.

    2009-07-01

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and unoscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muonlike events are measured between -1{<=}cos{theta}{sub zenith}{<=}0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30x10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22{+-}0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos{theta}{sub zenith}>0.4 is measured to be (3.31{+-}0.01(stat){+-}0.09(sys))x10{sup -10} {mu}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-02-16

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Andersen, T. C.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M. C.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox-Mobrand, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Grant, D. R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Harvey, P. J.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A. J.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-07-10

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  20. A comparison of six methods for measuring soil-surface carbon dioxide fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, J.M.; Kucharik, C.J.; Gower, S.T.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Crill, P.M.; Rayment, M.; Savage, K.; Striegl, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of soil-surface CO2 fluxes are important for characterizing the carbon budget of boreal forests because these fluxes can be the second largest component of the budget. Several methods for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes are available: (1) closed-dynamic-chamber systems, (2) closed-static-chamber systems, (3) open-chamber systems, and (4) eddy covariance systems. This paper presents a field comparison of six individual systems for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes with each of the four basic system types represented. A single system is used as a reference and compared to each of the other systems individually in black spruce (Picea mariana), jack pine (Pinus banksiana), or aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests. Fluxes vary from 1 to 10 ??mol CO2 m-2 s-1. Adjustment factors to bring all of the systems into agreement vary from 0.93 to 1.45 with an uncertainty of about 10-15%.

  1. Sensible heat bias in open-path eddy covariance carbon dioxide flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, O.; Helbig, M.; Karoline, W.; Humphreys, E.; Quinton, W. L.; Bogoev, I.

    2015-12-01

    The widely observed differences between net carbon dioxide (CO2) flux estimates derived from eddy covariance systems deploying open- and closed-path infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) pose a major challenge for site intercomparison studies. Our limited knowledge about potential systematic biases in the derivation of CO2 flux estimates by these two types of systems hampers our ability to detect significant differences in CO2 flux measurements made at contrasting ecosystems. Here we explore potential systematic biases in CO2 fluxes measured with two open-path IRGAs. Comparison of fluxes from open- (EC150 & IRGASON, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and (en)closed-path IRGAs (LI7000 & LI7200, LI-COR Biosciences) at a northern peatland and a northern boreal forest site revealed consistent differences in CO2 flux estimates across a wide range of environmental conditions. These differences directly scaled with the magnitude of the sensible heat flux indicating a selectively systematic bias in open-path CO2 flux measurements due to the temperature sensitivity of the CO2 density measurements. We present two empirical correction procedures: the "direct" approach requires data from a limited period of concurrent CO2 flux measurements by open- and closed-path IRGA-based eddy covariance systems, whereas the second approach only requires wintertime CO2 flux data from the open-path IRGA. The "direct" approach effectively removes the bias in the open-path CO2 flux measurements and results in remaining differences with the closed-path CO2 fluxes smaller than 0.5 µmol m-2 s-1. In contrast, the "wintertime" approach seems to overcompensate for the sensible heat effects with differences remaining between 0.9 µmol m-2 s-1 and 1.8 µmol m-2 s-1. When a high-frequency air temperature is used to compensate for the temperature sensitivity of the CO2 density measurements, open- and closed-path CO2 flux agree within ±0.5 µmol m-2 s-1, similar to the "direct" post-processing correction. These

  2. Enhancing the precision and accuracy within and among AmeriFlux site measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Bev

    2013-11-25

    This is the final report for AmeriFlux QA/QC at Oregon State University. The major objective of this project is to contribute to the AmeriFlux network by continuing to build consistency in AmeriFlux measurements by addressing objectives stated in the AmeriFlux strategic plan and self evaluation, the North American Carbon Program, and the US Carbon Cycle Science Program. The project directly contributes to NACP and CCSP goals to establish an integrated, near-real time network of observations to inform climate change science.

  3. Comparison of surface fluxes and boundary-layer measurements at Arctic terrestrial sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Albee, Robert; Makshtas, Alexander; Kustov, Vasily; Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy

    2014-05-01

    Observational evidence suggests that atmospheric energy fluxes are a major contributor to the decrease of the Arctic pack ice, seasonal land snow cover and the warming of the surrounding land areas and permafrost layers. To better understand the atmosphere-surface exchange mechanisms, improve models, and to diagnose climate variability in the Arctic, accurate measurements are required of all components of the net surface energy budget and the carbon dioxide cycle over representative areas and over multiple years. This study analyzes and discusses variability of surface fluxes and basic meteorological parameters based on measurements made at several long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in USA (Barrow), Canada (Eureka), and Russia (Tiksi). Tower-based eddy covariance and solar radiation measurements provide a long-term near continuous temporal record of hourly average mass and energy fluxes respectively. The turbulent fluxes of the momentum, sensible heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are supported by additional atmospheric and surface/snow/permafrost measurements (mean wind speed, air temperature and humidity, upwelling and downwelling short-wave and long-wave atmospheric and surface radiation, snow depth, surface albedo, soil heat flux, active layer temperature profiles etc.) In this study we compare annual cycles of surface fluxes including solar radiation and other ancillary data to describe four seasons in the Arctic including spring onset of melt and fall onset of snow accumulation. Particular interest is a transition through freezing point, i.e. during transition from winter to spring and from summer to fall, when the carbon dioxide and/or water vapor turbulent fluxes change their direction. According to our data, in a summer period observed temporal variability of the carbon dioxide flux was generally in anti-phase with water vapor flux (downward CO2 flux and upward H2O flux). On average the turbulent flux of carbon

  4. An assessment of corrections for eddy covariance measured turbulent fluxes over snow in mountain environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snow-covered complex terrain is an extremely important runoff generating landscape in high altitude and latitude environments, yet is often considered non-viable for eddy covariance measurements of turbulent fluxes. Turbulent flux data are useful for evaluating the coupled snow cover mass and energ...

  5. Shipboard Measurements of Surface Flux and Near Surface Profiles and Surface Flux Parameterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    suspected that the bow measurements are affected by wave breaking that is similar to the problem in the Licor system. We also note that temperature...vapor mixing ratio measurements with the same Licor systems on the two masts (not shown here) had significant differences and frequent problems, which...is probable due to the sensitivity of Licor sensor to the spays from the breaking waves, especially the system on the bow mast. More careful

  6. Quantifying particle size and turbulent scale dependence of dust flux in the Sahara using aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Philip D.; Parker, Douglas J.; Ryder, Claire L.; Marsham, John H.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Dorsey, James R.; Brooks, Ian M.; Dean, Angela R.; Crosier, Jonathon; McQuaid, James B.; Washington, Richard

    2014-06-01

    The first size-resolved airborne measurements of dust fluxes and the first dust flux measurements from the central Sahara are presented and compared with a parameterization by Kok (2011a). High-frequency measurements of dust size distribution were obtained from 0.16 to 300 µm diameter, and eddy covariance fluxes were derived. This is more than an order of magnitude larger size range than previous flux estimates. Links to surface emission are provided by analysis of particle drift velocities. Number flux is described by a -2 power law between 1 and 144 µm diameter, significantly larger than the 12 µm upper limit suggested by Kok (2011a). For small particles, the deviation from a power law varies with terrain type and the large size cutoff is correlated with atmospheric vertical turbulent kinetic energy, suggesting control by vertical transport rather than emission processes. The measured mass flux mode is in the range 30-100 µm. The turbulent scales important for dust flux are from 0.1 km to 1-10 km. The upper scale increases during the morning as boundary layer depth and eddy size increase. All locations where large dust fluxes were measured had large topographical variations. These features are often linked with highly erodible surface features, such as wadis or dunes. We also hypothesize that upslope flow and flow separation over such features enhance the dust flux by transporting large particles out of the saltation layer. The tendency to locate surface flux measurements in open, flat terrain means these favored dust sources have been neglected in previous studies.

  7. Measurement of the Magnetic Flux Noise Spectrum in Superconducting Xmon Transmon Quantum Bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaro, Ben; Sank, D.; Kelly, J.; Chen, Z.; Campbell, B.; Dunsworth, A.; O'Malley, P.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Migrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Roushan, P.; White, T.; Martinis, J. M.

    Dephasing induced by magnetic flux noise limits the performance of modern superconducting quantum processors. We measure the flux noise power spectrum in planar, frequency-tunable, Xmon transmon quantum bits (qubits), with several SQUID loop geometries. We extend the Ramsey Tomography Oscilloscope (RTO) technique by rapid sampling up to 1 MHz, without state reset, to measure the flux noise power spectrum between 10-2 and 105 Hz. The RTO measurements are combined with idle gate randomized benchmarking and Ramsey decay to give a more complete picture of dephasing in SQUID-based devices.

  8. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  9. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  10. Progress in the measurement of SSME turbine heat flux with plug-type sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1991-01-01

    Data reduction was completed for tests of plug-type heat flux sensors (gauges) in a turbine blade thermal cycling tester (TBT) that is located at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, and a typical gauge is illustrated. This is the first time that heat flux has been measured in a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopump Turbine environment. The development of the concept for the gauge was performed in a heat flux measurement facility at Lewis. In this facility, transient and steady state absorbed surface heat flux information was obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gauge. A schematic of the TBT is presented, and plots of the absorbed surface heat flux measured on the three blades tested in the TBT are presented. High quality heat flux values were measured on all three blades. The experiments demonstrated that reliable and durable gauges can be repeatedly fabricated into the airfoils. The experiment heat flux data are being used for verification of SSME analytical stress, boundary layer, and heat transfer design models. Other experimental results and future plans are also presented.

  11. An inter-comparison of surface energy flux measurement systems used during FIFE, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nie, D.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Fritschen, L. J.; Weaver, H.; Smith, E. A.; Verma, S. B.; Field, R. T.; Kustas, W.; Stewart, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    During the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Program Field Experiment (FIFE-87), surface energy fluxes were measured at 22 flux sites by nine groups of scientists using different measuring systems. A rover Bowen ratio station was taken to nearly all the flux stations to serve as a reference for estimating the instrument related differences. The rover system was installed within a few meters from the host instrument of a site. Net radiation, Bowen ratio, and latent heat fluxes were compared between the rover and the host for the stations visited. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between rover measurements and host measurements. These inter-comparisons are needed to examine the influence of instrumentation on measurement uncertainty. Highly significant effects of instrument type were detected from these comparisons. Instruments of the same type showed average differences of less than 5 percent for net radiation, 10 percent for Bowen ratio, and 6 percent for latent heat flux. The corresponding average differences for different types of instruments can be up to 10, 30, and 20 percent respectively. The Didcot net radiometer gave higher net radiation while the Swissteco type showed lower values, as compared to the corrected REBS model. The 4-way components methed and the Thornswaite type give similar values to the REBS. The SERBS type Bowen ratio systems exhibit slightly lower Bowen ratios and thus higher latent heat fluxes, compared to the AZET systems. Eddy correlation systems showed slightly lower latent heat flux in comparison to the Bowen ratio systems.

  12. Structural Transitions of F-Actin:Espin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Espin is an actin bundling protein involved in the formation of the parallel bundles of filamentous actin in hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in espin are implicated in deafness phenotypes in mice and humans. We present measurements of the F-actin structures induced by wild type and by mutated espin obtained via small angle x-ray scattering and fluorescence microscopy. We found that wild type espin induced a paracrystalline hexagonal array of twisted F-actin, whereas the mutated espin only condensed the F-actin into a nematic-like phase. The possibility of coexisting nematic and bundled actin in mixtures containing both mutant and wild type espins was also investigated.

  13. Neutral hydrogen flux measured at 100- to 200-km altitude in an electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen fluxes were measured at altitudes of 120-200 km by a rocket payload that also measured electron and proton fluxes and vector magnetic fields. An intense electron arc was crossed, while an upper limit to the flux of 0.5- to 20-keV protons was 1,000,000 per sq cm s sr keV. A neutral flux of 50,000,000 per sq cm s sr was observed, assuming hydrogen with greater than 1-keV energy, with greater north-south extent than the electron flux. Its pitch angle distribution was peaked toward 90 deg, tending toward isotropy in the center. This is fitted to a model describing spreading of an initial proton arc above 500 km.

  14. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  15. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  16. Intercalibration of a passive wind-vane flux sampler against a continuous-flow denuder for the measurements of atmospheric ammonia concentrations and surface exchange fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Wyers, G. P.; Nørnberg, P.; Nemitz, E.; Sutton, M. A.

    A passive wind-vane flux sampler is a simple low-cost device used to estimate long-term vertical fluxes of ammonia in the atmospheric surface boundary layer. The passive flux sampler measures the horizontal flux of ammonia. A vertical gradient of the horizontal flux, combined with micro-meteorological measurements of wind speed and temperature, is used to estimated the vertical flux of ammonia using a modified aerodynamic gradient technique. The passive wind-vane flux sampler gradient was calibrated against a gradient measured with fast response (6 min) continuous-flow denuders. The measurements were carried out at a heathland located in an intensive farming area in the centre of the Netherlands. A field campaign took place over 70 day period in the summer of 1996, during which the sampling periods of the passive wind-vane flux sampler varied between 3 and 9 days. The comparison clearly showed that the long-term measurements with the passive wind-vane flux samplers gave accurate average ammonia deposition values for the field campaign as a whole which deviated by only 18% from the reference flux. However, there was no significant correlation between the fluxes from the passive samplers and the reference method for the individual 10 periods which were compared. Possible explanations found for the lacking correlation were (I) a high percentage number of half-hour emission events within each period resulted in a significant large relative deviation between the fluxes, and (II) uncertainties in the reference method might also explain the lacking correlation. The passive wind-vane flux samplers proved to be a stable method for long-term measurements (months to years) due to a close to 100% optimal functioning during the field campaign.

  17. Architecture and Connectivity Govern Actin Network Contractility.

    PubMed

    Ennomani, Hajer; Letort, Gaëlle; Guérin, Christophe; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Cao, Wenxiang; Nédélec, François; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2016-03-07

    Actomyosin contractility plays a central role in a wide range of cellular processes, including the establishment of cell polarity, cell migration, tissue integrity, and morphogenesis during development. The contractile response is variable and depends on actomyosin network architecture and biochemical composition. To determine how this coupling regulates actomyosin-driven contraction, we used a micropatterning method that enables the spatial control of actin assembly. We generated a variety of actin templates and measured how defined actin structures respond to myosin-induced forces. We found that the same actin filament crosslinkers either enhance or inhibit the contractility of a network, depending on the organization of actin within the network. Numerical simulations unified the roles of actin filament branching and crosslinking during actomyosin contraction. Specifically, we introduce the concept of "network connectivity" and show that the contractions of distinct actin architectures are described by the same master curve when considering their degree of connectivity. This makes it possible to predict the dynamic response of defined actin structures to transient changes in connectivity. We propose that, depending on the connectivity and the architecture, network contraction is dominated by either sarcomeric-like or buckling mechanisms. More generally, this study reveals how actin network contractility depends on its architecture under a defined set of biochemical conditions.

  18. Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Pressley, S.; Grivicke, R.; Allwine, E.; Coons, T.; Foster, W.; Jobson, B. T.; Westberg, H.; Ramos, R.; Hernández, F.; Molina, L. T.; Lamb, B.

    2009-10-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric chemistry and the role that cities play in regional and global chemical cycles. As part of the MCMA-2003 study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City (Velasco et al., 2005a, b). During the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign, a second flux measurement study was conducted in a different district of Mexico City to corroborate the 2003 flux measurements, to expand the number of species measured, and to obtain additional data for evaluation of the local emissions inventory. Fluxes of CO2 and olefins were measured by the conventional EC technique using an open path CO2 sensor and a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard. In addition, fluxes of toluene, benzene, methanol and C2-benzenes were measured using a virtual disjunct EC method with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer. The flux measurements were analyzed in terms of diurnal patterns and vehicular activity and were compared with the most recent gridded local emissions inventory. In both studies, the results showed that the urban surface of Mexico City is a net source of CO2 and VOCs with significant contributions from vehicular traffic. Evaporative emissions from commercial and other anthropogenic activities were significant sources of toluene and methanol. The results show that the emissions inventory is in reasonable agreement with measured olefin and CO2 fluxes, while C2-benzenes and toluene emissions from evaporative sources are overestimated in the inventory. It appears that methanol emissions from mobile sources occur, but are not reported in the mobile emissions inventory.

  19. Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Pressley, S.; Grivicke, R.; Allwine, E.; Coons, T.; Foster, W.; Jobson, T.; Westberg, H.; Ramos, R.; Hernández, F.; Molina, L. T.; Lamb, B.

    2009-03-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric chemistry and the role that cities play in regional and global chemical cycles. As part of the MCMA-2003 study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City (Velasco et al., 2005a, b). During the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign, a second flux measurement study was conducted in a different district of Mexico City to corroborate the 2003 flux measurements, to expand the number of species measured, and to obtain additional data for evaluation of the local emissions inventory. Fluxes of CO2 and olefins were measured by the conventional EC technique using an open path CO2 sensor and a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard. In addition, fluxes of toluene, benzene, methanol and C2-benzenes were measured using a virtual disjunct EC method with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer. The flux measurements were analyzed in terms of diurnal patterns and vehicular activity and were compared with the most recent gridded emissions inventory. In both studies, the results showed that the urban surface of Mexico City is a net source of CO2 and VOCs with significant contributions from vehicular traffic. Evaporative emissions from commercial and other anthropogenic activities were significant sources of toluene and methanol. The data show that the emissions inventory is in reasonable agreement with measured olefin and CO2 fluxes, while C2-benzenes and toluene emissions from evaporative sources are overestimated in the inventory. It appears that methanol emissions from mobile sources occur, but are not present in the mobile emissions inventory.

  20. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  1. The Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Solid Samples by Heat Flux Differantial Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kök, M.; Aydoǧdu, Y.

    2007-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of polyvinylchloride (PVC), polysytrene (PS) and polypropylene (PP) were measured by heat flux DSC. Our results are in good agreement with the results observed by different methods.

  2. Measurements of the Solar Neutrino Flux from Super-Kamiokande{close_quote}s First 300 Days

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Ichihara, E.; Inoue, K.; Ishihara, K.; Ishino, H.; Itow, Y.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Kasuga, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Koshio, Y.; Martens, K.; Miura, M.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Okada, A.; Oketa, M.; Okumura, K.; Ota, M.; Sakurai, N.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yamada, S.; Earl, M.; Habig, A.; Hong, J.T.; Kearns, E.; Kim, S.B.; Masuzawa, M.; Messier, M.D.; Scholberg, K.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Walter, C.W.; Goldhaber, M.; Barszczak, T.; Gajewski, W.; Halverson, P.G.; Hsu, J.; Kropp, W.R.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Sobel, H.W.; Vagins, M.R.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Ganezer, K.S.; Keig, W.E.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Tasaka, S.; Flanagan, J.W.; Kibayashi, A.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Stenger, V.; Takemori, D.; Ishii, T.; Kanzaki, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakai, A.; Sakuda, M.; Sasaki, O.; Echigo, S.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, A.T.; Haines, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    The first results of the solar neutrino flux measurement from Super-Kamiokande are presented. The results shown here are obtained from data taken between 31 May 1996, and 23 June 1997. Using our measurement of recoil electrons with energies above 6.5thinspthinspMeV, we infer the total flux of {sup 8}B solar neutrinos to be 2.42{plus_minus}0.06(stat){sup +0.10}{sub {minus}0.07}(syst){times}10{sup 6} thinspcm{sup {minus}2}thinsp s{sup {minus}1} . This result is consistent with the Kamiokande measurement and is 36{percent} of the flux predicted by the BP95 solar model. The flux is also measured in 1.5 month subsets and shown to be consistent with a constant rate. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  3. Analysis of uncertainty in the nitrous oxide flux values measured using a coupled eddy covariance - flux gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Sturman, A.; Mcmillan, A. M.; Harvey, M.; Zawar-Reza, P.

    2012-12-01

    An error analysis has been performed for a typical flux gradient - eddy covariance system setup for N2O flux measurement using data from two field campaigns. The diffusivity parameters were estimated using both a thermal and parameterization approach. Algebraic relationships of random relative error have been derived between the diffusivity parameters and the surface layer stability and turbulence terms. Based on these relationships, a Monte Carlo type analysis was performed to explore the dependency of the diffusivity terms on their contributing factors during the stable and unstable atmospheric conditions in the surface layer. The total relative uncertainty in the flux values due to errors in diffusivity terms and concentration gradients were then estimated. It was found that the mean uncertainty in the diffusivity parameter derived using the thermal method is higher (11%) than the parameterization method (≈7%), irrespective of stability. However, depending on the initial uncertainty among the surface layer variables, the maximum uncertainty can vary between 0-80% and 0-37% for the thermal and parameterization methods irrespective of stability. These maximum variations were obtained from the synthetic population of the random errors of the diffusivity parameters. The probability density function of the error anomaly of the diffusivity term from parameterization method was found to have higher kurtosis during unstable atmosphere, whereas marginally higher positive skewness was observed in the relative error term of the same diffusivity parameter during the unstable condition. Errors in the concentration gradients were estimated based on the minimum resolvable estimates from the gas analyzer and the associated random errors were found to be 6% and 8% for unstable and stable conditions. Finally, the mean total error in the N2O flux values was found to be approximately of the order of 9% and 11% for the parameterization method for unstable and stable conditions

  4. Annual sediment flux estimates in a tidal strait using surrogate measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Annual suspended-sediment flux estimates through Carquinez Strait (the seaward boundary of Suisun Bay, California) are provided based on surrogate measurements for advective, dispersive, and Stokes drift flux. The surrogates are landward watershed discharge, suspended-sediment concentration at one location in the Strait, and the longitudinal salinity gradient. The first two surrogates substitute for tidally averaged discharge and velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration in the Strait, thereby providing advective flux estimates, while Stokes drift is estimated with suspended-sediment concentration alone. Dispersive flux is estimated using the product of longitudinal salinity gradient and the root-mean-square value of velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration as an added surrogate variable. Cross-sectional measurements validated the use of surrogates during the monitoring period. During high freshwater flow advective and dispersive flux were in the seaward direction, while landward dispersive flux dominated and advective flux approached zero during low freshwater flow. Stokes drift flux was consistently in the landward direction. Wetter than average years led to net export from Suisun Bay, while dry years led to net sediment import. Relatively low watershed sediment fluxes to Suisun Bay contribute to net export during the wet season, while gravitational circulation in Carquinez Strait and higher suspended-sediment concentrations in San Pablo Bay (seaward end of Carquinez Strait) are responsible for the net import of sediment during the dry season. Annual predictions of suspended-sediment fluxes, using these methods, will allow for a sediment budget for Suisun Bay, which has implications for marsh restoration and nutrient/contaminant transport. These methods also provide a general framework for estimating sediment fluxes in estuarine environments, where temporal and spatial variability of transport are large. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  6. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2016-02-16

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of –170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm–2 s–1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. Furthermore, a simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beamanalysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.

  7. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E), West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E), West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u'w' and v'w', where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005). The observed u'w' at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v'w' were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u'w' and v'w' was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u'w' and v'w' showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u'w' showed eastward values in February-April and July-September and v'w' was northward in June to August at 90-94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  8. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    DOE PAGES

    Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2016-02-16

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of –170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm–2 s–1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggestsmore » that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. Furthermore, a simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beamanalysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.« less

  9. Direct Measurement of CO2 Fluxes in Marine Whitings

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa L. Robbins; Kimberly K. Yates

    2001-07-05

    Clean, affordable energy is a requisite for the United States in the 21st Century Scientists continue to debate over whether increases in CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources, including electricity generation, transportation and building systems may be altering the Earth's climate. While global climate change continues to be debated, it is likely that significant cuts in net CO{sub 2} emissions will be mandated over the next 50-100 years. To this end, a number of viable means of CO{sub 2} sequestration need to be identified and implemented. One potential mechanism for CO{sub 2} sequestration is the use of naturally-occurring biological processes. Biosequestration of CO{sub 2} remains one of the most poorly understood processes, yet environmentally safe means for trapping and storing CO{sub 2}. Our investigation focused on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in microbial precipitations of CaCO{sub 3}. Specifically, we investigated modern whitings (microbially-induced precipitates of the stable mineral calcium carbonate) as a potential, natural mechanism for CO{sub 2} abatement. This process is driven by photosynthetic metabolism of cyanobacteria and microalgae. We analyzed net air: sea CO{sub 2} fluxes, net calcification and photosynthetic rates in whitings. Both field and laboratory investigations have demonstrated that atmospheric CO{sub 2}decreases during the process of microbial calcification.

  10. Nightside electron flux measurements at Mars by the Phobos-2 HARP instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shutte, N.; Gringauz, K.; Kiraly, P.; Kotova, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Rosenbauer, H.; Szego, K.; Verigin, M.

    1995-01-01

    All the available nightside electron data obtained during circular orbits at Mars from the Phobos-2 Hyperbolic Retarded Potential Analyzer (HARP) instrument have been examined in detail and are summarized in this paper. An electron flux component with energies exceeding that of the unperturbed solar wind was observed inside the magnetosheath, indicating the presence of acceleration mechanism(s). The character of the electron fluxes measured in the magnetotail cannot be classified in any simple manner, however, there is a correlation between the electron fluxes measured well inside this region and the unperturbed solar wind ram pressure.

  11. Measurement of Solar pp-neutrino flux with Borexino: results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, O. Yu; Agostini, M.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, O.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the Solar pp-neutrino flux completed the measurement of Solar neutrino fluxes from the pp-chain of reactions in Borexino experiment. The result is in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Solar Model and the MSW/LMA oscillation scenario. A comparison of the total neutrino flux from the Sun with Solar luminosity in photons provides a test of the stability of the Sun on the 105 years time scale, and sets a strong limit on the power production by the unknown energy sources in the Sun.

  12. Why is Actin Patchy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders

    2009-03-01

    The intracellular protein actin, by reversibly polymerizing into filaments, generates forces for motion and shape changes of many types of biological cells. Fluorescence imaging studies show that actin often occurs in the form of localized patches of size roughly one micrometer at the cell membrane. Patch formation is most prevalent when the free-actin concentration is low. I investigate possible mechanisms for the formation of actin patches by numerically simulating the ``dendritic nucleation'' model of actin network growth. The simulations include filament growth, capping, branching, severing, and debranching. The attachment of membrane-bound activators to actin filaments, and subsequent membrane diffusion of unattached activators, are also included. It is found that as the actin concentration increases from zero, the actin occurs in patches at lower actin concentrations, and the size of the patches increases with increasing actin concentration. At a critical value of the actin concentration, the system undergoes a transition to complete coverage. The results are interpreted within the framework of reaction-diffusion equations in two dimensions.

  13. Comparison of N2O fluxes measured using flux-gradient, eddy-covariance, and chamber methods from an agricultural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. E.; Sargent, S.; Machado, P.; Freemantle, V.; Carvalho de Sena Rabelo, L.; Wagner-Riddle, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from agricultural lands occur as pulses at short intervals during various times throughout a given year, with the timing and magnitude dependent on management, soil, and climatic conditions. A thorough assessment of N2O emissions from fertilized fields requires methods capable of measuring fluxes at large temporal and spatial scales. A study investigating the effect of fertilizer treatment on the total annual N2O emissions from cornfields in Southern, Ontario, Canada provided the setting to analyze three methods for measuring N2O fluxes. Four 2-ha plots within a homogeneous 30-ha area were each subject to different nitrogen fertilizer source and timing treatments. N2O fluxes were measured using eddy-covariance (EC), multi-plot flux gradient (FG), and chamber techniques. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Eddy-covariance is a standard method for measuring fluxes at the resolutions required to assess trace gas emissions, but the erratic nature of agricultural N2O fluxes necessitates testing of N2O analyzers, and the application of the EC method to N2O fluxes. This study acted as a field test of the Campbell Scientific TGA200A tunable diode trace gas analyzer. Testing the TGA200A against a TGA100A provided two simultaneous EC-flux measurements of N2O for one plot. Multi-plot FG measurements have the advantage of providing year-round, spatiality integrated, semi-continuous fluxes for side-by-side comparisons of N2O fluxes from separate treatments under similar climatic and soil conditions, but is a less common practice. Chambers have the advantage of being the most direct means of measuring soil fluxes; however, spatial resolution is low, and winter measurements are often impossible. Preliminary results showed that temporal patterns measured by each of the methods matched for three post-fertilizer N2O emission events of one plot. EC fluxes of N2O measured by each of the TGA analyzers correlated well (r2 = 0.90) and values were on

  14. How Well Can We Measure the Vertical Wind Speed? Implications for Fluxes of Energy and Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, John; Meyers, Tilden P.; Frank, John; Massman, William J.; Heuer, Mark W.

    2012-11-01

    Sonic anemometers are capable of measuring the wind speed in all three dimensions at high frequencies (10-50 Hz), and are relied upon to estimate eddy-covariance-based fluxes of mass and energy over a wide variety of surfaces and ecosystems. In this study, wind-velocity measurement errors from a three-dimensional sonic anemometer with a non-orthogonal transducer orientation were estimated for over 100 combinations of angle-of-attack and wind direction using a novel technique to measure the true angle-of-attack and wind speed within the turbulent atmospheric surface layer. Corrections to the vertical wind speed varied from -5 to 37% for all angles-of-attack and wind directions examined. When applied to eddy-covariance data from three NOAA flux sites, the wind-velocity corrections increased the magnitude of CO2 fluxes, sensible heat fluxes, and latent heat fluxes by ≈11%, with the actual magnitude of flux corrections dependent upon sonic anemometer, surface type, and scalar. A sonic anemometer that uses vertically aligned transducers to measure the vertical wind speed was also tested at four angles-of-attack, and corrections to the vertical wind speed measured using this anemometer were within ±1% of zero. Sensible heat fluxes over a forest canopy measured using this anemometer were 15% greater than sensible heat fluxes measured using a sonic anemometer with a non-orthogonal transducer orientation. These results indicate that sensors with a non-orthogonal transducer orientation, which includes the majority of the research-grade three-dimensional sonic anemometers currently in use, should be redesigned to minimize sine errors by measuring the vertical wind speed using one pair of vertically aligned transducers.

  15. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  16. Classical Heat-Flux Measurements in Coronal Plasmas from Collective Thomson-Scattering Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2016-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering was used to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas. The relative amplitude of the Thomson-scattered power into the up- and downshifted electron plasma wave features was used to determine the flux of electrons moving along the temperature gradient at three to four times the electron thermal velocity. Simultaneously, the ion-acoustic wave features were measured. Their relative amplitude was used to measure the flux of the return-current electrons. The frequencies of these ion-acoustic and electron plasma wave features provide local measurements of the electron temperature and density. These spectra were obtained at five locations along the temperature gradient in a laser-produced blowoff plasma. These measurements of plasma parameters are used to infer the Spitzer-Härm flux (qSH = - κ∇Te ) and are in good agreement with the values of the heat flux measured from the scattering-feature asymmetries. Additional experiments probed plasma waves perpendicular to the temperature gradient. The data show small effects resulting from heat flux compared to probing waves along the temperature gradient. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Using "snapshot" measurements of CH4 fluxes from peatlands to estimate annual budgets: interpolation vs. modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Sophie M.; Baird, Andy J.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing interest in estimating annual budgets of peatland-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) exchanges. Such budgeting is required for calculating peatland carbon balance and the radiative forcing impact of peatlands on climate. There have been multiple approaches used to estimate CO2 budgets; however, there is a limited literature regarding the modelling of annual CH4 budgets. Using data collected from flux chamber tests in an area of blanket peatland in North Wales, we compared annual estimates of peatland-atmosphere CH4 emissions using an interpolation approach and an additive and multiplicative modelling approach. Flux-chamber measurements represent a snapshot of the conditions on a particular site. In contrast to CO2, most studies that have estimated the time-integrated flux of CH4 have not used models. Typically, linear interpolation is used to estimate CH4 fluxes during the time periods between flux-chamber measurements. It is unclear how much error is involved with such a simple integration method. CH4 fluxes generally show a rise followed by a fall through the growing season that may be captured reasonably well by interpolation, provided there are sufficiently frequent measurements. However, day-to-day and week-to-week variability is also often evident in CH4 flux data, and will not necessarily be properly represented by interpolation. Our fits of the CH4 flux models yielded r2 > 0.5 in 38 of the 48 models constructed, with 55% of these having a weighted rw2 > 0.4. Comparison of annualised CH4 fluxes estimated by interpolation and modelling reveals no correlation between the two data sets; indeed, in some cases even the sign of the flux differs. The difference between the methods seems also to be related to the size of the flux - for modest annual fluxes there is a fairly even scatter of points around the 1:1 line, whereas when the modelled fluxes are high, the corresponding interpolated fluxes tend to be low. We consider the

  18. Measurement of high-energy neutron flux above ground utilizing a spallation based multiplicity technique

    DOE PAGES

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; ...

    2016-11-14

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Montemore » Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.« less

  19. Measurement of high-energy neutron flux above ground utilizing a spallation based multiplicity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-11-14

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.

  20. Flux measurements of CA II H and K emission. [from stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, A. H.; Preston, G. W.; Wilson, O. C.

    1978-01-01

    A four-channel photon-counting spectrophotometer (designated HKP-2) is described which is designed for measuring stellar chromospheric calcium emission. The HKP-2 is calibrated, and its performance and accuracy evaluated, by observing 63 of Wilson's (1968) program stars on the same nights with both the HKP-2 and a coude scanner designated HKP-1. The results of the observations are discussed in terms of the calibration of mean H-K flux indices, variations in individual stellar fluxes, the flux ratio for H and K, and the instrument color index. It is shown that the HKP-2 provides satisfactory performance in the measurement of stellar chromospheric emission in a manner closely analogous to the method of Wilson and that a single observation yields a color index as well as flux indices for H and K that can be calibrated and transferred unambiguously to Wilson's system of measurement.

  1. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  2. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Verma, Shashi B.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Starks, Patrick; Hays, Cynthia; Norman, John M.; Waltershea, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    The primary objectives of the 1985 study were to test the feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations and to evaluate the use of the data collected by the automated weather stations for modeling the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation over wheat. The model Cupid was used to calculate these fluxes which were compared with fluxes of these entities measured using micrometeorological techniques. The primary objectives of the 1986 study were to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams at a few locations within the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) site and to compare modeled and measured latent heat and sensible heat fluxes from the prairie vegetation.

  3. Analysis of field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Shashi B.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes is discussed. These data were examined in conjunction with reflectance obtained from helicopter mounted Modular Multiband Radiometer. These measurements are representative of the canopy scale (10 to 100 m)(exp 2) and provide a good basis for investigating the hypotheses/relationship potentially useful in remote sensing applications. All the micrometeorological data collected during FIFE-89 were processed and fluxes of CO2, water vapor, and sensible heat were calculated. Soil CO2 fluxes were also estimated. Employing these soil CO2 flux values, in conjunction with micrometeorological measurements, canopy photosynthesis is being estimated. A biochemical model of leaf photosynthesis was adapted to the prairie vegetation. The modeled leaf photosynthesis rates were scaled up to the canopy level. This model and a multiplicative stomatal conductance model are also used to calculate canopy conductance.

  4. Inverse estimation of radon flux distribution for East Asia using measured atmospheric radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Hirao, S; Hayashi, R; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Tohjima, Y; Mukai, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the (222)Rn flux density distribution at surface was estimated in East Asia with the Bayesian synthesis inversion using measurement data and a long-range atmospheric (222)Rn transport model. Surface atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at Hateruma Island in January 2008 were used. The estimated (222)Rn flux densities were generally higher than the prior ones. The area-weighted mean (222)Rn flux density for East Asia in January 2008 was estimated to be 44.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The use of the estimated (222)Rn flux density improved the discrepancy of the model-calculated concentrations with the measurements at Hateruma Island.

  5. Measurement of angular momentum flux in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Asavei, Theodor; Preece, Daryl; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2011-03-01

    It is well established that a light beam can carry angular momentum and therefore when using optical tweezers it is possible to exert torques to twist or rotate microscopic objects. Both spin and orbital angular momentum can be transferred. This transfer can be achieved using birefringent particles exposed to a Gaussian circularly polarized beam. In this case, a transfer of spin angular momentum will occur. The change in spin, and hence the torque, can be readily measured optically. On the other hand, it is much more challenging to measure orbital angular momentum and torque. Laguerre-Gauss mode decomposition, as used for orbital angular momentum encoding for quantum communication, and rotational frequency shift can be used, and are effective methods in a macro-environment. However, the situation becomes more complicated when a measurement is done on microscale, especially with highly focused laser beams. We review the methods for the measurement of the angular momentum of light in optical tweezers, and the challenges faced when measuring orbital angular momentum. We also demonstrate one possible simple method for a quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum in optical tweezers.

  6. Ion-selective optodes measure extracellular potassium flux in excitable cells.

    PubMed

    Harjes, Daniel I; Dubach, J Matthew; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Das, Saumya; Clark, Heather A

    2010-01-18

    Optodes have been used for detection of ionic concentrations and fluxes for several years. However, their uses in biomedical applications have not yet been fully explored. This study investigates optodes as a potential sensor platform for monitoring cellular ion flux with attendant implications in the field of drug screening and toxicology. A prototype system was developed to quantitatively measure extracellular potassium flux from a monolayer of cardiomyocytes. Optodes were created and immobilized on a glass coverslip for fluorescent imaging. The system detected potassium (K(+) ) ion flux during the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential and further detected a decrease in the magnitude of the flux in the presence of a known K(+) channel inhibitor by optically monitoring local K(+) ion concentrations during field stimulation of the cardiomyocyte monolayer.

  7. A new method for simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in car underhood applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, M.; Garnier, B.; Harambat, F.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2010-02-01

    A new experimental technique is presented that allows simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in the underhood. The goal is to devise an easily implemented and accurate experimental method for application in the vehicle underhood compartment. The new method is based on a technique for heat-flux measurement developed by the authors (Heat flow (flux) sensors for measurement of convection, conduction and radiation heat flow 27036-2, © Rhopoint Components Ltd, Hurst Green, Oxted, RH8 9AX, UK) that uses several thermocouples in the thickness of a thermal resistive layer (foil heat-flux sensor). The method proposed here uses a pair of these thermocouples with different radiative properties. Measurements validating this novel technique are carried out on a flat plate with a prescribed constant temperature in both natural- and forced-convection flow regimes. The test flat plate is instrumented by this new technique, and also with a different technique that is intrusive but very accurate, used as reference here (Bardon J P and Jarny Y 1994 Procédé et dispositif de mesure transitoire de température et flux surfacique Brevet n°94.011996, 22 February). Discrepancies between the measurements by the two techniques are less than 10% for both convective and radiative heat flux. Error identification and sensitivity analysis of the new method are also presented.

  8. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5flux. In this case bioturbation, bioirrigation and advection should be taken into account. For the second group measured fluxes can be both much lower (practically absent) and much higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.01

  9. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.

    1995-03-15

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

  10. Testing the Need for Replication of Eddy Covariance Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over Agricultural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. M.; Amiro, B. D.; Gervais, M.

    2015-12-01

    The eddy covariance method directly measures carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes for long periods of time and with footprints up to hundreds of meters in size. Any ecosystem process that alters how gases and energy move between the atmosphere and soil/vegetation can affect these fluxes. Eddy covariance is vulnerable to systematic errors and uncertainy, particular through relying on assumptions about surface characteristics. Additionally, spatial variation within a site can cause more uncertainty in these measurements and lack of replication in many eddy covariance studies makes statistical analysis of carbon fluxes challenging. We tested if there are significant differences between co-located and simultaneous CO2 flux measurements over a uniform crop surface, and if the differences increase if we measure different flux footprint areas over the same field. During the summer of 2014, three matched instrumented 2.5-m high towers were co-located and then periodically separated by moving at 50 m intervals along a north-south transect on an alfalfa/trefoil field and a spring wheat field in Southern Manitoba, Canada to compare CO­2 fluxes. Georeferenced leaf area index measurements were taken in 50 m grid of each field to establish uniformity of the source/sink within a footprint. Diurnal differences of similar magnitude in the CO2 ­fluxes were found in both the co-located experiment and the spatially separated intervals. Despite rigorous calibration during the experiment, some differences were caused by the measurement systems rather than by variation within the field. Interpretation of the spatial variation in leaf area index is being used to determine the contribution caused by difference in source/sink contributions to the flux footprint areas when the towers were spatially separated.

  11. Seasonality of Overstory and Understory Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Oak Savanna: What can be Learned from Comparing Measured and Modeled Fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz-Yaseef, N.; Sonnentag, O.; Kobayashi, H.; Chen, J. M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid climates experience large seasonal and inter-annual variability in radiation and precipitation, creating natural conditions adequate to study how year-to-year changes affect atmosphere-biosphere fluxes. Especially, savanna ecosystems, that combine tree and below-canopy components, create a unique environment in which phenology dramatically changes between seasons. We used a 10-year flux database in order to define seasonal and interannual variability of climatic inputs and fluxes, and evaluate model capability to reproduce observed variability. This is based on the perception that model capability to construct the deviation, and not the average, is important in order to correctly predict ecosystem sensitivity to climate change. Our research site is a low density and low LAI (0.8) semi-arid savanna, located at Tonzi Ranch, Northern California. In this system, trees are active during the warm season (Mar - Oct), and grasses are active during the wet season (Dec - May). Measurements of carbon and water fluxes above and below the tree canopy using eddy covariance and supplementary measurements have been made since 2001. Fluxes were simulated using bio-meteorological process-oriented ecosystem models: BEPS and 3D-CAONAK. Models were partly capable of reproducing fluxes on daily scales (R2=0.66). We then compared model outputs for different ecosystem components and seasons, and found distinct seasons with high correlations while other seasons were purely represented. Comparison was much higher for ET than for GPP. The understory was better simulated than the overstory. CANOAK overestimated spring understory fluxes, probably due to the capability to directly calculated 3D radiative transfer. BEPS underestimated spring understory fluxes, following the pre-description of grass die-off. Both models underestimated peak spring overstory fluxes. During winter tree dormant, modeled fluxes were null, but occasional high fluxes of both ET and GPP were measured following

  12. Lidar Based Particulate Flux Measurements of Agricultural Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-wavelength portable scanning lidar system was developed to derive information on particulate spatial aerosol distribution over remote distances. The lidar system and retrieval approach has been tested during several field campaigns measuring agricultural emissions from a swine feeding operat...

  13. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2013-06-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  14. Eddy Covariance flux measurements with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Mauder, M.; Beyrich, F.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility and quality of Eddy-Covariance flux measurements from a weight-shift microlight aircraft (WSMA). Firstly we investigate the precision of the wind measurement (σu,v≤ 0.09 m s-1, σw = 0.04 m s-1), the lynchpin of flux calculations from aircraft. From here the smallest resolvable changes in friction velocity (0.02 m s-1,and sensible- (5 W m-2) and latent (3 W m-2) heat flux are estimated. Secondly a seven-day flight campaign was performed near Lindenberg (Germany). Here we compare measurements of wind, temperature, humidity and respective fluxes between a tall tower and the WSMA. The maximum likelihood functional relationship (MLFR) between tower and WSMA measurements considers the random error in the data, and shows very good agreement of the scalar averages. The MLFRs for standard deviations (SDs, 2-34%) and fluxes (17-21%) indicate higher estimates of the airborne measurements compared to the tower. Considering the 99.5% confidence intervals the observed differences are not significant, with exception of the temperature SD. The comparison with a large-aperture scintillometer reveals lower sensible heat flux estimates at both, tower (-40--25%) and WSMA (-25-0%). We relate the observed differences to (i) inconsistencies in the temperature and wind measurement at the tower and (ii) the measurement platforms differing abilities to capture contributions from non-propagating eddies. These findings encourage the use of WSMA as a low price and highly versatile flux measurement platform.

  15. Aerosol Fluxes over Amazon Rain Forest Measured with the Eddy Covariance Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlm, L.; Nilsson, E. D.; Krejci, R.; Mårtensson, E. M.; Vogt, M.; Artaxo, P.

    2008-12-01

    We present measurements of vertical aerosol fluxes over the Amazon carried out on top of K34, a 50 meter high tower in the Cuieiras Reserve about 50 km north of Manaus in northern Brazil. The turbulent fluxes were measured with the eddy covariance method. The covariance of vertical wind speed from a sonic anemometer Gill Windmaster and total aerosol number concentration from a condensation particle counter (CPC) TSI 3010 provided the total number flux (diameter >0.01 μm). The covariance of vertical wind speed and size resolved number concentrations from an optical particle counter (OPC) Grimm 1.109 provided size resolved number fluxes in 15 bins from 0.25 μm to 2.5 μm diameter. Additionally fluxes of CO2 and H2O were derived from Li-7500 observations. The observational period, from early March to early August, includes both wet and dry season. OPC fluxes generally show net aerosol deposition both during wet and dry season with the largest downward fluxes during midday. CPC fluxes show different patterns in wet and dry season. During dry season, when number concentrations are higher, downward fluxes clearly dominate. In the wet season however, when number concentrations are lower, our data indicates that upward and downward fluxes are quite evenly distributed during course of a day. On average there is a peak in upward flux during late morning and another peak during the afternoon. Since the OPC fluxes in the same time show net deposition, there is an indication of net source of primary aerosol particles with diameters between 10 and 250 nm emitted from the rain forest. Future data analysis will hopefully shed light on origin and formation mechanism of these particles and thus provide a deeper insight in the rain forest - atmosphere interactions. The aerosol flux measurements were carried out as a part of the AMAZE project in collaboration with University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and financial support was provided by Swedish International Development Cooperation

  16. Actin-Regulator Feedback Interactions during Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinxin; Galletta, Brian J.; Cooper, John A.; Carlsson, Anders E.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis mediated by clathrin, a cellular process by which cells internalize membrane receptors and their extracellular ligands, is an important component of cell signaling regulation. Actin polymerization is involved in endocytosis in varying degrees depending on the cellular context. In yeast, clathrin-mediated endocytosis requires a pulse of polymerized actin and its regulators, which recruit and activate the Arp2/3 complex. In this article, we seek to identify the main protein-protein interactions that 1) cause actin and its regulators to appear in pulses, and 2) determine the effects of key mutations and drug treatments on actin and regulator assembly. We perform a joint modeling/experimental study of actin and regulator dynamics during endocytosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We treat both a stochastic model that grows an explicit three-dimensional actin network, and a simpler two-variable Fitzhugh-Nagumo type model. The models include a negative-feedback interaction of F-actin onto the Arp2/3 regulators. Both models explain the pulse time courses and the effects of interventions on actin polymerization: the surprising increase in the peak F-actin count caused by reduced regulator branching activity, the increase in F-actin resulting from slowing of actin disassembly, and the increased Arp2/3 regulator lifetime resulting from latrunculin treatment. In addition, they predict that decreases in the regulator branching activity lead to increases in accumulation of regulators, and we confirmed this prediction with experiments on yeast harboring mutations in the Arp2/3 regulators, using quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Our experimental measurements suggest that the regulators act quasi-independently, in the sense that accumulation of a particular regulator is most strongly affected by mutations of that regulator, as opposed to the others. PMID:27028652

  17. Eddy Covariance Measurements of Methane Flux Using an Open-Path Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Anderson, T.; Zona, D.; Schedlbauer, J.; Anderson, D.; Eckles, R.; Hastings, S.; Ikawa, H.; McDermitt, D.; Oberbauer, S.; Oechel, W.; Riensche, B.; Starr, G.; Sturtevant, C.; Xu, L.

    2008-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential of about 23 times that of carbon dioxide over a 100-year cycle (Houghton et al., 2001). Measurements of methane fluxes from the terrestrial biosphere have mostly been made using flux chambers, which have many advantages, but are discrete in time and space and may disturb surface integrity and air pressure. Open-path analyzers offer a number of advantages for measuring methane fluxes, including undisturbed in- situ flux measurements, spatial integration using the Eddy Covariance approach, zero frequency response errors due to tube attenuation, confident water and thermal density terms from co-located fast measurements of water and sonic temperature, and remote deployment due to lower power demands in the absence of a pump. The prototype open-path methane analyzer is a VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser)-based instrument. It employs an open Herriott cell and measures levels of methane with RMS noise below 6 ppb at 10 Hz sampling in controlled laboratory environment. Field maintenance is minimized by a self-cleaning mechanism to keep the lower mirror free of contamination. Eddy Covariance measurements of methane flux using the prototype open-path methane analyzer are presented for the period between 2006 and 2008 in three ecosystems with contrasting weather and moisture conditions: (1) Fluxes over a short-hydroperiod sawgrass wetland in the Florida Everglades were measured in a warm and humid environment with temperatures often exceeding 25oC, variable winds, and frequent heavy dew at night; (2) Fluxes over coastal wetlands in an Arctic tundra were measured in an environment with frequent sub-zero temperatures, moderate winds, and ocean mist; (3) Fluxes over pacific mangroves in Mexico were measured in an environment with moderate air temperatures high winds, and sea spray. Presented eddy covariance flux data were collected from a co-located prototype open-path methane analyzer, LI-7500, and

  18. CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.; Johnson, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

  19. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  20. Comparison of static chambers to measure N2O and CH4 fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlatie, M.

    2009-04-01

    Soil fluxes of the greenhouse gases (GHG) nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are often measured by closed static chambers. During a chamber enclosure the concentration of the target gas changes in the headspace of the chamber. This changes the concentration difference between the soil and the atmosphere and hence also the fluxes from the soil. We hypothesize that the magnitude how much a chamber affects the gas fluxes from the soil is chamber design specific. In addition, the use of inappropriate flux calculation methods can further lead to uncertainties in the flux estimates. To test different types of static chambers for N2O and CH4 flux measurements a chamber calibration campaign was organized at Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland during August-October 2008. The overall aims of the campaign were to quantitatively assess the uncertainties and errors related to static chamber measurements. Overall 17 different static chambers were tested for five different N2O and CH4 flux levels with three different soil conditions (different moisture and porosity) in the chamber calibration system described by Pumpanen et al. (2004). Preliminary results show that most of the static chambers either over- or underestimated the N2O and CH4 fluxes. This chamber specific over- or underestimation remained near constant with different flux levels. However, the deviation varied greatly with different soil porosities. Here we will show the main results of the measurement campaign and give preliminary suggestions for ideal chamber designs, gas sampling protocol and flux calculation methods for N2O and CH4 flux measurements. References: Pumpanen, J., Kolari, P., Ilvesniemi, H., Minkkinen, K., Vesala, T., Niinistö, S., Lohila, A., Larmola, T., Morero, M., Pihlatie, M., Janssens, I., Curiel Yuste, J., Grünzweig, J. M., Reth, S., Subke, J.-A., Savage, K., Kutsch, W., Østreng, G., Ziegler, W., Anthoni, P., Lindroth, A. & Hari, P. 2004. Comparison

  1. Inverse estimation of near-field temperature and surface heat flux via single point temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Shu, Yong-Hua; Xie, Ji-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Zheng; Fan, Jing

    2017-02-01

    A concept was developed to inversely estimate the near-field temperature as well as the surface heat flux for the transient heat conduction problem with boundary condition of the unknown heat flux. The mathematical formula was derived for the inverse estimation of the near-field temperature and surface heat flux via a single point temperature measurement. The experiments were carried out in a vacuum chamber and the theoretically predicted temperatures were justified in specific positions. The inverse estimation principle was validated and the estimation deviation was evaluated for the present configuration.

  2. Improved Eddy Flux Measurements by Open-Path Gas Analyzer and Sonic Anemometer Co-Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A novel instrument design combines the sensing paths of an open-path gas analyzer and a 3-D sonic anemometer and integrates the sensors in a single aerodynamic body. Common electronics provide fast-response, synchronized measurements of wind vector, sonic temperature, CO2 and H2O densities, and atmospheric pressure. An instantaneous CO2 mixing ratio, relative to dry air, is computed in real time. The synergy of combined sensors offers an alternative to the traditional density-based flux calculation method historically used for standalone open-path analyzers. A simple method is described for a direct, in-situ, mixing-ratio-based flux calculation. The method consists of: (i) correcting sonically derived air temperature for humidity effects using instantaneous water vapor density and atmospheric pressure measurements, (ii) computing water vapor pressure based on water-vapor density and humidity-corrected sonic temperature, (iii) computing fast-response CO2 mixing ratio based on CO2 density, sonic temperature, water vapor, and atmospheric pressures, and (iv) computing CO2 flux from the covariance of the vertical wind speed and the CO2 mixing ratio. Since CO2 mixing ratio is a conserved quantity, the proposed method simplifies the calculations and eliminates the need for corrections in post-processing by accounting for temperature, water-vapor, and pressure-fluctuation effects on the CO2 density. A field experiment was conducted using the integrated sensor to verify performance of the mixing-ratio method and to quantify the differences with density-derived CO2 flux corrected for sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The pressure term of the density corrections was also included in the comparison. Results suggest that the integrated sensor with co-located sonic and gas sensing paths and the mixing-ratio-based method minimize or eliminate the following uncertainties in the measured CO2 flux: (i) correcting for frequency-response losses due to spatial separation of measured

  3. Dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat for measurements at high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Islam, Zahirul; Das, Ritesh K.; Weinstein, Roy

    2015-04-14

    A method and a dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat apparatus are provided for implementing enhanced measurements at high magnetic fields. The dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat system includes a trapped-flux magnet (TFM). A sample, for example, a single crystal, is adjustably positioned proximate to the surface of the TFM, using a translation stage such that the distance between the sample and the surface is selectively adjusted. A cryostat is provided with a first separate thermal stage provided for cooling the TFM and with a second separate thermal stage provided for cooling sample.

  4. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  5. Measurements of upward turbulent ozone fluxes above a subalpine spruce-fir forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Karl; Hehn, Ted

    High rural concentrations of ozone (O3) are thought to be either stratospheric in origin, advected from upwind urban sources, or photochemically generated locally as a result of natural trace gas emissions. Ozone is known to be transported vertically downward from the above-canopy atmospheric surface layer and destroyed within stomata or on other biological and mineral surfaces. However, here we report winter-time eddy correlation measurements of vertical O3 flux above a subalpine canopy of Picea engelmannii and Abies lasiocarpa in the Snowy Range Mountains of Wyoming that indicate anomalous upward O3 fluxes Upward fluxes of 0.5 µg m-2 s-1 (11 kg km-2 day-1) were routinely measured during the 1991-92 winter season. Decreasing O3 concentration from several hours to several days that relate to increasing positive O3 flux magnitudes and visa versa, suggest O3 may be temporarily stored in the snow base.

  6. The measurement of the solar neutrino flux with the sudbury neutrino observatory's neutron capture detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, B.

    2008-06-01

    Phase III of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment began after the installation of the Neutral-Current Detector (NCD) array in the D2O-filled acrylic vessel. This unique phase provides a measurement of the Neutral-Current (NC) flux that can be statistically and systematically separated from the Elastic-Scattering (ES) and Charged-Current (CC) fluxes by simply counting the number of solar-induced dissociated neutrons captured in the NCD array. The measurement with NCDs will provide increased precision on the CC and NC fluxes, and thus on the solar neutrino mixing parameters. This poster presents the status of the analysis of the SNO phase III solar neutrino fluxes.

  7. Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

  8. Can CO2 Turbulent Flux Be Measured by Lidar? A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Fabien; Koch, Grady; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, Timothy W.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Flamant, Pierre H.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2011-01-01

    The vertical profiling ofCO2 turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is investigated using a coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL) operated nearby a tall tower in Wisconsin during June 2007. A CDIAL can perform simultaneous range-resolved CO2 DIAL and velocity measurements. The lidar eddy covariance technique is presented. The aims of the study are (i) an assessment of performance and current limitation of available CDIAL for CO2 turbulent fluxes and (ii) the derivation of instrument specifications to build a future CDIAL to perform accurate range-resolved CO2 fluxes. Experimental lidar CO2 mixing ratio and vertical velocity profiles are successfully compared with in situ sensors measurements. Time and space integral scales of turbulence in the ABL are addressed that result in limitation for time averaging and range accumulation. A first attempt to infer CO2 fluxes using an eddy covariance technique with currently available 2-mm CDIAL dataset is reported.

  9. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance at a temperate upland forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Murphy, J. G.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Geddes, J. A.; Thomas, S.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate upland forest in Central Ontario, Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve (45.28° N, 78.55° W) using the eddy covariance (EC) method. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS) Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA from Los Gatos Research, Inc.) operated at a sampling rate of 10 Hz allowed for simultaneous measurement of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water (H2O) over five months from June to October in 2011. Air was pulled from the top of a 32 m tower, 8 m above the forest canopy, to the bottom of the tower through 40 m of tubing to the instrument. A sonic anemometer and a LI-7500 open-path sensor were also used at the top of the tower to provide high frequency wind data and comparative open-path measurements of CO2 and H2O. A nearby soil station measured soil water content and soil temperature at 0, 3, and 10 cm below the surface. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux value (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7±0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. In early June when measurements commenced, the soil moisture was relatively high and CH4 flux values showed net emission. As the season advanced the soil became progressively drier, and there was an increasing trend in CH4 uptake, peaking in mid-September. There was also a diurnal trend in the CH4 flux, with increased uptake during the day, and decreased uptake between 0:00 and 08:00. The CH4 flux values correlated well with the horizontal wind speed measured within the forest canopy. We hypothesize that this may be due to a ventilation effect in which higher wind speed facilitates the introduction of CH4-rich air and removes CH4-depleted air near the methanotrophs in the soil. The measurements were made in an uneven-aged managed forest stand last harvested 15 years ago containing sandy and acidic soils (pH 4.0 - 5.0). Chamber flux measurements of CH4 were also performed at seven

  10. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  11. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements. PMID:26082786

  12. Airflows and turbulent flux measurements in mountainous terrain: Part 1. Canopy and local effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, Andrew A.; Anderson, Dean E.; Blanken, Peter D.; Baugh, William M.; Monson, Russell K.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the effects of local topography and canopy structure on turbulent flux measurements at a site located in mountainous terrain within a subalpine, coniferous forest. Our primary aim was to determine whether the complex terrain of the site affects the accuracy of eddy flux measurements from a practical perspective. We observed displacement heights, roughness lengths, spectral peaks, turbulent length scales, and profiles of turbulent intensities that were comparable in magnitude and pattern to those reported for forest canopies in simpler terrain. We conclude that in many of these statistical measures, the local canopy exerts considerably more influence than does topographical complexity. Lack of vertical flux divergence and modeling suggests that the flux footprints for the site are within the standards acceptable for the application of flux statistics. We investigated three different methods of coordinate rotation: double rotation (DR), triple rotation (TR), and planar-fit rotation (PF). Significant variability in rotation angles at low wind speeds was encountered with the commonly used DR and TR methods, as opposed to the PF method, causing some overestimation of the fluxes. However, these differences in fluxes were small when applied to large datasets involving sensible heat and CO2 fluxes. We observed evidence of frequent drainage flows near the ground during stable, stratified conditions at night. Concurrent with the appearance of these flows, we observed a positive bias in the mean vertical wind speed, presumably due to subtle topographic variations inducing a flow convergence below the measurement sensors. In the presence of such drainage flows, advection of scalars and non-zero bias in the mean vertical wind speed can complicate closure of the mass conservation budget at the site.

  13. Monoterpene fluxes measured above a Japanese red pine forest at Oshiba plateau, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, A.; Nozoe, S.; Aoki, M.; Hewitt, C. N.

    Monoterpene fluxes above a Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora) forest in Japan were measured with a heat balance method from May to November 2000. The most abundant monoterpenes were α-pinene and limonene+ β-phellandrene. Degradation losses of the major monoterpenes by the reactions with ozone and OH during transfer between the two sampling heights were estimated to be negligibly small. The highest values of average fluxes were observed in June measurement period, with values for α-pinene and limonene+ β-phellandrene of 0.6 and 0.5 nmol m -2 s -1. Their average fluxes in September, October and November measurement periods were almost the same and lowest. Vertical profiles of monoterpene concentrations inside the forest suggest that large amounts of monoterpenes are accumulated in the aerial space in the forest and transferred to the atmosphere above. The difference between logarithms of measured and calculated total monoterpene fluxes, ln F mea-ln F cal, had positive values in many morning measurements and negative values in most late afternoon measurements, indicating that monoterpenes accumulated during the night were transported to the upper atmosphere the next morning and they began to accumulate again in the late afternoon, following a decrease of turbulent mixing. Leaf wetness effect was also considered and, finally, a simple model was proposed to explain controlling parameters for monoterpene flux above the forest.

  14. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analysers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2012-12-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analysers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and long-term performance were not assessed. Prototype-7700 is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, however if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyser is needed.

  15. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Andrew T.; Mankoff, Kenneth D.; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Tyler, Scott W.; Foley, Neil

    2015-01-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m2, significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m2. The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region. PMID:26601210

  16. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew T; Mankoff, Kenneth D; Tulaczyk, Slawek M; Tyler, Scott W; Foley, Neil

    2015-07-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m(2), significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m(2). The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region.

  17. Wind tunnel measurement of turbulent and advective scalar fluxes: a case study on intersection ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux.

  18. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Ate; Keijsers, Joep G S; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface.

  19. Eddy correlation measurements of NO, NO{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; martin, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    The micrometeorological technique of eddy correlation was used to measure the vertical fluxes of NO, NO{sub 2}, and ozone in rural North Carolian during spring 1995 as part of the Natural emission of Oxidant precurssors-Validation of techniques and Assessment (NOVA) field experiment. Net flux densities were measured at heights 5 and 10 m above an agricultural field with short corn plants and large amount of exposed bare soil between the rows. Large upward eddy fluxes of NO{sub 2} were seen, and strong NO emissions from the soil were measured by collaborators using environmental enclosures on the soil surface. Data indicate that about 50% of the nitrogen emitted from the soil as NO was converted into NO{sub 2} at 5 m. Rest of the emitted nitrogen may remain as NO flux and be returned back to the vegetation and soil by deposition. Divergence of the NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} fluxes were detected between 5 and 10 m. This is consistent with likely net NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} destruction rates. The data will be used to help develop parameterizations of the flux of nitrogen oxides into the lower troposphere.

  20. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux. PMID:22649290

  1. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, Joep G.S.; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M.

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  2. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Carslaw, David C; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D; Karl, Thomas G

    2016-07-18

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over London. The highest fluxes were observed over central London, with lower fluxes measured in suburban areas. A footprint model was used to estimate the spatial area from which the measured emissions occurred. This allowed comparison of the flux measurements to the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for NOx, with scaling factors used to account for the actual time of day, day of week and month of year of the measurement. The comparison suggests significant underestimation of NOx emissions in London by the NAEI, mainly due to its under-representation of real world road traffic emissions. A comparison was also carried out with an enhanced version of the inventory using real world driving emission factors and road measurement data taken from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI). The measurement to inventory agreement was substantially improved using the enhanced version, showing the importance of fully accounting for road traffic, which is the dominant NOx emission source in London. In central London there was still an underestimation by the inventory of 30-40% compared with flux measurements, suggesting significant improvements are still required in the NOx emissions inventory.

  3. Measurements of Two-Cell Flux Qubits at Millikelvin Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    contributes decoherence, its coupling to the qubit  should be made as  weak  as possible. In the second part of this report, we demonstrate a new data evaluation...measured Rabi and Ramsey oscillations  in a wide range of temperatures. Unexpectedly, the decoherence times extracted from the data show only a very  weak ...coupling to the qubit should be made as weak as possible. In the second part of this report, we demonstrate a new data evaluation method which maximizes

  4. Wind tunnels vs. flux chambers: Area source emission measurements and the necessity for VOC and odour correction factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odour, and ammonia (NH3) with little regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. As a result, flux measurements have been highly variable and scientists have been in disagreement as to the better...

  5. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying volatile organic compound and ammonia emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and potential inaccuracies caused by inappropriate air velocity or sw...

  6. Imposing strong constraints on tropical terrestrial CO2 fluxes using passenger aircraft based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Y.; Machida, T.; Sawa, Y.; Matsueda, H.; Schuck, T. J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Imasu, R.; Satoh, M.

    2011-12-01

    Better understanding of the global and regional carbon budget is needed to perform a reliable prediction of future climate with an earth system model. However, the reliability of CO2 source/sink estimation by inverse modeling, which is one of the promising methods to estimate regional carbon budget, is limited because of sparse observational data coverage. Very few observational data are available in tropics. Therefore, especially the reconstruction of tropical terrestrial fluxes has considerable uncertainties. In this study, regional CO2 fluxes for 2006-2008 are estimated by inverse modeling using the Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airliner (CONTRAIL) in addition to the surface measurement dataset of GLOBALVIEW-CO2. CONTRAIL is a recently established CO2 measurement network using in-situ measurement instruments on board commercial aircraft. Five CONTRAIL aircraft travel back and forth between Japan and many areas: Europe, North America, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Australia. The Bayesian synthesis approach is used to estimate monthly fluxes for 42 regions using NICAM-TM simulations with existing CO2 flux datasets and monthly mean observational data. It is demonstrated that the aircraft data have great impact on estimated tropical terrestrial fluxes. By adding the aircraft data to the surface data, the analyzed uncertainty of tropical fluxes has been reduced by 15 % and more than 30 % uncertainty reduction rate is found in Southeast and South Asia. Specifically, for annual net CO2 fluxes, nearly neutral fluxes of Indonesia, which is estimated using the surface dataset alone, turn to positive fluxes, i.e. carbon sources. In Indonesia, a remarkable carbon release during the severe drought period of October-December in 2006 is estimated, which suggests that biosphere respiration or biomass burning was larger than the prior fluxes. Comparison of the optimized atmospheric CO2 with independent aircraft measurements of CARIBIC tends to validate

  7. Rocket measurements of relativistic electrons: New features in fluxes, spectra and pitch angle distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrero, F.A.; Baker, D.N.; Goldberg, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors report new features of precipitating relativistic electron fluxes measured on a spinning sounding rocket payload at midday between altitudes of 70 and 130 km in the auroral region (Poker Flat, Alaska, 65.1{degree}N, 147.5{degree}W, and L = 5.5). The sounding rocket (NASA 33.059) was launched at 21:29 UT on May 13, 1990 during a relativistic electron enhancement event of modest intensity. Electron fluxes were measured for a total of about 210 seconds at energies from 0.1 to 3.8 MeV, while pitch angle was sampled from 0{degree} to 90{degree} every spin cycle. Flux levels during the initial 90 seconds were about 5 to 8 times higher than in the next 120 seconds, revealing a time scale of more than 100 seconds for large amplitude intensity variations. A shorter time scale appeared for downward electron bursts lasting 10 to 20 seconds. Electrons with energies below about 0.2 MeV showed isotropic pitch angle distributions during most of the first 90 seconds of data, while at higher energies the electrons had highest fluxes near the mirroring angle (90{degree}); when they occurred, the noted downward bursts were seen at all energies. Data obtained during the second half of the flight showed little variation in the shape of the pitch angle distribution for energies greater than 0.5 MeV; the flux at 90{degree} was about 100 times the flux at 0{degree}. They have compared the low altitude fluxes with those measured at geostationary orbit (L = 6.6), and find that the low altitude fluxes are much higher than expected from a simple mapping of a pancake distribution at high altitudes (at the equator). Energy deposition of this modest event is estimated to increase rapidly above 45 km, already exceeding the cosmic ray background at 45 km.

  8. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred J.; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Bollinger, James S.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  9. Metabolic flux analysis using ¹³C peptide label measurements.

    PubMed

    Mandy, Dominic E; Goldford, Joshua E; Yang, Hong; Allen, Doug K; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-02-01

    ¹³C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate the cellular metabolism of microbes, cell cultures and plant seeds. Conventional steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtained from protein hydrolysates. To retain spatial information in conventional steady-state MFA, tissues or subcellular fractions must be dissected or biochemically purified. In contrast, peptides retain their identity in complex protein extracts, and may therefore be associated with a specific time of expression, tissue type and subcellular compartment. To enable 'single-sample' spatially and temporally resolved steady-state flux analysis, we investigated the suitability of peptide mass distributions (PMDs) as an alternative to amino acid label measurements. PMDs are the discrete convolution of the mass distributions of the constituent amino acids of a peptide. We investigated the requirements for the unique deconvolution of PMDs into amino acid mass distributions (AAMDs), the influence of peptide sequence length on parameter sensitivity, and how AAMD and flux estimates that are determined through deconvolution compare to estimates from a conventional GC-MS measurement-based approach. Deconvolution of PMDs of the storage protein β-conglycinin of soybean (Glycine max) resulted in good AAMD and flux estimates if fluxes were directly fitted to PMDs. Unconstrained deconvolution resulted in inferior AAMD and flux estimates. PMD measurements do not include amino acid backbone fragments, which increase the information content in GC-MS-derived analyses. Nonetheless, the resulting flux maps were of comparable quality due to the precision of Orbitrap quantification and the larger number of peptide measurements.

  10. Radon-222 activity flux measurement using activated charcoal canisters: revisiting the methodology.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sami H; Akber, Riaz A

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of radon ((222)Rn) activity flux using activated charcoal canisters was examined to investigate the distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the relationship between (222)Rn activity flux and exposure time. The activity flux of (222)Rn from five sources of varying strengths was measured for exposure times of one, two, three, five, seven, 10, and 14 days. The distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed was obtained by dividing the bed into six layers and counting each layer separately after the exposure. (222)Rn activity decreased in the layers that were away from the exposed surface. Nevertheless, the results demonstrated that only a small correction might be required in the actual application of charcoal canisters for activity flux measurement, where calibration standards were often prepared by the uniform mixing of radium ((226)Ra) in the matrix. This was because the diffusion of (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the detection efficiency as a function of the charcoal depth tended to counterbalance each other. The influence of exposure time on the measured (222)Rn activity flux was observed in two situations of the canister exposure layout: (a) canister sealed to an open bed of the material and (b) canister sealed over a jar containing the material. The measured (222)Rn activity flux decreased as the exposure time increased. The change in the former situation was significant with an exponential decrease as the exposure time increased. In the latter case, lesser reduction was noticed in the observed activity flux with respect to exposure time. This reduction might have been related to certain factors, such as absorption site saturation or the back diffusion of (222)Rn gas occurring at the canister-soil interface.

  11. Direct measurement of x-ray flux for a pre-specified highly-resolved region in hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Ren, Guoli; Huo, Wenyi; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Li, Zhichao; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Chen; Yan, Ji; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Liu, Jie; Lan, Ke

    2015-09-21

    A space-resolving flux detector (SRFD) is developed to measure the X-ray flux emitted from a specified region in hohlraum with a high resolution up to 0.11mm for the first time. This novel detector has been used successfully to measure the distinct X-ray fluxes emitted from hot laser spot and cooler re-emitting region simultaneously, in the hohlraum experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility. According to our experiments, the ratio of laser spot flux to re-emitted flux shows a strong time-dependent behavior, and the area-weighted flux post-processed from the measured laser spot flux and re-emitting wall flux agrees with that measured from Laser Entrance Hole by using flat-response X-ray detector (F-XRD). The experimental observations is reestablished by our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations and is well understood with the power balance relationship.

  12. Contribution of Soil Surface CO2 Efflux to Boreal Forest Net Ecosystem Flux: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinisto, S. M.; Kellomaki, S.

    2001-05-01

    The aims of the study are to assess the contribution of measured soil surface CO2 efflux to boreal forest net ecosystem flux and to test whether modeled component fluxes such as leaf and surface soil fluxes are consistent with the net flux measured from a tower over a forest stand. Net ecosystem flux was measured continuously in a boreal Scots pine forest in eastern Finland (62° 52'N, 30° 49'E) during the growing period in 2000. Height and diameter of trees in this 50-year-old stand ranged from 10 to 13 m and from 9 to 12 cm, respectively, for 80 % of trees. Eddy-flux measurements were made at the top of a 32-m tower, about 20 m above the canopy. Wind velocity and virtual temperature were measured with a three-axis sonic anemometer. CO2 fluctuations at 32 m were continuously monitored with a CO2 analyzer. Raw data were sampled at 10 Hz and 1/2 hr fluxes calculated. Soil surface CO2 efflux was measured on the top of a feather moss or lichen cover with an IRGA and four automated open dynamic chambers, each equipped with a PAR sensor and air temperature probe. Chambers of 19 cm diameter were made of transparent PMMA. Measurements were made twice per hr, lasting 1 min each. Periods considered in this study included both early and late season conditions, since data from the automated soil surface efflux measurements were available from May to June as well as from August to September. In this study, we aim to compare the measured soil surface CO2 efflux with simultaneously measured net ecosystem flux. The performance of the automated chambers will be tested by comparing with simultaneous measurements from a dark closed static chamber at the same site. A simple regression model, using soil surface temperature as an independent variable, will be built using the static dark chamber data from the previous years. A rough correction for the carbon uptake of moss will be made. This model could be validated later with automated measurements. To investigate further the

  13. Flux measurements of energy and trace gases in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, I.; Schade, G. W.; Adams, S.; Park, C.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the setup and some first year results of a new flux measurements tower in an urban area. An existing radio communications tower 4 km north of downtown Houston was equipped with micrometeorological instrumentation and trace gas sampling lines in spring 2007. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity are recorded at five levels between 12 and 60 m above ground; 3-D wind speed measurements, solar and net radiances, and trace gas sampling are established from the 60 m level. A closed path IRGA is used for CO2 and water vapor fluxes, and independent instrumentation for criteria pollutant and VOC fluxes. Two CSI data loggers and software control the measurements, and EdiRe software is used to analyze turbulence data and compute fluxes. A project description is provided at http://atmo.tamu.edu/yellowcabtower. Surface properties as calculated from the gradient measurements show the site to be surprisingly uniform, with displacement heights between 5 and 9 m and roughness lengths between 0.4 and 0.7 m, despite urban heterogeneity. The latter is investigated through visible/near IR orthoimagery and LIDAR data, which are incorporated into a local GIS. Net radiation was also only marginally affected by surface heterogeneity. At this urban location it is balanced by roughly equal amounts of sensible heat, latent heat, and storage fluxes. Latent heat flux, however, is smaller outside the growing season, with an equivalent increase in winter storage fluxes, as expected. Significant differences are also observed with direction during summer, showing decreased Bowen ratios and lower CO2 emissions from sectors with a larger urban tree canopy cover in the footprint. The largely mature, dominantly oak urban canopy cover alleviates approximately 100 W m- 2 during typical summer days. On the other hand, anthropogenic CO2 emissions dominate over photosynthetic uptake all year round. Measured carbon fluxes peak during morning rush-hour traffic, especially when increasing

  14. A new frontier in CO2 flux measurements using a highly portable DIAL laser system.

    PubMed

    Queiβer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-09-22

    Volcanic CO2 emissions play a key role in the geological carbon cycle, and monitoring of volcanic CO2 fluxes helps to forecast eruptions. The quantification of CO2 fluxes is challenging due to rapid dilution of magmatic CO2 in CO2-rich ambient air and the diffuse nature of many emissions, leading to large uncertainties in the global magmatic CO2 flux inventory. Here, we report measurements using a new DIAL laser remote sensing system for volcanic CO2 (CO2DIAL). Two sites in the volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy) were scanned, yielding CO2 path-amount profiles used to compute fluxes. Our results reveal a relatively high CO2 flux from Campi Flegrei, consistent with an increasing trend. Unlike previous methods, the CO2DIAL is able to measure integrated CO2 path-amounts at distances up to 2000 m using virtually any solid surface as a reflector, whilst also being highly portable. This opens a new frontier in quantification of geological and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes.

  15. A new frontier in CO2 flux measurements using a highly portable DIAL laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiβer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic CO2 emissions play a key role in the geological carbon cycle, and monitoring of volcanic CO2 fluxes helps to forecast eruptions. The quantification of CO2 fluxes is challenging due to rapid dilution of magmatic CO2 in CO2-rich ambient air and the diffuse nature of many emissions, leading to large uncertainties in the global magmatic CO2 flux inventory. Here, we report measurements using a new DIAL laser remote sensing system for volcanic CO2 (CO2DIAL). Two sites in the volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy) were scanned, yielding CO2 path-amount profiles used to compute fluxes. Our results reveal a relatively high CO2 flux from Campi Flegrei, consistent with an increasing trend. Unlike previous methods, the CO2DIAL is able to measure integrated CO2 path-amounts at distances up to 2000 m using virtually any solid surface as a reflector, whilst also being highly portable. This opens a new frontier in quantification of geological and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes.

  16. A new frontier in CO2 flux measurements using a highly portable DIAL laser system

    PubMed Central

    Queiβer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic CO2 emissions play a key role in the geological carbon cycle, and monitoring of volcanic CO2 fluxes helps to forecast eruptions. The quantification of CO2 fluxes is challenging due to rapid dilution of magmatic CO2 in CO2-rich ambient air and the diffuse nature of many emissions, leading to large uncertainties in the global magmatic CO2 flux inventory. Here, we report measurements using a new DIAL laser remote sensing system for volcanic CO2 (CO2DIAL). Two sites in the volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy) were scanned, yielding CO2 path-amount profiles used to compute fluxes. Our results reveal a relatively high CO2 flux from Campi Flegrei, consistent with an increasing trend. Unlike previous methods, the CO2DIAL is able to measure integrated CO2 path-amounts at distances up to 2000 m using virtually any solid surface as a reflector, whilst also being highly portable. This opens a new frontier in quantification of geological and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. PMID:27652775

  17. Electrooptical measurements for monitoring metabolite fluxes in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations.

    PubMed

    Junne, Stefan; Klein, Eva; Angersbach, Alexander; Goetz, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Anisotropy of electrical polarizability in Clostridium acetobutylicum cells during pH 5 controlled acetone butanol ethanol fermentations was observed. Cell length was determined from the electrooptical data. Mean length was determined as being 2.5 microm in the growth phase and 3.5 microm in the early stationary phase. Based on the obtained frequency dispersion of polarizability anisotropy (FDPA) in the range of 190 to 2,100 kHz, the switch from the acidogenic to the solventogenic phase could be monitored. The slope of polarizability versus the frequency made it possible to differentiate between phases of dominating acid and solvent production. Metabolite fluxes determined from concentration measurements correlated well to the polarizability. A partial least-squares (PLS) model was established and validated by applying data from several fermentations. The root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) was 0.09 for the acid fluxes and 0.11 for the solvent fluxes. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.20 for acid fluxes and 0.24 for solvent fluxes. The ratio of polarizability at high and low frequencies correlated to the ongoing sporulation process. At ratios below 0.25, spore formation in the cells became visible under the microscope. The advantage of using electrooptical measurements is the ability to observe metabolite fluxes rather than concentrations, which provides useful information on productivity during a bioprocess.

  18. Nonlinear magneto-optic measurement of flux propagation dynamics in thin Permalloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. J.; Pufall, M. R.; Kabos, Pavel

    2002-02-01

    Time-resolved nonlinear optics are used to study the propagation of magnetic flux pulses in a 250 nm Permalloy film. The flux is generated in the film by coupling it to a coplanar waveguide structure driven with broadband voltage pulses. Flux pulses propagated in the film with a phase velocity of 4.2×105 m/s and a group velocity of 1.5×105 m/s. Both velocities are consistent with the predictions of Damon-Eshbach theory for magnetostatic surface waves with 200-300 μm wavelengths. Within 100 μm of the excitation source, flux pulses decayed monotonically but with no measurable delay.

  19. Measurements of turbulent boundary layer flow and surface fluxes over roughness and temperature transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey; Zhang, Wei; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Often natural and engineered surfaces have spatially heterogeneous properties at a variety of scales that affect the structure of the turbulent boundary layer, which is no longer in equilibrium with the local surface. Predicting the spatial distributions of surface momentum and scalar fluxes over heterogeneous surfaces remains a challenge. We present measurements made in a thermally stratified boundary layer wind tunnel to characterize the turbulent flow and surface fluxes for abrupt transitions in surface temperature and roughness. We compare the development of internal boundary layers for momentum and heat, and associated mean surface flux for two cases. The first is a smooth boundary layer with an abrupt change in surface temperature and the second also involves a change from a fully rough to a smooth wall. The effects of roughness change on surface heat flux and implications for prediction are examined. The data will be compared to typical models that utilize Monin-Obukhov similarity theory.

  20. Measuring diurnal cycles of plant transpiration fluxes in the Arctic with an automated clear chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, L. R.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Curtis, J. B.; Rahn, T. A.; Young, J. M.; Newman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important greenhouse gas and a major component of the hydrological cycle, but methodological challenges still limit our knowledge of this flux. Measuring evapotranspiration is even more difficult when aiming to partition plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Information on this process for arctic systems is very limited. In order to decrease this gap, our objective was to directly measure plant transpiration in Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N 156.7°W). A commercial system allows measuring carbon soil respiration fluxes with an automated clear chamber connected to an infrared gas-analyzer (Licor 8100), and while it simultaneously measures water concentrations, it is not calibrated to measure vapor fluxes. We calibrated the clear chamber against a previously established method based on a Licor 6400 soil chamber, and we developed a code to calculate fluxes. We performed laboratory comparisons in New Mexico and field comparisons in the Arctic, suggesting that this is a valid tool for a large range of climates. In the field we found a strong correlation between the two instruments with R2 of 0.79. Even with 24 hours of daylight in the Arctic, the system captures a clear diurnal transpiration flux, peaking at 0.9 mmol m-2 s-1 and showing no flux at the lowest points. This new method should be a powerful approach for long term measurements of specific vegetation types or surface features. Such Data can also be used to help understand controls on larger scale eddy covariance tower measurements of evapotranspiration.

  1. Eddy-Covariance Flux Measurements in the Complex Terrain of an Alpine Valley in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Rebecca; Zeeman, Matthias J.; Eugster, Werner

    2008-06-01

    We measured the surface energy budget of an Alpine grassland in highly complex terrain to explore possibilities and limitations for application of the eddy-covariance technique, also for CO2 flux measurements, at such non-ideal locations. This paper focuses on the influence of complex terrain on the turbulent energy measurements of a characteristic high Alpine grassland on Crap Alv (Alp Weissenstein) in the Swiss Alps during the growing season 2006. Measurements were carried out on a topographic terrace with a slope of 25◦ inclination. Flux data quality is assessed via the closure of the energy budget and the quality flag method used within the CarboEurope project. During 93% of the time the wind direction was along the main valley axis (43% upvalley and 50% downvalley directions). During the transition times of the typical twice daily wind direction changes in a mountain valley the fraction of high and good quality flux data reached a minimum of ≈50%, whereas during the early afternoon ≈70% of all records yielded good to highest quality (CarboEurope flags 0 and 1). The overall energy budget closure was 74 ± 2%. An angular correction for the shortwave energy input to the slope improved the energy budget closure slightly to 82 ± 2% for afternoon conditions. In the daily total, the measured turbulent energy fluxes are only underestimated by around 8% of net radiation. In summary, our results suggest that it is possible to yield realistic energy flux measurements under such conditions. We thus argue that the Crap Alv site and similar topographically complex locations with short-statured vegetation should be well suited also for CO2 flux measurements.

  2. Long-term micrometeorological measurements of nitrous oxide fluxes from agro-ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Riddle, C.; Brown, S.; Snider, D.

    2013-12-01

    Year-round measurements of nitrous oxide fluxes are needed in order to better characterize emissions from agro-ecosystems, and devise mitigation strategies for emission reduction. This is particularly the case for agroecosystems in cold regions where freezing and thawing of soil often results in enhanced fluxes. In addition, nitrogen fertilizer application at crop planting in the spring will also result in emission events with high temporal variability. Micrometeorological methods do not interfere with soil conditions and hence, can be used quasi-continuously (at hourly to half-hourly intervals) to capture the highly intermittent nature of N2O emission episodes. Simultaneous flux measurements on multiple plots is desirable so that the effect of soil management practices on N2O emissions can be characterized. We have conducted several studies deploying the flux-gradient technique to measure surface N2O fluxes at a long-term in Elora, ON, Canada, a site established in 2000 with the objective of improving our understanding of how management affects N2O emissions. The experimental area consists of four 1.5-4 ha plots within a level and aerodynamically homogeneous 30-ha area, and half-hourly flux is measured sequentially providing up to 12 values per plot per day. A total of 521 monthly N2O emission rates were measured over the 2000-2013 period for a range of crops (e.g. soybeans, corn, wheat) and management (e.g. no-tillage, conventional). The aggregated analysis shows that extreme flux events tend to be concentrated in February/March and May/Jun/Jul (Fig. 1). The main thaw events tend to occur in February and March, and they events contribute on average 30% to the annual nitrous oxide emission total. Timely rains after fertilizer application at crop planting in May provide high soil water content for denitrification to take place and also lead to high emission events. Sixty-six percent of the annual emission occurred from Jan to Jun on average at this site. Emissions

  3. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  4. Snow, Shrubs, Grasses, and Footprint Theory: Measuring Moisture and Energy Fluxes in Patchy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, J. E.; Liston, G. E.; Hiemstra, C. A.; Pielke, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    When measuring sensible and latent heat flux from a tower within a heterogeneous landscape, one must consider which part of the landscape influences the flux sampled by the instruments. This variable landscape fraction, known as a footprint, is dependent upon wind direction, wind speed and atmospheric stability (thermal and mechanical). From 1 December 2002 - 31 March 2003, the FLuxes Over Snow Surfaces II (FLOSS II) field campaign measured sensible and latent heat fluxes at various heights on a 34 m tower in North Park, Colorado. North Park is an intermountain basin covered with a mixture of shrubs and graminoids (grasses and sedges) that interact with winter snow and wind to produce heterogeneous snow covers and, depending on the depth, protruding vegetation. During this period, snow depth measurements were made along transects extending 400-600 m upwind of the tower roughly every ten days. These snow depth data, in combination with blowing-snow model (SnowTran-3D) simulations, provided daily snow-depth distributions on a 1-meter grid over the area surrounding the flux tower. In addition, shrub height and vertical biomass profiles were measured and combined with a vegetation map having a 1-meter sampling scale. Merging the snow-depth distributions with the vegetation-height map allowed us to quantify the amount of vegetation protruding above the snow. This, in turn, allowed us to analyze the influence of exposed vegetation on observed energy and moisture fluxes. In this poster we describe our model for identifying the landscape fraction gauged by the flux-tower instruments as a function of commonly observed atmospheric conditions.

  5. Seasonal distribution of methane flux in Minnesota Peatland measured by eddy correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Shurpali, N.J.; Verma, S.B.; Clement, R.J.; Billesbach, D.P.

    1993-11-20

    Methane flux was measured using the micrometerological eddy correlation technique during 62 days in mid-May through mid-October 1991 in a peatland ecosystem in north central Minnesota. Application of this technique allows measurement of spatially integrated fluxes. The distribution of methane flux consisted of a gradual pattern with several episodic emissions superimposed. The gradual (nonepisodic) pattern of methane flux (daytime average) exhibited an increase from 30-120 mg m{sup {minus}2}/d in late May to early July to 125-160 mg m{sup {minus}2}/d in mid-July to mid-August and then a decline to 100-35 mg m{sup {minus}2}/d in early September to mid-October. Peat temperature (at 0.1 m depth) and water table depth accounted for about 70% of the variance in the methane flux data. The episodic emissions were associated with drops in atmospheric pressure and a declining water table. Generally, the hourly values of daytime methane flux were fairly stable, perhaps with a slight depression during the midday. However, on days with episodic emissions, the daytime methane flux had a peak during the midafternoon, and its pattern appeared to be similar to those of the standard deviation of atmospheric pressure flunctuations and mean horizontal wind velocity. The ratio of soil CO{sub 2} to methane fluxes (during nonepisodic emission periods) increased with increasing water table depth in a manner similar to that observed in a laboratory study of peat columns from different wetland types in Quebec. The annual methane emission for this ecosystem was estimated to be about 16-19.5 gm{sup {minus}2}yr{sup {minus}1}. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Acosta, L.; Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  7. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  8. Measured and parameterized energy fluxes estimated for Atlantic transects of RV Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumke, Karl; Macke, Andreas; Kalisch, John; Kleta, Henry

    2013-04-01

    Even to date energy fluxes over the oceans are difficult to assess. As an example the relative paucity of evaporation observations and the uncertainties of currently employed empirical approaches lead to large uncertainties of evaporation products over the ocean (e.g. Large and Yeager, 2009). Within the frame of OCEANET (Macke et al., 2010) we performed such measurements on Atlantic transects between Bremerhaven (Germany) and Cape Town (South Africa) or Punta Arenas (Chile) onboard RV Polarstern during the recent years. The basic measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes are inertial-dissipation (e.g. Dupuis et al., 1997) flux estimates and measurements of the bulk variables. Turbulence measurements included a sonic anemometer and an infrared hygrometer, both mounted on the crow's nest. Mean meteorological sensors were those of the ship's operational measurement system. The global radiation and the down terrestrial radiation were measured on the OCEANET container placed on the monkey island. At least about 1000 time series of 1 h length were analyzed to derive bulk transfer coefficients for the fluxes of sensible and latent heat. The bulk transfer coefficients were applied to the ship's meteorological data to derive the heat fluxes at the sea surface. The reflected solar radiation was estimated from measured global radiation. The up terrestrial radiation was derived from the skin temperature according to the Stefan-Boltzmann law. Parameterized heat fluxes were compared to the widely used COARE-parameterization (Fairall et al., 2003), the agreement is excellent. Measured and parameterized heat and radiation fluxes gave the total energy budget at the air sea interface. As expected the mean total flux is positive, but there are also areas, where it is negative, indicating an energy loss of the ocean. It could be shown that the variations in the energy budget are mainly due to insolation and evaporation. A comparison between the mean values of measured and

  9. Development of Magnetically Insulated Baffled Probe Cluster for Measurement of Energy Flux and Particle Flux in the Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, S. H.; Koepke, M.; Demidov, V.; Williams, C.; Gentle, K.

    2015-11-01

    Progress is reported in employing magnetically insulated baffled (MIB) probes in the Texas Helimak. Radial scans at the plasma edge of dc and ac space potential are presented. Like the Ball-Pen probe, the MIB probe shares the Langmuir probe simplicity and overcomes its shortcomings in the ability to make real-time measurements of plasma space potential, temperature, and energy/particle fluxes in magnetized plasma. By rotating the probe shaft to change the extent to which the baffle ``masks'' the probe collection area, the ratio between electron and ion probe current, and consequently the relative sensitivity of the floating-probe oscillations to space potential and electron/ion temperature, can be adjusted, thus allowing space potential fluctuations and electron/ion temperature fluctuations to be distinguished when measured at two different rotation angles. At the optimal rotation angle, the contribution of electron temperature and its fluctuations to the floating-potential measurement are eliminated and the space potential fluctuation phase is preserved. Support from DOE is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Observing the Arctic Carbon Feedback: Regional scale methane flux measurements over the Alaskan North Slope using airplane flux observations and in situ measurements of δ13CH4.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, C. E.; Sayres, D. S.; Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Munster, J. B.; Kochendorfer, J.; Wilkerson, J.; Baker, B.; Dubey, M. K.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most powerful positive feedback mechanisms to anthropogenic climate change postulated is the increase in carbon emissions from polar-regions. Warmer temperatures at the poles is predicted to increase the rate of methanogensesis in thawing permafrost soils as well as destabilize the network of arctic marine and terrestrial methane hydrates. Recent estimates put the quantity of organic carbon stored in soils in the northern permafrost zone around 1,700 Pg of C, which is well in excess of the maximum carbon emissions necessary to limit global average temperature increase to only 2 C° (260-410 Pg of C between 2011 and 2100 as CO2). However, many climate models used to forecast changes in average global temperature and inform policy decisions do not take into account arctic carbon feedback. This is largely due in part to the daunting observational challenge presented by observing methane fluxes in the Arctic. An ideal measurement system must be able to distinguish between biological and anthropogenic methane sources, have the ability to cover large spatial ranges, and have the sensitivity to distinguish changes from season to season, and year to year. The FOCAL platform has been engineered to address these challenges and help bridge the gap in spatial coverage between ground based and inverse modelling studies. It consists of a small aircraft equipped with the best atmospheric turbulence (BAT) probe, and gas sensors for in situ measurements of CH4, CO2, δ13CH4, δ13CO2 to make regional scale surface eddy-covariance flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide as well as their stable isotopologues. We will present data from the initial FOCAL flight series in August 2013 based out of Deadhorse, AK, including CH4 concentration and running flux data, as well as in situ δ13CH4 observations to gain mechanistic insight. With the FOCAL platform we were able to dramatically extend regional coverage of methane flux observations beyond what can normally be observe

  11. Development of airborne eddy-correlation flux measurement capabilities for reactive oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John (Principal Investigator); Zheng, Xiaonan; Sandholm, Scott T.

    1996-01-01

    This research is aimed at producing a fundamental new research tool for characterizing the source strength of the most important compound controlling the hemispheric and global scale distribution of tropospheric ozone. Specifically, this effort seeks to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a new general purpose laser-induced fluorescence based spectrometer for making airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen compounds. The new all solid-state laser technology being used in this advanced sensor will produce a forerunner of the type of sensor technology that should eventually result in highly compact operational systems. The proof-of-concept sensor being developed will have over two orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity than present-day instruments. In addition, this sensor will offer the possibility of eventual extension to airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and possibly other compounds, such as ammonia (NH3), peroxyradicals (HO2), nitrateradicals (NO3) and several iodine compounds (e.g., I and IO). Demonstration of the new sensor's ability to measure NO fluxes will occur through a series of laboratory and field tests. This proof-of-concept demonstration will show that not only can airborne fluxes of important ultra-trace compounds be made at the few parts-per-trillion level, but that the high accuracy/precision measurements currently needed for predictive models can also. These measurement capabilities will greatly enhance our current ability to quantify the fluxes of reactive nitrogen into the troposphere and significantly impact upon the accuracy of predictive capabilities to model O3's distribution within the remote troposphere. This development effort also offers a timely approach for producing the reactive nitrogen flux measurement capabilities that will be needed by future research programs such as NASA's planned 1999 Amazon Biogeochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry

  12. Combined analysis of neutron and photon flux measurements for the Jules Horowitz reactor core mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J. P.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J. Y.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Brun, J.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the combined analysis of nuclear measurements to improve the knowledge of the irradiation conditions in the experimental locations of the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The goal of the present work is to measure more accurately neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating in the reactor. In a Material Testing Reactor (MTR), nuclear heating is a crucial parameter to design the experimental devices to be irradiated in harsh nuclear conditions. This parameter drives the temperature of the devices and of the samples. The numerical codes can predict this parameter but in-situ measurements are necessary to reach the expected accuracy. For this reason, one objective of the IN-CORE program [1] is to study the combined measurements of neutron and photon flux and their cross advanced interpretation. It should be reminded that both neutron and photon sensors are not totally selective as their signals are due to neutron and photon interactions. We intend to measure the neutron flux by three different kinds of sensors (Uranium Fission chamber, Plutonium Fission chamber and Self Powered Neutron Detector), the photon flux by two different sensors (Ionization chamber and Self Powered Gamma Detector) and the nuclear heating by two different ones (Differential calorimeter and Gamma Thermometer). For the same parameter, we expect that the use of different kinds of sensors will allow a better estimation of the aimed parameter by mixing different spectrum responses and different neutron and gamma contributions. An experimental test called CARMEN-1 is scheduled in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France) at the end of 2011, with the goal to map irradiation locations in the reactor reflector to get a first validation of the analysis model. This article focuses on the sensor selection for CARMEN-1 experiment and to the way to link neutron and photon flux measurements in view to reduce their uncertainties but also to better assess the neutron and photon contributions to nuclear

  13. Shaped scintillation detector systems for measurements of gamma ray flux anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Vette, J. I.; Stecker, F. W.; Eller, E. L.; Wildes, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The detection efficiencies of cylindrical detectors for various gamma ray photon angular distributions were studied in the energy range from .10 Mev to 15 Mev. These studies indicate that simple detector systems on small satellites can be used to measure flux anisotropy of cosmic gamma rays and the angular distribution of albedo gamma rays produced in planetary atmospheres. The results indicate that flat cylindrical detectors are most suitable for measuring flux anisotropy because of their angular response function. A general method for calculating detection efficiencies for such detectors is presented.

  14. Measuring Fluxes with Better Certainty without a Need for Density Corrections or Pressure Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Nakai, T.; Schmidt, A.; Scott, R.; Kathilankal, J.; Fratini, G.; Hanson, C.; Law, B.; McDermitt, D.; Eckles, R.

    2012-04-01

    Eddy Covariance flux measurements using gas analyzers of an enclosed design rely on the covariance between instantaneous vertical wind speed and instantaneous output of gas mixing ratio, such that density data are corrected on-the-fly using instantaneous water vapor, temperature and pressure measurements in the cell, collected and aligned with CO2 or other gas of interest. This approach implicitly accounts for the effects of fluctuations in water vapor, temperature and pressure on the density of the gas of interest. Therefore no sensible heat or latent heat portions of Webb-Pearman-Leuning density corrections (WPL) are required, and the pressure term, which is usually neglected in traditional WPL implementation, is accounted for in these mixing ratio-based measurements. A somewhat similar way of calculating fluxes has been used frequently with traditional closed-path analyzers, with some assumptions: (i) slow temperature measurements were used to convert from density to mixing ratio, assuming fast fluctuations of the air temperature to be fully attenuated in the long intake tube; (ii) slow pressure measurements were used, assuming negligible instantaneous pressure fluctuations. Nine field experiments were conducted in a wide range of environmental conditions from Florida to Alaska using an enclosed CO2/H2O gas analyzer. These experiments presented an opportunity to verify the performance of the mixing ratio approach, and examine the differences from traditional density-based measurements. Results indicate that the mixing ratio-based approach helps to minimize or eliminate a number of uncertainties associated with traditional density-based approach, including: (i) uncertainties associated with correcting the product of fast covariances of gas density using sensible and latent heat flux calculated over half-hour or an hour; (ii) uncertainties in the magnitudes of the sensible and latent heat fluxes used in correcting gas flux; (iii) bias in long-term accumulated CO2

  15. Development of a laser remote sensing instrument to measure sub-aerial volcanic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike

    2016-04-01

    A thorough quantification of volcanic CO2 fluxes would lead to an enhanced understanding of the role of volcanoes in the geological carbon cycle. This would enable a more subtle understanding of human impact on that cycle. Furthermore, variations in volcanic CO2 emissions are a key to understanding volcanic processes such as eruption phenomenology. However, measuring fluxes of volcanic CO2 is challenging as volcanic CO2 concentrations are modest compared with the ambient CO2 concentration (~400 ppm) . Volcanic CO2 quickly dilutes with the background air. For Mt. Etna (Italy), for instance, 1000 m downwind from the crater, dispersion modelling yields a signal of ~4 ppm only. It is for this reason that many magmatic CO2 concentration measurements focus on in situ techniques, such as direct sampling Giggenbach bottles, chemical sensors, IR absorption spectrometers or mass spectrometers. However, emission rates are highly variable in time and space. Point measurements fail to account for this variability. Inferring 1-D or 2-D gas concentration profiles, necessary to estimate gas fluxes, from point measurements may thus lead to erroneous flux estimations. Moreover, in situ probing is time consuming and, since many volcanoes emit toxic gases and are dangerous as mountains, may raise safety concerns. In addition, degassing is often diffuse and spatially extended, which makes a measurement approach with spatial coverage desirable. There are techniques that allow to indirectly retrieve CO2 fluxes from correlated SO2 concentrations and fluxes. However, they still rely on point measurements of CO2 and are prone to errors of SO2 fluxes due to light dilution and depend on blue sky conditions. Here, we present a new remote sensing instrument, developed with the ERC project CO2Volc, which measures 1-D column amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere with sufficient sensitivity to reveal the contribution of magmatic CO2. Based on differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) the instrument measures

  16. Shallow cumulus processes deduced from subcloud flux measurements and parameterization schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Oetles, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to improve understanding of shallow cumulus in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), to quantitatively measure their subcloud root processes, and to link those measurements to estimates of cloud layer processes. Subcloud aircraft turbulence data for three days from the 1986 HAPEX project in southwest France is extensively analyzed. Various parameterizations of cloud layer processes are used to estimate cumulus layer effects by employing the subcloud fluxes as boundary conditions. Case 1 (5/21/86) had active cumuli; over the forest they were deep and large in diameter, but clouds over farmland were shallow and small in diameter. Case 2 (5/9/86) has also weak active cumulus with a smaller vertical depth and case 3 (6/13/86) had only forced cumuli. Four methods of decomposition of turbulence data have been employed: by land surface-cumulus regime, by proximity to clouds and clear areas, by scale, and by turbulence process types. In the presence strong active cumuli from case 1, the turbulent fluxes and energy are intensified, due to the cloud [open quotes]root[close quotes] effects. The strong active cumuli are initiated by warm-moist thermals. Since cumulus layer flux measurements were not made during the HAPEX experiment, different parameterization schemes have been used to estimate cloud layer fluxes. The schemes are: the simple cumulus flux scheme, the Betts-Miller adjustment scheme, an eddy diffusion scheme, and a new eddy diffusion scheme with counter-gradient term which is developed as a part of this study. For the strong active cumulus regime from case 1, the liquid water potential temperature and total water fluxes obtained from different parameterization schemes yield very similar results. Unlike the other parameterization schemes, the new eddy diffusion scheme with a counter-gradient term yields upward buoyancy fluxes which are in a good agreement with earlier studies.

  17. Constraining the Sulfur Dioxide Degassing Flux from Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica Using Unmanned Aerial System Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xi, Xin; Johnson, Matthew S.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fladeland, Matthew; Pieri, David; Diaz, Jorge Andres; Bland, Geoffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Observed sulfur dioxide (SO2)mixing ratios onboard unmanned aerial systems (UAS) duringMarch 11-13, 2013 are used to constrain the three-day averaged SO2 degassing flux fromTurrialba volcanowithin a Bayesian inverse modeling framework. A mesoscale model coupled with Lagrangian stochastic particle backward trajectories is used to quantify the source-receptor relationships at very high spatial resolutions (i.e., b1 km). The model shows better performance in reproducing the near-surface meteorological properties and observed SO2 variations when using a first-order closure non-local planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme. The optimized SO2 degassing fluxes vary from 0.59 +/- 0.37 to 0.83 +/- 0.33 kt d-1 depending on the PBL scheme used. These fluxes are in good agreement with ground-based gas flux measurements, and correspond to corrective scale factors of 8-12 to the posteruptive SO2 degassing rate in the AeroCom emission inventory. The maximum a posteriori solution for the SO2 flux is highly sensitive to the specification of prior and observational errors, and relatively insensitive to the SO2 loss term and temporal averaging of observations. Our results indicate relatively low degassing activity but sustained sulfur emissions from Turrialba volcano to the troposphere during March 2013. This study demonstrates the utility of low-cost small UAS platforms for volcanic gas composition and flux analysis.

  18. Constraining the sulfur dioxide degassing flux from Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica using unmanned aerial system measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xin; Johnson, Matthew S.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fladeland, Matthew; Pieri, David; Diaz, Jorge Andres; Bland, Geoffrey L.

    2016-10-01

    Observed sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixing ratios onboard unmanned aerial systems (UAS) during March 11-13, 2013 are used to constrain the three-day averaged SO2 degassing flux from Turrialba volcano within a Bayesian inverse modeling framework. A mesoscale model coupled with Lagrangian stochastic particle backward trajectories is used to quantify the source-receptor relationships at very high spatial resolutions (i.e., < 1 km). The model shows better performance in reproducing the near-surface meteorological properties and observed SO2 variations when using a first-order closure non-local planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme. The optimized SO2 degassing fluxes vary from 0.59 ± 0.37 to 0.83 ± 0.33 kt d- 1 depending on the PBL scheme used. These fluxes are in good agreement with ground-based gas flux measurements, and correspond to corrective scale factors of 8-12 to the posteruptive SO2 degassing rate in the AeroCom emission inventory. The maximum a posteriori solution for the SO2 flux is highly sensitive to the specification of prior and observational errors, and relatively insensitive to the SO2 loss term and temporal averaging of observations. Our results indicate relatively low degassing activity but sustained sulfur emissions from Turrialba volcano to the troposphere during March 2013. This study demonstrates the utility of low-cost small UAS platforms for volcanic gas composition and flux analysis.

  19. Using Airborne Microwave Remotely Sensed Root-Zone Soil Moisture and Flux Measurements to Improve Regional Predictions of Carbon Fluxes in a Terrestrial Biosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Antonarakis, A. S.; Medvigy, D.; Burgin, M. S.; Crow, W. T.; Milak, S.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Truong-Loi, M.; Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S. S.; Cuenca, R. H.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    North American ecosystems are critical components of the global carbon cycle, exchanging large amounts of carbon dioxide and other gases with the atmosphere. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 between atmosphere and ecosystems quantifies these carbon fluxes, but current continental-scale estimates contain high levels of uncertainty. Root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) and its spatial and temporal heterogeneity influences NEE and improved estimates can help reduce uncertainty in NEE estimates. We used the RZSM measurements from the Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission, and the carbon, water and energy fluxes observed by the eddy-covariance flux towers to constrain the Ecosystem Demography Model 2.2 (ED2.2) to improve its predictions of carbon fluxes. The parameters of the ED2.2 model were first optimized at seven flux tower sites in North America, which represent six different biomes, by constraining the model against a suite of flux measurements and forest inventory measurements through a Bayesian Markov-Chain Monte Carlo framework. We further applied the AirMOSS RZSM products to constrain the ED2.2 model to achieve better estimates of regional NEE. Evaluation against flux tower measurements and forest dynamics measurements shows that the constrained ED2.2 model produces improved predictions of monthly to annual carbon fluxes. The remote sensing based RZSM can further help improve the spatial patterns and temporal variations of model NEE. The results demonstrate that model-data fusion can substantially improve model performance and highlight the important role of RZSM in regulating the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of carbon fluxes.

  20. Water Use Patterns of Four Tropical Bamboo Species Assessed with Sap Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mei, Tingting; Fang, Dongming; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Bamboos are grasses (Poaceae) that are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions. We aimed at exploring water use patterns of four tropical bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris, Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atroviolacea, and G. apus) with sap flux measurement techniques. Our approach included three experimental steps: (1) a pot experiment with a comparison of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs), the stem heat balance (SHB) method and gravimetric readings using potted B. vulgaris culms, (2) an in situ calibration of TDPs with the SHB method for the four bamboo species, and (3) field monitoring of sap flux of the four bamboo species along with three tropical tree species (Gmelina arborea, Shorea leprosula, and Hevea brasiliensis) during a dry and a wet period. In the pot experiment, it was confirmed that the SHB method is well suited for bamboos but that TDPs need to be calibrated. In situ, species-specific parameters for such calibration formulas were derived. During field monitoring we found that some bamboo species reached high maximum sap flux densities. Across bamboo species, maximal sap flux density increased with decreasing culm diameter. In the diurnal course, sap flux densities in bamboos peaked much earlier than radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and also much earlier than sap flux densities in trees. There was a pronounced hysteresis between sap flux density and VPD in bamboos, which was less pronounced in trees. Three of the four bamboo species showed reduced sap flux densities at high VPD values during the dry period, which was associated with a decrease in soil moisture content. Possible roles of internal water storage, root pressure and stomatal sensitivity are discussed.

  1. Water Use Patterns of Four Tropical Bamboo Species Assessed with Sap Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Tingting; Fang, Dongming; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Bamboos are grasses (Poaceae) that are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions. We aimed at exploring water use patterns of four tropical bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris, Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atroviolacea, and G. apus) with sap flux measurement techniques. Our approach included three experimental steps: (1) a pot experiment with a comparison of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs), the stem heat balance (SHB) method and gravimetric readings using potted B. vulgaris culms, (2) an in situ calibration of TDPs with the SHB method for the four bamboo species, and (3) field monitoring of sap flux of the four bamboo species along with three tropical tree species (Gmelina arborea, Shorea leprosula, and Hevea brasiliensis) during a dry and a wet period. In the pot experiment, it was confirmed that the SHB method is well suited for bamboos but that TDPs need to be calibrated. In situ, species-specific parameters for such calibration formulas were derived. During field monitoring we found that some bamboo species reached high maximum sap flux densities. Across bamboo species, maximal sap flux density increased with decreasing culm diameter. In the diurnal course, sap flux densities in bamboos peaked much earlier than radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and also much earlier than sap flux densities in trees. There was a pronounced hysteresis between sap flux density and VPD in bamboos, which was less pronounced in trees. Three of the four bamboo species showed reduced sap flux densities at high VPD values during the dry period, which was associated with a decrease in soil moisture content. Possible roles of internal water storage, root pressure and stomatal sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26779233

  2. Gravity wave momentum fluxes from MF and meteor radar measurements in the polar MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Latteck, Ralph; Rapp, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Annual cycles of horizontal winds and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) are presented for the medium frequency Doppler radar at Saura (SMF radar, located at 69°N, 16°E) for the first time. Four year mean wind and momentum flux fields for 2008 through 2011 clearly show the coupling and interactions between GWs and the mean flow especially in the summer months. GW breaking at mesopause heights results in momentum flux divergence and affects the wind field by forcing a reversal of the wind profile in summer. Height-time cross sections for the individual years (2008 to 2011) illustrate the year-to-year variation of horizontal winds and the vertical fluxes of zonal and meridional momentum. They show similar annual patterns from year to year which are more consistent in the summer months than during winter and have maximum absolute values in 2009. Furthermore, the precise SMF radar measurements give an excellent possibility to evaluate momentum flux estimates from the colocated meteor radar at Andenes. Both radars have different capabilities, and different techniques are applied to derive momentum fluxes. They show comparable results for the 4 year mean annual cycles of horizontal winds and momentum fluxes especially in summer. This holds for both structure and magnitudes in the overlapping heights, where the SMF radar data provide a wider vertical coverage. The best agreement is found for the zonal components of both radars, whereas there are some larger discrepancies in the meridional components, especially in the vertical flux of meridional momentum.

  3. Apparatus development for measuring heat flux in a direct coal-liquefaction preheater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornosky, R. M.; Perlmutter, M.; Fuchs, W.; Ruether, J. A.

    1982-04-01

    A device is evaluated for determining heat flux in a direct coal liquefaction preheater. The heat fluxmeter determines heat flux from measurements of temperature difference across the preheater tube wall at a given plane perpendicular to the tube axis. Six fluxmeters were installed in a 5.08 m length of nominal 1 1/2 inch diameter, schedule XX pipe enclosed in stacked electric furnaces. Heat flux to a heat transfer fluid flowing through the pipe was measured and compared to values predicted by the fluxmeters. Fair agreement was observed, and the method can be used as an empirical calibration procedure for fluxmeters. A number of apparatus improvements were identified that will be incorporated in the planned experimental program.

  4. Potentials and challenges associated with automated closed dynamic chamber measurements of soil CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration fluxes are influenced by natural factors such as climate and soil type, but also by anthropogenic activities in managed ecosystems. As a result, soil CO2 fluxes show a large intra- and interannual as well as intra- and intersite variability. Most of the available soil CO2 flux data giving insights into this variability have been measured with manually closed static chambers, but technological advances in the past 15 years have also led to an increased use of automated closed chamber systems. The great advantage of automated chambers in comparison to manually operated chambers is the higher temporal resolution of the flux data. This is especially important if we want to better understand the effects of short-term events, e.g. fertilization or heavy rainfall, on soil CO2 flux variability. However, the chamber method is an invasive measurement method which can potentially alter soil CO2 fluxes and lead to biased measurement results. In the peer-reviewed literature, many papers compare the field performance and results of different closed static chamber designs, or compare manual chambers with automated chamber systems, to identify potential biases in CO2 flux measurements, and thus help to reduce uncertainties in the flux data. However, inter-comparisons of different automated closed dynamic chamber systems are still lacking. Here we are going to present a field comparison of the most-cited automated chamber system, the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, with the also commercially available Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. Both measurement systems were installed side by side at a recently harvested poplar bioenergy plantation (POPFULL, http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/popfull/) from April 2014 until August 2014. The plantation provided optimal comparison conditions with a bare field situation after the harvest and a regrowing canopy resulting in a broad variety of microclimates. Furthermore, the plantation was planted in a double-row system with

  5. Simple, stable, and affordable: Towards long-term ecosystem scale flux measurements of VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are key players in atmospheric chemistry and climate, yet our understanding of their emission dynamics is very limited. They dominate global emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) with estimated rates that are an order of magnitude higher than the anthropogenic VOC emissions. Since the publication of the first global BVOC emission inventories there have been efforts to develop more realistic and process-based models of BVOC emissions. However, there are only a few ecosystem-scale BVOC flux data for evaluation and improvement of these models. Thus a reliable network of observations is urgently needed. Surface layer flux measurements by micrometeorological methods provide the most suitable data for this purpose but there are some hindrances preventing the implementation of a long-term flux measurement network.

  6. Measurement of greenhouse gas flux from agricultural soils using static chambers.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sarah M; Ruark, Matthew D; Oates, Lawrence G; Jokela, William E; Dell, Curtis J

    2014-08-03

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape management practices. The static chamber-based method described here is based on trapping gases emitted from the soil surface within a chamber and collecting samples from the chamber headspace at regular intervals for analysis by gas chromatography. Change in gas concentration over time is used to calculate flux. This method can be utilized to measure landscape-based flux of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, and to estimate differences between treatments or explore system dynamics over seasons or years. Infrastructure requirements are modest, but a comprehensive experimental design is essential. This method is easily deployed in the field, conforms to established guidelines, and produces data suitable to large-scale GHG emissions studies.

  7. Measurement of Greenhouse Gas Flux from Agricultural Soils Using Static Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Sarah M.; Ruark, Matthew D.; Oates, Lawrence G.; Jokela, William E.; Dell, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape management practices. The static chamber-based method described here is based on trapping gases emitted from the soil surface within a chamber and collecting samples from the chamber headspace at regular intervals for analysis by gas chromatography. Change in gas concentration over time is used to calculate flux. This method can be utilized to measure landscape-based flux of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, and to estimate differences between treatments or explore system dynamics over seasons or years. Infrastructure requirements are modest, but a comprehensive experimental design is essential. This method is easily deployed in the field, conforms to established guidelines, and produces data suitable to large-scale GHG emissions studies. PMID:25146426

  8. Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds measured and modelled above a Norway spruce forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juráň, Stanislav; Fares, Silvano; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Savi, Flavia; Alivernini, Alessandro; Calfapietra, Carlo; Večeřová, Kristýna; Křůmal, Kamil; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were investigated at Norway spruce forest at Bílý Kříž in Beskydy Mountains of the Czech Republic during the summer 2014. A proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS, Ionicon Analytik, Austria) has been coupled with eddy-covariance system. Additionally, Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model has been used to derive fluxes from concentration gradient of various monoterpenes previously absorbed into n-heptane by wet effluent diffusion denuder with consequent quantification by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. Modelled data cover each one day of three years with different climatic conditions and previous precipitation patterns. Model MEGAN was run to cover all dataset with monoterpene fluxes and measured basal emission factor. Highest fluxes measured by eddy-covariance were recorded during the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes and isoprene. Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model suggests most abundant monoterpene fluxes being α- and β-pinene. Principal component analysis revealed dependencies of individual monoterpene fluxes on air temperature and particularly global radiation; however, these dependencies were monoterpene specific. Relationships of monoterpene fluxes with CO2 flux and relative air humidity were found to be negative. MEGAN model correlated to eddy-covariance PTR-TOF-MS measurement evince particular differences, which will be shown and discussed. Bi-directional fluxes of oxygenated short-chain volatiles (methanol, formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and methyl ethyl ketone) were recorded by PTR-TOF-MS. Volatiles of anthropogenic origin as benzene and toluene were likely transported from the most benzene polluted region in Europe - Ostrava city and adjacent part of Poland around Katowice, where metallurgical and coal mining industries are located. Those were accumulated during

  9. High CO2 emissions through porous media: Transport mechanisms and implications for flux measurement and fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; Sorey, M.L.; Kennedy, B.M.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Rogie, J.D.; Shuster, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was constructed in the laboratory where known fluxes could be maintained through dry sand. Steady-state gas concentration profiles and fractionation effects observed in the 30-cm sand column nearly match those predicted by the Stefan-Maxwell equations, indicating that the test system was functioning successfully as a uniform porous medium. Eight groups of investigators tested their accumulation chamber equipment, all configured with continuous infrared gas analyzers (IRGA), in this system. Over a flux range of ~ 200-12,000 g m-2 day-1, 90% of their 203 flux measurements were 0-25% lower than the imposed flux with a mean difference of - 12.5%. Although this difference would seem to be within the range of acceptability for many geologic investigations, some potential sources for larger errors were discovered. A steady-state pressure gradient of -20 Pa/m was measured in the sand column at a flux of 11,200 g m-2 day-1. The derived permeability (50 darcies) was used in the dusty-gas model (DGM) of transport to quantify various diffusive and viscous flux components. These calculations were used to demonstrate that accumulation chambers, in addition to reducing the underlying diffusive gradient, severely disrupt the steady-state pressure gradient. The resultant diversion of the net gas flow is probably responsible for the systematically low flux measurements. It was also shown that the fractionating effects of a viscous CO2 efflux against a diffusive influx of air will have a major impact on some important geochemical indicators, such as N2/Ar, ??15N-N2, and 4He/22

  10. Improved measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. -H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, D.; Joshi, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. -C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pan, H. -R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C. -H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Here, a new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is reported. The antineutrinos were generated by six 2.9 GWth nuclear reactors and detected by eight antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (560 m and 600 m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (1640 m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected. The IBD yield in the eight detectors was measured, and the ratio of measured to predicted flux was found to be 0.946 ± 0.020 (0.992 ± 0.021) for the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model. A 2.9σ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4$-$6 MeV was found in the measured spectrum, with a local significance of 4.4σ. Finally, a reactor antineutrino spectrum weighted by the IBD cross section is extracted for model-independent predictions.

  11. Improved measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    DOE PAGES

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Here, a new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is reported. The antineutrinos were generated by six 2.9 GWth nuclear reactors and detected by eight antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (560 m and 600 m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (1640 m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected. The IBD yield in the eight detectors was measured, and the ratio of measured to predicted flux was found to be 0.946 ± 0.020 (0.992 ±more » 0.021) for the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model. A 2.9σ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4$-$6 MeV was found in the measured spectrum, with a local significance of 4.4σ. Finally, a reactor antineutrino spectrum weighted by the IBD cross section is extracted for model-independent predictions.« less

  12. Gap-filling of flux measurements over a heterogeneous urban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, O.; McFadden, J.

    2012-12-01

    A small, but growing, number of urban flux towers measure surface-atmospheric exchanges of energy, water, and greenhouse gases by the eddy covariance method. Imputation of gaps in these measurements caused by low turbulence conditions and system failures is essential for obtaining annual sums of CO2 exchange and evaporation. Yet most gap-filling methods were designed for natural measurement sites such as forests and grasslands. In the urban environment, however, the assumptions on which those approaches are based are violated and well known temperature or light response models are not applicable because of urban footprint heterogeneity and localized CO2 emissions. Observation-based methods of machine learning can reveal intrinsic mechanisms by using inputs such as wind direction, footprint size, and continuous traffic data, making gap-filling results more accurate. Here, we report preliminary gap-filling results using such empirical approaches for >3 years of flux measurements from the KUOM tall tower in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. We also ran one of the most common gap-filling methods that has been used for natural systems as a baseline or null model. We found that CO2 and water vapor fluxes from the urban landscape showed higher variability than those from a nearby turfgrass lawn, in which fluxes closely followed environmental drivers of light and temperature. Higher variability was found in NEE measurements as compared to LE, due to the relatively greater heterogeneity of sources and sinks that influenced CO2 exchange in the urban landscape.

  13. Numerical modeling of cold magmatic CO2 flux measurements for the exploration of hidden geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Loïc.; Wanner, Christoph; Pan, Lehua

    2015-10-01

    The most accepted conceptual model to explain surface degassing of cold magmatic CO2 in volcanic-geothermal systems involves the presence of a gas reservoir. In this study, numerical simulations using the TOUGH2-ECO2N V2.0 package are performed to get quantitative insights into how cold CO2 soil flux measurements are related to reservoir and fluid properties. Although the modeling is based on flux data measured at a specific geothermal site, the Acoculco caldera (Mexico), some general insights have been gained. Both the CO2 fluxes at the surface and the depth at which CO2 exsolves are highly sensitive to the dissolved CO2 content of the deep fluid. If CO2 mainly exsolves above the reservoir within a fracture zone, the surface CO2 fluxes are not sensitive to the reservoir size but depend on the CO2 dissolved content and the rock permeability. For gas exsolution below the top of the reservoir, surface CO2 fluxes also depend on the gas saturation of the deep fluid as well as the reservoir size. The absence of thermal anomalies at the surface is mainly a consequence of the low enthalpy of CO2. The heat carried by CO2 is efficiently cooled down by heat conduction and to a certain extent by isoenthalpic volume expansion depending on the temperature gradient. Thermal anomalies occur at higher CO2 fluxes (>37,000 g m-2 d-1) when the heat flux of the rising CO2 is not balanced anymore. Finally, specific results are obtained for the Acoculco area (reservoir depth, CO2 dissolved content, and gas saturation state).

  14. The first geothermal heat flux measurement below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Mankoff, K. D.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Foley, N.; Hossainzadeh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow and mass balance of outlet glaciers and ice sheets. We measured directly the geothermal heat flux below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), under Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW), as part of the Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project. The one-dimensional, conductive heat flux is the product of thermal gradient and thermal conductivity. We developed and fielded a tool to determine the thermal gradient in lake sediments, after penetrating ~800 m of ice using a hot water drilling system. We used the needle-probe method to measure the thermal conductivity of sediments recovered from the bottom of the lake with a gravity-driven multi-corer. The thermal gradient was determined during two separate deployments of the geothermal tool, which penetrated ~1.1 m into the till below SLW, yielding essentially identical results: 0.21±0.07 °C/m. Fifteen sediment thermal conductivity measurements yield an average value of 1.36±0.12 W/m-K. The heat flux determined from these measurements is 285±85 W/m2. This value is somewhat higher than that estimated from the WAIS-Divide ice core site, 230 mW/m2, ~800 km away, and much higher than regional estimates based on magnetics and a global seismic model, generally ≤100 mW/m2. Elevated heat flux in this area could result from thermal perturbations associated with rifting, crustal thinning, or volcanic activity. Heat flux of this magnitude is likely to cause basal melt rate of a few cm/year. If this value is representative of conditions below this part of the WAIS, it might help to explain the occurrence of active subglacial lakes and fast-moving ice streams and the ice dynamics of WAIS more broadly.

  15. Comparison of CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance and soil chambers measurements in a vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Meggio, Franco; Pitacco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the processes involved in the carbon balance of a vineyard, we set up a long-term monitoring station of CO2, water vapour and energyfluxes. The experimental site is located in an extensive flat vineyard in the north-east of Italy. We measure the net ecosystem exchange with the eddy covariance (EC) technique using a Campbell Scientific closed-path IRGA and sonic anemometer, and the soil CO2 flux using a Li-Cor multiplexed system connected with six automatic dynamic chambers. Ancillary meteorological and soil variables are also measured. The vineyard is planted with north-south oriented rows spaced 2.2 m apart. Floor is grass covered, and a strip 0.6 m wide on the rows is chemically treated. To represent the different soil conditions existing in the EC footprint and to study the components of the CO2 soil flux, we placed dark soil chambers both on the vineyard rows and in the inter-row space. A well-known limit of the EC technique is the underestimation of fluxes during calm wind periods, mainly occurring at night. In the autumn/winter vine dormancy period, the EC and soil chambers CO2 fluxes should be similar. We compared the CO2 fluxes measured using the two methods to evaluate the reliability of EC measurements at different atmospheric turbulent mixing conditions and stability. The EC technique underestimates the ecosystem respiration during night time periods with friction velocity lower than 0.1 m/s. The present comparison could enable the assessment of a friction velocity threshold, representing the limit above which the EC fluxes can be considered representative of the vegetation-atmosphere exchanges at our specific site.

  16. Nonlinearity measurements of solar cells with an LED-based combinatorial flux addition method

    PubMed Central

    Hamadani, Behrang H.; Shore, Andrew; Roller, John; Yoon, Howard W; Campanelli, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We present a light emitting diode (LED)-based system utilizing a combinatorial flux addition method to investigate the nonlinear relationship in solar cells between the output current of the cell and the incident irradiance level. The magnitude of the light flux is controlled by the supplied currents to two LEDs (or two sets of them) in a combinatorial fashion. The signals measured from the cell are arranged within a related overdetermined linear system of equations derived from an appropriately chosen Nth degree polynomial representing the relationship between the measured signals and the incident fluxes. The flux values and the polynomial coefficients are then solved for by linear least squares to obtain the best fit. The technique can be applied to any solar cell, under either monochromatic or broadband spectrum. For the unscaled solution, no reference detectors or prior calibrations of the light flux are required. However, if at least one calibrated irradiance value is known, then the entire curve can be scaled to an appropriate spectral responsivity value. Using this technique, a large number of data points can be obtained in a relatively short time scale over a large signal range. PMID:27524837

  17. Nonlinearity measurements of solar cells with an LED-based combinatorial flux addition method.

    PubMed

    Hamadani, Behrang H; Shore, Andrew; Roller, John; Yoon, Howard W; Campanelli, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We present a light emitting diode (LED)-based system utilizing a combinatorial flux addition method to investigate the nonlinear relationship in solar cells between the output current of the cell and the incident irradiance level. The magnitude of the light flux is controlled by the supplied currents to two LEDs (or two sets of them) in a combinatorial fashion. The signals measured from the cell are arranged within a related overdetermined linear system of equations derived from an appropriately chosen N(th) degree polynomial representing the relationship between the measured signals and the incident fluxes. The flux values and the polynomial coefficients are then solved for by linear least squares to obtain the best fit. The technique can be applied to any solar cell, under either monochromatic or broadband spectrum. For the unscaled solution, no reference detectors or prior calibrations of the light flux are required. However, if at least one calibrated irradiance value is known, then the entire curve can be scaled to an appropriate spectral responsivity value. Using this technique, a large number of data points can be obtained in a relatively short time scale over a large signal range.

  18. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-02-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one third to global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analysers the instrumentation at many flux sites have been amended for these gases. However the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatial and temporal uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to two orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best guess of this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows to determine CH4 emissions of grazing cows if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  19. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-06-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one-third of global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analyzers, the instrumentation at many flux sites has been amended for these gases. However, the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatially and temporally uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best estimate from this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However, a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found, which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows one to determine CH4 emissions of cows on a pasture if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  20. Eddy covariance N2O flux measurements at low flux rates: results from the InGOS campaign in a Danish willow field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Brümmer, Christian; Hensen, Arjan; van Asperen, Hella; Carter, Mette S.; Gasche, Rainer; Famulari, Daniela; Kutsch, Werner; Pilegaard, Kim; Ambus, Per

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils are characterised by their high spatial and temporal variability. The fluxes depend on the availability of the substrates for nitrification and denitrification and soil physical and chemical conditions that control the metabolic microbial activity. The sporadic nature of the fluxes and their high sensitivity to alterations of the soil climate put very high demands on measurement approaches. Laser spectroscopy enables accurate and fast response detection of atmospheric N2O concentrations and is used for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. Alternatively N2O fluxes can be measured with chambers together with high precision analysers. Differences in the measurement approaches and system designs are expected to have a considerable influence on the accuracy of the flux estimation. This study investigates how three different eddy covariance systems perform in a situation of low N2O fluxes from a flat surface. Chamber flux measurements with differing chamber and analyser designs are used for comparison. In April 2013, the EU research infrastructure project InGOS (http://www.ingos-infrastructure.eu/) organised a campaign of N2O flux measurements in a willow plantation close to the Risø Campus of the Technical University of Denmark. The willow field was harvested in February 2013 and received mineral fertiliser equivalent to 120 kg N ha-1 before the campaign started. Three different eddy covariance systems took part in the campaign: two Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL) based systems and one Los Gatos Research off-axis integrated-cavity-output spectroscopy (ICOS) system for N2O and CO. The sonic anemometers were all installed at 2 m height above the bare ground. Gill R3 type sonic anemometers were used with QCL systems and a Gil HS-50 with the ICOS system. The 10 Hz raw data were analysed with group specific softwares and procedures. The local conditions in the exceptionally cold and dry spring 2013 did not lead to large N2O flux

  1. Fractal dimension as a measure of altered actin cytoskeleton in MC3T3-E1 cells under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Li, D; Han, J; Gao, X; Di, S M; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Shang, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, respond to various mechanical forces, such as stretch and fluid shear force in essentially similar ways. The cytoskeleton, as the load-bearing architecture of the cell, is sensitive to altered inertial forces. Disruption of the cytoskeleton will result in alteration of cellular structure and function. However, it is difficult to quantitatively illustrate cytoskeletal rearrangement because of the complexity of cytoskeletal structure. Usually, the morphological changes in actin organization caused by external stimulus are basically descriptive. In this study, fractal dimensions (D) analysis was used to quantify the morphological changes in the actin cytoskeleton of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats. The ImageJ software was used to count the fractal dimension of actin cytoskeleton by box-counting methods. Real-time PCR and immunofluroscent assays were used to further confirm the results obtained by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed significant decreases in D value of actin cytoskeleton, β-actin mRNA expression, and the mean fluorescence intensity of F-actin in osteoblast-like cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation under 3-D/2-D clinorotation condition compared with control. The findings indicate that 3-D/2-D clinorotation affects both actin cytoskeleton architecture and mRNA expression, and fractal may be a promising approach for quantitative analysis of the changes in cytoskeleton in different environments.

  2. Reversible stress softening of actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Parekh, Sapun H.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells play an essential role in numerous physiological processes. Organized networks of semiflexible actin filaments determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes1–3. Although numerous actin-binding proteins have been identified that organize networks, the mechanical properties of actin networks with physiological architectures and concentrations have been difficult to measure quantitatively. Studies of mechanical properties in vitro have found that crosslinked networks of actin filaments formed in solution exhibit stress stiffening arising from the entropic elasticity of individual filaments or crosslinkers resisting extension4–8. Here we report reversible stress-softening behaviour in actin networks reconstituted in vitro that suggests a critical role for filaments resisting compression. Using a modified atomic force microscope to probe dendritic actin networks (like those formed in the lamellipodia of motile cells), we observe stress stiffening followed by a regime of reversible stress softening at higher loads. This softening behaviour can be explained by elastic buckling of individual filaments under compression that avoids catastrophic fracture of the network. The observation of both stress stiffening and softening suggests a complex interplay between entropic and enthalpic elasticity in determining the mechanical properties of actin networks. PMID:17230186

  3. Actin filaments as dynamic reservoirs for Drp1 recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Ji, Wei-Ke; Merrill, Ronald A.; Strack, Stefan; Higgs, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    Drp1 is a dynamin-family GTPase recruited to mitochondria and peroxisomes, where it oligomerizes and drives membrane fission. Regulation of mitochondrial Drp1 recruitment is not fully understood. We previously showed that Drp1 binds actin filaments directly, and actin polymerization is necessary for mitochondrial Drp1 oligomerization in mammals. Here we show the Drp1/actin interaction displays unusual properties that are influenced by several factors. At saturation, only a fraction Drp1 binds actin filaments, and the off-rate of actin-bound Drp1 is significantly increased by unbound Drp1. GDP and GTP accelerate and decelerate Drp1/actin binding dynamics, respectively. Actin has a biphasic effect on Drp1 GTP hydrolysis, increasing at low actin:Drp1 ratio but returning to baseline at high ratio. Drp1 also bundles filaments. Bundles have reduced dynamics but follow the same trends as single filaments. Drp1 preferentially incorporates into bundles at higher ionic strength. We measure Drp1 concentration to be ∼0.5 μM in U2OS cell cytosol, suggesting the actin-binding affinity measured here (Kd = 0.6 μM) is in the physiologically relevant range. The ability of Drp1 to bind actin filaments in a highly dynamic manner provides potential for actin filaments to serve as reservoirs of oligomerization-competent Drp1 that can be accessed for mitochondrial fission. PMID:27559132

  4. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  5. Signal-to-noise issues in measuring nitrous oxide fluxes by the eddy covariance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicholas; Levy, Peter; Langford, Ben; Skiba, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Recently-developed fast-response gas analysers capable of measuring atmospheric N2O with high precision (< 50 ppt) at a rate of 10 Hz are becoming more widely available. These instruments are capable of measuring N2O fluxes using the eddy covariance method, with significantly less effort and uncertainty than previous instruments have allowed. However, there are still many issues to overcome in order to obtain accurate and reliable flux data. The signal-to-noise ratio of N2O measured using these instruments is still two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of CO2. The low signal-to-noise ratio can lead to systematic uncertainties, in the eddy covariance method, the most significant being in the calculation of the time lag between gas analyser and anemometer by maximisation of covariance (Langford et al., 2015). When signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low, as it is with many N2O measurements, the maximisation of covariance method can systematically overestimate fluxes. However, if constant time lags are assumed, then fluxes will be underestimated. This presents a major issue for N2O eddy covariance measurements. In this presentation we will focus on the signal to noise ratio for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL). Eddy covariance flux measurements from multiple agricultural sites across the UK were investigated for potential uncertainties. Our presentation highlights some of these uncertainties when analysing eddy covariance data and offers suggestions as to how these issues may be minimised. Langford, B., Acton, W., Ammann, C., Valach, A. and Nemitz, E.: Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection, Atmos Meas Tech, 8(10), 4197-4213, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4197-2015, 2015.

  6. Annual measurement of size resolved particle fluxes over an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deventer, Malte Julian; Griessbaum, Frank; Klemm, Otto

    2013-04-01

    Urban areas exhibit a multitude of well-known particle sources. Therefore, most flux studies over bigger cities detected almost exclusively upward fluxes or aerosol particles. In most of these studies, the total particle number concentration was measured for a broad size range, e.g. PM2.5or PM10. However, source apportionment and analytical studies suggest that particles within such wide size ranges may vary in their origin, longevity, and chemical composition. The scope of this study is to directly quantify turbulent exchange of atmospheric aerosol particles (AAP) of 16 different size classes. Aerosol dynamics are analyzed in combination with the exchange fluxes of sensible heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. Furthermore, annual time series are analyzed for seasonal trends. We employed the Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) and a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-X2), both manufactured by Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, Colorado (USA). This setup covers the aerosol particle size range between 0.6 μm and 10 μm diameters in up to 140 size bins. In order to reach acceptable counting statistics and to minimize random flux errors, we combine the initial 140 bins into 16 wider size bins. Nevertheless, the measurement yields a considerable improvement in terms of sizing information in comparison to that in previous studies. The measurements are conducted at a 65 m high telecommunication tower in the city of Münster (population ~ 275.000), NW Germany, throughout the year of 2012 and beyond. The results confirm the hypothesis that urban areas can act both as sources and sinks for AAP at the same time. We regularly observe bi-directional fluxes as a function of particle size. While smaller particles typically exhibit (upward) emission fluxes, the larger particles show deposition (downward fluxes). The tipping point (TP) between mostly up- and downward transported particles lies in the accumulation mode at about 180 nm

  7. Productivity and carbon dioxide exchange of the leguminous crops: Estimates from flux tower measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net CO2 exchange data on legume crops at 17 flux tower sites in North America and 3 sites in Europe representing 29 site-years of measurements were partitioned into gross photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration using a light-response function method, resulting in new estimates of ecosystem-scale ec...

  8. Measuring fast-temporal sediment fluxes with an analogue acoustic sensor: a wind tunnel study.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Ate; van Minnen, Jan; Keijsers, Joep; Riksen, Michel; Goossens, Dirk; Seeger, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In aeolian research, field measurements are important for studying complex wind-driven processes for land management evaluation and model validation. Consequently, there have been many devices developed, tested, and applied to investigate a range of aeolian-based phenomena. However, determining the most effective application and data analysis techniques is widely debated in the literature. Here we investigate the effectiveness of two different sediment traps (the BEST trap and the MWAC catcher) in measuring vertical sediment flux. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with sediment fluxes characterized using saltiphones. Contrary to most studies, we used the analogue output of five saltiphones mounted on top of each other to determine the total kinetic energy, which was then used to calculate aeolian sediment budgets. Absolute sediment losses during the experiments were determined using a balance located beneath the test tray. Test runs were conducted with different sand sizes and at different wind speeds. The efficiency of the two traps did not vary with the wind speed or sediment size but was affected by both the experimental setup (position of the lowest trap above the surface and number of traps in the saltation layer) and the technique used to calculate the sediment flux. Despite this, good agreement was found between sediment losses calculated from the saltiphone and those measured using the balance. The results of this study provide a framework for measuring sediment fluxes at small time resolution (seconds to milliseconds) in the field.

  9. Measurements of Mass, Momentum and Energy fluxes over an ice/snow covered lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Rui; Potes, Miguel; Mammarella, Ivan; Provenzale, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of the interactions between ice and snow and the atmosphere requires improved measurements of energy, mass and momentum fluxes, which continue to have a high degree of uncertainty. In this communication, observed near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) over a boreal lake during a freezing period (winter 2015/2016) will be analysed and compared with observations over ice free lakes. Continuously measurements of near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) are obtained with a new eddy covariance (EC) system, the Campbell Scientific's IRGASON Integrated Open-Path CO2/H2O Gas Analyzer and 3D Sonic Anemometer, over lake Vanajavesi in Finland. The measurement site is located in a tip of narrow peninsula on the lake (61.133935° N ; 24.259119° E), offering very good conditions for eddy covariance flux measurements. The EC system was installed at 2.5m height above the lake surface and was oriented against the prevailing wind direction in the site.

  10. Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based soil greenhouse gas flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewed interest in quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from soil has lead to an increase in the application of chamber-based flux measurement techniques. Despite the apparent conceptual simplicity of chamber-based methods, nuances in chamber design, deployment, and data analyses can have marked ef...

  11. MEASUREMENT OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AMMONIA FLUXES OVER SOYBEAN USING MODIFIED BOWEN-RATIO TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of bi-directional ammonia exchange over a fertilized soybean canopy are presented for an 8-week period during the summer of 2002. The modified Bowne-ratio approach was used to determine fluxes from vertical NH3 and temperature gradients in combination with eddy covar...

  12. Estimation of water flux in urban area using eddy covariance measurements in Riverside, Southern California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods can direct measure the sensible and latent heat flux in specific sites and provide robust estimates of the evaporative fraction (EF), which is the fraction of available surface energy contained in latent heat. Across a vegetation coverage gradient in urban area, an empir...

  13. FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF CONTAMINANT FLUX BY INTEGRAL PUMPING TESTS (SAN FRANCISCO, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current remedial techniques are unable to completely eliminate all dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) from source zone areas and conflicting views on the benefits of partial DNAPL source zone remediation exist in the literature. A comparison of flux measurements before and af...

  14. Measurement of greenhouse gas flux from agricultural soils using static chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape mana...

  15. Measuring Fast-Temporal Sediment Fluxes with an Analogue Acoustic Sensor: A Wind Tunnel Study

    PubMed Central

    Poortinga, Ate; van Minnen, Jan; Keijsers, Joep; Riksen, Michel; Goossens, Dirk; Seeger, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In aeolian research, field measurements are important for studying complex wind-driven processes for land management evaluation and model validation. Consequently, there have been many devices developed, tested, and applied to investigate a range of aeolian-based phenomena. However, determining the most effective application and data analysis techniques is widely debated in the literature. Here we investigate the effectiveness of two different sediment traps (the BEST trap and the MWAC catcher) in measuring vertical sediment flux. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with sediment fluxes characterized using saltiphones. Contrary to most studies, we used the analogue output of five saltiphones mounted on top of each other to determine the total kinetic energy, which was then used to calculate aeolian sediment budgets. Absolute sediment losses during the experiments were determined using a balance located beneath the test tray. Test runs were conducted with different sand sizes and at different wind speeds. The efficiency of the two traps did not vary with the wind speed or sediment size but was affected by both the experimental setup (position of the lowest trap above the surface and number of traps in the saltation layer) and the technique used to calculate the sediment flux. Despite this, good agreement was found between sediment losses calculated from the saltiphone and those measured using the balance. The results of this study provide a framework for measuring sediment fluxes at small time resolution (seconds to milliseconds) in the field. PMID:24058512

  16. An instrument for the heat flux measurement from a contour of a surface with uniform temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughn, J. W.; Hoffman, M. A.; Lee, Daehee

    1994-03-01

    An instrument for the measurement of the heat flux distribution along an internal or external contour of a surface with a uniform temperature is described. The main element in this instrument is an electrically heated narrow nickel/chromium ribbon which is mounted flush with, but thermally and electrically insulated from, walls on all sides. The walls are separately heated and are made of a highly conducting material (e.g., aluminum) to ensure a uniform temperature. Differential thermocouples are used to measure the temperature difference between the walls and Ni/Cr ribbon at various positions along the ribbon. The ribbon power is adjusted until the differential temperature is nulled at a particular position on the ribbon. Since conduction along the ribbon is small, the electrical power divided by the sensor area is a direct measure of the surface heat flux at the nulled position. This makes it possible to measure the local time-average heat flux at various positions along a contour of a surface inside a circular duct. The time constant in this application was 13 s. An uncertainty analysis shows that this instrument has an uncertainty of ±3.84% for a convective heat flux on the order of 900 W/m2.

  17. Surface Measurements of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes Using AN Automated Chamber System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fentabil, M. M.; Fazackerley, S.; Nichol, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    The various soil respiration measurements that are available depend on measuring the emitted CO2 flux as organic carbon is respired aerobically. Comparative studies among the four well known methods (the open-flow infra-red gas analyzer method; the closed chamber method; the dynamic closed chamber method; and the alkali absorption method) under field conditions and laboratory experiments show differences. The discrepancies observed in these methods under field conditions could be evaluated by incorporating O2 flux measurement in addition to CO2 flux measurement. However, this is hampered by the absence of suitable equipment for measuring oxygen influx at the soil surface. A system to measure O2 fluxes at the soil surface using chamber methods has been developed. A gas handling subsystem and O2 analyser has been incorporated into an existing non-steady state automated chamber system originally designed for CO2 and H2O flux monitoring. The system consists of four 60 L soil chambers connected to temperature-controlled datalogger housing. During a measurement cycle, the chamber lid closes and the system measures changes of CO2/H2O and depletion of O2in the chamber headspace. Samples for CO2 /H2O circulate in a closed path between the chamber and an IR gas analyser. An air sample for O2 analysis is sub-sampled from this circulating air stream. Air samples for O2 are first dried using a two-stage Nafion drier. Mass flows and pressures are balanced at the pascal level prior to the gas passing into a ppm level fuel-cell oxygen analyser (Sable Systems Oxzilla). The chamber sample airstream is measured against a reference gas identically handled in a parallel air stream. A makeup gas of dry N2 is injected back to the chamber to return equimolar amounts of gas to replace the wet air removed, and hence prevent pressure fluctuation in the headspace of the chamber. The implementation of automated control of gas drying and sampling, pressure balancing, flow regulation and self

  18. Chamber and Diffusive Based Carbon Flux Measurements in an Alaskan Arctic Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, E.; Oechel, W. C.; Zona, D.

    2013-12-01

    Eric Wilkman, Walter Oechel, Donatella Zona Comprising an area of more than 7 x 106 km2 and containing over 11% of the world's organic matter pool, Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are vitally important components of the global carbon cycle, yet their structure and functioning are sensitive to subtle changes in climate and many of these functional changes can have large effects on the atmosphere and future climate regimes (Callaghan & Maxwell 1995, Chapin et al. 2002). Historically these northern ecosystems have acted as strong C sinks, sequestering large stores of atmospheric C due to photosynthetic dominance in the short summer season and low rates of decomposition throughout the rest of the year as a consequence of cold, nutrient poor, and generally water-logged conditions. Currently, much of this previously stored carbon is at risk of loss to the atmosphere due to accelerated soil organic matter decomposition in warmer future climates (Grogan & Chapin 2000). Although there have been numerous studies on Arctic carbon dynamics, much of the previous soil flux work has been done at limited time intervals, due to both the harshness of the environment and labor and time constraints. Therefore, in June of 2013 an Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (UGGA - Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed in concert with the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System (LI-COR Biosciences) in Barrow, AK to gather high temporal frequency soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes from a wet sedge tundra ecosystem. An additional UGGA in combination with diffusive probes, installed in the same location, provides year-round soil and snow CO2 and CH4 concentrations. When used in combination with the recently purchased AlphaGUARD portable radon monitor (Saphymo GmbH), continuous soil and snow diffusivities and fluxes of CO2 and CH4 can be calculated (Lehmann & Lehmann 2000). Of particular note, measuring soil gas concentration over a diffusive gradient in this way allows one to separate both net production and

  19. Measurement of the solar diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic-ray albedo neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifedili, S. O.

    1982-03-01

    The solar diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic-ray albedo neutron flux has been measured by a neutron detector on board the OGO-6 satellite. On the average the diurnal amplitudes and phases of the cosmic ray albedo neutron flux (less than or equal to 10 MeV) were respectively 0.18 + or - 0.02% and 15 + or - 1 hr LT, though there were substantial fluctuations of a few days' duration which did not depend on the solar sector structure polarity and a 27-day periodicity in the diurnal amplitudes which was associated with the sun's rotation.

  20. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  1. A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

  2. Constraining surface carbon fluxes using in situ measurements of carbonyl sulfide and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkelhammer, M.; Asaf, D.; Still, C.; Montzka, S.; Noone, D.; Gupta, M.; Provencal, R.; Chen, H.; Yakir, D.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon is critical for assessing atmospheric CO2 budgets. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is taken up by vegetation during photosynthesis following a pathway that mirrors CO2 but has a small or nonexistent emission component, providing a possible tracer for gross primary production. Field measurements of COS and CO2 mixing ratios were made in forest, senescent grassland, and riparian ecosystems using a laser absorption spectrometer installed in a mobile trailer. Measurements of leaf fluxes with a branch-bag gas-exchange system were made across species from 10 genera of trees, and soil fluxes were measured with a flow-through chamber. These data show (1) the existence of a narrow normalized daytime uptake ratio of COS to CO2 across vascular plant species of 1.7, providing critical information for the application of COS to estimate photosynthetic CO2 fluxes and (2) a temperature-dependent normalized uptake ratio of COS to CO2 from soils. Significant nighttime uptake of COS was observed in broad-leafed species and revealed active stomatal opening prior to sunrise. Continuous high-resolution joint measurements of COS and CO2 concentrations in the boundary layer are used here alongside the flux measurements to partition the influence that leaf and soil fluxes and entrainment of air from above have on the surface carbon budget. The results provide a number of critical constraints on the processes that control surface COS exchange, which can be used to diagnose the robustness of global models that are beginning to use COS to constrain terrestrial carbon exchange.

  3. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  4. Investigation of SOL parameters and divertor particle flux from electric probe measurements in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Bae, M. K.; Juhn, J. W.; Seo, D. C.; Bang, E. N.; Shim, S. B.; Chung, K. S.; Lee, H. J.; Hong, S. H.

    2015-08-01

    The upstream scrape-off layer (SOL) profiles and downstream particle fluxes are measured with a fast reciprocating Langmuir probe assembly (FRLPA) at the outboard mid-plane and a fixed edge Langmuir probe array (ELPA) at divertor region, respectively in the KSTAR. It is found that the SOL has a two-layer structure in the outboard wall-limited (OWL) ohmic and L-mode: a near SOL (∼5 mm zone) with a narrow feature and a far SOL with a broader profile. The near SOL width evaluated from the SOL profiles in the OWL plasmas is comparable to the scaling for the L-mode divertor plasmas in the JET and AUG. In the SOL profiles and the divertor particle flux profile during the ELMy H-modes, the characteristic e-folding lengths of electron temperature, plasma density and particle flux during an ELM phase are about two times larger than ones at the inter ELM.

  5. A review of micrometeoroid flux measurements and models for low orbital altitudes of the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1984-01-01

    A review of meteoroid flux measurements and models for low orbital altitudes of the Space Station has been made in order to provide information that may be useful in design studies and laboratory hypervelocity impact tests which simulate micrometeoroids in space for design of the main wall of the Space Station. This report deals with the meteoroid flux mass model, the defocusing and shielding factors that affect the model, the probability of meteoroid penetration of the main wall of a Space Station. Whipple (1947) suggested a meteoroid bumper, a thin shield around the spacecraft at some distance from the wall, as an effective device for reducing penetration, which has been discussed in this report. The equations of the probability of meteoroid penetration, the average annual cumulative total flux, and the equations for the thickness of the main wall and the bumper are presented in this report.

  6. Muon flux Measurements at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility with the Majorana Demonstrator Veto System

    DOE PAGES

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; ...

    2017-02-16

    Here, we report the first measurement of the total muon flux underground at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the 4850 ft level. Measurements were performed using the MajoranaDemonstratormuon veto system arranged in two different configurations. The measured total flux is (5.31±0.17)×10–9μ/s/cm2.

  7. Eddy covariance measurements of the sea spray aerosol flux over the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Sarah J.; Brooks, Ian M.; Hill, Martin K.; Brooks, Barbara J.; Smith, Michael H.; Sproson, David A. J.

    2012-04-01

    Direct eddy covariance measurements of size-segregated sea spray aerosol fluxes over the open Atlantic Ocean are presented, along with a source function derived from them for a wind speed range of 4 to 18 m s-1 and a size range of 0.176 < R80 < 6.61 μm. This is in broad agreement with other recent estimates of the source function over this size range but shows a more rapid decrease with size above R80 = 2 μm than most other functions. The measurements were made during a 3 week cruise in the North Atlantic as part of the UK contribution to the international Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) program. They utilized the new high-rate Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP), providing a 16-channel size spectrum (0.17 measurements demonstrate the high variability in sea spray aerosol flux compared with other air-sea fluxes, both between individual estimates and in the scales contributing to the flux.

  8. Fluxes of polychlorinated biphenyls volatilizing from the Hudson River, New York measured using micrometeorological approaches.

    PubMed

    Sandy, Andy L; Guo, Jia; Miskewitz, Robert J; McGillis, Wade R; Rodenburg, Lisa A

    2012-01-17

    This study represents the first time that a micrometeorological technique, using turbulent transport measurements, has been used to determine the direction and magnitude of air-water exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The study was conducted during July 2008 on the Hudson River estuary near the Tappan Zee Bridge, which is the site of some of the most serious PCB contamination in the world. Gas-phase ΣPCB concentrations measured at two heights above the water column averaged 1.1 ng m(-3), and concentrations were usually lower in the upper air sample, indicating net transport of PCBs from the water column to the air. Volatilization PCB fluxes were calculated using the modified Thornthwaite-Holzman equation. Values of friction velocity and atmospheric stability were calculated using the Aerodynamic Gradient and Eddy Correlation techniques. The PCB fluxes were corrected for changes in atmospheric stability using the atmospheric stability factor of water vapor (ϕ(w)) calculated from empirical formulations which ranged from 1.0 to 3.2 (neutral to stable atmospheric boundary layer conditions). Vertical ΣPCB fluxes ranged from +0.5 μg m(-2) d (-1) to +13 μg m(-2) d (-1). Mono- through tri-homologues accounted for about half of ΣPCB fluxes, with tetra- through hexa-homologue accounting for the other half. This work demonstrates the utility of a micrometeorological approach to measuring the air-water exchange of organic contaminants.

  9. New ground-based lidar enables volcanic CO2 flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Nuvoli, Marcello; Chiodini, Giovanni; Minopoli, Carmine; Tamburello, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    There have been substantial advances in the ability to monitor the activity of hazardous volcanoes in recent decades. However, obtaining early warning of eruptions remains challenging, because the patterns and consequences of volcanic unrests are both complex and nonlinear. Measuring volcanic gases has long been a key aspect of volcano monitoring since these mobile fluids should reach the surface long before the magma. There has been considerable progress in methods for remote and in-situ gas sensing, but measuring the flux of volcanic CO2-the most reliable gas precursor to an eruption-has remained a challenge. Here we report on the first direct quantitative measurements of the volcanic CO2 flux using a newly designed differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which were performed at the restless Campi Flegrei volcano. We show that DIAL makes it possible to remotely obtain volcanic CO2 flux time series with a high temporal resolution (tens of minutes) and accuracy (<30%). The ability of this lidar to remotely sense volcanic CO2 represents a major step forward in volcano monitoring, and will contribute improved volcanic CO2 flux inventories. Our results also demonstrate the unusually strong degassing behavior of Campi Flegrei fumaroles in the current ongoing state of unrest.

  10. Subsurface approaches for measuring soil CO2 isotopologue flux: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, Nick; Egan, Jocelyn; Risk, David

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope composition of soil flux have many uses, from separating autotrophic and heterotrophic components of respiration to teasing apart information about gas transport physics. While soil flux chambers are typically used for these measurements, subsurface approaches are becoming more accessible with the introduction of field-deployable isotope analyzers. These subsurface measurements have the unique benefit of offering depth-resolved isotopologue flux data, which can help to disentangle the many soil respiration processes that occur throughout the soil profile. These methods are likely to grow in popularity in the coming years and a solid methodological basis needs to be formed in order for data collected in these subsurface studies to be interpreted properly. Here we explore the range of possible techniques that could be used for subsurface isotopologue gas interpretation and rigorously test the assumptions and application of each approach using a combination of numerical modeling, laboratory experiments, and field studies. Our results suggest that methodological uncertainties arise due to poor assumptions and mathematical instabilities but certain methods, particularly those based on diffusion physics, are able to cope with these uncertainties well and produce excellent depth-resolved isotopologue flux data.

  11. Direct measurement of magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Bliss, D. E.; Martin, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Lamppa, D. C.; Dolan, D. H.; Lemke, R. W.; Rovang, D. C.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for directly measuring magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid aluminum liner (a cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-20-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz(t) =Bz (0)×[R(0)/R(t)]2, where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields directly. We report on our latest efforts to do so using a fiber-optic-based Faraday rotation diagnostic, where the magneto-active portion of the sensor is made from terbium-doped optical fiber. We have now used this diagnostic to measure a flux-compressed magnetic field to over 600 T prior to the imploding liner hitting the on-axis fiber housing. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.S.; McMullin, D.; Judge, D.L. ); Canfield, L.R. )

    1990-04-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme ultraviolet photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 {angstrom}. The detector was flown aboard a solar point sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on October 24, 1988. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 {times} 10{sup 10} photons cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Based on a nominal probable error of 7% for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-{angstrom} region (5% on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 {angstrom}), and based on experimental errors associated with their rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of {approximately}14% is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  13. New ground-based lidar enables volcanic CO2 flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Nuvoli, Marcello; Chiodini, Giovanni; Minopoli, Carmine; Tamburello, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    There have been substantial advances in the ability to monitor the activity of hazardous volcanoes in recent decades. However, obtaining early warning of eruptions remains challenging, because the patterns and consequences of volcanic unrests are both complex and nonlinear. Measuring volcanic gases has long been a key aspect of volcano monitoring since these mobile fluids should reach the surface long before the magma. There has been considerable progress in methods for remote and in-situ gas sensing, but measuring the flux of volcanic CO2—the most reliable gas precursor to an eruption—has remained a challenge. Here we report on the first direct quantitative measurements of the volcanic CO2 flux using a newly designed differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which were performed at the restless Campi Flegrei volcano. We show that DIAL makes it possible to remotely obtain volcanic CO2 flux time series with a high temporal resolution (tens of minutes) and accuracy (<30%). The ability of this lidar to remotely sense volcanic CO2 represents a major step forward in volcano monitoring, and will contribute improved volcanic CO2 flux inventories. Our results also demonstrate the unusually strong degassing behavior of Campi Flegrei fumaroles in the current ongoing state of unrest. PMID:26324399

  14. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Manuela

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  15. Zenith distribution and flux of atmospheric muons measured with the 5-line ANTARES detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Lefèvre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyons, K.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Maurin, G.; Mazure, A.; Melissas, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pillet, R.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    The ANTARES high-energy neutrino telescope is a three-dimensional array of about 900 photomultipliers distributed over 12 mooring lines installed in the Mediterranean Sea. Between February and November 2007 it acquired data in a 5-line configuration. The zenith angular distribution of the atmospheric muon flux and the associated depth-intensity relation are measured and compared with previous measurements and Monte Carlo expectations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is presented.

  16. Measurements of microparticle fluxes on orbital stations in 1978-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Lev; Baranov, Dmitrii; Dergachev, Valentin; Gagarin, Yurii; Samokhina, Maria S.; Bednyakov, Sergey A.

    The important task of ISO WG4/SC14 activity is the development of standards for the micrometeoroids/space debris environment. To develop such standards it is necessary to have a large amount of experimental data. This paper presents results of flight experiments for measuring fluxes of hard particles with sizes of 1-500 mum, that were carried out on “Salut-6” (1978-1979), “Salut-7” (1984-1985) and “Mir” (1988-1997) orbital space stations, and on ISS (1998-2011). Particle fluxes were determined by analyzing holes in thermal protective shields of plastic track detectors for heavy nuclei of cosmic rays, that were used in PLATAN experiment on “Salut” and “Mir” stations, and on ISS (2002-2004), and by studying craters in polished metal samples and at the surface of a specimen cartridge of KOMPLAST experiment on ISS (1998-2011). Differential and integral dependences of particle fluxes on their diameter were obtained for various assumptions about the correlation between diameters of craters/holes and of incident particles. The elemental composition analysis of remainders in craters, carried out with an electron microprobe, enabled to distinguish craters created by micrometeoroids from the ones made by space debris particles. The data obtained on particle fluxes are compared with existing models of natural and artificial particle fluxes. KOMPLAST results for particles with size of 5-50 mum exceed corresponding values of ORDEM2000 model for the ISS orbit.

  17. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  18. Measuring proton energies and fluxes using EIT (SOHO) CCD areas outside the solar disk images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D. L.; Jones, A. R.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.; Gurman, J. B.

    2006-05-01

    An indirect proton flux measuring tool based on discrimination of the energy deposited by protons in 128×128 pixel EIT CCD areas outside the solar disk images is presented. Single pixel intensity events are converted into proton incident energy flux using modeled energy deposition curves for angles of incidence ± 60° in four EIT spatial areas with different proton stopping power. The extracted proton flux is corrected for both the loss of one-pixel events in the range of angles of incidence as well as for the contribution to the single pixel events resulting from scattered middle-energy protons (low-energy or high-energy particles are stopped by the EIT components or pass through them, accordingly). A simple geometrical approach was found and applied to correct for a non-unique relation between the proton-associated CCD output signal and the incident proton energy. With this geometrical approximation four unique proton incident energy ranges were determined as 45-49, 145-154, 297-335, and 390-440 MeV. The indirect proton flux measuring tool has been tested by comparing Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) flux temporal profiles extracted from the EIT CCD frames and downloaded from the GOES database for the Bastille Day (BD) of 2000 July 14 and the more recent 2005 January 20 events. The SEP flux temporal profiles and proton spectra extracted from the EIT in the relatively narrow energy ranges between 45 and 440 MeV reported here are consistent with the related GOES profiles. The four additional EIT extracted ranges provide higher energy resolution of the SEP data.

  19. Estimation of regional CO2 fluxes in northern Wisconsin using the ring of towers concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uliasz, M.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K.; Miles, N.; Richardson, S.; Davis, K.

    2006-12-01

    The WLEF TV tower in northern Wisconsin is instrumented to take continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio at 6 levels from 11 to 396m. During the spring and summer of 2004 additional CO2 measurements were deployed on five 76 m communication towers forming a ring around the WLEF tower with a 100-150 km radius. The data from the ring of towers are being used to estimate regional fluxes of CO2. The modeling framework developed for this purpose is based on SiB-RAMS: Regional Atmospheric Modeling System linked to Simple Biosphere model. The RAMS domain extends over the entire continental US with nested grids centered in northern Wisconsin. The CO2 lateral boundary conditions are provided by a global transport model PCTM (Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model). This model system is capable to realistically reproduce diurnal cycle of CO2 fluxes as well as their spatial patterns in regional scale related to different vegetation types. However, there is still significant uncertainty in simulating atmospheric transport of CO2 due to synoptic and mesoscale circulations. We are attempting to assimilate available CO2 tower data into our modeling system in order to provide corrections for the fluxes simulated by the SiB-RAMS. These corrections applied separately to respiration and assimilation fluxes have spatial patterns but are assumed constant in time during a period of 10 days. Another correction is estimated for the CO2 inflow concentration entering the regional domain. The CO2 data assimilation is based the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) model and the Bayessian inversion technique. The LPD model is driven by meteorological fields from the SiB-RAMS and is used for a regional domain in its adjoint mode to trace particles backward in time to derive influence functions for each concentration sample. The influence functions provide information on potential contributions both from surface sources and inflow fluxes that make their way through the modeling domain

  20. Suspended sediment fluxes in a tidal wetland: Measurement, controlling factors, and error analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Suspended sediment fluxes to and from tidal wetlands are of increasing concern because of habitat restoration efforts, wetland sustainability as sea level rises, and potential contaminant accumulation. We measured water and sediment fluxes through two channels on Browns Island, at the landward end of San Francisco Bay, United States, to determine the factors that control sediment fluxes on and off the island. In situ instrumentation was deployed between October 10 and November 13, 2003. Acoustic Doppler current profilers and the index velocity method were employed to calculate water fluxes. Suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) were determined with optical sensors and cross-sectional water sampling. All procedures were analyzed for their contribution to total error in the flux measurement. The inability to close the water balance and determination of constituent concentration were identified as the main sources of error; total error was 27% for net sediment flux. The water budget for the island was computed with an unaccounted input of 0.20 m 3 s-1 (22% of mean inflow), after considering channel flow, change in water storage, evapotranspiration, and precipitation. The net imbalance may be a combination of groundwater seepage, overland flow, and flow through minor channels. Change of island water storage, caused by local variations in water surface elevation, dominated the tidalty averaged water flux. These variations were mainly caused by wind and barometric pressure change, which alter regional water levels throughout the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Peak instantaneous ebb flow was 35% greater than peak flood flow, indicating an ebb-dominant system, though dominance varied with the spring-neap cycle. SSC were controlled by wind-wave resuspension adjacent to the island and local tidal currents that mobilized sediment from the channel bed. During neap tides sediment was imported onto the island but during spring tides sediment was exported because the main

  1. Combining two complementary micrometeorological methods to measure CH4 and N2O fluxes over pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, J.; Barthel, M.; Fraser, A.; Hunt, J. E.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand's largest industrial sector is pastoral agriculture, giving rise to a large fraction of the country's emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). We designed a system to continuously measure CH4 and N2O fluxes at the field scale on two adjacent pastures that differed with respect to management. At the core of this system was a closed-cell Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), measuring the mole fractions of CH4, N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) at two heights at each site. In parallel, CO2 fluxes were measured using eddy-covariance instrumentation. We applied two different micrometeorological ratio methods to infer the CH4 and N2O fluxes from their respective mole fractions and the CO2 fluxes. The first is a variant of the flux-gradient method, where it is assumed that the turbulent diffusivities of CH4 and N2O equal that of CO2. This method was reliable when the CO2 mole-fraction difference between heights was at least 4 times greater than the FTIR's resolution of differences. For the second method, the temporal increases of mole fractions in the stable nocturnal boundary layer, which are correlated for concurrently-emitted gases, are used to infer the unknown fluxes of CH4 and N2O from the known flux of CO2. This method was sensitive to "contamination" from trace gas sources other than the pasture of interest and therefore required careful filtering. With both methods combined, estimates of mean daily CH4 and N2O fluxes were obtained for 60 % of days at one site and 77 % at the other. Both methods indicated both sites as net sources of CH4 and N2O. Mean emission rates for one year at the unfertilised, winter-grazed site were 8.2 (± 0.91) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.40 (± 0.018) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. During the same year, mean emission rates at the irrigated, fertilised and rotationally-grazed site were 7.0 (± 0.89) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.57 (± 0.019) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. At this site, the N2O emissions amounted to 1.19 (± 0.15) % of the

  2. Combining two complementary micrometeorological methods to measure CH4 and N2O fluxes over pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Johannes; Barthel, Matti; Fraser, Anitra; Hunt, John E.; Griffith, David W. T.

    2016-03-01

    New Zealand's largest industrial sector is pastoral agriculture, giving rise to a large fraction of the country's emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). We designed a system to continuously measure CH4 and N2O fluxes at the field scale on two adjacent pastures that differed with respect to management. At the core of this system was a closed-cell Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, which measured the mole fractions of CH4, N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) at two heights at each site. In parallel, CO2 fluxes were measured using eddy-covariance instrumentation. We applied two different micrometeorological ratio methods to infer the CH4 and N2O fluxes from their respective mole fractions and the CO2 fluxes. The first is a variant of the flux-gradient method, where it is assumed that the turbulent diffusivities of CH4 and N2O equal that of CO2. This method was reliable when the CO2 mole-fraction difference between heights was at least 4 times greater than the FTIR's resolution of differences. For the second method, the temporal increases of mole fractions in the stable nocturnal boundary layer, which are correlated for concurrently emitted gases, are used to infer the unknown fluxes of CH4 and N2O from the known flux of CO2. This method was sensitive to "contamination" from trace gas sources other than the pasture of interest and therefore required careful filtering. With both methods combined, estimates of mean daily CH4 and N2O fluxes were obtained for 56 % of days at one site and 73 % at the other. Both methods indicated both sites as net sources of CH4 and N2O. Mean emission rates for 1 year at the unfertilised, winter-grazed site were 8.9 (±0.79) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.38 (±0.018) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. During the same year, mean emission rates at the irrigated, fertilised and rotationally grazed site were 8.9 (±0.79) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.58 (±0.020) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. At this site, the N2O emissions amounted to 1.21 (±0.15) % of the nitrogen

  3. Direct ion flux measurements at high-pressure-depletion conditions for microcrystalline silicon deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bronneberg, A. C.; Kang, X.; Palmans, J.; Janssen, P. H. J.; Lorne, T.; Creatore, M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2013-08-14

    The contribution of ions to the growth of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been investigated in the well-known high-pressure-depletion (HPD) regime by coupling thin-film analysis with plasma studies. The ion flux, measured by means of a capacitive probe, has been studied in two regimes, i.e., the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition regime and a low-to-high power regime; the latter regime had been investigated to evaluate the impact of the plasma power on the ion flux in collisional plasmas. The ion flux was found not to change considerably under the conditions where the deposited material undergoes a transition from the amorphous to the microcrystalline silicon phase; for solar-grade material, an ion-to-Si deposition flux of ∼0.30 has been determined. As an upper-estimation of the ion energy, a mean ion energy of ∼19 eV has been measured under low-pressure conditions (<1 mbar) by means of a retarding field energy analyzer. Combining this upper-estimate with an ion per deposited Si atom ratio of ∼0.30, it is concluded that less than 6 eV is available per deposited Si atom. The addition of a small amount of SiH{sub 4} to an H{sub 2} plasma resulted in an increase of the ion flux by about 30% for higher power values, whereas the electron density, deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, decreased. The electron temperature, also deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, reveals a slight decrease with power. Although the dominant ion in the HPD regime is SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, i.e., a change from H{sub 3}{sup +} in pure hydrogen HPD conditions, the measured larger ion loss can be explained by assuming steeper electron density profiles. These results, therefore, confirm the results reported so far: the ion-to-Si deposition flux is relatively large but has neither influence on the microcrystalline silicon film properties nor on the phase transition. Possible explanations are the reported high atomic hydrogen to deposition flux ratio

  4. Interpretation of surface flux measurements in heterogeneous terrain during the Monsoon '90 experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, D.I.; Blanford, J.H.; Kustas, W.P.; Nichols, W.D.; Amer, S.A.; Schmugge, T.J.; Weltz, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A network of 9-m-tall surface flux measurement stations were deployed at eight sparsely vegetated sites during the Monsoon '90 experiment to measure net radiation, Q, soil heat flux, G, sensible heat flux, H (using eddy correlation), and latent heat flux, λE (using the energy balance equation). At four of these sites, 2-m-tall eddy correlation systems were used to measure all four fluxes directly. Also a 2-m-tall Bowen ratio system was deployed at one site. Magnitudes of the energy balance closure (Q + G + H + λE) increased as the complexity of terrain increased. The daytime Bowen ratio decreased from about 10 before the monsoon season to about 0.3 during the monsoons. Source areas of the measurements are developed and compared to scales of heterogeneity arising from the sparse vegetation and the topography. There was very good agreement among simultaneous measurements of Q with the same model sensor at different heights (representing different source areas), but poor agreement among different brands of sensors. Comparisons of simultaneous measurements of G suggest that because of the extremely small source area, extreme care in sensor deployment is necessary for accurate measurement in sparse canopies. A recently published model to estimate fetch is used to interpret measurements of H at the 2 m and 9 m heights. Three sites were characterized by undulating topography, with ridgetops separated by about 200–600 m. At these sites, sensors were located on ridgetops, and the 9-m fetch included the adjacent valley, whereas the 2-m fetch was limited to the immediate ridgetop and hillside. Before the monsoons began, vegetation was mostly dormant, the watershed was uniformly hot and dry, and the two measurements of H were in close agreement. After the monsoons began and vegetation fully matured, the 2-m measurements of H were significantly greater than the 9-m measurements, presumably because the vegetation in the valleys was denser and cooler than on the ridgetops and

  5. Aircraft measured atmospheric momentum, heat and radiation fluxes over Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jörg; Kottmeier, Christoph; Wamser, Christian; Augstein, Ernst

    The vertical turbulent momentum, sensible and latent heat fluxes and the surface radiation balance are derived from measurements of low level flights (<50 m height) with a highly instrumented aircraft over Fram Strait in September/October 1991. High resolution information on the sea ice cover is obtained with a digital line scan camera. It is found that the drag coefficient for neutral static stability at 10 m height can be composed of a skin drag (cdns = 1.1 . 10-3), which coincides with the open water value, and a form drag which linearly increases with the mean ice area perpendicular to the surface wind vector per unit surface area. The ratio of the generally small sensible and latent heat fluxes (both ≤ 20 Wm-2) is close to unity for near neutral atmospheric stratification and no dependence of these fluxes on sea ice concentration can be detected, at least for the encountered ice concentrations larger than 50%. Measurements at about 40 m height are not sufficient to study cases with stable stratification since the flight level seems to be fully decoupled from the surface processes. In this autumn measurements 50% to 90% of the net energy flux at the surface is made up by the radiation balance. Therefore, radiative fluxes form important components in polar air-sea exchange processes. The long wave downward radiation can be parameterised using the ɛσT4 law with the near surface air temperature and the empirically determined values for the emissivity ɛ = 0.71 and ɛ = 0.90 for clear and cloudy skies, respectively. The standard deviations of our measurements from this parameterisation are 4.6 Wm-2 for clear and 8.6 Wm-2 for cloudy skies. These values fall into the range ofthe instrumental uncertainty.

  6. Testing of models of stomatal ozone fluxes with field measurements in a mixed Mediterranean forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, S.; Matteucci, G.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.; Morani, A.; Calfapietra, C.; Salvatori, E.; Fusaro, L.; Manes, F.; Loreto, F.

    2013-03-01

    Mediterranean forests close to urban areas are exposed to polluted plumes loaded with tropospheric ozone. This is the case of Castelporziano Estate, a 6000 ha Mediterranean forest 25 km from Rome downtown on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. In September 2011 we started an intensive field campaign aimed at investigating ozone deposition from a mixed Mediterranean forest, mainly composed by Quercus suber, Quercus ilex, Pinus pinea. Measurements at canopy level with the eddy covariance technique were supported by a vegetation survey and the measurement of all environmental parameters which allowed to calculate stomatal ozone fluxes. Leaf-level measurements were used to parameterize models to calculate stomatal conductance based on a Jarvis-type and Ball-Berry approach. We show changes in magnitude of ozone fluxes from a warm (September) to a cold period (October-December). Stomatal component explained almost the totality of ozone fluxes during the cold days, but contributed only up to 50% to total ozone deposition during warm days, suggesting that other sinks (e.g. chemistry in the gas-phase) play a major role. Modeled stomatal ozone fluxes based on a Jarvis-type approach (DO3SE) correlated with measured fluxes better than using a Ball-Berry approach. A third model based on a modified Ball-Berry equation was proposed to account for the non-linear dependency of stomatal conductance on relative humidity. This research will help the development of metrics for ozone-risk assessment and advance our understanding of mixed Mediterranean forests in biosphere-atmosphere exchange.

  7. Measurements of agricultural N2O: a comparative study of static chamber and eddy covariance fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodovskaya, M.; Warland, J.; Anderson, T. R.; Archibald, J. A.; Chiang, J.; Li, J.; Marjerison, R. D.; Sharma, A.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2009-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emitted from soils is a strong greenhouse gas and catalyst of ozone destruction by virtue of its long persistence in the atmosphere. Our understanding of both agricultural and natural N2O emissions has significantly improved over the past decade, but difficulties with precise soil N2O emission quantification still exist, related mostly to the large flux variability (both temporally and spatially) and the diversity of factors affecting N2O formation. The most commonly used methodologies for N2O measurements are conventional chambers and more recently-developed (and more expensive) micrometeorological methods. However, the differences in the flux-footprint between those two methods result in a large uncertainty in the integrated flux estimates, especially for areas with non-uniform land use and vegetation. In this study, comparative N2O flux measurements were performed on dairy manure fertilized cropland (on a field split between corn (Zea mays) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa)) in New York State. The field area was monitored simultaneously with (1) micrometeorological eddy covariance technique and (2) arrays of conventional static chambers. For eddy covariance measurements, a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas analyzer (TGA100a) and 3D sonic anemometer were used, with the high- frequency data averaged over 30 min periods. The chamber design included a set of 28 chambers (14 on the alfalfa, and 14 on the corn site), and the sampling was time-synchronized with TDLAS/TGA100 measurements. The comparative analysis of the two N2O emission data sets helped to estimate the agreement between the methodologies and the spatial distribution of integrated N2O flux formation.

  8. Understanding the representativeness of FLUXNET for upscaling carbon flux from eddy covariance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; Collier, Nathan

    2016-08-23

    Eddy covariance data from regional flux networks are direct in situ measurement of carbon, water, and energy fluxes and are of vital importance for understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of the the global carbon cycle. FLUXNET links regional networks of eddy covariance sites across the globe to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of fluxes at regional to global scales and to detect emergent ecosystem properties. This study presents an assessment of the representativeness of FLUXNET based on the recently released FLUXNET2015 data set. We present a detailed high resolution analysis of the evolving representativeness of FLUXNET through time. Results provide quantitative insights into the extent that various biomes are sampled by the network of networks, the role of the spatial distribution of the sites on the network scale representativeness at any given time, and how that representativeness has changed through time due to changing operational status and data availability at sites in the network. To realize the full potential of FLUXNET observations for understanding emergent ecosystem properties at regional and global scales, we present an approach for upscaling eddy covariance measurements. Informed by the representativeness of observations at the flux sites in the network, the upscaled data reflects the spatio-temporal dynamics of the carbon cycle captured by the in situ measurements. In conclusion, this study presents a method for optimal use of the rich point measurements from FLUXNET to derive an understanding of upscaled carbon fluxes, which can be routinely updated as new data become available, and direct network expansion by identifying regions poorly sampled by the current network.

  9. Understanding the representativeness of FLUXNET for upscaling carbon flux from eddy covariance measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; ...

    2016-08-23

    Eddy covariance data from regional flux networks are direct in situ measurement of carbon, water, and energy fluxes and are of vital importance for understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of the the global carbon cycle. FLUXNET links regional networks of eddy covariance sites across the globe to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of fluxes at regional to global scales and to detect emergent ecosystem properties. This study presents an assessment of the representativeness of FLUXNET based on the recently released FLUXNET2015 data set. We present a detailed high resolution analysis of the evolving representativeness of FLUXNET through time. Results providemore » quantitative insights into the extent that various biomes are sampled by the network of networks, the role of the spatial distribution of the sites on the network scale representativeness at any given time, and how that representativeness has changed through time due to changing operational status and data availability at sites in the network. To realize the full potential of FLUXNET observations for understanding emergent ecosystem properties at regional and global scales, we present an approach for upscaling eddy covariance measurements. Informed by the representativeness of observations at the flux sites in the network, the upscaled data reflects the spatio-temporal dynamics of the carbon cycle captured by the in situ measurements. In conclusion, this study presents a method for optimal use of the rich point measurements from FLUXNET to derive an understanding of upscaled carbon fluxes, which can be routinely updated as new data become available, and direct network expansion by identifying regions poorly sampled by the current network.« less

  10. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  11. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response. PMID:24996661

  12. Nanotopography-induced symmetry-breaking and guidance of actin polymerization waves and cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Guven, Can; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Driscoll, Meghan

    2015-03-01

    Many types of eukaryotic cells on a surfaces exhibit reaction diffusion-type waves of actin polymerization. Exposing migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells to asymmetries at a length scale relevant to actin waves (300 nm) results in guidance of actin polymerization and of the migration of the cells themselves. Quantitative measurements of actin wave speed and direction distributions show that actin polymerization is preferentially localized to nanoridges and directed along the ridges, and that the velocity of guided actin polymerization waves decreases with decreasing ridge spacing. A stochastic growth model of actin polymerization dynamics reproduces these key observations. Supported by NSF-PoLS.

  13. Axonal actin in action: Imaging actin dynamics in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ladt, Kelsey; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved, key cytoskeletal protein involved in numerous structural and functional roles. In neurons, actin has been intensively investigated in axon terminals-growth cones-and dendritic spines, but details about actin structure and dynamics in axon shafts have remained obscure for decades. A major barrier in the field has been imaging actin. Actin exists as soluble monomers (G-actin) as well as actin filaments (F-actin), and labeling actin with conventional fluorescent probes like GFP/RFP typically leads to a diffuse haze that makes it difficult to discern kinetic behaviors. In a recent publication, we used F-actin selective probes to visualize actin dynamics in axons, resolving striking actin behaviors that have not been described before. However, using these probes to visualize actin dynamics is challenging as they can cause bundling of actin filaments; thus, experimental parameters need to be strictly optimized. Here we describe some practical methodological details related to using these probes for visualizing F-actin dynamics in axons.

  14. Integral emission factors for methane determined using urban flux measurements and local-scale inverse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Andreas; Johnson, Mark; Molodovskaya, Marina; Ketler, Rick; Nesic, Zoran; Crawford, Ben; Giometto, Marco; van der Laan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    The most important long-lived greenhouse gas (LLGHG) emitted during combustion of fuels is carbon dioxide (CO2), however also traces of the LLGHGs methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are released, the quantities of which depend largely on the conditions of the combustion process. Emission factors determine the mass of LLGHGs emitted per energy used (or kilometre driven for cars) and are key inputs for bottom-up emission modelling. Emission factors for CH4 are typically determined in the laboratory or on a test stand for a given combustion system using a small number of samples (vehicles, furnaces), yet associated with larger uncertainties when scaled to entire fleets. We propose an alternative, different approach - Can integrated emission factors be independently determined using direct micrometeorological flux measurements over an urban surface? If so, do emission factors determined from flux measurements (top-down) agree with up-scaled emission factors of relevant combustion systems (heating, vehicles) in the source area of the flux measurement? Direct flux measurements of CH4 were carried out between February and May, 2012 over a relatively densely populated, urban surface in Vancouver, Canada by means of eddy covariance (EC). The EC-system consisted of an ultrasonic anemometer (CSAT-3, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and two open-path infrared gas analyzers (Li7500 and Li7700, Licor Inc.) on a tower at 30m above the surface. The source area of the EC system is characterised by a relative homogeneous morphometry (5.3m average building height), but spatially and temporally varying emission sources, including two major intersecting arterial roads (70.000 cars drive through the 50% source area per day) and seasonal heating in predominantly single-family houses (natural gas). An inverse dispersion model (turbulent source area model), validated against large eddy simulations (LES) of the urban roughness sublayer, allows the determination of the spatial area that

  15. A new sensitivity analysis and solution method for scintillometer measurements of area-average turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Matthew

    Scintillometer measurements of the turbulence inner-scale length lo and refractive index structure function C2n allow for the retrieval of large-scale area-averaged turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer. This retrieval involves the solution of the non-linear set of equations defined by the Monin-Obukhov similarity hypothesis. A new method that uses an analytic solution to the set of equations is presented, which leads to a stable and efficient numerical method of computation that has the potential of eliminating computational error. Mathematical expressions are derived that map out the sensitivity of the turbulent flux measurements to uncertainties in source measurements such as lo. These sensitivity functions differ from results in the previous literature; the reasons for the differences are explored.

  16. A New Sensitivity Analysis and Solution Method for Scintillometer Measurements of Area-Averaged Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Matthew; Fochesatto, Gilberto J.

    2013-07-01

    Scintillometer measurements of the turbulence inner-scale length l_o and refractive index structure function C_n^2 allow for the retrieval of large-scale area-averaged turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer. This retrieval involves the solution of the non-linear set of equations defined by the Monin-Obukhov similarity hypothesis. A new method that uses an analytic solution to the set of equations is presented, which leads to a stable and efficient numerical method of computation that has the potential of eliminating computational error. Mathematical expressions are derived that map out the sensitivity of the turbulent flux measurements to uncertainties in source measurements such as l_o. These sensitivity functions differ from results in the previous literature; the reasons for the differences are explored.

  17. Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2011-06-04

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

  18. Evaluation of scintillometery measurements of fluxes of momentum and sensible heat in the roughness sublayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Inagaki, Atsushi; Roth, Matthias; Kanda, Manabu

    2016-11-01

    Scintillometer measurements of turbulent fluxes of momentum and sensible heat in the roughness sublayer over a regular array of cubes in an outdoor environment were tested with direct measurement from sonic anemometers. The dissipation rate, ɛ, and temperature structure parameter, C T 2 , obtained from the scintillometer agreed well with those from four sonic anemometers located along the scintillometer path. The fluxes measured by the scintillometer also corresponded well to those from the line-averaged eddy covariance approach, although this agreement was greatly influenced by the choice of the zero-plane displacement length and the form of the similarity function used in the scintillometer software. A guide for choosing the appropriate similarity function for the urban roughness sublayer is proposed.

  19. Automated closed-chamber measurements of methane fluxes from intact leaves and trunk of Japanese cypress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kenshi; Kosugi, Yoshiko; Kanazawa, Akito; Sakabe, Ayaka

    2012-05-01

    Continuous in situ measurements of methane (CH4) fluxes from intact leaves and trunk of Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa Sieb. et Zucc) were conducted in a temperate forest from August 2009 to August 2010. An automated closed-chamber system, which was used to evaluate CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and forest ecosystems, was coupled to a laser-based instrument to monitor CH4 concentrations. Temporal changes in CH4 concentrations from the foliage and trunk were measured at one-second intervals during chamber closure to determine CH4 fluxes between the leaf and trunk surfaces and the atmosphere. While recent studies have suggested that some plants emit CH4 under aerobic conditions, emission or uptake of CH4 in detectable amounts with our experimental system, by intact leaves or the trunk of C. obtusa, was not significantly observed throughout the measurement period.

  20. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  1. Measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Jaffe; Bishai, M; Diwan, M.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hans, S.; Hu, L. M.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Tang, W.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2016-02-12

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9~GWth nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1,579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296,721 and 41,589 inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 ± 0.04) × 10–18 cm2/GW/day or (5.92 ± 0.14) × 10–43 cm2/fission. This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946 ± 0.022 (0.991 ± 0.023) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ~4σ between 4-6 MeV. Furthermore, a reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.

  2. Measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    DOE PAGES

    D. E. Jaffe; Bishai, M; Diwan, M.; ...

    2016-02-12

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9~GWth nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1,579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296,721 and 41,589 inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 ± 0.04) × 10–18 cm2/GW/day or (5.92 ± 0.14) × 10–43 cm2/fission. This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946 ± 0.022more » (0.991 ± 0.023) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ~4σ between 4-6 MeV. Furthermore, a reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.« less

  3. Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay.

    PubMed

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Butorov, I; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dove, J; Draeger, E; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, K Y; Leung, J K C; Lewis, C A; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S K; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S S; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Monari Kebwaro, J; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Pan, H-R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xia, X; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, Z Y; Zang, S L; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y F; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-02-12

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9 GWth nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512 and 561 m) and one far (1579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296 721 and 41 589 inverse β decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55±0.04) ×10(-18)  cm(2) GW(-1) day(-1) or (5.92±0.14) ×10(-43)  cm(2) fission(-1). This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946±0.022 (0.991±0.023) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber-Mueller (ILL-Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ∼4σ between 4-6 MeV. A reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.

  4. Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dove, J.; Draeger, E.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, K. Y.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S. S.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9 GWt h nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512 and 561 m) and one far (1579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296 721 and 41 589 inverse β decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 ±0.04 ) ×10-18 cm2 GW-1 day-1 or (5.92 ±0.14 ) ×10-43 cm2 fission-1 . This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946 ±0.022 (0.991 ±0.023 ) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber -Mueller (ILL -Vogel ) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2 σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ˜4 σ between 4-6 MeV. A reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.

  5. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors.

    PubMed

    Egan, R; Philippe, M; Wera, L; Fagnard, J F; Vanderheyden, B; Dennis, A; Shi, Y; Cardwell, D A; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm(3)) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m(2) (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  6. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, R.; Philippe, M.; Wera, L.; Fagnard, J. F.; Vanderheyden, B.; Dennis, A.; Shi, Y.; Cardwell, D. A.; Vanderbemden, P.

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm3) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m2 (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  7. Momentum and Heat Flux Measurements in the Exhaust of VASIMR using Helium Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, D. Gregory; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Irvine, Claude; Squire, Jared P.

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary travel requires propulsion systems that can provide high specific impulse (Isp), while also having sufficient thrust to rapidly accelerate large payloads. One such propulsion system is the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket (VASIMR), which creates, heats, and ejects plasma to provide variable thrust and Isp, designed to optimally meet the mission requirements. The fraction of the total energy invested in creating the plasma, as compared to the plasma's total kinetic energy, is an important factor in determining the overall system efficiency. In VASIMR, this 'frozen flow loss' is appreciable when at high thrust, but negligible at high Isp. The loss applies to other electric thrusters as well. If some of this energy could be recovered through recombination processes, and reinjected as neutral kinetic energy, the efficiency of VASIMR, in its low Isp/high thrust mode may be improved. An experiment is being conducted to investigate the possibility of recovering some of the energy used to create the plasma by studying the flow characteristics of the charged and neutral particles in the exhaust of the thruster. This paper will cover the measurements of momentum flux and heat flux in the exhaust of the VASIMR test facility using helium as the propellant where the heat flux is comprised of both kinetic and plasma recombination energy. The flux measurements also assist in diagnosing and verifying the plasma conditions in the existing experiment.

  8. Eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and energy fluxes in the city of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Z.; Feng, J. W.; Järvi, L.; Vesala, T.

    2012-03-01

    Long-term measurement of carbon dioxide flux (Fc) was performed using the eddy covariance (EC) method in the Beijing megacity over a 4-yr period in 2006-2009. The EC setup was installed at a height of 47 m on the Beijing 325-m meteorological tower in the northwest part of the city. Latent heat flux dominated the energy exchange between the urban surface and the atmosphere in summer, while sensible heat flux was the main component in the spring. The source area of the measurements of CO2 is highly heterogeneous, which consists of buildings, parks, and highways. It is valuable for global carbon budget research to study the temporal and spatial variability of Fc in this urban environment of a developing country. Both on a diurnal and monthly scale, the urban surface acted as a net source for CO2 and downward fluxes were only occasionally observed. The diurnal pattern of Fc showed dependence on automobile traffic and the typical two peak traffic pattern appeared in Fc diurnal cycle. Also, the Fc was higher on weekdays than on weekends due to the higher traffic volumes on weekdays. On seasonal scale, Fc was generally higher in winter than during other seasons, likely due to domestic heating during colder months. Total annual average CO2 emissions were estimated to be 4.90 kg C m-2 y-1 over the 4-yr period.

  9. Tunable diode laser measurements of methane fluxes from an irrigated rice paddy field in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Thurtell, G. W.; Kidd, G. E.; Lin, M.; Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Flitcroft, I. D.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Nie, D.; Bronson, K. F.; Neue, H. U.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the first micrometeorological-based measurements of methane (CH4) emissions from Asian rice paddies of which we are aware. The research features the tunable diode laser trace gas analyzer system (TGAS) recently developed at the University of Guelph. CH4 fluxes were measured between March 9 and 24, 1992, from an irrigated rice paddy field at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), the Philippines. The daytime CH4 flux averaged 6.0 μg m-2 s-1. The CH4 fluxes displayed a diurnal trend similar to daily soil temperature curves, with peak emissions of about 8 μg m-2 s-1 in the early afternoon. A tenfold increase in CH4 emissions (to about 70μg m-2 s-1) during a brief weeding experiment resulted from soil disturbance. Up to 25 μg m-2 s-1 of CH4 were released during a drying of the field, after which unsuitable soil redox potentials apparently suppressed methanogenesis. The CH4 flux was also arrested when the field was flooded with oxygen-rich water during a heavy rainstorm.

  10. Isoprene Fluxes Measured By Eddy-correlation Over A Mixed Deciduous Forest In Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finco, A.; Cieslik, S.

    A measuring campaign was conducted from July to September 2001 at a mixed de- ciduous forest located at a flat site (Nonantola, 4441' N; 1107' E) in the North- ern Italian plain to determine isoprene fluxes. The measuring station, operated by the CNR-ISAO (Bologna ) and CNR-IATA (Florence) was part of the CARBOEU- ROFLUX network, whose main goal is the study of the carbon balance in European forests. The flux measuring system used the eddy-correlation technique and consisted of a Gill sonic anemometer installed at 13 m a.g.l., and a LI-COR CO2/H2O analyser. For isoprene, a Hills Fast Isoprene Sensor was used.In this forest, about 50% of the trees (oaks, poplars and willows) are isoprene emitters. The canopy is very dense and homogeneous; its average height is 8 meters a.g.l. The general daily course of isoprene concentrations consisted in an increase during morning hours, followed with a sharp maximum and a rapid decrease. Maximum val- ues were quite high (around 15 ppb) in July and August, decreasing in September. During daytime, fluxes appeared to be strongly correlated with latent heat fluxes, con- firming the hypothesis of emission through stomata. The concentration decrease ob- served in the afternoon shows exponential decay, suggesting that no emission occurs after the concentration maximum, when stomata are progressively closing. A resistance analysis confirmed the above hypothesis : the role of stomatal emission appears essential, practically excluding other pathways. A mathematical investigation of the stationarity state of the lower atmosphere dur- ing the observations was made in order to draw attention on limitations of the eddy- correlation method. During nighttime, non-stationary situations are frequent, causing apparent peaks of isoprene flux, not due to an emission from the plants. The method developed permits to eliminate these biases.

  11. Measuring Water and Carbon Fluxes Over Forested Complex Topography From Plant to Small Watershed Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, R. J.; Zhao, W.

    2005-12-01

    The overall goal of this research is to contribute toward a better understanding and methods of quantifying the magnitude, timing, distribution and coupling of carbon and water fluxes in mountainous forestlands. This includes one segment of the continuum of carbon and water flow from the "forest to the sea". The processes addressed include the storage and exchange of carbon and water between the atmosphere and the land surface including in and by vegetation. We have three key objectives: 1) the merging of innovative new measurements with models to improve the biophysics of the models at the tree and canopy scale; 2) the application of models at the landscape scale, which is necessary for evaluating the impacts of human activities on regional carbon balance; and 3) the use of models to predict the impacts of policy decisions, for example land cover change decisions, as well as climate change. The work to be presented here focuses on one aspect of this problem: the measurement of turbulent fluxes of water from and carbon into the forest canopy over complex terrain. Measurement of turbulent fluxes in complex topography with complex vegetation is an area of significant scientific interest, but which at present is not well understood. Some of the work that has been done by others includes slope and air density corrections, analysis of the relationship of friction velocity and spectral frequency on energy budget closure, relative effects of mesoscale topography versus local topography and canopy structure on local flux measurements. In order to address this problem, we have constructed a 130 foot tall tower in a mountainous, forested watershed, among a mix of conifers including Douglas fir, Cedar, Tamarack, and Hemlock. The forest was planted 75 to 80 years ago, and the trees average around 100 feet in height. We are collecting eddy correlation measurements of water, carbon and heat fluxes above the canopy. The issues surrounding measurement of fluxes from complex

  12. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    PubMed

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  13. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  14. Cytoskeletal remodeling in differentiated vascular smooth muscle is actin isoform dependent and stimulus dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Gunst, Susan J; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton plays an essential role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. It has been suggested that actin remodeling may also play an important functional role in nonmigrating, nonproliferating differentiated vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). In the present study, we show that contractile agonists increase the net polymerization of actin in dVSM, as measured by the differential ultracentrifugation of vascular smooth muscle tissue and the costaining of single freshly dissociated cells with fluorescent probes specific for globular and filamentous actin. Furthermore, induced alterations of the actin polymerization state, as well as actin decoy peptides, inhibit contractility in a stimulus-dependent manner. Latrunculin pretreatment or actin decoy peptides significantly inhibit contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha-agonist, but these procedures have no effect on contractions induced by KCl. Aorta dVSM expresses alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-actin, nonmuscle gamma-actin, and smooth muscle gamma-actin. The incorporation of isoform-specific cell-permeant synthetic actin decoy peptides, as well as isoform-specific probing of cell fractions and two-dimensional gels, demonstrates that actin remodeling during alpha-agonist contractions involves the remodeling of primarily gamma-actin and, to a lesser extent, beta-actin. Taken together, these results show that net isoform- and agonist-dependent increases in actin polymerization regulate vascular contractility.

  15. Improved measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.-H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, D.; Joshi, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C.-H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is reported. The antineutrinos were generated by six 2.9 GWth nuclear reactors and detected by eight antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (560 m and 600 m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (1640 m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected. The IBD yield in the eight detectors was measured, and the ratio of measured to predicted flux was found to be 0.946±0.020 (0.992±0.021) for the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model. A 2.9σ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4-6 MeV was found in the measured spectrum, with a local significance of 4.4σ. A reactor antineutrino spectrum weighted by the IBD cross section is extracted for model-independent predictions. Supported in part by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China, the United States Department of Energy, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Guangdong provincial government, the Shenzhen municipal government, the China General Nuclear Power Group, the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China, the MOST and MOE in Taiwan, the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic, the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia, the NSFC-RFBR joint research program, the National Commission for Scientific and Technological Research of Chile

  16. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kömle, Norbert I.; Hütter, Erika S.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP3 currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements. PMID:21760643

  17. Instrument for the measurement of heat flux from a surface with uniform temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughn, J. W.; Cooper, D.; Iacovides, H.; Jackson, D.

    1986-05-01

    An instrument for the measurement of heat flux from a surface with a nearly uniform temperature is described. This instrument contains a thin-film electrical resistance heater embedded in a copper cone which is thermally isolated from the surrounding walls. A differential thermocouple between the copper cone and the wall is nulled such that the electrical power becomes a direct measure of the surface heat flux. The advantage of this design over earlier sensors is its modular characteristic and its ability to be flush mounted in an external surface or mounted in the wall of a duct. It has been used to measure the local time-average heat transfer coefficient inside a circular duct. The time constant in this application was 43 s. For these measurements an uncertainty analysis is presented which shows that this instrument has an uncertainty of ±3.6% for a convective heat flux of 342 W/sq m. The major source of uncertainty was the surface area.

  18. Airflows and turbulent flux measurements in mountainous terrain: Part 2: Mesoscale effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, A.A.; Anderson, D.E.; Burns, S.; Blanken, P.D.; Monson, Russell K.

    2004-01-01

    The location of the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site within the rocky mountains subjects it to airflows which are common in mountainous terrain. In this study, we examine the effects of some of these mesoscale features on local turbulent flux measurements; most notably, the formation of valley/mountain flows and mountain lee-side waves. The valley/mountain flows created local non-stationarities in the wind flow caused by the passage of a lee-side convergence zone (LCZ) in which upslope and downslope flows met in the vicinity of the measurement tower. During June-August, 2001, possible lee-side convergences were flagged for ???26% of all half-hour daytime flux measurement periods. However, there was no apparent loss of flux during these periods. On some relatively stable, summer nights, turbulence (designated via ??w), and scalar fluctuations (temperature and CO2, for example) exhibited periodicities that appeared congruent with passage of low frequency gravity waves (?? ??? 20 min). Spectral peaks at 0.0008 Hz (20 min) in both vertical velocity and scalar spectra were observed and indicated that 25-50% of the total scalar covariances were accounted for by the low frequency waves. During some periods of strong westerly winds (predominantly in winter), large mountain gravity waves were observed to form. Typically, the flux tower resided within a region of downslope "shooting flow", which created high turbulence, but had no detrimental effect on local flux measurements based on valid turbulence statistics and nearly complete energy budget closure. Periodically, we found evidence for re-circulating, rotor winds in the simultaneous time series of wind data from the Ameriflux tower site and a second meteorological site situated 8 km upslope and to the West. Only 14% of the half-hour time periods that we examined for a 4 month period in the winter of 2000-2001 indicated the possible existence of rotor winds. On average, energy budget closure was ???20% less during periods with

  19. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  20. Investigating Alaskan methane and carbon dioxide fluxes using measurements from the CARVE tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, John B.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Commane, Roisin; Dinardo, Steven; Henderson, John M.; Lindaas, Jacob; Lin, John C.; Luus, Kristina A.; Newberger, Tim; Tans, Pieter; Wofsy, Steven C.; Wolter, Sonja; Miller, Charles E.

    2016-04-01

    Northern high-latitude carbon sources and sinks, including those resulting from degrading permafrost, are thought to be sensitive to the rapidly warming climate. Because the near-surface atmosphere integrates surface fluxes over large ( ˜ 500-1000 km) scales, atmospheric monitoring of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) mole fractions in the daytime mixed layer is a promising method for detecting change in the carbon cycle throughout boreal Alaska. Here we use CO2 and CH4 measurements from a NOAA tower 17 km north of Fairbanks, AK, established as part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE), to investigate regional fluxes of CO2 and CH4 for 2012-2014. CARVE was designed to use aircraft and surface observations to better understand and quantify the sensitivity of Alaskan carbon fluxes to climate variability. We use high-resolution meteorological fields from the Polar Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model (hereafter, WRF-STILT), along with the Polar Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (PolarVPRM), to investigate fluxes of CO2 in boreal Alaska using the tower observations, which are sensitive to large areas of central Alaska. We show that simulated PolarVPRM-WRF-STILT CO2 mole fractions show remarkably good agreement with tower observations, suggesting that the WRF-STILT model represents the meteorology of the region quite well, and that the PolarVPRM flux magnitudes and spatial distribution are generally consistent with CO2 mole fractions observed at the CARVE tower. One exception to this good agreement is that during the fall of all 3 years, PolarVPRM cannot reproduce the observed CO2 respiration. Using the WRF-STILT model, we find that average CH4 fluxes in boreal Alaska are somewhat lower than flux estimates by Chang et al. (2014) over all of Alaska for May-September 2012; we also find that enhancements appear to persist during some wintertime

  1. Long-term isoprene flux measurements above a northern hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressley, Shelley; Lamb, Brian; Westberg, Hal; Flaherty, Julia; Chen, Jack; Vogel, Christoph

    2005-04-01

    We report continuous whole canopy isoprene emission fluxes from a northern hardwood forest in Michigan for the 1999-2002 growing seasons. The eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene, CO2, latent heat, and sensible heat are presented along with an analysis of the seasonal and year-to-year variations. Measurements were made in collaboration with the AmeriFlux site located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) and the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions, and Transport (PROPHET). In general, isoprene emissions increased throughout the day with increasing temperature and light levels, peaked at midafternoon, and declined to zero by night. There were significant variations from one 30-min period to the next, and from one day to the next. Average midday isoprene fluxes were 2.8, 3.2, and 2.9 mg C m-2 h-1 for 2000 through 2002, respectively. Insufficient data were available to include 1999. Last frost and full leaf out were significantly later in 2002 compared to the other years; however, total accumulated isoprene emissions for each year varied by less than 10%. Fully developed isoprene emissions occurred between 400 and 500 heating degree days, roughly half those required at other sites. Using long-term net ecosystem exchange measurements from the UMBS˜Flux group, isoprene emissions represent between 1.7 to 3.1% of the net carbon uptake at this site. Observations for 2000-2002 were compared with the BEIS3 emission model. Estimates agree well with observations during the midsummer period, but BEIS3 overestimates observations during the spring onset of emissions and the fall decline in emissions. This work provides a unique long-term data set useful for verifying canopy scale models and to help us better understand the dynamics of biosphere-atmosphere exchange of isoprene.

  2. Measurement of magnetic characteristics along arbitrary directions of grain-oriented silicon steel up to high flux densities

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, T.; Takahashi, N.; Fujiwara, K.; Nakano, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A new technique for measuring B-H curves of grain-oriented silicon steel along arbitrary directions has been developed. As the control of waveform is not necessary in the new technique, it is possible to measure B-H curves up to high flux densities which are required for calculating flux distribution using the finite element method.

  3. Seasonal variation in measured H2O and CO2 flux of irrigated rice in the Mid-South

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice production in the Lower Mississippi River Basin constitutes over half of US rice production, but little research has been done on water and carbon flux in this region at the field scale. Eddy covariance measurements of water and CO2 flux allow for an integrated field measurement of the interac...

  4. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  5. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  6. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai,